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1

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OITs Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the waste water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the waste water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

Boyd, Tonya

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Fuel cell generating plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses a fuel cell generating plant. It comprises a compressed fuel supply; a fuel cell system including fuel conditioning apparatus and fuel cells; a main fuel conduit for conveying fuel from the fuel supply to the fuel cell system; a turbo compressor having a turbine receiving exhaust products from the fuel cell system and a compressor for compressing air; a main air conduit for conveying air from the compressor to the fuel cell system; an auxiliary burner having a primary burner and a pilot; an auxiliary air conduit for conveying air from the compressed fuel supply to the auxiliary burner; an auxiliary exhaust conduit for conveying exhaust products from the auxiliary burner to the turbine; a check valve located between the fuel supply and the pilot; and a gas accumulator in the auxiliary fuel conduit located between the check valve and the pilot.

Sanderson, R.A.

1990-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

3

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 ORNLTM-2007147, Vol. 5 Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research...

4

A Geothermic Generating Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... energy is generated in the turbo-alternators at 25,000 volts and transmitted to the substations along the ViareggioRome railway, where it is converted to 3,000 volts direct ...

1939-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

5

Efficiently generate steam from cogeneration plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As cogeneration gets more popular, some plants have two choices of equipment for generating steam. Plant engineers need to have a decision chart to split the duty efficiently between (oil-fired or gas-fired) steam generators (SGs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) using the exhaust from gas turbines. Underlying the dilemma is that the load-versus-efficiency characteristics of both types of equipment are different. When the limitations of each type of equipment and its capability are considered, analysis can come up with several selection possibilities. It is almost always more efficient to generate steam in an HRSG (designed for firing) as compared with conventional steam generators. However, other aspects, such as maintenance, availability of personnel, equipment limitations and operating costs, should also be considered before making a final decision. Loading each type of equipment differently also affects the overall efficiency or the fuel consumption. This article describes the performance aspects of representative steam generators and gas turbine HRSGs and suggests how plant engineers can generate steam efficiently. It also illustrates how to construct a decision chart for a typical installation. The equipment was picked arbitrarily to show the method. The natural gas fired steam generator has a maximum capacity of 100,000 lb/h, 400-psig saturated steam, and the gas-turbine-exhaust HRSG has the same capacity. It is designed for supplementary firing with natural gas.

Ganapathy, V. [ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Solar Power Plant Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Solana Generating Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status Under Construction Developer Abengoa Solar Location Gila Bend, Arizona Coordinates 32.916163°, -112.968727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.916163,"lon":-112.968727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact were studied through both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. Based on thermodynamics and statistical physics, a thermal ionization model was proposed to explore the relationships of ionization degree and plasma conductivity to temperature with consideration of the velocity distribution law in the thermodynamic equilibrium state. In order to derive the temperature, internal energy, and density of the plasma generated by the impact for the above relationships, a 3-D model for the impact of an aluminum spherical projectile on an aluminum target was established and five cases with different impact angles were numerically simulated. Then, the temperature calculated from the internal energy and the Thomas Fermi (TF) model, the internal energy and the density of the plasma were put into the function of the ionization degree to study the characteristics of plasma. Finally, based on the experimental data, a good agreement was obtained between the theoretical predictions and the experimental results, and the feasibility of this theoretical model was verified.

Song, Weidong; Li, Jianqiao; Ning, Jianguo [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Nevada's Beowawe Geothermal Plant Begins Generating Clean Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nevada's Beowawe Geothermal Plant Begins Generating Clean Energy Nevada's Beowawe Geothermal Plant Begins Generating Clean Energy April 20, 2011 - 1:45pm Addthis U.S. Energy...

9

Turbine Drive Gas Generator for Zero Emission Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vision 21 Program seeks technology development that can reduce energy costs, reduce or eliminate atmospheric pollutants from power plants, provide choices of alternative fuels, and increase the efficiency of generating systems. Clean Energy Systems is developing a gas generator to replace the traditional boiler in steam driven power systems. The gas generator offers the prospects of lower electrical costs, pollution free plant operations, choices of alternative fuels, and eventual net plant efficiencies in excess of 60% with sequestration of carbon dioxide. The technology underlying the gas generator has been developed in the aerospace industry over the past 30 years and is mature in aerospace applications, but it is as yet unused in the power industry. This project modifies and repackages aerospace gas generator technology for power generation applications. The purposes of this project are: (1) design a 10 MW gas generator and ancillary hardware, (2) fabricate the gas generator and supporting equipment, (3) test the gas generator using methane as fuel, (4) submit a final report describing the project and test results. The principal test objectives are: (1) define start-up, shut down and post shutdown control sequences for safe, efficient operation; (2) demonstrate the production of turbine drive gas comprising steam and carbon dioxide in the temperature range 1500 F to 3000 F, at a nominal pressure of 1500 psia; (3) measure and verify the constituents of the drive gas; and (4) examine the critical hardware components for indications of life limitations. The 21 month program is in its 13th month. Design work is completed and fabrication is in process. The gas generator igniter is a torch igniter with sparkplug, which is currently under-going hot fire testing. Fabrication of the injector and body of the gas generator is expected to be completed by year-end, and testing of the full gas generator will begin in early 2002. Several months of testing are anticipated. When demonstrated, this gas generator will be the prototype for use in demonstration power plants planned to be built in Antioch, California and in southern California during 2002. In these plants the gas generator will demonstrate durability and its operational RAM characteristics. In 2003, it is expected that the gas generator will be employed in new operating plants primarily in clean air non-attainment areas, and in possible locations to provide large quantities of high quality carbon dioxide for use in enhanced oil recovery or coal bed methane recovery. Coupled with an emission free coal gasification system, the CES gas generator would enable the operation of high efficiency, non-polluting coal-fueled power plants.

Doyle, Stephen E.; Anderson, Roger E.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

10

Mesaba next-generation IGCC plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through a US Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement awarded in June 2006, MEP-I LLC plans to demonstrate a next generation integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generating plant, the Mesaba Energy Project. The 606-MWe plant (the first of two similarly sized plants envisioned by project sponsors) will feature next-generation ConocoPhillips E-Gas{trademark} technology first tested on the DOE-funded Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering project. Mesaba will benefit from recommendations of an industry panel applying the Value Improving Practices process to Wabash cost and performance results. The project will be twice the size of Wabash, while demonstrating better efficient, reliability and pollutant control. The $2.16 billion project ($36 million federal cost share) will be located in the Iron Range region north of Duluth, Minnesota. Mesaba is one of four projects selected under Round II of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. 1 fig.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Second Generation Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on AddThis.com...

12

GENERATING CLIMBING PLANTS USING L-SYSTEMS Johan Knutzen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and heliotropism, as well pseudo- tropisms. The structure of the generated climbing plants is discretized

Assarsson, Ulf

13

Generators of simple Lie superalgebras in characteristic 0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that any finite dimensional simple Lie superalgebra over an algebraically closed field of characteristic 0 is generated by 2 elements.

Wende Liu; Liming Tang

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

14

Ownership Change, Incentives and Plant Efficiency: The Divestiture of U.S. Electric Generation Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ownership Change, Incentives and Plant Efficiency: The Divestiture of U.S. Electric Generation generating plants. Between 1998 and 2001, over 300 electric generating plants in the US, accounting Plants James B. Bushnell and Catherine Wolfram March 2005 Abstract Electric industry restructuring

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

15

Characteristics of an Economically Attractive Fusion Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characteristics of an Economically Attractive Fusion Power Plant Farrokh Najmabadi University: Assessment Based on Attractiveness & Feasibility Periodic Input from Energy Industry Goals and Requirements Scientific & Technical Achievements Evaluation Based on Customer Attributes Attractiveness Characterization

16

Water generator replaces bottled water in nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WaterPure International Incorporated of Doylestown, Pennsylvania, USA, has announced that it has placed its atmospheric water generator (AWG) inside a selected nuclear power plant.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " constant dollars per million Btu in ""dollar year"" specific to each...

18

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.6 mb) 1.6 mb) Appendix A - Photovoltaic (PV) Cost and Performance Characteristics for Residential and Commercial Applications (1.0 mb) Appendix B - The Cost and Performance of Distributed Wind Turbines, 2010-35 (0.5 mb) Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Release date: August 7, 2013 Distributed generation in the residential and commercial buildings sectors refers to the on-site generation of energy, often electricity from renewable energy systems such as solar photovoltaics (PV) and small wind turbines. Many factors influence the market for distributed generation, including government policies at the local, state, and federal level, and project costs, which vary significantly depending on time, location, size, and application.

19

Power generation using solar power plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Pursuing the commitment of California State to generate at least 20 percent of total generated energy from the renewable source by the year 2010 rather (more)

Amin, Parth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Characteristics of Vector Surge Relays for Distributed Synchronous Generator Protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work presented a detailed investigation on the performance characteristics if vector surge relays to detect islanding of distributed synchronous generators. A detection time versus active power imbalance curve is proposed to evaluate the relay performance. Computer simulations are used to obtain the performance curves. The concept of critical active power imbalance is introduced based on these curves. Main factors affecting the performance of the relays are analyzed. The factors investigated are voltage-dependent loads, load power factor, inertia constant of the generator, generator excitation system control mode, feeder length and R/X ratio as well as multi-distributed generators. The results are a useful guideline to evaluate the effectiveness of anti-islanding schemes based on vector surge relays for distributed generation applications.

Freitas, Walmir; Xu, Wilsun; Huang, Zhenyu; Vieira, Jose C.

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distributed Generation System Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

22

Fuel cell power plants in a distributed generator application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ONSI`s (a subsidiary of International Fuel Cells Corporation) world wide fleet of 200-kW PC25{trademark} phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants which began operation early in 1992 has shown excellent performance and reliability in over 1 million hours of operation. This experience has verified the clean, quiet, reliable operation of the PC25 and confirmed its application as a distributed generator. Continuing product development efforts have resulted in a one third reduction of weight and volume as well as improved installation and operating characteristics for the PC25 C model. Delivery of this unit began in 1995. International Fuel Cells (IFC) continues its efforts to improve product design and manufacturing processes. This progress has been sustained at a compounded rate of 10 percent per year since the late 1980`s. These improvements will permit further reductions in the initial cost of the power plant and place increased emphasis on market development as the pacing item in achieving business benefits from the PC25 fuel cell. Derivative product opportunities are evolving with maturation of the technologies in a commercial environment. The recent announcement of Praxair, Inc., and IFC introducing a non-cryogenic hydrogen supply system utilizing IFC`s steam reformer is an example. 11 figs.

Smith, M.J. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Development of second-generation PFB combustion plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Contract DE-AC21-86MC21023 to develop a new type of coal-fueled plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant--called an Advanced or Second-generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (APFBC) plant--offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 45 percent (HHV), with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized-coal-fired plants with scrubbers. This paper summarizes the pilot-plant R&D work being conducted to develop this new type of plant and discusses a proposed design that should reduce demonstration-plant risks and costs.

Robertson, A.; Domeracki, W.; Horazak, D. [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOEs project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10 CFR 52, for the purpose of demonstrating the suitability of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors for commercial electric power and hydrogen production. Products that will support the licensing of the NGNP include the environmental impact statement, the preliminary safety analysis report, the NRC construction permit, the final safety analysis report, and the NRC operating license. The fuel development and qualification program consists of five elements: development of improved fuel manufacturing technologies, fuel and materials irradiations, safety testing and post-irradiation examinations, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term modeling. Two basic approaches will be explored for using the heat from the high-temperature helium coolant to produce hydrogen. The first technology of interest is the thermochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The most promising processes for thermochemical splitting of water are sulfur-based and include the sulfur-iodine, hybrid sulfur-electrolysis, and sulfur-bromine processes. The second technology of interest is thermally assisted electrolysis of water. The efficiency of this process can be substantially improved by heating the water to high-temperature steam before applying electrolysis.

F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks...

Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

26

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant June 29, 2006 - 2:41pm Addthis Gen IV Reactor Capable of Producing Electricity and/or Hydrogen WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from prospective industry teams interested in participating in the development and conceptual design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor prototype with the capability to produce process heat, electricity and/or hydrogen. The very high temperature reactor is based on research and development activities supported by DOE's Generation IV nuclear energy systems initiative.

27

Springerville Generating Station Solar System Solar Power Plant | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springerville Generating Station Solar System Solar Power Plant Springerville Generating Station Solar System Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Springerville Generating Station Solar System Solar Power Plant Facility Springerville Generating Station Solar System Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Tucson Electric Power Location Springerville, Arizona Coordinates 34.1333799°, -109.2859196° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.1333799,"lon":-109.2859196,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

Survey of insulation used in nuclear power plants and the potential for debris generation. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of Unresolved Safety Issue A-43, 'Containment Emergency Sump Performance,' 11 nuclear power plants representative of different U.S. reactor manufacturers and architect-engineers were surveyed to identify and document the types and amounts of insulation used, location within containment, components insulated, material characteristics, and methods of installation and attachment. A preliminary assessment was made of the potential effects of insulation debris generated as the result of a loss-of-coolant accident (pipe break).

Reyer, R.; Gahan, E.; Riddington, J.W.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain-term solution (e.g.,are long-term solution (e.g., solar power and wind power (solar power and wind power Heavy user of fossil fuels:Heavy user of fossil fuels: Electric power industryElectric power industry

Nagurney, Anna

30

Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Power Plant Emission Reductions Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard by J. Alan Beamon, Tom Leckey, and Laura Martin There are many policy instruments available for reducing power plant emissions, and the choice of a policy will affect compliance decisions, costs, and prices faced by consumers. In a previous analysis, the Energy Information Administration analyzed the impacts of power sector caps on nitrogen oxides (NO x ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, assuming a policy instru- ment patterned after the SO 2 allowance program created in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. 1 This report compares the results of that work with the results of an analysis that assumes the use of a dynamic generation performance standard (GPS) as an instrument for reducing CO 2 emissions. 2 In general, the results of the two analyses are similar: to reduce

31

Technology Data for Electricity and Heat Generating Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................63 13 Centralised Biogas Plants

32

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

33

Steam generator design considerations for modular HTGR plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies are in progress to develop a standard High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant design that is amenable to serial production and is licensable. Based on the results of trade studies performed in the DOE-funded HTGR program, activities are being focused to emphasize a modular concept based on a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Utilization of a multiplicity of the standard module affords flexibility in power rating for utility electricity generation. The selected modular HTGR concept has the reactor core and heat transport systems housed in separate steel vessels. This paper highlights the steam generator design considerations for the reference plant, and includes a discussion of the major features of the heat exchanger concept and the technology base existing in the US.

McDonald, C.F.; DeFur, D.D.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Characteristic Requirements of a Small Scale Squirrel Cage Induction Generator for Effective Electricity Generation from Wind Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper proposes characteristic requirements of a small scale squirrel cage induction generator for effective electricity generation from wind energy. These characteristics are obtained from modeling and testing results. Investigation into comparative performances between Standard and high efficiency induction generators is given in order to find out the characteristic requirements of a suitable induction generator. Performances of various features of the machine structure are given. The suitable design of the induction generator based on empirical rules is also included. The investigation of power loss of the induction machine both in theory using FEM (Finite Element Method) and tests has been made. In addition, static var (Volt-Ampere reactive power) compensator using power electronic control to keep terminal voltage of a self-excited induction generator constant is explained. These results can be guidelines for machine development and control method for effective electricity generation.

V. Kinnares; B. Sawetsakulanond

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

Mark Holbrook

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Study of Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Protective Load Control Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbines: Doubly-fed Induction Generator (DFIG) and Fixed-speed Wind Turbine (FSWT) are compared), Distributed Generation System (DGS), Doubly- fed Induction Generator (DFIG), Fixed-speed Wind Turbine (FSWT (FSWT) and doubly-fed induction generator wind turbine (DFIG) have different characteristics, when

Chen, Zhe

37

Plugging of steam generator tubes and consequences for plant operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation of pressurized water reactor (SIROP) code was created using the SICLE software developed by the study and research department at Electricite de France. It is the largest computer code with this software (260 tubes, 1800 computation points, 19 water-steam cavities, 9 pumps, 6 turbines, 32 control system elements). It simulates the general operating conditions of a 900-MW(electric) CP2 power plant by computing the main physical parameters from the reactor core to the condenser. The study was performed by the study and research department (Reactor Physics Division) with the help of SEPTEN following an SPT (power operation department) request. It consisted of identifying the change in margins with respect to emergency shutdown protections (especially for ..delta..T protections) as a function of the number of plugged steam generators (1, 2, or 3) and the degree of plugging (10, 20, and 30%) under the following operating conditions: (1) steady state at 100% full power; and (2) main transients: manual load rejection, load rejection induced by grid fault, turbine tripping. The purpose was to assess the effect of a large number of steam generator plugged tubes on the behavior of the plant to secure a long-term prediction for the date of replacement of these steam generators.

Agnoux, D.; Chenal, J.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Options for Generating Steam Efficiently  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes how plant engineers can efficiently generate steam when there are steam generators and Heat Recovery Steam Generators in their plant. The process consists of understanding the performance characteristics of the various equipment...

Ganapathy, V.

39

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

Lynne M. Stevens

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

M. Patterson; C. Park

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The next generation of power reactors - safety characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The next generation of commercial nuclear power reactors is characterized by a new approach to achieving reliability of their safety systems. In contrast to current generation reactors, these designs apply passive safety features that rely on gravity-driven transfer processes or stored energy, such as gas-pressurized accumulators or electric batteries. This paper discusses the passive safety system of the AP600 and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) designs.

Modro, S.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Characteristics of electromagnetic interference generated during discharge of Mylar samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the measurements of the electromagnetic interference (EMI) generated during discharges of Mylar samples. The two components of EMI, the conducted emission and the radiated emission, are characterized by the replacement current and the radiated RF spectrum respectively. The measured radiated RF spectra reveal important information on the source of the electromagnetic radiation. The possible sources are the replacement current pulse and the discharged generated plasma. The scaling of the amplitudes of the EMI, as a function of the area of the test sample, is also discussed.

Leung, P.L.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Efficient gas stream cooling in Second-Generation PFBC plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coal-fueled Advanced or Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor concept (APFBC) is an efficient combined cycle in which coal is carbonized (partially gasified) to fuel a gas turbine, gas turbine exhaust heats feedwater for the steam cycle, and carbonizer char is used to generate steam for a steam turbine while heating combustion air for the gas turbine. The system can be described as an energy cascade in which chemical energy in solid coal is converted to gaseous form and flows to the gas turbine followed by the steam turbine, where it is converted to electrical power. Likewise, chemical energy in the char flows to both turbines generating electrical power in parallel. The fuel gas and vitiated air (PFBC exhaust) streams must be cleaned of entrained particulates by high-temperature equipment representing significant extensions of current technology. The energy recovery in the APFBC cycle allows these streams to be cooled to lower temperatures without significantly reducing the efficiency of the plant. Cooling these streams would allow the use of lower-temperature gas cleanup equipment that more closely approaches commercially available equipment, reducing cost and technological risk, and providing an earlier path to commercialization. This paper describes the performance effects of cooling the two hottest APFBC process gas streams: carbonizer fuel gas and vitiated air. Each cooling variation is described in terms of energy utilization, cycle efficiency, and cost implications.

White, J.S.; Horazak, D.A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Bulk Electricity Generating Technologies This appendix describes the technical characteristics and cost and performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and technologies expected to be available to meet bulk power generation needs during the period of the power plan PRICES The price forecasts for coal, fuel oil and natural gas are described in Appendix B. COAL-FIRED STEAM-ELECTRIC PLANTS Coal-fired steam-electric power plants are a mature technology, in use for over

46

Stochastic Modeling and Analysis of Plant Microtubule System Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problem. Overall, we build a comprehensive framework for analysis and control of microtubule organization in plant cells using a wide range of models and methodologies in conjunction. This research also has broader impacts related to the fields of bio-energy...

Eren, Ezgi

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

Experimental Study on the Thermal Argon Plasma Generation and Jet Length Change Characteristics at Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The generation, jet length and flow-regime change characteristics of argon plasma issuing into ambient air have been experimentally examined. Different torch structures have been used in the tests. Laminar pla...

Wenxia Pan; Xian Meng; Chengkang Wu; Xi Chen

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A new Rankine cycle for hydrogen-fired power generation plants and its exergetic efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel power generation cycle is proposed in this paper taking hydrogen as fuel and using steam generated by hydrogen firing as working fluid. The progress of the development work and side issues such as the application of hydrogen combustion turbines to environmentally clean fossil fuel power plants for early commercialisation of the system are reviewed. We propose the hydrogen-fired Rankine cycle as similar to (C) type developed earlier by Hisadome et al. and Sugishita et al. and then making a new design of it by increasing the performance characteristics and efficiencies with (reheating, regenerative and recuperation) of the working fluid of the bottoming cycle respectively, and in this case we present two types (C1 and C2). In the case of type C2 the cycle is called the ''New Rankine Cycle''. These cycles are also compared with the Rankine cycle of type (C) for hydrogen-fired to show the advantages of the performance characteristics of the new design at which the highest value of exergetic efficiency reaches 63.58% as HHV at 1700°C of the combustor discharge temperature. These cycles are analysed through thermodynamics, particularly by exergy analysis, and the performance characteristics of the cycles are also studied.

Mohammed Ghiyath Soufi; Terushige Fujii; Katsumi Sugimoto; Hitoshi Asano

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Electric power generating plant having direct-coupled steam and compressed-air cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

Drost, M.K.

1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Electric power generating plant having direct coupled steam and compressed air cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

Drost, Monte K. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A review of the secondary plant modifications on steam generator performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides recommendations for modifications in the secondary system of existing pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants for the purpose of arresting the problem of steam generator corrosion.

Asarpota, A.; Snaith, R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Power plants coordination for economic and environmental load dispatch of thermal power plants with wind generation systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economic load dispatch (ELD) and economic emission dispatch (EED) have been applied to obtain generation scheduling of thermal power plants at optimum fuel cost and emissions. Due to limited availability of quality coal, issue of environmental emissions and high prices of coal, installation of renewable energy systems are suggested in power grid. Renewable energy system preferably wind generators are used in co-working with thermal plant which reduces generation cost, coal requirement and environmental emissions. This paper presents Newton-Raphson method to obtain ELD and EED. System simulation and programming is carried out in MATLAB environment. Analysis has been made on generation cost and for nitrous oxides emissions only due to its harmful effects and its rising tendency with excess air. Price penalty factor is also calculated to determine emission cost. Doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) is suggested as wind energy systems in combination with coal-based thermal plant. Performance results related to generation scheduling, transmission line loading, bus voltages, total cost and environmental emissions are shown for coal-based thermal power plant and with co-generation. The investigation shows that with co-generation, coal-based thermal power plant runs at minimum emissions level which further reflects on the generation economy.

Kishor B. Porate; Krishna L. Thakre; Ghanashyam Bodhe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Property:EIA/861/OperatesGeneratingPlant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OperatesGeneratingPlant OperatesGeneratingPlant Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Boolean. Description: Operates Generating Plant Entity operates power generating plants (Y or N) [1] References ↑ EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2008 - F861 File Layout-2008.doc Pages using the property "EIA/861/OperatesGeneratingPlant" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) + true + AEP Generating Company + true + AES Eastern Energy LP + true + AGC Division of APG Inc + true + Akiachak Native Community Electric Co + true + Alabama Municipal Elec Authority + true + Alabama Power Co + true + Alaska Electric & Energy Coop + true + Alaska Electric Light&Power Co + true + Alaska Energy Authority + true +

55

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants (NGGPP) process data for binary cycle plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants (NGGPP) study provides the firm estimates - in the public domain - of the cost and performance of U.S. geothermal systems and their main components in the early 1990s. The study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Research Program, managed for DOE by Evan Hughes of the Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA, and conducted by John Brugman and others of the CE Holt Consulting Firm, Pasadena, CA. The printed NGGPP reports contain detailed data on the cost and performance for the flash steam cycles that were characterized, but not for the binary cycles. The nine Tables in this document are the detailed data sheets on cost and performance for the air cooled binary systems that were studied in the NGGPP.

Not Available

1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Author Electric Energy Publications Inc. Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Citation Electric Energy Publications Inc.. North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update [Internet]. [updated 2010;cited 2010]. Available from:

57

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011). Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download February 17, 2012 EIS-0476: Notice of Adoption of Final Environmental Impact Statement Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4, Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Support Funding for Construction, Burke County, GA

58

Spectroscopy of infrared emission characteristics of thermal power plant boiler coal ash deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits on a coal combustion boiler of an electric power plant are investigated. Normal emittance spectra in 2.5-25 m wavelength region and total normal emittance are measured on four kinds of ash at 600-1100K ... Keywords: ash deposit, emittance, pulverized coal combustion boiler furnace, spectroscopic measurement, thermal radiation

Aleksandar Saljnikov; Darko Goricanec; Danijela Dobersek; Dorde Kozic

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of electricity generation plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address challenges in attaining operational excellence for clean energy plants, the U.S.Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR). The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real time,high-fidelity dynamic simulators with operator training systems and 3D virtual immersive training systems into an integrated energy plant and control room environment.

Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was established under the Energy Policy Act in August 2005 (EPACT-2005). EPACT-2005 defined an overall plan and timetable for NGNP research, design, licensing, construction and operation by the end of FY 2021. At the time that EPACT-2005 was passed, it was envisioned that key aspects of the project included: NGNP is based on R&D activities supported by the Gen-IV Nuclear Energy initiative;  NGNP is to be used to generate electricity, to produce hydrogen or (to do) both;  The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be the lead national lab for the project;  NGNP will be sited at the INL in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

62

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

63

Improving heat capture for power generation in coal gasification plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving the steam cycle design to maximize power generation is demonstrated using pinch analysis targeting techniques. Previous work models the steam pressure level in composite curves based on its saturation temperature ...

Botros, Barbara Brenda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Co-Generation at a Practical Plant Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Steam Turbine: A basic description of how a steam turbine converts available heat into mechanical energy to define the formulae used for the cost comparisons in the subsequent examples. Co-Generation: Comparison between condensing cycle...

Feuell, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant April 17, 2008 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it is seeking public and industry input on how to best achieve the goals and meet the requirements for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) demonstration project work at DOE's Idaho National Laboratory. DOE today issued a Request for Information and Expressions of Interest from prospective participants and interested parties on utilizing cutting-edge high temperature gas reactor technology in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by enabling nuclear energy to replace fossil fuels used by industry for process heat. "This is an opportunity to advance the development of safe, reliable, and

66

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

67

Testing of power-generating gas-turbine plants at Russian electric power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper cites results of thermal testing of various types and designs of power-generating gas-turbine plants (GTP), which have been placed in service at electric-power stations in Russia in recent years. Therm...

G. G. Olkhovskii; A. V. Ageev; S. V. Malakhov

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Electrical generation plant design practice intern experience at Power Systems Engineering, Inc.: an internship report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. One involved design of a 480 MW power plant. The other was the design of a 8.2 MW induction generator for cogeneration. The author's activities during this period can be categorized into two major areas. First, technically oriented...

Lee, Ting-Zern Joe, 1950-

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

69

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

70

Table 2. Ten Largest Plants by Generation Capacity, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" Oklahoma" "1. Northeastern","Coal","Public Service Co of Oklahoma",1815 "2. Muskogee","Coal","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1524 "3. Seminole","Gas","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1504 "4. Kiamichi Energy Facility","Gas","Kiowa Power Partners LLC",1178 "5. Redbud Power Plant","Gas","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1160 "6. Oneta Energy Center","Gas","Calpine Central L P",1086 "7. Riverside","Gas","Public Service Co of Oklahoma",1070 "8. Sooner","Coal","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1046 "9. GRDA","Coal","Grand River Dam Authority",1010

71

MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) retrofit of a coal-fired generating plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the following appendices on the design of a coal-fired MHD retrofit: AVCO part load study; AVCO full load calculations; MSE mass balance calculations; Corette/MHD combined plant overall efficiency estimate; Corette boiler efficiency estimate; dynamic modeling and control simulation; combustor and nozzle scaling approach; field inductance and energy calculations; diagnostic instrumentation listing; equipment list; cost estimate factors; equipment and vendor costs data; CFFF test information; HRSR-ESP seed/ash calculations; and K{sub 2}/S molar ratio.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The O H E G plant is a revolutionary concept using tidal energy designed by FreeFlow 69 The plant uses tidal energy to create electricity 24 hours a day making this a unique project 24 hour power is produced by using both the kinetic energy in tidal flow and the potential energy created by tidal height changes The O H E G plant is completely independent of the wind farm however it does make an ideal foundation for offshore wind turbines combining both tidal energy and wind energy The O H E G plant is not detrimental to the surrounding environment or ecosystem and due to its offshore location it will not be visually offensive

74

New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Modelling and testing of the force-generating characteristics of magnetorheological dampers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a model for a magnetorheological damper, and subsequent experimental results. Two cylindrical piston type MR dampers, which develop almost identical friction and viscous forces, were tested. These dampers were designed to provide different combinations of fluid flow and magnetic field orientation. In one damper, the magnetic field and magnetic field orientation are designed to be primarily parallel to each other, and in the other damper, the field and flow are designed to be perpendicular. Each actuator was tested under different conditions of applied current and piston speed, and the force-generating characteristics were studied. The two damper designs will be introduced and a comparison between results from the model and the experiments will be made. In general, the model captures the forcegenerating characteristics of the dampers; however, it does not account for field-flow orientations.

Muturi G. Muriuki; William W. Clark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Characteristic measurements of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas generated in a Planckian radiation environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temporally and spatially resolved characteristics of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas were studied using x-ray spectroscopy. The plasma was generated in the near-Planckian radiation environment within gold hohlraum targets irradiated by laser pulses with a total energy of 2.4 kJ in 1 ns. The contributions of silicon ions at different charge states to the specific components of the measured absorption spectra were also investigated. It was found that each main feature in the absorption spectra of the measured silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas was contributed by two neighboring silicon ionic species.

Dong Quanli; Wang Shoujun; Li Yutong; Zhang Yi; Zhao Jing [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei Huigang; Shi Jianrong; Zhao Gang [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang Jiyan; Gu Yuqiu; Ding Yongkun; Wen Tianshu; Zhang Wenhai; Hu Xin; Liu Shenye; Zhang Lin; Tang Yongjian; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian [Research Center for Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Nishimura, Hiroaki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Efficiency analysis of hydroelectric generating plants: A case study for Portugal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper estimates changes in total productivity, breaking this down into technically efficient change and technological change, by means of data envelopment analysis (DEA) applied to the hydroelectric energy generating plants of EDP the Portugal Electricity Company. The aim of this procedure is to seek out those best practices that will lead to improved performance in the energy market. We rank the plants according to their change in total productivity for the period 20012004, concluding that some plants experienced productivity growth while others experienced a decrease in productivity. The implications arising from the study are that EDP should adopt an internal benchmark management procedure in order to evaluate the relative position of each hydroelectric generating plant and to adopt managerial strategies designed to catch up with the frontier of best practices. As the frontier is shifting along the time, constant efforts are needed in this respect along the time.

Carlos Pestana Barros

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants January 25, 2013 - 11:10am Addthis AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What Does AVESTAR Provide? Advanced dynamic simulation, control and virtual plant technologies

79

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants January 25, 2013 - 11:10am Addthis AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What Does AVESTAR Provide? Advanced dynamic simulation, control and virtual plant technologies

80

Tracking new coal-fired power plants: coal's resurgence in electric power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This information package is intended to provide an overview of 'Coal's resurgence in electric power generation' by examining proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under consideration in the USA. The results contained in this package are derived from information that is available from various tracking organizations and news groups. Although comprehensive, this information is not intended to represent every possible plant under consideration but is intended to illustrate the large potential that exists for new coal-fired power plants. It should be noted that many of the proposed plants are likely not to be built. For example, out of a total portfolio (gas, coal, etc.) of 500 GW of newly planned power plant capacity announced in 2001, 91 GW have been already been scrapped or delayed. 25 refs.

NONE

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

Puga, J. Nicolas

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Analysis of Temporal and Spatial Characteristics on Output of Wind Farms with Doubly Fed Induction Generator Wind Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the large number of wind turbines and covering too large area in a large wind farm, wake effects among wind turbines and wind speed time delays will have a greater impact of wind farms models. Taking wind farms with doubly fed induction generator(DFIG) ... Keywords: wind farm, modeling, temporal and spatial characteristics, DFIG, output characteristics

Shupo Bu; Xunwen Su

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Chemical characteristics of waters in Karst Formations at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several waste disposal sites are located adjacent to or on a karst aquifer composed of the Cambrian Maynardville Limestone (Cmn) and the Cambrian Copper Ridge Dolomite (Ccr) at the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN. Highly variable chemical characteristics (i.e., hardness) can indicate that the portion of the aquifer tapped by a particular well is subject to a significant quick-flow component where recharge to the system is rapid and water levels and water quality change rapidly in response to precipitation events. Water zones in wells at the Y-12 Plant that exhibit quick-flow behavior (i.e., high hydraulic conductivity) are identified based on their geochemical characteristics and variability in geochemical parameters, and observations made during drilling of the wells. The chemical data used in this study consist of between one and 20 chemical analyses for each of 102 wells and multipart monitoring zones. Of these 102 water zones, 10 were consistently undersaturated with respect to calcite suggesting active dissolution. Repeat sampling of water zones shows that both supersaturation and undersaturation with respect to dolomite occurs in 46 water zones. Twelve of the zones had partial pressure of CO{sub 2} near atmospheric values suggesting limited interaction between recharge waters and the gases and solids in the vadose zone and aquifer, and hence, relatively short residence times. The preliminary data suggest that the Cmn is composed of a complicated network of interconnected, perhaps anastomosing, cavities. The degree of interconnection between the identified cavities is yet to be determined, although it is expected that there is a significant vertical and lateral interconnection between the cavities located at shallow depths in the Cnm throughout Bear Creek Valley and the Y-12 Plant area.

Shevenell, L.A. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Solar Power Plant Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Facility Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Developer FPL Energy Location Martin County, Florida Coordinates 27.051214°, -80.553389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.051214,"lon":-80.553389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

85

A Systematic Comparison on Power Block Efficiencies for CSP Plants with Direct Steam Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The increase of the process temperature of concentrating solar power plants above the degradation temperature of thermal oil (400C) opens the way for increased power block efficiency and thus reduced cost of electricity production. Direct solar steam generation is one technical option to follow this path. The paper presents different power block designs for direct steam generation parabolic trough and linear Fresnel power plants. Based on a systematic modelling approach, results for efficiency gains are derived and compared against a reference case of an oil-based plant. The results show that different reheat configurations are feasible and that efficiency gains in the range from 4 to 6% can be expected based on todays or near future solar collector technology.

T. Hirsch; A. Khenissi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Field ionization characteristics of an ion source array for neutron generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new deuterium ion source is being developed to improve the performance of existing compact neutron generators. The ion source is a microfabricated array of metal tips with an integrated gate (i.e., grid) and produces deuterium ions by field ionizing (or field desorbing) a supply of deuterium gas. Deuterium field ion currents from arrays at source temperatures of 77 K and 293 K are studied. Ion currents from single etched-wire tips operating under the same conditions are used to help understand array results. I-F characteristics of the arrays were found to follow trends similar to those of the better understood single etched-wire tip results; however, the fields achieved by the arrays are limited by electrical breakdown of the structure. Neutron production by field ionization at 293 K was demonstrated for the first time from microfabricated array structures with integrated gates.

Bargsten Johnson, B.; Schwoebel, P. R. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)] [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Resnick, P. J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Holland, C. E. [SRI International, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)] [SRI International, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Hertz, K. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Chichester, D. L. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States)] [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

87

Short-Circuit Characteristics of Asynchronous Generators and Double-Fed Induction Generators Inter-connected Grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the electrical transient mode of induction generators is studied, establishing the short-circuit current sequence component of wind generators are when faulty occuring in collect feeder, ... type, ...

Su Chang-Sheng; Li Feng-Ting; Liu Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Table 3. Nuclear Reactor Characteristics and Operational History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Nuclear Reactor Characteristics and Operational History" "Plant Name","Generator ID","Type","Reactor Supplier and Model","Construction Start","Grid Connection","Commercial...

89

A HIRARC model for safety and risk evaluation at a hydroelectric power generation plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There are many formal techniques for the systematic analysis of occupational safety and health in general, and risk analysis in particular, for power generation plants at hydroelectric power stations. This study was initiated in order to create a HIRARC model for the evaluation of environmental safety and health at a hydroelectric power generation plant at Cameron Highlands in Pahang, Malaysia. The HIRARC model was used to identify the primary and secondary hazards which may be inherent in the system which were determined as a serious threat for plant operation and maintenance. The primary tools of the model consisted of, generic check-lists, work place inspection schemes which included task observation and interview, safety analysis as well as accident and incident investigation. For risk assessment, the Likert scale was complemented by the severity matrix analysis in order to determine the probability and extent of safety and health at the study power generation plant. These were used to identify and recommend control measures which included engineering and administrative aspects as well as the use of personal protective equipment (PPE). A total of forty-one important hazard items were identified in the system at target power generation plant. These hazards were mainly identified by means of checklists which were sourced from literature and subsequently customized for the current purpose. Risk assessment was conducted by initially classifying the hazards into three levels such as Low, Medium and High. Generally 66% of the hazards identified were at low risk, 32% at medium and 2% at high risk. This indicated that there was sufficient awareness and commitment to safety and health at the study power station. Meanwhile the Power Station was also certified by MS 1722:2005, OHSAS 18001, MS ISO 14001:2004, MS ISO 9001:2000 and scheduled waste regulation 2005 which give credibility to the current study in creating a working model which may find widespread application in the future.

A.M. Saedi; J.J. Thambirajah; Agamuthu Pariatamby

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

High Energy Utilization, Co-Generation Nuclear power Plants With Static Energy Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to being cost effective, very small nuclear power plants with static energy conversion could meet the needs and the energy mix in underdeveloped countries and remote communities, which may include electricity, residential and industrial space heating, seawater desalination, and/or high temperature process heat or steam for industrial uses. These plants are also an attractive option in naval, marine, and undersea applications, when the absence of a sound signature is highly desirable. An Analysis is performed of Gas Cooled Reactor (CGR) and Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (LMR), very small nuclear power plants with static energy conversion, using a combination of options. These include Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converters (AMTECs) and both single segment and segmented thermoelectric converters. The total energy utilization of these plants exceeds 88%. It includes the fraction of the reactor's thermal power converted into electricity and delivered to the Grid at 6.6 kVA and those used for residential and industrial space heating at {approx}370 K, seawater desalination at 400 K, and/or high temperature process heat or steam at {approx}850 K. In addition to its inherently high reliability, modularity, low maintenance and redundancy, static energy conversion used in the present study could deliver electricity to the Grid at a net efficiency of 29.5%. A LMR plant delivers 2-3 times the fraction of the reactor thermal power converted into electricity in a GCR plant, but could not provide for both seawater desalination and high temperature process heat/steam concurrently, which is possible in GCR plants. The fraction of the reactor's thermal power used for non-electrical power generation in a GCR plant is {approx} 10 - 15% higher than in a LMR plant. (authors)

El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel P. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies and Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Facility Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer FPL Energy Location Orlando, Florida Coordinates 28.5383355°, -81.3792365° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.5383355,"lon":-81.3792365,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

92

DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Facility DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer FPL Energy Location DeSoto County, Florida Coordinates 27.2142078°, -81.7787021° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.2142078,"lon":-81.7787021,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

93

Impact of wind power on generation economy and emission from coal based thermal power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major chunk of power generation is based on coal fueled thermal power plant. Due to increasing demand of power there will be future crises of coal reservoirs and its costing. Apart from this, coal based thermal power plant is the main source of environmental emissions like carbon dioxides (CO2), sulfur dioxides (SO2) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) which not only degrades the air quality but also is responsible for global warming, acid rain etc. This paper proposes a combined working of Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) with coal based Synchronous Generator (SG) in the MATLAB environment. STATCOM is suggested at common coupling point to maintain voltage stability and also maintain the system in synchronism. Analysis have been made for environmental emissions, coal requirement and system economy for both the cases, when the total load supplied by only SG and with the combination. Emission analysis have been also made with the application of washed coal in SG. With the impact of DFIG energy generation from SG have been reduces which proportionally affects on coal requirement, generation cost and environmental emissions. Application of washed coal improves the performance of SG and also reduces the environmental emissions.

K.B. Porate; K.L. Thakre; G.L. Bodhe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Decommissioning of Large Components as an Example of Steam Generator from PWR Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the procedure for the qualification of large components (Steam Generators) as an IP-2 package, the ship transport abroad to Sweden and the external treatment of this components to disburden the Nuclear Power Plant from this task, to assure an accelerated the deconstruction phase and to minimize the amount of waste. In conclusion: The transport of large components to an external treatment facility is linked with many advantages for a Nuclear Power Plant: - Disburden of the Nuclear Power Plant from the treatment of such components, - no timely influence on the deconstruction phase of the power reactor and therewith an accelerated deconstruction phase and - minimization of the waste to be returned and therewith less demand of required waste storage capacity. (authors)

Beverungen, M. [GNS Gesellschaft fur Nuklear-Service mbH, Hollestrabe 7A (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Hydrogen generation by metal corrosion in simulated Waste Isolation Pilot Plant environments. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion and gas-generation characteristics of four material types: low-carbon steel (the current waste packaging material for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), Cu-base and Ti-base (alternative packaging) materials, and Al-base (simulated waste) materials were determined in both the liquid and vapor phase of Brine A, a brine representative of an intergranular Salado Formation brine. Test environments consisted primarily of anoxic brine with overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}. Limited tests of low-carbon steel were also performed in simulated-backfill environments and in brine environments with pH values ranging from 3 to 11. Low-carbon steel reacted at a slow, measurable rate with anoxic brine, liberating H{sub 2} on an equimolar basis with Fe reacted. Presence of CO{sub 2} caused the initial reaction to proceed more rapidly, but CO{sub 2}-induced passivation stopped the reaction if the CO{sub 2} were present in sufficient quantities. Addition of H{sub 2}S to a CO{sub 2}-passivated system caused reversal of the passivation. Low-carbon steel immersed in brine with H{sub 2}S showed no reaction, apparently because of passivation of the steel by formation of FeS. Addition of CO{sub 2} to an H{sub 2}S-passivated system did not reverse the passivation. Cu- and Ti-base materials showed essentially no corrosion when exposed to brine and overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S except for the rapid and complete reaction between Cu-base materials and H{sub 2}S. The Al-base materials reacted at approximately the same rate as low-carbon steel when immersed in anoxic Brine A; considerably more rapidly in the presence of CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S; and much more rapidly when iron was present in the system as a brine contaminant. High-purity Al was much more susceptible to corrosion than the 6061 alloy. No significant reaction took place on any material in any environment in the vapor-phase exposures.

Telander, M.R.; Westerman, R.E. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Correlation among the transient characteristics of doubly fed induction generators under grid fault  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) under grid fault has increasingly gained attention among researchers for the better protection and control of power system. However existing studies which focus on the single DFIG are incomplete because other DFIGs can significantly affect the transient process of DFIG in the wind farm. Thus this paper investigates the correlation among the transient characteristics of DFIGs when a three-phase fault occurs in power grids. A vector model of a DFIG is built with consideration for the excitation regulation. Transient processes of the DFIG when wind farm contains different numbers of DFIGs are mathematically deduced by dividing the fault process into two periods according to converter regulation. The analytic expressions indicate the relationship between the transient electrical variables of a DFIG and the number of DFIGs is proposed to acquire the varying pattern of the correlation. The correlation phenomenon is verified both through analysis and simulation which provide positive implications for the operation of wind power integrated systems.

Jinxin Ouyang; Xiaofu Xiong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Informing the next nuclear generation - how does the Ginna plant branch do it?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of us are familiar with the latest advertising phrase, ``Our children are our future.`` This phrase has been used in so many instances - from concerns about waste, Social Security, and the federal deficit to drug abuse and violence. One more area can be added to the list and advertised nuclear power. Since the establishment of the Ginna plant branch (GPB) in 1992, our target audience has been the next nuclear generation (our children), but our vehicle for dissemination has been the current generation (the adults). Have you ever thought about how often your opinions affect the children you come in contact with? One of GPB`s goals is to provide as much information as possible to teachers, neighbors, and civic organizations of our community so that there is a nuclear future that can be carried on by the next generation.

Saavedra, A. [Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation, Ontario, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Recommended practice for fire protection for electric generating plants and high voltage direct current converter stations. 2005 ed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The standard outlines fire safety recommendations for gas, oil, coal, and alternative fuel electric generating plants including high voltage direct current converter stations and combustion turbine units greater than 7500 hp used for electric generation. Provisions apply to both new and existing plants. The document provides fire prevention and fire protection recommendations for the: safety of construction and operating personnel; physical integrity of plant components; and continuity of plant operations. The 2005 edition includes revisions and new art that clarify existing provisions. 5 annexes.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

John Saurwein

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Evaluation of cracking in steam generator feedwater piping in pressurized water reactor plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cracking in feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to steam generators in 15 pressurized water reactor plants. Sections with cracks from nine plants are examined with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Using transmission electron microscopy, fatigue striations are observed on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a cyclic stress value of 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses and it is concluded that the overriding factor in the cracking problem was the presence of such undocumented cyclic loads.

Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Geothermal Power Plants Minimizing Solid Waste and Recovering Minerals  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Although many geothermal power plants generate no appreciable solid waste, the unique characteristics of some geothermal fluids require special attention to handle entrained solid byproducts.

103

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47 1.50 AEO 1996 1994 1.32 1.29 1.28 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.26 1.28

104

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.502753725,1.549729719,1.64272351,1.727259934,1.784039735,1.822135762,1.923203642,2.00781457,2.134768212,2.217425497,2.303725166,2.407715232,2.46134106,2.637086093,2.775389073,2.902293046,3.120364238,3.298013245 "AEO 1995",,1.4212343,1.462640338,1.488780998,1.545300242,1.585877053,1.619428341,1.668671498,1.7584219,1.803937198,1.890547504,1.968695652,2.048913043,2.134750403,2.205281804,2.281690821,2.375434783,2.504830918 "AEO 1996",,,1.346101641,1.350594221,1.369020126,1.391737646,1.421340737,1.458772082,1.496497523,1.561369914,1.619940033,1.674758358,1.749420803,1.800709877,1.871110564,1.924495246,2.006850327,2.048938234,2.156821499

105

Market Characteristics for Efficient Integration of Variable Generation in the Western Interconnection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overriding purpose of this report is to establish the physical requirements of a power system that can accommodate high levels of variable generation.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment Maximizing electrical efficiency Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill Maximizing equipment uptime Minimizing water consumption Minimizing post-combustion emissions The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWhs of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Active noise within the generating/pumping groups of a large hydroelectric plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work is related to a feasibility study for the implementation of an active noise control system to reduce the hydraulic turbomachines noise in the Presenzano power plant. Previous studies showed that interested turbines are low frequencies noise sources generating pure tones at 150 and 200 Hz (third and fourth harmonics of the turbines BPF). At these frequencies passive noise control systems are ineffective in front of relevant costs and an active approach was so decided to be tested. In accordance with a classical architecture the preliminary system was composed of four error microphones four secondary noise sources and a digital controller implementing an adaptive digital filter. Main performed activities could be identified through four successive steps: (i) analysis of the turbomachines generated primary field levels and space distribution (ii) secondary sources generated noise field measurement ten different loudspeakers locations were investigated at this stage; (iii) sensor and actuator locations optimization by the use of a genetic algorithms procedure and (iv) active noise control tests. A mean reduction of 15 dB at 150 Hz and 7.5 dB at 200 Hz was measured at the error sensors during these tests revealing the good opportunities of such an approach but also the opportune improvement to pass at a practical implementation.

Leonardo Lecce; Massimo Viscardi; Bruno Maja; Vincenzo Limone; Mario DIschia; Francesco Di Maso

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Management activities for retrieved and newly generated transuranic waste, Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to assess the potential environmental impacts of the retrieval and processing of retrieved and newly generated transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), including the transportation of the processes TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. A new TRU Waste Facility (TWF) will be constructed at SRP to retrieve and process the SRP TRU waste in interim storage to meet WIPP criteria. This EA has been prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, and the requirements of the Council of Environmental Quality Regulations for implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500--1508). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires the assessment of environmental consequences of all major federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. This document describes the environmental impact of constructing and operating the TWF facility for processing and shipment of the TRU waste to WIPP and considers alternatives to the proposed action. 40 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs.

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Power System Frequency Control Characteristics as a Function of Nuclear Power Plant Participation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the participation of nuclear power plants in electric power system increases then they have to be ... take an increasing part in the frequency and power control of the power system. However there are specifi...

Z. Domachowski

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

L.E. Demick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Experimental investment of a pulse combustion steam generator and assessment of its environmental characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of a steam generator constructed on the basis of a pulse combustion apparatus equipped with a swirl combustion chamber and an aerodynamic vale is described, and results of its experimenta; investment are presented. The quantity of nitrogen oxide emissions is estimated. A schematic arrangement for practical application of such an apparatus is proposed.

Tereshchenko, M.A.; Bychenok, V.I.; Mozgovoi, N.V. [Voronezh State Technical University, Voronezh (Russian Federation)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Table 12. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2.03 2.17 2.33 2.52 2.73 2.99 AEO 1983 1.99 2.10 2.24 2.39 2.57 2.76 4.29 AEO 1984 1.90 2.01 2.13 2.28 2.44 2.61 3.79 AEO 1985 1.68 1.76 1.86 1.95 2.05 2.19 2.32 2.49 2.66 2.83 3.03 AEO 1986 1.61 1.68 1.75 1.83 1.93 2.05 2.19 2.35 2.54 2.73 2.92 3.10 3.31 3.49 3.68 AEO 1987 1.52 1.55 1.65 1.75 1.84 1.96 2.11 2.27 2.44 3.55 AEO 1989* 1.50 1.51 1.68 1.77 1.88 2.00 2.13 2.26 2.40 2.55 2.70 2.86 3.00 AEO 1990 1.46 1.53 2.07 2.76 3.7 AEO 1991 1.51 1.58 1.66 1.77 1.88 1.96 2.06 2.16 2.28 2.41 2.57 2.70 2.85 3.04 3.26 3.46 3.65 3.87 4.08 4.33 AEO 1992 1.54 1.61 1.66 1.75 1.85 1.97 2.03 2.14 2.26 2.44 2.55 2.69 2.83 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.58 3.78 4.01 AEO 1993 1.92 1.54 1.61 1.70

115

Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mono-container fuel cell generator (10) contains a layer of interior insulation (14), a layer of exterior insulation (16) and a single housing (20) between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation (14) in the interior (12) of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650.degree. C., where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing (20) below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling.

Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mono-container fuel cell generator contains a layer of interior insulation, a layer of exterior insulation and a single housing between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation in the interior of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650 C, where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling. 7 figs.

Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

117

Accident Generated Particulate Materials and Their Characteristics -- A Review of Background Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of the amount of radioactive particulate material initially airborne (source term) during accidents. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has surveyed the literature, gathering information on the amount and size of these particles that has been developed from limited experimental work, measurements made from operational accidents, and known aerosol behavior. Information useful for calculating both liquid and powder source terms is compiled in this report. Potential aerosol generating events discussed are spills, resuspension, aerodynamic entrainment, explosions and pressurized releases, comminution, and airborne chemical reactions. A discussion of liquid behavior in sprays, sparging, evaporation, and condensation as applied to accident situations is also included.

Sutter, S. L.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Web-Queryable Large-Scale Data Sets for Hypothesis Generation in Plant Biology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...improve function prediction are key to...understanding the plant as a collection...technology and machine learning methods, short...that mediate disease resistance...to available plant large-scale...gene function prediction, similar to...

Siobhan M. Brady; Nicholas J. Provart

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

120

Physical characteristics of gliding arc discharge plasma generated in a laval nozzle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamic behavior of gliding arc discharge generated in a Laval nozzle has been investigated by electrical diagnostics and a high-speed camera. The results show that the voltage waveform keeps the initial shape as the gas flow rate is small, while it becomes less stable with increasing flow rate. During the first half of a cycle, the voltage rises and after that it decreases. In nitrogen and oxygen, the break down voltage for the arc is between 3.3 and 5.5 kV, while it is between 3.3-7.5 kV in air. The waveform of current I remains almost stable; and for nitrogen and oxygen, the maximum value of current I is between 0.28 and 0.46 A. With increasing flow rate, the power consumption in air first increases and then decreases; it remains in the range of 110-217 W, and gradually increases in nitrogen and oxygen. The power consumption in oxygen is lower than that in nitrogen; the input of the energy density decreases with increasing flow rate for all the three gases. The development of the arc is tracked and recorded by a high-speed camera. The cycle is stable at 10 ms for flow rates up to 1 m{sup 3} h{sup -1}. At a higher flow rate, the cycle becomes unstable.

Lu, S. Y.; Sun, X. M.; Li, X. D.; Yan, J. H. [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Institute for Thermal Power Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Du, C. M. [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Intraspecific variability for seed protein content and selected plant characteristics in okra, Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and . 2000 g. The sample was folded up 1n the poly- vinylchlor1de and labeled with the research number (RN) by placing a 19 9mm x 15mm Avery adhesive label on the polyvinylchloride. Samples were placed tn numerical order tn small boxes and stored until... replicated study. Percent nitrogen (Z, N) and percent protein (X P) for okra seed from okra plant introductions or cultivars of diverse origin . Page 26 27 Number of genotypes analyzed and percent of the total number of genotypes analyzed in a...

Krennerich, Carol Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

122

The design of solar chimney power plant for sustainable power generation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The solar chimney power plant (SCPP) also known as solar updraft tower is a nonconcentrating solar thermal technology, which employs both solar and wind energy (more)

Asante, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Characteristics of carbonized sludge for co-combustion in pulverized coal power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co-combustion of sewage sludge can destabilize its combustion profile due to high volatility, which results in unstable flame. We carried out fuel reforming for sewage sludge by way of carbonization at pyrolysis temperature of 300-500 deg. C. Fuel characteristics of carbonized sludge at each temperature were analyzed. As carbonization temperature increased, fuel ratio increased, volatile content reduced, and atomic ratio relation of H/C and O/C was similar to that of lignite. The analysis result of FT-IR showed the decrease of aliphatic C-H bond and O-C bond in carbonization. In the analysis result of TG-DTG, the thermogravimetry reduction temperature of carbonized sludge (CS400) was proven to be higher than that of dried sludge, but lower than that of sub-bituminous coal. Hardgrove grindability index increased in proportion to fuel ratio increase, where the carbonized sludge value of 43-110 was similar or higher than the coal value of 49-63. As for ash deposits, slagging and fouling index were higher than that of coal. When carbonized sludge (CS400) and coal were co-combusted in 1-10% according to calorific value, slagging tendency was low in all conditions, and fouling tendency was medium or high according to the compositions of coal.

Park, Sang-Woo [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Cheol-Hyeon, E-mail: jangch@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Microbial gas generation under expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository was investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosics (various types of paper) and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, neoprene, hypalon, and leaded hypalon) was examined. The rate of gas production from cellulose biodegradation in inundated samples incubated for 1,228 days at 30 C was biphasic, with an initial rapid rate up to approximately 600 days incubation, followed by a slower rate. The rate of total gas production in anaerobic samples containing mixed inoculum was as follows: 0.002 mL/g cellulose/day without nutrients; 0.004 mL/g cellulose/day with nutrients; and 0.01 mL/g cellulose/day in the presence of excess nitrate. Carbon dioxide production proceeded at a rate of 0.009 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in anaerobic samples without nutrients, 0.05 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the presence of nutrients, and 0.2 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day with excess nitrate. Adding nutrients and excess nitrate stimulated denitrification, as evidenced by the accumulation of N{sub 2}O in the headspace (200 {micro}mol/g cellulose). The addition of the potential backfill bentonite increased the rate of CO{sub 2} production to 0.3 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in anaerobic samples with excess nitrate. Analysis of the solution showed that lactic, acetic, propionic, butyric, and valeric acids were produced due to cellulose degradation. Samples incubated under anaerobic humid conditions for 415 days produced CO{sub 2} at a rate of 0.2 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the absence of nutrients, and 1 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the presence of bentonite and nutrients. There was no evidence of biodegradation of electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Giles, M.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A 2DH nonlinear Boussinesq-type wave model of improved dispersion, shoaling, and wave generation characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A modified Boussinesq-type model is derived to account for the propagation of either regular or irregular waves in two horizontal dimensions. An improvement of the dispersion and shoaling characteristics of the model is obtained by optimizing the coefficients of each term in the momentum equation, expanding in this way its applicability in very deep waters and thus overcoming a shortcoming of most models of the same type. The values of the coefficients are obtained by an inverse method in such a way as to satisfy exactly the dispersion relation in terms of both first and second-order analyses matching in parallel the associated shoaling gradient. Furthermore a physically more sound way to approach the evaluation of wave number in irregular wave fields is proposed. A modification of the wave generator boundary condition is also introduced in order to correctly simulate the phase celerity of each input wave component. The modified model is applied to simulate the propagation of breaking and non-breaking, regular and irregular, long and short crested waves in both one and two horizontal dimensions, in a variety of bottom profiles, such as of constant depth, mild slope, and in the presence of submerged obstacles. The simulations are compared with experimental data and analytical results, indicating very good agreement in most cases.

Michalis K. Chondros; Constantine D. Memos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Performance and emission characteristics of natural gas combined cycle power generation system with steam injection and oxyfuel combustion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Natural gas combined cycle power generation systems are gaining popularity due to their high power generation efficiency and reduced emission. In the present work, combined (more)

Varia, Nitin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The New Generation of Uranium In Situ Recovery Facilities: Design Improvements Should Reduce Radiological Impacts Relative to First Generation Uranium Solution Mining Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium In Situ Leaching / In Situ Recovery (ISL / ISR - also referred to as 'solution mining'), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and are expected to make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since the mid 1970's. However, current designs are expected to result in less radiological wastes and emissions relative to these 'first' generation plants (which were designed, constructed and operated through the 1980's). These early designs typically used alkaline leach chemistries in situ including use of ammonium carbonate which resulted in groundwater restoration challenges, open to air recovery vessels and high temperature calcining systems for final product drying vs the 'zero emissions' vacuum dryers as typically used today. Improved containment, automation and instrumentation control and use of vacuum dryers in the design of current generation plants are expected to reduce production of secondary waste byproduct material, reduce Radon emissions and reduce potential for employee exposure to uranium concentrate aerosols at the back end of the milling process. In Situ Recovery in the U.S. typically involves the circulation of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing (gaseous oxygen e.g) and complexing agents (carbon dioxide, e.g) into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant ( mill). Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. The radiological character of these processes are described using empirical data collected from many operating facilities. Additionally, the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these first generation facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of uranium ISR technologies and facilities. In summary: This paper has presented an overview of in situ Uranium recovery processes and associated major radiological aspects and monitoring considerations. Admittedly, the purpose was to present an overview of those special health physics considerations dictated by the in situ Uranium recovery technology, to point out similarities and differences to conventional mill programs and to contrast these alkaline leach facilities to modern day ISR designs. As evidenced by the large number of ISR projects currently under development in the U.S. and worldwide, non conventional Uranium recovery techniques

Brown, S.H. [CHP, SHB INC., Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Improving the Capacity or Output of a Steam Turbine Generator at XYZ Power Plant in Illinois  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and capacitance mapping ? Performed wedge tightness check by means of manual tap test ? Performed RTD functioning test ? Cleaned generator brush rigging ? Inspected generator brush rigging for signs of heating, arcing or other damage... turbine with a net generating rating of 366MW. The unit began commercial operation in 1976. Coal is received by rail and limestone by rail by rail or truck. Rail cars are unloaded in a rotary car dumper at a rate of 20-25 cars per hour. A 30 day...

Amoo-Otoo, John Kweku

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

129

Web-Queryable Large-Scale Data Sets for Hypothesis Generation in Plant Biology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...connectivity can be identified using Antipole, a graph clustering algorithm (Ferro et al...sequencing abilities in terms of time and cost. Within the next 10 years, thousands...members of photosynthesis-associated nuclear gene families in Arabidopsis. Plant Physiol...

Siobhan M. Brady; Nicholas J. Provart

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Investigation on the Excitation Capacitor for a Wind Pumping Plant Using Induction Generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a SEIG-IM system using a self excited induction generator driven by wind turbine and supplying an induction motor which is coupled to a centrifugal...

Manel Ouali; Mohamed Ben Ali Kamoun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Restoration of the graphite memory of a reactor in the third power-generating unit of the Leningrad nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The restoration of the graphite masonry of cell 52-16 in the reactor in the third power-generating unit of the Leningrad nuclear power plant is described. The process reduces to moving...

V. I. Lebedev; Yu. V. Garusov; M. A. Pavlov; A. N. Peunov; E. P. Kozlov

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Abstract-Private investment in generation plants in Ecuador has been null over the last 10 years due to several political  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract- Private investment in generation plants in Ecuador has been null over the last 10 years and the Ministry of Electricity are the only ones initiating the construction of new hydro plants of significant in place for the last 10 years, particularly in relation to incentive to private investment. Arguments

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

133

Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz: Preprint  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Doubly Fed Induction Generator Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz Preprint Eduard Muljadi, Mohit Singh, and Vahan Gevorgian To be presented at the IEEE Energy Conversion Congress and Exhibition Raleigh, North Carolina September 15-20, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-55573 June 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

134

Management Activities for Retrieved and Newly Generated Transuranic Wastes Savannah River Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 WL 253648 (F.R.) 8 WL 253648 (F.R.) NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Finding of No Significant Impact; Transuranic Waste Management Activities at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, SC Tuesday, August 30, 1988 *33172 AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA -0315, for transuranic (TRU) waste management activities at DOE's Savannah River Plant (SRP), including the construction and operation of a new TRU Waste Processing Facility. Based on analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact

135

Energy intensities, \\{EROIs\\} (energy returned on invested), and energy payback times of electricity generating power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy returned on invested, EROI, has been evaluated for typical power plants representing wind energy, photovoltaics, solar thermal, hydro, natural gas, biogas, coal and nuclear power. The strict exergy concept with no primary energy weighting, updated material databases, and updated technical procedures make it possible to directly compare the overall efficiency of those power plants on a uniform mathematical and physical basis. Pump storage systems, needed for solar and wind energy, have been included in the EROI so that the efficiency can be compared with an unbuffered scenario. The results show that nuclear, hydro, coal, and natural gas power systems (in this order) are one order of magnitude more effective than photovoltaics and wind power.

D. Weibach; G. Ruprecht; A. Huke; K. Czerski; S. Gottlieb; A. Hussein

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

New technology for purging the steam generators of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technology for removal of undissolved impurities from a horizontal steam generator using purge water is developed on the basis of a theoretical analysis. A purge with a maximal flow rate is drawn off from the zone with the highest accumulation of sludge in the lower part of the steam generator after the main circulation pump of the corresponding loop is shut off and the temperatures of the heat transfer medium at the inlet and outlet of the steam generator have equilibrated. An improved purge configuration is used for this technology; it employs shutoff and regulator valves, periodic purge lines separated by a cutoff fixture, and a D{sub y} 100 drain union as a connector for the periodic purge. Field tests show that the efficiency of this technology for sludge removal by purge water is several times that for the standard method.

Budko, I. O.; Kutdjusov, Yu. F.; Gorburov, V. I. [Scientific-Research Center for Energy Technology 'NICE Centrenergo' (Russian Federation); Rjasnyj, S. I. [JSC 'The All-Rissia Nuklear Power Engineering Research and Development Institute' (VNIIAM) (Russian Federation)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Artificial neural network based models for forecasting electricity generation of grid connected solar PV power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an artificial neural network (ANN) approach for forecasting the performance of electric energy generated output from a working 25-kWp grid connected solar PV system and a 100-kWp grid connected PV system installed at Minicoy Island of Union Territory of Lakshadweep Islands. The ANN interpolates among the solar PV generation output and relevant parameters such as solar radiation, module temperature and clearness index. In this study, three ANN models are implemented and validated with reasonable accuracy on real electric energy generation output data. The first model is univariate based on solar radiation and the output values. The second model is a multivariate model based on module temperature along with solar radiation. The third model is also a multivariate model based on module temperature, solar radiation and clearness index. A forecasting performance measure such as percentage root mean square error has been presented for each model. The second model, which gives the most accurate results, has been used in forecasting the generation output for another PV system with similar accuracy.

Imtiaz Ashraf; A. Chandra

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Modeling and Control of Co-generation Power Plants: A Hybrid System Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle is driven by some fossil fuel (usually natural gas) and produces electric power via expansion of the gas turbine and generates both electricity and steam for the industrial processes. Clearly, the liberalization of the energy market has promoted the need of operating CCPPs in the most efficient way

Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

139

Generating 24-Hour ECG, BP and Respiratory Signals with Realistic Linear and Nonlinear Clinical Characteristics Using a Nonlinear Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generating 24-Hour ECG, BP and Respiratory Signals with Realistic Linear and Nonlinear Clinical, London School of Economics, London, UK Abstract A nonlinear model for generating lifelike human ECG it to three ordinary differential equations, the model generates a 24-hour ECG signal. Using both standard

McSharry, Patrick E.

140

Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The evaluations determined which configurations and coolants are the most promising from thermal-hydraulic and efficiency points of view. These evaluations also determined which configurations and options do not appear to be feasible at the current time.

C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

A cost-benefit analysis of power generation from commercial reinforced concrete solar chimney power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper develops a model different from existing models to analyze the cost and benefit of a reinforced concrete solar chimney power plant (RCSCPP) built in northwest China. Based on the model and some assumptions for values of parameters, this work calculates total net present value (TNPV) and the minimum electricity price in each phase by dividing the whole service period into four phases. The results show that the minimum electricity price in the first phase is higher than the current market price of electricity, but the minimum prices in the other phases are far less than the current market price. The analysis indicates that huge advantages of the RCSCPP over coal-fired power plants can be embodied in phases 24. In addition, the sensitivity analysis performed in this paper discovers TNPV is very sensitive to changes in the solar electricity price and inflation rate, but responds only slightly to changes in carbon credits price, income tax rate and interest rate of loans. Our analysis predicts that \\{RCSCPPs\\} have very good application prospect. To encourage the development of RCSCPPs, the government should provide subsidy by setting higher electricity price in the first phase, then lower electricity price in the other phases.

Weibing Li; Ping Wei; Xinping Zhou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Model of sludge behavior in nuclear plant steam generators. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accumulation of large amounts of sludge in pressurized water reactor steam generators is thought to be a cause of accelerated corrosion by trace impurities which concentrate in such deposits. Based on fundamental principles, this study develops a mathematical model for predicting the behavior (e.g., deposition and reentrainment) of sludge in steam generators. The calculated sludge behavior shows good agreement with the limited amount of experimental data available. The results suggest that the continued accumulation of sludge on the tubesheet might be preventable, and that if it could be, the incoming sludge would be removed by blowdown. An analysis of the uncertainties in the model led to suggested priorities for further analytical and experimental work to gain a better understanding of sludge behavior. 29 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs.

Beal, S.K.; Chen, J.H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

The Effects of Corporate and Community Characteristics on Environmental Pollution in U.S. Electrical Generating Facilities: A Multilevel Examination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In accordance with ecostructural theory, the findings demonstrate that the total number of subsidiaries in the corporate structure and the dividend payments to shareholders have significant positive effects on the power plant emissions rates. The analysis...

Touche, George 1967-

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

144

Power generation plants with carbon capture and storage: A techno-economic comparison between coal combustion and gasification technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Worldwide energy production requirements could not be fully satisfied by nuclear and renewables sources. Therefore a sustainable use of fossil fuels (coal in particular) will be required for several decades. In this scenario, carbon capture and storage (CCS) represents a key solution to control the global warming reducing carbon dioxide emissions. The integration between CCS technologies and power generation plants currently needs a demonstration at commercial scale to reduce both technological risks and high capital and operating cost. This paper compares, from the technical and economic points of view, the performance of three coal-fired power generation technologies: (i) ultra-supercritical (USC) plant equipped with a conventional flue gas treatment (CGT) process, (ii) USC plant equipped with SNOX technology for a combined removal of sulphur and nitrogen oxides and (iii) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant based on a slurry-feed entrained-flow gasifier. Each technology was analysed in its configurations without and with CO2 capture, referring to a commercial-scale of 1000MWth. Technical assessment was carried out by using simulation models implemented through Aspen Plus and Gate-Cycle tools, whereas economic assessment was performed through a properly developed simulation model. USC equipped with CGT systems shows an overall efficiency (43.7%) comparable to IGCC (43.9%), whereas introduction of SNOX technology increases USC efficiency up to 44.8%. Being the CCS energy penalties significantly higher for USC (about 10.5% points vs. about 8.5 for IGCC), the IGCC with CCS is more efficient (35.3%) than the corresponding CO2-free USC (34.2% for the SNOX-based configuration). Whereas, for the case study, USC is most profitable than IGCC (with a net present value, NPV, of 190M vs. 54M) for a conventional configuration, CO2-free IGCC shows a higher NPV (?673M) than USC (?711M). In any cases, the NPV of all the CO2-free configurations is strongly negative: this means that, with the current market conditions, the introduction of a CCS system cannot be economically justified without a significant incentive.

Vittorio Tola; Alberto Pettinau

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to identify possible issues highlighted by these lessons learned that could apply to the NGNP in reducing technical risks commensurate with the current phase of design. Some of the lessons learned have been applied to the NGNP and documented in the Preconceptual Design Report. These are addressed in the background section of this document and include, for example, the decision to use TRISO fuel rather than BISO fuel used in the Peach Bottom reactor; the use of a reactor pressure vessel rather than prestressed concrete found in Fort St. Vrain; and the use of helium as a primary coolant rather than CO2. Other lessons learned, 68 in total, are documented in Sections 2 through 6 and will be applied, as appropriate, in advancing phases of design. The lessons learned are derived from both negative and positive outcomes from prior HTGR experiences. Lessons learned are grouped according to the plant, areas, systems, subsystems, and components defined in the NGNP Preconceptual Design Report, and subsequent NGNP project documents.

J. M. Beck; L. F. Pincock

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Monitoring and smart management for hybrid plants (photovoltaicgenerator) in Ghardaia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper an effective operation of standalone hybrid photovoltaic (PV) system is proposed by implementing a management program via control strategy. The system is composed of photovoltaic modules a liquid petroleum gas (LPG) fired generator and electrochemical batteries. The system configuration can solve problems that affect the quality and reliability of power supplies. This document includes the state of the art work carried out so far in the field of hybrid energy systems including the study and evaluation of control methods. This paper focuses on the design and implementation of an electronic control module and optimal energy management in hybrid energy systems using real weather data and load profile. The results have shown a reliable behavior of the control system and a good robustness to perturbations.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Evaluation of cracking in feedwater piping adjacent to the steam generators in Nine Pressurized Water Reactor Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cracking in ASTM A106-B and A106-C feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to the steam generators in a number of pressurized water reactor plants. We received sections with cracks from nine of the plants with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Variations were observed in piping surface irregularities, corrosion-product, pit, and crack morphology, surface elmental and crystal structure analyses, and steel microstructures and mechanical properties. However, with but two exceptions, namely, arrest bands and major surface irregularities, we were unable to relate the extent of cracking to any of these factors. Tensile and fracture toughness (J/sub Ic/ and tearing modulus) properties were measured over a range of temperatures and strain rates. No unusual properties or microstructures were observed that could be related to the cracking problem. All crack surfaces contained thick oxide deposits and showed evidence of cyclic events in the form of arrest bands. Transmission electron microscopy revealed fatigue striations on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces from one plant and possibly from three others. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a value of ..delta..sigma = 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses. Although surface irregularities and corrosion pits were sources for crack initiation and corrosion may have contributed to crack propagation, it is proposed that the overriding factor in the cracking problem is the presence of unforeseen cyclic loads.

Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.; Scott, R.G.

1980-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermo-economic model has been built and validated for prediction of project economics of Enhanced Geothermal Projects. The thermo-economic model calculates and iteratively optimizes the LCOE (levelized cost of electricity) for a prospective EGS (Enhanced Geothermal) site. It takes into account the local subsurface temperature gradient, the cost of drilling and reservoir creation, stimulation and power plant configuration. It calculates and optimizes the power plant configuration vs. well depth. Thus outputs from the model include optimal well depth and power plant configuration for the lowest LCOE. The main focus of this final report was to experimentally validate the thermodynamic properties that formed the basis of the thermo-economic model built in Phase 2, and thus build confidence that the predictions of the model could be used reliably for process downselection and preliminary design at a given set of geothermal (and/or waste heat) boundary conditions. The fluid and cycle downselected was based on a new proprietary fluid from a vendor in a supercritical ORC cycle at a resource condition of 200?C inlet temperature. The team devised and executed a series of experiments to prove the suitability of the new fluid in realistic ORC cycle conditions. Furthermore, the team performed a preliminary design study for a MW-scale turbo expander that would be used for a supercritical ORC cycle with this new fluid. The following summarizes the main findings in the investigative campaign that was undertaken: 1. Chemical compatibility of the new fluid with common seal/gasket/Oring materials was found to be problematic. Neoprene, Viton, and silicone materials were found to be incompatible, suffering chemical decomposition, swelling and/or compression set issues. Of the materials tested, only TEFLON was found to be compatible under actual ORC temperature and pressure conditions. 2. Thermal stability of the new fluid at 200?C and 40 bar was found to be acceptable after 399 hours of exposure?only 3% of the initial charge degraded into by products. The main degradation products being an isomer and a dimer. 3. In a comparative experiment between R245fa and the new fluid under subcritical conditions, it was found that the new fluid operated at 1 bar lower than R245fa for the same power output, which was also predicted in the Aspen HSYSY model. As a drop-in replacement fluid for R245fa, this new fluid was found to be at least as good as R245fa in terms of performance and stability. Further optimization of the subcritical cycle may lead to a significant improvement in performance for the new fluid. 4. For supercritical conditions, the experiment found a good match between the measured and model predicted state point property data and duties from the energy balance. The largest percent differences occurred with densities and evaporator duty (see Figure 78). It is therefore reasonable to conclude that the state point model was experimentally validated with a realistic ORC system. 5. The team also undertook a preliminary turbo-expander design study for a supercritical ORC cycle with the new working fluid. Variants of radial and axial turbo expander geometries went through preliminary design and rough costing. It was found that at 15MWe or higher power rating, a multi-stage axial turbine is most suitable providing the best performance and cost. However, at lower power ratings in the 5MWe range, the expander technology to be chosen depends on the application of the power block. For EGS power blocks, it is most optimal to use multi-stage axial machines. In conclusion, the predictions of the LCOE model that showed a supercritical cycle based on the new fluid to be most advantageous for geothermal power production at a resource temperature of ~ 200C have been experimentally validated. It was found that the cycle based on the new fluid is lower in LCOE and higher in net power output (for the same boundary conditions). The project, therefore has found a new optimal configuration for low temperature geothermal power production in the form of a su

Zia, Jalal [GE Global Research; Sevincer, Edip; Chen, Huijuan; Hardy, Ajilli; Wickersham, Paul; Kalra, Chiranjeev; Laursen, Anna Lis; Vandeputte, Thomas

2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Capacity and Generation, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History 1. Capacity and Generation, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History Table 2. U.S. Nuclear Reactor Ownership Data PDF XLS Plant/Reactor Name Generator ID Utility Name - Operator Owner Name % Owned Arkansas Nuclear One 1 Entergy Arkansas Inc Entergy Arkansas Inc 100 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 Entergy Arkansas Inc Entergy Arkansas Inc 100 Beaver Valley 1 FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company FirstEnergy Nuclear Generation Corp 100 Beaver Valley 2 FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company FirstEnergy Nuclear Generation Corp 100 Braidwood Generation Station 1 Exelon Nuclear Exelon Nuclear 100 Braidwood Generation Station 2 Exelon Nuclear Exelon Nuclear 100 Browns Ferry 1 Tennessee Valley Authority Tennessee Valley Authority 100

150

Hydrodynamic Analysis of a Three-Fluidized Bed Reactor Cold Flow Model for Chemical Looping Hydrogen Generation: Pressure Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical looping hydrogen generation (CLHG) can produce pure hydrogen with inherent separation of CO2 from fossils fuel. The process involves a metal oxide, as an oxygen carrier, such as iron oxide. The CLHG syst...

Zhipeng Xue; Wenguo Xiang; Shiyi Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

From the first nuclear power plant to fourth-generation nuclear power installations [on the 60th anniversary of the Worlds First nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful commissioning in the 1954 of the Worlds First nuclear power plant constructed at the Institute for Physics ... center for training Soviet and foreign specialists on nuclear power plants, the personnel...

V. I. Rachkov; S. G. Kalyakin; O. F. Kukharchuk; Yu. I. Orlov

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a New Technology for Extraction of Insoluble Impurities from Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generators with Purge Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental technology for the removal of insoluble impurities from a horizontal steam generator with purge water during planned shutdowns of the power generating unit is improved through a more representative determination of the concentration of impurities in the purge water ahead of the water cleanup facility and a more precise effective time for the duration of the purge process. Tests with the improved technique at power generating unit No. 1 of the Rostov Nuclear Power Plant show that the efficiency with which insoluble impurities are removed from the steam generator volume was more than two orders of magnitude greater than under the standard regulations.

Bud'ko, I. O. [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation)] [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. G. [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)] [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Effect of nitrogen source, rate and time of application on soil nitrogen status and on the characteristics of the plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. They attributed this partly to the rapid hydrolysis of urea to ammoni- um which was then exchangeably sorbed by the soil. Studies by Black (5) indicated more rapid loss of nitrate from coarse than fine textured soils. Research by Greaves et al. (15) indicated... source on the subsoil ammoni- um content on May 16, The influence of nitrogen source, rate and time of application on cotton plant growth. The dry weight of the entire plant on May 30 and the dry weight of the entire plant together...

Sadik, Mohamed Kamal

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Characteristics of a RF-Driven Ion Source for a Neutron Generator Used for Associated Particle Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present recent work on a prototype compact neutron generator for associated particle imaging (API). API uses alpha particles that are produced simultaneously with neutrons in the deuterium-tritium ({sup 2}D({sup 3}T,n){sup 4}{alpha}) fusion reaction to determine the direction of the neutrons upon exiting the reaction. This method determines the spatial position of each neutron interaction and requires the neutrons to be generated from a small spot in order to achieve high spatial resolution. The ion source for API is designed to produce a focused ion beam with a beam spot diameter of 1-mm or less on the target. We use an axial type neutron generator with a predicted neutron yield of 10{sup 8} n/s for a 50 {mu}A D/T ion beam current accelerated to 80 kV. The generator utilizes an RF planar spiral antenna at 13.56 MHz to create a highly efficient inductively coupled plasma at the ion source. Experimental results show that beams with an atomic ion fraction of over 80% can be obtained while utilizing only 100 watts of RF power in the ion source. A single acceleration gap with a secondary electron suppression electrode is used in the tube. Experimental results from ion source testing, such as the current density, atomic ion fraction, electron temperature, and electron density will be discussed.

Wu Ying; Leung, K.-N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hurley, John P. [Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, CA 93111 (United States); Ji Qing; Kwan, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers, Volumes 1, 2.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001 ???????????????????????????????? September 2004. ???????????????????????????????· Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. ???????????????????????????????· Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. ???????????????????????????????· Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. ???????????????????????????????· Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. ???????????????????????????????· Development of advanced signal processing methods using wavelet transforms and image processing techniques for isolating flaw types. ???????????????????????????????· Development and implementation of a new nonlinear and non-stationary signal processing method, called the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), for flaw detection and location. This is a more robust and adaptive approach compared to the wavelet transform

Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Hines, J. Wesley; Lu, Baofu; Huang, Xuedong; Penha, Rosani, L.; Perillo, Sergio, R.; Zhao, Ke

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

156

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001-September 2004. (1) Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. (2) Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. (3) Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. (4) Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. (5) Development of advanced signal processing methods using wavelet transforms and image processing techniques for isolating flaw types. (6) Development and implementation of a new nonlinear and non-stationary signal processing method, called the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), for flaw detection and location. This is a more robust and adaptive approach compared to the wavelet transform. (7) Implementation of a moving-window technique in the time domain for detecting and quantifying flaw types in tubular structures. A window zooming technique was also developed for flaw location in tubes. (8) Theoretical study of elastic wave propagation (longitudinal and shear waves) in metallic flat plates and tubing with and without flaws. (9) Simulation of the Lamb wave propagation using the finite-element code ABAQUS. This enabled the verification of the experimental results. The research tasks included both analytical research and experimental studies. The experimental results helped to enhance the robustness of fault monitoring methods and to provide a systematic verification of the analytical results. The results of this research were disseminated in scientific meetings. A journal manuscript was submitted for publication. The new findings of this research have potential applications in aerospace and civil structures. The report contains a complete bibliography that was developed during the course of the project.

Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

157

Influence by small dispersive coal dust particles of different fractional consistence on characteristics of iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main purpose of research is to determine the influence by the small dispersive coal dust particles of the different fractional consistence on the technical characteristics of the vertical iodine air filter at nuclear power plant. The research on the transport properties of the small dispersive coal dust particles in the granular filtering medium of absorber in the vertical iodine air filter is completed in the case, when the modeled aerodynamic conditions are similar to the real aerodynamic conditions. It is shown that the appearance of the different fractional consistence of small dispersive coal dust particles with the decreasing dimensions down to the micro and nano sizes at the action of the air dust aerosol stream normally results in a significant change of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles masses in the granular filtering medium of an absorber in the vertical iodine air filter, changing the vertical iodine air filter aerodynamic characteristics. The precise characterization of...

Neklyudov, I M; Fedorova, L I; Poltinin, P Ya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Solar aided power generation of a 300MW lignite fired power plant combined with line-focus parabolic trough collectors field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nowadays, conventional coal or gas fired power plants are the dominant way to generate electricity in the world. In recent years there is a growth in the field of renewable energy sources in order to avoid the threat of climate change from fossil fuel combustion. Solar energy, as an environmental friendly energy source, may be the answer to the reduction of global CO2 emissions. This paper presents the concept of Solar Aided Power Generation (SAPG), a combination of renewable and conventional energy sources technologies. The operation of the 300MW lignite fired power plant of Ptolemais integrated with a solar field of parabolic trough collectors was simulated using TRNSYS software in both power boosting and fuel saving modes. The power plant performance, power output variation, fuel consumption and CO2 emissions were calculated. Furthermore, an economic analysis was carried out for both power boosting and fuel saving modes of operation and optimum solar contribution was estimated.

G.C. Bakos; Ch. Tsechelidou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

injection wells capacity; temperature; costs; legal reviews by Oregon DoJ. * Partners: Johnson Controls?? Overview 3 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Project Objectives...

160

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Influence by small dispersive coal dust particles of different fractional consistence on characteristics of iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main purpose of research is to determine the influence by the small dispersive coal dust particles of the different fractional consistence on the technical characteristics of the vertical iodine air filter at nuclear power plant. The research on the transport properties of the small dispersive coal dust particles in the granular filtering medium of absorber in the vertical iodine air filter is completed in the case, when the modeled aerodynamic conditions are similar to the real aerodynamic conditions. It is shown that the appearance of the different fractional consistence of small dispersive coal dust particles with the decreasing dimensions down to the micro and nano sizes at the action of the air dust aerosol stream normally results in a significant change of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles masses in the granular filtering medium of an absorber in the vertical iodine air filter, changing the vertical iodine air filter aerodynamic characteristics. The precise characterization of the aerodynamic resistance of a model of the vertical iodine air filter is completed. The comparative analysis of the technical characteristics of the vertical and horizontal iodine air filters is also made.

I. M. Neklyudov; O. P. Ledenyov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

162

Iodine Pathways and Off-Gas Stream Characteristics for Aqueous Reprocessing Plants A Literature Survey and Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Used nuclear fuel is currently being reprocessed in only a few countries, notably France, England, Japan, and Russia. The need to control emissions of the gaseous radionuclides to the air during nuclear fuel reprocessing has already been reported for the entire plant. But since the gaseous radionuclides can partition to various different reprocessing off-gas streams, for example, from the head end, dissolver, vessel, cell, and melter, an understanding of each of these streams is critical. These off-gas streams have different flow rates and compositions and could have different gaseous radionuclide control requirements, depending on how the gaseous radionuclides partition. This report reviews the available literature to summarize specific engineering data on the flow rates, forms of the volatile radionuclides in off-gas streams, distributions of these radionuclides in these streams, and temperatures of these streams. This document contains an extensive bibliography of the information contained in the open literature.

R. T. Jubin; D. M. Strachan; N. R. Soelberg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Tsiklauri-Durst combined cycle (T-D Cycle{trademark}) application for nuclear and fossil-fueled power generating plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tsiklauri-Durst combined cycle is a combination of the best attributes of both nuclear power and combined cycle gas power plants. A technology patented in 1994 by Battelle Memorial Institute offers a synergistic approach to power generation. A typical combined cycle is defined as the combination of gas turbine Brayton Cycle, topping steam turbine Rankine Cycle. Exhaust from the gas turbine is used in heat recovery steam generators to produce steam for a steam turbine. In a standard combined cycle gas turbine-steam turbine application, the gas turbine generates about 65 to 70 percent of system power. The thermal efficiency for such an installation is typically about 45 to 50 percent. A T-D combined cycle takes a new, creative approach to combined cycle design by directly mixing high enthalpy steam from the heat recovery steam generator, involving the steam generator at more than one pressure. Direct mixing of superheated and saturated steam eliminates the requirement for a large heat exchanger, making plant modification simple and economical.

Tsiklauri, B.; Korolev, V.N.; Durst, B.M.; Shen, P.K.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Utility Generation Plant Exhausts and Sequestration by a Biomimetic Route Based on Enzymatic Catalysts-Current Status  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from Coal-Fired Utility Generation Plant Exhausts, and from Coal-Fired Utility Generation Plant Exhausts, and Sequestration by a Biomimetic Route Based on Enzymatic Catalysis - Current Status Gillian M. Bond (gbond@nmt.edu; 505-835-5653) Margaret-Gail Medina (magail@nmt.edu; 505-835-5229) New Mexico Tech 801 Leroy Socorro, NM 87801 John Stringer (jstringe@epri.com; 650-855-2472) Electric Power Research Institute 3412 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94304 F. Arzum Simsek-Ege (fatma.a.simsek-egel@intel.com; 505-893-8694) Intel Corporation Albuquerque, New Mexico Introduction A range of carbon management strategies will have to be implemented if meaningful reductions in CO 2 emissions are to be achieved in response to concerns about global climate change. It is becoming increasingly clear that some form or forms of carbon

165

The analysis and specification of large high-pressure, high-temperature valves for combustion turbine protection in second-generation PFB power plants: Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to provide a specification for the high-pressure/high-temperature valves for turbine overspeed protection in a commercial-scale second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) power plant. In the event of a loss of external (generator) load, the gas turbine rapidly accelerates from its normal operating speed. Protection from excessive overspeed can be maintained by actuation of fuel isolation and air bypass valves. A design specification for these valves was developed by analyses of the turbine/compressor interaction during a loss of load and analyses of pressure and flow transients during operation of the overspeed protection valves. The basis for these analyses was the Phase 1 plant conceptual design prepared in 1987.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The implementation of a 3D characteristics solver for the generation of incremental cross sections for reactivity devices in a CANDU reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are presenting issues related to the generation of consistent incremental cross sections for the reactivity devices in a CANDU reactor. Such calculations involve the solution of the neutron transport equation over complex 3D geometries representing a single vertical reactivity device inserted mid-way between two horizontal fuel channels. The DRAGON lattice code has recently been upgraded and can handle the exact geometry of such configurations for trajectory-based transport solvers. Within this framework, the detailed representation of the reactivity devices implies an increase in the number of regions when the strongly absorbing regions and fuel clusters are described without cylinderization. In this paper, a solution based on the characteristics method is compared with the standard procedure, based on the collision probabilities method. The coherence of both solvers is highlighted and a comparison of their computational costs is presented. (authors)

Le Tellier, R.; Hebert, A.; Marleau, G. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, C.P. 6079 suce. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Que. H3C 3A7 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Reactor Physics Parametric and Depletion Studies in Support of TRISO Particle Fuel Specification for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactor physics calculations were initiated to answer several major questions related to the proposed TRISO-coated particle fuel that is to be used in the prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) or the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These preliminary design evaluation calculations help ensure that the upcoming fuel irradiation tests will test appropriate size and type of fuel particles for a future NGNP reactor design. Conclusions from these calculations are expected to confirm and suggest possible modifications to the current particle fuel parameters specified in the evolving Fuel Specification. Calculated results dispel the need for a binary fuel particle system, which is proposed in the General Atomics GT-MHR concept. The GT-MHR binary system is composed of both a fissile and fertile particle with 350- and 500- micron kernel diameters, respectively. For the NGNP reactor, a single fissile particle system (single UCO kernel size) can meet the reactivity and power cycle length requirements demanded of the NGNP. At the same time, it will provide substantial programmatic cost savings by eliminating the need for dual particle fabrication process lines and dual fuel particle irradiation tests required of a binary system. Use of a larger 425-micron kernel diameter single fissile particle (proposed here), as opposed to the 350-micron GT-MHR fissile particle size, helps alleviate current compact particle packing fractions fabrication limitations (<35%), improves fuel block loading for higher n-batch reload options, and tracks the historical correlation between particle size and enrichment (10 and 14 wt% U-235 particle enrichments are proposed for the NGNP). Overall, the use of the slightly larger kernel significantly broadens the NGNP reactor core design envelope and provides increased design margin to accommodate the (as yet) unknown final NGNP reactor design. Maximum power-peaking factors are calculated for both the initial and equilibrium NGNP cores. Radial power-peaking can be fully controlled with particle packing fraction zoning (no enrichment zoning required) and discrete burnable poison rods. Optimally loaded NGNP cores can expect radial powerpeaking factors as low as 1.14 at beginning of cycle (BOC), increasing slowly to a value of 1.25 by end of cycle (EOC), an axial power-peaking value of 1.30 (BOC), and for individual fuel particles in the maximum compact <1.05 (BOC) and an approximate value of 1.20 (EOC) due to Pu-239 buildup in particles on the compact periphery. The NGNP peak particle powers, using a conservative total power-peaking factor (~2.1 factor), are expected to be <150 mW/particle (well below the 250 mW/particle limit, even with the larger 425-micron kernel size).

James W. Sterbentz; Bren Phillips; Robert L. Sant; Gray S. Chang; Paul D. Bayless

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible. For integration purposes, an analysis comparing the design, cost and schedule impact of maintaining a technology neutral approach through conceptual design or making an early hydrogen process technology selection was performed. Early selection does not specifically eliminate a technology, but rather selects the first hydrogen technology for demonstration. A systems-engineering approach was taken to define decision-making criteria for selecting a hydrogen technology. The relative technical, cost and schedule risks of each approach were analyzed and risk mitigation strategies were recommended, including provisions to maintain close collaboration with the NHI. The results of these analyses are presented here.

Michael W. Patterson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

170

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

171

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

172

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

173

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

174

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

175

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

176

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

177

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

178

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

179

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

180

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

182

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

183

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

184

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

185

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

186

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

187

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

188

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

189

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

190

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

191

Predictive current control of outer-rotor five-phase BLDC generators applicable for off-shore wind power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Model predictive control algorithms have recently gained more importance in the field of wind power generators. One of the important categories of model predictive control methods is improved deadbeat control in which the reverse model of generator is used to calculate the appropriate inputs for the next iteration of controlling process. In this paper, a new improved deadbeat algorithm is proposed to control the stator currents of an outer-rotor five-phase BLDC generator. Extended Kalman filter is used in the estimation step of proposed method, and generator equations are used to calculate the appropriate voltages for the next modulation period. Two aspects of proposed controlling method are evaluated including its sensitivity to generator parameter variations and its speed in following the reference values of required torque during transient states. Wind power generators are kept in mind, and proposed controlling method is both simulated and experimentally evaluated on an outer-rotor five-phase BLDC generator.

Jose Luis Romeral Martinez; Ramin Salehi Arashloo; Mehdi Salehifar; Juan Manuel Moreno

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Protection from ground faults in the stator winding of generators at power plants in the Siberian networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experience of many years of experience in developing and utilization of ground fault protection in the stator winding of generators in the Siberian networks is generalized. The main method of protection is to apply a direct current or an alternating current with a frequency of 25 Hz to the primary circuits of the stator. A direct current is applied to turbo generators operating in a unit with a transformer without a resistive coupling to the external grid or to other generators. Applying a 25 Hz control current is appropriate for power generation systems with compensation of a capacitive short circuit current to ground. This method forms the basis for protection of generators operating on busbars, hydroelectric generators with a neutral grounded through an arc-suppression reactor, including in consolidated units with generators operating in parallel on a single low-voltage transformer winding.

Vainshtein, R. A., E-mail: vra@tpu.ru [Tomsk Polytechnical University (Russian Federation); Lapin, V. I. [ODU Sibiri (Integrated Dispatcher Control for Siberia), branch of JSC 'SO EES' (Russian Federation); Naumov, A. M.; Doronin, A. V. [JSC NPP 'EKRA' (Russian Federation); Yudin, S. M. [Tomsk Polytechnical University (Russian Federation)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Minimum Cost of Photovoltaic Energy for a Utility Grid and General Features of a Generating Plant Using Costless Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to evaluate the minimum long term cost of electricity produced by future photovoltaic plants connected to a utility grid. As the cost of photovoltaic cells is supposed to drop drama...

Daniel Madet

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Electricity Generation | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Electricity Generation Electricity Generation Photo of geothermal power plant. A geothermal resource requires fluid, heat and permeability in order to generate electricity:...

195

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Turbines Inc Olinda Generating Plant Marina Landfill GasSolar Turbines Inc Olinda Generating Plant Marina Landfill Gas

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Power conversion unit studies for the next generation nuclear plant coupled to a high-temperature steam electrolysis facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. A high temperature steam electrolysis hydrogen production plant was coupled to the reactor...

Barner, Robert Buckner

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

197

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Fossil-Fu.e l and Geothermal Power Plants", Lawrencefrom fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants Control offrom fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants Radionuclide

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Effects of variable renewable power on a country-scale electricity system: High penetration of hydro power plants and wind farms in electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present article analyses the effects caused by variable power. The analysis concerns a country-scale electricity system with a relatively high penetration of seasonally variable hydro power plants and wind farms in the total electricity generation in 2030. For this purpose, the Latvian electricity system was chosen as an appropriate case study, as around half of its electricity is already generated from hydro power and numerous wind farm installations are planned for 2030. Results indicate that in such systems high renewable power variations occur between seasons causing a high probability of power deficit in the winter and power surplus in the spring. Based on the results, the wind farms' influence on the power deficit and surplus occurrences are discussed in detail. Wind farm generation decreases the probability of the electricity system being in power deficit, but increases the probability of the system being in power surplus. In the latter situation, the maximum value of power surplus increases since it is enhanced by the wind farm generation. Probability equations to express these changes are provided.

Arturs Purvins; Ioulia T. Papaioannou; Irina Oleinikova; Evangelos Tzimas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Virtually simulating the next generation of clean energy technologies: NETL's AVESTAR Center is dedicated to the safe, reliable and efficient operation of advanced energy plants with carbon capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Imagine using a real-time virtual simulator to learn to fly a space shuttle or rebuild your car's transmission without touching a piece of equipment or getting your hands dirty. Now, apply this concept to learning how to operate and control a state-of-the-art, electricity-producing power plant capable of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture. That's what the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center (www.netl.doe.gov/avestar) is designed to do. Established as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to advance new clean energy technology for power generation, the AVESTAR Center focuses primarily on providing simulation-based training for process engineers and energy plant operators, starting with the deployment of a first-of-a-kind operator training simulator for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Based on Invensys Operations Management's SimSci-Esscor DYNSIM software, the high-fidelity dynamic simulator provides realistic training on IGCC plant operations, including normal and faulted operations, as well as plant start-up, shutdown and power demand load changes. The highly flexible simulator also allows for testing of different types of fuel sources, such as petcoke and biomass, as well as co-firing fuel mixtures. The IGCC dynamic simulator is available at AVESTAR's two locations, NETL (Figure 1) and West Virginia University's National Research Center for Coal and Energy (www.nrcce.wvu.edu), both in Morgantown, W.Va. By offering a comprehensive IGCC training program, AVESTAR aims to develop a workforce well prepared to operate, control and manage commercial-scale gasification-based power plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The facility and simulator at West Virginia University promotes NETL's outreach mission by offering hands-on simulator training and education to researchers and university students.

Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The effects of a steam-electric generating plant on suitability of adjacent estuarine waters for growth of phytoplankton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'F above normal levels. Roessler (1971) and Steidinger and Breedveld (1971) reported thermal discharges from power plants in Florida caused benthic macroalgae and grasses to be replaced by fil- amentous blue green algae mats. Morgan and Stross... on the north and east by a line running from Morgan's Point to Cedar Point then southeastward to Smith Point (Masch and Espy 1967). The Bay extends south and west from this line to form arm-like East and West Bays. Outlets to the Gulf of Mexico...

Kelsey, John Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

202

Gas-dynamic characteristics of a noise and heat insulating jacket on a gas turbine in a gas pumping plant on emergency disconnection of the cooling fans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper discusses the operation of a gas turbine plant (GTP) when the fans in ... NHJ by a fan. The operation of gas-pumping plant involves working with brief (10 ... describing the motion of an ideal thermally...

P. V. Trusov; D. A. Charntsev; I. R. Kats

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO{sub 2} Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TDA Research, Inc. has developed a novel sorbent based post-combustion CO{sub 2} removal technology. This low cost sorbent can be regenerated with low-pressure (ca. 1 atm) superheated steam without temperature swing or pressure-swing. The isothermal and isobaric operation is a unique and advantageous feature of this process. The objective of this project was to demonstrate the technical and economic merit of this sorbent based CO{sub 2} capture approach. Through laboratory, bench-scale and field testing we demonstrated that this technology can effectively and efficiently capture CO{sub 2} produced at an existing pulverized coal power plants. TDA Research, Inc is developing both the solid sorbent and the process designed around that material. This project addresses the DOE Program Goal to develop a capture technology that can be added to an existing or new coal fired power plant, and can capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced with the lowest possible increase in the cost of energy. .

Elliott, Jeannine

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

A preliminary user-friendly, digital console for the control room parameters supervision in old-generation Nuclear Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvements in the awareness of a system status is an essential requirement to achieve safety in every kind of plant. In particular, in the case of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), a progress is crucial to enhance the Human Machine Interface (HMI) in order to optimize monitoring and analyzing processes of NPP operational states. Firstly, as old-fashioned plants are concerned, an upgrading of the whole console instrumentation is desirable in order to replace an analog visualization with a full-digital system. In this work, we present a novel instrument able to interface the control console of a nuclear reactor, developed by using CompactRio, a National Instruments embedded architecture and its dedicated programming language. This real-time industrial controller composed by a real-time processor and FPGA modules has been programmed to visualize the parameters coming from the reactor, and to storage and reproduce significant conditions anytime. This choice has been made on the basis of the FPGA properties: high reliability, determinism, true parallelism and re-configurability, achieved by a simple programming method, based on LabVIEW real-time environment. The system architecture exploits the FPGA capabilities of implementing custom timing and triggering, hardware-based analysis and co-processing, and highest performance control algorithms. Data stored during the supervisory phase can be reproduced by loading data from a measurement file, re-enacting worthwhile operations or conditions. The system has been thought to be used in three different modes, namely Log File Mode, Supervisory Mode and Simulation Mode. The proposed system can be considered as a first step to develop a more complete Decision Support System (DSS): indeed this work is part of a wider project that includes the elaboration of intelligent agents and meta-theory approaches. A synoptic has been created to monitor every kind of action on the plant through an intuitive sight. Furthermore, another important aim of this work is the possibility to have a front panel available on a web interface: CompactRio acts as a remote server and it is accessible on a dedicated LAN. This supervisory system has been tested and validated on the basis of the real control console for the 1-MW TRIGA reactor RC-1 at the ENEA, Casaccia Research Center. In this paper we show some results obtained by recording each variable as the reactor reaches its maximum level of power. The choice of a research reactor for testing the developed system relies on its training and didactic importance for the education of plant operators: in this context a digital instrument can offer a better user-friendly tool for learning and training. It is worthwhile to remark that such a system does not interfere with the console instrumentation, the latter continuing to preserve the total control. (authors)

Memmi, F.; Falconi, L.; Cappelli, M.; Palomba, M.; Santoro, E.; Bove, R.; Sepielli, M. [UTFISST, ENEA Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, Rome (Italy)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Coupled multiphase flow and closure analysis of repository response to waste-generated gas at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A long-term assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository performance must consider the impact of gas generation resulting from the corrosion and microbial degradation of the emplaced waste. A multiphase fluid flow code, TOUGH2/EOS8, was adapted to model the processes of gas generation, disposal room creep closure, and multiphase (brine and gas) fluid flow, as well as the coupling between the three processes. System response to gas generation was simulated with a single, isolated disposal room surrounded by homogeneous halite containing two anhydrite interbeds, one above and one below the room. The interbeds were assumed to have flow connections to the room through high-permeability, excavation-induced fractures. System behavior was evaluated by tracking four performance measures: (1) peak room pressure; (2) maximum brine volume in the room; (3) total mass of gas expelled from the room; and (4) the maximum gas migration distance in an interbed. Baseline simulations used current best estimates of system parameters, selected through an evaluation of available data, to predict system response to gas generation under best-estimate conditions. Sensitivity simulations quantified the effects of parameter uncertainty by evaluating the change in the performance measures in response to parameter variations. In the sensitivity simulations, a single parameter value was varied to its minimum and maximum values, representative of the extreme expected values, with all other parameters held at best-estimate values. Sensitivity simulations identified the following parameters as important to gas expulsion and migration away from a disposal room: interbed porosity; interbed permeability; gas-generation potential; halite permeability; and interbed threshold pressure. Simulations also showed that the inclusion of interbed fracturing and a disturbed rock zone had a significant impact on system performance.

Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Davies, P.B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Boiler and steam generator corrosion: Fossil fuel power plants. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning corrosion effects, mechanisms, detection, and inhibition in fossil fuel fired boilers. Fluidized bed combustors and coal gasification are included in the applications. The citations examine hot corrosion, thermal mechanical degradation, and intergranular oxidation corrosion studies performed on the water side and hot gas side of heat exchanger tubes and support structures. Coatings and treatment of material to inhibit corrosion are discussed. Corrosion affecting nuclear powered steam generators is examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 119 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

First-year's operation of a full-scale second-generation FBC in an industrial plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data related to the operation of a two stage coal fired fluidized bed boiler installed for Iowa Beef Processors, Inc. Amarillo, Texas are presented. This steam generator, which has a rating of 70,000 lb/hr steam, 650 psig, is the large privately funded fluidized bed coal combustion installation in the United States. The facility includes a dual bed combustor, whereby the coal is burned in a lower bed containing steam tubes and sulfur dioxide is collected in an upper bed containing dolomite. Coal burns predominantly in the lower bed at relatively high temperatures while combustion is completed in the upper bed. The upper bed also improves sulfur capture by reacting with SO/sub 2/ generated in the freeboard, which would be difficult to capture in early designs for FBC packaged boilers. The two stage concept provides high combustion efficiency, low NO/sub X/ emissions, and high sulfur capture. The results of recent measurements of emissions of sulfur dioxide will be included in this presentation. 4 figures.

Baty, G.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

TRU (transuranic) waste certification compliance requirements for acceptance of newly generated contact-handled wastes to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compliance requirements are presented for certifying that unclassified, newly generated (NG), contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) solid wastes from defense programs meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Where appropriate, transportation and interim storage requirements are incorporated; however, interim storage sites may have additional requirements consistent with these requirements. All applicable Department of Energy (DOE) orders must continue to be met. The compliance requirements for stored or buried waste are not addressed in this document. The compliance requirements are divided into four sections, primarily determined by the general feature that the requirements address. These sections are General Requirements, Waste Container Requirements, Waste Form Requirements, and Waste Package Requirements. The waste package is the combination of waste container and waste. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

210

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

211

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

212

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables Release date: November 22, 2011 Next release date: November 2012 See also: Table 2. Ownership Data, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History Table 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation, and Capacity Factor PDF XLS Plant/Reactor Name Generator ID State Type 2009 Summer Capacity Net MW(e)1 2010 Annual Generation Net MWh2 Capacity Factor Percent3 Arkansas Nuclear One 1 AR PWR 842 6,607,090 90 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 AR PWR 993 8,415,588 97 Beaver Valley 1 PA PWR 892 7,119,413 91 Beaver Valley 2 PA PWR 885 7,874,151 102 Braidwood Generation Station 1 IL PWR 1,178 9,196,689 89

213

Okeanskaya Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Information Facility Type Single Flash Owner Ministry of Natural Resources of Russia Commercial Online Date 2007 Power Plant Data Type of Plant Number of Generating Units...

214

Mendeleevskaya Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Information Facility Type Single Flash Owner Ministry of Natural Resources of Russia Commercial Online Date 2007 Power Plant Data Type of Plant Number of Generating Units...

215

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrity monitoring and flaw diagnostics of flat beams and tubular structures was investigated in this research task using guided acoustic signals. A piezo-sensor suite was deployed to activate and collect Lamb wave signals that propagate along metallic specimens. The dispersion curves of Lamb waves along plate and tubular structures are generated through numerical analysis. Several advanced techniques were explored to extract representative features from acoustic time series. Among them, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is a recently developed technique for the analysis of non-linear and transient signals. A moving window method was introduced to generate the local peak characters from acoustic time series, and a zooming window technique was developed to localize the structural flaws. The time-frequency analysis and pattern recognition techniques were combined for classifying structural defects in brass tubes. Several types of flaws in brass tubes were tested, both in the air and in water. The techniques also proved to be effective under background/process noise. A detailed theoretical analysis of Lamb wave propagation was performed and simulations were carried out using the finite element software system ABAQUS. This analytical study confirmed the behavior of the acoustic signals acquired from the experimental studies. The report presents the background the analysis of acoustic signals acquired from piezo-electric transducers for structural defect monitoring. A comparison of the use of time-frequency techniques, including the Hilbert-Huang transform, is presented. The report presents the theoretical study of Lamb wave propagation in flat beams and tubular structures, and the need for mode separation in order to effectively perform defect diagnosis. The results of an extensive experimental study of detection, location, and isolation of structural defects in flat aluminum beams and brass tubes are presented. The results of this research show the feasibility of on-line monitoring of small structural flaws by the use of transient and nonlinear acoustic signal analysis, and its implementation by the proper design of a piezo-electric transducer suite.

Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

216

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. NeroResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

SUN-TO-EARTH CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS INTERACTING NEAR 1 AU: FORMATION OF A COMPLEX EJECTA AND GENERATION OF A TWO-STEP GEOMAGNETIC STORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On 2012 September 30-October 1 the Earth underwent a two-step geomagnetic storm. We examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the geomagnetic storm with combined heliospheric ...

Liu, Ying D.

219

Improving Vortex Generators to Enhance the Performance of Air-Cooled Condensers in a Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop strategies to enhance air-side heat transfer in geothermal air-cooled condensers such that it should not significantly increase pressure drop and parasitic fan pumping power. The work was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) of Japan, Yokohama National University, and the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India. A combined experimental and numerical investigation was performed to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to largescale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique was employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements were obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that included four tube rows in a staggered array. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements were also acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus in the Single Blow Test Facility. In addition, a numerical modeling technique was developed to predict local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds number flows, with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results were obtained that reveal quantitative details of local finsurface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results were obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500. The winglets were of triangular (delta) shape with a 1:2 or 1:3 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface heat transfer results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (in terms of Colburn j-factor) associated with deployment of the winglets with circular as well as oval tubes. In general, toe-in (common flow up) type winglets appear to have better performance than the toe-out (common flow down) type winglets. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. During the course of their independent research, all of the researchers have established that about 10 to 30% enhancement in Colburn j-factor is expected. However, actual increase in heat transfer rate from a heat exchanger employing finned tubes with winglets may be smaller, perhaps on the order of 2 to 5%. It is also concluded that for any specific application, more full-size experimentation is needed to optimize the winglet design for a specific heat exchanger application. If in place of a circular tube, an oval tube can be economically used in a bundle, it is expected that the pressure drop across the tube bundle with the application of vortex generators (winglets) will be similar to that in a conventional circular tube bundle. It is hoped that the results of this research will demonstrate the benefits of applying vortex generators (winglets) on the fins to improve the heat transfer from the air-side of the tube bundle.

Manohar S. Sohal

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Biomass: Biogas Generator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BIOGAS GENERATOR Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, chemicalcarbon cycles, plants, energy resourcestransformations) Grade Level: Middle School (6-8) Small groups (3 to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

222

Efficient 1341-nm Laser Emission and Heat Generation Characteristics in Nd:GdVO4 Laser under Direct 879-nm Pumping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on a highly efficient (over 60% slope efficiency) 1.3-m cw Nd:GdVO4 laser pumped by a 879-nm Ti:Sapphire laser. Non-radiative transition induced heat generation in Nd:GdVO4...

Saikawa, Jiro; Sato, Yoichi; Taira, Takunori; Nakamura, Osamu; Furukawa, Yasunori

223

Generated using version 3.2 of the official AMS LATEX template Sensitivity of Latent Heating Characteristics in a Storm1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) a summer-time squall line over the Great Plains9 is simulated suitable because of the intensity of local storms, the existence of11 widespread reports of waves generated likely tied to the fact that the top22 of the convective cells reaches into a region of strong wind shear

Alexander, M. Joan

224

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High- importance phenomena related to the RPV include crack initiation and subcritical crack growth; field fabrication process control; property control in heavy...

225

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of enhanced heat transfer in the primary heat exchanger. After blowdown, there will be a loss of the heat sink. < Leak into reactor primary system. The total gas inventory in the...

226

Evaluation of Sludge Characteristics and Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Full-scale Wastewater Treatment Plants in China by Mass and Energy Balances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy balances were used to evaluate the characteristics of sludge and to calculate the carbon dioxide emissions in the WWTPs in this study. To avoid the errors, mass balances by TP have been used to calibrate the relating data before making energy ... Keywords: Sludge, CEP, mass balance, energy balance, carbon dioxide

Gan Wang; Yongzhen Peng; Shuying Wang; Gan Wang; Hongxun Hou

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Definition: Distributed generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation generation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Distributed generation A term used by the power industry to describe localized or on-site power generation[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Distributed generation, also called on-site generation, dispersed generation, embedded generation, decentralized generation, decentralized energy or distributed energy, generates electricity from many small energy sources. Most countries generate electricity in large centralized facilities, such as fossil fuel, nuclear, large solar power plants or hydropower plants. These plants have excellent economies of scale, but usually transmit electricity long distances and can negatively affect the environment. Distributed generation allows collection of energy from many

228

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power plant interface engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of EPRI Research Project 2466-10. The objective of this project was to identify the preliminary interface requirements and characteristics for a coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic retrofit power plant located at the Scholz Generating Station, Sneads, Florida. An initial building arrangement has been developed and incorporated into the plot plan of the Scholz Generating Station. An MHD process flow diagram was generated and integrated with the existing plant process flow diagram. The electrical interface schematic for the MHD system was also developed. A preliminary list of process flow, electrical, and physical interfaces was produced and the respective interface requirements defined. The existing facilities were inspected and the necessary modifications imposed by the MHD system have been identified. 6 refs., 24 figs., 11 tabs.

Van Bibber, L.E.; Wiseman, D.A. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Advanced Energy Systems Div.); Cuchens, J.W. (Southern Electric International, Birmingham, AL (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Effect of Spacing and Time of Thinning on the Yield, Growth, and Fruiting Characteristics of the Cotton Plant in 1925.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 360 JUNE. 1927 DIVISION OF AGRONOMY THE EFFECT OF SPACING AND TIME OF THINNING ON THE YIELD, GROWTH, AND FRUITING CHARACTERISTICS... *On Leave. **Dean, School of Veterinary Medicine. ***In cooperat!on w!th U. S. Department of Agriculture. ****In cooperat~on wlth the School of Aprlculture. SYNOPSIS This Bulletin reports the results of work conducted in 1925 at the Main Station...

Stansel, R. H. (Roy Harrison)

1927-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Measurements of photon ionizing radiation fields in the reactor room of the 4th power-generating unit of the chernobyl nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radiation examination of the reactor room of the damaged fourth unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant was performed. The most strongly radiating surfaces...

A. G. Volkovich; V. N. Potapov; S. V. Smirnov; L. I. Urutskoev

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Confirmation of the seismic resistance of nuclear power plant equipment after assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that the natural frequencies and damping decrements of nuclear power plant equipment can only be determined experimentally and directly at the power generation units (reactors) of nuclear power plants under real disassembly conditions for the equipment, piping network, thermal insulation, etc. A computational experimental method is described in which the natural frequencies and damping decrements are determined in the field and the seismic resistance is reevaluated using these values. This method is the basis of the standards document 'Methods for confirming the dynamic characteristics of systems and components of the generating units of nuclear power plants which are important for safety' prepared and introduced in 2012.

Kaznovsky, P. S.; Kaznovsky, A. P.; Saakov, E. S.; Ryasnyj, S. I. [JSC 'Atomtehenergo' (Russian Federation)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

233

Preliminary experimental analysis of a small-scale prototype SWRO desalination plant, designed for continuous adjustment of its energy consumption to the widely varying power generated by a stand-alone wind turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Given the significant water-energy problems associated with many remote and arid areas of the planet, most studies, projects and developments of installations for the production of fresh water using desalination technologies powered by renewable energy sources have focussed on small-scale stand-alone systems. The most commonly used energy sources have been solar photovoltaic and wind and the most widely applied desalination technology that of reverse osmosis (RO). Most of the systems use batteries as a means of mass energy storage and the RO plants normally operate at constant pressure and flow rate. This paper presents a small-scale prototype SWRO (seawater reverse osmosis) desalination plant designed to continuously adapt its energy consumption to the variable power supplied by a wind turbine (WT), dispensing with mass energy storage in batteries and proposing the use of a supercapacitor bank as a dynamic regulation system. A description is given of the tests performed to date with the SWRO desalination plant connected to the conventional grid while controlling the number of pressure vessels that are connected/disconnected to/from the system and regulating their operating pressures and flow rates (within predetermined admissible limits) to maintain a constant permeate recovery rate and adapt the energy consumption of the plant to a widely varying simulated wind energy supply. One of the most important conclusions that can be drawn from the studies undertaken is the feasibility of adapting the consumption of the prototype of the SWRO desalination plant to widely varying WT-generated power. Despite using various time interval lengths in which it was assumed that the WT output power remained constant, a perfect fit was not obtained between the theoretical WT-generated power and the power consumed by the SWRO desalination plant, nor was it possible to maintain a constant permeate recovery rate at each instant.

Jos A. Carta; Jaime Gonzlez; Pedro Cabrera; Vicente J. Subiela

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables Release date: November 22, 2011 Next release date: November 2012 See also: Table 1. Capacity and Generation, Table 2. Ownership Data Table 3. Nuclear Reactor Characteristics and Operational History PDF XLS Plant Name Generator ID Type Reactor Supplier and Model Construction Start Grid Connection Original Expiration Date License Renewal Application License Renewal Issued Extended Expiration Arkansas Nuclear One 1 PWR Babcock&Wilcox, Lower Loop 10/1/1968 8/17/1974 5/20/2014 2/1/2000 6/20/2001 5/20/2034 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 PWR Combustion Eng. 7/1/1971 12/26/1978 7/17/2018 10/15/2003 6/30/2005 7/17/2038

235

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper discusses the applications of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation. Consultants, plant engineers and plant developers can evaluate the steam side performance of HRSGs and arrive at the optimum system which matches the needs...

Ganapathy, V.

236

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMERGENCY PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSINGEmergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination ofproposed nuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Local Generation Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Limited Place: United Kingdom Sector: Biomass Product: UK-based biomass firm developing anaerobic digestion plants. References: Local Generation Limited1 This article...

238

MHD power plant instrumentation and control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has awarded a contract to the MHD Development Corporation (MDC) to develop instrumentation and control requirements and strategies for commercial MHD power plants. MDC subcontracted MSE to do the technical development required. MSE is being assisted by Montana State University (MSU) for the topping cycle development. A computer model of a stand-alone MHD/steam plant is being constructed. The plant is based on the plant design set forth in the MDC proposal to the Federal Clean Coal Technology 5 solicitation. It consists of an MHD topping plant, a Heat Recovery Seed Recovery (HRSR) plant, and a steam turbo-generator. The model is based on the computer code used for a study of the Corette plant retrofitted with an MHD plant. Additional control strategies, based on MHD testing results and current steam bottoming plant control data, will be incorporated. A model will be devised and implemented for automatic control of the plant. Requirements regarding instrumentation and actuators will be documented. Instrumentation and actuators that are not commercially available will be identified. The role and desired characteristics of an expert system in the automated control scheme is being investigated. Start-up and shutdown procedures will be studied and load change dynamic performance will be evaluated. System response to abnormal topping cycle and off-design system operation will be investigated. This includes use of MHD topping cycle models which couple gasdynamic and electrical behavior for the study of controlling of the MHD topping cycle. A curvefitter, which uses cubic Hermitian spline interpolation functions in as many as five dimensions, allows much more accurate reproduction of nonlinear, multidimensional functions. This project will be the first to investigate plant dynamics and control using as many as seven independent variables or control inputs to the MHD topping cycle.

Lofftus, D.; Rudberg, D. [MSE Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Johnson, R.; Hammerstrom, D. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

The air dose rate around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant: its spatial characteristics and temporal changes until December 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Distribution maps of air dose rates around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant were constructed using the results of measurement obtained from approximately 6500 locations (at most) per measurement period. The measurements were conducted 1m above the ground using survey meters in flat and spatially open locations. Spatial distribution and temporal change of the air dose rate in the area were revealed by examining the resultant distribution maps. The observed reduction rate of the air dose rate over the 18 months between June 2011 and December 2012 was greater than that calculated from radioactive decay of radiocesium by 10% in relative percentage except decontaminated sites. This 10% difference in the reduction of the air dose rate can be explained by the mobility of radiocesium in the depth direction. In the region where the air dose rate was lower than 0.25?Svh?1 on June 2011, the reduction of the air dose rate was observed to be smaller than that of the other dose rate regions, and it was in fact smaller than the reduction rate caused by radioactive decay alone. In contrast, the reduction rate was larger in regions with higher air dose rates. In flat and spatially open locations, no significant difference in the reduction tendency of air dose rates was observed among different land use classifications (rice fields, farmland, forests, and building sites).

Satoshi Mikami; Takeshi Maeyama; Yoshifumi Hoshide; Ryuichi Sakamoto; Shoji Sato; Naotoshi Okuda; Tetsuro Sato; Hiroshi Takemiya; Kimiaki Saito

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Transuranic waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transuranic waste (TRUW) loads and potential contaminant releases at and en route to treatment, storage, and disposal sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex are important considerations in DOE`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Waste loads are determined in part by the level of treatment the waste has undergone and the complex-wide configuration of origination, treatment, storage, and disposal sites selected for TRUW management. Other elements that impact waste loads are treatment volumes, waste characteristics, and the unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. Treatment levels and site configurations have been combined into six TRUW management alternatives for study in the WM PEIS. This supplemental report to the WM PEIS gives the projected waste loads and contaminant release profiles for DOE treatment sites under each of the six TRUW management alternatives. It gives TRUW characteristics and inventories for current DOE generation and storage sites, describes the treatment technologies for three proposed levels of TRUW treatment, and presents the representative unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. The data presented are primary inputs to developing the costs, health risks, and socioeconomic and environmental impacts of treating, packaging, and shipping TRUW for disposal.

Hong, K.; Kotek, T.; Folga, S.; Koebnick, B.; Wang, Y.; Kaicher, C.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Power Plant Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

Tingley, Joseph V.

242

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant ... A natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with capacity of about 430 MW integrated to a chemical solvent absorber/stripping capture plant is investigated. ... The natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) is an advanced power generation technology that improves the fuel efficiency of natural gas. ...

Mehdi Karimi; Magne Hillestad; Hallvard F. Svendsen

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

The Second Opening of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant? Review of Salient Characteristics and Unique Operational Considerations for Remote Handled Transuranic Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) intends to dispose of remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) beginning in 2005. (1) Four principle regulatory agencies are involved in the process of approving the RH TRU waste activities. The DOE is responsible for operational activities. The U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approves the design and use of shipping containers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for assuring safe and environmentally effective long-term disposal of the radioactive component of the waste and operational environmental monitoring. The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) is responsible for the handling and the disposal of the non-radioactive hazardous component of the waste. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is responsible for performing independent technical oversight of all WIPP activities, and will comment on documents and practices for the various regulated RH TRU waste activities. The DOE has already obtained the necessary approvals from the NRC, and has submitted a Class 3 Modification request to the NMED. On December 16, 2002 the DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) provided the EPA with a notice of proposed change, in accordance with 40 CFR 194.4 (b) (3), to receive and dispose of remote handled transuranic waste. (2) WIPP procedures for the management of RH TRU waste at the site are being developed. While there are no issues with current NRC Certificates of Compliance for the RH TRU waste shipping containers, it is likely that there will be some controversy over other aspects of the currently planned RH TRU waste program. These issues may include: (1) the published RH TRU waste inventory, (2) the characterization of the radionuclide portion of the waste, for which one planned method is to use dose-to-Curie conversions, and (3) the plans to use bounding estimates for the hazardous portion of the WIPP waste, rather than measuring VOCs on a container-by-container basis or by representative sampling as is done for contact handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste. This paper discusses the currently planned process and the possible issues related to the DOE's efforts to dispose RH TRU waste at the WIPP.

Anastas, G.; Walker, B.A.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

244

Planting Food or Fuel: Developing an Interdisciplinary Approach to Understanding the Role of Culture in Farmers Decisions to Grow Second-Generation Biofuel Feedstock Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent interest in biofuels as an alternative energy source has spurred considerable changes in agricultural practice worldwide. These changes will be more pronounced as second-generation biofuels, such as switch grass, gain prominence; this article...

White, Stacey Swearingen; Brown, J. Christopher; Gibson-Carpenter, Jane W.; Hanley, Eric; Earnhart, Dietrich H.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

"1. Beluga","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",344 "2. George M Sullivan Generation Plant 2","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",220  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska" Alaska" "1. Beluga","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",344 "2. George M Sullivan Generation Plant 2","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",220 "3. North Pole","Petroleum","Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc",144 "4. Bradley Lake","Hydroelectric","Homer Electric Assn Inc",126 "5. Anchorage 1","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",88 "6. Snettisham","Hydroelectric","Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",78 "7. Bernice Lake","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",62 "8. Lemon Creek","Petroleum","Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",58

246

Power Generation and the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as hydro and gas tur- bines. It...these increases in power costs will be a...aspects of power generation: the exploration...residual fuels for power plants, as well...concepts of oil-fired power generation plants for the...

Rolf Eliassen

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California",and Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants", Lawrencejected lifetime for a nuclear power plant is 40 years, a

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,Summary of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience for

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Plant in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Project in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts Sandra Reategui Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 January 2009 DOE/GO-102009-2760 Acknowledgements ....................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 2 Report Overview ......................................................................................................................... 2

250

Economics of Hydropower Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feed-in tariff scheme, as its name suggests is based ... plant. The most important aspect of a feed-in tariff system is that the grid operator cannot ... stations must reduce their power generation. The feed-in

Prof. Dr.-Ing Hermann-Josef Wagner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

EIS-0036: Coal Conversion Program, New England Power Company, Brayton Point Generating Station Plants 1, 2 and 3, Sommerset, Bristol County, Massachusetts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Economic Regulatory Administration developed this EIS to evaluate the site-specific environmental impacts of issuing a Notice of Effectiveness to New England Power Company's Brayton Point Generating Station, Units 1, 2 and 3 to prohibit burning of gas or oil as the primary source of fuel.

252

Specific activity of243Am and243Cm in the fuel of the 4th power-generating unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The activity ratios241Am/241Am.243Cm/244Cm, and242Cm/244Cm in core samples taken at the industrial site of the object Cover were measured. The content of243Am and243Cm in the fuel in the 4th power-generating un...

V. A. Ageev; S. L. Vyrichek; A. P. Lashko; T. N. Lashko; A. A. Odintsov

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Biogass Generator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Another internet tool by: Another internet tool by: Build Your Own Page 1 of 5 Teach...build...learn...renewable energy! Biogas Generator A Renewable Energy Project Kit The Pembina Institute What Is Biogas? Biogas is actually a mixture of gases, usually carbon dioxide and methane. It is produced by a few kinds of microorganisms, usually when air or oxygen is absent. (The absence of oxygen is called "anaerobic conditions.") Animals that eat a lot of plant material, particularly grazing animals such as cattle, produce large amounts of biogas. The biogas is produced not by the cow or elephant, but by billions of microor- ganisms living in its digestive system. Biogas also develops in bogs and at the bottom of lakes, where decaying organic matter builds up under wet and

254

Modulating lignin in plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

255

Plant Phenotype Characterization System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

256

NETL: Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues of Oxy-Fuel Combustion Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues of Oxy-Fuel Combustion Project No.: DE-FE0002402 NETL has partnered with the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) to investigate the characteristics of oxy-fuel flames and assess their impact on the operability of oxy-fuel combustion systems. The examination of fundamental flame characteristics data and related burner operability parameters are essential for designing and developing oxy-fuel combustion systems for new power plants and retrofitting existing power generation units. In an oxy-fuel system, coal is combusted in an enriched oxygen environment using pure oxygen diluted with recycled CO2 or water vapor (H2O), resulting in a flue stream consisting only of CO2 and H2O (no other co-contaminants) (Figure 1). Oxy-fuel combustion is promising for CCUS applications because water can be condensed out of the CO2/H2O flue stream to produce a relatively pure CO2 end product for capture. Oxy-fuel combustion and subsequent CO2 capture is currently being considered by the DOE's Innovations for Existing Plants Program as having the potential to meet the goal of 90 percent CO2 capture without increasing the cost of electricity more than 35 percent.

257

ADVANCED CO2 CYCLE POWER GENERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-FC26-02NT41621 to develop a conceptual design and determine the performance characteristics of a new IGCC plant configuration that facilitates CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration. This new configuration will be designed to achieve CO{sub 2} sequestration without the need for water gas shifting and CO{sub 2} separation, and may eliminate the need for a separate sequestration compressor. This research introduces a novel concept of using CO{sub 2} as a working fluid for an advanced coal gasification based power generation system, where it generates power with high system efficiency while concentrating CO{sub 2} for sequestration. This project supports the DOE research objective of development of concepts for the capture and storage of CO{sub 2}.

A. Nehrozoglu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

ADVANCED CO2 CYCLE POWER GENERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-FC26-02NT41621 to develop a conceptual design and determine the performance characteristics of a new IGCC plant configuration that facilitates CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration. This new configuration will be designed to achieve CO{sub 2} sequestration without the need for water gas shifting and CO{sub 2} separation, and may eliminate the need for a separate sequestration compressor. This research introduces a novel concept of using CO{sub 2} as a working fluid for an advanced coal gasification based power generation system, where it generates power with high system efficiency while concentrating CO{sub 2} for sequestration. This project supports the DOE research objective of development of concepts for the capture and storage of CO{sub 2}.

A. Nehrozoglu

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: Analysis of Probability of Detection of Plausible Diversion Scenarios at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants Using Advanced Safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last decade, efforts by the safeguards community, including inspectorates, governments, operators and owners of centrifuge facilities, have given rise to new possibilities for safeguards approaches in enrichment plants. Many of these efforts have involved development of new instrumentation to measure uranium mass and uranium-235 enrichment and inspection schemes using unannounced and random site inspections. We have chosen select diversion scenarios and put together a reasonable system of safeguards equipment and safeguards approaches and analyzed the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed safeguards approach by predicting the probability of detection of diversion in the chosen safeguards approaches. We analyzed the effect of redundancy in instrumentation, cross verification of operator instrumentation by inspector instrumentation, and the effects of failures or anomalous readings on verification data. Armed with these esults we were able to quantify the technical cost benefit of the addition of certain instrument suites and show the promise of these new systems.

Hase, Kevin R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hawkins Erpenbeck, Heather [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

Boiler and steam generator corrosion: Fossil-fuel power plants. March 1977-December 1989 (A Bibliography from the NTIS data base). Report for March 1977-December 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning corrosion effects, mechanisms, detection, and inhibition in fossil fuel fired boilers. Fluidized bed combustors and coal gasification are included in the applications. Hot corrosion, thermal mechanical degradation, and intergranular oxidation corrosion studies performed on the water side and hot gas side of heat exchanger tubes and support structures are presented. Coatings and treatment of material to inhibit corrosion are discussed. Corrosion affecting nuclear powered steam generators is examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 88 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: helical screw expander power plant, Model 76-1. Final report to the International Energy Agency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 1-MW geothermal wellhead power plant incorporating a Lysholm or helical screw expander (HSE) was field tested between 1980 and 1983 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand with technical assistance from the United States. The objectives were to provide data on the reliability and performance of the HSE and to assess the costs and benefits of its use. The range of conditions under which the HSE was tested included loads up to 933 kW, mass flowrates of 14,600 to 395, 000 lbs/hr, inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0 to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, total dissolved solids up to 310,000 ppM, and noncondensible gases up to 38% of the vapor mass flow. Typical machine efficiencies of 40 to 50% were calculated. For most operations efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power, while inlet quality and rotor speed had only small effects. The HSE was designed with oversized internal clearances in the expectation that adherent scale would form during operation. Improvements in machine efficiency of 3.5 to 4 percentage points were observed over some test periods with some scale deposition. A comparison with a 1-MW back-pressure turbine showed that the HSE can compete favorably under certain conditions. The HSE was found to be a rugged energy conversion machine for geothermal applications, but some subsystems were found to require further development. 7 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1985-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

263

Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant Overview. Part II: A Utility Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solar One Pilot Plant has been connected to ... to evaluate the plants performance as a utility generation resource.

J. N. Reeves

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Diophantine Generation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diophantine Generation, Horizontal and Vertical Problems, and the Weak Vertical Method Alexandra Shlapentokh Diophantine Sets, Definitions and Generation Diophantine Sets Diophantine Generation Properties of Diophantine Generation Diophantine Family of Z Diophantine Family of a Polynomial Ring Going Down Horizontal

Shlapentokh, Alexandra

265

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Grain characteristics and engineering properties of coal ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Ash produced by the coal fired thermal plants is often used as ... the grain characteristics and the engineering properties of coal ash. The results of x-ray diffraction, ... characteristic that may be used for ...

A. Trivedi; V. K. Sud

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Characterization of the oxide formed in the presence of poly acrylic acid over the steam generator structural materials of nuclear power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On-line addition of polymeric dispersants, such as poly acrylic acid (PAA), to the steam generator (SG) results in the formation of a better protective inner oxide layer that reduces subsequent corrosion of structural materials. Its dispersive action inhibits the growth of a secondary oxide layer thereby facilitating their easy removal. This paper discusses the effect of PAA on the nature of oxides formed over the surfaces of SG. In the case of carbon steel, the inner oxide layer (magnetite) formed in the presence of PAA was protective. Electrochemical studies showed a minimum concentration of 350ppb of PAA was found to be optimum. On the monel surface, in the absence of PAA, nickel ferrite was formed while in the presence of PAA, the oxide formed was a mixture of oxides of copper and nickel. A concentration of 700ppb of PAA was found to be optimum for monel. In the case of incoloy, the effect of PAA was not discernible except for the size and morphology of the crystallites formed.

Akhilesh C. Joshi; Appadurai L. Rufus; Sumathi Suresh; Palogi Chandramohan; Srinivasan Rangarajan; Sankaralingam Velmurugan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation, and Capacity Factor " "PlantReactor Name","Generator ID","State","Type","2009 Summer Capacity"," 2010 Annual...

269

Description Plants ESIS ESD FSGD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Site Description Plants ESIS ESD FSGD ESI Forestland ESI Rangeland Data Access > Return CHARACTERISTICS Site Type: Rangeland Site Name: Red Sandy Loam 25-32" PZ Site ID: R082AY369TX Major Land Resource

270

Thermodynamic and economic analysis of polygeneration system integrating atmospheric pressure coal pyrolysis technology with circulating fluidized bed power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignite-based polygeneration system has been considered as a feasible technology to realize clean and efficient utilization of coal resources. A newly polygeneration system has been proposed, featuring the combination of a 2נ300MW circulating fluidized bed (CFB) power plant and atmospheric pressure fluidized bed pyrolyzers. Xiaolongtan lignite is pyrolyzed in pyrolyzers. Pyrolyzed volatiles are further utilized for the co-generation of methanol, oil, and electricity, while char residues are fired in CFB boilers to maintain the full load condition of boilers. Detailed system models were built, and the optimum operation parameters of the polygeneration plant were sought. Technical and economic performances of optimum design of the polygeneration plant were analyzed and compared with those of the conventional CFB power plant based on the evaluation of energy and exergy efficiency, internal rate of return (IRR), and payback period. Results revealed that system efficiency and the IRR of the polygeneration plant are ca. 9% and 14% points higher than those of the power plant, respectively. The study also analyzed the effects of market fluctuations on the economic condition of the polygeneration plant, and found that prices of fuel, material, and products have great impacts on the economic characteristics of the polygeneration plant. Polygeneration plant is more economic than CFB power plant even when prices fluctuate within a wide range. This paper provides a thorough evaluation of the polygeneration plant, and the study indicates that the proposed polygeneration plant has a bright prospect.

Zhihang Guo; Qinhui Wang; Mengxiang Fang; Zhongyang Luo; Kefa Cen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New...

272

A systemic approach for dimensioning and designing anaerobic bio-digestion/energy generation biomass supply networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Anaerobic bio-digestion/energy generation complexes using animal waste raw materials represent an important component of renewable energy initiatives and policies worldwide, and are significant contributors to broaden sustainability efforts. In such projects bio-power feasibility depends heavily on generation complex access to biomass which is of costly transportation. As a result, an important component of renewable energy planning is the optimization of a logistics system to guarantee low-cost access to animal waste. This access is a function of local characteristics including number and geographic location of organic waste sources, operating and maintenance costs of the generation facility, energy prices, and marginal contribution of biomass collected and delivered to the anaerobic bio-digestion unit. Because biomass exhibits high transportation costs per unit of energy ultimately generated, and because different types of biomass have different biogas-generating properties, design of the supply logistics system can be the determinant factor towards economic viability of energy generation from an anaerobic bio-digestion plant. Indeed, to address this problem it is helpful to consider the farms, the logistics system, the anaerobic bio-digestion plant, and the generation plant as subsystems in an integrated system. Additionally, the existence of an outlet for manure may allow farmers to significantly raise boundaries of one constraint they face, namely disposing of animal waste, therefore permitting increases in farm production capacity. This paper suggests and outlines a systematic methodology to address the design of such systems.

Joo Neiva de Figueiredo; Srgio Fernando Mayerle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Next Generation CANDU Technology: Competitive Design for the Nuclear Renaissance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AECL has developed the design for a next generation of CANDU{sup R} plants by marrying a set of enabling technologies to well-established successful CANDU features. The basis for the design is to replicate or adapt existing CANDU components for a new core design. By adopting slightly enriched uranium fuel, a core design with light water coolant, heavy water moderator and reflector has been defined, based on the existing CANDU fuel channel module. This paper summarizes the main features and characteristics of the reference next-generation CANDU design. The progress of the next generation of CANDU design program in meeting challenging cost, schedule and performance targets is described. AECL's cost reduction methodology is summarized as an integral part of the design optimization process. Examples are given of cost reduction features together with enhancement of design margins. (authors)

Hopwood, J.M.; Hedges, K.R.; Pakan, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

275

Plant design: Integrating Plant and Equipment Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Like power plant engineers, process plant engineers must design generating units to operate efficiently, cleanly, and profitably despite fluctuating costs for raw materials and fuels. To do so, they increasingly create virtual plants to enable evaluation of design concepts without the expense of building pilot-scale or demonstration facilities. Existing computational models describe an entire plant either as a network of simplified equipment models or as a single, very detailed equipment model. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project (Figure 5) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks to bridge the gap between models by integrating plant modeling and equipment modeling software. The goal of the effort is to provide greater insight into the performance of proposed plant designs. The software integration was done using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (Computer Aided Process EngineeringOpen), or CO interface. Several demonstration cases based on operating power plants confirm the viability of this co-simulation approach.

Sloan, David (Alstrom Power); Fiveland, Woody (Alstrom Power); Zitney, S.E.; Osawe, Maxwell (Ansys, Inc.)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Application of membrane technology to power generation waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three membrane technlogies (reverse osmosis, ultrafiltration, and electrodialysis) for wastewater treatment and reuse at electric generating power plants were examined. Recirculating condenser water, ash sluice water, coal pile drainage, boiler blowdown and makeup treatment wastes, chemical cleaning wastes, wet SO/sub 2/ scrubber wastes, and miscellaneous wastes were studied. In addition, membrane separation of toxic substances in wastewater was also addressed. Waste characteristics, applicable regulations, feasible membrane processes, and cost information were analyzed for each waste stream. A users' guide to reverse osmosis was developed and is provided in an appendix.

Tang, T.L.D.; Chu, T.J.; Boroughs, R.D.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Exploitation of temporary water flow by hybrid PV-hydroelectric plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents a new type of Renewable Energy Sources (RES) suitable for exploitation watercourse with periodical-temporary water flow. This innovative solution consist of Hydroelectric Plant (HEP) and solar Photovoltaic (PV) generator working together as one hybrid power plant, producing green energy with the same characteristics as classical hydroelectric plants. The main objective of this hybrid solution is achievement of optimal renewable energy production in order to increase the share of RES in an Electricity Power System (EPS). As a paradigm of such exploitation of RES, the example of HEP Zavrelje/Dubrovnik in Croatia was used, where it was ascertained that the proposed solution of hybrid PV-HEP system is natural, realistic and very acceptable, which enhances the characteristics of both energy sources. The application of such hybrid systems would increase the share of high quality RES in energy systems.

Jure Margeta; Zvonimir Glasnovic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

1. Generation 1 1. Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Generation 1 _________________________________________________________________________ 1. Generation Sound and vibrations or, in more general terms, oscillations of matter (solids or fluids) are generated in many different dynamic processes. The basic mechanisms which underlie these oscillations

Berlin,Technische Universität

279

Linear PM Generator for Wave Energy Conversion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The main objective of this thesis is to design a selected version of linear PM generator and to determine the electromechanical characteristics at variable operating (more)

Parthasarathy, Rajkumar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants,natural gas plants, and combined cycle natural gas plants.generated largely from combined-cycle Capacity (GW) yd r as

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

AVESTAR® - Smart Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plant Plant In the area of smart plant operations, AVESTAR's dynamic simulators enable researchers to analyze plant-wide performance over a wide range of operating scenarios, including plant startup (cold, warm, hot), shutdown, fuel switchovers, on-load cycling, high-load operations of 90-120% of rated capacity, and high frequency megawatt changes for automatic generation control. The dynamic simulators also let researchers analyze the plant's response to disturbances and malfunctions. The AVESTAR team is also using dynamic simulators to develop effective strategies for the operation and control of pre-combustion capture technology capable of removing at least 90% of the CO2 emissions. Achieving operational excellence can have significant impact on the extent and the rate at which commercial-scale capture processes will be scaled-up, deployed, and used in the years to come. If deployment of new CO2 capture technologies is to be accelerated, power generators must be confident in ensuring efficient, flexible, reliable, environmentally-friendly, and profitable plant operations.

282

Dubuque generation station, Dubuque, Iowa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alliant Energy's Dubuque generation station is a fine example of why small does not mean insignificant in the power generation industry. This winner of the EUCG best performer award in the small plant category shows that its operating excellence towers over that of many larger and much newer coal-fired power plants. The plant has three operating units with boilers originally designed for Illinois basin coal but now Powder River Basin coal makes up 75% of the coal consumed. The boilers can also burn natural gas. 4 photos.

Peltier, R.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Efficient 1.3-m Laser Oscillation and Heat Generation Characteristics in Nd:GdVO4 Laser under Direct Pumping into 4F3/2 Emitting Level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrated a near quantum-limited slope efficiency in 1.3-m cw Nd:GdVO4 laser under a 879-nm (Ti:Sapphire laser) pumping. Large heat generation due to non-radiative decay in...

Saikawa, Jiro; Sato, Yoichi; Taira, Takunori; Nakamura, Osamu; Furukawa, Yasunori

284

October 11, 2011 Wind Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years. #12;Reading on ESRP 285 Website #12;The Competition: Gas-Fired Generation from a Combined CycleESRP 285 October 11, 2011 Wind Generation · Videos · Power Point Lecture #12;Wind Videos Wind (CC) Power Plant #12;Wind Investors Face These Costs #12;Fixed Costs #12;Variable Costs #12;Bottom

Ford, Andrew

285

Loan Guarantee Recipient Awarded Power Plant of the Year  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, a DOE loan guarantee recipient, won 2014 Plant of the Year from POWER Magazine.

286

World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, the world’s largest concentrating solar power plant, officially opened on February 13.

287

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel power plants. However,power plants, which are reviewed and licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and relatively few areas of geothermal and

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Helium circulator design considerations for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts are in progress to develop a standard modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant that is amenable to design certification and serial production. The MHTGR reference design, based on a steam cycle power conversion system, utilizes a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Flexibility in power rating is afforded by utilizing a multiplicity of the standard module. The circulator, which is an electric motor-driven helium compressor, is a key component in the primary system of the nuclear plant, since it facilitates thermal energy transfer from the reactor core to the steam generator; and, hence, to the external turbo-generator set. This paper highlights the helium circulator design considerations for the reference MHTGR plant and includes a discussion on the major features of the turbomachine concept, operational characteristics, and the technology base that exists in the U.S.

McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Helium circulator design considerations for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts are in progress to develop a standard modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant that is amenable to design certification and serial production. The MHTGR reference design, based on a steam cycle power conversion system, utilizes a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Flexibility in power rating is afforded by utilizing a multiplicity of the standard module. The circulator, which is an electric motor-driven helium compressor, is a key component in the primary system of the nuclear plant, since it facilitates thermal energy transfer from the reactor core to the steam generator; and, hence, to the external turbo-generator set. This paper highlights the helium circulator design considerations for the reference MHTGR plant and includes a discussion on the major features of the turbomachine concept, operational characteristics, and the technology base that exists in the US.

McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Microstructural Characterization of Next Generation Nuclear Graphites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports the microstructural characteristics of various petroleum and pitch based nuclear graphites (IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA) that are of interest to the next generation nuclear plant program. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to identify and understand the different features constituting the microstructure of nuclear graphite such as the filler particles, microcracks, binder phase, rosette-shaped quinoline insoluble (QI) particles, chaotic structures, and turbostratic graphite phase. The dimensions of microcracks were found to vary from a few nanometers to tens of microns. Furthermore, the microcracks were found to be filled with amorphous carbon of unknown origin. The pitch coke based graphite (NBG-18) was found to contain higher concentration of binder phase constituting QI particles as well as chaotic structures. The turbostratic graphite, present in all of the grades, was identified through their elliptical diffraction patterns. The difference in the microstructure has been analyzed in view of their processing conditions.

Karthik Chinnathambi; Joshua Kane; Darryl P. Butt; William E. Windes; Rick Ubic

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Reactive power interconnection requirements for PV and wind plants : recommendations to NERC.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Voltage on the North American bulk system is normally regulated by synchronous generators, which typically are provided with voltage schedules by transmission system operators. In the past, variable generation plants were considered very small relative to conventional generating units, and were characteristically either induction generator (wind) or line-commutated inverters (photovoltaic) that have no inherent voltage regulation capability. However, the growing level of penetration of non-traditional renewable generation - especially wind and solar - has led to the need for renewable generation to contribute more significantly to power system voltage control and reactive power capacity. Modern wind-turbine generators, and increasingly PV inverters as well, have considerable dynamic reactive power capability, which can be further enhanced with other reactive support equipment at the plant level to meet interconnection requirements. This report contains a set of recommendations to the North-America Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) as part of Task 1-3 (interconnection requirements) of the Integration of Variable Generation Task Force (IVGTF) work plan. The report discusses reactive capability of different generator technologies, reviews existing reactive power standards, and provides specific recommendations to improve existing interconnection standards.

McDowell, Jason (General Electric, Schenectady, NY); Walling, Reigh (General Electric, Schenectady, NY); Peter, William (SunPower, Richmond, CA); Von Engeln, Edi (NV Energy, Reno, NV); Seymour, Eric (AEI, Fort Collins, CO); Nelson, Robert (Siemens Wind Turbines, Orlando, FL); Casey, Leo (Satcon, Boston, MA); Ellis, Abraham; Barker, Chris. (SunPower, Richmond, CA)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Design and simulation of a plant control system for a GCFR demonstration plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plant control system is being designed for a 300 MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) demonstration plant. Control analysis is being performed as an integral part of the plant design process to ensure that control requirements are satisfied as the plant design evolves. Plant models and simulations are being developed to generate information necessary to further define control system requirements for subsequent plant design iterations.

Estrine, E.A.; Greiner, H.G.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Flow Characteristics Analysis of Widows' Creek Type Control Valve for Steam Turbine Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steam turbine converts the kinetic energy of steam to mechanical energy of rotor blades in the power conversion system of fossil and nuclear power plants. The electric output from the generator of which the rotor is coupled with that of the steam turbine depends on the rotation velocity of the steam turbine bucket. The rotation velocity is proportional to the mass flow rate of steam entering the steam turbine through valves and nozzles. Thus, it is very important to control the steam mass flow rate for the load following operation of power plants. Among various valves that control the steam turbine, the control valve is most significant. The steam flow rate is determined by the area formed by the stem disk and the seat of the control valve. While the ideal control valve linearly controls the steam mass flow rate with its stem lift, the real control valve has various flow characteristic curves pursuant to the stem lift type. Thus, flow characteristic curves are needed to precisely design the control valves manufactured for the operating conditions of nuclear power plants. OMEGA (Optimized Multidimensional Experiment Geometric Apparatus) was built to experimentally study the flow characteristics of steam flowing inside the control valve. The Widows' Creek type control valve was selected for reference. Air was selected as the working fluid in the OMEGA loop to exclude the condensation effect in this simplified approach. Flow characteristic curves were plotted by calculating the ratio of the measured mass flow rate versus the theoretical mass flow rate of the air. The flow characteristic curves are expected to be utilized to accurately design and operate the control valve for fossil as well as nuclear plants. (authors)

Yoo, Yong H.; Sohn, Myoung S.; Suh, Kune Y. [PHILOSOPHIA, Inc., Seoul National University, San 56-1 Sillim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

295

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

296

Steady-state analysis of doubly fed induction generators for wind turbines using MATLAB  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A wind energy conversion system (WECS) differs from a conventional power system. The power output of a conventional power plant can be controlled whereas; the power output of a WECS depends on the wind. This nature of WECS makes it difficult for analysis, design and management. Various approaches have been developed to study the behaviour of WECS. In this paper, the steady-state characteristics of a WECS using doubly fed induction generators (DFIG) are analysed using MATLAB. The dynamic steady-state simulation model of the DFIG is developed using MATLAB. Simulation analysis is performed to investigate a variety of DFIG characteristics, including torque-speed, real and reactive-power over speed characteristics. Based on the analysis, the DFIG operating characteristics are studied.

B. Baby Priya; A. Chilambuchelvan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fault Analysis at a Wind Power Plant for One Year of Observation: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the fault characteristics observed at a wind power plant, and the behavior of the wind power plant under fault events.

Muljadi, E.; Mills, Z.; Foster, R.; Conto, J.; Ellis, A.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Electric generating prospects for nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the nuclear power plants in the U.S. today are of the light-water variety. In many parts of the U.S. these plants are competitive with plants burning coal, but the electricity that they generate will be more costly in the future as uranium supplies ...

Manson Benedict

1970-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Distributed Generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Untapped Value of Backup Generation Untapped Value of Backup Generation While new guidelines and regulations such as IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 1547 have come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain conditions, these units (primarily backup generators) represent a significant source of power that can deliver utility services at lower costs than traditional centralized solutions. These backup generators exist today in large numbers and provide utilities with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie Mellon's Electricity

300

Thermal Solar Power Plants Experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In parallel with rising interest in solar power generation, several solar thermal facilities of different configuration and size were ... were designed as modest-size experimental or prototype solar power plants ...

W. Grasse; H. P. Hertlein; C.-J. Winter; G. W. Braun

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EIS-0362: Colorado Springs Utilities' Next Generation CFB Coal Generating Unit, CO  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve Colorado Springs Utilities design, construction, and operation of their Next- Generation Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Coal Generating Unit demonstration plant near Fountain, El Paso County, Colorado.

302

Thermal Analysis of the Z-Pinch Power Plant Concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, a preliminary thermal model for the Z-Pinch Power Plant is presented. This power plant utilizes fusion energy to generate electric energy in the GW range. The Z-Pinch Technology consists of compressing high-density plasma to produce X-rays to indirectly heat to ignition a deuterium/tritium fusion capsule. This ignition releases a minimum of 3 GJ every 10 seconds. The thermal energy generated is absorbed by the primary cycle fluid, and it is later used to power a Brayton or Rankine cycle. An advanced heat exchanger is used as the interface between the two cycles. This heat exchanger plays an important role in power plant performance. Three fluids (Flibe, Pb-17Li, and Li) were used for the plant performance analysis. The thermodynamic properties of the selected fluids determine the maximum operating temperature of the power cycles. Model results show that high temperatures (over 1000 deg. C) are developed in the primary cycle as needed to efficiently run the secondary cycle. The results of the performance parametric study demonstrated that the Brayton cycle exhibits better performance characteristics than the Rankine cycle for this type of application.

Modesto, M.A.; Lindgren, E.R.; Morrow, C.W. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

A stochastic model for the daily coordination of pumped storage hydro plants and wind power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a stochastic model for the daily operation scheduling of a generation system including pumped storage hydro plants and wind power plants, where the uncertainty is represented by the hourly wind power p...

Maria Teresa Vespucci; Francesca Maggioni

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Coal-fired diesel generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the proposed project is to test the technical, environmental, and economic viability of a coal-fired diesel generator for producing electric power in small power generating markets. Coal for the diesel generator would be provided from existing supplies transported for use in the University`s power plant. A cleanup system would be installed for limiting gaseous and particulate emissions. Electricity and steam produced by the diesel generator would be used to supply the needs of the University. The proposed diesel generator and supporting facilities would occupy approximately 2 acres of land adjacent to existing coal- and oil-fired power plant and research laboratory buildings at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. The environmental analysis identified that the most notable changes to result from the proposed project would occur in the following areas: power plant configuration at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks; air emissions, water use and discharge, and the quantity of solid waste for disposal; noise levels at the power plant site; and transportation of coal to the power plant. No substantive adverse impacts or environmental concerns were identified in analyzing the effects of these changes.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Generation Planning (pbl/generation)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Generation Planning Thumbnail image of BPA White Book BPA White Book (1998 - 2011) Draft Dry...

306

Developer Installed Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-installed treatment plants. These treatment plants are more commonly known as package wastewater treatment plants. 1

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emission*from geothermal power plants W. Investigation ofI i. Plant size. Geothermal power plants are expected TheProcesses for Geothermal Electric Power Generation,

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

ADVANCED CO{sub 2} CYCLE POWER GENERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-FC26-02NT41621 to develop a conceptual design and determine the performance characteristics of a new IGCC plant configuration that facilitates CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration. This new configuration will be designed to achieve CO{sub 2} sequestration without the need for water gas shifting and CO{sub 2} separation, and may eliminate the need for a separate sequestration compressor. This research introduces a novel concept of using CO{sub 2} as a working fluid for an advanced coal gasification based power generation system, where it generates power with high system efficiency while concentrating CO{sub 2} for sequestration. This project supports the DOE research objective of development of concepts for the capture and storage of CO{sub 2}.

A. Nehrozoglu

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Power Plant Analyser -- A computer code for power plant operation studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes Power Plant Analyser (PPA), a computer code for power plant dynamic and steady-state performance analysis. Power Plant Analyser simulates fossil power plant systems, such as drum-type, once-through, gas turbine, and combined cycle plants in a user-friendly manner. It provides a convenient tool for power engineers to understand the complex and interrelated thermodynamic processes and operating characteristics of the plant. It can also be used for conceptual training of power plant operators, and as a test bed for control and operating strategies.

Lu, S.; Hogg, B.W. [Queen`s Univ. of Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering] [Queen`s Univ. of Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 3, Chapter C, Appendix C3 (conclusion)--Chapter C, Appendix C9: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices for the following: results of extraction procedure (EP) toxicity data analyses; summary of headspace gas analysis in Rocky Flats Plant sampling program-FY 1988; waste drum gas generation sampling program at Rocky Flats Plant during FY 1988; TRU waste sampling program waste characterization; summary of headspace gas analyses in TRU waste sampling program; summary of volatile organic compounds analyses in TRU waste sampling program; totals analysis versus toxicity characteristic leaching procedure; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization sampling and analysis methods; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization analytical methods; data reduction, validation and reporting; examples of waste screening checklists; and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant generator/storage site waste screening and acceptance audit program.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Issues in heat recovery steam generator system noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is a fundamental component of all combustion turbine?based combined cycle power plants. While its primary purpose is to convert exhaust gas heat to steam an important secondary function is to reduce noise emissions from the combustion turbine exhaust. This source at about 155 dB (overall) re: 1 pW for a 100?MW turbine is the highest noise emission source in any combustion turbine plant. Therefore the residual exhaust noise emissions leaving the HRSG walls and stack exit must be predicted with acceptable accuracy to determine the total plant noise level. The sources involved in this prediction methodology will be discussed. The issues include source power levels wall and duct transmission loss and the noise reduction characteristics through the HRSG flow path. Special measurement techniques required to quantify HRSG noise emissions are described. Whereas the HRSG is mainly a passive device that attenuates combustion turbine exhaust noise two HRSG generated sources steam venting and supplemental duct firing will also be discussed. [See NOISE?CON Proceedings for full paper.

George F. Hessler Jr.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Power Generation and Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions from power generation are associated with adverse health and ecological effects. Fossil fuel-based power plants (such as coal, oil, and to a lesser extent, natural gas) are associated with emissions of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and a variety of organic contaminants such as mercury and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Exposure to emissions from power plants has been associated with a variety of respiratory symptoms, typically based on short-term (e.g., from 510min to 24h) increases in ambient concentrations. In addition, exposure to constituents from emissions generated by fossil fuels has been associated with increases in premature mortality, particularly in the elderly, and a variety of respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses. Fossil fuels, particularly coal-fired power plants, are responsible for generating the majority of emissions to which humans are exposed.

K. von Stackelberg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

NETL Water and Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water and Power Plants Review Water and Power Plants Review A review meeting was held on June 20, 2006 of the NETL Water and Power Plants research program at the Pittsburgh NETL site. Thomas Feeley, Technology Manager for the Innovations for Existing Plants Program, gave background information and an overview of the Innovations for Existing Plants Water Program. Ongoing/Ending Projects Alternative Water Sources Michael DiFilippo, a consultant for EPRI, presented results from the project "Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities". John Rodgers, from Clemson University, presented results from the project "An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation".

315

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station Unit 1, Unit 2","1,773","14,239",34.0,"Nine Mile Point Nuclear Sta LLC" "R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1",581,"4,948",11.8,"R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC" "4 Plants

316

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generate steam to drive a steam turbine, giving rise to theValves and Pi~ing STEAM TURBINE COMPONENT OUTAGE CAUSESbasically of a steam-driven turbine, an electric generator

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Binary Cycle Power Plant Binary Cycle Power Plant (Redirected from Binary Cycle Power Plants) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators.

318

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Binary Cycle Power Plant Binary Cycle Power Plant (Redirected from Binary) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators. Binary cycle power plants are closed-loop systems and virtually nothing

319

NREL: Energy Analysis: Impacts of Conventional Generators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts of Renewable Electricity Generation on Efficiency and Emissions of Conventional Generators With increasing penetration of wind and solar generation, conventional fossil-fired power plants may be required to adjust their output level, start up, or shut down more frequently to accommodate the variability and uncertainty of these technologies. These operational changes can negatively impact plant efficiency and emissions. NREL's analyses are focused on understanding and quantifying the emissions and costs associated with these operational changes. NREL's impacts of renewable electricity generation on conventional generators analyses show that: While the emissions impacts of generator cycling and part-loading can be significant (e.g., combined cycle generators), these impacts are

320

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

HAS222d Intro to Energy and Environement: 40% off energy use in US goes into generating electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

goes into generating electricity generation efficiency: 33% electric power loss: plant to consumer 7) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_power_transmission#Losses http fuel power generation plants that dominate our electricity production. Remember that electricity

322

World electric power plants database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This global database provides records for 104,000 generating units in over 220 countries. These units include installed and projected facilities, central stations and distributed plants operated by utilities, independent power companies and commercial and self-generators. Each record includes information on: geographic location and operating company; technology, fuel and boiler; generator manufacturers; steam conditions; unit capacity and age; turbine/engine; architect/engineer and constructor; and pollution control equipment. The database is issued quarterly.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

324

Frozen plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Frozen plants Frozen plants Name: janicehu Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Why do some plants freeze and others do not? Replies: The main reason some plants freeze and others do not is that some plants do not have much water in them. Pine tree leaves have little water and are therefore difficult to freeze. Another reason is that some plants make chemicals to put into their fluids that reduce the freezing temperature. Salts and oils are some. The polyunsaturated fats found in many plants freeze at a lower temperature than the saturated fats found in many animals. Therefore plant fats are liquid (oils) at room temperature, and animal fats are solid. Plants could not use so many saturated fats as warm blooded animals do or they would freeze up solid at higher temperatures. I know little of plants but many animals can make ethylene glycol to keep themselves from freezing. Ethylene glycol is the active ingredient in car anti-freeze

325

Next Generation CANDU Performance Assurance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AECL is developing a next generation CANDU design to meet market requirements for low cost, reliable energy supplies. The primary product development objective is to achieve a capital cost substantially lower than the current nuclear plant costs, such that the next generation plant will be competitive with alternative options for large-scale base-load electricity supply. However, other customer requirements, including safety, low-operating costs and reliable performance, are being addressed as equally important design requirements. The main focus of this paper is to address the development directions that will provide performance assurance. The next generation CANDU is an evolutionary extension of the proven CANDU 6 design. There are eight CANDU 6 units in operation in four countries around the world and further three units are under construction. These units provide a sound basis for projecting highly reliable performance for the next generation CANDU. In addition, the next generation CANDU program includes development and qualification activities that will address the new features and design extensions in the advanced plant. To limit product development risk and to enhance performance assurance, the next generation CANDU design features and performance parameters have been carefully reviewed during the concept development phase and have been deliberately selected so as to be well founded on the existing CANDU knowledge base. Planned research and development activities are required only to provide confirmation of the projected performance within a modest extension of the established database. Necessary qualification tests will be carried out within the time frame of the development program, to establish a proven design prior to the start of a construction project. This development support work coupled with ongoing AECL programs to support and enhance the performance and reliability of the existing CANDU plants will provide sound assurance that the next generation CANDU plants will meet customer expectations. (authors)

Wren, David J.; Allsop, P.J.; Hopwood, J.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Development of the merchant plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The co-authors of this paper are currently involved in over 1500 megawatts of merchant plant developments in the US. This paper will discuss the latest in combined cycle steam reheat ``H and G'' technology. Big improvements in heat rates along with substantial drop in installed cost will make this power cycle the leading merchant plant of the future. This paper will compare the actual present day performance and clearing price of a state-of-the-art merchant plant versus utility dispatch cost duration curves, known as ``system lambda''. Deregulation of the power market will ultimately provide an open market for these efficient plants to compete effectively against aging utility plants. Comparison of utility system heat rates versus merchant plant heat rates along with an increase need for generation capacity and forecasts of stable gas prices supports to the potential for a large scale building program of these high efficiency generators. This paper will also review the capacity crunch in the Northeast and Wisconsin and how problems with nuclear plants may accelerate the need for merchant plants. This paper will compare the required capacity for the population growth in the SERC Region and in Florida and how this will produce a potential ``hot bed'' for merchant plant development.

Wolfinger, R.; Gilliss, M.B.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Bidding strategies for renewable energy generation with non stationary statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a wind power producer have been studied in [Bathurst et al., 2002, Matevosyan and Soder, 2006, Pinson et of power generation, the cdf s can be estimated from all past data of the power generated by the plant the generated power with respect to the power that could be obtained from the plant under clear-sky conditions

Giannitrapani, Antonello

328

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

329

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Power Plant Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal(Redirected from Power Plant) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (19) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine which is connected to a generator to produce electricity. The type of energy conversion technology that is used depends on whether the resource is predominantly water or steam, the temperature of the resource, and the

330

Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flash Steam Power Plant Flash Steam Power Plant (Redirected from Flash Steam Power Plants) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Flash Steam Power Plants General List of Flash Steam Plants Flash Steam power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Flash steam plants are the most common type of geothermal power generation plants in operation in the world today. Fluid at temperatures greater than 360°F (182°C) is pumped under high pressure into a tank at the surface held at a much lower pressure, causing some of the fluid to rapidly vaporize, or "flash." The vapor then drives a turbine, which drives a generator. If any liquid remains in the tank, it can be flashed again in a second tank to extract even more energy.[1] Facility Name Owner Capacity (MW) Facility

331

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Dry Steam) (Redirected from Dry Steam) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

332

Carnivorous Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carnivorous Plants Carnivorous Plants Nature Bulletin No. 597-A March 27, 1976 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CARNIVOROUS PLANTS Plants, generally, are eaten by insects or furnish other food for them. But there are a few families of strange plants that, instead, "eat" insects and other small animals. About 500 species are distributed over the world, from the arctic to the tropics. Most of them have peculiar leaves that not only attract insects but are equipped to trap and kill their victims. Even more remarkable is the fact that some have glands which secrete a digestive juice that softens and decomposes the animal until it is absorbed by the plant in much the same way as your stomach digests food.

333

Thermoelectric Generators 1. Thermoelectric generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Cold Hot I - -- - - - - -- Figure 1 Electron concentration in a thermoelectric material. #12;2 A large1 Thermoelectric Generators HoSung Lee 1. Thermoelectric generator 1.1 Basic Equations In 1821 on the direction of current and material [3]. This is called the Thomson effect (or Thomson heat). These three

Lee, Ho Sung

334

Characteristics of Cleanroom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cleanroom shows different characteristics when it is in ... , the curve will reveal the law of cleanroom.

Zhonglin Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Regression analysis of technical parameters affecting nuclear power plant performances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the 80's many studies have been conducted in order to explicate good and bad performances of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs), but yet no defined correlation has been found out to be totally representative of plant operational experience. In early works, data availability and the number of operating power stations were both limited; therefore, results showed that specific technical characteristics of NPPs were supposed to be the main causal factors for successful plant operation. Although these aspects keep on assuming a significant role, later studies and observations showed that other factors concerning management and organization of the plant could instead be predominant comparing utilities operational and economic results. Utility quality, in a word, can be used to summarize all the managerial and operational aspects that seem to be effective in determining plant performance. In this paper operational data of a consistent sample of commercial nuclear power stations, out of the total 433 operating NPPs, are analyzed, mainly focusing on the last decade operational experience. The sample consists of PWR and BWR technology, operated by utilities located in different countries, including U.S. (Japan)) (France)) (Germany)) and Finland. Multivariate regression is performed using Unit Capability Factor (UCF) as the dependent variable; this factor reflects indeed the effectiveness of plant programs and practices in maximizing the available electrical generation and consequently provides an overall indication of how well plants are operated and maintained. Aspects that may not be real causal factors but which can have a consistent impact on the UCF, as technology design, supplier, size and age, are included in the analysis as independent variables. (authors)

Ghazy, R.; Ricotti, M. E.; Trueco, P. [Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa, 34, 20156 Milano (Italy)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Quasiseparable Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is clear from the preceding chapter that any matrix has quasiseparable representations. By padding given quasiseparable generators with zero matrices of large sizes one ... large orders. However, one is lookin...

Yuli Eidelman; Israel Gohberg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Evaluation of fossil plants versus hydro plants for load frequency control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economics of using hydroplants with Francis turbines or fossil plants for load frequency control are evaluated. Using data from the TVA Gallatin steam plant and the TVA Cherokee, Wilson, and Fontana hydroplants, a cost comparison of different modes of operation for load frequency control was performed considering two plants at a time. The results showed that when the fossil plant was used for load frequency control instead of a hydro plant a lower system generation cost was incurred. Dynamic responses of fossil and hydro units, improved controls for fossil plants, and maneuvering costs of the Gallatin plant are also considered.

Broadwater, R.P.; Johnson, R.L.; Duckett, F.E.; Boston, W.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

PressurePressure Indiana Coal Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TimeTime PressurePressure · Indiana Coal Characteristics · Indiana Coals for Coke · Coal Indiana Total Consumption Electricity 59,664 Coke 4,716 Industrial 3,493 Major Coal- red power plantsTransportation in Indiana · Coal Slurry Ponds Evaluation · Site Selection for Coal Gasification · Coal-To-Liquids Study, CTL

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

339

Sempra Generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Jump to: navigation, search Name Sempra Generation Place California Utility Id 55701 Utility Location Yes Ownership W NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sempra_Generation&oldid=411504" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases

340

Dynamic Models for Wind Turbines and Wind Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this report was to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind turbine and wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Manufacturer-specific models of wind turbines are favored for use in wind power interconnection studies. While they are detailed and accurate, their usages are limited to the terms of the non-disclosure agreement, thus stifling model sharing. The primary objective of the work proposed is to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Each of these models includes representations of general turbine aerodynamics, the mechanical drive-train, and the electrical characteristics of the generator and converter, as well as the control systems typically used. To determine how realistic model performance is, the performance of one of the models (doubly-fed induction generator model) has been validated using real-world wind power plant data. This work also documents selected applications of these models.

Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Born Digital: Looking at Information Literacy Instruction through a Generational Lens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Provides an introduction to the study of generations with a focus on the Millennial generation, also referred to as Generation Y (born 1982-2002). Identifies characteristics associated with this generation, including the ...

Walter, Scott

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

342

Classification of coryneform bacteria based on morphological characteristics and numerical taxonomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the taxonomy and biochemical characteristics of coryneforms that are animal and plant pathogens. However, our knowledge in these areas with respect to coryneforms from seafoods is sparce. In this study numerical taxonomy was used to compare characteristics...

Judkins, Paul Wesley

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Turbine-generator replacement study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes an engineering study for the replacement of a nominal 70 Mw turbine-generator in a multi-unit utility cogeneration station. The existing plant is briefly described, alternatives considered are discussed, and the conclusions reached are presented. Key topics are the turbine steam cycle evaluation and the turbine pedestal analysis.

Miller, E.F.; Stuhrke, S.P., Shah, A.A. (Burns and Roe Enterprises, Inc., Oradell, NJ (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

INVESTING IN NEW BASE LOAD GENERATING CAPACITY  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

game for investments in new regulated generating plants (e.g. as Florida is doing) * Fish or cut bait on wholesale and retail competition * Facilitate utility and IPP mergers...

345

Air-cooled Condensers in Next-generation Conversion Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Program Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: to reduce the costs associated with the generation of electrical power from air-cooled binary plants.

346

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission...  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Summer Net Winter Plant Fuel Type Generators Capacity Capacity Capacity Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Wind Solar Thermal and...

347

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KM. Distributed generation investment and upgrade underin gas fired power plant investments. Review of Financial13] Dixit AK, Pindyck RS. Investment under uncertainty.

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

EIS-0416: Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in San Bernardino...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Generating System (07-AFC-5) Project, Proposal to Construct a 400-m Megawatt Concentrated Solar Power Tower, Thermal-Electric Power Plant, San Bernardino County, California July 1,...

349

Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for fuel cells. Stationary fuel cell units are used for backup power, power for remote locations, stand-alone power plants for towns and cities, distributed generation...

350

Re: Potomac River Generating Station Department of Energy, Case...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the downtown area of the District of Columbia. Earlier scheduled maintenance on these lines was postponed because of the shutdown of Mirant's Potomac River Generating Plant, but...

351

agronomie: plant genetics and breeding Transgenic potato plants can be used to evaluate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agronomie: plant genetics and breeding Transgenic potato plants can be used to evaluate stability (Received 3 August 1995; accepted 28 December 1995) Summary 35S-rolC and rbcS-rolC transgenic potato of transgenic potato plants and in subsequent vegetative generations. Transgenics carrying one or two copies

Boyer, Edmond

352

GCFR steam generator conceptual design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) steam generators are large once-through heat exchangers with helically coiled tube bundles. In the GCFR demonstration plant, hot helium from the reactor core is passed through these units to produce superheated steam, which is used by the turbine generators to produce electrical power. The paper describes the conceptual design of the steam generator. The major components and functions of the design are addressed. The topics discussed are the configuration, operating conditions, design criteria, and the design verification and support programs.

Holm, R.A.; Elliott, J.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Microwave generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

How to quantify uncertainty and variability in life cycle assessment: the case of greenhouse gas emissions of gas power generation in the US  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study quantified the contributions of uncertainty and variability to the range of life-cycle greenhouse gas (LCGHG) emissions associated with conventional gas-fired electricity generation in the US. Whereas uncertainty is defined as lack of knowledge and can potentially be reduced by additional research, variability is an inherent characteristic of supply chains and cannot be reduced without physically modifying the system. The life-cycle included four stages: production, processing, transmission and power generation, and utilized a functional unit of 1 kWh of electricity generated at plant. Technological variability requires analyses of life cycles of individual power plants, e.g. combined cycle plants or boilers. Parameter uncertainty was modeled via Monte Carlo simulation. Our approach reveals that technological differences are the predominant cause for the range of LCGHG emissions associated with gas power, primarily due to variability in plant efficiencies. Uncertainties in model parameters played a minor role for 100 year time horizon. Variability in LCGHG emissions was a factor of 1.4 for combined cycle plants, and a factor of 1.3 for simple cycle plants (95% CI, 100 year horizon). The results can be used to assist decision-makers in assessing factors that contribute to LCGHG emissions despite uncertainties in parameters employed to estimate those emissions.

M Hauck; Z J N Steinmann; I J Laurenzi; R Karuppiah; M A J Huijbregts

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flash Steam Power Plant Flash Steam Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Flash Steam Power Plants General List of Flash Steam Plants Flash Steam power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Flash steam plants are the most common type of geothermal power generation plants in operation in the world today. Fluid at temperatures greater than 360°F (182°C) is pumped under high pressure into a tank at the surface held at a much lower pressure, causing some of the fluid to rapidly vaporize, or "flash." The vapor then drives a turbine, which drives a generator. If any liquid remains in the tank, it can be flashed again in a second tank to extract even more energy.[1] Facility Name Owner Capacity (MW) Facility Type Commercial Online Date Geothermal Area

356

Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation B.E. Logan Department accomplishing wastewater treatment in processes based on microbial fuel cell technologies. When bacteria oxidize.4 £ 106 L of wastewater, a wastewater treatment plant has the potential to become a 2.3 MW power plant

357

Power Generation Loading Optimization using a Multi-Objective Constraint-Handling Method via  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results of the power generation loading optimization based on a coal-fired power plant demonstrates algorithm in solving significant industrial problems. I. INTRODUCTION Most power generation plants have.e., heat rate/NOx vs. load, for a given plant condition. There are two objectives for the power generation

Li, Xiaodong

358

Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

Lester M. Waganer

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

359

Suez SNC-Lavalin Nuclear to replace US steam generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SNC-Lavalin Nuclear (USA) has signed a contract with Xcel Energy to replace the Unit #2 steam generators at the Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant (PINGP) in Welch, Minnesota.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Hardware simulation of diesel generator and microgrid stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the last few years, people have begun to depend less on large power plants with extensive distribution systems, and more on local distributed generation sources. A microgrid, a local collection of distributed generators, ...

Zieve, Michael M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Paleophysiology of Permian and Triassic Seed Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characteristics of extinct plants, although many of these studies did not involve the direct study of fossil plants. Raven (1977) used published descriptions of early vascular land plants (e.g., rhyniophytes) and knowledge of water and gas exchange in extant..., it was concluded through the use of fossil leaf modeling that the earliest angiosperms had lower gas exchange capacities than their modern counterparts (Feild et al., 2011b). It has also been demonstrated that the increased hydraulic conductance...

Schwendemann, Andrew Benjamin

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

On Line Power Plant Performance Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in achieving the best operation of the plant 3. To evaluate component performance and deterioration for use in a maintenance program 4. To develop cost data and incremental cost characteristics for the economic operation or dispatch of the unit... ? Analyze current plant?eQuipment status and diagnostics for preventive maintenance and equipment damage ? Provide current energy management and system dispatch operation information ? Capability for plant and equipment acceptance and periodic...

Ahner, D. J.; Priestley, R. R.

363

Effect of surface treatments on radiation buildup in steam generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the effect of surface preparation on the radiation buildup of steam generator materials of construction was conducted. The tests consisted of exposing treated manway seal plates to primary reactor coolant during the second through the fifth fuel cycle of the Chinon B1 pressurized water reactor. The pretreatments included: mechanical polishing, electropolishing (either on the as received surface or on a surface which had been previously mechanically polished), and passivation via the RCT (laboratory) process or the Framatome (in situ) process. Radioactivity buildup was determined at the end of each fuel cycle. A selected number of the seal plates were removed from the steam generators after each exposure cycle for destructive examinations. The electropolished surfaces exhibited a significantly lower radioactive buildup rate; an average factor of five less buildup compared to an as-received surface. Passivation of the electropolished surface, especially via the RCT process, reduced the buildup rate still further by a factor of two over the electropolished-only surface. Examination of the surfaces by profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, etc., after exposure indicated no detrimental effects on the surface characteristics attributable to the surface treatments. A program has now been instituted to electropolish the steam generator channel heads of all new reactors in France, as well as the steam generators intended for replacement in existing plants. 1 ref., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Design of advanced fossil-fuel systems (DAFFS): a study of three developing technologies for coal-fired, base-load electric power generation. Integrated coal gasification/combined cycle power plant with Texaco gasification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are to present the facility description, plant layouts and additional information which define the conceptual engineering design, and performance and cost estimates for the Texaco Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. Following the introductory comments, the results of the Texaco IGCC power plant study are summarized in Section 2. In Section 3, a description of plant systems and facilities is provided. Section 4 includes pertinent performance information and assessments of availability, natural resource requirements and environmental impact. Estimates of capital costs, operation and maintenance costs and cost of electricity are presented in Section 5. A Bechtel Group, Inc. assessment and comments on the designs provided by Burns and Roe-Humphreys and Glasgow Synthetic Fuel, Inc. are included in Section 6. The design and cost estimate reports which were prepared by BRHG for those items within their scope of responsibility are included as Appendices A and B, respectively. Appendix C is an equipment list for items within the BGI scope. The design and cost estimate classifications chart referenced in Section 5 is included as Appendix D. 8 references, 17 figures, 15 tables.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Design of advanced fossil-fuel systems (DAFFS): a study of three developing technologies for coal-fired, base-load electric power generation. Integrated coal-gasification/combined power plant with BGC/Lurgi gasification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are to present the facility description, plant layouts and additional information which define the conceptual engineering design, and performance and cost estimates for the BGC/Lurgi Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. Following the introductory comments, the results of the British Gas Corporation (BGC)/Lurgi IGCC power plant study are summarized in Section 2. In Secion 3, a description of plant systems and facilities is provided. Section 4 includes pertinent performance information and assessments of availability, natural resource requirements and environmental impact. Estimates of capital costs, operating and maintenance costs and cost of electricity are presented in Section 5. A Bechtel Group Inc. (BGI) assessment and comments on the designs provided by Burns and Roe-Humphreys and Glasgow Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (BRHG) are included in Section 6. The design and cost estimate reports which were prepared by BRHG for those items within their scope of responsibility are included as Appendices A and B, respectively. Apendix C is an equipment list for items within the BGI scope. The design and cost estimate classifications chart referenced in Section 5 is included as Appendix D. 8 references, 18 figures, 5 tables.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Property:Other Characteristics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characteristics Characteristics Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Other Characteristics Property Type String Pages using the property "Other Characteristics" Showing 8 pages using this property. A Alden Large Flume + Point measurement capability + Alden Small Flume + Point measurement capability + Alden Tow Tank + Point measurement capability + Alden Wave Basin + Point measurement capability + D DeFrees Flume 4 + Sufficient fetch to generate wind waves + H Haynes Wave Basin + Two individual fans placed as appropriate + O OTRC Wave Basin + Bank of 16 fans with variable speed control for low frequency gustiness. + S Ship Towing Tank + Wind is provided from a special moving carriage + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Other_Characteristics&oldid=597949

368

Magnetocumulative generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing providing a housing chamber with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber, from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

Pettibone, J.S.; Wheeler, P.C.

1981-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

369

Monthly Generation System Peak (pbl/generation)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation > Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Monthly Generation System Peak (GSP) This site is no longer maintained. Page last...

370

Photon generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni (Shoreham, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Light beam frequency comb generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics.

Priatko, Gordon J. (Cupertino, CA); Kaskey, Jeffrey A. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Energeticals power plant engineering | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energeticals power plant engineering Energeticals power plant engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name energeticals power plant engineering Place München, Bavaria, Germany Zip 81371 Sector Biomass, Geothermal energy Product Planning, design, installation and operation of turnkey plants for heat and electricity generation in the field of solid Biomass, deep and shallow geothermal energy and water power. References energeticals power plant engineering[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. energeticals power plant engineering is a company located in München, Bavaria, Germany . References ↑ "[ energeticals power plant engineering]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Energeticals_power_plant_engineering&oldid=344770

373

Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Coal-Fired Power Plants New Coal-Fired Power Plants (data update 1/13/2012) January 13, 2012 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Strategic Energy Analysis & Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants This report is intended to provide an overview of proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under development. This report may not represent all possible plants under consideration but is intended to illustrate the potential that exists for installation of new coal-fired power plants. Additional perspective has been added for non-coal-fired generation additions in the U.S. and coal-fired power plant activity in China. Experience has shown that public announcements of power plant developments do not provide an accurate representation of eventually

374

Sensitivity analysis for the outages of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 17, 2012 ... Energy generation in France is a competitive market, whereas ... from wind farms, solar energy or run of river plant without pondage.

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

376

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

377

Mapping Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Plants | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

resources make up most of the current geothermal operating plants in the United States. Power generation comes from drawing heat from the fluid found naturally deep below the...

378

How a Geothermal Power Plant Works (Simple) - Text Version |...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Lines Deliver Electricity Electrical current from the generator is sent to a step-up transformer outside the power plant. Voltage is increased in the transformer and electrical...

379

Rock bed thermal storage for concentrating solar power plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Concentrating solar power plants are a promising means of generating electricity. However, they are dependent on the sun as a source of energy, (more)

Allen, Kenneth Guy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Medicinal Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Medicinal Plants Medicinal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 187 April 11, 1981 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MEDICINAL PLANTS In springtime, many years ago, grandma made her family drink gallons of tea made by boiling roots of the sassafras. That was supposed to thin and purify the blood. Children were sent out to gather dandelion, curly dock, wild mustard, pokeberry and other greens as soon as they appeared -- not only because they added welcome variety to the diet of bread, meat, potatoes and gravy, but because some of them were also laxatives. For a bad "cold on the lungs," she slapped a mustard plaster on the patient's back, and on his chest she put a square of red flannel soaked in goose grease. For whooping cough she used a syrup of red clover blossoms. She made cough medicine from the bloodroot plant, and a tea from the compass plant of the prairies was also used for fevers and coughs. She made a pleasant tea from the blossoms of the linden or basswood tree. For stomach aches she used tea from any of several aromatic herbs such as catnip, fennel, yarrow, peppermint, spearmint, sweetflag, wild ginger, bergamot and splice bush.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Bog Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bog Plants Bog Plants Nature Bulletin No. 385-A June 6, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BOG PLANTS Fifty years ago there were probably more different kinds of plants within a 50 mile radius from the Loop than anywhere else in the Temperate Zone. Industrial, commercial and residential developments, plus drainage and fires have erased the habitats where many of the more uncommon kinds flourished, including almost all of the tamarack swamps and quaking bogs. These bogs were a heritage from the last glacier. Its front had advanced in a great curve, from 10 to 20 miles beyond what is now the shoreline of Lake Michigan, before the climate changed and it began to melt back. Apparently the retreat was so rapid that huge blocks of ice were left behind, surrounded by the outwash of boulders, gravel and ground-up rock called "drift". These undrained depressions; became lakes. Sphagnum moss invaded many of them and eventually the thick floating mats of it supported a variety of bog-loving plants including certain shrubs, tamarack, and a small species of birch. Such lakes became bogs.

382

3) What makes a species invasive? Is it characteristics of the species or characteristics of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traits (Chapter 3 of NRC 2002) 1. Reproductive system · Dioecious vs. Monoecious · Self-incompatible Life History Traits (Chapter 3 of NRC 2002) 1. Reproductive system · Dioecious vs. Monoecious · Self-incompatible pollen vs. Self-compatible pollen #12;3) What makes a species invasive? Species characteristics: Plant

Nowak, Robert S.

383

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators. Binary cycle power plants are closed-loop systems and virtually nothing (except water vapor) is emitted to the atmosphere. Resources below 400°F

384

Wind Plant Collector System Fault Protection and Coordination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a summary of the most important protection and coordination considerations for wind power plants. Short-circuit characteristics of both aggregate wind plant and individual wind turbine genera- tors, as well as general interconnection protection requirements are discussed. Many factors such as security, reliability, and safety are considered for proper conservative protection of the wind power plant and individual turbines.

Bradt, M. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Behnke, M. R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Bloethe, W.G. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Brooks, C. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Camm, E H [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Dilling, W. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Goltz, B. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Li, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Niemira, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Nuckles, K. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Patino, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Reza, M [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Richardson, B. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Samaan, N. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Schoene, Jens [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Smith, Travis M [ORNL; Snyder, Isabelle B [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Walling, R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Zahalka, G. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Plutonium finishing plant dangerous waste training plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the Plutonium Finish Plant (PFP) waste generation facilities, permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) units, and the 90-Day Accumulation Areas.

ENTROP, G.E.

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

386

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Catawba Unit 1, Unit 2","2,258","18,964",36.5,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "H B Robinson Unit 2",724,"3,594",6.9,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "Oconee Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","2,538","20,943",40.3,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "V C Summer Unit 1",966,"8,487",16.3,"South Carolina Electric&Gas Co" "4 Plants 7 Reactors","6,486","51,988",100.0

387

Second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy, Foster Wheeler Corporation is developing second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) power plant technology that will enable this type of plant to operate with net plant efficiencies in the range of 43 to 46 percent (based on the higher heating value of the coal), with a reduction in the cost of electricity of at least 20 percent. A three-phase program is under way. Its scope encompasses the conceptual design of a commercial plant through the process of gathering needed experimental test data to obtain design parameters.

Wolowodiuk, W.; Robertson, A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy, Foster Wheeler Corporation is developing second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) power plant technology that will enable this type of plant to operate with net plant efficiencies in the range of 43 to 46 percent (based on the higher heating value of the coal), with a reduction in the cost of electricity of at least 20 percent. A three-phase program is under way. Its scope encompasses the conceptual design of a commercial plant through the process of gathering needed experimental test data to obtain design parameters.

Wolowodiuk, W.; Robertson, A.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Generation Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many local governments are using green power in their facilities and providing assistance to local businesses and residents to do the same. Green power is a subset of renewable energy that is produced with no GHG emissions, typically from solar, wind, geothermal, biogas, biomass, or low-impact small hydroelectric sources, includes three types of products: utility products (i.e., green power purchased from the utility through the electricity grid), renewable energy certificates (RECs), and on-site generation. Opportunities to purchase these products are increasing significantly, with annual green power market growth rates

Green Power

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Leaching and standing water characteristics of bottom ash and composted manure blends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal burning electrical generating facilities produce roughly 91 million metric tons of ash byproducts annually. Typically, this ash is retained at the power plant sites, adding to the cost of managing wastes at the plants. Another waste material...

Mathis, James Gregory

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Milliwatt Generator Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator Project from April 1986 through March 1988. Activities included fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, fabrication of pressure-burst test units, compatibility studies, impact testing, and examination of surveillance units. The major task of the Los Alamos Milliwatt Generator Project is to fabricate MC2893A heat sources (4.0 W) for MC2730A radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGS) and MC3599 heat sources (4.5 W) for MC3500 RTGs. The MWG Project interfaces with the following contractors: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (designer); E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. (Inc.), Savannah River Plant (fuel); Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility (metal hardware); and General Electric Company, Neutron Devices Department (RTGs). In addition to MWG fabrication activities, Los Alamos is involved in (1) fabrication of pressure-burst test units, (2) compatibility testing and evaluation, (3) examination of surveillance units, and (4) impact testing and subsequent examination of compatibility and surveillance units.

Latimer, T.W.; Rinehart, G.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Characteristics and Methods of Southern Henan Power Grid Planning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the gradual deepening of the reform of southern Henan Power, power plants and power grids will be completely separated and independent power generation companies and has a natural monopoly power grid compani...

Menglan Huang; Yaoxian Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

EXPLORING MULTIPACTING CHARACTERISTICS OF A RECTANGULAR WAVEGUIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Laboratory of Nuclear Studies, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 Presented at the 1999 Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, NY SRF990409-05 Abstract Multipacting (MP) characteristics is subjected to RF fields and vacuum[1]. When MP occurs, a large number of elec- trons are generated, consuming

Geng, Rong-Li

394

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Characteristics of New and Stock Generating Capacities, by Plant Type Total Capital Costs Size Overnight Costs (2) of Typical New Plant New Plant Type (MW) (2010 $/kW) ($2010 million) Scrubbed Coal 1300 2809 3652 Integrated Coal-Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) 1200 3182 3818 IGCC w/Carbon Sequestration 520 5287 2749 Conv. Gas/Oil Combined Cycle 540 967 522 Adv. Gas/Oil Combined Cycle 400 991 396 Conv. Combustion Turbine 85 961 82 Adv. Combustion Turbine 210 658 138 Fuel Cell 10 6752 68 Advanced Nuclear 2236 5275 11795 Municipal Solid Waste 50 8237 412 Conventional Hydropower (3) 500 2221 1111 Wind 100 2409 241 Stock Plant Type 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Fossil Fuel Steam Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) Nuclear Energy Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Plant use of electricity is included in heat rate calculations; however, transmission and distribution losses of the electric grid are excluded.

395

Magnetocumulative generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing (100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105) providing a housing chamber (106) with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber (106) forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber (106), from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers (107, 108) disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber (106) which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

Pettibone, Joseph S. (Livermore, CA); Wheeler, Paul C. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Characteristics of Strong Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Existing financing programs offer a number of important lessons on effective program design. Some characteristics of strong financing programs drawn from past program experience are described below.

397

Concentrated solar power in the future of electricity generation: a synthesis of reasons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...electricity generation. Experience...steam-Rankine coal-fired power plants, nuclear...defaults in generation units. Large...need to have a generation system with...the unitary power will have to...and natural gas. Evidently...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Poisonous Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plants Plants Nature Bulletin No. 276 October 1, 1983 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation POISONOUS PLANTS In the autumn of 1818, Nancy Hanks Lincoln died of milk sickness and left her son, Abe, motherless before he was ten years old. Since colonial times, in most of the eastern half of the United States, that dreaded disease has been a hazard in summer and fall, wherever cattle graze in woodlands or along wooded stream banks. In the 1920s it was finally traced to white snakeroot -- an erect branched plant, usually about 3 feet tall, with a slender round stem, sharply-toothed nettle-like leaves and, in late summer, several small heads of tiny white flowers. Cows eating small amounts over a long period develop a disease called "trembles", and their milk may bring death to nursing calves or milk sickness to humans. When larger amounts are eaten the cow, herself, may die.

400

EIS-0194: Proposed Tenaska-Washington II Generation Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This environmental impact statement analyzes the Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to purchase electrical power from a proposed privately-owned combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Washington. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate 240 average megawatts of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Tenaska Washington Partners II, L.P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Measuring spatial variability in soil characteristics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides systems and methods for measuring a load force associated with pulling a farm implement through soil that is used to generate a spatially variable map that represents the spatial variability of the physical characteristics of the soil. An instrumented hitch pin configured to measure a load force is provided that measures the load force generated by a farm implement when the farm implement is connected with a tractor and pulled through or across soil. Each time a load force is measured, a global positioning system identifies the location of the measurement. This data is stored and analyzed to generate a spatially variable map of the soil. This map is representative of the physical characteristics of the soil, which are inferred from the magnitude of the load force.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Svoboda, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sawyer, J. Wayne (Hampton, VA); Hess, John R. (Ashton, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

USE of mine pool water for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water and energy production issues intersect in numerous ways. Water is produced along with oil and gas, water runs off of or accumulates in coal mines, and water is needed to operate steam electric power plants and hydropower generating facilities. However, water and energy are often not in the proper balance. For example, even if water is available in sufficient quantities, it may not have the physical and chemical characteristics suitable for energy or other uses. This report provides preliminary information about an opportunity to reuse an overabundant water source--ground water accumulated in underground coal mines--for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which has implemented a water/energy research program (Feeley and Ramezan 2003). Among the topics studied under that program is the availability and use of ''non-traditional sources'' of water for use at power plants. This report supports NETL's water/energy research program.

Veil, J. A.; Kupar, J. M .; Puder, M. G.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

403

Balancing people, plants, and practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two of the biggest challenges facing the US power industry today are retaining an experienced, capable workforce and operating and maintaining a reliable, diversified fleet of generating plants. Success in the marketplace requires a proper balancing of staff and new technology, something few gencos do well. Following this introductory paper in this issue are several technical articles representing a small sample of the steps that gencos nationwide are taking to prolong plant life. Unlike the false promise of Ponce de Leon's fountain of youth in Florida, the promise of longer life for aging plants is real wherever experienced engineers and technicians are on the job. The article looks at problems across America, from the East Coast to the West Coast. It is supported by diagrams projecting US new capacity and plant type additions up to 2014. 5 figs.

Peltier, R.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Finite generation of Tate cohomology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Let G be a finite group and let k be a field of characteristic p. Given a finitely generated indecomposable non-projective kG-module M, we conjecture that if the Tate cohomology $\\HHHH^*(G, M)$ of G with coefficients in M is finitely generated over the Tate cohomology ring $\\HHHH^*(G, k)$, then the support variety V_G(M) of M is equal to the entire maximal ideal spectrum V_G(k). We prove various results which support this conjecture. The converse of this conjecture is established for modules in the connected component of k in the stable Auslander-Reiten quiver for kG, but it is shown to be false in general. It is also shown that all finitely generated kG-modules over a group G have finitely generated Tate cohomology if and only if G has periodic cohomology.

Jon F. Carlson; Sunil K. Chebolu; Jan Minac.; 15 (2011) 244-257

405

Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics...

406

Scattering Characteristics In Heterogeneous Fractured Reservoirs From Waveform Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Offset-dependent characteristics of seismic scattering are useful in the interpretation of fractured reservoirs. Synthetic seismograms generated by a 3-D finite difference modeling are used to study elastic wave propagation ...

Shen, Feng

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Bagdad Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bagdad Plant Bagdad Plant 585 Silicon Drive Leechburg, P A 15656 * ATI Allegheny "'I Ludlum e-mail: Raymond.Polinski@ATImetals.com Mr. James Raba U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Building Technologies Program 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 205585-0121 Raymond J. Polinski General Manager Grain-Oriented Electrical Steel RE: Distribution Transformers Rulemaking Docket Number EE-2010-STD-0048 RIN 1904-AC04 Submitted 4-10-12 via email Mr. Raba, I was planning to make the following closing comments at the DOE Public Meeting on February 23, 2012, but since the extended building evacuation caused the meeting to run well past the scheduled completion time I decided to submit my comments directly to you for the record.

408

Thermoelectric generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermoelectric generator unit is described comprising: a hot side heat exchanger including a plate having extruded retention posts projecting from one surface of the plate, and fins adapted for contact with a heating source. The fins are positioned between two of the retention posts. Retention rods are inserted between the retention posts and the base of the fins to retain the fin in thermal contact with the plate surface upon insertion of the retention rod between the engaging surface of the post and the corresponding fin. Thermoelectric semi-conductor modules are in thermal contact with the opposite side of the hot side heat exchanger plate from the contact with the fins. The modules are arranged in a grid pattern so that heat flow is directed into each of the modules from the hot side heat exchanger. The modules are connected electrically so as to combine their electrical output; and a cold side heat exchanger is in thermal contact with the modules acting as a heat sink on the opposite side of the module from the hot side heat exchanger plate so as to produce a thermal gradient across the modules.

Shakun, W.; Bearden, J.H.; Henderson, D.R.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

409

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Generator Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generator Modeling Generator Modeling NREL works with the solar and wind industries to provide utilities and grid operators with generator models to help them analyze the impact of variable generation on power system performance and reliability. As the amount of variable generation increases, the need for such models increases. Ensuring the models are as generic as possible allows for ease of use, model validation, data exchange, and analysis. To address this need, NREL researchers are developing generic dynamic models of wind and solar power plants. NREL's dynamic modeling efforts include: Collecting wind plant output data with corresponding wind resource data (speed, direction, and air density) from meteorological towers and performing multivariate analysis of the data to develop an equivalent wind

410

Tailpulse signal generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tailpulse signal generating/simulating apparatus, system, and method designed to produce electronic pulses which simulate tailpulses produced by a gamma radiation detector, including the pileup effect caused by the characteristic exponential decay of the detector pulses, and the random Poisson distribution pulse timing for radioactive materials. A digital signal process (DSP) is programmed and configured to produce digital values corresponding to pseudo-randomly selected pulse amplitudes and pseudo-randomly selected Poisson timing intervals of the tailpulses. Pulse amplitude values are exponentially decayed while outputting the digital value to a digital to analog converter (DAC). And pulse amplitudes of new pulses are added to decaying pulses to simulate the pileup effect for enhanced realism in the simulation.

Baker, John (Walnut Creek, CA); Archer, Daniel E. (Knoxville, TN); Luke, Stanley John (Pleasanton, CA); Decman, Daniel J. (Livermore, CA); White, Gregory K. (Livermore, CA)

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

411

Evaluation of low flow characteristics of the Vermont Yankee plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boiling water reactor (BWR) core flow instrumentation inaccuracies under low-flow conditions have been the subject of both reactor vendor and regulatory communications in response to incidents of the reported core flow being less than the flow corresponding to the natural-circulation line on the power flow map. During single recirculation loop operation, low-flow conditions exist in the idle recirculation loop, and these flow inaccuracies can affect the usefulness of the reported core flow. Accurate core flow indications are needed above 25% power to administer fuel thermal limits and comply with restrictions associated with the potential for thermal-hydraulic instability. While the natural-circulation line on the power flow map is recognized to be a nominal estimate of the flow expected at and near natural-circulation conditions, the boundaries of the stability regions are associated with conditions assumed in safety analyses performed to demonstrate compliance with general design criteria 10 and 12.

Ganther, S.; LeFrancoi, M.; Bergeron, P. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Photoconductive circuit element pulse generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pulse generator for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test.

Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Aspects of the electrical system design of the colmi 660 mw coal-fired power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conceptual design of the electrical systems for Mexico's Commission Federal de Electricidad (CFE) COLMI 660-MW coal-fired power plant builds on Bechtel's experience with nuclear, gas and coal-fired generating plants. The COLMI conceptual design incorporates a combination of new equipment applications and design considerations that make it more economical when compared to traditional alternatives. Also it provides a reliable state-of-the-art distribution system that is flexible enough for any unit in the 400-900 MW range. Alternative approaches were studied for the system design and equipment arrangement. This paper reviews the approach taken to arrive at the conceptual design and describes the equipment selected and the advantages they provide. Exact sizing and determination of characteristics of the equipment are not given because these were not determined during the conceptual design. These will be determined during the detailed design phase of the project.

Aguilar, J. (Bechtel Corp., Norwalk, CA (US)); Fernandez, J.H. (Comision Federal de Electricidad, Mexico, D.F. (MX))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Housing characteristics 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, Housing Characteristics 1993, presents statistics about the energy-related characteristics of US households. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) -- the ninth in a series of nationwide energy consumption surveys conducted since 1978 by the Energy Information Administration of the US Department of Energy. Over 7 thousand households were surveyed, representing 97 million households nationwide. A second report, to be released in late 1995, will present statistics on residential energy consumption and expenditures.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Gasification Plant Databases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Plant Databases News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan...

416

Introduction Minimal generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Minimal generation Random generation Minimal and probabilistic generation of finite generation of finite groups #12;Introduction Minimal generation Random generation Some motivation Let x1 random elements of G = x1, . . . , xk . (G is the group generated by x1, . . . , xk : all possible

St Andrews, University of

417

Configuration management in nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Configuration management (CM) is the process of identifying and documenting the characteristics of a facility's structures, systems and components of a facility, and of ensuring that changes to these characteristics are properly developed, assessed, approved, issued, implemented, verified, recorded and incorporated into the facility documentation. The need for a CM system is a result of the long term operation of any nuclear power plant. The main challenges are caused particularly by ageing plant technology, plant modifications, the application of new safety and operational requirements, and in general by human factors arising from migration of plant personnel and possible human failures. The IAEA Incident Reporting System (IRS) shows that on average 25% of recorded events could be caused by configuration errors or deficiencies. CM processes correctly applied ensure that the construction, operation, maintenance and testing of a physical facility are in accordance with design requirements as expressed in the d...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Biomass plants face wood supply risks Report warns giant new biomass power plants will be hugely reliant on wood chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass plants face wood supply risks Report warns giant new biomass power plants will be hugely's biomass energy sector could be undermined unless businesses move to resolve the supply chain issues-scale biomass plants will leave generators largely reliant on biomass from overseas such as wood chips, elephant

419

Definition: Gross generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Gross generation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gross generation The total amount of electric energy produced by generating units (e.g. power plants) and measured at the generating terminal in kilowatt-hours (kWh) or megawatt-hours (MWh).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms Electricity generation, Net generation, power References ↑ http://205.254.135.24/tools/glossary/index.cfm?id=G#gross_gen Retri Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. eved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Gross_generation&oldid=480543" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

420

CSEM WP 111R The Efficiency of Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSEM WP 111R The Efficiency of Electricity Generation in the U.S. After Restructuring Catherine Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;THE EFFICIENCY OF ELECTRICITY GENERATION IN THE US AFTER-utility generating plants. Then, beginning with California in 1996, nearly half the states passed and a smaller

California at Berkeley. University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Tribology in coal-fired power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Material wear and degradation is of great importance to the economy of South Africa especially within the mining, agriculture, manufacturing and power generation fields. It has been found that unexpected and high rates of fly-ash erosion occur at certain sections of power plants, this is particularly evident at the Majuba power station. The loss of small amounts of material due to erosion can be enough to cause serious damage and significantly reduce the working lifetime of, for, e.g. hopper liners. This study investigated the long-term solid particle erosion of a range of oxide and nitride-fired SiC-based ceramics and alumina with the aim of reducing erosive wear damage in power plants. This entailed carrying out experimental tests on an in-house built erosion testing machine that simulate the problems encountered in the industry. The target materials were eroded with 125180?m silica sand at shallow and high impact angles. The surface wear characteristics were studied using both light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained indicate that the erosion rates of the materials remain fairly constant from the onset. It was found that prolonged exposure to erosion results in the progressive removal of the matrix and subsequent loss of unsupported SiC particulates. The fact that the particles were relatively small did not have a significant effect on the erosion rate. This would explain the observed constant rates of erosion for longer periods. These behaviours can be further explained in terms of the composition and mechanical properties of the erodents and target ceramics.

D.O. Moumakwa; K. Marcus

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Comparison of regime-dependent capacities of wind-driven power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The operational regimes of wind-driven power plants developed in Russia are analyzed taking into account the aerodynamic characteristics of the wind wheel.

R. S. Tsgoev

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Plant Rosettes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rosettes Rosettes Nature Bulletin No. 662 January 13, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist PLANT ROSETTES In winter our landscape is mostly leafless trees silhouetted against the sky, and the dead stalks of wildflowers, weeds and tall grasses -- with or without a blanket of snow. Some snows lie on the ground for only a few days. Others follow one after another and cover the ground with white for weeks at a time. Soon the eye begins to hunger for a glimpse of something green and growing. Then, in sunny spots where the snow has melted or where youngsters have cleared it away, there appear clusters of fresh green leaves pressed tight to the soil. Whether it is a dandelion in the lawn, a pansy in a flower border, or a thistle in a vacant lot, such a typical leaf cluster -- called a winter rosette -- is a ring of leaves around a short central stem. The leaves are narrow at the base, wider toward the tip, and spread flat on the ground with little or no overlap. This arrangement gives full exposure to sunlight and close contact with the warmer soil beneath. Such plants continue to grow, sometimes faster, sometimes slower, even under snow, throughout winter.

424

An Estimate of the Cost of Electricity from Light Water Reactors and Fossil Plants with Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As envisioned in this report, LIFE technology lends itself to large, centralized, baseload (or 'always on') electrical generation. Should LIFE plants be built, they will have to compete in the electricity market with other generation technologies. We consider the economics of technologies with similar operating characteristics: significant economies of scale, limited capacity for turndown, zero dependence on intermittent resources and ability to meet environmental constraints. The five generation technologies examined here are: (1) Light Water Reactors (LWR); (2) Coal; (3) Coal with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS); (4) Natural Gas; and (5) Natural Gas with Carbon Capture and Sequestration. We use MIT's cost estimation methodology (Du and Parsons, 2009) to determine the cost of electricity at which each of these technologies is viable.

Simon, A J

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

425

Regional variations in the health, environmental, and climate benefits of wind and solar generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...400 fossil-fueled power plants, dollar-per-ton...hourly emissions and generation data to estimate...the Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated...Agency (EPA) using Power Control Areas as a guide...displaces coal-fired generators. Sites...beneficial because gas-fired plants...

Kyle Siler-Evans; Ins Lima Azevedo; M. Granger Morgan; Jay Apt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (20) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine

427

Error compensation in distance relays caused by wind power plants in the power grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article presents the Prony method as a filtering technique for distance relays. First, the effect of non-filtered frequency components generated by wind power plants in distance relays is evaluated in a simplified model of a doubly fed induction generator, resulting in an error of apparent impedance measurement. Then, the effects of non-filtered frequency components for typical distance relay are presented. The error in apparent impedance measurement is evaluated in reach and operation time of the relay; a distorted characteristic of the mho distance relay is shown in the impedance plane. Finally, Prony method as a filtering technique is implemented as a solution of the apparent impedance measurement error, and the simulated case and a real fault event are evaluated to validate the proposed distance relay algorithm. Thus the asynchronous frequency components of voltage and current signals are identified and filtered, as a result the performance of the distance relay is enhanced.

L.A. Trujillo Guajardo; A. Conde Enrquez; Z. Leonowicz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey—Commercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses | End-Use Equipment | Conservation Features and Practices Additional Information on: Survey methods, data limitations, and other information supporting the data The 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) was the seventh in the series begun in 1979. The 1999 CBECS estimated that 4.7 million commercial buildings (± 0.4 million buildings, at the 95% confidence level) were present in the United States in that year. Those buildings comprised a total of 67.3 (± 4.6) billion square feet of floorspace. Additional information on 1979 to 1999 trends

429

Chapter 2. Vehicle Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Vehicle Characteristics 2. Vehicle Characteristics Chapter 2. Vehicle Characteristics U.S. households used a fleet of nearly 157 million vehicles in 1994. Despite remarkable growth in the number of minivans and sport-utility vehicles, passenger cars continued to predominate in the residential vehicle fleet. This chapter looks at changes in the composition of the residential fleet in 1994 compared with earlier years and reviews the effect of technological changes on fuel efficiency (how efficiently a vehicle engine processes motor fuel) and fuel economy (how far a vehicle travels on a given amount of fuel). Using data unique to the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, it also explores the relationship between residential vehicle use and family income.

430

Distributed generation - the fuel processing example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increased costs of transportation and distribution are leading many commercial and industrial firms to consider the on-site generation for energy and other commodities used in their facilities. This trend has been accelerated by the development of compact, efficient processes for converting basic raw materials into finished services at the distributed sites. Distributed generation with the PC25{trademark} fuel cell power plant is providing a new cost effective technology to meet building electric and thermal needs. Small compact on-site separator systems are providing nitrogen and oxygen to many industrial users of these gases. The adaptation of the fuel processing section of the PC25 power plant for on-site hydrogen generation at industrial sites extends distributed generation benefits to the users of industrial hydrogen.

Victor, R.A. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States); Farris, P.J.; Maston, V. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

DSM Power Plant in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

India is facing acute energy shortage that is likely to affect its economic development. There are severe supply side constraints in term of coal and gas shortages that are likely to continue in the near future. Hence, in its current focus to solving the energy shortage problem and sustaining the development trajectory, the country should aim at a balance between supply side and demand side measures. Energy Efficiency in end use is increasingly gaining importance as one of the most cost effective options for achieving short to medium term energy savings. India has initiated the National Mission for Enhanced Energy Efficiency under National Action Plan for Climate Change which addresses various aspects of energy efficiency such as technology, financing, fiscal incentive and also creation of energy efficiency as a market instrument. However, even though energy efficiency has substantial scope in the Indian subcontinent, the market for energy efficiency has been limited. This paper discusses the concept of mega Demand Side Management projects as a DSM Power Plant. A DSM Power Plant acts as an umbrella with multiple energy efficiency schemes under its ambit aimed at transforming energy efficiency into a business by providing a push to the scale of operation as well as financial sustenance to energy efficiency projects. This paper expounds on the various aspects of DSM Power Plant in terms of its policy and institutional mechanism for the large scale implementation of energy efficiency in India. This paper provides an illustration of the concept of DSM Power Plant model through a case study in one of the states (Rajasthan) of India. Further, a comparative analysis of the cost of generation from DSM Power Plant and a representative conventional power plant (CPP) in Rajasthan has been undertaken and the DSM Power Plant comes out to be a more cost effective option. The concept of DSM Power Plant will not only address the issue of energy shortages but will also help the financially thwarted utilities to reduce their revenue deficit in the near future.

Saurabh Gupta; Tanushree Bhattacharya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

The Lattice Structure of Pseudo-Random Number Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Structure of Pseudo-Random Number Generators B. D. Ripley The pairs, triples...congruential pseudo-random number generators are known to lie on a lattice, and...in the quality of the output of the generator. Various characteristics of the lattices...

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Economics of Steam Electric Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by manufacturers, data available from past installations and recent installations. 7) Labor costs were based on labor rates in ~he Lansing, Michigan area. 8) Power plant labor and supervision costs were based on manning data supplied by the Board of Water...-service. No other figures, including labor, fuel cost, outside services and other costs have been escalated. 12) Operating costs were established, based on steam generation. Credit has been allotted to any program for the electric power generated during...

Ophaug, R. A.; Birget, C. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Profitability analysis of non-coking coal preparation for power plants in India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently coal-based power plants produce about 70% of the total electricity generated in India, where non-coking (steam) coals are utilized mostly without any preparation. A massive capacity addition of at least 140,000 MWe is required (over the 81,000 MWe of current installed capacity) during the next 15 years to meet growing energy demand. Such a rapid expansion of power generation capacity poses a serious challenge to the environment (at emission controls) and transportation infrastructure in India. Furthermore, the high ash content of indigenous coals and concentration of coal mines in central and northeastern India away from urban centers exacerbate the problem. Thus, coal preparation is envisioned to play a major role in shaping the energy future of India. Under the Indo-US Coal Preparation Program, the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) is coordinating coal preparation activities for the US Agency for International Development. In this context, a detailed analysis of the washability characteristics of non-coking coals was performed using the PETC Coal Preparation Plant Simulator (CPPS) to identify coal preparation strategies for India. Based on these strategies, a profitability analysis of non-coking coal preparation has been conducted considering coal preparation and transportation costs, and coal quality impacts on power plant operations. This paper summarizes the results of this analysis and quantifies the significance of coal preparation for the Indian power sector.

Gollakota, S.V.; Rao, S.N. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Staats, G.E. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Understanding and Managing Generation Y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are four generations in the workplace today; they consist of the Silent Generation, Baby Boom Generation, Generation X, and Generation Y. Generation Y, being the newest generation, is the least understood generation although marketers...

Wallace, Kevin

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

436

Power generation considerations in a solar biomodal receiver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS), or solar bimodal stage provides both propulsive thrust for efficient orbital transfer(s) and electrical power generation for the spacecraft. The combined propulsive and power systems allow the solar bimodal system to effectively compete for a variety of missions. Once on station, thermionic converters are used to supply continuous electrical power to the satellite, even during periods when the spacecraft is in the Earth`s shadow. The key to continuous power supply is thermal energy storage. The ISUS propulsion system also benefits through the use of thermal storage. By utilizing a graphite receiver, large amounts of sensible heat can be stored for later power generation. Waste heat is radiated to space through the use of heat pipes. Clearly, the graphite mass must be minimized without sacrificing electrical power capability. Voltage and current characteristics are carefully designed to operate within acceptable ranges. The detailed design of the receiver/absorber/converter (RAC) power system must meet these requirements with as little impact to the remainder of the bimodal system as possible. This paper addresses the key design considerations of a solar bimodal receiver as a power plant. Factors including the thermal storage and heat transfer from the graphite receiver to the thermionic converters, the support structures, electrical insulation and converter string design will be discussed.

Rochow, R.F. [NovaTech, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Miles, B.J. [Babcock and Wilcox, Lynchburg, VA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

TDX Manley Generating LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TDX Manley Generating LLC TDX Manley Generating LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name TDX Manley Generating LLC Place Alaska Utility Id 56503 Utility Location Yes Ownership M Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.6340/kWh Commercial: $0.6920/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=TDX_Manley_Generating_LLC&oldid=411634

438

National Grid Generation, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Grid Generation, LLC National Grid Generation, LLC (Redirected from KeySpan Generation LLC) Jump to: navigation, search Name National Grid Generation, LLC Place New York Service Territory Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island Website www1.nationalgridus.com/C Green Button Landing Page www1.nationalgridus.com/S Green Button Reference Page www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2 Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 26751 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NY Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

439

Characteristic (Version A)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in Vladivostok is investigating the characteristics and limitations of a solar energy system as an energy source the photovoltaic array, the charging system, the energy storage system, and the power management system) on the design of an AUV. It also seeks to identify constraints that an AUV system places on the solar energy

440

Waste generator services implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recurring waste management noncompliance problems have spurred a fundamental site-wide process revision to characterize and disposition wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The reengineered method, termed Waste Generator Services, will streamline the waste acceptance process and provide waste generators comprehensive waste management services through a single, accountable organization to manage and disposition wastes in a timely, cost-effective, and compliant manner. This report outlines the strategy for implementing Waste Generator Services across the INEEL. It documents the culmination of efforts worked by the LMITCO Environmental Management Compliance Reengineering project team since October 1997. These efforts have included defining problems associated with the INEEL waste management process; identifying commercial best management practices; completing a review of DOE Complex-wide waste management training requirements; and involving others through an Integrated Process Team approach to provide recommendations on process flow, funding/charging mechanisms, and WGS organization. The report defines the work that will be performed by Waste Generator Services, the organization and resources, the waste acceptance process flow, the funding approach, methods for measuring performance, and the implementation schedule and approach. Field deployment will occur first at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant in June 1998. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1999, Waste Generator Services will be deployed at the other major INEEL facilities in a phased approach, with implementation completed by March 1999.

Mousseau, J.; Magleby, M.; Litus, M.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Automation of hydroelectric power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes how the author's company has been automating its hydroelectric generating plants. The early automations were achieved with a relay-type supervisory control system, relay logic, dc tachometer, and a pneumatic gate-position controller. While this system allowed the units to be started and stopped from a remote location, they were operated at an output that was preset by the pneumatic control at the generating site. The supervisory control system at the site provided such information as unit status, generator breaker status, and a binary coded decimal (BCD) value of the pond level. The generating units are started by energizing an on-site relay that sets the pneumatic gate controller to a preset value above the synchronous speed of the hydroelectric generator. The pneumatic controller then opens the water-wheel wicket gates to the preset startup position. As the hydroelectric generator starts to turn, the machine-mounted dc tachometer produces a voltage. At a dc voltage equivalent to synchronous speed, the generator main breaker closes, and a contact from the main breaker starts a field-delay timer. Within a few seconds, the field breaker closes. Once the cycle is complete, a relay changes the pneumatic setpoint to a preset operating point of about 8/10 wicket gate opening.

Grasser, H.S. (Consolidated Papers, Inc., Wisconsin Rapids, WI (US))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Hull Municipal Light Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Light Plant Municipal Light Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Hull Municipal Light Plant Place Massachusetts Utility Id 8797 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Area Lights Rate 150 WATT Lighting Area Lights Rate 250 WATT Lighting Area Lights Rate 400 WATT Lighting Large Power Rate 35 Industrial Large Power Taxable Rate 39 Industrial Municipal Lighting Rate 33 Lighting Municipal Rate 36 Commercial Residential Rate 31 Residential

443

A Simulated Field Trip: "The Visual Aspects of Power Plant Sitings1"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Simulated Field Trip: "The Visual Aspects of Power Plant Sitings1" Bill Bottom 2 Alex Young 3 of conventional thermal (fossil fuel and nuclear), geo- thermal, wind and solar power plants. There are several be dependent on conventional thermal power plants to generate electricity. These power plants are powered

Standiford, Richard B.

444

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants in the United States as of 2009 and highlights characteristics of this segment of the industry. The purpose of the paper is to examine the role of natural gas processing plants in the natural gas supply chain and to provide an overview and summary of processing plant characteristics in the United States, such as locations, capacities, and operations. Key Findings There were 493 operational natural gas processing plants in the United States with a combined operating capacity of 77 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. Overall, operating capacity increased about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009, not including the processing capacity in Alaska1. At the same time, the number of all processing plants in the lower 48 States decreased

445

The Rising Cost of Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades.

Tobey Winters

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Assessment of postcombustion carbon capture technologies for power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A significant proportion of power generation stems from coal-combustion processes and accordingly represents one of the largest point sources of CO2 emissions worldwide. Coal power plants are major assets with la...

Mikel C. Duke; Bradley Ladewig; Simon Smart

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Structural materials issues for the next generation fission reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater to ... longer lasting, proliferation-resistant, and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful developme...

I. Chant; K. L. Murty

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Thermohydraulic analysis of U-tube steam generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent trends in plant safety analysis reveal a need for benchmark analytical representations of the steam generators to aid in the improvement of system codes and of fast codes for operator assistance. A model for such ...

da Silva, Hugo Cardoso

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation and treatment of paper recycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation and treatment of paper recycling wastewater production and treatment of a paper recycling plant wastewater using microbial fuel cells. Treatment. Keywords Microbial fuel cell . Paper recycling wastewater. Cellulose . Solution conductivity. Power

450

Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind-Powered Generation Examples are: The rough running bands of hydro turbines Loadings of coal burning steam plants at which coal mills

Lacommare, Kristina S H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Strategies for Mitigating the Reduction in Economic Value of Variable Generation with Increasing Penetration Levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Puga. The importance of combined cycle generating plants inthe assumption that new combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs)Ancillary services Combined cycle gas turbine Concentrating

Mills, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The renewable electric plant information system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explains the procedures used for creating the Renewable Electric Plant Information System (REPiS) database, describes the database fields, and summarizes the data. The REPiS database contains comprehensive information on grid-connected renewable electric generation plants in the United States. Originally designed in 1987 and updated in 1990, the database includes information through 1994. The report also illustrates ways of using the data for analysis is and describes how researchers validated the data.

Sinclair, K.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

PUREX Plant waste analysis plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous wastes are managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Plant to characterize the designate waste that is generated within the plant, stored in Tanks F18, U3/U4, and managed through elementary neutralization in Tank 31.

Villalobos, C.N.

1995-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

454

PUREX Plant waste analysis plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility shall develop and follow a written analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous wastes are managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Plant to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the plant and stored in Tanks F18 and U3/U4 prior to transfer to Tank Farms.

Ellis, M.W.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

The early history of tomato fruit morphology characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The early history of tomato fruit morphology characteristics Summary by Nic Welty Tomato originated and named a cultivar pomi'd oro (golden apple) (11). The first fruit shape was described as being "flattened) documented the red faciated tomato. He illustrated the tomato plant and fruit in detail, and also noted

van der Knaap, Esther

456

Innovative Self- Generating Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steam Driven Cooling Water Pump Blast Furnace Coke Plant Flares Boilers Steam Header Electric Cooling Water Pump (Back-up) Process Steam (Main Plant) Coal Hot Mill Reheat Furnace COG Bunker Oil ESL-IE-13-05-06 Proceedings... Driven Cooling Pump (New Back-up) Blast Furnace Coke Plant Flares Boilers Parastic Loads Natural Gas Turbine Steam Header Electric Cooling Water Pump (with Power Meter) Net ElectricityG Process Steam (Main Plant) Coal Hot Mill Reheat...

Kelly, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Next Generation Radioisotope Generators | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

» Next Generation Radioisotope Generators » Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) - The ASRG is currently being developed as a high-efficiency RPS technology to support future space missions on the Martian surface or in the vacuum of space. This system uses Stirling convertors, which have moving parts to mechanically convert heat to electricity. This power conversion system, if successfully deployed, will reduce the weight of each RPS and the amount of Pu-238 needed per mission. A HISTORY OF MISSION SUCCESSES For over fifty years, the Department of Energy has enabled space exploration on 27 missions by providing safe reliable radioistope power systems and radioisotope heater units for NASA, Navy and Air Force.

458

Seafood Plant Sanitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hygienically designed plant can improve the wholesomeness of seafood and the sanitation program. The location of the seafood plant can contribute to the sanitation of...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Excess Titanium from NNSA's Y-12 Plant to be Used by the Army...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Y-12 Plant to ... Excess Titanium from NNSA's Y-12 Plant to be Used by the Army for New Generation of Protective Body Armor for Combat Troops applicationmsword icon R-6-28.doc...

460

Microsoft Word - Solar Plant Reference_r2_May06.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The electric output of the plant will be provided entirely by solar energy. No electricity will be generated by the use of fossil fuel. A dry-cooled plant provides about 5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Seasonal changes in agar characteristics of two populations ofPterocladia capillacea in Gran Canaria, Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agar characteristics ofPterocladia capillacea...were examined seasonally at two intertidal populations exposed to different wave energy on the northern rocky shore of Gran Canaria Island. Plants were collected mo...

Y. Freile-Pelegrn; D. Robledo; R. Armisn; G. Garca-Reina

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " ",,,"Renewable Energy" ,,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "Economic","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.1,1.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

463

Off-design performance of integrated waste-to-energy, combined cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the off-design operation of plants where a waste-to-energy (WTE) system fed with municipal solid waste (MSW) is integrated with a natural gas-fired combined cycle (CC). Integration is accomplished by sharing the steam cycle: saturated steam generated in a MSW grate combustor is exported to the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) of the combined cycle, where it is superheated and then fed to a steam turbine serving both the CC and the WTE plant. Most likely, the WTE section and the natural gas-fired CC section are subject to different operation and maintenance schedules, so that the integrated plant operates in conditions different from those giving full power output. In this paper we discuss and give performance estimates for the two situations that delimit the range of operating conditions: (a) WTE plant at full power and gas turbine down; (b) WTE plant down and gas turbine at full power. This is done for two integrated plants having the same WTE section, i.e. grate combustors with an overall MSW combustion power of 180MWLHV, coupled with Combined Cycles based on two different heavy-duty gas turbines: a medium-size, 70MW class turbine and a large-size, 250MW class turbine. For each situation we discuss the control strategy and the actions that can help to achieve safe and reliable off-design operation. Heat and mass balances and performances at off-design conditions are estimated by accounting for the constraints imposed by the available heat transfer areas in boilers, heaters and condenser, as well as the characteristic curve of the steam turbine. When the gas turbine is down the net electric efficiency of the WTE section is very close to the one of the stand-alone WTE plant; instead, when the WTE section is down, the efficiency of the CC is much below the one of a stand alone CC. These performances appear most congenial to what is likely to be the operational strategy of these plants, i.e. paramount priority to waste treatment and CC dispatched according to the requirements of the national grid.

Stefano Consonni; Paolo Silva

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Generation gaps in engineering?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is much enthusiastic debate on the topic of generation gaps in the workplace today; what the generational differences are, how to address the apparent challenges, and if the generations themselves are even real. ...

Kim, David J. (David Jinwoo)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Energy Generation by Extracellular Aldose Oxidation in N2-Fixing Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ARTICLE PLANT MICROBIOLOGY Energy Generation by Extracellular...115, 1900 La Plata, Argentina. Phone and fax: 54...increase the efficiency of energy generation. | CINDEFI...Plata-CONICET, 1900 La Plata, Argentina. | Journal Article Research...metabolism Culture Media Energy Metabolism Gluconates...

Mara F. Luna; Cecilia E. Bernardelli; Carlos F. Mignone; Jos L. Boiardi

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Modelling of a Coil Steam Generator for Concentrated Solar Power Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The project investigates a new design for a CSP plant steam generation system, the Coil Steam Generator(CSG). This system allows faster start-ups and therefore higher (more)

PELAGOTTI, LEONARDO

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

468

Property:NbrGeneratingUnits | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NbrGeneratingUnits NbrGeneratingUnits Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NbrGeneratingUnits Property Type Number Description Number of Generating Units. Pages using the property "NbrGeneratingUnits" Showing 12 pages using this property. B BLM Geothermal Facility + 3 + Blundell 1 Geothermal Facility + 1 + Blundell 2 Geothermal Facility + 1 + E ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility + 2 + F Faulkner I Energy Generation Facility + 6 + N Navy I Geothermal Facility + 3 + Navy II Geothermal Facility + 3 + Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant + 3 + North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant + 5 + P Puna Geothermal Facility + 10 + R Raft River Geothermal Facility + 1 + Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center + 1 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:NbrGeneratingUnits&oldid=400184#SMWResults"

469

SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Generation Concentrating Solar Power Generation In 2010, DOE issued the Baseload Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Generation funding opportunity announcement (FOA). The following projects were selected under this competitive solicitation: Abengoa: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant eSolar: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design and Feasibility General Atomics: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage HiTek: Low-Cost Heliostat Development Infinia: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power PPG: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector Rocketdyne: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs SENER: High-Efficiency Thermal Storage System for Solar Plants

470

Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Better Engineered Solutions. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop 2 Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  Intro to Teledyne Energy Systems  H 2 Generator Basics & Major Subsystems  H 2 Generating & Storage System Overview  Electrolysis System Efficiency & Economics  Focus for Attaining DOE H 2 Production Cost Goals 3 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Hunt Valley, Maryland  State-of-the-art thermoelectric,

471

A gluttonous plant reveals how its cellular power plant devours foreign DNA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

December 20, 2013 December 20, 2013 A gluttonous plant reveals how its cellular power plant devours foreign DNA Amborella trichopoda, a sprawling shrub that grows on just a single island in the remote South Pacific, is the only plant in its family and genus. It is also one of the oldest flowering plants, having branched off from others about 200 million years ago. Now, researchers from Indiana University, with the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), Penn State University, and the Institute of Research for Development in New Caledonia, have determined a remarkable expansion of the genome of the plant's critical energy-generating structures. Its mitochondria, the plant's energy-producing organelles, in an epic demonstration of horizontal gene transfer, have acquired six genome equivalents of foreign DNA -- one from a

472

National Grid Generation, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation, LLC Generation, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name National Grid Generation, LLC Place New York Service Territory Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island Website www1.nationalgridus.com/C Green Button Reference Page www.nationalgridus.com/ab Green Button Committed Yes Utility Id 26751 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NY Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates

473

Dynamic power systems for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characteristics of dynamic power systems have considerable potential value, especially for the space station. The base of technology that makes these dynamic power systems practical is reviewed. The following types of power-generating systems are examined herein: organic Rankine cycle, potassium Rankine cycle, Brayton cycle, and Stirling cycle.

English, R.E.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Generating power with drained coal mine methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article describes the three technologies most commonly used for generating electricity from coal mine methane: internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and microturbines. The most critical characteristics and features of these technologies, such as efficiency, output and size are highlighted. 5 refs.

NONE

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Energy efficiency of a confectionery plant Case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The characteristic features of confectionery plants are determined by the type and quantity of processed raw materials, the applied production technology, structure of technical equipment and degree of automation. The above factors contribute to variations in the consumption of different energy carriers. This paper analyzes the energy consumption profile of a randomly chosen confectionery plant. It describes technical and technological factors that can be applied in a detailed analysis of energy efficiency in the confectionery industry to facilitate the selection of the best available techniques. The discussed indicators can also be used to create a database that tracks the energy efficiency characteristics of confectionery plants.

Janusz Wojdalski; Jzef Grochowicz; Bogdan Dr?d?; Katarzyna Bartoszewska; Paulina Zdanowska; Adam Kupczyk; Adam Ekielski; Iwona Florczak; Aleksandra Hasny; Gra?yna Wjcik

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

477

High-efficiency third-generation silicon solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of investigating third-generation matrix silicon solar cells with an efficiency of more than 25% during conversion of concentrated solar radiation are given. Electrical and optical characteristics ......

D. S. Strebkov; V. I. Polyakov

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Wave generation of a compartmented surface-effect ship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of carefully controlled experiments on the wave-generation characteristics of a model of a compartmented surface-effect ship has been conducted in a towing tank....

Lawrence J. Doctors; Alexander H. Day

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Solar generator performance with load matching to water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 7 W generator, based on monocrystalline silicon solar cells, was directly wired to an electronic load, simulating the current-voltage characteristic of an advanced water electrolyser. System performance was ...

K. Freudenberg

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis in plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel transgenic plants and plant cells are capable of biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). Heterologous enzymes involved in PHA biosynthesis, particularly PHA polymerase, are targeted to the peroxisome of a transgenic plant. Transgenic plant materials that biosynthesize short chain length monomer PHAs in the absence of heterologous .beta.-ketothiolase and acetoacetyl-CoA reductase are also disclosed.

Srienc, Friedrich (Lake Elmo, MN); Somers, David A. (Roseville, MN); Hahn, J. J. (New Brighton, MN); Eschenlauer, Arthur C. (Circle Pines, MN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plant characteristics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.