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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011).

2

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011). Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download February 17, 2012 EIS-0476: Notice of Adoption of Final Environmental Impact Statement Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4, Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Support Funding for Construction, Burke County, GA

3

Mathematical model of steam generator feed system at power unit of nuclear plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model of a steam generator feed system at a power unit of a nuclear plant with variable values of transfer function coefficients is presented. The model is realized in the MATLAB/Simulink/Stateflow event-driven simulation.

E. M. Raskin; L. A. Denisova; V. P. Sinitsyn; Yu. V. Nesterov

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Electrical generating plant availability  

SciTech Connect

A discussion is given of actions that can improve availability, including the following: the meaning of power plant availability; The organization of the electric power industry; some general considerations of availability; the improvement of power plant availability--design factors, control of shipping and construction, maintenance, operating practices; sources of statistics on generating plant availability; effects of reducing forced outage rates; and comments by electric utilities on generating unit availability.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Power conversion unit studies for the next generation nuclear plant coupled to a high-temperature steam electrolysis facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold: 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in their early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were modeled using the process code HYSYS; a three-shaft design with 3 turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. A high temperature steam electrolysis hydrogen production plant was coupled to the reactor and power conversion unit by means of an intermediate heat transport loop. Helium, CO2, and an 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative heat exchanger size and turbomachinery work were estimated for the different working fluids. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. Recommendations on the optimal working fluid for each configuration were made. The helium working fluid produced the highest overall plant efficiency for the three-shaft and reheat cycle; however, the nitrogen-helium mixture produced similar efficiency with smaller component sizes. The CO2 working fluid is recommend in the combined cycle configuration.

Barner, Robert Buckner

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

7

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

8

Establishing a Groundwater Protection Program for New Nuclear Generating Units: Appendix to the EPRI Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New nuclear power plants should plan for groundwater protection early in the planning process. The construction project team should be made aware of the need to establish the groundwater protection program prior to the construction planning process. This document provides guidance for establishing Groundwater Protection Programs for new nuclear generating units. It applies to new nuclear generating units on both new and existing nuclear power plant ...

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

9

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a giv

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Property:NbrGeneratingUnits | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NbrGeneratingUnits NbrGeneratingUnits Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NbrGeneratingUnits Property Type Number Description Number of Generating Units. Pages using the property "NbrGeneratingUnits" Showing 12 pages using this property. B BLM Geothermal Facility + 3 + Blundell 1 Geothermal Facility + 1 + Blundell 2 Geothermal Facility + 1 + E ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility + 2 + F Faulkner I Energy Generation Facility + 6 + N Navy I Geothermal Facility + 3 + Navy II Geothermal Facility + 3 + Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant + 3 + North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant + 5 + P Puna Geothermal Facility + 10 + R Raft River Geothermal Facility + 1 + Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center + 1 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:NbrGeneratingUnits&oldid=400184#SMWResults"

12

Power Plant Profitability and Investment in the Central United States: Impact of New Gas Capacity on Generation and Repowering Economics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 12 months, announcements of capacity additions by 2005 in the midwest have jumped from 20,000 to 60,000 MW. This report examines how just a portion of this capacity, if built, could affect the profitability of new and existing power plants.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

13

Gas generator and turbine unit  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine power unit is disclosed in which the arrangement and configuration of parts is such as to save space and weight in order to provide a compact and self-contained assembly. An air-intake casing supports the upstream end of a gas generator, the down-stream end of which is integral with a power turbine. The stator casing of the turbine is connected to a cone thermally insulated and completely inserted into any exhaust casing having a vertical outlet, wherein the turbine exhaust is conveyed into the exhaust casing by an annular diffusing cone. The turbine casing is supported on four legs. In addition, the turbine rotor and thus the turbine shaft are overhangingly supported by an independent structure, the weight of which bears on the machine base outside the exhaust casing and away of the power turbine space.

Vinciguerra, C.

1984-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

14

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes several approaches to reduce the costs and enhance the performance of geothermal power generation plants. Electricity supply planners, research program managers, and engineers evaluating geothermal power plant additions or modifications can use this report to compare today's geothermal power systems to several near- and long-term future options.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

15

Method and apparatus for set point control for steam temperatures for start-up of the turbine and steam generator in unit power plants  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus are described for controlling the set point for steam temperatures for cold start-up of a steam generator-turbine unit wherein inlet steam temperature and turbine load absorption are steadily and substantially simultaneously increased in accordance with a predetermined relationship so as to reach their final values substantially synchronously.

Bloch, H.; Salm, M.

1978-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

16

Next Generation Rooftop Unit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Rooftop Unit Next Generation Rooftop Unit Next Generation Rooftop Unit The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research in a next generation rooftop unit (RTU). More than half of U.S. commercial building space is cooled by packaged heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment. Existing rooftop HVAC units consume more than 1.3% of the United States' annual energy usage annually. Project Description This project seeks to evaluate optimal design strategies for significantly improving the efficiency of rooftop units. The primary market for this project is commercial buildings, such as supermarkets and hotels. Project Partners Research is being undertaken through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National

17

Generating capacity of the united power system of Russia and conditions of fuel supply to electric power plants for the period up to 2020  

SciTech Connect

Prospects of development of the energy economy in Russia are considered up to 2020. The proportion of thermal power plants (TPP) in the structure of the generating capacity of Russia amounts to about 70% (147 mln kW). The proportion of gas in the structure of fuel consumed by TPP amounts to 64%. It is predicted that the fraction of high-quality kinds of fuel (gas and fuel oil) will decrease in the considered period due to maximum involvement of coal in the fuel balance and wider use of combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies that provide a lower specific consumption of fuel. It is planned to resort to advanced technologies both for reconstructing existing plants and erecting new ones. This paper deals with problems of fuel supply of fossil-fuel-fired thermal power plants in the light of the evolution of the energy economy of Russia. The demand of TPP for different kinds of fossil fuel, i.e., gas, coal, and fuel oil, is estimated for the whole of the country and for its regions according to two variants of development of the generating capacity with planned commissioning of combined-cycle plants with a total output of 32 mln kW and gas-turbine plants with a total output of 61 mln kW in the period of up to 2020. The tasks of the fuel policy to be solved in the considered period are presented.

V.I. Chemodanov; N.V. Bobyleva; N.G. Chelnokova; N.Yu. Sokolova [Energoset'proekt Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Renewable Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the use of renewable energy sources to generate electricity in the United States and a critical analysis of the federal and state policies that have supported the deployment of renewable ...

Schmalensee, Richard

19

Decommissioning San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Unit 1 (SONGS-1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning a nuclear power plant and termination of the plant license requires the removal of highly activated materials from inside the nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Such a task presents a major challenge in terms of technology, project management, and worker exposure. This report documents the approach taken by Southern California Edison (SCE) in their highly successful reactor vessel internals (RVI) segmentation of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Unit 1 (SONGS-1). The report detail...

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

20

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station - Unit 1 Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides detailed information on the successful decommissioning activities of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (SONGS 1). The report describes their experiences and lessons learned for managers of US and international plants beginning or currently engaged in decommissioning.

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9" 9" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

22

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6" 6" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

23

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7" 7" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

24

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4" 4" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

25

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10" 10" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

26

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8" 8" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

27

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3" 3" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

28

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5" 5" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

29

Unit Commitment Considering Generation Flexibility and Environmental Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new framework for power system unit commitment process, which incorporates the generation flexibility requirements and environmental constraints into the existing unit commitment algorithm. The generation flexibility requirements are to address the uncertainties with large amount of intermittent resources as well as with load and traditional generators, which causes real-time balancing requirements to be variable and less predictable. The proposed flexibility requirements include capacity, ramp and ramp duration for both upward and downward balancing reserves. The environmental constraints include emission allowance for fossil fuel-based generators and ecological regulations for hydro power plants. Calculation of emission rates is formulated. Unit commitment under this new framework will be critical to the economic and reliable operation of the power grid and the minimization of its negative environmental impacts, especially when high penetration levels of intermittent resources are being approached, as required by the renewable portfolio standards in many states.

Lu, Shuai; Makarov, Yuri V.; Zhu, Yunhua; Lu, Ning; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Chakrabarti, Bhujanga B.

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7" 7" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","MultiGenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

31

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8" 8" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","MultiGenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

32

Inventory of Power Plants in the United States, October 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States is prepared annually by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). The publication also provides a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions. Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The report is organized into the following chapters: Year in Review, Operable Electric Generating Units, and Projected Electric Generating Unit Additions. Statistics presented in these chapters reflect the status of electric generating units as of December 31, 1992.

Not Available

1993-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear- based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950°C) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications (see Figure 1). The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to other nuclear technologies.

Dr. David A. Petti

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

09" 09" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

35

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10" 10" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

36

E.A. Gilbert Generating Unit, Maysville, Kentucky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new, 368-MW E.A. Gilbert Generating Unit at the H.L. Spurlock Power Station in Maysville isn't just the cleanest coal-burning plant in Kentucky. Thanks to its circulating liquidized bed boiler from Alstom, it is one of the cleanest in the US. The boiler's ability to burn a wide variety of coals and even pet coke, biomass, or tire-derived fuels - also was a factor in Power's decision to name E.A. Gilbert a Top Plant of 2005. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Wicker, K.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Inventory of power plants in the United States, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States is prepared annually by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). The publication also provides a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions. Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Inventory of power plants in the United States 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Inventory of Power Plants in the US provides year-end statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the US (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of December 31, 1994. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal, and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. This is a report of electric utility data; in cases where summary data of nonutility capacity are presented, it is specifically noted as such.

NONE

1995-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Diesel Generator Tanks 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear power provides about 20 % of the total electricity generated in the United States. In 2005, this was about 782 Billion kWh of the total electricity generation (EIA 2006). 2 As with fossil-fueled electricity generating plants, electricity in a nuclear power plant is produced by heated steam that drives a turbine generator. In a nuclear power plant, however, nuclear fission reactions in the core produce heat that is absorbed by a liquid that flows through the system and is converted to steam. Nuclear power plants are highly efficient and have become more so over the last 25 years. Operational efficiency (also referred to as plant performance or electricity production) can be measured by the capacity factor. The capacity factor is the ratio of the actual amount of electricity generated to the maximum possible amount that could be generated in a given period of time – usually a year. Today, nuclear power plants operate at an average 90 % capacity factor (compared to 56 % in 1980) (EIA 2006a). Thus, although nuclear generating capacity has remained roughly constant since 1990, at about 99 gigawatts (or about 10 % of the total U.S. electric generating capacity), the amount of electricity produced has increased 33 % since that time because of increased capacity utilization. Nuclear plants have the highest capacity factors of

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides annual aggregate statistics on generating units operated by nonutilities in the United States and the District of Columbia. Provides a 5-year outlook for generating unit additions and changes.

Information Center

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Combustion gas turbine/steam generator plant  

SciTech Connect

A fired steam generator is described that is interconnected with a gas turbine/steam generator plant having at least one gas turbine group followed by an exhaust-gas steam generator. The exhaust-gas steam generator has a preheater and an evaporator. The inlet of the preheater is connected to a feedwater distribution line which also feeds a preheater in the fired steam generator. The outlet of the preheater is connected to the evaporator of the fired steam generator. The evaporator outlet of the exhaust-gas steam generator is connected to the input of a superheater in the fired steam generator.

Aguet, E.

1975-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

42

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

Hall, Sharon J.

43

Polish plant beats the odds to become model EU generator  

SciTech Connect

Once a Soviet satellite, Poland is now transforming into a thoroughly modern nation. To support its growing economy, this recent European Union member country is modernizing its power industry. Exemplifying the advances in the Polish electricity generation market is the 460 MW Patnow II power plant - the largest, most efficient (supercritical cycle) and environmentally cleanest lignite-fired unit in the country. 3 photos.

Neville, A.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Solar Power Plant Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Solana Generating Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status Under Construction Developer Abengoa Solar Location Gila Bend, Arizona Coordinates 32.916163°, -112.968727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.916163,"lon":-112.968727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

EVALUATION OF SINGLE AND DUAL TURBINE-GENERATOR UNITS FOR PL-3  

SciTech Connect

The investigation performed relative to the selection of a turbine- generator unit for the PL-3 portable nuclear power plant, Byrd Station, Antarctica, is described. Available conventional equipment was surveyed to minimize air shipment, installation, and cost requirements. Pertinent details of functional performance were considered. A comparison was drawn between the alternatives of utilizing either a single turbine generator unit shipped partially disassembled or twin, half-capacity units shipped assembled. The conclusion reached was that a single turbine-generator unit should be used with the turbine and generator shipped separately. (auth)

Prall, T.F.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Generator loss of field study for AEP's Rockport plant  

SciTech Connect

Generator loss of field (LOF) conditions occur rarely. However, when LOF and consequent out-of-step conditions occur, the resultant high currents and pulsating torques can damage the turbine-generator under some conditions. Also the electrical system near the disturbance can be impacted by abnormal levels and cyclic swings of power, VArs, and voltages. This article describes the computed performance of AEP's remotely-located 2600 MW Rockport plant after simulated LOF disturbances to one of its 1300 MW cross-compound units. It shows the transmission facilities near Rockport, as well as nearby plants. Because of this topology, LOF on one unit can significantly impact the adjacent Rockport unit, and the reactive power drain could impose a heavy burden on transmission, impacting local voltages.

Rana, R.D.; Schulz, R.P.; Heyeck, M.; Boyer, T.R. Jr. (American Electric Power, Inc., Canton, OH (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

How many and what kind of power plants are there in the United ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How many and what kind of power plants are there in the United States? There are about 19,023 individual generators at about 6,997 operational power ...

48

Optimal Placement and Sizing of Distributed Generator Units using Genetic Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and electricity in the distribution grid. A group of DG units can form a virtual power plant, being centrally of distributed generation units in a residential distri- bution grid. Power losses are minimized while grid topology with pro- duction and residential load data based on measurements. Different scenarios

49

Efficiently generate steam from cogeneration plants  

SciTech Connect

As cogeneration gets more popular, some plants have two choices of equipment for generating steam. Plant engineers need to have a decision chart to split the duty efficiently between (oil-fired or gas-fired) steam generators (SGs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) using the exhaust from gas turbines. Underlying the dilemma is that the load-versus-efficiency characteristics of both types of equipment are different. When the limitations of each type of equipment and its capability are considered, analysis can come up with several selection possibilities. It is almost always more efficient to generate steam in an HRSG (designed for firing) as compared with conventional steam generators. However, other aspects, such as maintenance, availability of personnel, equipment limitations and operating costs, should also be considered before making a final decision. Loading each type of equipment differently also affects the overall efficiency or the fuel consumption. This article describes the performance aspects of representative steam generators and gas turbine HRSGs and suggests how plant engineers can generate steam efficiently. It also illustrates how to construct a decision chart for a typical installation. The equipment was picked arbitrarily to show the method. The natural gas fired steam generator has a maximum capacity of 100,000 lb/h, 400-psig saturated steam, and the gas-turbine-exhaust HRSG has the same capacity. It is designed for supplementary firing with natural gas.

Ganapathy, V. [ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Mesaba next-generation IGCC plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through a US Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement awarded in June 2006, MEP-I LLC plans to demonstrate a next generation integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generating plant, the Mesaba Energy Project. The 606-MWe plant (the first of two similarly sized plants envisioned by project sponsors) will feature next-generation ConocoPhillips E-Gas{trademark} technology first tested on the DOE-funded Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering project. Mesaba will benefit from recommendations of an industry panel applying the Value Improving Practices process to Wabash cost and performance results. The project will be twice the size of Wabash, while demonstrating better efficient, reliability and pollutant control. The $2.16 billion project ($36 million federal cost share) will be located in the Iron Range region north of Duluth, Minnesota. Mesaba is one of four projects selected under Round II of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. 1 fig.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants: 2012 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this report is to provide an update of historical and current trends in geothermal power plant technology, extending the previous Next Generation Geothermal Power Plant (NGGPP) report originally developed by EPRI in 1996.BackgroundIn its 1996 study, EPRI evaluated a number of technologies with the potential to lower the cost of geothermal power production or to expand cost effective power production to lower temperature resources, thus opening ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

52

Backgrounder: Geothermal resource production, steam gathering, and power generation at Salton Sea Unit 3, Calipatria, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 10,000-kilowatt Salton Sea Unit 1 power plant was designed to demonstrate that electrical power generation, using the highly saline brines from the Salton Sea geothermal reservoir, was technically and economically feasible. Unit 1, owned by Earth Energy, a Unocal subsidiary, began operating in 1982, initiating an intensive testing program which established the design criteria necessary to construct the larger 47,500-kilowatt Unit 3 power plant, unit 3 contains many of the proprietary or patented technological innovations developed during this program. Design, construction and start-up of the Unit 3 power generating facility began in December, 1986, and was completed in 26 months. By the end of 1988, the brine handling system was in full operation, and the turbine had been tested at design speed. Desert Power Company, a Unocal subsidiary, owns the power generating facility. Unocal owns the brine resource production facility. Power is transmitted by the Imperial Irrigation District to Southern California Edison Company.

None

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Bioenergy plants in the United States and China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

181 (2011) 621- 622 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Plant Science j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / p l a n t s c i Editorial Bioenergy plants in the United States and China The emerging bio-economies of the US and China hinge on the development of dedicated bioenergy feedstocks that will increase the production of next-generation biofuels and bioproducts. While biofuels might have less eventual importance than bioproducts, transportation needs for both countries require increasingly more biofuels to be produced in the coming decades. The US Renewable Fuels Standard mandate 136 billion litres of biofuels by 2022. Nearly 80 billion litres are required to be "advanced biofuels," generally regarded as fuels from non-corn and soybean feedstocks. Because

54

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Second Generation Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on AddThis.com...

55

Wind generating capacity is distributed unevenly across the United ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The highest concentration of wind turbines in the United States is in the Great Plains states, where the best conditions for onshore wind power generation exist.

56

Coal-fired power plants the next generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal is today a very important source of energy and the resources are sufficient for a long period. To keep power generation with coal up-to-date in view of minimizing the pollution (especially the CO{sub 2}) and of better economy, we will have introduce new plant technologies. After a general overview three of these are presented and compared with the state-of-the-art PCF technology, in respect to plant efficiency, environmental impact, investment cost, cost of electricity, and unit size.

Schemenau, W.; Schoedel, J. (ABB Kraftwerke AG, Mannheim (DE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Ownership Change, Incentives and Plant Efficiency: The Divestiture of U.S. Electric Generation Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compiles data on power plant operations and characteristicscharacteristics (e.g. power plant unit, state, grid controlBaseCase contains hourly power-plant unit-level information

Bushnell, James B.; Wolfram, Catherine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Operable Generating Units in the United States by State and Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Operable Generating Units in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2011" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form...

59

Large Steam Generating Units for the Combustion of Refuse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many by-products of our economy are considered 'waste' and are disposed of as landfill or by incineration. A shortage of landfill sites and increasingly higher fuel prices have stimulated interests in the conversion of burnable waste products into heat for process and the generation of power. Interest in the combustion of the most widely distributed waste products, household and industrial municipal refuse, is rapidly escalating. The assembly of a large complex for power and steam production by the combustion of municipal refuse, however, is a very complex process requiring the cooperation of many governmental, private, industrial, environmental and financial entities. A number of refuse burning plants have been and are being built. Many projects are in the planning stage. This paper reviews the background available in the combustion for steam generation of municipal refuse in shredded form on spreader stokers. This paper also provides up-to-date information regarding the design, construction, and operational status of the two large steam generating units for the combustion of municipal refuse presently being completed at the Hooker Chemical installation in Niagara Falls, New York.

Adams, P. J.; Robinson, C. C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Large Steam Generating Units for the Combustion of Refuse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Many by-products of our economy are considered ""waste"" and are disposed of as landfill or by incineration. A shortage of landfill sites and increasingly higher fuel prices have stimulated interests in the conversion of burnable waste products into heat for process and the generation of power. Interest in the combustion of the most widely distributed waste products, household and industrial municipal refuse, is rapidly escalating. The assembly of a large complex for power and steam production by the combustion of municipal refuse, however, is a very complex process requiring the cooperation of many governmental, private, industrial, environmental and financial entities. A number of refuse burning plants have been and are being built. Many projects are in the planning stage. This paper reviews the background available in the combustion for steam generation of municipal refuse in shredded form on spreader stokers. This paper also provides up-to-date information regarding the design, construction, and operational status of the two large steam generating units for the combustion of municipal refuse presently being completed at the Hooker Chemical installation in Niagara Falls, New York."

Adams, P. J.; Robinson, C. C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

C. A. La Electricidad de Caracas: Feasibility-study definitional report. Arreciffs Units 1 through 5 repowering project, electric power generation expansion Venezuela thermal power plant. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

C.A. La Electricidad de Caracas (E.de C.) is a private company which in 1991 served some 830,000 customers in an area of 4,160 square kilometers surrounding Caracas. A program is underway by E.de C. for upgrading equipment and expanding the capacity of several of its existing generating facilities. The Arrecifes repowering project will involve the addition of about 330 MW of new natural gas fired gas turbine generators and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) to five existing thermal power units built 30 to 40 years ago which have steam turbine generator sets of 26 to 41 MW each. The existing steam boilers will be removed. The limited but seemingly sufficient space available is to be a primary focus of the feasibility study.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

63

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides detailed statistics on existing generating units operated by electric utilities as of December 31, 2000, and certain summary statistics about new generators planned for operation by electric utilities during the next 5 years.

Information Center

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants in the United States as of 2009 and highlights characteristics of this segment of the industry. The purpose of the paper is to examine the role of natural gas processing plants in the natural gas supply chain and to provide an overview and summary of processing plant characteristics in the United States, such as locations, capacities, and operations. Key Findings There were 493 operational natural gas processing plants in the United States with a combined operating capacity of 77 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. Overall, operating capacity increased about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009, not including the processing capacity in Alaska1. At the same time, the number of all processing plants in the lower 48 States decreased

65

Figure 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units Operable Units,1 1957-2011 Nuclear Net Summer Capacity Change, 1950-2011 Status of All Nuclear Generating Units, ...

66

Inventory of power plants in the United States as of January 1, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States provides annual statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the US (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of January 1, 1998. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions and generating unit changes. This report is prepared annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience. This is a report of electric utility data; in cases where summary data or nonconfidential data of nonutilities are presented, it is specifically noted as nonutility data. 19 figs., 36 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A Hybrid Model for Hydroturbine Generating Unit Trend Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to the nonlinear and nonstationary characteristics of hydroelectricity systems, an hybrid prediction model based on wavelet transform and support vector machines is proposed in this paper for the trend analysis of hydroturbine generating unit ...

Min Zou; Jianzhong Zhou; Zhong Liu; Liangliang Zhan

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Economical operation of thermal generating units integrated with smart houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an economic optimal operation strategy for thermal power generation units integrated with smart houses. With the increased competition in retail and power sector reasoned by the deregulation and liberalization of power market make ... Keywords: particle swarm optimization, renewable energy sources, smart grid, smart house, thermal unit commitment

Shantanu Chakraborty; Takayuki Ito; Tomonobu Senjyu

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Investigation of an Emergency Diesel Generator Reliability Program, A Case Study of Crystal River Unit 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Florida Power Corporation Crystal River nuclear station has markedly improved emergency diesel generator (EDG) reliability at its Unit 3 reactor. Analysis of plant activities that contributed to this improvement demonstrates the effectiveness of applying practical EDG reliability programs and confirms the usefulness of proposed EPRI guidelines for such programs.

1989-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

70

A Study of United States Hydroelectric Plant Ownership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ownership of United States hydroelectric plants is reviewed from several perspectives. Plant owners are grouped into six owner classes as defined by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The numbers of plants and the corresponding total capacity associated with each owner class are enumerated. The plant owner population is also evaluated based on the number of owners in each owner class, the number of plants owned by a single owner, and the size of plants based on capacity ranges associated with each owner class. Plant numbers and corresponding total capacity associated with owner classes in each state are evaluated. Ownership by federal agencies in terms of the number of plants owned by each agency and the corresponding total capacity is enumerated. A GIS application that is publicly available on the Internet that displays hydroelectric plants on maps and provides basic information about them is described.

Douglas G Hall

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

First U. S. sulfreen unit in Dakota gas plant  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the first natural gas processing plant in the U.S. that uses Sulfreen as the optimum process for tail gas cleanup. A minimum overall recovery of 98.9% is expected. The Sulfreen process appears to be a viable tail gas treater for Claus units in the U.S., providing high overall recoveries and process reliability. The North Dakota plant joins more than 30 other units operating in Canada, Greece, China and throughout Europe.

Davis, G.W.

1985-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design.

Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Inventory of power plants in the United States as of January 1, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States provides annual statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of January 1, 1996. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress; Federal and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 as amended.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Inventory of power plants in the United States as of January 1, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States provides annual statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of January 1, 1997. The publication also provides a 10-yr outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress; Federal and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Integrating Process Unit Energy Metrics into Plant Energy Management Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As energy costs continue to rise across the process industry, many plants have responded by developing improved energy monitoring and reporting programs. At the center of such programs are typically spreadsheet or database applications that pull information, such as fired heater excess oxygen and steam vent rates, from the plant data historian and generate summary reports that compare and trend actual performance relative to targets. On average, plants can expect to reduce overall energy costs by up to 10% through improved management of plant variables, or metrics, that influence energy consumption. Energy metrics can generally be classified into three categories: Equipment, Utility System, and Process. Examples of each type of metric will be given in the paper. As a percentage of the overall savings sited above, the energy savings through stewardship and optimization of Equipment, Utility System and Process metrics are generally 50%, 40% and 10%, respectively. Plants have generally done a good job of stewarding the 90% of savings available through Utility and Equipment related energy metrics, primarily because target setting is fairly straightforward. However, the 10% of savings available from Process metrics, such as tower reflux ratios, pumparound rates, and steam stripping ratios, are typically missing from energy management systems due to the difficulty in first identifying them, and second in determining the optimum targets. Target setting is most difficult because with process metrics, yield considerations must be included in the target setting process. It is quite easy, for example, to save energy by cutting tower reflux rates. But too much reduction will sacrifice yield performance. Even at elevated energy prices, even the smallest reduction in yield will typically offset any energy savings that might have been captured. Therefore, in order to effectively incorporate Process energy metrics into the plant energy management system, knowledge of both energy and yield parameters is required. This paper will explore an effective methodology for determining what process unit energy metrics are important, how to effectively set their targets, and how to incorporate them into an effective energy management system. In terms of how to identify process energy metrics, the paper will discuss which energy intensive processes should be examined first, such as crude distillation and cat cracking. In terms of target setting, the paper will describe how process engineering experience is combined with simulation to develop meaningful targets that characterize the point where yield and energy are simultaneously optimized. Finally, the work process required

Davis, J. L.; Knight, N.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Vogtle Electric Generating Plant ETE Analysis Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL)-Albuquerque reviewed the evacuation time estimate (ETE) analysis dated April 2006 prepared by IEM for the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant (VEGP). The ETE analysis was reviewed for consistency with federal regulations using the NRC guidelines in Review Standard (RS)-002, Supplement 2 and Appendix 4 to NUREG-0654, and NUREG/CR-4831. Additional sources of information referenced in the analysis and used in the review included NUREG/CR-6863 and NUREG/CR-6864. The PNNL report includes general comments, data needs or clarifications, and requests for additional information (RAI) resulting from review of the ETE analysis.

Diediker, Nona H.; Jones, Joe A.

2006-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

77

Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

B Plant treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units inspection plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This inspection plan is written to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303 for operations of a TSD facility. Owners/operators of TSD facilities are required to inspection their facility and active waste management units to prevent and/or detect malfunctions, discharges and other conditions potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. A written plan detailing these inspection efforts must be maintained at the facility in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC), Chapter 173-303, ``Dangerous Waste Regulations`` (WAC 173-303), a written inspection plan is required for the operation of a treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facility and individual TSD units. B Plant is a permitted TSD facility currently operating under interim status with an approved Part A Permit. Various operational systems and locations within or under the control of B Plant have been permitted for waste management activities. Included are the following TSD units: Cell 4 Container Storage Area; B Plant Containment Building; Low Level Waste Tank System; Organic Waste Tank System; Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) Tank System; Low Level Waste Concentrator Tank System. This inspection plan complies with the requirements of WAC 173-303. It addresses both general TSD facility and TSD unit-specific inspection requirements. Sections on each of the TSD units provide a brief description of the system configuration and the permitted waste management activity, a summary of the inspection requirements, and details on the activities B Plant uses to maintain compliance with those requirements.

Beam, T.G.

1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. This project utilized GridViewTM, an electric grid dispatch software package, to estimate hourly emission factors for all of the eGRID subregions in the continental United States. These factors took into account electricity imports and exports

80

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant hydrogen generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most promising method for the disposal of highly radioactive nuclear wastes is a vitrification process in which the wastes are incorporated into borosilicate glass logs, the logs are sealed into welded stainless steel canisters, and the canisters are buried in suitably protected burial sites for disposal. The purpose of the research supported by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) project of the Department of Energy through Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and summarized in this report was to gain a basic understanding of the hydrogen generation process and to predict the rate and amount of hydrogen generation during the treatment of HWVP feed simulants with formic acid. The objectives of the study were to determine the key feed components and process variables which enhance or inhibit the.production of hydrogen. Information on the kinetics and stoichiometry of relevant formic acid reactions were sought to provide a basis for viable mechanistic proposals. The chemical reactions were characterized through the production and consumption of the key gaseous products such as H{sub 2}. CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}0, NO, and NH{sub 3}. For this mason this research program relied heavily on analyses of the gases produced and consumed during reactions of the HWVP feed simulants with formic acid under various conditions. Such analyses, used gas chromatographic equipment and expertise at the University of Georgia for the separation and determination of H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and NO.

King, R.B.; King, A.D. Jr.; Bhattacharyya, N.K. [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

SUBJECT: PRAIRIE ISLAND NUCLEAR GENERATING PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generating Plant. The enclosed report documents the inspection findings which were discussed on February 22, 2001, with you and other members of your staff. This inspection examined activities conducted under your license as they relate to safety and compliance with the Commission’s rules and regulations and with the conditions of your license. The inspectors reviewed selected procedures and records, observed activities, and interviewed personnel. Based on the results of this inspection, the inspectors identified two issues of very low safety significance (Green). One of these issues was determined to involve a violation of NRC requirements. However, because of its very low safety significance and because it has been entered into your corrective action program, the NRC is treating the issue as a non-cited violation, in accordance with Section VI.A.1 of the NRC’s Enforcement Policy. If you deny the non-cited violation, you should provide a response with the basis for your denial, within 30 days of the date of this inspection report, to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ATTN: Document Control Desk, Washington DC 20555-0001; with copies to the Regional Administrator,

Dear Mr. Sorensen; Roger D. Lanksbury

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT GRAPHITE PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing new nuclear grades of graphite used in the core of a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the critical development activities being pursued within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. Graphite’s thermal stability (in an inert gas environment), high compressive strength, fabricability, and cost effective price make it an ideal core structural material for the HTGR reactor design. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermo-mechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. The NGNP graphite R&D program has selected a handful of commercially available types for research and development activities necessary to qualify this nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor. These activities fall within five primary areas; 1) material property characterization, 2) irradiated material property characterization, 3) modeling, and 4) ASTM test development, and 5) ASME code development efforts. Individual research and development activities within each area are being pursued with the ultimate goal of obtaining a commercial operating license for the nuclear graphite from the US NRC.

William E. Windes; Timothy D. Burchell; Robert L. Bratton

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate? ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

84

North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW;...

85

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... by the costs has changed significantly. Prior estimates were for a highly efficient plant employing gasification and a combined cycle generator; the new ...

86

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (kWh). There were 65 nuclear power plants with 104 operating nuclear reactors that generated a total of 790 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh), ...

87

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3" 3" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

88

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5" 5" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

89

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4" 4" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

90

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6" 6" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

91

Fluorescent lamp unit with magnetic field generating means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluorescent lamp unit having a magnetic field generating means for improving the performance of the fluorescent lamp is disclosed. In a preferred embodiment the fluorescent lamp comprises four longitudinally extending leg portions disposed in substantially quadrangular columnar array and joined by three generally U-shaped portions disposed in different planes. In another embodiment of the invention the magnetic field generating means comprises a plurality of permanent magnets secured together to form a single columnar structure disposed within a centrally located region defined by the shape of lamp envelope. 4 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1989-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

92

Examination of Crystal River Unit 3 Steam Generator Tube Sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An examination of seven tubes removed from the Crystal River unit 3 steam generator characterized tube degradation associated with low-voltage eddy-current indications in the free span region above the lower tubesheet. The defects responsible for the low-voltage eddy-current signals consisted of small, relatively shallow, isolated, pit-like spots of outside-diameter-initiated intergranular attack, which had almost no effect on the burst strength of the tubing.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Integration of Advanced Emissions Controls to Produce Next-Generation Circulating Fluid Bed Coal Generating Unit (withdrawn prior to award)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Colorado Springs Utilities Colorado Springs, CO aDDItIonaL tEaM MEMBERs Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. Clinton, NJ IntegratIon of advanced emIssIons controls to Produce next-generatIon cIrculatIng fluId Bed coal generatIng unIt (wIthdrawn PrIor to award) Project Description Colorado Springs Utilities (Springs Utilities) and Foster Wheeler are planning a joint demonstration of an advanced coal-fired electric power plant using advanced, low-cost emission control systems to produce exceedingly low emissions. Multi- layered emission controls will be

95

Plant monitoring techniques and second generation designs  

SciTech Connect

Chemical and instrumental monitoring techniques suitable for geothermal use are described in a manner to relate them to plant operational problems and downtime avoidance. The use of these techniques permits the detection of scaling, the onset of scaling, corrosion loss, current corrosion rates and incipient heat exchanger failure. Conceptual advances are noted which simplify the research techniques to approaches that should be usable even in some low-capital well-head type power plants. 10 refs., 8 figs.

Kindle, C.H.; Shannon, D.W.; Robertus, R.J.; Pierce, D.D.; Sullivan, R.G.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOE’s project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10 CFR 52, for the purpose of demonstrating the suitability of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors for commercial electric power and hydrogen production. Products that will support the licensing of the NGNP include the environmental impact statement, the preliminary safety analysis report, the NRC construction permit, the final safety analysis report, and the NRC operating license. The fuel development and qualification program consists of five elements: development of improved fuel manufacturing technologies, fuel and materials irradiations, safety testing and post-irradiation examinations, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term modeling. Two basic approaches will be explored for using the heat from the high-temperature helium coolant to produce hydrogen. The first technology of interest is the thermochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The most promising processes for thermochemical splitting of water are sulfur-based and include the sulfur-iodine, hybrid sulfur-electrolysis, and sulfur-bromine processes. The second technology of interest is thermally assisted electrolysis of water. The efficiency of this process can be substantially improved by heating the water to high-temperature steam before applying electrolysis.

F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Innovative Design of New Geothermal Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect

This very significant and useful report assessed state-of-the-art geothermal technologies. The findings presented in this report are the result of site visits and interviews with plant owners and operators, representatives of major financial institutions, utilities involved with geothermal power purchases and/or wheeling. Information so obtained was supported by literature research and data supplied by engineering firms who have been involved with designing and/or construction of a majority of the plants visited. The interviews were conducted by representatives of the Bonneville Power Administration, the Washington State Energy Office, and the Oregon Department of Energy during the period 1986-1989. [DJE-2005

Bloomquist, R. Gordon; Geyer, John D.; Sifford, B. Alexander III

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Analysis of Steam Generator Tubing from Crystal River, Unit 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four tubes were removed from Crystal River Unit 3 steam generator B during the 1994 refueling outage (RFO 9). The tubes were examined to characterize any tube degradation associated with eddy current (EC) indications occurring at the 7th and 9th tube support plate (TSP) intersections, which were identified during RFO 8. Mechanical wear observed at the 7th and 9th TSP lands had almost no effect on the tubing's burst strength. Small patches of intergranular attack (IGA) were observed in the first freespan ...

1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

100

Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association's Springverville unit 3 earns POWER's highest honor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is said that pioneers take the arrows. In the case of Springerville Unit 3 - a 418 MW(net) expansion of a Tucson Electric Power facility in Arizona and the first pulverized coal-fired units built in the US in more than decade, the arrows were many. Although Tri-State (the developer), Tuscon Electric (the host), and Bechtel Power (the EPC contractor) were wounded by delayed deliveries of major equipment, bankruptcy of a major supplier, and a labor shortage, the companies showed their pioneering spirit and completed the project ahead of schedule. For ushering in a new generation of clean and desperately needed baseload capacity, Springerville Unit 3 is POWER magazine's 2006 Plant of the Year. 9 figs.

Peltier, R.

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Combustion systems and power plants incorporating parallel carbon dioxide capture and sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein are combustion systems and power plants that incorporate sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases. In its most basic embodiment, the invention is a combustion system that includes three discrete units: a combustion unit, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In a preferred embodiment, the invention is a power plant including a combustion unit, a power generation system, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In both of these embodiments, the carbon dioxide capture unit and the sweep-based membrane separation unit are configured to be operated in parallel, by which we mean that each unit is adapted to receive exhaust gases from the combustion unit without such gases first passing through the other unit.

Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

102

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001...

103

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant June 29, 2006 - 2:41pm Addthis Gen IV Reactor Capable of Producing Electricity and/or Hydrogen WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from prospective industry teams interested in participating in the development and conceptual design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor prototype with the capability to produce process heat, electricity and/or hydrogen. The very high temperature reactor is based on research and development activities supported by DOE's Generation IV nuclear energy systems initiative.

104

Texas refiner optimizes by integrating units from idle plant  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, Phibro Energy USA Inc. purchased Dow Chemical Co.`s idle 200,000 b/d refinery at Freeport, TX. The Dow facility, known as the Oyster Creek refinery, was incapable of producing gasoline, and therefore was somewhat incomplete as a stand-alone refinery. By relocating and integrating units from the Dow plant with Phibro`s 130,700 b/d refinery at Texas City, TX, and adding a new residual oil solvent extraction (ROSE) unit, Phibro will optimize its Texas refinery operations. The dismantling, movement, and re-erection phases of the project are all but finished, and installation of piping and new instrumentation for the major relocated units is well under way. When the project is complete, Phibro will drastically reduce fuel oil production at Texas City and increase output of middle distillate. Resid, which the company now produces in excess, will be converted to a heavy fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) feedstock. Most of this stream will be fed to the oversized FCC unit at Phibro`s 71,000 b/d Houston refinery, thus eliminating Phibro`s reliance on purchased FCC feed. The paper discusses the Oyster Creek refinery, the decision to reduce residual fuel oil production company-wide, building versus moving equipment, dismantling and transport, construction, products, operational changes, utilities, process wastes, regulations, preparations, and future prospects. The remaining equipment at Oyster Creek was sold to a South Korean refinery.

Rhodes, A.K.

1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

105

Unit-Contingent Power Purchase Agreement and Asymmetric Information About Plant Outage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes a unit-contingent power purchase agreement between an electricity distributor and a power plant. Under such a contract the distributor pays the plant a fixed price if the plant is operational and nothing if plant outage occurs. Pricing ... Keywords: electricity industry, risk allocation, spot market, unit-contingent contract

Owen Q. Wu; Volodymyr Babich

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Springerville Generating Station Solar System Solar Power Plant | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springerville Generating Station Solar System Solar Power Plant Springerville Generating Station Solar System Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Springerville Generating Station Solar System Solar Power Plant Facility Springerville Generating Station Solar System Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Tucson Electric Power Location Springerville, Arizona Coordinates 34.1333799°, -109.2859196° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.1333799,"lon":-109.2859196,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

107

Geothermal power plants of the United States: a technical survey of existing and planned installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of geothermal energy as a source of electric power in the United States is reviewed. A thorough description is given of The Geysers geothermal power project in northern California. The recent efforts to exploit the hot-water resources of the Mexicali-Imperial Rift Valley are described. Details are given concerning the geology of the several sites now being used and for those at which power plants will soon be built. Attention is paid to the technical particulars of all existing plants, including wells, gathering systems, energy conversion devices, materials, environmental impacts, economics and operating characteristics. Specifically, plants which either exist or are planned for the following locations are covered: The Geysers, CA; East Mesa, CA; Heber, CA; Roosevelt Hot Springs, UT; Valles Caldera, NM; Salton Sea, CA; Westmorland, CA; Brawley, CA; Desert Peak, NV; and Raft River, ID. The growth of installed geothermal electric generating capacity is traced from the beginning in 1960 and is projected to 1984.

DiPippo, R.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

109

Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies in the United States: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes highlights of exploratory research into next-generation photovoltaic (PV) technologies funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) through its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of finding disruptive or ''leap frog'' technologies that may leap ahead of conventional PV in energy markets. The most recent set of 14 next-generation PV projects, termed Beyond the Horizon PV, will complete their third year of research this year. The projects tend to take two notably different approaches: high-efficiency solar cells that are presently too expensive, or organic solar cells having potential for low cost although efficiencies are currently too low. We will describe accomplishments for several of these projects. As prime examples of what these last projects have accomplished, researchers at Princeton University recently reported an organic solar cell with 5% efficiency (not yet NREL-verified). And Ohio State University scientists recently demonstrated an 18% (NREL-verified) single-junction GaAs solar cell grown on a low-cost silicon substrate. We also completed an evaluation of proposals for the newest set of exploratory research projects, but we are unable to describe them in detail until funding becomes available to complete the award process.

McConnell, R.; Matson, R.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A new method for stochastic production simulation in generation system with multiple hydro units  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a new method of calculating loss of load probability, expected energy generation and production cost for units in a generating system with multiple hydro units. The method uses the equivalent load duration curve (ELDC) obtained by convolving the distributions of the original load and the forced outage power loss of all generators. Hydro units are scheduled on the ELDC according to their assigned energy and available capacity. Then the deconvolution procedure is performed to obtain a load duration curve for an equivalent system without hydro units. The expected energy of the thermal units is achieved by convolving the generating units in an economic merit order of loading.

Chen, S.J.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Recommended practice for fire protection for electric generating plants and high voltage direct current converter stations. 2005 ed.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard outlines fire safety recommendations for gas, oil, coal, and alternative fuel electric generating plants including high voltage direct current converter stations and combustion turbine units greater than 7500 hp used for electric generation. Provisions apply to both new and existing plants. The document provides fire prevention and fire protection recommendations for the: safety of construction and operating personnel; physical integrity of plant components; and continuity of plant operations. The 2005 edition includes revisions and new art that clarify existing provisions. 5 annexes.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Proceedings: Ninth International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil and Combined Cycle Plants with Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper selection, application, and optimization of cycle chemistry have long been recognized as integral to ensuring the highest possible levels of component availability and reliability in fossil-fired generating plant units. These proceedings of the Ninth EPRI International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil Plants address state-of-the-art practices in conventional and combined-cycle plants. The content provides a worldwide perspective on cycle chemistry practices and insight on industry issues an...

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

113

Approach to Assessing Fuel Flexibility for Improved Generating Plant Profitability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an EPRI study of fuel flexibility, a strategy that can increase a power plant's financial performance by matching choices regarding the type of coal burned at a generating station to fluctuations in the market price of electricity. The report presents detailed analytical information as well as conclusions drawn from the study, and includes a checklist utilities can use in evaluating the potential for a plant to benefit by adopting fuel flexibility.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

114

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

116

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

Turbine-Generator Topics for Plant Engineers: Residual Magnetism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The undesirable magnetization of components of rotating equipment used in the generation of electric power is a problem that has been recognized for many years; but wide understanding of the origins, detection techniques, remediation, and avoidance principles of residual magnetization has been lacking. As part of the series Turbine-Generator Topics for Plant Engineers, EPRI commissioned this report with the purpose of providing engineers active in the operation and maintenance of power ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

118

Program on Technology Innovation: The Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Update documents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which will demonstrate the design, licensing, construction, and operation of a new nuclear energy source using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. This new non-emitting energy source is applicable to a broad range of uses, from generating electricity to providing high-temperature industrial process heat to producing hydrogen. The NGNP project is sponsored as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and envi...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Solving the Unit Commitment Problem in Power Generation by Primal and Dual Methods \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deals with the fuel cost optimal scheduling of on/off decisions and output levels for generating unitsSolving the Unit Commitment Problem in Power Generation by Primal and Dual Methods \\Lambda D and results of test runs are reported. 1 Introduction The unit commitment problem in electricity production

Römisch, Werner

120

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Steam Generator Management Program: Applicability of EDF's Steam Generator Blockage Ratio Estimation Method to Plant Shutdown Transients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricité de France (EDF) has developed a technique that it uses to estimate the level of deposit buildup on steam generator tube support plates at its pressurized water reactor (PWR) units in France. The technique could potentially be of use to other PWR operators, but it needs to be carefully evaluated to determine what adaptations would be necessary to enable it to be used accurately at other plants. This report documents work undertaken by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and EDF to det...

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

122

Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Power Plant Emission Reductions Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard by J. Alan Beamon, Tom Leckey, and Laura Martin There are many policy instruments available for reducing power plant emissions, and the choice of a policy will affect compliance decisions, costs, and prices faced by consumers. In a previous analysis, the Energy Information Administration analyzed the impacts of power sector caps on nitrogen oxides (NO x ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, assuming a policy instru- ment patterned after the SO 2 allowance program created in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. 1 This report compares the results of that work with the results of an analysis that assumes the use of a dynamic generation performance standard (GPS) as an instrument for reducing CO 2 emissions. 2 In general, the results of the two analyses are similar: to reduce

123

IMPROVEMENTS IN OR RELATING TO STEAM GENERATING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A steam generating plant for marine vessels includes a steam superheater (nuclear reactor, perhaps) from which steam is ducted to the point of use (heat exchanger, etc.). A steam generator receiving the condensed steam from the point of use uses steam from the superheater to evaporate the condensate. The superheated steam used in the evaporation is compressed by a turbo-compressor and directed into the superheater. The condensate evaporated in the generator is used to drive the turbo-compressor. (D.C.W.)

Kendon, M.H.

1963-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

124

Commercial second-generation PFBC plant transient model: Task 15  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustor (APFBC) power plant combines an efficient gas-fired combined cycle, a low-emission PFB combustor, and a coal pyrolysis unit (carbonizer) that converts coal, America`s most plentiful fuel, into the gas turbine fuel. From an operation standpoint, the APFBC plant is similar to an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant, except that the PFBC and fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHE) allow a considerable fraction of coal energy to be shunted around the gas turbine and sent directly to the steam turbine. By contrast, the fuel energy in IGCC plants and most other combined cycles is primarily delivered to the gas turbine and then to the steam turbine. Another characteristic of the APFBC plant is the interaction among three large thermal inertias--carbonizer, PFBC, and FBHE--that presents unique operational challenges for modeling and operation of this type of plant. This report describes the operating characteristics and dynamic responses of the APFBC plant and discusses the advantages and shortcomings of several alternative control strategies for the plant. In particular, interactions between PFBC, FBHE, and steam bottoming cycle are analyzed and the effect of their interactions on plant operation is discussed. The technical approach used in the study is described in Section 2. The dynamic model is introduced in Section 3 and described is detail in the appendices. Steady-state calibration and transient simulations are presented in Sections 4 and 5. The development of the operating philosophy is discussed in Section 6. Potential design changes to the dynamic model and trial control schemes are listed in Sections 7 and 8. Conclusions derived from the study are presented in Section 9.

White, J.S.; Getty, R.T.; Torpey, M.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0095(2000) Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000 March 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric

126

Demonstration of Clyde Bergemann Water Cannons at Alabama Power Company's Plant Miller Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of a demonstration of Clyde Bergemann Water Cannons at Alabama Power Company's Plant Miller Unit 1.

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

127

Test factoring with amock: generating readable unit tests from system tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated unit tests are essential for the construction of reliable software, but writing them can be tedious. If the goal of test generation is to create a lasting unit test suite (and not just to optimize execution of ...

Glasser, David Samuel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Natural Gas Processing Plants Utilization Rates Based on 2008 Flows Figure 3. Natural Gas Processing Plants Utilization Rates Based on 2008 Flows Note: Average utilization rates...

129

Interim Project Results: United Parcel Service's Second-Generation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application for Each Engine and Truck Manufacturer Hybrid Drive Unit Transmission InverterControls Partners Brakes (ABS) Eaton Hybrid Electric System UPS' hybrid-electric...

130

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

AVESTAR Center for Operational Excellence of Electricity Generation Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address industry challenges in attaining operational excellence for electricity generation plants, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM). This presentation will highlight the AVESTARTM Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of high-efficiency, near-zero-emission electricity generation plants. The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real-time, high-fidelity dynamic simulators with full-scope operator training systems (OTSs) and 3D virtual immersive training systems (ITSs) into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. AVESTAR’s initial offering combines--for the first time--a “gasification with CO2 capture” process simulator with a “combined-cycle” power simulator together in a single OTS/ITS solution for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option for power generation, especially when capturing and storing CO2 is necessary to satisfy emission targets. The AVESTAR training program offers a variety of courses that merge classroom learning, simulator-based OTS learning in a control-room operations environment, and immersive learning in the interactive 3D virtual plant environment or ITS. All of the courses introduce trainees to base-load plant operation, control, startups, and shutdowns. Advanced courses require participants to become familiar with coordinated control, fuel switching, power-demand load shedding, and load following, as well as to problem solve equipment and process malfunctions. Designed to ensure work force development, training is offered for control room and plant field operators, as well as engineers and managers. Such comprehensive simulator-based instruction allows for realistic training without compromising worker, equipment, and environmental safety. It also better prepares operators and engineers to manage the plant closer to economic constraints while minimizing or avoiding the impact of any potentially harmful, wasteful, or inefficient events. The AVESTAR Center is also used to augment graduate and undergraduate engineering education in the areas of process simulation, dynamics, control, and safety. Students and researchers gain hands-on simulator-based training experience and learn how the commercial-scale power plants respond dynamically to changes in manipulated inputs, such as coal feed flow rate and power demand. Students also analyze how the regulatory control system impacts power plant performance and stability. In addition, students practice start-up, shutdown, and malfunction scenarios. The 3D virtual ITSs are used for plant familiarization, walk-through, equipment animations, and safety scenarios. To further leverage the AVESTAR facilities and simulators, NETL and its university partners are pursuing an innovative and collaborative R&D program. In the area of process control, AVESTAR researchers are developing enhanced strategies for regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control, including gasifier and gas turbine lead, as well as advanced process control using model predictive control (MPC) techniques. Other AVESTAR R&D focus areas include high-fidelity equipment modeling using partial differential equations, dynamic reduced order modeling, optimal sensor placement, 3D virtual plant simulation, and modern grid. NETL and its partners plan to continue building the AVESTAR portfolio of dynamic simulators, immersive training systems, and advanced research capabilities to satisfy industry’s growing need for training and experience with the operation and control of clean energy plants. Future dynamic simulators under development include natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) and supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC) plants with post-combustion CO2 capture. These dynamic simulators are targeted for us

Zitney, Stephen

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

132

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy...

133

Text to Text : plot unit searches generated from English  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The story of Macbeth centers around revenge. World War I was started by an act of revenge. Even though these two stories are seemingly unrelated, humans use the same concept to draw meaning from them. Plot units, revenge ...

Nackoul, David Douglas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

Mark Holbrook

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Performance modelling and simulated availability of shell gasification and carbon recovery unit of urea plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper deals with the performance modelling and simulated availability of shell gasification and carbon recovery unit of urea plant. The fertilizer plant comprises of various units viz. shell gasification and carbon recovery, desulphurisation, ... Keywords: modelling, performance evaluation and maintenance strategies, steady state availability

Sunand Kumar; Sanjeev Kumar; P. C. Tewari

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMICS OF A NOMINAL 500 MWe SECOND-GENERATION PFB COMBUSTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Research has been conducted under United States Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-86MC21023 to develop a new type of coal-fired plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant, called a Second Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Plant (2nd Gen PFB), offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 48 percent, with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than those of conventional pulverized coal-fired (PC) plants with wet flue gas desulfurization. The 2nd Gen PFB plant incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a carbonizer, the combustion of carbonizer char in a pressurized circulating fluidized bed boiler, and the combustion of carbonizer syngas in a gas turbine combustor to achieve gas turbine inlet temperatures of 2300 F and higher. A conceptual design and an economic analysis was previously prepared for this plant. When operating with a Siemens Westinghouse W501F gas turbine, a 2400psig/1000 F/1000 F/2-1/2 in. Hg. steam turbine, and projected carbonizer, PCFB, and topping combustor performance data, the plant generated 496 MWe of power with an efficiency of 44.9 percent (coal higher heating value basis) and a cost of electricity 22 percent less than a comparable PC plant. The key components of this new type of plant have been successfully tested at the pilot plant stage and their performance has been found to be better than previously assumed. As a result, the referenced conceptual design has been updated herein to reflect more accurate performance predictions together with the use of the more advanced Siemens Westinghouse W501G gas turbine. The use of this advanced gas turbine, together with a conventional 2400 psig/1050 F/1050 F/2-1/2 in. Hg. steam turbine increases the plant efficiency to 48.2 percent and yields a total plant cost of $1,079/KW (January 2002 dollars). The cost of electricity is 40.7 mills/kWh, a value 12 percent less than a comparable PC plant.

A. Robertson; H. Goldstein; D. Horazak; R. Newby

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

IMPROVEMENTS IN STEAM GENERATING PLANT AND AN IMPROVED METHOD OF GENERATING STEAM  

SciTech Connect

A steam generating plant, designed for heat transfer from a liquid metal (potassium, sodium, or their alloy) with reduced danger of explosion, is based on the fact that, if steam (especially superheated) rather than water contacts the liquid metal, the risk of explosion is much reduced. In this plant steam is superheated by heat transfer from liquid metal, the steam bsing generated by heat transfer between the superheated steam and water. Diagrams are given for the plant, which comprises a series of heat exchangers in which steam is superheated; part of the superheated steam is recycled to convert water into steam. Apart from the danger of a steam--liquid metal contact, the main danger is that the superheated steam might cool, coming to the saturated condition; this danger can be averted by setting up mceans for detecting low steam temperatures. (D.L.C.)

Zoller, R.E.

1960-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Improved taguchi method based contracted capacity optimization for power consumer with self-owned generating units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper proposes an improved Taguchi method to determine the best capacity contracts and dispatch the power output of the self-owned generating units from almost infinite combinations. To be achieved are savings of total power expenses of the consumers ... Keywords: capacity contracts, improved Taguchi method, self-owned generating units

Hong-Tzer Yang; Pai-Chun Peng; Chung-His Huang

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

140

AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER'S CONESVILLE POWER PLANT UNIT NO.5 CO2 CAPTURE RETROFIT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with American Electric Power (AEP), ABB Lummus Global Inc. (ABB), the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies applied to an existing US coal-fired electric generation power plant. The motivation for this study was to provide input to potential US electric utility actions concerning GHG emissions reduction. If the US decides to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, action would need to be taken to address existing power plants. Although fuel switching from coal to natural gas may be one scenario, it will not necessarily be a sufficient measure and some form of CO{sub 2} capture for use or disposal may also be required. The output of this CO{sub 2} capture study will enhance the public's understanding of control options and influence decisions and actions by government, regulators, and power plant owners in considering the costs of reducing greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} emissions. The total work breakdown structure is encompassed within three major reports, namely: (1) Literature Survey, (2) AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study, and (3) Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation. The report on the literature survey results was issued earlier by Bozzuto, et al. (2000). Reports entitled ''AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study'' and ''Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation'' are provided as companion volumes, denoted Volumes I and II, respectively, of the final report. The work performed, results obtained, and conclusions and recommendations derived therefrom are summarized.

Carl R. Bozzuto; Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; Mark Palkes; John L. Marion

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Feedwater Iron Optimization: Quad Cities Generating Station Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines 2004 Revisions (report 1008192) recommends feedwater iron control in the range of 0.1 ppb 1.0 ppb for plants operating with reducing chemistry conditions for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation. Since all U.S. plants now operate under moderate hydrogen water chemistry (HWC-M) or noble metals chemical addition and hydrogen water chemistry (NMCA+HWC), it is appropriate to target the lower end of the range (0.1 0.5 ppb) to minimize zinc requiremen...

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

142

Seismic Margin Assessment of the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A seismic margin assessment of the Georgia Power Company Edwin I. Hatch, unit 1 nuclear power plant showed the practicality of an EPRI methodology for assessing the ability of nuclear plants to withstand large earthquakes. The assessment, performed by the utility, established that the plant can withstand an earthquake at least twice the magnitude for which it was designed.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Processing Plants and Production Basins, 2009 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, GasTran Natural Gas Transportation ...

144

Development of Next Generation Phasor Measurement Unit Features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the communications and computing foundations necessary to achieve the smart transmission grid: one capable of anticipating problems and automatically reconfiguring itself after an event. Wide-Area Measurement System (WAMS) is a new technology that enables major advances in power system operation, protection, and maintenance. Key building blocks of WAMS are synchronized phasor measurement units (PMUs), or synchrophasors. When linked together, they can provide a precise and comprehens...

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

Design of heat-recovery and seed-recovery units in MHD power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Crucial and limiting engineering and materials problems associated with the design of an MHD steam bottoming plant are discussed. Existing experimental and theoretical results on corrosion, fouling and deposits, potassium seed recovery and regeneration, are reviewed. The state of knowledge regarding the design of heat recovery and seed recovery units for coal-fired MHD plants is inadequate at the present time.

Bergman, P.D.; Joubert, J.I.; Demski, R.J.; Bienstock, D.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Nuclear plant design and modification guidelines for PWR steam generator reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating experience gathered from PWR plant operation during the 1960's and 1970's has been incorporated into a series of design guidelines for secondary plant systems and steam generators. Specific guidelines included in this volume are: plant design for PWR steam generator inspection and nondestructive testing, revision 1; guidelines for design of steam generator blowdown systems, revision 1; plant design guidelines for layup and cleanup of steam, feedwater, and condensate systems, revision 1; design guidelines for plant secondary systems, revision 1 and plant design for steam generator replaceability, revision 1. The guidelines are intended to address those aspects of new plant design which will minimize corrosion damage to steam generators by controlling impurity ingress, facilitate steam generator nondestructive testing and provide for eventual replacement of steam generator if necessary. The guidelines, last revised in 1986, are primarily applicable to new plant construction, however, some of the guidelines may also be applicable to major backfits to existing plants.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

Lynne M. Stevens

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale ground-mounted solar facilities, defined as installations greater than 1 MW. We begin by discussing standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature and then discuss their applicability to solar power plants. We present total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and other infrastructure. As of the third quarter of 2012, the solar projects we analyze represent 72% of installed and under-construction utility-scale PV and CSP capacity in the United States.

Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Heath, G.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Siting and sizing of distributed generation units using GA and OPF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the important task of finding the optimal siting and sizing of Distributed Generation (DG) units for a given distribution network so that the cost of active and reactive power generation can be minimized. The optimization technique ... Keywords: distributed generation, genetic alghorithm(GA), optimal power flow(OPF)

M. Hosseini Aliabadi; M. Mardaneh; B. Behbahan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

M. Patterson; C. Park

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steam generators (SG),steam turbines(T), generators andawith the costs of modern steam turbine generator plants forSteam generators Remote maintenance equipment Turbine plant

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

on standby, test, maintenance/repairs, out of service, and indefinite shutdown represented 43 percent of the total nonutility generating capacity in 1999.

154

Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Sean Ong, Clinton Campbell, Paul Denholm, Robert Margolis, and Garvin Heath Technical Report NRELTP-6A20-56290...

155

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 120, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States- Reference Case (xls, 119.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

156

Hybrid simulation and optimization-based capacity planner for integrated photovoltaic generation with storage units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unlike fossil-fueled generation, solar energy resources are geographically distributed and highly intermittent, which makes their direct control difficult and requires storage units. The goal of this research is to develop a flexible capacity planning ...

Esfandyar M. Mazhari; Jiayun Zhao; Nurcin Celik; Seungho Lee; Young-Jun Son; Larry Head

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water withdrawals for thermoelectric cooling account for a significant portion of total water use in the United States. Any change in electrical energy generation policy and technologies has the potential to have a major ...

Strzepek, Kenneth M.

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Generation of Optimal Unit Distance Codes for Rotary Encoders through Simulated Evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evolutionary algorithm is used to generate unit distance codes for absolute rotary encoders. The target is to obtain a code suitable for disk size reduction, or for resolution increase, thus overcoming the limitations of conventional Gray codes. Obtained ...

Stefano Gregori; Roberto Rossi; Guido Torelli; Valentino Liberali

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Maintenance practices for emergency diesel generator engines onboard United States Navy Los Angeles class nuclear submarines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Navy has recognized the rising age of its nuclear reactors. With this increasing age comes increasing importance of backup generators. In addition to the need for decay heat removal common to all (naval ...

Hawks, Matthew Arthur

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A Systems Engineering Framework for Design, Construction and Operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Not since the International Space Station has a project of such wide participation been proposed for the United States. Ten countries, the European Union, universities, Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, and industry will participate in the research and development, design, construction and/or operation of the fourth generation of nuclear power plants with a demonstration reactor to be built at a DOE site and operational by the middle of the next decade. This reactor will be like no other. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be passively safe, economical, highly efficient, modular, proliferation resistant, and sustainable. In addition to electrical generation, the NGNP will demonstrate efficient and cost effective generation of hydrogen to support the President’s Hydrogen Initiative. To effectively manage this multi-organizational and technologically complex project, systems engineering techniques and processes will be used extensively to ensure delivery of the final product. The technological and organizational challenges are complex. Research and development activities are required, material standards require development, hydrogen production, storage and infrastructure requirements are not well developed, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission may further define risk-informed/performance-based approach to licensing. Detailed design and development will be challenged by the vast cultural and institutional differences across the participants. Systems engineering processes must bring the technological and organizational complexity together to ensure successful product delivery. This paper will define the framework for application of systems engineering to this $1.5B - $1.9B project.

Edward J. Gorski; Charles V. Park; Finis H. Southworth

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Efficient gas stream cooling in Second-Generation PFBC plants  

SciTech Connect

The coal-fueled Advanced or Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor concept (APFBC) is an efficient combined cycle in which coal is carbonized (partially gasified) to fuel a gas turbine, gas turbine exhaust heats feedwater for the steam cycle, and carbonizer char is used to generate steam for a steam turbine while heating combustion air for the gas turbine. The system can be described as an energy cascade in which chemical energy in solid coal is converted to gaseous form and flows to the gas turbine followed by the steam turbine, where it is converted to electrical power. Likewise, chemical energy in the char flows to both turbines generating electrical power in parallel. The fuel gas and vitiated air (PFBC exhaust) streams must be cleaned of entrained particulates by high-temperature equipment representing significant extensions of current technology. The energy recovery in the APFBC cycle allows these streams to be cooled to lower temperatures without significantly reducing the efficiency of the plant. Cooling these streams would allow the use of lower-temperature gas cleanup equipment that more closely approaches commercially available equipment, reducing cost and technological risk, and providing an earlier path to commercialization. This paper describes the performance effects of cooling the two hottest APFBC process gas streams: carbonizer fuel gas and vitiated air. Each cooling variation is described in terms of energy utilization, cycle efficiency, and cost implications.

White, J.S.; Horazak, D.A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Generating Unit Additions in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation" Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation" "NY","Orange",463,"Ameresco LFG I Inc",10549,"Al Turi",2,,"OP",0.8,0.8,0.8,22,"IC","LFG",,7,2011 "NY","Orange",463,"Ameresco LFG I Inc",10549,"Al Turi",3,,"OP",0.8,0.8,0.8,22,"IC","LFG",,7,2011 "CA","Orange",590,"City of Anaheim - (CA)",57027,"Canyon Power Plant","CPP1",,"OP",50,50,50,22,"GT","NG",,9,2011 "CA","Orange",590,"City of Anaheim - (CA)",57027,"Canyon Power Plant","CPP2",,"OP",50,48.5,48.5,22,"GT","NG",,9,2011

163

Heuristic solutions to the long-term unit commitment problem with cogeneration plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a long-term version of the unit commitment problem that spans over one year divided into hourly time intervals. It includes constraints on electricity and heating production as well as on biomass consumption. The problem is of interest for ... Keywords: Energy planning, Local search, Mixed integer programming heuristics, Unit commitment with cogeneration plants

Niels Hvidberg Kjeldsen; Marco Chiarandini

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Development of a New USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map for the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many regions of the world, the extremes of winter cold are a major determinant of the geographic distribution of perennial plant species and of their successful cultivation. In the United States, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Plant ...

Christopher Daly; Mark P. Widrlechner; Michael D. Halbleib; Joseph I. Smith; Wayne P. Gibson

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Generator loss of field; Experience and studies for AEP's Rockport Plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the performance of American Electric Power (AEP) Company's remotely-located 2600 MW Rockport Plant after loss of field (LOF) disturbances to one of its 1300 MW cross-compound units. Loss of field conditions occur rarely, but the resultant high currents and pulsating torques can damage a turbine-generator, and the electrical system near the disturbance will be impacted by abnormal levels or cyclic swings of power, VArs, and voltages. Rockport LOF computer simulations were conducted with recently developed detailed models; the level of detail was suggested by analyses of recent LOF experience at AEP and by recent developments in generator and excitation system modeling. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the torques, current levels, voltages, speeds, and potential relay actions following loss of field.

Rana, R.D.; Schulz, R.P. (Bulk Transmission Planning Div., American Electric Power Service Corp., Columbus, OH (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

HTGR power plant turbine-generator load control system  

SciTech Connect

A control system is disclosed for a high temperature gas cooled reactor power plant, wherein a steam source derives heat from the reactor coolant gas to generate superheated and reheated steam in respective superheater and reheater sections that are included in the steam source. Each of dual turbine-generators includes a high pressure turbine to pass superheated steam and an associated intermediate low pressure turbine to pass reheated steam. A first admission valve means is connected to govern a flow of superheated steam through a high pressure turbine, and a second admission valve means is connected to govern a flow of reheated steam through an intermediate-low pressure turbine. A bypass line and bypass valve means connected therein are connected across a second admission valve means and its intermediate-low pressure turbine. The second admission valve means is positioned to govern the steam flow through the intermediate-low pressure turbine in accordance with the desired power output of the turbine-generator. In response to the steam flow through the intermediate-low pressure turbine, the bypass valve means is positioned to govern the steam flow through the bypass line to maintain a desired minimum flow through the reheater section at times when the steam flow through the intermediate-low pressure turbine is less than such minimum. The power output of the high pressure turbine is controlled by positioning the first admission valve means in predetermined proportionality with the desired power output of the turbine-generator, thereby improving the accuracy of control of the power output of the high pressure turbine at low load levels.

Braytenbah, A.S.; Jaegtnes, K.O.

1976-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Inventory of power plants in the United States 1989. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This document is prepared annually by the Electric Power Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units in operation and to provide a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 states and the District of Columbia). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA, to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The report is organized into the following chapters: Summary Statistics; Operable Electric Generating Units; and Projected Electric Generating Unit Additions.

Not Available

1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

168

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Modeling a Helical-coil Steam Generator in RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

Options for the primary heat transport loop heat exchangers for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant are currently being evaluated. A helical-coil steam generator is one heat exchanger design under consideration. Safety is an integral part of the helical-coil steam generator evaluation. Transient analysis plays a key role in evaluation of the steam generators safety. Using RELAP5-3D to model the helical-coil steam generator, a loss of pressure in the primary side of the steam generator is simulated. This report details the development of the steam generator model, the loss of pressure transient, and the response of the steam generator primary and secondary systems to the loss of primary pressure. Back ground on High Temperature Gas-cooled reactors, steam generators, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant is provided to increase the readers understanding of the material presented.

Nathan V. Hoffer; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan A. Anderson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Report on Preliminary Engineering Study for Installation of an Air Cooled Steam Condenser at Brawley Geothermal Plant, Unit No. 1  

SciTech Connect

The Brawley Geothermal Project comprises a single 10 MW nominal geothermal steam turbine-generator unit which has been constructed and operated by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE). Geothermal steam for the unit is supplied through contract by Union Oil Company which requires the return of all condensate. Irrigation District (IID) purchases the electric power generated and provides irrigation water for cooling tower make-up to the plant for the first-five years of operation, commencing mid-1980. Because of the unavailability of irrigation water from IID in the future, SCE is investigating the application and installation of air cooled heat exchangers in conjunction with the existing wet (evaporative) cooling tower with make-up based on use of 180 gpm (nominal) of the geothermal condensate which may be made available by the steam supplier.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Yonghuang Therm Power Plant Units 1 and 2, Inchon, South Korea  

SciTech Connect

Because South Korea depends heavily on imported fuels, its government continues to encourage energy diversification. Today Korea has about 60,000 MW of installed capacity that is fueled equally by coal, liquefied natural gas, and nuclear fission. Although the linchpins of the ongoing diversification program are more nukes and more plants powered by imported LNG, another piece of the plan is to make greater use of the country's domestic coal supplies. That is where Korea South-East Power Co. enters the picture, with two new supercritical units that showcase the technology's 40% efficiency. The plant has two 800-MW units and two identical units are under construction at the site. The plant has two-stage combustion and low NOx burners followed by selective catalytic reduction on each unit. SOx emissions are under 45 ppm. An integrated control and monitoring system helps keep down operating costs. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Peltier, R.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report The objective of this document is to provide the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry with the basis for a plan to ensure the availability of near-term nuclear energy options that can be in operation in the U.S. by 2010. This document identifies the technological, regulatory, and institutional gaps and issues that need to be addressed for new nuclear plants to be deployed in the U.S. in this timeframe. It also identifies specific designs that could be deployed by 2010, along with the actions and resource requirements that are needed to ensure their

175

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report The objective of this document is to provide the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry with the basis for a plan to ensure the availability of near-term nuclear energy options that can be in operation in the U.S. by 2010. This document identifies the technological, regulatory, and institutional gaps and issues that need to be addressed for new nuclear plants to be deployed in the U.S. in this timeframe. It also identifies specific designs that could be deployed by 2010, along with the actions and resource requirements that are needed to ensure their

176

Nuclear power plant performance assessment pertaining to plant aging in France and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of aging on nuclear power plant performance has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. The approaches used to make an assessment of this effect strongly influence the economics of nuclear power plant ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for managing the R&D program elements; (2) Developing a specific work package for the R&D activities to be performed during each government fiscal year; (3) Reporting the status and progress of the work based on committed deliverables and milestones; (4) Developing collaboration in areas of materials R&D of benefit to the NGNP with countries that are a part of the Generation IV International Forum; and (5) Ensuring that the R&D work performed in support of the materials program is in conformance with established Quality Assurance and procurement requirements. The objective of the NGNP Materials R&D Program is to provide the essential materials R&D needed to support the design and licensing of the reactor and balance of plant, excluding the hydrogen plant. The materials R&D program is being initiated prior to the design effort to ensure that materials R&D activities are initiated early enough to support the design process and support the Project Integrator. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge; thus, new materials and approaches may be required.

G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Proceedings: Eighth International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil and Combined Cycle Plants with Heat Recovery Steam Generators, June 20-22, 2006, Calgary, Alberta Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper selection, application, and optimization of the cycle chemistry have long been recognized as integral to ensuring the highest possible levels of component availability and reliability in fossil-fired generating plant units. These proceedings of the Eighth EPRI International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil Plants address state-of-the-art practices in conventional and combined cycle plants. The content provides a worldwide perspective on cycle chemistry practices, and insight as to industry ...

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

179

Small power systems study technical summary report. Volume II. Inventory of small generating units in U. S. utility systems  

SciTech Connect

Data identifying small (less than or equal to 10 MW) power units in the United States are tabulated. The data are listed alphabetically by state and are reported sequentially for investor owned utilities, municipal utilities, and electrical cooperatives and other utility systems. For a given utility system, the generating units are divided into steam turbines, diesel generators and gas turbines. The number and size of generating units are listed. A summary tabulation of the number of generating units of each type and total generating capacity by state is presented.

Sitney, L.R.

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Electric power generating plant having direct-coupled steam and compressed-air cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

Drost, M.K.

1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electric power generating plant having direct coupled steam and compressed air cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

Drost, Monte K. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

An examination of the pursuit of nuclear power plant construction projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent serious reconsideration of nuclear power as a means for U.S. electric utilities to increase their generation capacity provokes many questions regarding the achievable success of future nuclear power plant ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Nuclear Plant Design and Modification Guidelines for PWR Steam Generator Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating and maintenance experience relative to PWR steam generator reliability has produced a variety of "lessons learned." This information has been incorporated in a series of guidelines to aid utilities in major plant modifications and new plant construction.

1991-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

184

Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncertainty can be either an opportunity or a risk. Every construction project begins with the expectation of project performance. To meet the expectation, construction projects need to be managed through sound risk assessment and management beginning with the front-end of the project life cycle to check the feasibility of a project. The Construction Industry Institute’s (CII) International Project Risk Assessment (IPRA) tool has been developed, successfully used for a variety of heavy industry sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks associated with NPP projects, the goal of this thesis is to develop tailored risk framework for NPP projects that leverages and modifies the existing IPRA process. The IPRA has 82 elements to assess the risks associated with international construction projects. The modified IPRA adds five major issues (elements) to consider the unique risk factors of typical NPP projects based upon a review of the literature and an evaluation of the performance of previous nuclear-related facilities. The modified IPRA considers the sequence of NPP design that ultimately impacts the risks associated with plant safety and operations. Historically, financial risks have been a major chronic problem with the construction of NPPs. This research suggests that unstable regulations and the lack of design controls and oversight are significant risk issues. This thesis includes a consistency test to initially validate whether the asserted risks exist in actual conditions. Also, an overall risk assessment is performed based on the proposed risk framework for NPP and the list of assessed risk is proposed through a possible scenario. After the assessment, possible mitigation strategies are also provided against the major risks as a part of this thesis. This study reports on the preliminary findings for developing a new risk framework for constructing nuclear power plants. Future research is needed for advanced verification of the proposed elements. Follow-on efforts should include verification and validation of the proposed framework by industry experts and methods to quantify and evaluate the performance and risks associated with the multitude of previous NPP projects.

Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

None

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

P. E. MacDonald

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Method and apparatus for optimizing operation of a power generating plant using artificial intelligence techniques  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for optimizing the operation of a power generating plant using artificial intelligence techniques. One or more decisions D are determined for at least one consecutive time increment, where at least one of the decisions D is associated with a discrete variable for the operation of a power plant device in the power generating plant. In an illustrated embodiment, the power plant device is a soot cleaning device associated with a boiler.

Wroblewski, David (Mentor, OH); Katrompas, Alexander M. (Concord, OH); Parikh, Neel J. (Richmond Heights, OH)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Pseudo-random number generators for Monte Carlo simulations on Graphics Processing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic uniform pseudo-random number generators are implemented on ATI Graphics Processing Units (GPU). The performance results of the realized generators (multiplicative linear congruential (GGL), XOR-shift (XOR128), RANECU, RANMAR, RANLUX and Mersenne Twister (MT19937)) on CPU and GPU are discussed. The obtained speed-up factor is hundreds of times in comparison with CPU. RANLUX generator is found to be the most appropriate for using on GPU in Monte Carlo simulations. The brief review of the pseudo-random number generators used in modern software packages for Monte Carlo simulations in high-energy physics is present.

Vadim Demchik

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

190

Development of the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3, 4, 5 and 6  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the development process of the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for Units 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant. The units are Korean Standard Nuclear Power (KSNP) plant, 1000 MWe class pressurized water reactor (PWR) with two loops of primary coolant system. The severe accident management guidelines for the units have been completed in 2002. The generic severe accident management guidance for Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant has been used as the basis when developing Ulchin severe accident management guideline. Result of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for each unit was reviewed to integrate its insight into the SAMG. It indicates that each unit has a balanced design to any specific initiating events for core damage. Seven severe accident management strategies are applied in Ulchin SAMG. Seven strategies are (1) Inject into the steam generator (2) De-pressurize the RCS (3) Inject into the RCS (4) Inject into the containment (5) Control the fission product release into environment (6) Control the containment pressure and temperature and (7) Control hydrogen concentration in the containment. The range and capability of essential instrument for performing the strategies are assessed. Computational aids are developed to complement the unavailable instrument during the accident and to assist the operator's decision choosing strategies. To examine the ability of the SAMG to fulfill its intended function, small loss of coolant accident (SLOCA) with the failure of safety injection was selected as a reference scenario. The scenario was analyzed using MAAP code. The evaluation of the SAMG using this sequence has been successfully completed. (authors)

Kim, Hyeong T.; Yoo, Hojong; Lim, Hyuk Soon; Park, Jong W.; Lim, Woosang; Oh, Seung Jong [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 103-16 Munji-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon, 305-380 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Chul [Future and Challenges, Inc (Korea, Republic of)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Performance Calculations and Optimization of a Fresnel Direct Steam Generation CSP Plant with Heat Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This master thesis deals with the performance calculations of a 9MW linear Fresnel CSP plant withdirect steam generation built by the Solar Division of… (more)

Schlaifer, Perrine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

MHK Technologies/OCGen turbine generator unit TGU | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OCGen turbine generator unit TGU OCGen turbine generator unit TGU < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage OCGen turbine generator unit TGU.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Renewable Power Company Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Cook Inlet Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/East Foreland Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/Lubec Narrows Tidal *MHK Projects/Nenana Rivgen *MHK Projects/Treat Island Tidal *MHK Projects/Western Passage OCGen Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description he OCGen turbine-generator unit (TGU) is unidirectional regardless of current flow direction. Two cross flow turbines drive a permanent magnet generator on a single shaft. OCGen modules contain the ballast/buoyancy tanks and power electronics/control system allowing for easier installation. The OCGen TGU can be stacked either horizontally or vertically to form arrays.

193

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1, Unit 2","1,705","13,994",100.0,"Calvert Cliffs Nuclear PP Inc" "1 Plant 2...

194

State-of-Knowledge on Deposition, Part 2: Assessment of Deposition Activity in Fossil Plant Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last 20 years, substantial advances have been made in the understanding and control of fossil plant cycle chemistry. In spite of these advances, deposition activity, most notably in boilers and steam turbines, remains an issue of concern to many organizations that operate fossil units. The underlying science of deposition in fossil unit components has not, with the exception of steam turbines, been studied extensively under the EPRI Boiler and Turbine Steam and Cycle Chemistry Program. This repo...

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

195

Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012 Table A2. Natural gas processing plant capacity, by state, 2013 (million cubic feet per day) Alabama 1,403 Arkansas 24 California 926 Colorado 5,450 Florida 90 Illinois 2,100 Kansas 1,818 Kentucky 240 Louisiana 10,737 Michigan 479 Mississippi 1,123

196

Property:EIA/861/OperatesGeneratingPlant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OperatesGeneratingPlant OperatesGeneratingPlant Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Boolean. Description: Operates Generating Plant Entity operates power generating plants (Y or N) [1] References ↑ EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2008 - F861 File Layout-2008.doc Pages using the property "EIA/861/OperatesGeneratingPlant" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) + true + AEP Generating Company + true + AES Eastern Energy LP + true + AGC Division of APG Inc + true + Akiachak Native Community Electric Co + true + Alabama Municipal Elec Authority + true + Alabama Power Co + true + Alaska Electric & Energy Coop + true + Alaska Electric Light&Power Co + true + Alaska Energy Authority + true +

197

Assessment of next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is an advanced high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) concept with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 900-1000 C. In the indirect cycle system, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. The system concept for the vary high temperature reactor (VHTR) can be a reactor based on the prismatic block of the GT-MHR developed by a consortium led by General Atomics in the U.S. or based on the PBMR design developed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels of U.K. This report has made an assessment on the issues pertaining to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP. A detailed thermal hydraulic analysis, using models developed at ANL, was performed to calculate heat transfer, temperature distribution, and pressure drop. Two IHX designs namely, shell and straight tube and compact heat exchangers were considered in an earlier assessment. Helical coil heat exchangers were analyzed in the current report and the results were compared with the performance features of designs from industry. In addition, a comparative analysis is presented between the shell and straight tube, helical, and printed circuit heat exchangers from the standpoint of heat exchanger volume, primary and secondary sides pressure drop, and number of tubes. The IHX being a high temperature component, probably needs to be designed using ASME Code Section III, Subsection NH, assuming that the IHX will be classified as a class 1 component. With input from thermal hydraulic calculations performed at ANL, thermal conduction and stress analyses were performed for the helical heat exchanger design and the results were compared with earlier-developed results on shell and straight tube and printed circuit heat exchangers.

Majumdar, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Natesan, K.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Generation of Electric Power in the United States 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The President issued a directive on April 15, 1999, requiring an annual report summarizing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions produced by electricity generation in the United States, including both utilities and nonutilities. In response, this report is jointly submitted by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Information Center

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A0-44073 A0-44073 November 2008 Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States Paul Denholm and Robert Margolis Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States Paul Denholm and Robert Margolis Prepared under Task No. PVB7.6301 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A0-44073 November 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

200

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants (NGGPP) process data for binary cycle plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants (NGGPP) study provides the firm estimates - in the public domain - of the cost and performance of U.S. geothermal systems and their main components in the early 1990s. The study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Research Program, managed for DOE by Evan Hughes of the Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA, and conducted by John Brugman and others of the CE Holt Consulting Firm, Pasadena, CA. The printed NGGPP reports contain detailed data on the cost and performance for the flash steam cycles that were characterized, but not for the binary cycles. The nine Tables in this document are the detailed data sheets on cost and performance for the air cooled binary systems that were studied in the NGGPP.

Not Available

1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper provides information on the cost of building new electricity power plants. These cost estimates are critical inputs in the development of energy projections and analyses.

Michael Leff

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

202

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine induustrial plant study  

SciTech Connect

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100[degrees]F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600[degrees]F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine industrial plant study  

SciTech Connect

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100{degrees}F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600{degrees}F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Cycling Operation of Fossil Plants: Volume 1: Cycling Considerations for Niagara Mohawk's Oswego Unit 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil plants are being converted to cycling operation to accommodate daily load swings and to decrease the overall system fuel costs. This report summarizes the methods and results of an engineering study of three two-shift cycling approaches considered for Niagara Mohawk's Oswego unit 5: superheater/turbine bypass, variable pressure operations, and full-flow condensate polishing.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Land Use for Wind, Solar, and Geothermal Electricity Generation Facilities in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale wind, photovoltaic (PV), concentrating solar power (CSP), and geothermal projects. The analysts evaluated 458 existing or proposed projects, representing (as of 2012 third quarter) 51% of installed wind capacity, 80% of PV and CSP capacity, and all known geothermal power plants in the United States. The report identifies two major land use classes: 1) direct area (land permanently or temporarily disturbed due to ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Relevance of Generation The Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States Sari Fink, Kevin Porter, and Jennifer Rogers Exeter Associates, Inc. Columbia, Maryland Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48987 October 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 The Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States Sari Fink, Kevin Porter, and Jennifer Rogers Exeter Associates, Inc. Columbia, Maryland

207

Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 August 2009 Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States Paul Denholm, Maureen Hand, Maddalena Jackson, and Sean Ong National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45834 August 2009 Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States Paul Denholm, Maureen Hand, Maddalena Jackson, and Sean Ong Prepared under Task No. WER9.3550 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

208

North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Author Electric Energy Publications Inc. Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Citation Electric Energy Publications Inc.. North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update [Internet]. [updated 2010;cited 2010]. Available from:

209

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables (Information and data on nuclear power reactors Generation: by State and Reactor. Annual Energy Review, ...

210

San Luis Unit technical record of design and construction. Volume 5. Construction Dos Amigos Pumping Plant, Pleasant Valley Pumping Plant. Central Valley Project, West San Joaquin Division, San Luis Unit, California. A water resources technical publication. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The technical record of design and construction of the San Luis unit is divided into seven volumes. This volume, number V, deals with the construction of two specific features of the San Luis unit, Dos Amigos Pumping Plant and Pleasant Valley Pumping Plant.

1974-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

212

Summary of three regional assessment studies of solar electric generation opportunities in the Southwest, Southeast, and Northeast United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Market opportunities for solar generation of electricity for utility and for residential/commercial/industrial applications in the Northeast, Southeast, and Southwest regions of the United States were evaluated in three studies (JBF 1979, Stone and Webster 1979a, 1979b) and are summarized. The evaluations were based on both economic analyses and user perception of what they would require to select or approve the use of solar electric generation for themselves or for their employers. Over 30 utilities and several industrial and commercial firms and homeowners were involved. Solar electric technologies considered included biomass, hybrid retrofit, OTEC, photovoltaic, solar thermal, and wind. The studies projected that solar electric technologies could account for several percent of the forecast generation in year 2000 in the Southeast and Southwest regions,and up to 10 to 20% in the Northeast region. No single solar electric technology or application (for utility or industrial/commercial/residential use) arrived earlier at economic breakeven than other technologies in the Southeast region, but wind generation for both utility and industrial applications predominated in the Northeast region. The Southwest region, in which only utility applications were considered, showed wind energy and retrofit hybrid (a solar adjunct to an existing fossil-fueled plant) to be the most likely early applications.

Watts, R.L.; Harty, H.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Data Quality Evaluation of Hazardous Air Pollutants Measurements for the US Environmental Protection Agency's Electric Utility Steam Generating Units Information Collection Request  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued an Information Collection Request (ICR) to owners of fossil fuel-fired, electric steam generating units. Part III of the ICR required that almost 500 selected power plant stacks be tested for emissions of four groups of substances classified as hazardous air pollutants under the Clean Air Act: acid gases and hydrogen cyanide; metals; volatile and semivolatile organics; and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans, and polychlori...

2010-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

214

IMPROVEMENTS IN OR RELATING TO STEAM GENERATING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear power plant is designed using a heavy-watermoderated, steam- cooled reactor. In this plant, feed water is heated by the moderator and reactor steam to form feed steam, which is then superheated by superheated reactor steam and expanded through a nozzle. The feed steam issuing from the nozzie has added to it the superheated reactor steam, and the resulting steam is compressed, heated further in the reactor, and part of it passed to the turbine. (D.L.C.)

Bauer, S.G.; Jubb, D.H.

1962-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

215

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of electricity generation plants  

SciTech Connect

To address challenges in attaining operational excellence for clean energy plants, the U.S.Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR™). The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real time,high-fidelity dynamic simulators with operator training systems and 3D virtual immersive training systems into an integrated energy plant and control room environment.

Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Appendix  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Appendix Appendix The preceding report is the most comprehensive report published by the EIA on natural gas processing plants in the United States. The data in the report for the year 2008 were collected on Form EIA-757, Natural Gas Processing Survey Schedule A, which was fielded to EIA respondents in the latter part of 2008 for the first time. This survey was used to collect information on the capacity, status, and operations of natural gas processing plants and to monitor constraints of natural gas processing plants during periods of supply disruption in areas affected by an emergency, such as a hurricane. EIA received authorization to collect information on processing plants from the Office of Management and Budget in early 2008. The form consists of two parts, Schedule A and Schedule B. Schedule A is

217

Examination of Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous EPRI reports have documented problems associated with operation and maintenance of complex heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs). The EPRI report Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failure Manual (1004503) provides information about known HRSG tube failures and necessary steps that can be taken to diagnose and prevent similar problems. The EPRI report Delivering High Reliability Heat Recovery Steam Generators (1004240) provides guidance for continued and reliable operation of HRSGs from initial...

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Almost all of these factors can vary by region, as do capacity factors for renewable generation, operations and maintenance costs associated with individual ...

219

Distributed Generation and Virtual Power Plants: Barriers and Solutions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The present technological and regulatory power system needs to adapt to the increase in the share of distributed generation. This research focuses on the applicability… (more)

Olejniczak, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was established under the Energy Policy Act in August 2005 (EPACT-2005). EPACT-2005 defined an overall plan and timetable for NGNP research, design, licensing, construction and operation by the end of FY 2021. At the time that EPACT-2005 was passed, it was envisioned that key aspects of the project included: NGNP is based on R&D activities supported by the Gen-IV Nuclear Energy initiative; ï‚· NGNP is to be used to generate electricity, to produce hydrogen or (to do) both; ï‚· The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be the lead national lab for the project; ï‚· NGNP will be sited at the INL in

222

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

223

Overview of commercialization of stationary fuel cell power plants in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, DOE`s efforts to assist private sector organizations to develop and commercialize stationary fuel cell power plants in the United States are discussed. The paper also provides a snapshot of the status of stationary power fuel cell development occurring in the US, addressing all fuel cell types. This paper discusses general characteristics, system configurations, and status of test units and demonstration projects. The US DOE, Morgantown Energy Technology Center is the lead center for implementing DOE`s program for fuel cells for stationary power.

Hooie, D.T.; Williams, M.C.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Single-bridge unit-connected HVDC generation with increased pulse number  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A true unit-connected generator-HVdc convertor scheme is proposed which removes the need to use two bridges in series to achieve twelve-pulse operation. Moreover, the combination of a single main bridge and an auxiliary feedback dc ripple reinjection bridge is shown to increase the pulse number from 6 to 18. This is achieved purely by natural commutation and is equally valid for rectification and inversion. The theoretical waveforms are validated by extensive experimental verification.

Villablanca, M.; Arrillaga, J. (Univ. of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Interim Project Results: United Parcel Service's Second-Generation Hybrid-Electric Delivery Vans (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the performance evaluation of United Parcel Service's second-generation hybrid-electric delivery vans. The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is evaluating the 18-month, in-service performance of 11 of these vans along with 11 comparable conventional diesel vans operating in Minneapolis, Minnesota. As a complement to the field study, the team recently completed fuel economy and emissions testing at NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) laboratory.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER'S CONESVILLE POWER PLANT UNIT NO.5 CO2 CAPTURE RETROFIT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with American Electric Power (AEP), ABB Lummus Global Inc. (ABB), the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies applied to an existing US coal-fired electric generation power plant. The motivation for this study was to provide input to potential US electric utility actions concerning GHG emissions reduction. If the US decides to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, action would need to be taken to address existing power plants. Although fuel switching from coal to natural gas may be one scenario, it will not necessarily be a sufficient measure and some form of CO{sub 2} capture for use or disposal may also be required. The output of this CO{sub 2} capture study will enhance the public's understanding of control options and influence decisions and actions by government, regulators, and power plant owners in considering the costs of reducing greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} emissions. The total work breakdown structure is encompassed within three major reports, namely: (1) Literature Survey, (2) AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study, and (3) Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation. The report on the literature survey results was issued earlier by Bozzuto, et al. (2000). Reports entitled ''AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study'' and ''Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation'' are provided as companion volumes, denoted Volumes I and II, respectively, of the final report. The work performed, results obtained, and conclusions and recommendations derived therefrom are summarized.

Carl R. Bozzuto; Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; Mark Palkes; John L. Marion

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants  

SciTech Connect

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

Sackschewsky, M.R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

East Mesa Magmamax Power Process Geothermal Generating Plant, A Preliminary Analysis  

SciTech Connect

During recent months, Magma Power Company has been involved in the shakedown and startup of their 10 MW binary cycle power plant at East Mesa in the Imperial Valley of Southern California. This pilot plant has been designed specifically as an R & D facility, with its primary goal to explore the necessary technology improvements required to make the binary cycle an efficient, cost effective and reliable conversion process. Magma Power's exploration activities, carried out in other parts of the Western United States after the initial discovery and development at The Geyser's, gave evidence that The Geyser's type of steam reservoir was unique and that the majority of geothermal resources would be of the hydrothermal, or pressurized hot water type. Initial flow tests throughout different locations where this type of resource was discovered indicated that well bore scaling occurred at the flash point in the wells. Initial evaluations indicated that if the well fluid could be maintained under pressure as it traversed the well bore, the potential for scaling would be mitigated. Tests carried out in the late 60's at Magma's Brady Hot Springs development in Nevada indicated that scaling was mitigated with the installation of a pump in the geothermal well. Subsequently, designs were developed of a binary process, utilizing heat exchangers for power generation. Magma was able to acquire process patents associated with this and had a patent issued (Magmamax Power Process). This incorporates the concept of pumping a geothermal well and transferring the heat in the geothermal fluid to a secondary power fluid in heat exchangers. Magma's desire to demonstrate this technology was one of the prime motivations associated with the installation of the East Mesa plant.

Hinrichs, T.C.; Dambly, B.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Power Plant Electrical Reference Series, Volume 1: Electric Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive and practical guide to electric power apparatus and electrical phenomena provides an up-to-date source book for power plant managers, engineers, and operating personnel. Aiding in the recognition and prevention of potential problems, the 16-volume guide can help utilities save staff time and reduce operating expenses.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

CAES (conventional compressed-air energy storage) plant with steam generation: Preliminary design and cost analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was performed to evaluate the performance and cost characteristics of two alternative CAES-plant concepts which utilize the low-pressure expander's exhaust-gas heat for the generation of steam in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). Both concepts result in increased net-power generation relative to a conventional CAES plant with a recuperator. The HRSG-generated steam produces additional power in either a separate steam-turbine bottoming cycle (CAESCC) or by direct injection into and expansion through the CAES-turboexpander train (CAESSI). The HRSG, which is a proven component of combined-cycle and cogeneration plants, replaces the recuperator of a conventional CAES plant, which has demonstrated the potential for engineering and operating related problems and higher costs than were originally estimated. To enhance the credibility of the results, the analyses performed were based on the performance, operational and cost data of the 110-MW CAES plant currently under construction for the Alabama Electric Cooperative (AEC). The results indicate that CAESCC- and CAESSI-plant concepts are attractive alternatives to the conventional CAES plant with recuperator, providing greater power generation, up to 44-MW relative to the AEC CAES plant, with competitive operating and capital costs. 5 refs., 43 figs., 26 tabs.

Nakhamkin, M.; Swensen, E.C.; Abitante, P.A. (Energy Storage and Power Consultants, Mountainside, NJ (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Improving heat capture for power generation in coal gasification plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the steam cycle design to maximize power generation is demonstrated using pinch analysis targeting techniques. Previous work models the steam pressure level in composite curves based on its saturation temperature ...

Botros, Barbara Brenda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Supply Curves for Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy supply curves attempt to estimate the relationship between the cost of an energy resource and the amount of energy available at or below that cost. In general, an energy supply curve is a series of step functions with each step representing a particular group or category of energy resource. The length of the step indicates how much of that resource is deployable or accessible at a given cost. Energy supply curves have been generated for a number of renewable energy sources including biomass fuels and geothermal, as well as conservation technologies. Generating a supply curve for solar photovoltaics (PV) has particular challenges due to the nature of the resource. The United States has a massive solar resource base -- many orders of magnitude greater than the total consumption of energy. In this report, we examine several possible methods for generating PV supply curves based exclusively on rooftop deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feed-in tariffs (FITs) have been used to promote renewable electricity development in over 40 countries throughout the past two decades. These policies generally provide guaranteed prices for the full system output from eligible generators for a fixed time period (typically 15-20 years). Due in part to the success of FIT policies in Europe, some jurisdictions in the United States are considering implementing similar policies, and a few have already put such policies in place. This report is intended to offer some guidance to policymakers and regulators on how generator interconnection procedures may affect the implementation of FITs and how state generator interconnection procedures can be formulated to support state renewable energy objectives. This report is based on a literature review of model interconnection procedures formulated by several organizations, as well as other documents that have reviewed, commented on, and in some cases, ranked state interconnection procedures.

Fink, S.; Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

235

Near-term implications of a ban on new coal-fired power plants in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large numbers of proposed new coal power generators in the United States have been cancelled, and some states have prohibited new coal power generators. We examine the effects on the U.S. electric power system of banning the construction of coal-fired electricity generators, which has been proposed as a means to reduce U.S. CO{sub 2} emissions. The model simulates load growth, resource planning, and economic dispatch of the Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (ISO), Inc., Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and PJM under a ban on new coal generation and uses an economic dispatch model to calculate the resulting changes in dispatch order, CO{sub 2} emissions, and fuel use under three near-term (until 2030) future electric power sector scenarios. A national ban on new coal-fired power plants does not lead to CO{sub 2} reductions of the scale required under proposed federal legislation such as Lieberman-Warner but would greatly increase the fraction of time when natural gas sets the price of electricity, even with aggressive wind and demand response policies. 50 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Adam Newcomer; Jay Apt [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Processing Plant Utilization Data collected for 2009 show that the States with the highest total processing capacity are among the States with the highest average utilization rates. This is to be expected as most of the plants are located in production areas that have been prolific for many years. In fact, the five States situated along the Gulf of Mexico accounted for nearly 49 percent of total processing volume in 2009. The total utilization rate in the United States averaged 66 percent of total capacity in 2009 (Table 2). Plants in Alaska ran at 86 percent of total capacity during the year, the highest capacity utilization rate in the country. Texas had significant utilization capacity at 71 percent, for an average of 14 Bcf per day of natural gas in 2009. However, a number of

237

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico States Gulf of Mexico States Gulf of Mexico States The Gulf of Mexico area, which includes the States of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, has in the past accounted for the majority of natural gas production. Processing plants are especially important in this part of the country because of the amount of NGLs in the natural gas produced and existence of numerous petro-chemical plants seeking that feedstock in this area. Consequently, the States along the Gulf of Mexico are home to the largest number of plants and the most processing capacity in the United States. Natural gas produced in this area of the country is typically rich in NGLs and requires processing before it is pipeline-quality dry natural gas. Offshore natural gas production can contain more than 4 gallons of

238

DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant April 17, 2008 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it is seeking public and industry input on how to best achieve the goals and meet the requirements for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) demonstration project work at DOE's Idaho National Laboratory. DOE today issued a Request for Information and Expressions of Interest from prospective participants and interested parties on utilizing cutting-edge high temperature gas reactor technology in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by enabling nuclear energy to replace fossil fuels used by industry for process heat. "This is an opportunity to advance the development of safe, reliable, and

239

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

240

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Systems, Subsystems, and Components, establishes a baseline for the current technology readiness status, and provides a path forward to achieve increasing levels of technical maturity.

John Collins

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Main Generator and Exciter Life Cycle Management Plans at STARS Nuclear Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This CD is a compilation of six optimum LCM plans for the main generators and exciters at the six STARS plants and also contains a generic LCM information "sourcebook" for generators.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Small-Scale, Biomass-Fired Gas Turbine Plants Suitable for Distributed and Mobile Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of small-scale, biomass-fired gas turbine plants that use an indirectly-fired gas turbine cycle. Such plants were originally thought to have several advantages for distributed generation, including portability. However, detailed analysis of two designs revealed several problems that would have to be resolved to make the plants feasible and also determined that a steam turbine cycle with the same net output was more economic than the gas turbine cycle. The incre...

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

244

Life Cycle Management Plan for Main Generator and Exciter at Callaway Nuclear Plant: Generic Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This report provides Ameren UE with an optimized LCM plan for the main generator and exciter at Callaway Plant.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

Table 2. Ten Largest Plants by Generation Capacity, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" Oklahoma" "1. Northeastern","Coal","Public Service Co of Oklahoma",1815 "2. Muskogee","Coal","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1524 "3. Seminole","Gas","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1504 "4. Kiamichi Energy Facility","Gas","Kiowa Power Partners LLC",1178 "5. Redbud Power Plant","Gas","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1160 "6. Oneta Energy Center","Gas","Calpine Central L P",1086 "7. Riverside","Gas","Public Service Co of Oklahoma",1070 "8. Sooner","Coal","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1046 "9. GRDA","Coal","Grand River Dam Authority",1010

246

Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for both the PBMR and prismatic design. The main focus of this report is the RPV for both design concepts with emphasis on material selection.

Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

247

Project Overview: United Parcel Service's Second-Generation Hybrid-Electric Delivery Vans (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes UPS second generation hybrid-electric delivery vehicles as compared to conventional delivery vehicles. Medium-duty commercial vehicles such as moving trucks, beverage-delivery trucks, and package-delivery vans consume almost 2,000 gal of fuel per year on average. United Parcel Service (UPS) operates hybrid-electric package-delivery vans to reduce the fuel use and emissions of its fleet. In 2008, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Fleet Test and Evaluation Team evaluated the first generation of UPS' hybrid delivery vans. These hybrid vans demonstrated 29%-37% higher fuel economy than comparable conventional diesel vans, which contributed to UPS' decision to add second-generation hybrid vans to its fleet. The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team is now evaluating the 18-month, in-service performance of 11 second-generation hybrid vans and 11 comparable conventional diesel vans operated by UPS in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The evaluation also includes testing fuel economy and emissions at NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory and comparing diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration. In addition, a followup evaluation of UPS' first-generation hybrid vans will show how those vehicles performed over three years of operation. One goal of this project is to provide a consistent comparison of fuel economy and operating costs between the second-generation hybrid vans and comparable conventional vans. Additional goals include quantifying the effects of hybridization on DPF regeneration and helping UPS select delivery routes for its hybrid vans that maximize the benefits of hybrid technology. This document introduces the UPS second-generation hybrid evaluation project. Final results will be available in mid-2012.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

An overview of the United States Department of Energy plant lifetime improvement program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, 109 nuclear power plants provide over 20 percent of the electrical energy generated in the US. The operating license of the first of these plants will expire in the year 2000; one third of the operating licenses will expire by 2010 and the remaining plant licenses are scheduled to expire by 2033. The National Energy Strategy assumes that 70 percent of these plants will continue to operate beyond their current license expiration to assist in ensuring an adequate, diverse, and environmentally acceptable energy supply for economic growth. In order to preserve this energy resource in the US three major tasks must be successfully completed: (1) establishment of the regulations, technical standards, and procedures for the preparation and review of a license renewal application; (2) development, verification, and validation of the various technical criteria and bases for needed monitoring, refurbishment, or replacement of plant equipment; and (3) demonstration of the regulatory process. Since 1985, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear industry and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish and demonstrate the option to extend the life of nuclear power plants through the renewal of operating licenses. This paper focuses primarily on DOE`s Plant Lifetime Improvement (PLIM) Program efforts to develop the technical criteria and bases for effective aging management and lifetime improvement for continued operation of nuclear power plants. This paper describes current projects to resolve generic technical issues, including degradation of long-lived components, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) embrittlement management approaches, and analytical methodologies to characterize RPV integrity.

Rosinski, S.T.; Clauss, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harrison, D.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Lead Risk Minimization Program at Palisades Generating Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lead-assisted stress corrosion cracking (PbSCC) can affect all steam generator tubing materials in current use. The state-of-knowledge regarding lead transport, the effects of lead on tube degradation, and possible PbSCC mitigation measures were summarized in the Pressurized Water Reactor Lead Sourcebook: Identification and Mitigation of Lead in PWR Secondary Systems (EPRI 1013385). The Sourcebook outlines several actions that could be taken by utilities to assess and reduce the risk of PbSCC. This repor...

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

250

New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect

The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 6: Process Heat and Hydrogen Co-Generation PIRTs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) exercise was conducted to identify potential safety-0-related physical phenomena for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) when coupled to a hydrogen production or similar chemical plant. The NGNP is a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) with the design goal to produce high-temperature heat and electricity for nearby chemical plants. Because high-temperature heat can only be transported limited distances, the two plants will be close to each other. One of the primary applications for the VHTR would be to supply heat and electricity for the production of hydrogen. There was no assessment of chemical plant safety challenges. The primary application of this PIRT is to support the safety analysis of the NGNP coupled one or more small hydrogen production pilot plants. However, the chemical plant processes to be coupled to the NGNP have not yet been chosen; thus, a broad PIRT assessment was conducted to scope alternative potential applications and test facilities associated with the NGNP. The hazards associated with various chemicals and methods to minimize risks from those hazards are well understood within the chemical industry. Much but not all of the information required to assure safe conditions (separation distance, relative elevation, berms) is known for a reactor coupled to a chemical plant. There is also some experience with nuclear plants in several countries that have produced steam for industrial applications. The specific characteristics of the chemical plant, site layout, and the maximum stored inventories of chemicals can provide the starting point for the safety assessments. While the panel identified events and phenomena of safety significance, there is one added caveat. Multiple high-temperature reactors provide safety-related experience and understanding of reactor safety. In contrast, there have been only limited safety studies of coupled chemical and nuclear plants. The work herein provides a starting point for those studies; but, the general level of understanding of safety in coupling nuclear and chemical plants is less than in other areas of high-temperature reactor safety.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Gorensek, M. B. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Herring, S. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Pickard, P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Co-Generation at a Practical Plant Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Steam Turbine: A basic description of how a steam turbine converts available heat into mechanical energy to define the formulae used for the cost comparisons in the subsequent examples. Co-Generation: Comparison between condensing cycle and back pressure turbine exhausting to useful process, identifies potential energy savings. Process Power Recovery: Replacing pressure reducing valve with steam turbine produces mechanical or electrical energy in conjunction with process heat. Steam vs. Electric Motor: Comparison of electric motor operating cost with steam turbines to show that cost-savings depend on application. Waste Heat Recovery: The addition of a steam turbine can justify waste heat projects that were previously not feasible on an economic basis.

Feuell, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Next Generation Air Particle Detectors for the United States Navy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design and testing of the United States Navy’s next generation air particle detector (NGAPD) is presently underway. The NGAPD is intended for use in nuclear applications for the United States Navy and is being designed to detect airborne Co-60 with a reduction in false alarms and improved ease of use. Features being developed include gamma compensation, low maintenance, commercial off-the-shelf electronics, and spectrum simulation for quality assurance and functional testing applications. By supplying a spectrum simulator, the radon stripping algorithm can be running when a simulated anthropogenic source spectrum (e.g., from Co-60 or transuranics) is superimposed on the radon progeny spectrum. This will allow alarm levels to be tested when the air flow is running and the radon stripping algorithm is providing the instrument response output. Modern units evaluate source spectra with the air flow off and the radon spectrum absent thereby not testing the true system performance which comes out of the radon stripping algorithm. Testing results of the preliminary prototype show promise along with computer simulations of source spectra. Primary testing results taken to date include gamma compensation, thermal insults, vibration and spectrum simulation.

Robert Hayes and Craig Marianno

2007-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

254

Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Doubly Fed Induction Generator Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz Preprint Eduard Muljadi, Mohit Singh, and Vahan Gevorgian To be presented at the IEEE Energy Conversion Congress and Exhibition Raleigh, North Carolina September 15-20, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-55573 June 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

255

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Table 2  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Average Annual Flows and Utilization Rates for Processing Plants in the United States 2. Average Annual Flows and Utilization Rates for Processing Plants in the United States Average Annual Flows (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Minimum Plant Utilization Rate Maximum Plant Utilization Rate Average Utilization Rate (Percent) 2008 Percent of U.S. Total Texas 14,020 27.3 3 100 71 Louisiana 10,462 20.4 3 100 56 Alaska 8,105 15.8 77 100 86 Wyoming 4,462 8.7 21 100 61 Colorado 2,934 5.7 15 100 77 Oklahoma 2,789 5.4 12 100 75 New Mexico 2,221 4.3 17 95 73 Illinois 1,601 3.1 35 76 76 Kansas 852 1.7 51 84 68 Alabama 746 1.5 32 80 60 Utah 728 1.4 22 100 61 Mississippi 688 1.3 29 67 30 California 557 1.1 2 100 64 West Virginia 382 0.7 70 91 82 Kentucky 217 0.4 40 92 75 Michigan 182 0.4 5 100 19 North Dakota 158 0.3 33 94 80 Montana 89 0.2 27 88 54 Pennsylvania 36 0.1 43 89 70 Arkansas 27 0.1 3 90 4 Florida 20 0.0 22 22 22 Tennessee 16 0.0 64 64 64 TOTAL U.S. 51,289 100.0 2 100 66 Note: Average utilization rates are based on 2008 flows and 2009 capacity,

256

The effects of technological change, experience and environmental regulation on the construction of coal-burning generating units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an empirical analysis of the technological, regulatory and organizational factors that have influenced the costs of building coal-burning steam-electric generating units over the past twenty year. We ...

Joskow, Paul L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report for 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

All combined-cycle plants 10 MW and above are now required to report the CA unit generation by generator ID, regardless of supplemental firing status. Schedule 6.

258

Cycling Operation of Fossil Plants: Volume 3: Cycling Evaluation of Pepco's Potomac River Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a methodology for examining the economic feasibility of converting fossil power plants from baseload to cycling service. It employs this approach to examine a proposed change of Pepco's Potomac River units 3, 4, and 5 from baseload operation to two-shift cycling.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The O H E G plant is a revolutionary concept using tidal energy designed by FreeFlow 69 The plant uses tidal energy to create electricity 24 hours a day making this a unique project 24 hour power is produced by using both the kinetic energy in tidal flow and the potential energy created by tidal height changes The O H E G plant is completely independent of the wind farm however it does make an ideal foundation for offshore wind turbines combining both tidal energy and wind energy The O H E G plant is not detrimental to the surrounding environment or ecosystem and due to its offshore location it will not be visually offensive

260

High Speed Rotational Motor Unit with Optimized Couplant Feed System for Ultrasonic Examination of Steam Generator Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-speed rotational motor unit was designed and built to increase the ultrasonic data acquisition speed of steam generator tube examination in field applications. Rotational and couplant delivery speeds were optimized as they have a significant impact on data acquisition speed. The motor unit was designed to be waterproof and to move couplant (water) to the ultrasonic search unit in an efficient manner. Lessons learned from design and operations of laboratory motors were applied to this design. The r...

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

New baseload power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a listing of 221 baseload power plant units currently in the planning stage. The list shows the plant owner, capacity, fuel, engineering firm, constructor, major equipment suppliers (steam generator, turbogenerator, and flue gas desulfurization system), partner, and date the plant is to be online. This data is a result of a survey by the journal of power plant owners.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants January 25, 2013 - 11:10am Addthis AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What Does AVESTAR Provide? Advanced dynamic simulation, control and virtual plant technologies

263

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants January 25, 2013 - 11:10am Addthis AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What Does AVESTAR Provide? Advanced dynamic simulation, control and virtual plant technologies

264

The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

Puga, J. Nicolas

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Destructive Examination of Tube R31C66 From the Ginna Nuclear Plant Steam Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Like some other PWR steam generators, the Ginna plant has experienced loss of steam pressure for several years. Deposits of up to 8 mils thick have been found and may explain the steam pressure loss. In addition, destructive and nondestructive examinations found a through-wall crack in the roll transition of a hot leg tube removed from this plant as well as shallow intergranular attack (IGA) in the tubesheet crevice region.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Scenarios for multi-unit inertial fusion energy plants producing hydrogen fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work describes: (a) the motivation for considering fusion in general, and Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) in particular, to produce hydrogen fuel powering low-emission vehicles; (b) the general requirements for any fusion electric plant to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis at costs competitive with present consumer gasoline fuel costs per passenger mile, for advanced car architectures meeting President Clinton`s 80 mpg advanced car goal, and (c) a comparative economic analysis for the potential cost of electricity (CoE) and corresponding cost of hydrogen (CoH) from a variety of multi-unit IFE plants with one to eight target chambers sharing a common driver and target fab facility. Cases with either heavy-ion or diode-pumped, solid-state laser drivers are considered, with ``conventional`` indirect drive target gains versus ``advanced, e.g. Fast Ignitor`` direct drive gain assumptions, and with conventional steam balance-of-plant (BoP) versus advanced MHD plus steam combined cycle BoP, to contrast the potential economics under ``conventional`` and ``advanced`` IFE assumptions, respectively.

Logan, B.G.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Tracking new coal-fired power plants: coal's resurgence in electric power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This information package is intended to provide an overview of 'Coal's resurgence in electric power generation' by examining proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under consideration in the USA. The results contained in this package are derived from information that is available from various tracking organizations and news groups. Although comprehensive, this information is not intended to represent every possible plant under consideration but is intended to illustrate the large potential that exists for new coal-fired power plants. It should be noted that many of the proposed plants are likely not to be built. For example, out of a total portfolio (gas, coal, etc.) of 500 GW of newly planned power plant capacity announced in 2001, 91 GW have been already been scrapped or delayed. 25 refs.

NONE

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Local Generation Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limited Place United Kingdom Sector Biomass Product UK-based biomass firm developing anaerobic digestion plants. References Local Generation Limited1 LinkedIn Connections...

269

Turbine-Generator Topics for Power Plant Engineers: Synchronous Generator Voltage Regulator Basics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This material is intended for the new engineer, the control room operator, management, or the non-engineer. The basics of a synchronous generator excitation system; the fundamentals of the voltage regulator; and its controls and functions are discussed. The typical exciter types are covered, but not in detail. There is also basic information on voltage regulator maintenance issues. Put simply, the excitation system is made up of three basic component systems. The voltage regulator monitors the synchronou...

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

270

Turbine-Generator Topics for Power Plant Engineers: Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Signature Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electromagnetic signature analysis (EMSA) is the process used to evaluate the electromagnetic interference (EMI) generated by abnormalities in almost any energized power plant equipment—from cable connections to broken rotor bars in a motor to the isolated phase bus and generator step-up transformer. EMSA will detect any defect that involves EMI, noise, arcing, corona, partial discharge, gap discharge, sparking or microsparking, or any combination of these.With EMSA, every signal ...

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Steam Generator Tube Integrity Risk Assessment: Volume 2: Application to Diablo Canyon Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damage to steam generator tubing can impair its ability to adequately perform the required safety functions in terms of structural stability and leakage. This report describes the Diablo Canyon Power Plant application of a method for calculating risk for severe accidents involving steam generator tube failure. The method helps utilities determine risks associated with application of alternate repair criteria and/or operation with degraded tubing.

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

272

Planning for a multi-generational future : policies, regulations, and designs for multi-generational housing in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-generational housing is a rising trend that is increasingly being considered as a viable housing option for the Boomerang generation, Baby Boomers and the aging population, and immigrant families. Cultural preferences, ...

Shin, Stephanie H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Structures, Systems, and Components Safety Classification White Paper  

SciTech Connect

This white paper outlines the relevant regulatory policy and guidance for a risk-informed approach for establishing the safety classification of Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and sets forth certain facts for review and discussion in order facilitate an effective submittal leading to an NGNP Combined Operating License application under 10 CFR 52.

Pete Jordan

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Design Features and Technology Uncertainties for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the conclusions, observations, and recommendations of the Independent Technology Review Group (ITRG) regarding design features and important technology uncertainties associated with very-high-temperature nuclear system concepts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The ITRG performed its reviews during the period November 2003 through April 2004.

John M. Ryskamp; Phil Hildebrandt; Osamu Baba; Ron Ballinger; Robert Brodsky; Hans-Wolfgang Chi; Dennis Crutchfield; Herb Estrada; Jeane-Claude Garnier; Gerald Gordon; Richard Hobbins; Dan Keuter; Marilyn Kray; Philippe Martin; Steve Melancon; Christian Simon; Henry Stone; Robert Varrin; Werner von Lensa

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

276

Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Solar Power Plant Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Facility Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Developer FPL Energy Location Martin County, Florida Coordinates 27.051214°, -80.553389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.051214,"lon":-80.553389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plan - Plutonium Finishing Plant Treatment Unit Glovebox HA-20MB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This closure plan describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) glovebox HA-20MB that housed an interim status ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) of 1976 treatment unit. This closure plan is certified and submitted to Ecology for incorporation into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (HF RCRA Permit) in accordance with Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement; TPA) Milestone M-83-30 requiring submittal of a certified closure plan for ''glovebox HA-20MB'' by July 31, 2003. Glovebox HA-20MB is located within the 231-5Z Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Currently glovebox HA-20MB is being used for non-RCRA analytical purposes. The schedule of closure activities under this plan supports completion of TPA Milestone M-83-44 to deactivate and prepare for dismantlement the above grade portions of the 234-5Z and ZA, 243-Z, and 291-Z and 291-Z-1 stack buildings by September 30, 2015. Under this closure plan, glovebox HA-20MB will undergo clean closure to the performance standards of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 with respect to all dangerous waste contamination from glovebox HA-20MB RCRA operations. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP treatment unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. Any information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. Clearance form only sent to RHA.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant hydrogen generation study: Formation of ammonia from nitrate and nitrate in hydrogen generating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed for the Departrnent of Energy (DOE) to immobilize pretreated highly radioactive wastes in glass for permanent disposal in the HWVP, formic acid is added to the waste before vitrification to adjust glass redox and melter feed rheology. The operation of the glass melter and durability of the glass are affected by the glass oxidation state. Formation of a conductive metallic sludge in an over-reduced melt can result in a shortened melter lifetime. An over-oxidized melt may lead to foaming and loss of ruthenium as volatile RuO{sub 4}. Historically, foaming in the joule heated ceramic melter has been attributed to gas generation in the melt which is controlled by instruction of a reductant such as formic acid into the melter feed. Formic acid is also found to decrease the melter feed viscosity thereby facilitating pumping. This technical report discusses the noble metal catalyzed formic acid reduction of nitrite and/or nitrate to ammonia, a problem of considerable concern because of the generation of a potential ammonium nitrate explosion hazard in the plant ventilation system.

King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

280

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

New baseload power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a tabulation of the results of this magazines survey of current plans for new baseload power plants. The table lists the unit name, capacity, fuel, engineering firm, constructor, suppliers for steam generator, turbine generator and flue gas desulfurization equipment, date due on-line, and any non-utility participants. The table includes fossil-fuel plants, nuclear plants, geothermal, biomass and hydroelectric plants.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Wrong Unit, Train, and Component Events at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: Joint EPRI-CRIEPI Human Factors Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant human-related errors can occur when plant personnel perform activities on a wrong unit, train, or component. Such errors can result in costly adverse events such as safety system actuations, technical specification violations, failure of multiple safety trains, and reactor trips. This report investigates the wrong unit, train, component (WUTC) phenomena, providing an assessment of the current state of WUTC events as well as possible interventions for reducing errors.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

283

Design Option of Heat Exchanger for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very High temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTGRS) concept, will provide the first demonstration of a closed-loop Brayton cycle at a commercial scale of a few hundred megawatts electric and hydrogen production. The power conversion system (PCS) for the NGNP will take advantage of the significantly higher reactor outlet temperatures of the VHTGRS to provide higher efficiencies than can be achieved in the current generation of light water reactors. Besides demonstrating a system design that can be used directly for subsequent commercial deployment, the NGNP will demonstrate key technology elements that can be used in subsequent advanced power conversion systems for other Generation IV reactors. In anticipation of the design, development and procurement of an advanced power conversion system for the NGNP, the system integration of the NGNP and hydrogen plant was initiated to identify the important design and technology options that must be considered in evaluating the performance of the proposed NGNP. As part of the system integration of the VHTGRS and hydrogen production plant, the intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the process heat from VHTGRS to hydrogen plant. Therefore, the design and configuration of the intermediate heat exchanger are very important. This paper will include analysis of one stage versus two stage heat exchanger design configurations and thermal stress analyses of a printed circuit heat exchanger, helical coil heat exchanger, and shell/tube heat exchanger.

Eung Soo Kim; Chang Oh

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Robust Controller Design for Simultaneous Control of Throttle Pressure and Megawatt Output in a Power Plant Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently proposed (( and (-synthesis controller design methodologies permit the design of high-performance control systems for plants that are difficult to model accurately. The work summarized in this report assesses the benefits of the (( and (-synthesis controllers for the simultaneous control of throttle pressure and megawatt output in a power plant unit, while also serving to clarify the (( and (-synthesis design methods by an example.

1999-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

Cooldown control system for a combined cycle electrical power generation plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a combined cycle electrical power plant including a steam turbine, a heat recovery steam generator for supplying steam to the steam turbine, a gas turbine for supplying heat to the heat recovery steam generator. The steam generator and gas turbine both produce electrical power under load, and the gas turbine has a control circuit determining the operation therof. A cooldown control system is described for the power generation plant. The system comprises: first means for detecting one of a steaming condition and a non-steaming condition in the heat recovery steam generator; second means responsive to the steaming condition and to a gas turbine STOP signal for reducing the load of the gas turbine toward a minimum load level; third means responsive to the non-steaming condition and to the minimum load level being reached for generating a STOP command and applying the STOP command to the control circuit of the gas turbine, thereby to indicate a sequence of steps to stop the gas turbine.

Martens, A.; Snow, B.E.

1987-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Facility Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer FPL Energy Location Orlando, Florida Coordinates 28.5383355°, -81.3792365° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.5383355,"lon":-81.3792365,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

287

DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Facility DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer FPL Energy Location DeSoto County, Florida Coordinates 27.2142078°, -81.7787021° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.2142078,"lon":-81.7787021,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

288

Heat recovery steam generator outlet temperature control system for a combined cycle power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a command cycle electrical power plant including: a steam turbine and at least one set comprising a gas turbine, an afterburner and a heat recovery steam generator having an attemperator for supplying from an outlet thereof to the steam turbine superheated steam under steam turbine operating conditions requiring predetermined superheated steam temperature, flow and pressure; with the gas turbine and steam turbine each generating megawatts in accordance with a plant load demand; master control means being provided for controlling the steam turbine and the heat recovery steam generator so as to establish the steam operating conditions; the combination of: first control means responsive to the gas inlet temperature of the heat recovery steam generator and to the plant load demand for controlling the firing of the afterburner; second control means responsive to the superheated steam predetermined temperature and to superheated steam temperature from the outlet for controlling the attemperator between a closed and an open position; the first and second control means being operated concurrently to maintain the superheated steam outlet temperature while controlling the load of the gas turbine independently of the steam turbine operating conditions.

Martens, A.; Myers, G.A.; McCarty, W.L.; Wescott, K.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain seven separate stacks of graphite specimens. Six of the specimen stacks will have half of their graphite specimens under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will be organized into pairs with a different compressive load being applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks. The seventh stack will not have a compressive load on the graphite specimens during irradiation. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of the experiment. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in September 2008, and the fabrication and assembly of the experiment test train as well as installation and testing of the control and support systems that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation are being completed in early calendar 2009. The first experiment is scheduled to be ready for insertion in the ATR by April 30, 2009. This paper will discuss the design of the experiment including the test train and the temperature and compressive load monitoring, control, and data collection systems.

S. Blaine Grover

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A Survey of Water Use and Sustainability in the United States with a Focus on Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has identified water resource sustainability and its relation to electric power as one of the key challenges within EPRI's Electricity Technology Roadmap. This report presents an overview of present and future freshwater availability and generation demand for fresh water in the United States. The report takes a first step toward development of a comprehensive framework for evaluating possible impacts of water supply limitations on electric power generation and management approaches to limiting these...

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

291

Preliminary analysis of two aspects of magma-powered electric-generation plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two aspects critical to the development of magma electric generation plants using closed heat exchanger systems are addressed. The heat transfer between the cold fluid in the downcomer and the hot fluid in the upcomer is analyzed using an NTU-effectiveness technique. The results indicate the hot fluid must be thermally insulated from the colder fluid in order to yield a useful temperature difference at the surface. A preliminary system analysis is conducted to determine the well cost requirements of an economically competitive magma electric plant. There is no economic incentive to make the magma tap wellbore larger than conventional deep gas wells. The cost competitiveness of a magma/electric plant is influenced by the depth to the magma, the convective heat flux of the magma, and the expected life of each well.

Hoover, E.R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Flexible Operation of Current and Next-Generation Coal Plants, With and Without Carbon Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on input from research sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and other respected industry sources, this report aims to initially highlight the implications for existing pulverized coal (PC) plants when they are required to operate frequently under changing load conditions. The report presents design improvements to enable more flexible operation of the current and next generation coal fleet. It also discusses the implications on operation flexibility of both new and ...

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Effect of pressure on second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the search for a more efficient, less costly, and more environmentally responsible method for generating electrical power from coal, research and development has turned to advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and coal gasification technologies. A logical extension of this work is the second- generation PFBC plant, which incorporates key components of each of these technologies. In this new type of plant, coal devolatilized/carbonized before it is injected into the PFB combustor bed, and the low Btu fuel gas produced by this process is burned in a gas turbine topping combustor. By integrating coal carbonization with PFB coal/char combustion, gas turbine inlet temperatures higher than 1149{degrees}C (2100{degrees}F) can be achieved. The carbonizer, PFB combustor, and particulate-capturing hot gas cleanup systems operate at 871{degrees}C (1600{degrees}F), permitting sulfur capture by lime-based sorbents and minimizing the release of coal contaminants to the gases. This paper presents the performance and economics of this new type of plant and provides a brief overview of the pilot plant test programs being conducted to support its development.

Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Bonk, D.L. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

CFCC Development Program: commercial plant stacked combustor/steam generator design evaluation (Task 2. 1)  

SciTech Connect

The Coal Fired Combined Cycle (CFCC) is the unique power plant concept developed under the leadership of the General Electric Company to provide a direct coal-burning gas turbine and steam turbine combined cycle power plant. The advantages of the combined cycle for higher efficiency and the potential of the pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) combustor for improvements in emissions could offer a new and attractive option to the electric utility industry after its successful development. The CFCC approach provides cooling of the fluid bed combustor through the use of steam tubes in the bed, which supply a steam turbine-generator. The partially cooled combustion gases exiting from the combustor drive a gas turbine-generator after passing through a hot-gas cleanup train. On the basis of previous studies and confirming work under this contract, General Electric continues to believe that the CFCC approach offers these important advantages over alternate approaches: higher power plant efficiency in the combustor temperature range of interest; reduced combustor/steam generator corrosion potential, due to low fluid-bed tube temperature (as contrasted to the air in tube cycle); reduced hot-gas cleanup flow rate (as contrasted with the uncooled combustor cycle); and increased gas turbine bucket life through use of corrosion resistant material protection systems.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

EIS No. 20100312 EIS Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant Units 3 and 4  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with Section 309(a) of the Clean Air Act, EPA is required to make its comments on EISs issued by other Federal agencies public. Historically, EPA has met this mandate by publishing weekly notices of availability of EPA comments, which includes a brief summary of EPA's comment letters, in the Federal Register. Since February 2008, EPA has been including its comment letters on EISs on its Web site at: http://www.epa.gov/compliance/nepa/eisdata.html. Including the entire EIS comment letters on the Web site satisfies the Section 309(a) requirement to make EPA's comments on EISs available to the public. Accordingly, on March 31, 2010, EPA discontinued the publication of the notice of availability of EPA comments in the Federal Register. EIS No. 20100312, Draft EIS, NRC, TX, Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant Units 3 and 4, Application for Combined Licenses (COLs) for Construction Permits and Operating Licenses, (NUREG-1943), Hood and Somervell Counties, TX, Comment Period Ends: 10/26/2010.

Bjornstad, David J [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station Unit 1, Unit 2","1,773","14,239",34.0,"Nine Mile Point Nuclear Sta LLC" "R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1",581,"4,948",11.8,"R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC" "4 Plants

297

TWO-STAGE ROBUST UNIT COMMITMENT PROBLEM 1 ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demands for a power plant are highly uncertain. ... For a thermal plant to generate power for its customers, there are two phases: 1) Unit commit- ment, i.e.  ...

298

Rigorous Kinetic Modeling, Optimization, and Operability Studies of a Modified Claus Unit for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant with CO{sub 2} Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and the ability to recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Because of these criteria, modifications to the conventional process are often required, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant, such as rapid change in the feed flow rates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but they are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified, and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was devised so as to determine which set of linearly independent reactions would best describe the product distributions from available plant data. Various approaches are taken to derive the kinetic rate expressions, which are either missing in the open literature or found to be inconsistent. A set of plant data is used for optimal estimation of the kinetic parameters. The final model agrees well with the published plant data. Using the developed kinetics models of the Claus reaction furnace, WHB, and catalytic stages, two optimization studies are carried out. The first study shows that there exists an optimal steam pressure generated in the WHB that balances hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In the second study, it is shown that an optimal H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio exists that balances single-pass conversion, hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In addition, an operability study has been carried out to examine the operating envelope in which both the H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio and the adiabatic flame temperature can be controlled in the face of disturbances typical for the operation of an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Impact of CO{sub 2} capture on the Claus process has also been discussed.

Jones, Dustin; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Turton, Richard; Zitney, Stephen E

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Rigorous Kinetic Modeling and Optimization Study of a Modified Claus Unit for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant with CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and the ability to recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Because of these criteria, modifications to the conventional process are often required, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant, such as rapid change in the feed flow rates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but they are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified, and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was devised so as to determine which set of linearly independent reactions would best describe the product distributions from available plant data. Various approaches are taken to derive the kinetic rate expressions, which are either missing in the open literature or found to be inconsistent. A set of plant data is used for optimal estimation of the kinetic parameters. The final model agrees well with the published plant data. Using the developed kinetics models of the Claus reaction furnace, WHB, and catalytic stages, two optimization studies are carried out. The first study shows that there exists an optimal steam pressure generated in the WHB that balances hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In the second study, it is shown that an optimal H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio exists that balances single-pass conversion, hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In addition, an operability study has been carried out to examine the operating envelope in which both the H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio and the adiabatic flame temperature can be controlled in the face of disturbances typical for the operation of an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Impact of CO{sub 2} capture on the Claus process has also been discussed.

Jones, Dustin; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Turton, Richard; Zitney, Stephen E.

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

300

Preliminary issues associated with the next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design.  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is an advanced high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) concept with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 900-1000 C. In the indirect cycle system, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. The system concept for the vary high temperature reactor (VHTR) can be a reactor based on the prismatic block of the GT-MHR developed by a consortium led by General Atomics in the U.S. or based on the PBMR design developed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels of U.K. This report has made a preliminary assessment on the issues pertaining to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP. Two IHX designs namely, shell and tube and compact heat exchangers were considered in the assessment. Printed circuit heat exchanger, among various compact heat exchanger (HX) designs, was selected for the analysis. Irrespective of the design, the material considerations for the construction of the HX are essentially similar, except may be in the fabrication of the units. As a result, we have reviewed in detail the available information on material property data relevant for the construction of HX and made a preliminary assessment of several relevant factors to make a judicious selection of the material for the IHX. The assessment included four primary candidate alloys namely, Alloy 617 (UNS N06617), Alloy 230 (UNS N06230), Alloy 800H (UNS N08810), and Alloy X (UNS N06002) for the IHX. Some of the factors addressed in this report are the tensile, creep, fatigue, creep fatigue, toughness properties for the candidate alloys, thermal aging effects on the mechanical properties, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code compliance information, and performance of the alloys in helium containing a wide range of impurity concentrations. A detailed thermal hydraulic analysis, using a model developed at ANL, was performed to calculate heat transfer, temperature distribution, and pressure drop inside both printed circuit and shell-and-tube heat exchangers. The analysis included evaluation of the role of key process parameters, geometrical factors in HX designs, and material properties. Calculations were performed for helium-to-helium, helium-to-helium/nitrogen, and helium-to-salt HXs. The IHX being a high temperature component, probably needs to be designed using ASME Code Section III, Subsection NH, assuming that the IHX will be classified as a class 1 component. With input from thermal hydraulic calculations performed at ANL, thermal conduction and stress analyses for both compact and shell-and-tube HXs were performed.

Natesan, K.; Moisseytsev, A.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Supercritical plants to come online in 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A trio of coal-fired power plants using supercritical technology set to enter service this year. These are: We Energies is Elm Road Generating Station in Wisconsin, a two-unit, 1,230 MW supercritical plant that will burn bituminous coal; a 750 MW supercritical coal-fired power plant at the Comanche Generating Station in Pueblo, Colo., the third unit at the site; and Luminant's Oak Grove plant in Texas which will consist of two supercritical, lignite-fueled power generation units. When complete, the plant will deliver about 1,6000 MW. Some details are given on each of these projects. 2 photos.

Spring, N.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Impacts of Renewable Generation on Fossil Fuel Unit Cycling: Costs and Emissions (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prepared for the Clean Energy Regulatory Forum III, this presentation looks at the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and reexamines the cost and emissions impacts of fossil fuel unit cycling.

Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Denholm, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume VI. Electrical power generation; master control subsystems; balance of plant CDRL item 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Honeywell electrical power generation subsystem centers on a General Electric dual admission, triple extraction turbine generator sized to the output requirements of the Pilot Plant. The turbine receives steam from the receiver subsystem and/or the thermal storage subsystem and supplies those subsystems with feedwater. The turbine condensor is wet cooled. The plant control system consists of a coordinated digital master and subsystem digital/analog controls. The remainder of the plant, work spaces, maintenance areas, roads, and reception area are laid out to provide maximum convenience compatible with utility and safety. Most of the activities are housed in a complex around the base of the receiver tower. This volume contains a description of the relationship of the electrical power generation subsystem to the rest of the plant, the design methodology and evolution, the interface integration and control, and the operation and maintenance procedures.

None

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MISCELLAN £OUS LlOUID STEAM GENERATOR ORAIH OE .. ,N[PALIZEAon the steam system and turbine generator units, as d~fined

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Electrical generation plant design practice intern experience at Power Systems Engineering, Inc.: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A survey of the author's internship experience with Power Systems Engineering, Inc. during the period September 1980 through August, 1981 is presented. During this onr year internship, the author was assigned to two engineering projects. One involved design of a 480 MW power plant. The other was the design of a 8.2 MW induction generator for cogeneration. The author's activities during this period can be categorized into two major areas. First, technically oriented, he designed protective relaying and SCADA systems for the projects. Secondly, he assisted the Project Manager in project management activities such as project progress and cost control. The intent of this report is to prepare a training manual for PSE young engineers. It covers both technical guidelines for power plant design and nonacademic professional codes. Although this report is primarily written for young engineers, it can also be used as a reference by older and experienced engineers.

Lee, Ting-Zern Joe, 1950-

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Aging, Generations, and the Development of Partisan Polarization in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alwin, Duane F. 1994. "Aging, Personality, and SocialDuane F. Alwin. 1989. "Aging and Susceptibility to AttitudeAging, Generations, and the Development of Partisan

Stoker, Laura; Jennings, M. Kent

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western UtilityEmerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the WesternEnergy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Office of Planning,

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Using Market Simulations to Support Plant Budgeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant budgeting requires an exhaustive knowledge of generating assets/components and maintenance, yet it also requires knowledge of the dispatch and profitability of generating units. This report illustrates some of the ways that market and operational simulations can inform power plant budgeting strategy and may reveal opportunities possible by changing the mission or performance of units.

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

310

Plant power : the cost of using biomass for power generation and potential for decreased greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To date, biomass has not been a large source of power generation in the United States, despite the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits from displacing coal with carbon neutral biomass. In this thesis, the fuel cycle ...

Cuellar, Amanda Dulcinea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Deaerator pressure control system for a combined cycle steam generator power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a combined cycle steam generation power plant, until steam extraction can be used to reheat the deaerator, the economizer and/or the pegging recirculation are controlled so as to track the pressure upwards of the autocirculation reheater from the low pressure evaporator with a certain lag in pressure, and to establish pressure in the deaerator on the decreasing trend of the autocirculation reheater at a slower rate and without lowering below a minimum pressure so as to prevent the occurrence of bubbling and cavitation effect.

Martens, A.; Myers, G. A.

1985-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

312

ANNUAL UPDATE OF THE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNIT (SWMU) LIST FOR THE OAK RIDGE Y-12 PLANT.  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the terms of Paragraph II.A.8 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) Permit TN 001, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), RCRA Permit TN1 890 090 003 for Building 7652 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the list of the solid waste management units (SWMUs) for the Oak Ridge Reservation, including the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, must be updated and submitted to personnel at the Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV, and TDEC by January 30, 1997. This report includes information satisfying the {section}II.A.8 requirements, to update the SWMU list for the Y-12 Plant. Newly identified SWMUs include discernible units which have accumulated, treated, stored, or disposed of waste; areas contaminated by routine, deliberate, or systematic releases from process components; RCRA 90-day accumulation areas; and TSCA one-year areas.

Deakin, J.M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Optimal Sizing of a Stand-alone Wind/Photovoltaic Generation Unit using Particle Swarm Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid wind/photovoltaic generation system is designed to supply power demand. The aim of this design is minimization of the overall cost of the generation scheme over 20 years of operation. Full demand supply is modeled as constraint for optimization ... Keywords: genetic algorithm, optimal sizing, particle swarm optimization, photovoltaic, wind energy

Ali Kashefi Kaviani; Hamid Reza Baghaee; Gholam Hossein Riahy

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Field Examination and Hot Cell Post-Irradiation Examination of Fuel Channels from Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On January 20, 2007, Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant observed an unexpected no-settle condition at the 00 position in peripheral cell 42-11. Publication OE24588, "Control Rod Blade did not Move Normally at Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant," documented this event. This report gives field examination results of four symmetric channels including cell 42-11. Researchers sectioned channel coupons from two channels in cell 42-11 and sent them to Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC), Sunol, California for mor...

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

317

Protection from ground faults in the stator winding of generators at power plants in the Siberian networks  

SciTech Connect

The experience of many years of experience in developing and utilization of ground fault protection in the stator winding of generators in the Siberian networks is generalized. The main method of protection is to apply a direct current or an alternating current with a frequency of 25 Hz to the primary circuits of the stator. A direct current is applied to turbo generators operating in a unit with a transformer without a resistive coupling to the external grid or to other generators. Applying a 25 Hz control current is appropriate for power generation systems with compensation of a capacitive short circuit current to ground. This method forms the basis for protection of generators operating on busbars, hydroelectric generators with a neutral grounded through an arc-suppression reactor, including in consolidated units with generators operating in parallel on a single low-voltage transformer winding.

Vainshtein, R. A., E-mail: vra@tpu.ru [Tomsk Polytechnical University (Russian Federation); Lapin, V. I. [ODU Sibiri (Integrated Dispatcher Control for Siberia), branch of JSC 'SO EES' (Russian Federation); Naumov, A. M.; Doronin, A. V. [JSC NPP 'EKRA' (Russian Federation); Yudin, S. M. [Tomsk Polytechnical University (Russian Federation)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Optimization of disk generator performance for base-load power plant systems applications  

SciTech Connect

Disk generators for use in base-load MHD power plants are examined for both open-cycle and closed-cycle operating modes. The OCD cases are compared with PSPEC results for a linear channel; enthalpy extractions up to 23% with 71% isentropic efficiency are achievable with generator inlet conditions similar to those used in PSPEC, thus confirming that the disk configuration is a viable alternative for base-load power generation. The evaluation of closed-cycle disks includes use of a simplified cycle model. High system efficiencies over a wide range of power levels are obtained for effective Hall coefficients in the range 2.3 to 4.9. Cases with higher turbulence (implying ..beta../sub eff/ less than or equal to 2.4) yield high system efficiencies at power levels of 100 to 500 MW/sub e/. All these CCD cases compare favorably with linear channels reported in the GE ECAS study, yielding higher isentropic efficiences for a given enthalpy extraction. Power densities in the range 70 to 170 MW/m/sup 3/ appear feasible, leading to very compact generator configurations.

Teare, J.D.; Loubsky, W.J.; Lytle, J.K.; Louis, J.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Impacts of 1997—98 El Niño Generated Weather in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper assesses the major impacts on human lives and the economy of the United States resulting from weather events attributed to El Niño 1997-98. Southern states and California were plagued by storms, whereas the northern half of the nation ...

Stanley A. Changnon

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Flexible Coal: Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant (Brochure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the transformation of power systems Flexible Coal Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant The experience cited in this paper is from a generating station with multiple units...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

322

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

323

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In addition, the purpose and differences between the two experiments will be compared and the irradiation results to date on the first experiment will be presented.

S. Blaine Grover

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Catawba Unit 1, Unit 2","2,258","18,964",36.5,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "H B Robinson Unit 2",724,"3,594",6.9,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "Oconee Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","2,538","20,943",40.3,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "V C Summer Unit 1",966,"8,487",16.3,"South Carolina Electric&Gas Co" "4 Plants 7 Reactors","6,486","51,988",100.0

325

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.502753725,1.549729719,1.64272351,1.727259934,1.784039735,1.822135762,1.923203642,2.00781457,2.134768212,2.217425497,2.303725166,2.407715232,2.46134106,2.637086093,2.775389073,2.902293046,3.120364238,3.298013245 "AEO 1995",,1.4212343,1.462640338,1.488780998,1.545300242,1.585877053,1.619428341,1.668671498,1.7584219,1.803937198,1.890547504,1.968695652,2.048913043,2.134750403,2.205281804,2.281690821,2.375434783,2.504830918 "AEO 1996",,,1.346101641,1.350594221,1.369020126,1.391737646,1.421340737,1.458772082,1.496497523,1.561369914,1.619940033,1.674758358,1.749420803,1.800709877,1.871110564,1.924495246,2.006850327,2.048938234,2.156821499

326

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47 1.50 AEO 1996 1994 1.32 1.29 1.28 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.26 1.28

327

Integrated high speed intelligent utility tie unit for disbursed/renewable generation facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After experiencing the price hikes and rotating blackouts in California, the disbursed or distributed generation (DG) is considered as one of the most attractive alternatives for future utility industry. In addition to the conventional DG that uses fossil-fuel ...

Worakarn Wongsaichua / Wei-Jen Lee; Soontorn Oraintara

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Study of Linear Equivalent Circuits of Electromechanical Systems for Turbine Generator Units.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The thesis utilizes the analogy in dynamic equations between a mechanical and an electrical system to convert the steam-turbine, micro-turbine, wind-turbine and hydro-turbine generator mechanical… (more)

Tsai, Chia-Chun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Impact of unit commitment constraints on generation expansion planning with renewables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing use of renewables pushes thermal generators against operating constraints - e.g. ramping, minimum output, and operating reserves - that are traditionally ignored in expansion planning models. We show how including ...

Palmintier, Bryan Stephen

330

Evaluation of Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) Operating Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of a preliminary evaluation to determine the operating conditions for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) that will transfer heat from the reactor primary system to the demonstration hydrogen production plant(s). The Department of Energy is currently investigating two primary options for the production of hydrogen using a high temperature reactor as the power source. These options are the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) and Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical hydrogen production processes. However, since the SI process relies entirely on process heat from the reactor, while the HTE process relies primarily on electrical energy with only a small amount of process heat required, the design of the IHX is dictated by the SI process heat requirements. Therefore, the IHX operating conditions were defined assuming 50 MWt is available for the production of hydrogen using the SI process. Three configurations for the intermediate loop were evaluated, including configurations for both direct and indirect power conversion systems. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to perform sensitivity studies to determine the influence of reactor outlet temperatures, intermediate loop working fluids (helium and molten salt), intermediate loop pressures, and intermediate loop piping lengths on NGNP performance and IHX operating conditions. The evaluation of NGNP performance included assessments of overall electric power conversion efficiency and estimated hydrogen production efficiency. Based on these evaluations, recommended IHX operating conditions are defined.

E. A. Harvego

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of NewRenewable Generation in the Western United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the United States, markets for renewable generation--especially wind power--have grown substantially in recent years. This growth is typically attributed to technology improvements and resulting cost reductions, the availability of federal tax incentives, and aggressive state policy efforts. But another less widely recognized driver of new renewable generation is poised to play a major role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Common in the late-1980s to mid-1990s, but relegated to lesser importance as many states took steps to restructure their electricity markets in the late-1990s, IRP has re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions such as the western United States, where retail competition has failed to take root. As practiced in the United States, IRP is a formal process by which utilities analyze the costs, benefits, and risks of all resources available to them--both supply- and demand-side--with the ultimate goal of identifying a portfolio of resources that meets their future needs at lowest cost and/or risk. Though the content of any specific utility IRP is unique, all are built on a common basic framework: (1) development of peak demand and load forecasts; (2) assessment of how these forecasts compare to existing and committed generation resources; (3) identification and characterization of various resource portfolios as candidates to fill a projected resource deficiency; (4) analysis of these different ''candidate'' resource portfolios under base-case and alternative future scenarios; and finally, (5) selection of a preferred portfolio, and creation of a near-term action plan to begin to move towards that portfolio. Renewable resources were once rarely considered seriously in utility IRP. In the western United States, however, the most recent resource plans call for a significant amount of new wind power capacity. These planned additions appear to be motivated by the improved economics of wind power, an emerging understanding that wind integration costs are manageable, and a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities. Equally important, utility IRPs are increasingly recognizing the inherent risks in fossil-based generation portfolios--especially natural gas price risk and the financial risk of future carbon regulation--and the benefits of renewable energy in mitigating those risks. This article, which is based on a longer report from Berkeley Lab,i examines how twelve investor-owned utilities (IOUs) in the western United States--Avista, Idaho Power, NorthWestern Energy (NWE), Portland General Electric (PGE), Puget Sound Energy (PSE), PacifiCorp, Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo), Nevada Power, Sierra Pacific, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E)--treat renewable energy in their most recent resource plans (as of July 2005). In aggregate, these twelve utilities supply approximately half of all electricity demand in the western United States. In reviewing these plans, our purpose is twofold: (1) to highlight the growing importance of utility IRP as a current and future driver of renewable generation in the United States, and (2) to suggest possible improvements to the methods used to evaluate renewable generation as a resource option. As such, we begin by summarizing the amount and types of new renewable generation planned as a result of these twelve IRPs. We then offer observations about the IRP process, and how it might be improved to more objectively evaluate renewable resources.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

332

Evaluation of an Ultrasonic Search Unit for Examination of Steam Generator Tube U-Bends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques with high flaw detection probability and accurate flaw characterization are essential to perform cost effective structural integrity assessments of steam generator tubes. Such assessments are essential in assuring the integrity of the primary coolant loop. Ultrasonic examination technology has been developed and demonstrated to provide high quality results for examination of steam generator tubes. These ultrasonic techniques have been focused on straight sectio...

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

333

World electric power plants database  

SciTech Connect

This global database provides records for 104,000 generating units in over 220 countries. These units include installed and projected facilities, central stations and distributed plants operated by utilities, independent power companies and commercial and self-generators. Each record includes information on: geographic location and operating company; technology, fuel and boiler; generator manufacturers; steam conditions; unit capacity and age; turbine/engine; architect/engineer and constructor; and pollution control equipment. The database is issued quarterly.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task ‘Air-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systems’. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of recuperation, the use of turbine reheat, and the non-consumptive use of EGS make-up water to supplement heat rejection

Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Evaluation of the Stretford Unit at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report gives the results of an evaluation of the design and operational characteristics of the Stretford Sulfur Recovery Unit installed in the Great Plains Gasification Project, Beulah, North Dakota. The report contains discussion of the H/sub 2/S removal capability of the unit, the potential of solids deposition and the expected solution losses. 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Lang, R.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Surgut steam power plant: Block 1, unit 1 reconstruction feasibility study. Volume 2. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project Description; Work Tasks: Review Plant Data; Power Cycle, Heat Balance Study; Heat Cycle Screening and Selection; Selected Heat Cycle Discussion; Heat Balance Summary Data and Diagram; Plant Conceptual Engineering; Major Mechanical System Descriptions; Main, Reheat, District Heating Steam Systems; Feedwater and Condensate System; HRSG Blowdown System; Chemical Feed System; Auxiliary Cooling System; Natural Gas Fuel System; Piping System; and Flue Gas System.

Not Available

1993-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

337

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics® (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB® environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

How many and what kind of power plants are there in the United ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

339

Unit commitment with wind power generation: integrating wind forecast uncertainty and stochastic programming.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a computational framework for integrating the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in stochastic unit commitment/energy dispatch formulations that account for wind power uncertainty. We first enhance the WRF model with adjoint sensitivity analysis capabilities and a sampling technique implemented in a distributed-memory parallel computing architecture. We use these capabilities through an ensemble approach to model the uncertainty of the forecast errors. The wind power realizations are exploited through a closed-loop stochastic unit commitment/energy dispatch formulation. We discuss computational issues arising in the implementation of the framework. In addition, we validate the framework using real wind speed data obtained from a set of meteorological stations. We also build a simulated power system to demonstrate the developments.

Constantinescu, E. M.; Zavala, V. M.; Rocklin, M.; Lee, S.; Anitescu, M. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Univ. of Chicago); (New York Univ.)

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

340

Advanced techniques for safety analysis applied to the gas turbine control system of ICARO co-generative plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper describes two complementary and integrable approaches, a probabilistic one and a deterministic one, based on classic and advanced modelling techniques for safety analysis of complex computer based systems. The probabilistic approach is based on classical and innovative probabilistic analysis methods. The deterministic approach is based on formal verification methods. Such approaches are applied to the gas turbine control system of ICARO co generative plant, in operation at ENEA CR Casaccia. The main difference between the two approaches, behind the underlining different theories, is that the probabilistic one addresses the control system by itself, as the set of sensors, processing units and actuators, while the deterministic one also includes the behaviour of the equipment under control which interacts with the control system. The final aim of the research, documented in this paper, is to explore an innovative method which put the probabilistic and deterministic approaches in a strong relation to overcome the drawbacks of their isolated, selective and fragmented use which can lead to inconsistencies in the evaluation results. 1.

Ro Bologna; Ester Ciancamerla; Piero Incalcaterra; Michele Minichino; Andrea Bobbio; Università Del Piemonte Orientale; Enrico Tronci

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Has Restructuring Improved Operating Efficiency at U.S. Electricity Generating Plants?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

States N Distribution Transmission Generation RestructuringStates N Distribution Transmission Generation Restructuringof generation, transmission, and distribution services, we

Fabrizio, Kira; Rose, Nancy; Wolfram, Catherine

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Disparities in nuclear power plant performance in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents data comparing the performance of light water reactors in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The comparisons are made for the years 1980-1983 and include 21 Westinghouse ...

Hansen, Kent F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Assessment of Non-Native Invasive Plant Species on the United...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lobata (Willd.) Maesen and S.M. Almeida is a notorious invader of roadsides and power transmission line rights-of-way in the southeastern United States, but it is seldom found...

345

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Processing Capacity Processing plants are typically clustered close to major producing areas, with a high number of plants close to the Federal Gulf of Mexico offshore and the Rocky Mountain production areas (Figure 1). In terms of both the number of plants and processing capacity, about half of these plants are concentrated in the States along the Gulf of Mexico. Gulf States have been some of the most prolific natural gas producing areas. U.S. natural gas processing capacity showed a net increase of about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009 (not including the State of Alaska), with the largest increase occurring in Texas, where processing capacity rose by more than 4 Bcf per day. In fact, increases in Texas' processing capacity accounted for 57 percent of the total lower 48 States' capacity increase

346

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Analysis Regional Analysis Alaska Alaska The State of Alaska had the third-largest processing capacity, trailing only Texas and Louisiana. While much of the natural gas processed in Alaska does not enter any transmission system and is instead re-injected into reservoirs, its processing capability is nonetheless significant. At 9.5 Bcf per day of processing capacity, the State of Alaska accounted for about 12 percent of total U.S. capacity. As of 2009, there were a total of 4 plants in the State, with the largest one reporting a capacity of 8.5 Bcf per day. Average plant size of 2.4 Bcf per day far exceeded any other State, with Illinois noting the next largest average plant size of 1.1 Bcf per day. In addition to the significant processing total capacity, plants in

347

A computational framework for uncertainty quantification and stochastic optimization in unit commitment with wind power generation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a computational framework for integrating a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP) model in stochastic unit commitment/economic dispatch formulations that account for wind power uncertainty. We first enhance the NWP model with an ensemble-based uncertainty quantification strategy implemented in a distributed-memory parallel computing architecture. We discuss computational issues arising in the implementation of the framework and validate the model using real wind-speed data obtained from a set of meteorological stations. We build a simulated power system to demonstrate the developments.

Constantinescu, E. M; Zavala, V. M.; Rocklin, M.; Lee, S.; Anitescu, M. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Univ. of Chicago); (New York Univ.)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Steam Generator Replacement and Power Up-rating on Tihange 2 Nuclear Plant Safety Study Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Tihange2 900 MWe 3-L PWR NPP, operated by the Belgian utility Electrabel, was first commissioned in 1982 with a design core power of 2775 MWth. Following an initial core power up-rating by 4,5% in 1995, Electrabel has since replaced the Steam Generators which has allowed a further core power increase by roughly 5% (total 10%) in 2001. For both of each projects, licensing and implementation studies were successfully performed by Tractebel Energy Engineering and Framatome ANP. The demanding new operating conditions required a complete review of the plant design basis for which advanced methods were applied and licensed through a continuous process of discussions with the client and the Belgian Safety Authorities AVN. The licensing process required flexibility in the methods application in order to meet the specific requirements of the S.A., which was achieved within the time schedule and without jeopardising the technical objectives of the utility. (authors)

Malaval, Andre; Marin-Lafleche, Pascale; Forgeot d'Arc, Myriam; Collin, Celine [Framatome ANP (France)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Does EIA have data on each power plant in the United ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... Does EIA have city or county-level energy consumption and price data?

350

Conceptual design and optimization of a 1-1/2 generation PFBC plant task 14. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The economics and performance of advanced pressurized fluidized bed (PFBC) cycles developed for utility applications during the last 10 years (especially the 2nd-Generation PFBC cycle) are projected to be favorable compared to conventional pulverized coal power plants. However, the improved economics of 2nd-Generation PFBC cycles are accompanied by the perception of increased technological risk related to the pressurized carbonizer and its associated gas cleanup systems. A PFBC cycle that removed the uncertainties of the carbonizer while retaining the high efficiency and low cost of a 2nd-Generation PFBC cycle could improve the prospects for early commercialization and pave the way for the introduction of the complete 2nd-Generation PFBC cycle at some later date. One such arrangement is a PFBC cycle with natural gas topping combustion, referred to as the 1.5-Generation PFBC cycle. This cycle combines the advantages of the 2nd-Generation PFBC plant with the reduced risk associated with a gas turbine burning natural gas, and can potentially be part of a phased approach leading to the commercialization of utility 2nd-Generation PFBC cycles. The 1.5-Generation PFBC may also introduce other advantages over the more complicated 2nd-Generation PFBC system. This report describes the technical and economic evaluation of 1.5-Generation PFBC cycles for utility or industrial power generation.

White, J.S.; Witman, P.M.; Harbaugh, L.; Rubow, L.N.; Horazak, D.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Research and Development Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Site Selection & Characterization Status Report for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)  

SciTech Connect

In the near future, the US Department of Energy (DOE) will need to make important decisions regarding design and construction of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). One part of making these decisions is considering the potential environmental impacts that this facility may have, if constructed here at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides DOE decision makers with a process to systematically consider potential environmental consequences of agency decisions. In addition, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Title VI, Subtitel C, Section 644) states that the 'Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) shall have licensing and regulatory authority for any reactor authorized under this subtitle.' This stipulates that the NRC will license the NGNP for operation. The NRC NEPA Regulations (10 CFR Part 51) require tha thte NRC prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a permit to construct a nuclear power plant. The applicant is required to submit an Environmental report (ER) to aid the NRC in complying with NEPA.

Mark Holbrook

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Research and Development Technology Development Roadmaps for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for process heat, hydrogen and electricity production. The reactor will be graphite moderated with helium as the primary coolant and may be either prismatic or pebble-bed. Although, final design features have not yet been determined. Research and Development (R&D) activities are proceeding on those known plant systems to mature the technology, codify the materials for specific applications, and demonstrate the component and system viability in NGNP relevant and integrated environments. Collectively these R&D activities serve to reduce the project risk and enhance the probability of on-budget, on-schedule completion and NRC licensing. As the design progresses, in more detail, toward final design and approval for construction, selected components, which have not been used in a similar application, in a relevant environment nor integrated with other components and systems, must be tested to demonstrate viability at reduced scales and simulations prior to full scale operation. This report and its R&D TDRMs present the path forward and its significance in assuring technical readiness to perform the desired function by: Choreographing the integration between design and R&D activities; and proving selected design components in relevant applications.

Ian McKirdy

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Upgrading coal plant damper drives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The replacement of damper drives on two coal-fired units at the James H. Miller Jr. electric generating plant by Intelligent Contrac electric rotary actuators is discussed. 2 figs.

Hood, N.R.; Simmons, K. [Alamaba Power (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest – i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

L.E. Demick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Incorporating Wind Generation Forecast Uncertainty into Power System Operation, Dispatch, and Unit Commitment Procedures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, an approach to evaluate the uncertainties of the balancing capacity, ramping capability, and ramp duration requirements is proposed. The approach includes three steps: forecast data acquisition, statistical analysis of retrospective information, and prediction of grid balancing requirements for a specified time horizon and a given confidence level. Assessment of the capacity and ramping requirements is performed using a specially developed probabilistic algorithm based on histogram analysis, incorporating sources of uncertainty of both continuous (wind and load forecast errors) and discrete (forced generator outages and start-up failures) nature. A new method called the "flying-brick" technique is developed to evaluate the look-ahead required generation performance envelope for the worst case scenario within a user-specified confidence level. A self-validation process is used to validate the accuracy of the confidence intervals. To demonstrate the validity of the developed uncertainty assessment methods and its impact on grid operation, a framework for integrating the proposed methods with an EMS system is developed. Demonstration through integration with an EMS system illustrates the applicability of the proposed methodology and the developed tool for actual grid operation and paves the road for integration with EMS systems from other vendors.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Huang, Zhenyu; Ma, Jian; Subbarao, Krishnappa

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

359

Incorporating Uncertainty of Wind Power Generation Forecast into Power System Operation, Dispatch, and Unit Commitment Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach to evaluate the uncertainties of the balancing capacity, ramping capability, and ramp duration requirements is proposed. The approach includes three steps: forecast data acquisition, statistical analysis of retrospective information, and prediction of grid balancing requirements for a specified time horizon and a given confidence level. An assessment of the capacity and ramping requirements is performed using a specially developed probabilistic algorithm based on histogram analysis, incorporating sources of uncertainty - both continuous (wind and load forecast errors) and discrete (forced generator outages and start-up failures). A new method called the 'flying-brick' technique is developed to evaluate the look-ahead required generation performance envelope for the worst case scenario within a user-specified confidence level. A self-validation process is used to validate the accuracy of the confidence intervals. To demonstrate the validity of the developed uncertainty assessment methods and its impact on grid operation, a framework for integrating the proposed methods with an EMS system is developed. Demonstration through EMS integration illustrates the applicability of the proposed methodology and the developed tool for actual grid operation and paves the road for integration with EMS systems in control rooms.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Huang, Zhenyu; Subbarao, Krishnappa

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

360

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Repowering Fossil Steam Plants with Gas Turbines and Heat Recovery Steam Generators: Design Considerations, Economics, and Lessons L earned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes repowering fossil steam plants using gas turbines (GTs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) in combined-cycle mode. Design considerations and guidance, comparative economics, and lessons learned in the development of such projects are included. Various other methods of fossil plant repowering with GTs are also briefly discussed. The detailed results and comparisons that are provided relate specifically to a generic GT/HRSG repowering. Design parameters, limitations, schedulin...

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

362

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for container storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains Part B of the Permit Application for Container Storage Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Sections cover the following areas: Facility description; Waste characteristics; Process information; Ground water monitoring; Procedures to prevent hazards; Contingency plan; Personnel training; Closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; Recordkeeping; Other federal laws; Organic air emissions; Solid waste management units; and Certification.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Optimal sizing study of hybrid wind/PV/diesel power generation unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a methodology of sizing optimization of a stand-alone hybrid wind/PV/diesel energy system is presented. This approach makes use of a deterministic algorithm to suggest, among a list of commercially available system devices, the optimal number and type of units ensuring that the total cost of the system is minimized while guaranteeing the availability of the energy. The collection of 6 months of data of wind speed, solar radiation and ambient temperature recorded for every hour of the day were used. The mathematical modeling of the main elements of the hybrid wind/PV/diesel system is exposed showing the more relevant sizing variables. A deterministic algorithm is used to minimize the total cost of the system while guaranteeing the satisfaction of the load demand. A comparison between the total cost of the hybrid wind/PV/diesel energy system with batteries and the hybrid wind/PV/diesel energy system without batteries is presented. The reached results demonstrate the practical utility of the used sizing methodology and show the influence of the battery storage on the total cost of the hybrid system. (author)

Belfkira, Rachid; Zhang, Lu; Barakat, Georges [Groupe de Recherche en Electrotechnique et Automatique du Havre, University of Le Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 1123, 76063 Le Havre (France)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Table 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Processing Plant Capacity by State 1. Natural Gas Processing Plant Capacity by State Natural Gas Processing Capacity (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Number of Natural Gas Plants Average Plant Capacity (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Change Between 2004 and 2009 State 2009 Percent of U.S. Total 2009 Percent of U.S. Total 2004 2009 Capacity (Percent) Number of Plants Texas 19,740 25.5 163 33.1 95 121 24.7 -3 Louisiana 18,535 23.9 60 12.2 271 309 12.3 -1 Wyoming 7,273 9.4 37 7.5 154 197 5.1 -8 Colorado 3,791 4.9 44 8.9 49 86 81.1 1 Oklahoma 3,740 4.8 58 11.8 58 64 8.8 -1 New Mexico 3,022 3.9 24 4.9 137 126 -11.8 -1 Mississippi 2,273 2.9 4 0.8 262 568 44.6 -2 Illinois 2,102 2.7 2 0.4 1101 1,051 -4.6 0 Kansas 1,250 1.6 6 1.2 353 208 -64.6 -4 Alabama 1,248 1.6 12 2.4 87 104 -4.7 -3 Utah 1,185 1.5 12 2.4 61 99 22.2 -4 Michigan 977 1.3 10 2.0 30 98 102.2 -6 California 876 1.1 20 4.1 43 44 -15.5 -4 Arkansas 710 0.9 4 0.8 10 178

365

Simulation System on the Thermal Stress and Fatigue Life Loss of Startup and Shutdown for a Domestic 600MW Steam Turbo Generator Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Simulation System on the thermal stresses and fatigue life loss of the rotator during startup and shutdown for a domestic 600MW steam turbo generator unit, By means of the analysis of Simulation System on the thermal stress and life loss of the rotor, ... Keywords: steam turbine unit, thermal stress, Fatigue Life Loss, rotator, startup, shutdown

Yunchun Xia

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Induced Radioactivity and Waste Classification of Reactor Zone Components of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 After Final Shutdown  

SciTech Connect

The dismantlement of the reactor core materials and surrounding structural components is a major technical concern for those planning closure and decontamination and decommissioning of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Specific issues include when and how dismantlement should be accomplished and what the radwaste classification of the dismantled system would be at the time it is disassembled. Whereas radiation levels and residual radiological characteristics of the majority of the plant systems are directly measured using standard radiation survey and radiochemical analysis techniques, actual measurements of reactor zone materials are not practical due to high radiation levels and inaccessibility. For these reasons, neutron transport analysis was used to estimate induced radioactivity and radiation levels in the Chernobyl NPP Unit 1 reactor core materials and structures.Analysis results suggest that the optimum period of safe storage is 90 to 100 yr for the Unit 1 reactor. For all of the reactor components except the fuel channel pipes (or pressure tubes), this will provide sufficient decay time to allow unlimited worker access during dismantlement, minimize the need for expensive remote dismantlement, and allow for the dismantled reactor components to be classified as low- or medium-level radioactive waste. The fuel channel pipes will remain classified as high-activity waste requiring remote dismantlement for hundreds of years due to the high concentration of induced {sup 63}Ni in the Zircaloy pipes.

Bylkin, Boris K. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Davydova, Galina B. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Zverkov, Yuri A. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Krayushkin, Alexander V. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Neretin, Yuri A. [Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ukraine); Nosovsky, Anatoly V. [Slavutych Division of the International Chernobyl Center (Ukraine); Seyda, Valery A. [Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ukraine); Short, Steven M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States)

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Chilled Ammonia Process Development Unit at We Energies Pleasant Prairie Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alstom Power, Inc. (Alstom) has developed a patented process technology referred to as the chilled ammonia process (CAP) for the capture and concentration of carbon dioxide from combustion flue gas. The technology involves the use of a chilled, concentrated ammonia solution to chemically bind the carbon dioxide, followed by a thermal decomposition step to liberate the carbon dioxide for collection and further use. This report documents results from the process development unit (PDU) testing of the CAP at...

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

368

Plant Outage Time Savings Provided by Subcritical Physics Testing at Vogtle Unit 2  

SciTech Connect

The most recent core reload design verification physics testing done at Southern Nuclear Company's (SNC) Vogtle Unit 2, performed prior to initial power operations in operating cycle 12, was successfully completed while the reactor was at least 1% {delta}K/K subcritical. The testing program used was the first application of the Subcritical Physics Testing (SPT) program developed by the Westinghouse Electric Company LLC. The SPT program centers on the application of the Westinghouse Subcritical Rod Worth Measurement (SRWM) methodology that was developed in cooperation with the Vogtle Reactor Engineering staff. The SRWM methodology received U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval in August of 2005. The first application of the SPT program occurred at Vogtle Unit 2 in October of 2005. The results of the core design verification measurements obtained during the SPT program demonstrated excellent agreement with prediction, demonstrating that the predicted core characteristics were in excellent agreement with the actual operating characteristics of the core. This paper presents an overview of the SPT Program used at Vogtle Unit 2 during operating cycle 12, and a discussion of the critical path outage time savings the SPT program is capable of providing. (authors)

Cupp, Philip [Southern Nuclear Company (United States); Heibel, M.D. [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating patterns are examined both for an aggregation of all hydro generators and for select individual plants.

Hodge, B.-M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Table 12. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2.03 2.17 2.33 2.52 2.73 2.99 AEO 1983 1.99 2.10 2.24 2.39 2.57 2.76 4.29 AEO 1984 1.90 2.01 2.13 2.28 2.44 2.61 3.79 AEO 1985 1.68 1.76 1.86 1.95 2.05 2.19 2.32 2.49 2.66 2.83 3.03 AEO 1986 1.61 1.68 1.75 1.83 1.93 2.05 2.19 2.35 2.54 2.73 2.92 3.10 3.31 3.49 3.68 AEO 1987 1.52 1.55 1.65 1.75 1.84 1.96 2.11 2.27 2.44 3.55 AEO 1989* 1.50 1.51 1.68 1.77 1.88 2.00 2.13 2.26 2.40 2.55 2.70 2.86 3.00 AEO 1990 1.46 1.53 2.07 2.76 3.7 AEO 1991 1.51 1.58 1.66 1.77 1.88 1.96 2.06 2.16 2.28 2.41 2.57 2.70 2.85 3.04 3.26 3.46 3.65 3.87 4.08 4.33 AEO 1992 1.54 1.61 1.66 1.75 1.85 1.97 2.03 2.14 2.26 2.44 2.55 2.69 2.83 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.58 3.78 4.01 AEO 1993 1.92 1.54 1.61 1.70

371

Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mono-container fuel cell generator (10) contains a layer of interior insulation (14), a layer of exterior insulation (16) and a single housing (20) between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation (14) in the interior (12) of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650.degree. C., where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing (20) below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling.

Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mono-container fuel cell generator contains a layer of interior insulation, a layer of exterior insulation and a single housing between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation in the interior of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650 C, where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling. 7 figs.

Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

373

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the nuclear power plant, the Marine Corps base, thePower Plant Emergency Response Plan, July 1975. United States Marine

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Support and control system of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox  

SciTech Connect

A glovebox was designed and fabricated to house test containers loaded with contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. The test containers were designed to simulate the environmental characteristics of the caverns at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The support and control systems used to operate and maintain the Gas Generation Experiment (GGE) include the following: glovebox atmosphere and pressure control, test container support, glovebox operation support, and gas supply and exhaust systems. The glovebox atmosphere and pressure control systems consist of various components used to control both the pressure and quality of the argon atmosphere inside the glovebox. The glovebox pressure is maintained by three separate pressure control systems. The primary pressure control system is designed to maintain the glovebox at a negative pressure with the other two control systems serving as redundant safety backups. The quality of the argon atmosphere is controlled using a purifying bed system that removes oxygen and moisture. Glovebox atmosphere contaminants that are monitored on a continuous or periodic basis include moisture, oxygen, and nitrogen. The gas generation experiment requires the test containers to be filled with brine, leak tested, maintained at a constant temperature, and the gas head space of the test container sampled on a periodic basis. Test container support systems consisting of a brine addition system, leak test system, heating system, and gas sampling system were designed and implemented. A rupture disk system was constructed to provide pressure relief to the test containers. Operational requirements stipulated that test container temperature and pressure be monitored and collected on a continuous basis. A data acquisition system (DAS) was specifically designed to meet these requirements.

Benjamin, W.W.; Knight, C.J.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Rosenberg, K.E.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Test container design/fabrication/function for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox  

SciTech Connect

The gas generation experiments (GGE) are being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL0W) with contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The purpose of the GGE is to determine the different quantities and types of gases that would be produced and the gas-generation rates that would develop if brine were introduced to CH-TRU waste under post-closure WIPP disposal room conditions. The experiment requires that a prescribed matrix of CH-TRU waste be placed in a 7.5 liter test container. After loaded with the CH-TRU waste, brine and inoculum mixtures (consisting of salt and microbes indigenous to the Carlsbad, New Mexico region) are added to the waste. The test will run for an anticipated time period of three to five years. The test container itself is an ASME rated pressure vessel constructed from Hastelloy C276 to eliminate corrosion that might contaminate the experimental results. The test container is required to maintain a maximum 10% head space with a maximum working pressure of 17.25 MPa (2,500 psia). The test container is designed to provide a gas sample of the head space without the removal of brine. Assembly of the test container lid and process valves is performed inside an inert atmosphere glovebox. Glovebox mockup activities were utilized from the beginning of the design phase to ensure the test container and associated process valves were designed for remote handling. In addition, test container processes (including brine addition, sparging, leak detection, and test container pressurization) are conducted inside the glovebox.

Knight, C.J.; Russell, N.E.; Benjamin, W.W.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Michelbacher, J.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The evolution of NOx control policy for coal-fired power plants in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) contribute to formation of particulate matter and ozone, and also to acidification of the environment. The electricity sector is responsible for about 20% of NOx emissions in the United States, and the sector has been the target of both prescriptive (command-and-control) and flexible (cap-and-trade) approaches to regulation. The paper summarises the major NOx control policies affecting this sector in the USA, and provides some perspectives as to their effectiveness. While both prescriptive and flexible approaches continue to play an important role, significant new proposals have wholly embraced a cap-and-trade approach. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Dallas Burtraw; David A. Evans

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Seismic structural fragility investigation for the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (Project I); SONGS-1 AFWS Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the seismic capacities of several of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (SONGS-1) structures was conducted to determine input to the overall probabilistic methodology developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Seismic structural fragilities to be used as input consist of median seismic capacities and their variabilities due to randomness and uncertainty. Potential failure modes were identified for each of the SONGS-1 structures included in this study by establishing the seismic load-paths and comparing expected load distributions to available capacities for the elements of each load-path. Particular attention was given to possible weak links and details. The more likely failure modes were screened for more detailed investigation.

Wesley, D.A.; Hashimoto, P.S.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nuclear Safeguards Infrastructure Required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to be constructed near Idaho Falls, Idaho The NGNP is intrinsically safer than current reactors and is planned for startup ca. 2021 Safety is more prominent in the minds of the Public and Governing Officials following the nuclear reactor meltdown accidents in Fukushima, Japan The authors propose that the NGNP should be designed with International (IAEA) Safeguards in mind to support export to Non-Nuclear-Weapons States There are two variants of the NGNP design; one using integral Prismatic-shaped fuel assemblies in a fixed core; and one using recirculating fuel balls (or Pebbles) The following presents the infrastructure required to safeguard the NGNP This infrastructure is required to safeguard the Prismatic and Pebble-fueled NGNP (and other HTGR/VHTR) The infrastructure is based on current Safeguards Requirements and Practices implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for similar reactors The authors of this presentation have worked for decades in the area of International Nuclear Safeguards and are recognized experts in this field Presentation for INMM conference in July 2012.

Dr. Mark Schanfein; Philip Casey Durst

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Compaction Scale Up and Optimization of Cylindrical Fuel Compacts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of designed experiments have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel. Results from these experiments are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operational using nuclear fuel materials. The process is being certified for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts for the AGR-5/6/7 experiment at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

Jeffrey J. Einerson; Jeffrey A. Phillips; Eric L. Shaber; Scott E. Niedzialek; W. Clay Richardson; Scott G. Nagley

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Focused risk assessment: Mound Plant, Miami-Erie Canal Operable Unit 4  

SciTech Connect

In 1969, an underground waste line at Mound Plant ruptured and released plutonium-238 in a dilute nitric acid solution to the surrounding soils. Most of the acid was neutralized by the native soils. The plutonium, which in a neutral solution is tightly sorbed onto clay particles, remained within the spill area. During remediation, a severe storm eroded some of the contaminated soil. Fine grained plutonium-contaminated clay particles were carried away through the natural drainage courses to the remnants of the Miami-Erie Canal adjacent to Mound Plant, and then into the Great Miami River. This focused risk assessment considers exposure pathways relevant to site conditions, including incidental ingestion of contaminated soils, ingestion of drinking water and fish, and inhalation of resuspended soils and sediments. For each potential exposure pathway, a simplified conceptual model and exposure scenarios have been used to develop conservative estimates of potential radiation dose equivalents and health risks. The conservatism of the dose and risk estimates provides a substantive margin of safety in assuring that the public health is protected.

Rogers, D.R.; Dunning, D.F.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

382

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2804)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for application in heat exchangers and core internals for the NGNP. The primary candidates are Inconel 617, Haynes 230, Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR. Based on the technical maturity, availability in required product forms, experience base, and high temperature mechanical properties all of the vendor pre-conceptual design studies have specified Alloy 617 as the material of choice for heat exchangers. Also a draft code case for Alloy 617 was developed previously. Although action was suspended before the code case was accepted by ASME, this draft code case provides a significant head start for achieving codification of the material. Similarly, Alloy 800H is the material of choice for control rod sleeves. In addition to the above listed considerations, Alloy 800H is already listed in the nuclear section of the ASME Code; although the maximum use temperature and time need to be increased.

J. K. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Baseline risk assessment for groundwater operable units at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are evaluating conditions in groundwater and springs at the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The 88-ha (217-acre) chemical plant area is chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of uranium-processing activities conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s and 1960s and explosives-production activities conducted by the U.S. Army (Army) in the 1940s. The 6,974-ha (17,232-acre) ordnance works area is primarily chemically contaminated as a result of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) manufacturing activities during World War II. This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is being conducted as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RUFS) required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended. The purpose of the BRA is to evaluate potential human health and ecological impacts from contamination associated with the groundwater operable units (GWOUs) of the chemical plant area and ordnance works area. An RI/FS work plan issued jointly in 1995 by the DOE and DA (DOE 1995) analyzed existing conditions at the GWOUs. The work plan included a conceptual hydrogeological model based on data available when the report was prepared; this model indicated that the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. Hence, to optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts, the DOE and DA have decided to conduct a joint RI/BRA. Characterization data obtained from the chemical plant area wells indicate that uranium is present at levels slightly higher than background, with a few concentrations exceeding the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 20 {micro}g/L (EPA 1996c). Concentrations of other radionuclides (e.g., radium and thorium) were measured at back-ground levels and were eliminated from further consideration. Chemical contaminants identified in wells at the chemical plant area and ordnance works area include nitroaromatic compounds, metals, and inorganic anions. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2 -DCE) have been detected recently in a few wells near the raffinate pits at the chemical plant.

NONE

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

384

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Btu Content The natural gas received and transported by the major intrastate and interstate mainline transmission systems must be within a specific energy (Btu) content range. Generally, the acceptable Btu content is 1,035 Btu per cubic foot, with an acceptable deviation of +/-50 Btu. However, when natural gas is extracted, its Btu content can be very different from acceptable pipeline specifications. The Btu content of natural gas extracted varies depending on the presence of water, NGLs, as well as CO2, nitrogen, helium, and others. Significant amounts of NGLs in natural gas is generally associated with higher Btu values. Consistent with this, Btu values reported by plants in Texas and other Gulf of Mexico States are comparatively high (Table 3). On

385

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States combined accounted for about 13 percent of total U.S. processing capacity in 2009, accounting for the smallest portion of any region in the lower 48 States. The combined processing capacity in these States more than doubled, although a few of the States saw decreased capacity compared with 2004. Processing capacity in Illinois, Kansas, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania fell since 2004, with the highest decrease occurring in Kansas, which saw a 65 percent drop in processing capacity. At the same time, the number of plants in Kansas decreased by four. The decrease was likely the result of falling natural gas proved reserves, which decreased in this State between 1995 and 2005. While the proved reserves have

386

ASSESSMENT OF THE RADIONUCLIDE COMPOSITION OF "HOT PARTICLES" SAMPLED IN THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FOURTH REACTOR UNIT  

SciTech Connect

Fuel-containing materials sampled from within the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) 4th Reactor Unit Confinement Shelter were spectroscopically studied for gamma and alpha content. Isotopic ratios for cesium, europium, plutonium, americium, and curium were identified and the fuel burnup in these samples was determined. A systematic deviation in the burnup values based on the cesium isotopes, in comparison with other radionuclides, was observed. The conducted studies were the first ever performed to demonstrate the presence of significant quantities of {sup 242}Cm and {sup 243}Cm. It was determined that there was a systematic underestimation of activities of transuranic radionuclides in fuel samples from inside of the ChNPP Confinement Shelter, starting from {sup 241}Am (and going higher), in comparison with the theoretical calculations.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.; Marra, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Steam Generator Management Program: Generic Plant Qualification and Application Plan for Dispersant Use During Steam Generator Wet L ayup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) effort to develop dispersant application during steam generator (SG) wet layup as an additional deposit management strategy. Based on the results of this study, the addition of dispersant during wet layup is likely to modestly increase the amount of iron removed from the SGs of nuclear PWRs prior to power ascension, benefitting the utilities by reducing the corrosion product inventory within the SGs upon startup. The inform...

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants provides an overview of state-of-the art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal-fired generating units along with lessons learned for current plants worldwide. The Guideline aims to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation generating units that incorporate: Higher steam conditions for higher efficiency and reduced generation of pollutants Advanced environmental controls for reduced emissions and environmental im...

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

Impact of Nuclear Power Plant Operations on Carbon-14 Generation, Chemical Forms, and Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As nuclear power plants continue to implement best practices to reduce the total radioactivity in plant effluents, other radionuclides that were not previously significant fractions of the effluent streams will need to be quantified and reported. Carbon-14 can become a principal radionuclide for the gaseous effluent pathway as the concentrations of other radionuclides decrease. This report documents the potential opportunities for further understanding the impact of nuclear power plant operations on Carb...

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

390

Optimal control system design of an acid gas removal unit for an IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture should be operated optimally in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. To achieve this goal, a systematic approach is taken in this work to design the control system of a selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for a commercial-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The control system design is performed in two stages with the objective of minimizing the auxiliary power while satisfying operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. In the first stage of the control system design, a top-down analysis is used to analyze degrees of freedom, define an operational objective, identify important disturbances and operational/environmental constraints, and select the control variables. With the degrees of freedom, the process is optimized with relation to the operational objective at nominal operation as well as under the disturbances identified. Operational and environmental constraints active at all operations are chosen as control variables. From the results of the optimization studies, self-optimizing control variables are identified for further examination. Several methods are explored in this work for the selection of these self-optimizing control variables. Modifications made to the existing methods will be discussed in this presentation. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for control variables and due to the complexity of the underlying optimization problem, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. The second stage is a bottom-up design of the control layers used for the operation of the process. First, the regulatory control layer is designed followed by the supervisory control layer. Finally, an optimization layer is designed. In this paper, the proposed two-stage control system design approach is applied to the AGR unit for an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Aspen Plus Dynamics® is used to develop the dynamic AGR process model while MATLAB is used to perform the control system design and for implementation of model predictive control (MPC).

Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Steam electric plant factors, 1978. [48 states  

SciTech Connect

Fossil-fuel steam electric generation increased 5.8% in 1977 to 1,612.2 million MWh as compared to 1976. Thirty-four new fossil-fuel steam electric units and 7 new nuclear units became operational in 1977. Detailed data are reported for 748 plants, accounting for more than 99% of the total steam generation capacity, in the contiguous US.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P. ['Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod', branch of JSC 'Silovye mashiny' (Russian Federation); Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A. ['Institut Teploenergoproekt', branch of JSC 'Inzhenernyi tsentr EES' (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Plenary lecture 9: generation of electrical energy with variable speed in microhydro and eolian power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mini hydroelectric power plant are built to use the flow of the small rivers. The main disadvantage of these systems is the reduced capacity to store a high quantity of water which should ensure the long term running of the hydroelectric plants during ...

Sorin Deaconu

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The AL-R8 SI: The next generation staging container for plutonium pits at the USDOE Pantex Plant  

SciTech Connect

The AL-R8 SI (sealed insert) is the next generation staging container for plutonium pits at the US DOE Pantex Plant. The sealed insert is a stainless steel container that will be placed inside a modified AL-R8 container to stage pits. A pit is a hollow sphere of plutonium metal which is the primary fissionable material in nuclear weapons (warheads and bombs). It is hermetically sealed by a cladding material, which is usually stainless steel. Personnel exposures to ionizing radiation from the pits in storage are expected to decrease due to the attenuation provided by the new SI. All personnel exposures to ionizing radiation at Pantex Plant are As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). Pantex Plant secures the common defense and national security of the US by safely staging plutonium pits in a manner that protests the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment.

Eifert, E.J.; Vickers, L.D. [DOE Pantex Plant, Amarillo, TX (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Plant Engineering: Storage and Use of Low-Concentration (5%) Biodiesel Blends in Nuclear Plant Emergency Diesel Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for biodiesel to be found in diesel fuel for emergency diesel generators (EDGs) is greatly increased since ASTM approved the allowance of up to 5 volume percent biodiesel (B5) in commercial diesel covered by ASTM D975. Although B5 is approved for use by all major diesel engine manufacturers, little is known about possible problems that could be encountered by utilities with EDGs. This report is an addendum to previously published Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1021071. It i...

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

396

Plant Support Engineering: Storage and Use of Low Concentration (5%) Biodiesel Blends in Nuclear Plant Emergency Diesel Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for biodiesel to be found in diesel fuel for emergency diesel generators (EDGs) is greatly increased since the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approved the allowance of up to 5 volume percent (vol%) biodiesel (B5) in commercial diesel covered by ASTM D975. While B5 is approved for use by all major diesel engine manufacturers, little is known about possible problems that could be encountered by utilities with EDGs. This report contains the findings from an extensive literat...

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

397

Has Restructuring Improved Operating Efficiency at U.S. Electricity Generating Plants?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (FERC) collects data for investor-utility plants annually in the FERC Form 1, and the Energydata were reported to FERC or EIA over the 1981 through 1999

Fabrizio, Kira; Rose, Nancy; Wolfram, Catherine

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) General Contingency Plan for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect

This contingency plan provides a description of the Y-12 plant and its waste units and prescribes control procedures and emergency response procedures. It lists emergency and spill response equipment, provides information on coordination agreements with local agencies, and describes the evacuation plan and reporting requirements.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1988  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1988 presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1988. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

1989-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Need for Deployment of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research, development, design, construction, and operation of a prototype nuclear reactor to produce electricity and hydrogen. The NGNP is intended to be a collaborative effort among the U.S. Department of Energy, the Idaho National Laboratory, and appropriate industrial partners. It is also intended to include international technology exchanges. The NGNP will utilize what is commonly referred to as a Generation IV design. Generation III designs are the latest reactor designs licensed or certified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Generation III+ includes the new designs currently under review by the NRC and anticipated to begin operation during the next 10 to 20 years. Generation IV designs are more advanced and are expected to be ready for commercial construction after 2020. The Generation IV designs may include new or additional features such as the following: • capability for hydrogen production 2 • use of recycled fuel • use of plutonium and other fission by-products • a more efficient fuel cycle with lower generation of waste products • higher safety and physical protection levels • higher reliability • better economic performance. The ANS also supports the federal government efforts in support of a robust Generation IV development program in parallel with current Generation III+ efforts. 3 Sequential utilization of new or different designs and technologies will ensure ever-increasing safety levels and will help nuclear energy fulfill its vital role in worldwide electricity generation.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 8. Commercial status of licensed process units. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; licensed commercial processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document demonstrates the commercial status of the process units to be used in the Tri-State Synfuels Project at Henderson, Kentucky. The basic design philosophy as established in October, 1979, was to use the commercial SASOL II/III plants as a basis. This was changed in January 1982 to a plant configuration to produce gasoline via a methanol and methanol to gasoline process. To accomplish this change the Synthol, Oil workup and Chemical Workup Units were eliminated and replaced by Methanol Synthesis and Methanol to Gasoline Units. Certain other changes to optimize the Lurgi liquids processing eliminated the Tar Distillation and Naphtha Hydrotreater Units which were replaced by the Partial Oxidation Unit. The coals to be gasified are moderately caking which necessitates the installation of stirring mechanism in the Lurgi Dry Bottom gasifier. This work is in the demonstration phase. Process licenses either have been obtained or must be obtained for a number of processes to be used in the plant. The commercial nature of these processes is discussed in detail in the tabbed sections of this document. In many cases there is a list of commercial installations at which the licensed equipment is used.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Fault diagnosis for the feedwater heater system of a 300MW coal-fired power generating unit based on RBF neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new style radial basis function (RBF) neural network is used for fault diagnosis of the high-pressure feed-water heater system of a coal-fired power generating unit. The structure of the RBF network and its training algorithm are given. ...

Liangyu Ma; Yongguang Ma; Jin Ma

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR PORTIONS OF THE MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT FROM UNITS 1 AND 2 AT THE HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT, EUREKA, CALIFORNIA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) operated the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear reactor near Eureka, California under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) provisional license number DPR-7. HBPP Unit 3 achieved initial criticality in February 1963 and began commercial operations in August 1963. Unit 3 was a natural circulation boiling water reactor with a direct-cycle design. This design eliminated the need for heat transfer loops and large containment structures. Also, the pressure suppression containment design permitted below-ground construction. Stainless steel fuel claddings were used from startup until cladding failures resulted in plant system contamination—zircaloy-clad fuel was used exclusively starting in 1965 eliminating cladding-related contamination. A number of spills and gaseous releases were reported during operations resulting in a range of mitigative activities (see ESI 2008 for details).

W.C. Adams

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Combined cycle electric power plant having a control system which enables dry steam generator operation during gas turbine operation  

SciTech Connect

A control system for a combined cycle electric power plant is described. It contains: at least one gas turbine including an exit through which heated exhaust gases pass; means for generating steam coupled to said gas turbine exit for transferring heat from the exhaust gases to a fluid passing through the steam generator; a steam turbine coupled to the steam generator and driven by the steam supplied thereby; means for generating electric power by the driving power of the turbines; condenser means for receiving and converting the spent steam from the steam turbine into condensate; and steam generating means comprising a low pressure storage tank, a first heat exchange tube, a boiler feedwater pump for directing fluid from a low pressure storage tank through the first heat exchange tube, a main storage drum, a second heat exchange tube, and a high pressure recirculation pump for directing fluid from the main storage pump through the second heat exchange tube. The control system monitors the temperature of the exhaust gas turbine gases as directed to the steam generator and deactuates the steam turbine when a predetermined temperature is exceeded.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1974-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

405

1052 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 25, NO. 2, MAY 2010 Co-Optimization of Generation Unit Commitment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grid controllability: to make better use of the existing system and meet growing demand with existing element , state . Maximum ramp up rate for generator . Maximum ramp down rate for generator . Maximum shutdown ramp rate for generator . Maximum startup ramp rate for generator . Number of periods. , Max

Oren, Shmuel S.

406

Steam generator replacement overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since nuclear power began to be widely used for commercial purposes in the 1960s, unit operators have experienced a variety of problems with major components. Although many of the problems have diminished considerably, those associated with pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators persist. Steam generator problems rank second, behind refueling outages, as the most significant contributor to lost electricity generation. As of December 31, 1995, 38 steam generators had been replaced in 13 of the 72 operating PWRs, and three units had been shut down prematurely, due primarily (or partially) to degradation of their steam generators: Portland General Electric`s Trojan unit, located in Prescott, OR, in 1992; Southern California Edison`s San Onofre 1, located in San Clemente, CA, in 1992; and Sacramento Municipal Utility District`s Rancho Seco unit in 1989. In the coming years, operators of PWRs in the US with degraded steam generators will have to decide whether to make annual repairs (with eventual derating likely), replace the generators or shut the plants down prematurely. To understand the issues and decisions utility managers face, this article examines problems encountered at steam generators over the past few decades and identifies some of the remedies that utility operators and the nuclear community have employed, including operational changes, maintenance, repairs and steam generator replacement.

Chernoff, H. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States); Wade, K.C. [USDOE Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Thinking about Generation Diversity: Electric Power Plant Asset Portfolio Valuation and Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, large amounts of natural gas-fired power generation capacity have been added to the nation’s portfolio of power generation assets. In addition, a variety of analyses and market projections imply this trend will continue for a variety of reasons, including large and growing supplies of natural gas due to the “shale boom,” and commensurate low natural gas prices, and imposition of increasingly stringent environmental regulations associated with coal-fired ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CDRL item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VI. Electrical power generation and master control subsystems and balance of plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The requirements, performance, and subsystem configuration for both the Commercial and Pilot Plant electrical power generation subsystems (EPGS) and balance of plants are presented. The EPGS for both the Commercial Plant and Pilot Plant make use of conventional, proven equipment consistent with good power plant design practices in order to minimize risk and maximize reliability. The basic EPGS cycle selected is a regenerative cycle that uses a single automatic admission, condensing, tandem-compound double-flow turbine. Specifications, performance data, drawings, and schematics are included. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Management Activities for Retrieved and Newly Generated Transuranic Wastes Savannah River Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 WL 253648 (F.R.) 8 WL 253648 (F.R.) NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Finding of No Significant Impact; Transuranic Waste Management Activities at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, SC Tuesday, August 30, 1988 *33172 AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA -0315, for transuranic (TRU) waste management activities at DOE's Savannah River Plant (SRP), including the construction and operation of a new TRU Waste Processing Facility. Based on analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact

412

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Fuel Gas System for Combustion Turbine Combined Cycle Plant Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides information to assist personnel involved with the maintenance of the fuel gas system at a gas turbine combined cycle facility, including good maintenance practices, preventive maintenance techniques and troubleshooting guidance. BackgroundCombustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that can be unique to this particular type of power plant. As such, owners and operators of CTCC facilities may find ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

New technology for purging the steam generators of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technology for removal of undissolved impurities from a horizontal steam generator using purge water is developed on the basis of a theoretical analysis. A purge with a maximal flow rate is drawn off from the zone with the highest accumulation of sludge in the lower part of the steam generator after the main circulation pump of the corresponding loop is shut off and the temperatures of the heat transfer medium at the inlet and outlet of the steam generator have equilibrated. An improved purge configuration is used for this technology; it employs shutoff and regulator valves, periodic purge lines separated by a cutoff fixture, and a D{sub y} 100 drain union as a connector for the periodic purge. Field tests show that the efficiency of this technology for sludge removal by purge water is several times that for the standard method.

Budko, I. O.; Kutdjusov, Yu. F.; Gorburov, V. I. [Scientific-Research Center for Energy Technology 'NICE Centrenergo' (Russian Federation); Rjasnyj, S. I. [JSC 'The All-Rissia Nuklear Power Engineering Research and Development Institute' (VNIIAM) (Russian Federation)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Combined cycle electric power plant and heat recovery steam generator having improved multi-loop temperature control of the steam generated  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant is described that includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes a superheater tube and a steam drum from which heated steam is directed through the superheater to be additionally heated into superheated steam by the exhaust gas turbine gases. An afterburner serves to further heat the exhaust gas turbine gases passed to the superheater tube and a bypass conduit is disposed about the superheater tube whereby a variable steam flow determined by a bypass valve disposed in the bypass conduit may be directed about the superheater tube to be mixed with the superheated steam therefrom, whereby the temperature of the superheated steam supplied to the steam turbine may be accurately controlled. Steam temperature control means includes a first control loop responsive to the superheated steam temperature for regulating the position of the bypass valve with respect to a first setpoint, and a second control loop responsive to the superheated steam temperature for controlling the fuel supply to the afterburner with respect to a second setpoint varying in accordance with the bypass valve position. In particular, as the bypass valve position increases, the second setpoint, originally higher, is lowered toward a value substantially equal to that of the first setpoint.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

415

Dubuque generation station, Dubuque, Iowa  

SciTech Connect

Alliant Energy's Dubuque generation station is a fine example of why small does not mean insignificant in the power generation industry. This winner of the EUCG best performer award in the small plant category shows that its operating excellence towers over that of many larger and much newer coal-fired power plants. The plant has three operating units with boilers originally designed for Illinois basin coal but now Powder River Basin coal makes up 75% of the coal consumed. The boilers can also burn natural gas. 4 photos.

Peltier, R.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fossil Power Plant Cost and Performance Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is one of two companion studies that describe trends in operating costs and reliability of fossil steam plants since 1970. The studies are a foundation for more sophisticated statistical studies aimed at modeling and predicting the impacts of cycling. This report summarizes results for coal-fired steam generating units, contrasting performance across 112 baseload plants, 68 load-following/cycling plants, and 118 plants that varied their operations for at least three years. Annual trends are p...

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

1 MW Fuel Cell Project: Test and Evaluation of Five 200 kW Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Units Configured as a 1 MW Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cell technology can play a potentially significant role as a distributed generation resource at customer facilities. This report describes a demonstration of the new technology that is needed for utility management and control of multiple fuel cell power plants at a single location in an assured power application.

2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Review of CO2 Capture Development Activities for Coal-Fired Power Generation Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is to be implemented and play a role in keeping electricity prices affordable under proposed emission restrictions, its rate of progress needs to be accelerated. Demonstration plants need to be deployed in the short-term to allow the technology to evolve and become more efficient and cost–effective. Achieving this objective is the primary objective of EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow Program. This report provides an up-to-date review of the progress being made in pilot and d...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

Hanford waste vitrification plant hydrogen generation study: Preliminary evaluation of alternatives to formic acid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxalic, glyoxylic, glycolic, malonic, pyruvic, lactic, levulinic, and citric acids as well as glycine have been evaluated as possible substitutes for formic acid in the preparation of feed for the Hanford waste vitrification plant using a non-radioactive feed stimulant UGA-12M1 containing substantial amounts of aluminum and iron oxides as well as nitrate and nitrite at 90C in the presence of hydrated rhodium trichloride. Unlike formic acid none of these carboxylic acids liberate hydrogen under these conditions and only malonic and citric acids form ammonia. Glyoxylic, glycolic, malonic, pyruvic, lactic, levulinic, and citric acids all appear to have significant reducing properties under the reaction conditions of interest as indicated by the observation of appreciable amounts of N{sub 2}O as a reduction product of,nitrite or, less likely, nitrate at 90C. Glyoxylic, pyruvic, and malonic acids all appear to be unstable towards decarboxylation at 90C in the presence of Al(OH){sub 3}. Among the carboxylic acids investigated in this study the {alpha}-hydroxycarboxylic acids glycolic and lactic acids appear to be the most interesting potential substitutes for formic acid in the feed preparation for the vitrification plant because of their failure to produce hydrogen or ammonia or to undergo decarboxylation under the reaction conditions although they exhibit some reducing properties in feed stimulant experiments.

King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.; Kumar, V.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Next-generation online MC and A technologies for reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect

As power-production nuclear fuel cycles propagate across the globe, a new generation of measurement technologies is needed to support safeguards monitoring of fuel reprocessing facilities. This paper describes the simulation and analysis of two potential technologies for meeting the challenges of 1) direct measurement of fissile isotopic content in irradiated fuel to detect partial defects, and 2) near-real-time monitoring of process chemistry to detect protracted diversion scenarios. Lead slowing-down spectroscopy is the core of the spent fuel assay technology and multi-isotope indicators via high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy are the foundation of the process chemistry verification approach. The safeguards context and methods for each technology are described and the results of preliminary performance studies are presented. The quantitative results for both studies are promising but more comprehensive analysis and empirical validation is needed to adequately assess their potential value as next generation online materials control and accountability measures. (authors)

Smith, L.E.; Schwantes, J.M.; Ressler, J.J.; Douglas, M.; Anderson, K.A.; Fraga, C.G.; Durst, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States); Orton, C.; Christensen, R. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Mechanical Engineering Department, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 43210 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Next-Generation Online MC&A Technologies for Reprocessing Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As power-production nuclear fuel cycles propagate across the globe, a new generation of measurement technologies is needed to support safeguards monitoring of fuel reprocessing facilities. This paper describes the simulation and analysis of two potential technologies for meeting the challenges of 1) direct measurement of fissile isotopic content in irradiated fuel to detect partial defects, and 2) near-real-time monitoring of process chemistry to detect protracted diversion scenarios. Lead slowing-down spectroscopy is the core of the spent fuel assay technology and multi-isotope indicators via high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is the foundation of the process chemistry verification approach. The safeguards context and methods for each technology are described and the results of preliminary performance studies are presented. The quantitative results for both studies are promising but more comprehensive analysis and empirical validation is needed to adequately assess their potential value as next-generation online materials control and accountability measures.

Smith, Leon E.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Douglas, Matt; Anderson, Kevin K.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Durst, Casey; Orton, Chris; Christensen, Robert P.

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

422

Kansas refinery starts up coke gasification unit  

SciTech Connect

Texaco Refining and Marketing Inc. has started up a gasification unit at its El Dorado, Kan., refinery. The unit gasifies delayed coke and other refinery waste products. This is the first refinery to install a coke-fueled gasification unit for power generation. Start-up of the $80-million gasification-based power plant was completed in mid-June. The gasifier produces syngas which, along with natural gas, fuels a combustion turbine. The turbine produces virtually 100% of the refinery`s electricity needs and enough heat to generate 40% of its steam requirements.

Rhodes, A.K.

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

423

Alloys for 1000 degree C service in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant NERI 05-0191  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the proposed research is to define strategies for the improvement of alloys for structural components, such as the intermediate heat exchanger and primary-to-secondary piping, for service at 1000 degree C in the He environment of the NGNP. Specifically, we will investigate the oxidation/carburization behavior and microstructure stability and how these processes affect creep. While generating this data, the project will also develop a fundamental understanding of how impurities in the He environment affect these degradation processes and how this understanding can be used to develop more useful life prediction methodologies.

Gary S. Was; J.W. Jones; T. Pollock

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

RESTRUCTURING RELAP5-3D FOR NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RELAP5-3D is used worldwide for analyzing nuclear reactors under both operational transients and postulated accident conditions. Development of the RELAP code series began in 1975 and since that time the code has been continuously improved, enhanced, verified and validated [1]. Since RELAP5-3D will continue to be the premier thermal hydraulics tool well into the future, it is necessary to modernize the code to accommodate the incorporation of additional capabilities to support the development of the next generation of nuclear reactors [2]. This paper discusses the reengineering of RELAP5-3D into structured code.

Donna Post Guillen; George L. Mesina; Joshua M. Hykes

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Review of CO2-Capture Development Activities for Coal-Fired Power Generation Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal is used to produce a large proportion of the power generated in the US and around the world and is likely to continue doing so well into the future. Nevertheless, it faces a huge challenge in reducing its emissions of CO2 in response to concerns over global warming. One solution is to capture the CO2 and store it in geological strata beneath the surface of the earth. Research investigating this approach is being carried out worldwide, reflecting the global nature of the issue. The two most favored c...

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Shutdown, Layup, and Startup of Combined Cycle Units with Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complete optimization of cycle chemistry in a combined-cycle unit requires more than proper selection and optimization of operating chemistry. Protection of the steam-water cycle also is essential during shutdown, layup, and startup phases. These guidelines consider protection of steam- and water-touched components at these times, consistent with the operating cycle chemistries in use.

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

427

Melting characteristics of the stainless steel generated from the uranium conversion plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The partition ratio of cerium (Ce) and uranium (U) in the ingot, slag and dust phases has been investigated for the effect of the slag type, slag concentration and basicity in an electric arc melting process. An electric arc furnace (EAF) was used to melt the stainless steel wastes, simulated by uranium oxide and the real wastes from the uranium conversion plant in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The composition of the slag former used to capture the contaminants such as uranium, cerium, and cesium during the melt decontamination process generally consisted of silica (SiO{sub 2}), calcium oxide (CaO) and aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Also, Calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2} ), nickel oxide (NiO), and ferric oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were added to provide an increase in the slag fluidity and oxidative potential. Cerium was used as a surrogate for the uranium because the thermochemical and physical properties of cerium are very similar to those of uranium. Cerium was removed from the ingot phase to slag phase by up to 99% in this study. The absorption ratio of cerium was increased with an increase of the amount of the slag former. And the maximum removal of cerium occurred when the basicity index of the slag former was 0.82. The natural uranium (UO{sub 2}) was partitioned from the ingot phase to the slag phase by up to 95%. The absorption of the natural uranium was considerably dependent on the basicity index of the slag former and the composition of the slag former. The optimum condition for the removal of the uranium was about 1.5 for the basicity index and 15 wt% of the slag former. According to the increase of the amount of slag former, the absorption of uranium oxide in the slag phase was linearly increased due to an increase of its capacity to capture uranium oxide within the slag phase. Through experiments with various slag formers, we verified that the slag formers containing calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) and a high amount of silica were more effective for a melt decontamination of stainless steel wastes contaminated with uranium. During the melting tests with stainless steel wastes from the uranium conversion plant(UCP ) in KAERI, we found that the results of the uranium decontamination were very similar to those of the uranium oxide from the melting of stimulated metal wastes. (authors)

Choi, W.K.; Song, P.S.; Oh, W.Z.; Jung, C.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Min, B.Y. [Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-Dong, Yusung-Gu Taejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to identify possible issues highlighted by these lessons learned that could apply to the NGNP in reducing technical risks commensurate with the current phase of design. Some of the lessons learned have been applied to the NGNP and documented in the Preconceptual Design Report. These are addressed in the background section of this document and include, for example, the decision to use TRISO fuel rather than BISO fuel used in the Peach Bottom reactor; the use of a reactor pressure vessel rather than prestressed concrete found in Fort St. Vrain; and the use of helium as a primary coolant rather than CO2. Other lessons learned, 68 in total, are documented in Sections 2 through 6 and will be applied, as appropriate, in advancing phases of design. The lessons learned are derived from both negative and positive outcomes from prior HTGR experiences. Lessons learned are grouped according to the plant, areas, systems, subsystems, and components defined in the NGNP Preconceptual Design Report, and subsequent NGNP project documents.

J. M. Beck; L. F. Pincock

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

EDDY CURRENT EXAMINATION OF STEAM GENERATOR TUBES FROM PHWR POWER PLANTS USING ROTATING MAGNETIC FIELD TRANSDUCER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper present the results obtained at examination of steam generator tubes samples made from Incoloy 800, using eddy current transducer with rotating magnetic field. The emission part creates a magnetic rotating field which induces eddy currents in the walls of tubes, the reception being made with an array of sensors. The method presents the advantages of a complete inspection of tube’s surface at one passing. To increase the precision of discontinuity localization, a super resolution algorithm is used. The results are comparables with those obtained at the inspection with rotating probe, being obtained a good correlation, the speed of control being superior in the case of transducer with rotating magnetic field. 1.

Raimond Grimberg; Lalita Udpa; Alina Bruma; Rozina Steigmann; Adriana Savin; Satish S. Udpa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3ny6122 581 4,948 97.2 PWR R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit Summer Capacity (MW) Net Generation (Thousand MWh) Summer Capacity Factor (Percent) Type

431

Steam generator designs  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle is any one of combinations of gas turbines, steam generators or heat recovery equipment, and steam turbines assembled for the reduction in plant cost or improvement of cycle efficiency in the utility power generation process. The variety of combined cycles discussed for the possibilities for industrial applications include gas turbine plus unfired steam generator; gas turbine plus supplementary fired steam generator; gas turbine plus furnace-fired steam generator; and supercharged furnace-fired system generator plus gas turbine. These units are large enough to meet the demands for the utility applications and with the advent of economical coal gasification processes to provide clean fuel, the combined-cycle applications are solicited. (MCW)

Clayton, W.H