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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Generation of electrical power  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat-to-electricity converter is disclosed which includes a radioactive heat source and a thermoelectric element of relatively short overall length capable of delivering a low voltage of the order of a few tenths of a volt. Such a thermoelectric element operates at a higher efficiency than longer higher-voltage elements; for example, elements producing 6 volts. In the generation of required power, thermoelectric element drives a solid-state converter which is controlled by input current rather than input voltage and operates efficiently for a high signal-plus-noise to signal ratio of current. The solid-state converter has the voltage gain necessary to deliver the required voltage at the low input of the thermoelectric element.

Hursen, Thomas F. (Monroeville, PA); Kolenik, Steven A. (Leechburg, PA); Purdy, David L. (Indiana, PA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Electric Power Generation Expansion in Deregulated Markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The generation expansion problem involves increasing electric power generation capacity in an existing power network. In competitive environment, power producers, distributors, and consumers all make… (more)

KAYMAZ, PINAR

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility MunicipalPublic...

4

Conditions on Electric Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Analysis of the Effects of Drought An Analysis of the Effects of Drought Conditions on Electric Power Generation in the Western United States April 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1365 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

5

Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fossil fuels in Canada account for 27 percent of the electricity generated. The combustion of these fuels is a major source of emissions which affect air quality and climate change. The Government...

6

Conditions on Electric Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and California (CAL). We pay special attention to interdependencies among hydropower and thermal power plant operations because hydropower plants may provide up to 40% of the WECC...

7

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and...

8

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility...

9

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate? ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

10

Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PWP-030 Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James;PWP-030 Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James Bushnell. Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James Bushnell and Steven Stoft

California at Berkeley. University of

11

Figure 79. Electricity sales and power sector generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Figure 79. Electricity sales and power sector generating capacity, 1949-2040 (index, 1949 = 1.0) Subject: Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Author

12

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Jersey" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

13

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Illinois" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

14

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

15

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Texas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

16

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Washington" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

17

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Montana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,199...

18

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Maine" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

19

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "South Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,199...

20

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Kansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "West Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

22

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Louisiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1...

23

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Hampshire" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

24

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

25

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Ohio Power Siting Board Chapter 4906-17 of the Ohio Administrative Code states the Application Filing Requirements for wind-powered electric generating facilities in Ohio. The information requested in this rule shall be used to assess the environmental effects of the proposed facility. An applicant for a certificate to site a wind-powered electric generation

26

Integration of decentralized generators with the electric power grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report develops a new methodology for studying the economic interaction of customer-owned electrical generators with the central electric power grid. The purpose of the report is to study the reciprocal effects of the ...

Finger, Susan

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Compressed Air Storage for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Report focuses on the use of underground storage of natural gas as a means of leveling the load between supply and demand. The book presents a view of the way compressed air storage can reduce costs when constructing new facilities for generating peak load electricity. The primary emphasis given concerns underground storage of air in underground porous media, the vehicle utilized on a large scale for over 25 years by the natural gas industry.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Water Use for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes how thermoelectric plants use water and the strengths, limitations, and costs of available technologies for increasing water use efficiency (gal/MWh). The report will be of value to power company strategic planners, environmental managers, and generation managers as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Power Plant Electrical Reference Series, Volume 1: Electric Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive and practical guide to electric power apparatus and electrical phenomena provides an up-to-date source book for power plant managers, engineers, and operating personnel. Aiding in the recognition and prevention of potential problems, the 16-volume guide can help utilities save staff time and reduce operating expenses.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Unalaska geothermal exploration project. Electrical power generation analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine the most cost-effective power cycle for utilizing the Makushin Volcano geothermal resource to generate electricity for the towns of Unalaska and Dutch Harbor. It is anticipated that the geothermal power plant would be intertied with a planned conventional power plant consisting of four 2.5 MW diesel-generators whose commercial operation is due to begin in 1987. Upon its completion in late 1988, the geothermal power plant would primarily fulfill base-load electrical power demand while the diesel-generators would provide peak-load electrical power and emergency power at times when the geothermal power plant would be partially or completely unavailable. This study compares the technical, environmental, and economic adequacy of five state-of-the-art geothermal power conversion processes. Options considered are single- and double-flash steam cycles, binary cycle, hybrid cycle, and total flow cycle.

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Market concentration and marketing power among electricity generators in Texas  

SciTech Connect

Policy initiatives designed to foster competition among electricity generators in Texas face a special challenge due to the relative isolation of that system. This isolation contributes to high levels of market concentration and market power that could hinder the development of a truly competitive market. This paper examines market concentration and market power in the ERCOT market for electricity generation by calculating the Herfindahl-Hirschman index (HHI) under various assumptions to gauge the degree of market concentration among generators in ERCOT. In addition, some ongoing studies of market power in ERCOT are discussed. The distinction between market concentration and market power is highlighted.

Zarnikau, J.; Lam, A. [Planergy Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Utah" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

33

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Iowa" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

34

Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the...

35

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Ohio" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

36

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New York" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

37

Wind Power Generation Dynamic Impacts on Electric Utility Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical planning study is an initial assessment of potential dynamic impacts on electric utility systems of wind power generation via large wind turbines. Three classes of dynamic problems-short-term transient stability, system frequency excursions, and minute-to-minute unit ramping limitations - were examined in case studies based on the Hawaiian Electric Co. System.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

On Low-Frequency Electric Power Generation With PZT Ceramics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Piezoelectric materials have long been used as sensors and actuators, however their use as electrical generators is less established. A piezoelectric power generator has great potential for some remote applications such as in vivo sensors, embedded MEMS devices, and distributed networking. Such materials are capable of converting mechanical energy into electrical energy, but developing piezoelectric generators is challenging because of their poor source characteristics (high voltage, low current, high impedance) and relatively low power output. In the past these challenges have limited the development and application of piezoelectric generators, but the recent advent of extremely low power electrical and mechanical devices (e.g., MEMS) make such generators attractive. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of piezoelectric power generation that is verified with simulation and experimental results. Several important considerations in designing such generators are explored, including parameter identification, load matching, form factors, efficiency, longevity, energy conversion and energy storage. Finally, an application of this analysis is presented where electrical energy is generated inside a prototype Total Knee Replacement (TKR) implant.

Stephen R. Platt; et al.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Optimization of Piezoelectric Electrical Generators Powered by Random Vibrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper compares the performances of a vibrationpowered electrical generators using PZT piezoelectric ceramic associated to two different power conditioning circuits. A new approach of the piezoelectric power conversion based on a nonlinear voltage processing is presented and implemented with a particular power conditioning circuit topology. Theoretical predictions and experimental results show that the nonlinear processing technique may increase the power harvested by a factor up to 4 compared to the Standard optimization technique. Properties of this new technique are analyzed in particular in the case of broadband, random vibrations, and compared to those of the Standard interface.

Lefeuvre, E; Richard, C; Petit, L; Guyomar, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Japanese power companies using more LNG to generate electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... which led to the accident at Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and subsequent outages at other plants.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Impact of Wind Power Generation on Wholesale Electricity Price ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

price for power generation are examined to forecast LNG price for power genera- tion. Information on future power plant's construction and decommission plan ...

42

Decentralized control techniques applied to electric power distributed generation in microgrids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Distributed generation of electric energy has become part of the current electric power system. In this context a new scenario is arising in which small… (more)

Vásquez Quintero, Juan Carlos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables (Information and data on nuclear power reactors Generation: by State and Reactor. Annual Energy Review, ...

44

Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description The team of university and industry engineers, scientists, and project developers will evaluate the power capacity, efficiency, and economics of five commercially available ORC engines in collaboration with the equipment manufacturers. The geothermal ORC system will be installed at an oil field operated by Continental Resources, Inc. in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. Data and experience acquired can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.

45

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kauai...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

coming from renewable energy by 2023. vii List of Acronyms Btu British thermal unit CSP concentrating solar power DER distributed energy resource DG distributed generation DOE...

46

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (kWh). There were 65 nuclear power plants with 104 operating nuclear reactors that generated a total of 790 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh), ...

47

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal resources for electric power generation. i. PlantOF GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS Electric Power Generation SystemsUSE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resources for electric power generation. i. Plant size ii.SYSTEMS Electric Power Generation Systems NonelectricFLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Pipelines to Power Lines: Gas Transportation for Electricity Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas-fired power generation represents a major growth market for the natural gas industry; but the large, high pressure, highly variable loads required for individual power generators can be difficult to serve. This report, cosponsored by the Gas Research Institute and EPRI, is a design stage assessment of the engineering and costs of the pipelines needed to handle these types of loads.

1995-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

Feasibility investigation of the giromill for generation of electrical power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cyclogiro computer program, obtained from Prof. H. C. Larsen of the United States Air Force Institute of Technology, was modified to incorporate computation of blade loads for the normal operating and gust loading conditions. The program was also changed to allow computation of the effects of smoothing the blade rock angles in the region where they experienced large oscillations due to passing through a vortex shed by the previous blade. Using this program the various effects of rotor geometric parameters were investigated. Giromill configuration design concepts were explored. A baseline concept was adopted having an upper structural triangular tower extending through the lower support tower and supported by two main rotor bearings. Twenty-one different Giromill systems covering a power range of 120, 500 and 1500 kW were then synthesized. These were structurally analyzed and sized. An automatic electronic control concept built around existing equipment and employing state of the art techniques was developed. Preliminary cost estimates for generating electrical power from the Giromill systems were completed. Cost estimating relationships of the major items of equipment were formulated. 10 references. (auth)

Brulle, R.V.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Coordinating Fuel Inventory and Electric Power Generation Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the problem of hedging between the natural gas and electric power markets. Based on multiple forecasts for natural gas prices, natural gas demand, and electricity prices, a stochastic optimization model advises a decision maker on when to buy or sell natural gas and when to transform gas into electricity. For relatively small models, branch-and-bound solves the problem to optimality. Larger models are solved using Benders decomposition and Lagrangian relaxation. We apply our approach to the system of an electric utility and succeed in solving problems with 50,000 binary variables in less than 4 minutes to within 1.16% of the optimal value.

Samer Takriti; Chonawee Supatgiat; Lilian S.-Y. Wu

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Investigating the electric power distribution system (EPDS) bus voltage in the presence of distributed generation (DG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the Electric Power Distribution System (EPDS) bus voltage in the presence of Distributed Generation (DG). Distribution Company's (Discos) planner endeavor to develop new planning strategies for their network in order to serve ... Keywords: PSCAD, distributed generation, electric power distribution system, islanding, power quality, voltage stability

Hasham Khan; Mohammad Ahmad Choudhry; Tahir Mahmood; Aamir Hanif

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable Energy Certificates, and On-Site Renewable Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes the details of purchasing green power. Discussion covers topics like renewable electricity, renewable energy certificates, and on-site renewable generation.

54

Optimal control of generator resynchronisation in electric power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimal control techniques are discussed for the resynchronisation of a steam turbine unit in an electric power system after it has lost synchronism. A time optimal control is derived and the resulting bang-bang control law is first simulated on an analogue ...

D. Rosenfeld; F. J. Evans

1972-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A simulation solution of the integration of wind power into an electricity generating network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To effectively harness the power of wind electricity generation, significant infrastructure challenges exist. First, the individual wind turbines must be sited and constructed as part of a wind farm. Second, the wind farm must be connected to the electricity ...

Thomas F. Brady

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Table 8.2c Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage 5: Renewable Energy: Other 10: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2: Natural Gas 3: Other Gases 4: Total: Conventional Hydroelectric Power ...

57

Table 8.2b Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage 5: Renewable Energy: Other 10: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2: Natural Gas 3: Other Gases 4: Total: Conventional Hydroelectric Power ...

58

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities...

59

Use of Geothermal Energy for Electric Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and its 1,000 member systems are involved in the research, development and utilization of many different types of supplemental and alternative energy resources. We share a strong commitment to the wise and efficient use of this country's energy resources as the ultimate answer to our national prosperity and economic growth. WRECA is indebted to the United States Department of Energy for funding the NRECA/DOE Geothermal Workshop which was held in San Diego, California in October, 1980. We would also like to express our gratitude to each of the workshop speakers who gave of their time, talent and experience so that rural electric systems in the Western U. S. might gain a clearer understanding of the geothermal potential in their individual service areas. The participants were also presented with practical, expert opinion regarding the financial and technical considerations of using geothermal energy for electric power production. The organizers of this conference and all of those involved in planning this forum are hopeful that it will serve as an impetus toward the full utilization of geothermal energy as an important ingredient in a more energy self-sufficient nation. The ultimate consumer of the rural electric system, the member-owner, expects the kind of leadership that solves the energy problems of tomorrow by fully utilizing the resources at our disposal today.

Mashaw, John M.; Prichett, III, Wilson (eds.)

1980-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

60

Tracking new coal-fired power plants: coal's resurgence in electric power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This information package is intended to provide an overview of 'Coal's resurgence in electric power generation' by examining proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under consideration in the USA. The results contained in this package are derived from information that is available from various tracking organizations and news groups. Although comprehensive, this information is not intended to represent every possible plant under consideration but is intended to illustrate the large potential that exists for new coal-fired power plants. It should be noted that many of the proposed plants are likely not to be built. For example, out of a total portfolio (gas, coal, etc.) of 500 GW of newly planned power plant capacity announced in 2001, 91 GW have been already been scrapped or delayed. 25 refs.

NONE

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Distributed Electrical Power Generation: Summary of Alternative Available Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000ABSTRACT: The Federal government is the greatest consumer of electricity in the nation. Federal procurement and installation of higher efficiency energy sources promises many benefits, in terms of economy, employment, export, and environment. While distributed generation (DG) technologies offer many of the benefits of alternative, efficient energy sources, few DG systems can currently be commercially purchased “off the shelf, ” and complicated codes and standards deter potential users. Federal use of distributed generation demonstrates the technology, can help drive down costs, and an help lead the general public to accept a changing energy scheme. This work reviews and describes various distributed generation technologies, including fuel cells, microturbines, wind turbines, photovoltaic arrays, and Stirling engines. Issues such as fuel availability, construction considerations, protection controls are addressed. Sources of further information are provided. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. All product names and trademarks cited are the property of their respective owners. The findings of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents.

Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik; Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Table 8.2c Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. ... 10 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, ...

64

Table 8.2b Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. ... 10 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, ...

65

Framing Scenarios of Electricity Generation and Gas Use: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a systematic appraisal of trends in electric generation and demands for gas for power generation. Gas-fired generation is the leading driver of forecasted growth in demand for natural gas in the United States, and natural gas is a leading fuel for planned new generating capacity. The report goes behind the numbers and forecasts to quantify key drivers and uncertainties.

1996-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

66

The role of hydroelectric generation in electric power systems with large scale wind generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An increasing awareness of the operational challenges created by intermittent generation of electricity from policy-mandated renewable resources, such as wind and solar, has led to… (more)

Hagerty, John Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Table A31. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"

68

Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent Conditioned Floorspace","Total","Present","Not Present","Factors" " "," " "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,1.3,0.9 "ALL SQUARE FEET CATEGORIES" "Approximate Conditioned Floorspace"

69

Electric Power Metrology News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Next-generation "smart" electrical meters for residential and commercial ... NIST Team Demystifies Utility of Power Factor Correction Devices Release ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

70

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7. Net Generation from Wind by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent...

71

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors)...

72

Electric Power Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 3.19. Net Generation from Geothermal by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric...

73

Variable Renewable Generation can Provide Balancing Control to the Electric Power System (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As wind and solar plants become more common in the electric power system, they may be called on to provide grid support services to help maintain system reliability. For example, through the use of inertial response, primary frequency response, and automatic generation control (also called secondary frequency response), wind power can provide assistance in balancing the generation and load on the system. These active power (i.e., real power) control services have the potential to assist the electric power system in times of disturbances and during normal conditions while also potentially providing economic value to consumers and variable renewable generation owners. This one-page, two-sided fact sheet discusses the grid-friendly support and benefits renewables can provide to the electric power system.

Not Available

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Electric power generating plant having direct-coupled steam and compressed-air cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

Drost, M.K.

1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

Electric power generating plant having direct coupled steam and compressed air cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

Drost, Monte K. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Market for Coal Based Electric Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's initiative to effectively remove environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for producing electricity and transportation fuels through better technology....

77

The Powered Generation: Canadians, Electricity, and Everyday Life.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Most studies of electricity in Canada have examined the process of electrification from a business or political perspective, emphasizing the role of private and public… (more)

Gucciardo, Dorotea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Modeling, control, and power management of a power electrical system including two distributed generators based on fuel cell and supercapacitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on Distributed Generator (DG) integration in Power Electrical System (PES) for dispersed nodes. The main objective of the DG use can be classified into two aspects: a load following service and ancillary service systems. In this study

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Wind and solar power electric generation to see strong growth...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by roughly 30 percent in each of the next two years. Even with such strong growth, the amount of solar energy will remain a very small part of the total U.S. electricity supply...

80

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",76231696,85050801,907922...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4493024,4286431,4167054,...

82

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price Reduction Offsetting demand for natural gas in the electricity sector by increasing wind energy’price reductions, and water savings. Index Terms—power system modeling, wind energywind energy to offset coal- and natural gas-based electricity generation analyzed here include decreased natural gas prices,

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Market Power and Technological Bias: The Case of Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collective output isQg, and intermittent generators (which we will assume here is wind generation) whose output is assumed to have a fixed and stochastic component Qw,0+ ?w. We assume that E[?w] = 0 and V ar[?w] = ?2w. The intermittent output is produced by a... conventional generation assets. In equilibrium demand matches supply: DT = Qg +Qw,0 + ?w, (2) and using (1) gives: p = D0 ? b(Qg +Qw,0 + ?w). (3) We assume that a conventional generator has a quadratic cost function: Cg(Qg) = ?Qg + ? 2Q 2 g, (4) and thus...

Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

The role of hydroelectric generation in electric power systems with large scale wind generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An increasing awareness of the operational challenges created by intermittent generation of electricity from policy-mandated renewable resources, such as wind and solar, has led to increased scrutiny of the public policies ...

Hagerty, John Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Production and maintenance planning for electricity generators: modeling and application to Indian power systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 2,250 MW in 1961 to nearly 100,000 MW of installed capacity today. The electricity demand has also, or up to a year. The relevant decisions include fuel supply from the fuel sources to the generating, generators, and transmission network of their constituent states. The Indian power system has grown rapidly

Dragoti-Ã?ela, Eranda

86

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii. 52076.pdf More Documents & Publications Kauai, Hawaii: Solar Resource Analysis and High-Penetration PV Potential Integrating Renewable Energy into the Transmission and Distribution System of the U.S. Virgin Islands Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative

87

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights ... Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating capacity;

88

Electrical generating plant availability  

SciTech Connect

A discussion is given of actions that can improve availability, including the following: the meaning of power plant availability; The organization of the electric power industry; some general considerations of availability; the improvement of power plant availability--design factors, control of shipping and construction, maintenance, operating practices; sources of statistics on generating plant availability; effects of reducing forced outage rates; and comments by electric utilities on generating unit availability.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Table A15. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.3,1,1,0.9,1.2,1.2

90

EPRI Ergonomics Handbook for the Electric Power Industry: Ergonomic Design Handbook for Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Research Program has provided ergonomic information to the electric energy industry workforce since 1999. This is the fifth EPRI ergonomics handbook; it provides a framework and specific guidelines for decisionmaking that will apply ergonomic principles to the design of electric generating stations. Fossil-fueled power plant operation and maintenance is physically strenuous, and it may contribute to development of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) such as carp...

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

91

Electrokinetic Power Generation from Liquid Water Microjets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrokinetic energy to electrical power. Previous studiescurrents to generate electrical power have employed twodetermine the electrical power that can be generated from

Duffin, Andrew M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Evaluation of conventional electric power generating industry quality assurance and reliability practices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The techniques and practices utilized in an allied industry (electric power generation) that might serve as a baseline for formulating Quality Assurance and Reliability (QA and R) procedures for photovoltaic solar energy systems were studied. The study results provide direct near-term input for establishing validation methods as part of the SERI performance criteria and test standards development task.

Anderson, R.T.; Lauffenburger, H.A.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Transient stability enhancement of electric power generating systems by 120-degree phase rotation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for enhancing the transient stability of an intertied three-phase electric power generating system. A set of power exporting generators (10) is connected to a set of power importing generators (20). When a transient cannot be controlled by conventional stability controls, and imminent loss of synchronism is detected (such as when the equivalent rotor angle difference between the two generator sets exceeds a predetermined value, such as 150 degrees), the intertie is disconnected by circuit breakers. Then a switch (30) having a 120-degree phase rotation, or a circuit breaker having a 120-degree phase rotation is placed in the intertie. The intertie is then reconnected. This results in a 120-degree reduction in the equivalent rotor angle difference between the two generator sets, making the system more stable and allowing more time for the conventional controls to stabilize the transient.

Cresap, Richard L. (Portland, OR); Taylor, Carson W. (Portland, OR); Kreipe, Michael J. (Portland, OR)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply. National Renewable20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology byTERMS wind-generated electricity; wind energy; 20% wind

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Electric Power Monthly January 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly January 2012 With Data for November 2011 ... Electric Utility Power Generation Station (PGS) 2 CA 57696 1 3.8 OBG GT

96

Very High Efficiency Reactor (VHER) Concepts for Electrical Power Generation and Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Very High Efficiency Reactor study was to develop and analyze concepts for the next generation of nuclear power reactors. The next generation power reactor should be cost effective compared to current power generation plant, passively safe, and proliferation-resistant. High-temperature reactor systems allow higher electrical generating efficiencies and high-temperature process heat applications, such as thermo-chemical hydrogen production. The study focused on three concepts; one using molten salt coolant with a prismatic fuel-element geometry, the other two using high-pressure helium coolant with a prismatic fuel-element geometry and a fuel-pebble element design. Peak operating temperatures, passive-safety, decay heat removal, criticality, burnup, reactivity coefficients, and material issues were analyzed to determine the technical feasibility of each concept.

PARMA JR.,EDWARD J.; PICKARD,PAUL S.; SUO-ANTTILA,AHTI JORMA

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Solar Thermal Small Power Systems Study. Inventory of US industrial small electric power generating systems. [Less than 10 MW  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This inventory of small industrial electric generating systems was assembled by The Aerospace Corporation to provide a data base for analyses being conducted to estimate the potential for displacement of these fossil-fueled systems by solar thermal electric systems no larger than 10 MW in rated capacity. The approximately 2100 megawatts generating capacity of systems in this category constitutes a potential market for small solar thermal and other solar electric power systems. The sources of data for this inventory were the (former) Federal Power Commission (FPC) Form 4 Industrial Ledger and Form 12-C Ledger for 1976. Table 1 alphabetically lists generating systems located at industrial plants and at Federal government installations in each of the 50 states. These systems are differentiated by type of power plant: steam turbine, diesel generator, or gas turbine. Each listing is designated as a power system rather than a power unit because the FPC Ledgers do not provide a means of determining whether more than one unit is associated with each industrial installation. Hence, the user should consider each listing to be a system capacity rating wherein the system may consist of one or more generating units with less than 10 MW/sub e/ combined rating. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation  

SciTech Connect

In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

Zeh, C.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the relationship between wind power class and cost is showncosts associated with wind power. The cost implications ofprice electricity, wind power directly reduces exposure to

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Cooldown control system for a combined cycle electrical power generation plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a combined cycle electrical power plant including a steam turbine, a heat recovery steam generator for supplying steam to the steam turbine, a gas turbine for supplying heat to the heat recovery steam generator. The steam generator and gas turbine both produce electrical power under load, and the gas turbine has a control circuit determining the operation therof. A cooldown control system is described for the power generation plant. The system comprises: first means for detecting one of a steaming condition and a non-steaming condition in the heat recovery steam generator; second means responsive to the steaming condition and to a gas turbine STOP signal for reducing the load of the gas turbine toward a minimum load level; third means responsive to the non-steaming condition and to the minimum load level being reached for generating a STOP command and applying the STOP command to the control circuit of the gas turbine, thereby to indicate a sequence of steps to stop the gas turbine.

Martens, A.; Snow, B.E.

1987-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Bayesian Learning Model in the Agent-based Bilateral Negotiation between the Coal Producers and Electric Power Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reform of China’s coal sector has changed the traditional relationship of the coal producers and electric power generators, and now most of the coal the coal producers sell to the generators is transacted through electric coal bilateral contracts, ... Keywords: Electric price, Agent, Bayesian Learning

Mingwen Zhang; Zhongfu Tan; Jianbao Zhao; Li Li

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Comparative health and safety assessment of the satellite power system and other electrical generation alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work reported here is an analysis of existing data on the health and safety risks of a satellite power system and six electrical generation systems: a combined-cycle coal power system with a low-Btu gasifier and open-cycle gas turbine; a light water fission power system without fuel reprocessing; a liquid-metal, fast-breeder fission reactor; a centralized and decentralized, terrestrial, solar-photovoltaic power system; and a first-generation design for a fusion power system. The systems are compared on the basis of expected deaths and person-days lost per year associated with 1000 MW of average electricity generation. Risks are estimated and uncertainties indicated for all phases of the energy production cycle, including fuel and raw material extraction and processing, direct and indirect component manufacture, on-site construction, and system operation and maintenance. Also discussed is the potential significance of related major health and safety issues that remain largely unquantifiable. The appendices provide more detailed information on risks, uncertainties, additional research needed, and references for the identified impacts of each system.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Method for protecting an electric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for protecting an electrical generator which includes providing an electrical generator which is normally synchronously operated with an electrical power grid; providing a synchronizing signal from the electrical generator; establishing a reference signal; and electrically isolating the electrical generator from the electrical power grid if the synchronizing signal is not in phase with the reference signal.

Kuehnle, Barry W. (Ammon, ID); Roberts, Jeffrey B. (Ammon, ID); Folkers, Ralph W. (Ammon, ID)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

104

Economic impact of non-utility generation on electric power systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-Utility Generation is a major force in the way electrical energy is now being produced and marketed, and electric utilities are reacting to the growth… (more)

Gupta, Rajnish

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable Energy Certificates, and On-Site Renewable Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Purchasing Green Power Renewable Electricity, Renewable Energy Certificates, and On-Site Renewable Generation DOE/EE-0307 This guide can be downloaded from: www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/technologies/renewable_purchasingpower.html www.epa.gov/greenpower/ www.wri.org/publications www.resource-solutions.org/publications.php Office of Air (6202J) EPA430-K-04-015 www.epa.gov/greenpower March 2010 ISBN: 1-56973-577-8 Guide to Purchasing Green Power i Table of Contents Summary ........................................................................................................................................................1 Chapter 1: Introduction ....................................................................................................................................2

108

EIA Electric Power Forms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Forms Electric Power Forms EIA Electric Power Forms Listing of Publicly Available and Confidential Data EIA's statistical surveys encompass each significant electric supply and demand activity in the United States. Most of the electric power survey forms resulting data elements are published, but respondent confidentiality is required. The chart below shows the data elements for each survey form and how each data element is treated in regard to confidentiality. Data Categories Data collection forms EIA- 411 EIA- 826 EIA- 860 EIA- 860M EIA- 861 EIA- 923 Frame Information Utility identification and iocation -- -- -- -- X -- Plant identification and iocation -- -- -- X -- X Generation and fuel Latitude and longitude -- -- X -- -- --

109

EIA - Electric Power Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey-level Detail Data Files Survey-level Detail Data Files Electric power data are collected on survey instruments. Data collection is mandated by Congress to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding. The most widely used data are disseminated in reports, such as the Electric Power Monthly and the Electric Power Annual. Publicly available electric power data is available down to the plant level in the Electricity Data Browser and in detailed spreadsheets by survey below. Description Data availability State-level data (consolidated across forms) Contains electricity generation; fuel consumption; emissions; retail sales, revenue, number of customers, and retail prices; generating capacity; and financial data. 1990-2012 (monthly and annual) Electric power sales and revenue data - monthly (Form EIA-826)

110

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce Operating Costs of Small Producers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce produced water to create "green" electricity usable on site or for transmission off site . The goal the environmental impact by creating green electricity using produced water and no additional fossil fuel. Approach

111

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 6: Generating Resources and Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

......................................................................................................................... 26 Solar Thermal Power Plants) or polygeneration. A cogeneration power plant simultaneously produces electricity and thermal energy for industrial Storage Technologies Sixth Power Plan 6-3 Conventional coal plants are unlikely to be developed

112

Power System Modeling of 20% Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power System Modeling of 20% Power System Modeling of 20% Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030 Preprint M. Hand and N. Blair National Renewable Energy Laboratory M. Bolinger and R. Wiser Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory R. O'Connell Black & Veatch T. Hern and B. Miller Western Resources Advocates To be presented at the Power Engineering Society 2008 General Meeting Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania July 20-24, 2008 Conference Paper NREL/CP-500-42794 June 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of

113

Power Electronics and Electric Machines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PEEM Activities Application Power Electronics Electric Machines Traction Drive System Inverter & Boost Converter (if needed) MotorGenerator Vehicle Power Management Bi-directional...

114

Electric Power Annual 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating capacity; ... Average power plant operating expenses for major U.S. investor-owned electric utilities XLS:

115

Potential Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed around the world, with much work aiming to optimize engine and battery for efficient operation, both during discharge and when grid electricity is available for recharging. However, the general expectation has been that the grid will not be greatly affected by the use of PHEVs because the recharging will occur during off-peak hours, or the number of vehicles will grow slowly enough so that capacity planning will respond adequately. This expectation does not consider that drivers will control the timing of recharging, and their inclination will be to plug in when convenient, rather than when utilities would prefer. It is important to understand the ramifications of adding load from PHEVs onto the grid. Depending on when and where the vehicles are plugged in, they could cause local or regional constraints on the grid. They could require the addition of new electric capacity and increase the utilization of existing capacity. Usage patterns of local distribution grids will change, and some lines or substations may become overloaded sooner than expected. Furthermore, the type of generation used to meet the demand for recharging PHEVs will depend on the region of the country and the timing of recharging. This paper analyzes the potential impacts of PHEVs on electricity demand, supply, generation structure, prices, and associated emission levels in 2020 and 2030 in 13 regions specified by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), and on which the data and analysis in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 are based (Figure ES-1). The estimates of power plant supplies and regional hourly electricity demand come from publicly available sources from EIA and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Electricity requirements for PHEVs are based on analysis from the Electric Power Research Institute, with an optimistic projection of 25% market penetration by 2020, involving a mixture of sedans and sport utility vehicles. The calculations were done using the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model, a model developed over the past 12 years to evaluate a wide variety of critical electricity sector issues. Seven scenarios were run for each region for 2020 and 2030, for a total of 182 scenarios. In addition to a base scenario of no PHEVs, the authors modeled scenarios assuming that vehicles were either plugged in starting at 5:00 p.m. (evening) or at 10:00 p.m.(night) and left until fully charged. Three charging rates were examined: 120V/15A (1.4 kW), 120V/20A (2 kW), and 220V/30A (6 kW). Most regions will need to build additional capacity or utilize demand response to meet the added demand from PHEVs in the evening charging scenarios, especially by 2030 when PHEVs have a larger share of the installed vehicle base and make a larger demand on the system. The added demands of evening charging, especially at high power levels, can impact the overall demand peaks and reduce the reserve margins for a region's system. Night recharging has little potential to influence peak loads, but will still influence the amount and type of generation.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Potential Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed around the world, with much work aiming to optimize engine and battery for efficient operation, both during discharge and when grid electricity is available for recharging. However, the general expectation has been that the grid will not be greatly affected by the use of PHEVs because the recharging will occur during off-peak hours, or the number of vehicles will grow slowly enough so that capacity planning will respond adequately. This expectation does not consider that drivers will control the timing of recharging, and their inclination will be to plug in when convenient, rather than when utilities would prefer. It is important to understand the ramifications of adding load from PHEVs onto the grid. Depending on when and where the vehicles are plugged in, they could cause local or regional constraints on the grid. They could require the addition of new electric capacity and increase the utilization of existing capacity. Usage patterns of local distribution grids will change, and some lines or substations may become overloaded sooner than expected. Furthermore, the type of generation used to meet the demand for recharging PHEVs will depend on the region of the country and the timing of recharging. This paper analyzes the potential impacts of PHEVs on electricity demand, supply, generation structure, prices, and associated emission levels in 2020 and 2030 in 13 regions specified by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), and on which the data and analysis in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 are based (Figure ES-1). The estimates of power plant supplies and regional hourly electricity demand come from publicly available sources from EIA and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Electricity requirements for PHEVs are based on analysis from the Electric Power Research Institute, with an optimistic projection of 25% market penetration by 2020, involving a mixture of sedans and sport utility vehicles. The calculations were done using the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model, a model developed over the past 12 years to evaluate a wide variety of critical electricity sector issues. Seven scenarios were run for each region for 2020 and 2030, for a total of 182 scenarios. In addition to a base scenario of no PHEVs, the authors modeled scenarios assuming that vehicles were either plugged in starting at 5:00 p.m. (evening) or at 10:00 p.m.(night) and left until fully charged. Three charging rates were examined: 120V/15A (1.4 kW), 120V/20A (2 kW), and 220V/30A (6 kW). Most regions will need to build additional capacity or utilize demand response to meet the added demand from PHEVs in the evening charging scenarios, especially by 2030 when PHEVs have a larger share of the installed vehicle base and make a larger demand on the system. The added demands of evening charging, especially at high power levels, can impact the overall demand peaks and reduce the reserve margins for a region's system. Night recharging has little potential to influence peak loads, but will still influence the amount and type of generation.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Electric power annual 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

Not Available

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

118

Year-to-date natural gas use for electric power generation is down ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas used to generate electricity so far this year is below the high level during the comparable 2012 period, when low natural gas prices led to significant ...

119

Support for solar power and renewable electricity generation at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is poised to play an important role in supporting national plans for renewable electricity generation. As distributed… (more)

Krausz, Brian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AEO 2007 high fuel price forecast Coal prices follow AEOcoal- and natural gas-based electricity generation analyzed here include decreased natural gas prices,

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Sector ; Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector; Annual Totals: ...

123

Electric Power Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid Our country's way of life depends on the electric power distribution system. ...

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

124

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAND2011-3119 SAND2011-3119 Unlimited Release Printed May 2011 Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes Joseph W. Pratt, Leonard E. Klebanoff, Karina Munoz-Ramos, Abbas A. Akhil, Dita B. Curgus, and Benjamin L. Schenkman Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE -AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy

125

A Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission, and Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and less costly than older coal-fired power plants. In addition, technological advances in electricity, supply, trans- mission, and consumption is developed. The model is sufficiently general to handle the economics of power production. For example, new gas-fired combined cycle power plants are more effi- cient

Nagurney, Anna

126

Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Coproduced Fluids for Oil and Gas Wells Project Description The geothermal organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system will be installed at an oil field operated by Encore Acquisition in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. The data and knowledge acquire during the O & M phase can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.

127

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Development of a Segregated Municipal Solid Waste Gasification System for Electrical Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasification technologies are expected to play a key role in the future of solid waste management since the conversion of municipal and industrial solid wastes to a gaseous fuel significantly increases its value. Municipal solid waste (MSW) gasification for electrical power generation was conducted in a fluidized bed gasifier and the feasibility of using a control system was evaluated to facilitate its management and operation. The performance of an engine using the gas produced was evaluated. A procedure was also tested to upgrade the quality of the gas and optimize its production. The devices installed and automated control system developed was able to achieve and maintain the set conditions for optimum gasification. The most important parameters of reaction temperature and equivalence ratio were fully controlled. Gas production went at a rate of 4.00 kg min-1 with a yield of 2.78 m3 kg-1 of fuel and a heating value (HV) of 7.94 MJ Nm-3. Within the set limits of the tests, the highest production of synthesis gas and the net heating value of 8.97 MJ Nm-3 resulted from gasification at 725°C and ER of 0.25 which was very close to the predicted value of 7.47 MJ Nm-3. This was not affected by temperature but significantly affected by the equivalence ratio. The overall engine-generator efficiency at 7.5 kW electrical power load was lower at 19.81% for gasoline fueled engine compared to 35.27% for synthesis gas. The pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system increased the net heating value of the product gas by an average of 38% gas over that of inlet gas. There were no traces of carbon dioxide in the product gas indicating that it had been completely adsorbed by the system. MSW showed relatively lower fouling and slagging tendencies than cotton gin trash (CGT) and dairy manure (DM). This was further supported by the compressive strength measurements of the ash of MSW, CGT and DM and the EDS elemental analysis of the MSW ash.

Maglinao, Amado Latayan

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Strategic investment in power generation under uncertainty : Electric Reliability Council of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to develop a strategy for investment in power generation technologies in the future given the uncertainties in climate policy and fuel prices. First, such studies are commonly conducted using ...

Chiyangwa, Diana Kudakwashe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Thinking about Generation Diversity: Electric Power Plant Asset Portfolio Valuation and Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, large amounts of natural gas-fired power generation capacity have been added to the nation’s portfolio of power generation assets. In addition, a variety of analyses and market projections imply this trend will continue for a variety of reasons, including large and growing supplies of natural gas due to the “shale boom,” and commensurate low natural gas prices, and imposition of increasingly stringent environmental regulations associated with coal-fired ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

131

Strategic Analysis of Biomass and Waste Fuels for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass, waste fuels, and power technologies based on advanced combustion and gasification show promise for renewable baseload generation. Utilities can use the results of this study to evaluate the potential performance and cost of biomass and waste fuel-fired power plants in their systems and examine fuel use in integrated resource plans.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

GENERAL ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since last year’s GTC Conference, a considerable number of significant events have occurred in the gasification technology marketplace. New IGCC projects have come on stream with commercial operation, other new IGCC projects have been announced and started in development, environmental issues have gained emphasis, and energy prices, notably natural gas, have escalated dramatically. Directionally, all of these events appear to have created a more favorable atmosphere for IGCC projects. Related to an ongoing IGCC project currently in development, a joint analysis has been performed by Global Energy, General Electric Power Systems, and Praxair to evaluate technical and economic elements for the performance of BGL Gasification Technology based on solid hydrocarbon fuel feed to an IGCC for power generation. Results of the analysis provide a picture of the relative economics in today’s environment for electrical power generation by conventional natural gas fired combined cycle power systems compared to using BGL Gasification Technology in an IGCC configuration. 2

Igcc Power Generation; Richard A. Olliver; John M. Wainwright; Raymond F. Drnevich Abstract

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Coal Energy Conversion with Aquifer-Based Carbon Sequestration: An Approach to Electric Power Generation with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal Energy Conversion with Aquifer-Based Carbon Sequestration: An Approach to Electric Power an impermeable seal to prevent it from escaping the aquifer. The proposed alternative technology processes coal carbon and non-mineral coal combustion products in the process. This stream is denser than the aquifer

Nur, Amos

134

Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Generation of Electric Power in the United States 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The President issued a directive on April 15, 1999, requiring an annual report summarizing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions produced by electricity generation in the United States, including both utilities and nonutilities. In response, this report is jointly submitted by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Information Center

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O& #39; Connell, R.

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O'Connell, R.

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

137

Dynamic ModelingDynamic Modeling the Electric Power Networkthe Electric Power Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and distribution of Electric Power (ELECTRIC UTILITIES) At that time, many businesses (non-utilities) generated of power supplied by efficient, low-cost utility generation, transmission, and distribution was a natural;ElectricElectric PowerPower GenerationGeneration Steam Units: Steam produ

Oro, Daniel

138

Photovoltaic Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is an overview of photovoltaic power generation. The purpose of the report is to provide the reader with a general understanding of photovoltaic power generation and how PV technology can be practically applied. There is a brief discussion of early research and a description of how photovoltaic cells convert sunlight to electricity. The report covers concentrating collectors, flat-plate collectors, thin-film technology, and building-integrated systems. The discussion of photovoltaic cell types includes single-crystal, poly-crystalline, and thin-film materials. The report covers progress in improving cell efficiencies, reducing manufacturing cost, and finding economic applications of photovoltaic technology. Lists of major manufacturers and organizations are included, along with a discussion of market trends and projections. The conclusion is that photovoltaic power generation is still more costly than conventional systems in general. However, large variations in cost of conventional electrical power, and other factors, such as cost of distribution, create situations in which the use of PV power is economically sound. PV power is used in remote applications such as communications, homes and villages in developing countries, water pumping, camping, and boating. Gridconnected applications such as electric utility generating facilities and residential rooftop installations make up a smaller but more rapidly expanding segment of PV use. Furthermore, as technological advances narrow the cost gap, more applications are becoming economically feasible at an accelerating rate. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES ...................................................................................v

Tom Penick; Gale Greenleaf Instructor; Thomas Penick; Bill Louk; Bill Louk

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Renewable Power Options for Electrical Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii. This part of the HCEI project focuses on working with Kaua'i Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) to understand how to integrate higher levels of renewable energy into the electric power system of the island of Kaua'i. NREL partnered with KIUC to perform an economic and technical analysis and discussed how to model PV inverters in the electrical grid.

Burman, K.; Keller, J.; Kroposki, B.; Lilienthal, P.; Slaughter, R.; Glassmire, J.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Evaluation of power production from the solar electric generating systems at Kramer Junction: 1988 to 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The five Solar Electric Generating Systems (SEGS) at Kramer Junction, California, now have nearly 30 years of cumulative operating experience. These 30 MW plants employ parabolic trough technology originally deployed by LUZ International in the late 1980`s and are now managed, operated and maintained by the Kramer Junction Company. In this paper, Sandia National Laboratories performed an analysis of the annual energy production from the five plants. Annual solar-to-electric conversion efficiencies are calculated and the major factors that influenced the results are presented. The generally good efficiencies are primarily attributed to the excellent equipment availabilities achieved at all plants.

Kolb, G.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Power Charging and Supply System for Electric Vehicles ...  

Functions as a mobile electrical power generator for emergency and other uses; Applications and Industries. Electric vehicles; Hybrid electric ...

142

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",361043,179814,73991,188452,274252,188862,109809,70661,243975,230003,97423,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",67.5,"-" " Petroleum",361043,179814,73991,188452,274252,188862,109809,70661,243975,230003,97423,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",67.5,"-" "Independent Power Producers and Combined Heat and Power","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",46951,123239,261980,74144,36487,226042,81467,75251,72316,35499,199858,32.5,100

143

The role of the US electric utility industry in the commercialization of renewable energy technologies for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A key element in the federal government's plan to commercialize R/As was to guarantee a market for the generated electric power at an attractive price. This was provided by the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, better known as PURPA. Under PURPA, utilities were required to buy all that was produced by Qualifying Facilities or QFs{sup 2} and were required to pay for QF power based on the utilities; avoided costs. Utilities were also required to interconnect with such producers and provide supplemental and backup power to them at fair and reasonable rates. This article reviews the reason behind the rapid rise, and the subsequent oversupply, of R. As over the past decade in the context of the way PURPA was implemented. The article focuses on the critical role of the electric power industry in the commercialization of R/A technologies and the implications.

Nola, S.J.; Sioshansi, F.P. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Preliminary analysis of two aspects of magma-powered electric-generation plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two aspects critical to the development of magma electric generation plants using closed heat exchanger systems are addressed. The heat transfer between the cold fluid in the downcomer and the hot fluid in the upcomer is analyzed using an NTU-effectiveness technique. The results indicate the hot fluid must be thermally insulated from the colder fluid in order to yield a useful temperature difference at the surface. A preliminary system analysis is conducted to determine the well cost requirements of an economically competitive magma electric plant. There is no economic incentive to make the magma tap wellbore larger than conventional deep gas wells. The cost competitiveness of a magma/electric plant is influenced by the depth to the magma, the convective heat flux of the magma, and the expected life of each well.

Hoover, E.R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Electric Power Monthly - Monthly Data Tables Monthly electricity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Power Monthly - Monthly Data Tables Monthly electricity generation figures (and the fuel consumed to produce it). Source information available at

146

Combined cycle electric power plant having a control system which enables dry steam generator operation during gas turbine operation  

SciTech Connect

A control system for a combined cycle electric power plant is described. It contains: at least one gas turbine including an exit through which heated exhaust gases pass; means for generating steam coupled to said gas turbine exit for transferring heat from the exhaust gases to a fluid passing through the steam generator; a steam turbine coupled to the steam generator and driven by the steam supplied thereby; means for generating electric power by the driving power of the turbines; condenser means for receiving and converting the spent steam from the steam turbine into condensate; and steam generating means comprising a low pressure storage tank, a first heat exchange tube, a boiler feedwater pump for directing fluid from a low pressure storage tank through the first heat exchange tube, a main storage drum, a second heat exchange tube, and a high pressure recirculation pump for directing fluid from the main storage pump through the second heat exchange tube. The control system monitors the temperature of the exhaust gas turbine gases as directed to the steam generator and deactuates the steam turbine when a predetermined temperature is exceeded.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1974-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

147

Potential impacts of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on regional power generation  

SciTech Connect

Simulations predict that the introduction of PHEVs could impact demand peaks, reduce reserve margins, and increase prices. The type of power generation used to recharge the PHEVs and associated emissions will depend upon the region and the timing of the recharge. (author)

Hadley, Stanton W.; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A.

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Wave-actuated power take-off device for electricity generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2008, Resolute Marine Energy, Inc. (RME) has been engaged in the development of a rigidly moored shallow-water point absorber wave energy converter, the "3D-WEC". RME anticipated that the 3D-WEC configuration with a fully buoyant point absorber buoy coupled to three power take off (PTO) units by a tripod array of tethers would achieve higher power capture than a more conventional 1-D configuration with a single tether and PTO. The investigation conducted under this program and documented herein addressed the following principal research question regarding RME'Â?Â?s power take off (PTO) concept for its 3D-WEC: Is RME's winch-driven generator PTO concept, previously implemented at sub-scale and tested at the Ohmsett wave tank facility, scalable in a cost-effective manner to significant power levels Â?Â?e.g., 10 to 100kW?

Chertok, Allan

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide power in remote environments or to convert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells, "using this bacterial strain in a fuel cell to generate electricity would greatly increase the cell were more efficient at transferring electrons to generate power in fuel cells than bacteria

Lovley, Derek

150

Meeting the challenges of the new energy industry: The driving forces facing electric power generators and the natural gas industry  

SciTech Connect

The proceedings of the IGT national conference on meeting the challenges of the New Energy Industry: The driving forces facing Electric Power Generators and the Natural Gas Industry are presented. The conference was held June 19-21, 1995 at the Ambassador West Hotel in Downtown Chicago, Illinois. A separate abstract and indexing for each of the 18 papers presented for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

152

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary; Sales (consumption), revenue, ... Electric power plants generating capacity;

153

Transmission rights and market power on electric power networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze whether and how the allocation of transmission rights associated with the use of electric power networks affects the behavior of electricity generators and electricity consumers with market power. We consider ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Electric Power Annual 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation; Table 6.1. Stocks of coal, petroleum liquids, and petroleum coke: Electric power sector: XLS: Table 6.2.

155

Electric power generation using geothermal brine resources for a proof-of-concept facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A report is given of the initial phase of a proof-of-concept project to establish the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of utilizing hot brine resources for electric energy production and other industrial applications. Included in the report are the following: summary, conclusions, and recommendations; site selection; Heber site description; development of design bases for an experimental facility and a 10 MWe(Net) generating unit; description of facilities; safety analysis; environmental considerations; implementation plan and schedule; and conceptual capital cost estimate.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Electrical generation plant design practice intern experience at Power Systems Engineering, Inc.: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A survey of the author's internship experience with Power Systems Engineering, Inc. during the period September 1980 through August, 1981 is presented. During this onr year internship, the author was assigned to two engineering projects. One involved design of a 480 MW power plant. The other was the design of a 8.2 MW induction generator for cogeneration. The author's activities during this period can be categorized into two major areas. First, technically oriented, he designed protective relaying and SCADA systems for the projects. Secondly, he assisted the Project Manager in project management activities such as project progress and cost control. The intent of this report is to prepare a training manual for PSE young engineers. It covers both technical guidelines for power plant design and nonacademic professional codes. Although this report is primarily written for young engineers, it can also be used as a reference by older and experienced engineers.

Lee, Ting-Zern Joe, 1950-

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net Generation by Energy Source: Commercial Combined Heat and Power Sector . Table 1.5. Net Generation by Energy Source: Industrial Combined Heat and Power Sector .

158

Generation, distribution and utilization of electrical energy  

SciTech Connect

An up-to-date account of electric power generation and distribution (including coverage of the use of computers in various components of the power system). Describes conventional and unconventional methods of electricity generation and its economics, distribution methods, substation location, electric drives, high frequency power for induction and heating, illumination engineering, and electric traction. Each chapter contains illustrative worked problems, exercises (some with answers), and a bibliography.

Wadhwa, C.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Biomass for Electricity Generation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

Zia Haq

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Electric Power Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Electric Power Industry - U.S. Electricity Imports from and Electricity Exports to Canada and Mexico, 2001-2011 (Megawatthours) Canada Mexico U.S. Total Year Imports from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Definition: Electricity generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity generation Electricity generation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electricity generation The process of producing electric energy or the amount of electric energy produced by transforming other forms of energy into electrical energy; commonly expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh) or megawatt-hours (MWh).[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Electricity generation is the process of generating electrical power from other sources of primary energy. The fundamental principles of electricity generation were discovered during the 1820s and early 1830s by the British scientist Michael Faraday. His basic method is still used today: electricity is generated by the movement of a loop of wire, or disc of copper between the poles of a magnet. For electric utilities, it is the

162

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today's technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Munoz-Ramos, Karina (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Pratt, Joseph William; Akhil, Abbas Ali (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Schenkman, Benjamin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Siemens Power Generation, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presented at the 2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference Siemens Power Generation, Inc. Page 1 of 10 Siemens Power Generation, Inc., All Rights Reserved Development of a Catalytic...

164

Motor generator electric automotive vehicle  

SciTech Connect

A motor generator electric automotive vehicle is described comprising in combination, a traction drive motor coupled by a first drive shaft to a differential of an axle of the vehicle, a main battery bank electrically connected by wires to a small electric motor driving a large D.C. generator having a second drive shaft therebetween, an on-off switch in series with one of the wires to the small motor, a speed control unit attached to an accelerator pedal of the vehicle being coupled with a double pole-double throw reverse switch to the traction drive motor, a charger regulator electrically connected to the generator, a bank of solar cells coupled to the charge regulator, an electric extension cord from the charge regulator having a plug on its end for selective connection to an exterior electric power source, a plurality of pulleys on the second drive shaft, a belt unit driven by the pulley, one the belt unit being connected to a present alternator of the vehicle which is coupled to a present battery and present regulator of the vehicle, and other of the units being connected to power brakes and equipment including power steering and an air conditioner.

Weldin, W.

1986-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

165

Electric Power Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Monthly Excel files zipped 2010 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2009 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2008 January February March March Supplement April May June July August September October November December 2007 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2006 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2005 January February March April May June July August September October November December

166

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix I: Generating Resources -Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................... 38 Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plant)............................................................. 50 Table I-21: Levelized Cost of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants ............................................................................... 26 Woody Residue Power Plants

167

Electric power monthly, April 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

168

Electric power monthly, May 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

169

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes several approaches to reduce the costs and enhance the performance of geothermal power generation plants. Electricity supply planners, research program managers, and engineers evaluating geothermal power plant additions or modifications can use this report to compare today's geothermal power systems to several near- and long-term future options.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

171

Definition: Electric power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

power power Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electric power The amount of energy produced per second; the rate at which electric energy is transferred; commonly expressed in megawatts (MW).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Electric power is the rate at which electric energy is transferred by an electric circuit. The SI unit of power is the watt, one joule per second. Electric power is usually produced by electric generators, but can also be supplied by chemical sources such as electric batteries. Electric power is generally supplied to businesses and homes by the electric power industry. Electric power is usually sold by the kilowatt hour (3.6 MJ) which is the product of power in kilowatts multiplied by running time in hours. View on Reegle Reegle Definition

172

Planning for future uncertainties in electric power generation : an analysis of transitional strategies for reduction of carbon and sulfur emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of this paper is to identify strategies for the U.S. electric utility industry for reduction of both acid rain producing and global warming gases. The research used the EPRI Electric Generation Expansion Analysis ...

Tabors, Richard D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Annual Power Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Power Annual Revision Final Data for 2011 Released: January 30, 2013 Revison Date: May 16, 2013 May 16, 2013 Data revision. 2011 Total (all sectors) and electric utility...

174

Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix A PACIFIC NORTHWEST GENERATING RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Power Plants: Listed in Table A-3 are non-cogenerating thermal units of 100 megawatts of capacity-cogenerating thermal power plants in the four- state region. Several small eastern Montana power plants are located Fuel Installed Capacity (MW) Initial Service Site State Owner of Power Plant Thermal Load Comments

175

Power System Modeling of 20% Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030 (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes the methods used to analyze the potential for provided 20% of our nation's electricity demand with wind energy by 2030

Hand, M.; Blair, N.; Bolinger, M.; Wiser, R.; O'Connell, R.; Hern, T.; Miller, B.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Power System Modeling of 20% Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030 (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes the methods used to analyze the potential for provided 20% of our nation's electricity demand with wind energy by 2030

Hand, M.; Blair, N.; Bolinger, M.; Wiser, R.; O' Connell, R.; Hern, T.; Miller, B.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 9  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 9. Biomass-Fired Electricity Generation ...

178

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Winning in electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

Should you be a buyer or a seller of generation? In general, spot buyers should do very well, while many generation owners will be fortunate to recover their stranded costs. Successful generators will capitalize on superior operating performance and market knowledge. The smartest natural gas strategy in the early 1980`s was to short natural gas. Will this lesson of restructuring be written again of the electricity generation business of the late 1990`s? The authors will examine whether and how winners might emerge in the generation business of the future. The U.S. electric generation market, already marked by intense competition for new capacity and industrial demand, will become even more competitive as it makes the transition from regulated local monopoly to marketbased commodity pricing. At risk is up to $150 billion of shareholder equity and the future viability of half of the country`s investor-owned utilities. The winners in year 2005 will be those who early on developed strategies that simultaneously recovered existing generation investments while restructuring their asset portfolios and repositioning their plants to compete in the new market. Losers will have spent the time mired in indecision, their strategies ultimately forced upon them by regulators or competitors.

Hashimoto, L. [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jansen, P. [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States); Geyn, G. van [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)] [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly with Data for October 2012. December 2012 . Independent Statistics & Analysis . www.eia.gov . U.S. Department of Energy . ...

182

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly with Data for August 2012. October 2012 . Independent Statistics & Analysis . www.eia.gov . U.S. Department of Energy . ...

183

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4. Weighted Average Cost of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2011 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Fossil Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite All Coal Ranks...

184

Electric Power Annual 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Annual 2004 iii Contacts Questions regarding this report may be directed to: Energy Information Administration, EI-53

185

Water Use in Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water use is increasingly viewed as an important sustainability metric for electricity generation technologies. Most of the attention on the link between electricity generation and water use focuses on the water used in cooling thermoelectric power plants during operations. This is warranted given the size of these withdrawals; however, all electricity generation technologies, including those that do not rely on thermoelectric generation, use water throughout their life cycles. Each life cycle stage cont...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

186

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Charles Smith (Utility Wind Integration Group) and Robertare the integration costs associated with wind power. The

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Definition: Electric generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generator generator Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electric generator A device for converting mechanical energy to electrical energy. Note: The EIA defines "electric generator" as a facility rather than as a device; per the EIA definition, examples include electric utilities and independent power producers.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In electricity generation, an electric generator is a device that converts mechanical energy to electrical energy. A generator forces electric current to flow through an external circuit. The source of mechanical energy may be a reciprocating or turbine steam engine, water falling through a turbine or waterwheel, an internal combustion engine, a wind turbine, a hand crank, compressed air, or any other source of

188

Curtailing Intermittent Generation in Electrical Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy generation from intermittent renewable sources introduces additional variability into electrical systems, resulting in a higher cost of balancing against the increased variabilities. Ways to balance demand and supply for electricity include using ... Keywords: economic curtailment, energy storage operations, flexible generation, intermittent generation, operations management practice, wind power

Owen Q. Wu, Roman Kapuscinski

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Total (All Sectors) by State, 2011 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts...

190

EIA - Electric Power Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... 423 and FERC-423) Contains data on electricity generation, fuel consumption, useful thermal output, fossil fuel stocks, fuel deliveries, quantity delivered, ...

191

Power System Modeling of 20% Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper shows the results of the Wind Energy Deployment System model used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030.

Hand, M.; Blair, N.; Bolinger, M.; Wiser, R.; O'Connell, R.; Hern, T.; Miller, B.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Power System Modeling of 20% Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper shows the results of the Wind Energy Deployment System model used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030.

Hand, M.; Blair, N.; Bolinger, M.; Wiser, R.; O' Connell, R.; Hern, T.; Miller, B.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Radioisotope Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioisotope Power Generation Long lived power sources are needed for equipment that is too remote or inaccessible for replacement. By choosing a radioactive element with a long...

194

Electric power monthly, May 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

price elasticity of natural gas supply of 1.2; low and highfor natural gas, wind power may relieve gas supply pressures

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Electric Power | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Power Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 95, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States- Reference Case (xls, 260.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

197

Electric power monthly, August 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

198

Electric power monthly, September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

1993-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

199

Decentralized optimal neuro-controllers for generation and transmission devices in an electric power network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the dual heuristic programming (DHP) optimization algorithm is applied for the design of two LOCAL nonlinear optimal neuro-controllers on a practical multi-machine power system. One neuro-controller is designed to replace the conventional ... Keywords: Decentralized control, Dual heuristic programming, Optimal neuro-controller, Power network, Series capacitive reactance compensator

Jung-Wook Park; Ronald G. Harley; Ganesh K. Venayagamoorthy

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Electrical pulse generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for generating high-voltage, wide dynamic range, shaped electrical pulses in the nanosecond range. Two transmission lines are coupled together by resistive elements distributed along the length of the lines. The conductance of each coupling resistive element as a function of its position along the line is selected to produce the desired pulse shape in the output line when an easily produced pulse, such as a step function pulse, is applied to the input line.

Norris, Neil J. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Method and apparatus for electrokinetic co-generation of hydrogen and electric power from liquid water microjets  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for producing both a gas and electrical power from a flowing liquid, the method comprising: a) providing a source liquid containing ions that when neutralized form a gas; b) providing a velocity to the source liquid relative to a solid material to form a charged liquid microjet, which subsequently breaks up into a droplet spay, the solid material forming a liquid-solid interface; and c) supplying electrons to the charged liquid by contacting a spray stream of the charged liquid with an electron source. In one embodiment, where the liquid is water, hydrogen gas is formed and a streaming current is generated. The apparatus comprises a source of pressurized liquid, a microjet nozzle, a conduit for delivering said liquid to said microjet nozzle, and a conductive metal target sufficiently spaced from said nozzle such that the jet stream produced by said microjet is discontinuous at said target. In one arrangement, with the metal nozzle and target electrically connected to ground, both hydrogen gas and a streaming current are generated at the target as it is impinged by the streaming, liquid spray microjet.

Saykally, Richard J; Duffin, Andrew M; Wilson, Kevin R; Rude, Bruce S

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

202

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

203

Electric Motors Using High Temperature Superconducting Materials Applied to Power Generating Station Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large high-temperature superconducting (HTS) electric motors have the potential to operate with much greater efficiencies than conventional iron core induction motors of the same rating. This study describes the design and successful testing in the superconducting state of two synchronous motors, a 2 horsepower motor with stationary HTS field coils and a 5 horsepower motor with rotating HTS field coils.

1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

Electric power 2007  

SciTech Connect

Subjects covered include: power industry trends - near term fuel strategies - price/quality/delivery/opportunity; generating fleet optimization and plant optimization; power plant safety and security; coal power plants - upgrades and new capacity; IGCC, advanced combustion and CO{sub 2} capture technologies; gas turbine and combined cycle power plants; nuclear power; renewable power; plant operations and maintenance; power plant components - design and operation; environmental; regulatory issues, strategies and technologies; and advanced energy strategies and technologies. The presentations are in pdf format.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to

206

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~11%) reduction in natural gas demand in the United StatesB. Natural Gas Price Reduction Offsetting demand for naturalFinally, by reducing demand for natural gas, wind power may

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants,natural gas plants, and combined cycle natural gas plants.generated largely from combined-cycle Capacity (GW) yd r as

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration for Ways to Reduce Operating Costs for Small Producers Project: 08123-10 April 30, 2012 Loy Sneary, President Robin Dahlheim, Sales Gulf Coast Green Energy 1801 7th St, Ste 230 Bay City, TX 77414 RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Gulf Coast Green Energy as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO

209

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

210

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Electric Power: Resources and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Electric Power Industry Climate Initiative (EPICI) Members Electric Power Industry Climate Initiative (EPICI) Members American Public Power Association American Public Power Association Logo The American Public Power Association (APPA) is the service organization for the nation's public power utilities. Edison Electric Institute Edison Electric Institute Logo Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is the premier trade association for U.S. shareholder-owned electric companies, and serves international affiliates and industry associates worldwide. Electric Power Supply Association Electric Power Supply Association Logo The Electric Power Supply Association (EPSA) is the national trade association representing competitive power suppliers, including independent power producers, merchant generators, and power marketers. Large Public Power Council

211

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Electric power monthly, April 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Plenary lecture 9: generation of electrical energy with variable speed in microhydro and eolian power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mini hydroelectric power plant are built to use the flow of the small rivers. The main disadvantage of these systems is the reduced capacity to store a high quantity of water which should ensure the long term running of the hydroelectric plants during ...

Sorin Deaconu

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Stirling Engines for Low-Temperature Solar-Thermal-Electric Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUG 1979 SYSTEM PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP W. D. Richards W of the subsystem compo- nents, especially between the free piston Stirling engine and the free piston linear),* and a decision was made to proceed with the Prototype Development. Superiority of a Stirling engine over other

Sanders, Seth

215

Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable Energy Certificates and On-Site Renewable Generation Title Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity,...

216

Electric Power Monthly January 2012 - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly January 2012 ... Table 4.16. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers

217

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",591756,171457,109308,53740,68641,653076,3301111,3562833,2061351,9436,10823,"-",11836,11771,12402,10805,11008,11075,10612,10612,10827,0.2,0.1 " Petroleum",158154,54218,74715,28582,33836,50334,61675,16609,8827,9436,10823,"-",11836,11771,12402,10805,11008,11075,10612,10612,10827,0.2,0.1 " Natural Gas",433602,117239,34593,25158,34805,602742,3239436,3546224,2052524,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

218

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania" Pennsylvania" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",165682846,162366875,166034292,166200686,169029050,168941707,175022081,177166516,173903236,161595988,97075771,27633966,30537243,30099444,33900004,1058313,1311434,1077389,1224597,1159659,1086500,48.1,0.5 " Coal",101996271,100359157,102198817,100390066,93951561,96799645,100857561,105445514,106516740,85580341,36704124,13863092,15935860,15944113,18396944,"-","-","-","-","-","-",18.2,"-" " Petroleum",4013814,3713606,2220932,4559186,5182491,3072153,3212502,2307411,4097006,3063268,1656505,21609,39420,34944,32129,7717,2942,"-",873,710,525,0.8,"*"

219

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada" Nevada" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",19286260,20922439,20962974,19820333,20519076,19997354,21362057,22869773,26552567,26485602,29341675,27896065,25008568,24634871,24246391,24112225,19686302,22376989,22979409,26095005,23710917,82.7,67.5 " Coal",15053277,16365730,16443169,15627860,15324714,13971824,14656868,15250606,17161341,16907530,18931521,17736970,16413025,17085959,18257265,18384261,7253521,7090911,6884521,6376887,5584370,53.4,15.9 " Petroleum",284108,238321,327585,246506,166446,26549,93811,31156,50285,35418,64614,911611,25472,16793,95766,20500,17347,11447,9865,8472,7675,0.2,"*"

220

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota" Minnesota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",41549628,40427575,37783876,41254101,40917280,42502869,41791506,40302526,43976935,44153826,46615673,44798014,48568719,49576276,47232462,46791349,46710674,47793039,46758314,44442211,45428599,90.7,84.6 " Coal",27587603,26186299,24443013,27110850,26399834,26820765,27329077,27081067,29884402,28366977,31731081,31037544,32200713,33157032,31477117,30514512,30600302,31199099,30771207,28582304,27176478,61.7,50.6 " Petroleum",440740,575916,638979,630166,596987,484708,640427,763764,649866,674398,440264,599557,640129,845239,752362,752774,484235,362765,211633,49502,25870,0.9,"*"

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221

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut" Connecticut" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",32155574,23552082,25153644,28714867,27201416,26931900,15773738,13227766,15122925,20484367,16992594,2816826,21463,59812,45095,41709,47612,37217,52334,47137,65570,51.5,0.2 " Coal",2351049,2117781,2148078,1907826,2104045,2269352,2367889,2557934,1482608,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",8632571,7890483,5297424,4206354,3353897,3397400,5255050,8431425,8608001,5793975,7726,11032,928,13955,9253,695,1282,3325,2597,2465,2604,"*","*"

222

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",31312872,31038231,31899303,32687317,33324413,32673972,33971688,34375573,35471294,36167349,40108260,41957723,41509933,41226252,40436218,41014609,42055989,42353281,41176711,37467527,39584166,90.8,78 " Coal",29602738,28922906,30001882,30456351,31401250,30276010,31952337,32002082,33079201,32605202,35101982,35654162,35135198,35807527,35570358,35285966,36003331,35722617,34639561,31454143,34386818,79.5,67.8 " Petroleum",25129,37883,39164,8898,8913,10136,15539,14623,36736,32430,91320,158742,22519,33927,11797,15464,17646,14748,18092,12583,17424,0.2,"*"

223

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California" California" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",114528000,104967938,119309725,125782063,126749186,121881402,114706047,112183063,114926213,87874809,85856285,70132656,74588271,81728209,75177122,89348213,100338454,87348589,83346844,85123706,96939535,41.3,47.5 " Petroleum",4385235,598489,325424,2007674,1862719,488530,674899,141872,121385,51769,144590,316691,43933,50996,51482,57974,58991,65296,58187,50625,40819,0.1,"*" " Natural Gas",45221848,43940427,56609607,46499103,61530357,39089723,30768135,36300778,26385452,13917748,12411961,11918703,8808012,9873371,10759580,12982348,19805412,22896497,26129803,25237449,31251994,6,15.3

224

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming" Wyoming" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",39378154,38667162,41852352,40154595,42337169,39683722,40851631,40765087,44699071,42951057,44585709,43764015,42532420,42261405,43059537,44031568,42905244,43144350,43909400,43182207,44738543,98,93 " Coal",38681220,37862584,41153537,39301199,41380267,38804539,39551555,39315335,43287140,41718548,43355361,42560578,41685278,41490825,42372775,43112061,41948761,42204359,42900080,41040274,42126910,95.3,87.5 " Petroleum",45561,60850,54839,56970,47029,67673,59443,58765,42871,46197,35159,33744,38686,41567,43450,40311,44240,46116,43765,49958,55973,0.1,0.1

225

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho" Idaho" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",8617977,8281502,6260025,9022654,7303193,10062854,12230805,13511823,11978079,12456120,10114257,6666589,8164140,7732812,7765655,8032438,10495090,8611890,8893983,9977502,8589208,84.9,71.4 " Petroleum",615,311,475,103,31,311,245,95,253,155,2792,3723,65,116,136,5,144,134,120,41,74,"*","*" " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",76168,61229,27775,73353,94504,240504,230189,286865,170231,"-",1.4

226

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" Oklahoma" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",45063182,44850089,45942891,48810720,45380625,47955288,47544649,48380102,51454036,50278792,51403249,50413729,51218320,49776514,48298390,54250814,51917155,54177692,60074823,57516914,57421195,92.5,79.5 " Coal",25188557,26027968,27666494,28990113,27453911,29714368,31876730,33036688,31026837,30588375,32852645,32164601,33444114,34200128,31240478,33604628,32324391,31610751,33625415,31645255,29102532,59.1,40.3 " Petroleum",49422,18533,15180,14027,11456,77528,124951,12568,7541,7622,46637,146375,10311,111555,21008,13181,24187,139391,12600,12433,12606,0.1,"*"

227

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan" Michigan" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",89058681,94567383,82679444,92250107,83720636,92478772,95155261,89564616,85146307,87874695,89572141,97067330,100451718,96634055,99608512,104830689,97373706,96785842,94503953,82787341,89666874,86,80.4 " Coal",65295742,65138291,61434530,61558991,67538611,65425002,66097259,65552021,69142807,69118017,66980252,66931691,65389899,66448916,67253690,69158736,66654737,69406550,68421489,65867455,64766712,64.3,58.1 " Petroleum",689461,553863,498159,619777,655860,687264,651860,602053,1005170,1282696,993932,724313,1090767,883847,714881,788563,272106,445915,281604,215189,195180,1,0.2

228

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland" Maryland" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",31497406,38215120,39586558,43488284,43765565,44658945,44380543,44552905,48513503,49323828,31783195,88150,30734,51722,30023,44235,11941,23712,5856,2294,2996,62.1,"*" " Coal",23299412,22622989,23625314,24890670,25394481,27369905,27780141,27394342,29077013,29352347,20353004,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",39.8,"-" " Petroleum",3328080,3935221,2611820,3953777,4133533,1407598,1401195,1478623,3311978,3897208,1507860,87790,30734,51722,30023,44235,11941,23712,5856,2294,2832,2.9,"*"

229

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",36478610,35802358,32838301,28163544,27466049,26971667,27758877,33898697,26036881,4359511,1704653,1566491,1156651,2055622,1524169,1622208,942917,493885,507254,447912,802906,4.4,1.9 " Coal",11273069,11861344,10949228,9815909,10209727,10586608,11500536,12488802,8168608,1073628,1094848,1096681,"-",1074514,903789,1025141,"-","-","-","-","-",2.8,"-" " Petroleum",14556403,15612257,13282101,11112574,9561302,5848663,6221378,11586081,10019730,300040,123931,131797,220435,517767,290865,189211,29031,58456,57639,32698,42546,0.3,0.1

230

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon" Oregon" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",49171999,46298021,41220343,40743085,37490089,44031261,47883913,49068279,46352310,51698318,46059938,38059649,39731986,38577937,39092958,37407039,43068822,43202516,44590530,42703218,41142684,88.9,74.6 " Coal",1297978,2814199,3682715,3502742,3814009,1527874,1727583,1500879,3348089,3697900,3785462,4423843,3768531,4285697,3535764,3463644,2370628,4351624,4044319,3196902,4126435,7.3,7.5 " Petroleum",26809,9648,9212,32365,5398,4346,6631,10942,33127,7699,52038,92767,5893,44035,20305,47427,4323,5044,9974,2825,3330,0.1,"*"

231

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware" Delaware" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7099663,7603723,6267492,8306462,8501043,8324101,8121853,6578599,6317738,6239372,4137127,1872053,170994,31107,23751,25989,16558,47830,19068,12768,30059,69.1,0.5 " Coal",4904473,4598301,3813594,5185396,4754309,4226615,4225125,3925643,3811669,2762460,3319195,1626254,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",55.4,"-" " Petroleum",1436186,1899201,1829938,2094383,1619659,917065,1188294,832577,1234464,1234121,398100,209088,154118,9863,10083,6442,113,4132,512,457,843,6.6,"*"

232

Electric Power | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Power Electric Power From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, learn more about the long history of the light bulb. From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, learn more about the long history of the light bulb. Electricity -- the flow of electrical power -- is a secondary energy source, generated by the conversion of primary sources of energy, like fossil, nuclear, wind or solar. Keeping the power flowing to American homes and businesses is a critical necessity for everyday life and economic vitality. The Energy Department works to keep the grid secure from cyber and physical attacks; partners with states and other stakeholders to plan more resilient infrastructure that can better withstand extreme weather events; and supports efforts to

233

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 97, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into Texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, Midwest reliability council and Northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB)

234

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska" Nebraska" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",21630677,22971934,22387247,22724286,21945525,25279277,27322697,28388030,28720209,29980967,29045739,30411669,31550226,30367879,31944127,31391643,31599046,32403289,32355676,33776062,36242921,99.8,98.9 " Coal",12658464,13562815,12402148,14739783,14002015,16079519,16040775,17209080,18335965,17794136,18424799,20193542,19899803,20907970,20414960,20772590,20632855,19611849,21479723,23307746,23214616,63.3,63.4 " Petroleum",12981,13459,9482,19035,18201,26679,19973,31059,41892,28807,53715,25154,18410,47971,21004,30026,18914,35552,34655,22869,30849,0.2,0.1

235

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina" South Carolina" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",69259815,69837984,71478648,75588386,74193685,78439814,76325556,78374450,84396897,87347364,90421081,86734778,93689257,91544429,94406828,99104373,95872763,99997011,97921204,97336653,100610887,96.9,96.6 " Coal",22874805,23165807,23013743,26532193,26993543,25801600,30307236,31042658,32377814,35246389,38664405,36302690,36490769,37065509,38516633,39352428,39140908,41270230,41184319,34146526,37340392,41.4,35.9 " Petroleum",71997,83385,68375,95193,108250,129854,125657,188326,331357,300739,265931,225008,205664,289474,690071,484181,135522,174663,160102,490911,178378,0.3,0.2

236

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia" Georgia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",97565058,90809416,91779352,95737505,98752712,102015724,98729242,101780433,108716930,110536794,116176834,110564676,111855967,115755114,117918895,126444777,127367613,132831987,126031263,115074702,120425913,93.8,87.5 " Coal",67564750,59985395,58235454,63295811,64727519,65880095,63230856,66179551,69871150,74067633,79007166,73443695,77288328,77858022,79185166,86358096,85700960,89532913,84652246,68863420,72550375,63.8,52.7 " Petroleum",164987,107662,128485,237473,161235,218515,292018,200873,670924,662699,641415,275630,233940,278618,156672,189819,86798,82380,67971,64833,70781,0.5,0.1

237

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico" Mexico" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",28491171,25064613,27707513,28364368,30018011,29431903,29364389,30568142,31428332,31654480,32855587,32210683,29926241,31770151,32242728,33561875,35411074,34033374,33844547,34245148,30848406,96.6,85.1 " Coal",25826928,22129312,25348413,25507029,26752349,26121447,26357179,27078660,27537426,28067704,29065954,28402187,26902880,28812844,29263899,29947248,29859008,27603647,27014233,29117308,25617789,85.4,70.7 " Petroleum",34081,32240,35614,35337,22929,23073,22452,21075,23020,40133,29529,30210,30710,47860,30321,32528,40634,42969,52012,44599,49394,0.1,0.1

238

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

United States" United States" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",2808151009,2825022865,2797219151,2882524766,2910712079,2994528592,3077442152,3122523144,3212170791,3173673550,3015383376,2629945673,2549457170,2462280615,2505231152,2474845558,2483655548,2504130899,2475366697,2372775997,2471632103,79.3,59.9 " Coal",1559605707,1551166838,1575895394,1639151186,1635492971,1652914466,1737453477,1787806344,1807479829,1767679446,1696619307,1560145542,1514669950,1500281112,1513640806,1484855188,1471421060,1490984698,1466395192,1322092036,1378028414,44.6,33.4 " Petroleum",117016961,111462979,88916308,99538857,91038583,60844256,67346095,77752652,110157895,86929098,72179917,78907846,59124871,69930457,73693695,69722196,40902849,40719414,28123785,25216814,26064909,1.9,0.6

239

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",59010858,60120689,56627107,53202268,61519090,65400254,67827241,71073239,74894188,73504882,76283550,78990878,79796801,86102107,86419717,90159045,91118304,89925724,89178555,86704766,90176805,99.6,97.7 " Coal",48501751,47907503,46829678,40688696,48592766,53582211,57176084,59903073,62488551,61249846,62624807,65445161,67147996,73904272,74711159,77123580,77113165,74745712,73246599,71401581,74829029,81.8,81.1 " Petroleum",89342,118645,80522,634432,730820,682321,95980,125449,309734,280945,247622,637504,528353,155968,195098,168258,59958,59611,56620,87081,124866,0.3,0.1

240

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina" North Carolina" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",79845217,83520063,83007307,88753614,91454784,96109819,102786590,107371092,113112235,109882388,114433191,109807278,115597653,118433112,118328694,121674733,117797331,123215621,118778090,112961309,121251138,93.6,94.2 " Coal",46631040,46762330,54011457,59383147,53234497,55698342,64097781,70181392,69000633,68569499,71719489,68775284,71223313,70630278,71956852,74915235,72311023,76611703,72625233,62765545,69274374,58.7,53.8 " Petroleum",186899,174136,147134,165175,199418,234263,259252,211974,285902,284400,468482,412765,376170,459947,250402,231141,219114,236042,232446,232119,245987,0.4,0.2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi" Mississippi" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",22923971,23305127,20487946,23234028,26222313,26395165,28838302,31227619,31991676,32212133,33896003,47550273,35099283,31358938,32838145,30619168,34158706,34426533,33796221,34759024,40841436,90.1,75 " Coal",9445584,8750253,7796112,8819755,8889624,9259980,12010196,12500586,11747963,13037100,13877065,19196065,12483658,13742273,14274786,13389906,14907777,14422788,14033627,9610808,10309709,36.9,18.9 " Petroleum",705474,370130,371568,3545055,1106209,23738,1173503,2633109,5417924,3141934,2970676,5120602,26357,1620395,2763630,1432077,395330,397080,71597,12475,76832,7.9,0.1

242

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas" Arkansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",37053436,38365135,37369823,38049072,39547768,39526825,43677535,42789637,43198908,44130705,41486451,44728133,42873364,41636514,45055455,40545220,42068467,45522928,45880232,45423149,47108063,94.6,77.2 " Coal",19160989,19573925,20030355,18025615,19780738,21506397,24339185,22760970,23140020,24612079,24073573,24678344,22986650,23422401,25248810,22940659,24095405,25642175,25993257,24986333,26421729,54.9,43.3 " Petroleum",73856,64278,49640,65624,96439,53208,98250,66622,143834,141475,206991,846105,136134,263982,476133,162961,135291,76212,57158,80962,37140,0.5,0.1

243

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont" Vermont" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4992578,5258829,4698045,4300537,5293892,4839820,5004219,5323432,4393537,4734555,5307016,4734002,2971224,626337,643426,673607,802680,701474,752800,711507,720853,84.2,10.9 " Petroleum",2543,5244,2581,4805,5764,13357,3428,9816,41265,22392,60660,31740,9406,22607,17800,10179,7371,7811,4266,2439,4509,1,0.1 " Natural Gas",65281,95341,63120,20558,5806,6593,97,93,827,18291,90790,11000,3275,2029,3224,2240,1875,1889,2655,4431,3783,1.4,0.1 " Nuclear",3616268,4108314,3734594,3372148,4315544,3858509,3798790,4266866,3357696,4059107,4548065,4171120,2367209,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",72.2,"-"

244

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee" Tennessee" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",73902614,73931670,75396209,71614268,74853548,82277534,88647111,93293232,94142638,89682569,92311813,92937315,92570929,88678127,94371964,93942273,90960035,92474664,88262641,77432806,79816049,96.3,96.9 " Coal",50186951,46671234,49995747,59559596,52132070,57971909,55504189,58899058,55120297,55220519,60675314,58166973,58080553,53376149,56583558,57560600,59146323,58849255,55752210,40426487,42259569,63.3,51.3 " Petroleum",134397,160072,127282,234545,295961,252611,257586,192880,699233,502286,539784,379703,250325,379007,166943,201121,137187,155646,207233,182291,211654,0.6,0.3

245

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin" Wisconsin" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",45550958,47148818,46463756,47762861,49437481,51012390,51651435,48560127,52529065,54704370,55665471,54959426,54773666,56068698,56142364,55169108,51914755,44284480,45536712,41375366,45579970,93.3,70.9 " Coal",32144557,33489286,32740540,33558049,35282695,36863872,38144842,40819517,39785759,39899142,41057919,40185649,38583501,40579973,40981609,40506086,38866178,38719363,40452933,36238643,39185565,68.8,60.9 " Petroleum",47444,62162,54332,105173,171563,147493,124088,169863,200225,220944,191091,170443,162990,185625,494535,470219,591486,725019,647602,458848,478866,0.3,0.7

246

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",26824491,27535034,28592323,28499824,29003713,28842021,30769712,29719764,30518976,31259830,31122917,30135733,31147221,31075012,29526814,31512768,30328375,30402807,30852784,31375152,31343796,99.4,90.2 " Coal",25092696,25750792,26864520,27048924,27099914,26336456,27529906,26314471,28176015,28610457,28952976,28769721,29518865,29298347,27938264,30133242,28761820,29041826,29551647,29486194,28349079,92.5,81.6 " Petroleum",20682,27636,28951,35795,47340,49107,88834,85698,47091,40300,47457,33850,35728,45648,36565,32480,39269,47332,40977,41475,35855,0.2,0.1

247

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky" Kentucky" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",73807286,75505081,77351259,84997718,84097034,86161578,88438224,91558046,86151121,81658150,81349922,83677982,80161524,80696982,82921402,85679912,86816479,85259079,86012151,90029962,97472144,87.5,99.2 " Coal",70500461,71713851,73476309,81722246,79897442,82539467,84659818,87875331,82412216,78544604,78598836,79381504,75308162,76367048,78574428,81188722,83068626,81877334,83197690,84037596,91053858,84.5,92.7 " Petroleum",118646,111558,83886,96727,154819,130598,135437,125625,127062,103755,118876,120418,135412,130280,93651,96557,79520,96733,106853,2016282,2284852,0.1,2.3

248

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida" Florida" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",123623905,130743964,133976775,140066943,141790885,147156684,145140217,147983676,169447167,166914264,169888638,170966177,182346629,188034719,193383664,196096285,200015227,200533885,196524348,195063261,206062185,88.6,89.9 " Coal",59073203,61122819,61631012,61889050,60770030,61864438,65782399,66034628,65470151,62680522,67143257,63090794,60997142,62094661,60013823,57559411,60413597,62633944,59731231,49942611,56074369,35,24.5 " Petroleum",25092296,30115618,28176184,34277523,33330039,21583186,22890565,25742149,40952580,36697343,34337080,39075398,32449236,35545897,35824155,36122039,22508349,19841026,11830552,9028865,8867397,17.9,3.9

249

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana" Indiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",97738497,98199986,97299582,99951149,103485409,105188892,105557018,110466291,112771878,114182827,119721399,114666355,112029989,112395725,114690471,117373699,117643504,116727908,115887993,103594020,107852560,93.7,86.2 " Coal",96012872,96526976,95745949,98776088,102043025,103774522,104413600,108911799,110696190,112336883,117619535,113135350,109441044,109839659,112899892,115413188,116284183,114974642,114321205,101000267,103204599,92,82.4 " Petroleum",673984,354297,287064,197848,209379,213051,320566,606905,821530,813232,845481,371623,470976,407648,393135,244554,134035,155132,165142,132655,137977,0.7,0.1

250

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",62288980,66767347,70108979,68025039,71203728,68966538,70877043,78060498,81299241,83095924,88149792,85807868,81710063,80348246,81351521,82914964,84355976,88825573,94452931,89640192,91232664,99.1,81.6 " Coal",31636037,32306088,34602347,37020817,38072165,31710476,30780575,34219281,36225373,37994159,40662627,39731623,37957468,37739559,39419177,39750729,40056468,40911234,43505012,39464060,43347748,45.7,38.8 " Petroleum",116407,88935,72838,59875,128437,63610,65097,60927,61227,46287,189396,311787,51061,46706,39414,41127,71761,46137,48324,61381,63439,0.2,0.1

251

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii" Hawaii" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7996096,7333192,6861255,6083815,6055087,6190584,6420195,6212643,6301169,6452068,6534692,6383088,7513051,6493205,6982469,6915159,7040473,6928397,6700636,6509550,6416068,61.7,59.2 " Petroleum",7967354,7312791,6851432,6070063,6036282,6174627,6402329,6193852,6287107,6429429,6516929,6362846,7502913,6489565,6971259,6904293,7015977,6913231,6682593,6262182,6178666,61.5,57 " Hydroelectric",22743,20401,9823,13752,18805,15957,17866,18791,13750,18844,15114,18132,8533,2078,9724,9169,23656,14729,17872,28608,16719,0.1,0.2

252

Electric Power Monthly, July 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost in fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 12 refs., 4 figs., 48 tabs.

1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

253

Implementing Virtual Buffer for Electric Power Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power grid is a vital network for every aspect of our life. The lack of buffer between generation and consumption makes the power grid unstable and fragile. While large scale power storage is not technically and economically feasible at ... Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, Dynamic Data Driven, Electric Power Grid

Rong Gao; Lefteri H. Tsoukalas

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Fuel Use in Electricity Generation - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Use in Electricity Generation ... Cost of coal and natural gas delivered to electric power plants in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast, Jan 2007- April 2012 . 2

255

Chapter 3. Fossil-Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 69 Chapter 3. Fossil-Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation

256

Electric Power Industry Restructuring:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Good morning. I was asked to speak to you today about EIA’s data collection efforts in a more competitive electric power industry. I know that you want to hear ...

257

New optimization techniques for power system generation scheduling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Generation scheduling in restructured electric power systems is critical to maintain the stability and security of a power system and economical operation of the electricity… (more)

Sun, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Vehicle-to-Grid Power: Battery, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles as Resources for Distributed Electric Power in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency of the electric power system. This opportunity isvehicles and of the electric power grid, yet analysts,cell vehicle generates electric power, but it's not hooked

Kempton, Willett; Tomic, Jasna; Letendre, Steven; Brooks, Alec; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Palos Verdes Gas to Energy CA 10473 GEN1 2.50 LFG ST 2011 10 56505 National Grid Generation LLC Electric Utility E F Barrett NY 2511 7 0.00 NG GT 2011 10 14354...

260

Internal combustion electric power hybrid power plant  

SciTech Connect

An internal combustion-electric motor hybrid power plant for an automotive vehicle is disclosed. The power plant includes an internal combustion engine and a direct current electric motor generator which are connected to a drive shaft for the vehicle. A clutch mechanism is provided to connect the internal combustion engine, the direct current electric motor generator and the drive shaft for selectively engaging and disengaging the drive shaft with the internal combustion engine and the motor generator. A storage battery is electrically connected to the motor generator to supply current to and receive current therefrom. Thermoelectric semi-conductors are arranged to be heated by the waste heat of the internal combustion engine. These thermoelectric semi-conductors are electrically connected to the battery to supply current thereto. The thermoelectric semi-conductors are mounted in contact with the outer surfaces of the exhaust pipe of the internal combustion engine and also with the outer surfaces of the cylinder walls of the engine.

Cummings, T.A.

1979-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Combined cycle electric power plant and a heat recovery steam generator having improved boiler feed pump flow control  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant is described that includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes an economizer tube and a high pressure evaporator tube and a boiler feed pump for directing the heat exchange fluid serially through the aforementioned tubes. A condenser is associated with the steam turbine for converting the spent steam into condensate water to be supplied to a deaerator for removing undesired air and for preliminarily heating the water condensate before being pumped to the economizer tube. Condensate flow through the economizer tube is maintained substantially constant by maintaining the boiler feed pump at a predetermined, substantially constant rate. A bypass conduit is provided to feed back a portion of the flow heated in the economizer tube to the deaerator; the portion being equal to the difference between the constant flow through the economizer tube and the flow to be directed through the high pressure evaporator tube as required by the steam turbine for its present load.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1976-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

OpenEI - Electric Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Electric Power AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/858 This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 95, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. License

Type of License: 

263

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation: 1957 to latest available EIA final data information in the Annual Energy Review, table 9.2. U. S. Nuclear power plants projected electricity

264

Electrical power generation: comparative risks and benefits. Final report, August 6, 1973--August 10, 1973. A one-week workshop for high school science teachers  

SciTech Connect

A live-in type workshop available for academic credit covering basic nuclear power generation and the tradeoffs and problems that exist between nuclear power and alternative means to generate electricity was held for 37 high- school teachers at the Madison campus for the University of Wisconsin. Significant improvements over last year's program included the distribution of a large amount of information and the distribution of two minicourse outlines on the subject of power and the environment entitled: The Environmental Impact of Electrical Power Generation: Nuclear and Fossil'' prepared by the Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, and Science II Matter-Energy Interactions in Natural Systems'' prepared by Carl Pfeiffer of Monona Grove High School, Monona, Wisconsin. (MCW)

Carbon, M.W.; Hartwig, K.T.

1973-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

265

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Annual Technical Notes This appendix describes how the U.S. Energy Information Administration collects, estimates, and reports electric power data in the Electric Power Annual. Data Quality and Submission The Electric Power Annual (EPA) is prepared by the Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics (ERUS), U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ERUS performs routine reviews of the data collection respondent frames, survey forms, and reviews the quality of the data received. Data are entered directly by respondents into the ERUS Internet Data Collection (IDC) system. A small number of hard copy forms are keyed into the system by ERUS personnel. All data are subject to review via interactive edits built into the IDC system, internal quality assurance reports, and review by ERUS

266

Generation Trends in the Electricity Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the key questions concerning the interaction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and the electricity grid is how the upstream emissions and energy use of power plants used to charge PEVs compare with the lifecycle emissions and energy use of conventional vehicles. This Update provides a look at recent data on trends in power generation in the United States from 1990 to 2013, including capacity, generation, capacity factor, energy use, and heat rate—emissions rates will be analyzed in ...

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

267

HAS222d Intro to Energy and Environement: 40% off energy use in US goes into generating electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_power_transmission#Losses http goes into generating electricity generation efficiency: 33% electric power loss: plant to consumer 7 fuel power generation plants that dominate our electricity production. Remember that electricity

268

Hydrogen--electric power drives  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen--electric power drives would consist of most or all of these: chilled hydrogen gas tank, liquid oxygen tank, a bank of fuel cells, dc/ac inverter, ac drive motors, solid state ac speed control, dc sputter-ion vacuum pumps, steam turbine generator set and steam condenser. Each component is described. Optional uses of low pressure extraction steam and warm condensate are listed. Power drive applications are listed. Impact on public utilities, fuel suppliers, and users is discussed.

Hall, F.F.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Electric power monthly, January 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

Not Available

1994-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

270

Electric power monthly, October 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

Not Available

1993-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

Electric power monthly, February 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EMP) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

1994-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume VI. Electrical power generation; master control subsystems; balance of plant CDRL item 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Honeywell electrical power generation subsystem centers on a General Electric dual admission, triple extraction turbine generator sized to the output requirements of the Pilot Plant. The turbine receives steam from the receiver subsystem and/or the thermal storage subsystem and supplies those subsystems with feedwater. The turbine condensor is wet cooled. The plant control system consists of a coordinated digital master and subsystem digital/analog controls. The remainder of the plant, work spaces, maintenance areas, roads, and reception area are laid out to provide maximum convenience compatible with utility and safety. Most of the activities are housed in a complex around the base of the receiver tower. This volume contains a description of the relationship of the electrical power generation subsystem to the rest of the plant, the design methodology and evolution, the interface integration and control, and the operation and maintenance procedures.

None

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Assessment of Geothermal Resources for Electric Generation in the Pacific Northwest, Draft Issue Paper for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

SciTech Connect

This document reviews the geothermal history, technology, costs, and Pacific Northwest potentials. The report discusses geothermal generation, geothermal resources in the Pacific Northwest, cost and operating characteristics of geothermal power plants, environmental effects of geothermal generation, and prospects for development in the Pacific Northwest. This report was prepared expressly for use by the Northwest Power Planning Council. The report contains numerous references at the end of the document. [DJE-2005

Geyer, John D.; Kellerman, L.M.; Bloomquist, R.G.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

274

Electric power monthly, July 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Combined cycle electric power plant and heat recovery steam generator having improved multi-loop temperature control of the steam generated  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant is described that includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes a superheater tube and a steam drum from which heated steam is directed through the superheater to be additionally heated into superheated steam by the exhaust gas turbine gases. An afterburner serves to further heat the exhaust gas turbine gases passed to the superheater tube and a bypass conduit is disposed about the superheater tube whereby a variable steam flow determined by a bypass valve disposed in the bypass conduit may be directed about the superheater tube to be mixed with the superheated steam therefrom, whereby the temperature of the superheated steam supplied to the steam turbine may be accurately controlled. Steam temperature control means includes a first control loop responsive to the superheated steam temperature for regulating the position of the bypass valve with respect to a first setpoint, and a second control loop responsive to the superheated steam temperature for controlling the fuel supply to the afterburner with respect to a second setpoint varying in accordance with the bypass valve position. In particular, as the bypass valve position increases, the second setpoint, originally higher, is lowered toward a value substantially equal to that of the first setpoint.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Impact of Dispersed Generation on Electric Power Quality at the Central and South West Services Wind Farm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic and environmental concerns have propelled the utility industry toward renewable and clean energy sources as alternatives to coal- and gas-fired power stations. This report presents the results of an evaluation to determine the power quality characteristics of a wind turbine generator at an Oklahoma wind farm which is connected to a 69-kV subtransmission system.

1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

277

Electric Power Monthly, June 1990  

SciTech Connect

The EPM is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 40 tabs.

1990-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

278

EERE: Renewable Electricity Generation - Geothermal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Renewable Energy Search Search Search Help | A-Z Subject Index EERE Geothermal Renewable Electricity Generation EERE plays a key role in advancing America's "all...

279

EERE: Renewable Electricity Generation - Solar  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Renewable Electricity Generation EERE plays a key role in advancing America's "all of the above" energy strategy, leading a large network of researchers and other partners to...

280

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Recovering heat when generating power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intelligent use of heat-recovery stream generators (HRSGs) is vital for the efficient operation of cogeneration plants, which furnish both thermal energy (usually in the form of steam) and electric energy. HRSGs are similarly important in combined-cycle power plants, in which the thermal energy rejected from the primary electric-power-generation step is harnessed (as discussed below) to produce additional electrical energy. In these facilities, the HRSG is typically heated by gas-turbine exhaust. Natural gas is the fuel most widely used for gas turbines in the U.S., whereas fuel oil is the main fuel in other countries. Depending on the amount of steam to be produced, HRSGs for gas-turbine-exhaust applications may be unfired, supplementary-fired or furnace fired. The paper describes these three options; the pressure drop encountered in all three systems; the Cheng cycle; catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides and CO; and performance testing.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 3. Biomass Resources by Price: Quantities ...

284

FOR ELECTRIC POWER TRANSMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A contract network extends the concept of a contract path to address the problem of loop flow and congestion in electric power transmission systems. A contract network option provides a well defined, internally consistent framework for assigning long-term capacity rights to a complicated electric transmission network. The contract network respects the special conditions induced by Kirchoff's Laws; accommodates thermal, voltage and contingency constraints on transmission capacity; and can be adopted without disturbing existing methods for achieving an economic power dispatch subject to these constraints. By design, a contract network would maintain short-run efficiency through optimal spot price determination of transmission prices. Through payment of congestion rentals, the contract network makes a long-term capacityright holder indifferent between delivery of the power or receipt of payments in a settlement system. And the contract network framework can support allocation of transmission capacity rights through a competitive bidding process. CONTRACT NETWORKS

William W. Hogan; William W. Hogan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Gross System Electricity Production for 2001.CA. http://energy.ca.gov/electricity/gross_system_power.htmlCEC. 2002c. 1992-2001 Electricity Generation By Fuel Type.

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 96, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, midwest reliability council and northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electricity generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 400.2 KiB) Quality Metrics

287

Geothermal Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION A PRIMER ON LOW-TEMPERATURE, SMALL-SCALE APPLICATIONS by Kevin Rafferty Geo-Heat Center January 2000 REALITY CHECK Owners of low-temperature...

288

OpenEI - Electricity Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Generation (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/878 Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA).

License
Type of License:  Other (please specify below)
Source of

289

Electric Power Annual - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Industry - Electricity Purchases, 2002 through 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers

290

Natural Gas Electric Power Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January ...

291

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Power Pool Area Northwest Power Pool Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 93, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Northwest Power Pool Area projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Northwest Power Pool Area (xls, 259.1 KiB)

292

Electric Power Waveform Distortion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineering issues regarding waveform distortion, harmonics, radio-frequency noise, and similar concerns have existed as long as there has been a power industry. These deal with consequences ranging from heating of transformers and machinery to telephone and radio interference. While waveform distortion has been around for a long time, the sources of harmonics and electromagnetic noise owned by the electricity customer have proliferated in recent years with the widespread usage of such things as switchin...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

294

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation,...

295

NREL: Power Technologies Energy Data Book - Chapter 7. Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7.2 Net Generation at Electricity-Only Plants (Excel 21 KB) (PDF 204 KB) 7.3 Electricity Generation at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants (Excel 18 KB) (PDF 204 KB) 7.4 Generation and...

296

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

None

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Electricity Generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Dataset Summary Description Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Electricity Generation world Data text/csv icon total_electricity_net_generation_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 46.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote

299

Electric power annual 1997. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual 1997, Volume 2 contains annual summary statistics at national, regional, and state levels for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; power transactions; and demand-side management. Also included are data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity; gross generation; emissions; and supply and disposition of energy. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. 15 figs., 62 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT INSTRUCTIONS|Year: 2013 No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours| |PURPOSE|Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry.| |REQUIRED RESPONDENTS|Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860, ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT,

302

Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

THERMO-ELECTRIC GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The conversion of heat energy into electrical energy by a small compact device is descrtbed. Where the heat energy is supplied by a radioactive material and thermopIIes convert the heat to electrical energy. The particular battery construction includes two insulating discs with conductive rods disposed between them to form a circular cage. In the center of the cage is disposed a cup in which the sealed radioactive source is located. Each thermopile is formed by connecting wires from two adjacent rods to a potnt on an annular ring fastened to the outside of the cup, the ring having insulation on its surface to prevent electrica1 contact with the thermopiles. One advantage of this battery construction is that the radioactive source may be inserted after the device is fabricated, reducing the radiation hazard to personnel assembling the battery.

Jordan, K.C.

1958-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

304

Power Quality Impacts of Distributed Generation: Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of deregulation, distributed generation (DG) will play an increasing role in electric distribution systems. This report addresses the issue of integrating DG into the electric power system in a way that assures power quality in the grid and at end-use customer facilities.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

305

Plasma plume MHD power generator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described of generating power at a situs exposed to the solar wind which comprises creating at separate sources at the situs discrete plasma plumes extending in opposed directions, providing electrical communication between the plumes at their source and interposing a desired electrical load in the said electrical communication between the plumes.

Hammer, J.H.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

306

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 2011 January 2011 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were below normal in January 2011. Accordingly, the total population-weighted heating degree days for the United States were 4.3 percent above the January normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 1.8 percent from January 2010. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 2.9 percent. For the 12-month period ending January 2011, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 1.1 percent over the previous 12-month period ending January 2010. In January 2011, total electric power generation in the United States increased 0.5 percent compared to January 2010 (the change in electric power generation does not necessarily coincide with the change in retail sales of electricity

307

Electric Power detailed State data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed State Data Detailed State Data Annual data for 2012 Release Date: November 12, 2013 Next Release Date: November 2014 Revision/Corrections Annual data format 1990 - 2012 Net Generation by State by Type of Producer by Energy Source (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)1 XLS 1990 - 2012 Fossil Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation by Year, Industry Type and State (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)2 XLS 1990 - 2011 Existing Nameplate and Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source, Producer Type and State (EIA-860)1, 3 XLS 2011 - 2016 Proposed Nameplate and Net Summer Capacity by Year, Energy Source, and State (EIA-860)1 XLS 1990 - 2011 U.S. Electric Power Industry Estimated Emissions by State (EIA-767, EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)4 XLS 1990 - 2012 Average Price by State by Provider (EIA-861)5 XLS

308

Microelectromechanical power generator and vibration sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which can be used to generate electrical power in response to an external source of vibrations, or to sense the vibrations and generate an electrical output voltage in response thereto. The MEM apparatus utilizes a meandering electrical pickup located near a shuttle which holds a plurality of permanent magnets. Upon movement of the shuttle in response to vibrations coupled thereto, the permanent magnets move in a direction substantially parallel to the meandering electrical pickup, and this generates a voltage across the meandering electrical pickup. The MEM apparatus can be fabricated by LIGA or micromachining.

Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

309

"1. Beluga","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",344 "2. George M Sullivan Generation Plant 2","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",220  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska" Alaska" "1. Beluga","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",344 "2. George M Sullivan Generation Plant 2","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",220 "3. North Pole","Petroleum","Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc",144 "4. Bradley Lake","Hydroelectric","Homer Electric Assn Inc",126 "5. Anchorage 1","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",88 "6. Snettisham","Hydroelectric","Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",78 "7. Bernice Lake","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",62 "8. Lemon Creek","Petroleum","Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",58

310

Power Plant Electrical Reference Series, Volumes 1-16: Volume 1: Electric Generators; Volume 2: Power Transformers; Volume 3: Auxili ary System Planning; Volume 4: Wire and Cable; Volume 5: Grounding and Lightning Protection; Volume 6: Motors; Volume 7..  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive and practical guide to electric power apparatus and electrical phenomena provides an up-to-date source book for power plant managers, engineers, and operating personnel. Aiding in the recognition and prevention of potential problems, the 16-volume guide can help utilities save staff time and reduce operating expenses.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Siemens Power Generation, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference 2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference Siemens Power Generation, Inc. Page 1 of 10 © Siemens Power Generation, Inc., All Rights Reserved Development of a Catalytic Combustor for Fuel Flexible Turbines W. R. Laster Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation Abstract Siemens has been working on a catalytic combustor for natural gas operation for several years using the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL TM ) design. The design has been shown to produce low NOx emissions on natural gas operation. By operating the catalyst section fuel rich, the design shows considerable promise for robust operation over a wide range of fuel compositions including syngas. Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy' s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three year

312

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council Northwest Power Pool Area This...

313

Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, including combined heat and power, 2012-2040 (gigawatts) Coal

314

Power Electonics & Electric Machinery | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Electronics and Electric Machinery SHARE Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Power Electronics and Electric Machinery research has dramatically advanced the technology...

315

Electricity generation potential of Thai sugar mills  

SciTech Connect

At present, the total installed electricity generating capacity of Thailand is 7500 MW. Because this level of investment will take an unacceptable large part of total foreign borrowing, the government plans to encourage participation of the private sector in electricity generation. Among the various technology options for power production, cogeneration appears to be the most promising technology due to its very high effectiveness of fuel utilization. Therefore, in the first phase of private power generation, the Thai government is encouraging cogeneration systems. This paper discusses sugar mills, where expertise and equipment for electricity generation already exist, appear to be in a particularly advantageous position to participate in the private power generation program. At present, there are 46 sugar mills in Thailand with a total capacity of 338,000 tons of cane per day. The fiber part delivered from the milling of sugarcane, bagasse, is normally used to produce steam for the process heat and electricity generation. The investment and operating costs for each of these alternatives have been evaluated. The internal rate of return is used to indicate the benefit of each alternative.

Therdyothin, A.; Bhattacharaya, S.C.; Chirarattananon, S. (Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Solar-powered aroma generator  

SciTech Connect

In combination with a switch-controlled electric light bulb having a threaded plug and a threaded socket disposed in a room which is also subject to natural ambient light, a switchless aroma generator is installed in the room which is automatically activated only when the electric light bulb is switched on. The activated generator functions to discharge an air current into the room which conveys an aromatic vapor to modify the atmosphere. The generator described in this patent consists of: A.) an air-permeable cartridge containing an aroma supply which is exuded into the atmosphere at a relatively rapid rate as an air current is forced through the cartridge; B.) a fan driven by a low-voltage, direct-current motor having predetermined power requirements, the fan being arranged to force an air current through the cartridge; C.) a housing incorporating the cartridge and the motordriven fan, the housing containing an apparatus for mounting it on a wall in the room; and D.) a solar cell assembly producing a direct-current output placed in close proximity to the bulb in the room and irradiated when the bulb is switched on. The assembly is connected to the motor to supply power, the electrical relationship of the assembly to the motor being such that the cell output is sufficient to power the motor only when the bulb is switched on to irradiate the assembly, and is insufficient when the bulb is switched off. The cell output then depends on ambient light in the room, and the operation of the generator is coordinated with that of the bulb despite the absence of a wired connection between and an aroma is generated only when the bulb is switched on.

Spector, D.

1986-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

317

Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity is critical to our economy, but growth in demand has saturated the power grid causing instability and blackouts. The economic penalty due to lost productivity in the US exceeds $100 billion per year. Opposition to new transmission lines and power plants, environmental restrictions, and an expected $100 billion grid upgrade cost have slowed system improvements. Flywheel electricity storage could provide a more economical, environmentally benign alternative and slash economic losses if units could be scaled up in a cost effective manner to much larger power and capacity than the present maximum of a few hundred kW and a few kWh per flywheel. The goal of this project is to design, construct, and demonstrate a small-scale third generation electricity storage flywheel using a revolutionary architecture scalable to megawatt-hours per unit. First generation flywheels are built from bulk materials such as steel and provide inertia to smooth the motion of mechanical devices such as engines. They can be scaled up to tens of tons or more, but have relatively low energy storage density. Second generation flywheels use similar designs but are fabricated with composite materials such as carbon fiber and epoxy. They are capable of much higher energy storage density but cannot economically be built larger than a few kWh of storage capacity due to structural and stability limitations. LaunchPoint is developing a third generation flywheel — the "Power Ring" — with energy densities as high or higher than second generation flywheels and a totally new architecture scalable to enormous sizes. Electricity storage capacities exceeding 5 megawatt-hours per unit appear both technically feasible and economically attractive. Our design uses a new class of magnetic bearing – a radial gap “shear-force levitator” – that we discovered and patented, and a thin-walled composite hoop rotated at high speed to store kinetic energy. One immediate application is power grid frequency regulation, where Power Rings could cut costs, reduce fuel consumption, eliminate emissions, and reduce the need for new power plants. Other applications include hybrid diesel-electric locomotives, grid power quality, support for renewable energy, spinning reserve, energy management, and facility deferral. Decreased need for new generation and transmission alone could save the nation $2.5 billion per year. Improved grid reliability could cut economic losses due to poor power quality by tens of billions of dollars per year. A large export market for this technology could also develop. Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

318

Competition among fuels for power generation driven by changes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Most recently, a number of factors have led to a continuing electric power industry trend of substituting coal-fired generation with natural gas-fired generation: ...

319

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 2011 March 2011 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States experienced temperatures that were slightly above normal in March 2011. Accordingly, the total population-weighted heating degree days for the United States were 1.2 percent below the March normal. Retail sales of electricity decreased 0.2 percent from March 2010. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 1.1 percent. For the 12-month period ending March 2011, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 1.6 percent over the previous 12-month period ending March 2010. In March 2011, total electric power generation in the United States increased 1.2 percent compared to March 2010 (the change in electric power generation does not necessarily coincide with the change in retail sales of

320

Electric Power Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Electric Power Sector Hydroelectric Power (a) ............... 0.670 0.785 0.653 0.561 0.633 0.775 0.631 0.566 0.659 0.776 0.625 0.572 2.668 2.605 2.633 Wood Biomass (b) ........................ 0.048 0.043 0.052 0.046 0.045 0.039 0.051 0.052 0.055 0.049 0.060 0.054 0.190 0.187 0.218 Waste Biomass (c) ....................... 0.063 0.064 0.066 0.069 0.061 0.063 0.063 0.064 0.062 0.065 0.068 0.065 0.262 0.250 0.261 Wind ............................................. 0.376 0.361 0.253 0.377 0.428 0.461 0.315 0.400 0.417 0.461 0.340 0.424 1.368 1.604 1.641 Geothermal ................................. 0.036 0.037 0.038 0.039 0.041 0.041 0.041 0.042 0.041 0.040 0.041 0.042 0.149 0.164 0.165 Solar ............................................. 0.007 0.022 0.021 0.014 0.013 0.022 0.026 0.016 0.021 0.048 0.048 0.025 0.064

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Definition of engineering development and research problems relating to the use of geothermal fluids for electric power generation and nonelectric heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of geothermal fluids for electric power generation and nonelectric purposes causes problems not normally encountered when pure water is used for similar purposes. These problems must be identified and means developed to overcome them before geothermal energy resources can become an important source of electric power or thermal energy in the United States. Research and development projects aimed at solving problems arising from the use of geothermal fluids from known sources in the United States are listed. Problem areas covered are: impact on engineering design caused by chemical, thermodynamic, and transport properties of geothermal fluids; scaling and sludge formation; gases, volatile brine constituents, condensate chemistry; environmental problems. The research projects identified are general in nature and are not site specific. (JGB)

Apps, J.A.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the country’s thermal power plants: in the power generationMDM. The large thermal power plants, such as Kuzbassenergo,electric power plants and the largest and newest thermal

Wenle, Susanne Alice

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

High power microwave generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

Ekdahl, C.A.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

324

High power microwave generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

Ekdahl, Carl A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Renewable Electricity Generation | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation Geothermal Read more Solar Read more Water Read more Wind Read more Our nation has abundant solar, water, wind,...

326

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) Electric generating or transmission facility: determination...

327

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity A report to congress and the states pursuant to sections 1234 and 1832 of the...

328

Electric power annual 1994. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels.

NONE

1995-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

329

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency...

330

Southern Pine Electric Power Association - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southern Pine Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Southern Pine Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program <...

331

Turbine-generator set development for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this effort was to design, develop, and demonstrate an integrated turbine genset suitable for the power generation requirements of a hybrid automotive propulsion system. The result of this effort would have been prototype generator hardware including controllers for testing and evaluation by Allison Engine Company. The generator would have been coupled to a suitably sized and configured gas turbine engine, which would operate on a laboratory load bank. This effort could lead to extensive knowledge and design capability in the most efficient generator design for hybrid electric vehicle power generation and potentially to commercialization of these advanced technologies. Through the use of the high-speed turbines as a power source for the hybrid-electric vehicles, a significant reduction in nitrous oxides emissions would be achieved when compared to those of conventional gas powered vehicles.

Adams, D.J. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berenyi, S.G. [Allison Engine Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Transdisciplinary electric power grid science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 20th-century engineering feat that most improved the quality of human life, the electric power system, now faces discipline-spanning challenges that threaten that distinction. So multilayered and complex that they resemble ecosystems, power grids face risks from their interdependent cyber, physical, social and economic layers. Only with a holistic understanding of the dynamics of electricity infrastructure and human operators, automatic controls, electricity markets, weather, climate and policy can we fortify worldwide access to electricity.

Brummitt, Charles D; Dobson, Ian; Moore, Cristopher; D'Souza, Raissa M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Natural gas and electricity optimal power flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — In this paper, the combined natural gas and electric optimal power flow (GEOPF) is presented. It shows fundamental modeling of the natural gas network to be used for the GEOPF, and describes the equality constraints which describe the energy transformation between gas and electric networks at combined nodes (i.e., generators). We also present the formulation of the natural gas loadflow problem, which includes the amount of gas consumed in compressor stations. Case studies are presented to show the sensitivity of the real power generation to wellhead gas prices. Results from the simulation demonstrate that the GEOPF can provide social welfare maximizing solutions considering both gas and electric networks. I.

Seungwon An

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Electric power annual 1989. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents a summary of electric utility statistics at the national, regional and state levels. The Industry At A Glance'' section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance; a review of key statistics for the year; and projections for various aspects of the electric power industry through 2010. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; electricity sales, revenue and average revenue per kilowatthour sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; and electric power transactions. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. 24 figs., 57 tabs.

Not Available

1991-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Electric power annual 1989. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents a summary of electric utility statistics at the national, regional and state levels. The Industry At A Glance'' section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance; a review of key statistics for the year; and projections for various aspects of the electric power industry through 2010. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; electricity sales, revenue and average revenue per kilowatthour sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; and electric power transactions. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. 24 figs., 57 tabs.

1991-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 2010 November 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States experienced temperatures that were near normal in November 2010. Accordingly, the total population-weighted heating degree days for the United States were 3.0 percent below the November normal. In November 2010, retail sales of electricity increased 2.0 percent from November 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 2.8 percent. For the 12-month period ending November 2010, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 0.3 percent over the previous 12-month period ending November 2009. Total electric power generation in the United States increased 3.6 percent compared to November 2009. Over the same period, coal generation remained relatively unchanged, while natural gas generation increased 8.8 percent and

337

Electric Power Monthly March 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

order to provide an integrated view of the electric power ... EIA, Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State

338

Specialized power-electronic apparatus for harnessing electrical power from kinetic hydropower plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis introduces a power electronic interface for a kinetic hydropower generation platform that enables extraction of electric power from a free-flowing water source such… (more)

Mosallat, Farid

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

RFI Comments - Electric Power Coalition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The power grid is a complex infrastructure made up of networked generation, transmission, distribution, control, and communication technologies ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

340

Specification for Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) electrical output power characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The specification defines the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) standards and characteristics for electrical power generation required to be maintained at utilizing equipments power-input terminals during generation and distribution.

Post, P

1976-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Electric Power Monthly August 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.6.A. Net Generation by State by Sector, May 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Census Division and State Total (All Sectors) Electric ...

343

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California California Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 92, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released August 10th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO California EIA Electric Power projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California- Reference Case (xls, 259.5 KiB)

344

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwest Southwest Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 91, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections Southwest WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Southwest- Reference Case (xls, 259.1 KiB)

345

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Rockies Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 94, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections Rockies Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Rockies- Reference Case (xls, 258.8 KiB)

346

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5.70 SUN PV 2011 10 10393 PUD No 1 of Klickitat County Electric Utility Roosevelt Biogas 1 WA 7832 7 10.00 LFG CT 2011 10 10393 PUD No 1 of Klickitat County Electric Utility...

347

Electric power projections | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

power projections power projections Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 88, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Electric power projections Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon ASEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 259.3 KiB)

348

Electric Power Metrology Programs/Projects in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Power Metrology Programs/Projects in Semiconductors. Power Device and Thermal Metrology. Contact. General ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

349

ELECTRIC POWER AND VENTILATION SYSTEM OF SILOE  

SciTech Connect

The 15-kv electric power of Siloe is supplied from a central substation, which serves all the laboratories in the Center. The substation transforms primary 3-phase power from 15 kv to 380 to 220 v. Control installations are supplied from sets of rectifiers and batteries with 127 and 48 v direct current. If the normal electric power supply fails, a 12000 kva diesel driven generator is automatically started and in a very short time supplies power. The ventilation system supplies the whole building with conditioned air, holds the shell in negative pressure, and exhausts radioactive effluents. (auth)

Mitault, G.; Faudou, J.-C.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Solar Power and the Electric Grid, Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power and the Electric Grid Power and the Electric Grid In today's electricity generation system, different resources make different contributions to the electricity grid. This fact sheet illustrates the roles of distributed and centralized renewable energy technologies, particularly solar power, and how they will contribute to the future electricity system. The advantages of a diversified mix of power generation systems are highlighted. Grid 101: How does the electric grid work? The electric grid-an interconnected system illustrated in Figure 1-maintains an instantaneous balance between supply and demand (generation and load) while moving electricity from generation source to customer. Because large amounts of electricity are difficult to store, the amount generated and fed into the system must be care-

351

Solar Power and the Electric Grid, Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In today's electricity generation system, different resources make different contributions to the electricity grid. This fact sheet illustrates the roles of distributed and centralized renewable energy technologies, particularly solar power, and how they will contribute to the future electricity system. The advantages of a diversified mix of power generation systems are highlighted.

Not Available

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

SITE ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Site Electrical Power System receives and distributes utility power to all North Portal site users. The major North Portal users are the Protected Area including the subsurface facility and Balance of Plant areas. The system is remotely monitored and controlled from the Surface Operations Monitoring and Control System. The system monitors power quality and provides the capability to transfer between Off-Site Utility and standby power (including dedicated safeguards and security power). Standby power is only distributed to selected loads for personnel safety and essential operations. Security power is only distributed to essential security operations. The standby safeguards and security power is independent from all other site power. The system also provides surface lighting, grounding grid, and lightning protection for the North Portal. The system distributes power during construction, operation, caretaker, and closure phases of the repository. The system consists of substation equipment (disconnect switches, breakers, transformers and grounding equipment) and power distribution cabling from substation to the north portal switch gear building. Additionally, the system includes subsurface facility substation (located on surface), switch-gear, standby diesel generators, underground duct banks, power cables and conduits, switch-gear building and associated distribution equipment for power distribution. Each area substation distributes power to the electrical loads and includes the site grounding, site lighting and lightning protection equipment. The site electrical power system distributes power of sufficient quantity and quality to meet users demands. The Site Electrical Power System interfaces with the North Portal surface systems requiring electrical power. The system interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical Distribution System which will supply power to the underground facilities from the North Portal. Power required for the South Portal and development side activities of the subsurface facility will be provided at the South Portal by the Subsurface Electrical Distribution System. The Site Electrical Power System interfaces with the Off-Site Utility System for the receipt of power. The System interfaces with the Surface Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control. The System interfaces with MGR Site Layout System for the physical location of equipment and power distribution.

E.P. McCann

1999-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

353

Apparatuses and methods for generating electric fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatuses and methods relating to generating an electric field are disclosed. An electric field generator may include a semiconductive material configured in a physical shape substantially different from a shape of an electric field to be generated thereby. The electric field is generated when a voltage drop exists across the semiconductive material. A method for generating an electric field may include applying a voltage to a shaped semiconductive material to generate a complex, substantially nonlinear electric field. The shape of the complex, substantially nonlinear electric field may be configured for directing charged particles to a desired location. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed.

Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R; Tremblay, Paul L

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

354

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2011 Actual, 2012-2016 Projected Net Energy (Thousands of Megawatthours) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT...

355

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report;" and predecessor forms. Imports and Exports: Mexico data - DOE, Fossil Fuels, Office of Fuels Programs, Form OE-781R, "Annual Report of International Electrical Export...

356

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2011 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu)...

357

Electric Power Annual 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region" "1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected"...

358

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 5.6.A. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State . July 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration ...

359

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 5.6.A. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State . June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration ...

360

Coal-fired electric generators continue to dominate electric ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

More than 60% of electricity in the central region of the United States comes from coal-fired electric generators, down from 80% in the early part of ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Dan Klempel Basin Electric Power Cooperative DOE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dan Dan Klempel Basin Electric Power Cooperative DOE 2009 Congestion Study Workshop Oklahoma City, Oklahoma June 18, 2008 Page 1 of 5 Basin Electric Power Cooperative would like to thank the Department of Energy for this opportunity to share some of our thoughts on transmission congestion issues. Basin Electric is a wholesale power supplier to rural electric cooperatives located in the mid-west and in both the east and west interconnections. Naturally, our generation and transmission facilities also reside in both interconnections so we use asynchronous back-to-back DC facilities to balance loads with resources. With headquarters in Bismarck, North Dakota; we find ourselves in the heart of some of the nations most desirable wind patterns for potential renewable energy development as well as electric energy production from more traditional sources. Lignite coal has been a reliable

362

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Electricity Generation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation Electricity Generation Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Electricity Generation U.S. electricity consumption—including both purchases from electric power producers and on-site generation—increases steadily in the AEO2008 reference case, at an average rate of 1.3 percent per year. In comparison, electricity consumption grew by annual rates of 4.2 percent, 2.6 percent, and 2.3 percent in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, respectively. The growth rate in the AEO2008 projection is lower than in the AEO2007 reference case (1.5 percent per year), and it leads to lower projections of electricity generation. Figure 4. Electricity generation by fuel, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

363

EIA - 2008 New Electric Power Forms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Electricity Survey Forms New Electricity Survey Forms What's happening with electric power forms? In 2008 EIA is consolidating 6 data collection forms into 2 forms. Fill out forms electronically (Available soon!) Not registered? Why is that a good thing? * For Electricity Generators: This reduces the number of forms to submit. (Re-registering is not required!) * For EIA and Taxpayers: This streamlines the collection process for better efficiency. * For Everyone: This enables us to provide additional information about the electric power industry. figure showing what electricity forms merge into the new forms Click for more information on the New EIA-860 Click for more information on the New EIA-923 Resources to help you with the changes Printable Forms & Instructions 923 860

364

Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Brazos Electric Power Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Power Coop Inc Place Texas Utility Id 2172 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity...

366

South Mississippi Electric Power Association Smart Grid Project (Mississippi)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

South Mississippi Electric Power Association’s (SMEPA) smart grid project involves the deployment of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) and covers the Generation & Transmission (G&T)...

367

Managing Wind Power Forecast Uncertainty in Electric Grids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electricity generated from wind power is both variable and uncertain. Wind forecasts provide valuable information for wind farm management, but they are not perfect. Chapter… (more)

Mauch, Brandon Keith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Electric Power Metrology Programs/Projects in Quantum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Power Metrology Programs/Projects in Quantum Electrical Metrology. Electric Power Metrology Programs/Projects ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

369

Power generation method including membrane separation  

SciTech Connect

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Power Systems Engineering Research Center Renewable Electricity Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Systems Engineering Research Center Renewable Electricity Futures Trieu Mai Electricity of the extent to which renewable energy supply can meet the electricity demands of the contiguous United States renewable electricity generation levels: from 30% up to 90% (focusing on 80%) of all U.S. electricity

Van Veen, Barry D.

371

Generating capacity of the united power system of Russia and conditions of fuel supply to electric power plants for the period up to 2020  

SciTech Connect

Prospects of development of the energy economy in Russia are considered up to 2020. The proportion of thermal power plants (TPP) in the structure of the generating capacity of Russia amounts to about 70% (147 mln kW). The proportion of gas in the structure of fuel consumed by TPP amounts to 64%. It is predicted that the fraction of high-quality kinds of fuel (gas and fuel oil) will decrease in the considered period due to maximum involvement of coal in the fuel balance and wider use of combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies that provide a lower specific consumption of fuel. It is planned to resort to advanced technologies both for reconstructing existing plants and erecting new ones. This paper deals with problems of fuel supply of fossil-fuel-fired thermal power plants in the light of the evolution of the energy economy of Russia. The demand of TPP for different kinds of fossil fuel, i.e., gas, coal, and fuel oil, is estimated for the whole of the country and for its regions according to two variants of development of the generating capacity with planned commissioning of combined-cycle plants with a total output of 32 mln kW and gas-turbine plants with a total output of 61 mln kW in the period of up to 2020. The tasks of the fuel policy to be solved in the considered period are presented.

V.I. Chemodanov; N.V. Bobyleva; N.G. Chelnokova; N.Yu. Sokolova [Energoset'proekt Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Electric industry retail statistics by state State Retail sales (million kWh) Retail revenue (thousand dollars) Customers Alabama 89,995 8,100,051 2,505,190 Alaska 6,320 1,015,977...

373

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Electric Power  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements The electric power sector participates in the Climate VISION program through the Electric Power Industry Climate Initiative (EPICI) and its Power Partners program, which is being developed in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The memberships of the seven organizations that comprise EPICI represent 100% of the power generators in the United States. Through individual commitments and collective actions, the power sector will strive to make meaningful contributions to the President's greenhouse gas intensity goal. EPICI members also support efforts to increase technology research, development and deployment that will help the power sector, and other sectors, achieve the President's goal. The seven organizations comprising EPICI are the American Public Power

374

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CDRL item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VI. Electrical power generation and master control subsystems and balance of plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The requirements, performance, and subsystem configuration for both the Commercial and Pilot Plant electrical power generation subsystems (EPGS) and balance of plants are presented. The EPGS for both the Commercial Plant and Pilot Plant make use of conventional, proven equipment consistent with good power plant design practices in order to minimize risk and maximize reliability. The basic EPGS cycle selected is a regenerative cycle that uses a single automatic admission, condensing, tandem-compound double-flow turbine. Specifications, performance data, drawings, and schematics are included. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NYC-Westchester NYC-Westchester Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 78, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Northeast projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester - Reference Case (xls, 259.2 KiB)

376

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Northeast Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 77, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Northeast projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Northeast- Reference Case (xls, 259.2 KiB)

377

Role of wind power in electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

Current estimates suggest that the cost of wind-generated power is likely to be competitive with conventionally generated power in the near future in regions of the United States with favorable winds and high costs for conventionally generated electricity. These preliminary estimates indicate costs of $500 to 700 per installed kW for mass-produced wind turbines. This assessment regarding competitiveness includes effects of reduced reliability of wind power compared to conventional sources. Utilities employing wind power are likely to purchase more peaking capacity and less baseload capacity than they would have otherwise to provide the lowest-cost reserve power. This reserve power is needed mainly when wind outages coincide with peak loads. The monetary savings associated with this shift contribute substantially to the value of wind energy to a utility.

Davitian, H

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Industrial Combined Heat and Power, 2001 - 2011 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Other...

379

Municipal Electric Power (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes energy procurement for local utilities operating in Minnesota and provides a means for Minnesota cities to construct and operate hydroelectric power plants. The statute gives...

380

Annual Electricity Generation (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Galena Electric Power A Situational Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the investigation is to compare the economics of various electrical power generation options for the City of Galena. Options were assessed over a 30-year project period, beginning in 2010, and the final results were compared on the basis of residential customer electric rates ($/kWh). Galena's electric utility currently generates power using internal combustion diesel engines and generator sets. Nearby, there is an exposed coal seam, which might provide fuel for a power plant. Contributions to the energy mix might come from solar, municipal solid waste, or wood. The City has also been approached by Toshiba, Inc., as a demonstration site for a small (Model 4S) nuclear reactor power plant. The Yukon River is possibly a site for in-river turbines for hydroelectric power. This report summarizes the comparative economics of various energy supply options. This report covers: (1) thermal and electric load profiles for Galena; (2) technologies and resources available to meet or exceed those loads; (3) uses for any extra power produced by these options; (4) environmental and permitting issues and then; and (5) the overall economics of each of the primary energy options.

Robert E. Chaney; Stephen G. Colt; Ronald A. Johnson; Richard W. Wiles; Gregory J. White

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Competition among fuels for power generation driven by changes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil fuels—coal, natural gas, and petroleum—supplied 70% of total electric power generation in 1950, with that share rising to 82% in 1970, ...

383

Pennsylvania's use of natural gas for power generation has grown ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Changes in relative fuel prices. Prices of coal and natural gas are key input costs at electric power ... Pennsylvania coal and natural gas generation additions were ...

384

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Powering Electric Cooperatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Network Research Network DOE Electricity Distribution System Workshop Forward Looking Panel September 2012 NRECA's Technical Focus * Over 900 Electric Cooperatives * Serve 42 million Americans in 47 States * Cover >70% of Nation's land mass * Own 42% of all Distribution Line * Totals 2.4 Million Line Miles Not for Profit, Consumer Owned, Consumer Controlled 2 Timely Energy Innovations Identify and Adopt Beneficial Technologies: * Improve Productivity * Enhance Service * Control Cost Choosing the Right Technologies Motivations & Methods Uncovering Smart Grid ROI Technology Investments Hinge on Cost Benefit Accelerate Beneficial Adoption Rate Precision Modular Evaluation Tool * Run cost-benefit analyses on smart grid investments, either

386

Definition: Thermoelectric power generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermoelectric power generation Thermoelectric power generation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermoelectric power generation The conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy. Thermoelectric generation relies on a fuel source (e.g. fossil, nuclear, biomass, geothermal, or solar) to heat a fluid to drive a turbine[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The thermoelectric effect is the direct conversion of temperature differences to electric voltage and vice-versa. A thermoelectric device creates voltage when there is a different temperature on each side. Conversely, when a voltage is applied to it, it creates a temperature difference. At the atomic scale, an applied temperature gradient causes charge carriers in the material to diffuse from the hot side to the cold

387

Electricity generation with looped transmission networks: Bidding to an ISO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generation with looped transmission networks: Bidding to an ISO Xinmin Hu Daniel Ralph to model markets for delivery of electrical power on looped transmission networks. It analyzes in transmission capacity mean the ISO potentially sets a different electricity price at each node of the trans

Ferris, Michael C.

388

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW operates in the energy efficiency field- one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen® and WOWClean® provide more energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. •WOWGen® - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat •WOWClean® - Multi Pollutant emission control system. Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel and converts it to useful output. The remaining 65% is discharged into the environment as waste heat at temperatures ranging from 300°F to 1,200°F. This waste heat can be captured using the WOWGen® technology and turned into electricity. This efficiency is up to twice the rate of competing technologies. Compelling economics and current environmental policy are stimulating industry interest. WOWGen® power plants can generate between 1 - 25 MW of electricity. Project payback is between two to five years with IRR of 15% 30%. Nearly anywhere industrial waste heat is present, the WOW products can be applied. Beneficial applications of heat recovery power generation can be found in Industry (e.g. steel, glass, cement, lime, pulp and paper, refining and petrochemicals), Power Generation (CHP, biomass, biofuel, traditional fuels, gasifiers, diesel engines) and Natural Gas (pipeline compression stations, processing plants). Sources such as stack flue gases, steam, diesel exhaust, hot oil or combinations of sources can be used to generate power. WOWGen® can also be used with stand alone power plants burning fossil fuels or using renewable energy sources such as solar and biomass.

Romero, M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Electricity Generation By Electricity Generation Compare Activities by ... Electricity Generation Capability For commercial buildings as a whole, approximately 8 percent of buildings had the capability to generate electricity, and only 4 percent of buildings actually generated any electricity. Most all buildings generated electricity only for the purpose of emergency back-up. Inpatient health care and public order and safety buildings were much more likely to have the capability to generate electricity than other building types. Over half of all inpatient health care buildings and about one-third of public order and safety buildings actually used this capability. Electricity Generation Capability and Use by Building Type Top Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels

390

Electrical engineering Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation Transmission Distribution · Electrical generators · Electric motors · High voltage engineering associated with the systems Electrical engineering · Electric power generation Transmission Distribution The electricity transported to load locations from a power station transmission subsystem The transmission system

Ã?nay, Devrim

391

Electrokinetic Power Generation from Liquid Water Microjets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrokinetic power generation using liquid water microjetscalculations of power generation and conversion efficiency.for electrokinetic power generation. By creating a jet of

Duffin, Andrew M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Environmental Quality After a proposed power plant has received approval from the State Corporation Commission (SCC) and location approval from the local government, it must apply for all applicable permits from the Virginia

393

Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Focus Area: Water power Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-renewable-energy-electricity-generatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-electricity-generati Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This video teaches the viewer about the current status and future

394

Solar Electric Power Association | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by expanding it. Solar Electric Power Association is a company located in Washington, DC . References "Solar Electric Power Association" Retrieved from "http:...

395

Arizona Electric Power Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Power Cooperative Jump to: navigation, search Name Arizona Electric Power Cooperative Place Benson, Arizona Zip 85602 Product AEPCO was originally founded in 1961 to meet...

396

Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Efficiency Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy...

397

Holyoke Power & Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holyoke Power & Electric Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Holyoke Power & Electric Co Place Massachusetts Utility Id 8778 Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes Activity...

398

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu)

399

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

Hall, Sharon J.

400

Feasibility investigation of the Giromill for generation of electrical power. Volume II. Technical discussion. Final report, April 1975--April 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This one year study concentrated on determining the feasibility of the Giromill for the cost effective production of electrical energy. Twenty-one different Giromill configurations covering three sizes of Giromill systems (120, 500, and 1500 kW) were analyzed, varying such parameters as rotor solidity, rotor aspect ratio, rated wind velocity, and number of rotor blades. The Giromill system analysis employed the same ground rules being used for conventional windmill analyses to facilitate comparisons between these systems. The results indicate that a Giromill is a very efficient device, and coupled with its relatively simple construction appears quite cost effective when compared to conventional windmills.

Brulle, R.V.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Electric power monthly, July 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

Not Available

1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

402

Electric power monthly, June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Electric power monthly, August 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

Not Available

1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

404

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation by Year, Industry Type and State: Questions/comments: Electricity data experts. Latest Electricity Trends.

405

EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basin Electric Power Cooperative EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Order authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to export electric energy to Canada EA-64 Basin Electric...

406

EA-82 Vermont Electric Power Company | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82 Vermont Electric Power Company EA-82 Vermont Electric Power Company Order authorizing Vermont Electric Power Company to export electric energy to Canada EA-82 Vermont Electric...

407

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 4.6.A. Receipts of Coal Delivered for Electricity Generation by State . Table 4.6.B. Receipts of Coal Delivered for Electricity Generation by ...

409

Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2001-2011 Actual, 2012-2016 Projected megawatts and percent Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 2001/ 2002 2002/ 2003 2003/ 2004 2004/ 2005 2005/ 2006 2006/ 2007 2007/ 2008 2008/ 2009 2009/ 2010 2010/ 2011 2011/ 2012 2012/ 2013E 2013/ 2014E 2014/ 2015E 2015/ 2016E 2016/ 2017E FRCC 39,699 42,001 36,229 41,449 42,493 45,993 46,093 45,042 51,703 45,954 39,924 43,558 43,049 44,228 44,790 45,297 NPCC 42,551 45,980 47,850 47,859 46,328 48,394 46,185 47,151 44,864 44,172 43,806 46,224 46,312 46,284 46,246 46,246 Balance of Eastern Region 341,158 360,748 357,026 371,011 375,365 385,887 383,779 384,495 399,204 389,351 385,428 384,172 386,823 394,645 398,806 403,949 ECAR 82,831 84,844 86,332

411

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Noncoincident peak load, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2. Noncoincident peak load, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 1990-2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected megawatts Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E FRCC 27,266 28,818 30,601 32,823 32,904 34,524 35,444 35,375 38,730 37,493 37,194 39,062 40,696 40,475 42,383 46,396 45,751 46,676 44,836 46,550 45,722 44,968 45,613 46,270 46,857 47,758 48,594 NPCC 44,116 46,594 43,658 46,706 47,581 47,705 45,094 49,269 49,566 52,855 50,057 55,949 56,012 55,018 52,549 58,960 63,241

412

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1. Net Energy for load, actual and projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, Table 1. Net Energy for load, actual and projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 1990-2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected thousands of megawatthours Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E FRCC 142,502 146,903 147,464 153,468 159,861 169,021 173,377 175,557 188,384 188,598 196,561 200,134 211,116 219,021 220,335 226,544 230,115 232,405 226,874 225,966 233,034 224,064 224,337 227,095 230,481 235,490 239,191

413

Applications for Certificates for Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An applicant for a certificate to site an electric power generating facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a...

414

Renewable Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation by Energy Use Electricity Generation by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomass, geothermal, etc.) This data was compiled and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Commercial Electric Power Electricity Generation geothermal Industrial PV Renewable Energy Consumption solar wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Elec_.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 19.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

415

Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 07/01/2011 Expiration Date 10/01/2013 State Connecticut Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption Provider Connecticut Department of Revenue Services In 2011, Connecticut created a new tax requiring electric power plants in the state that generate and upload electricity to the regional bulk power grid to pay $2.50 per megawatt hour. Renewable energy facilities and customer-sited facilities are exempt from the tax. The tax and related

416

Optimal endogenous carbon taxes for electric power supply chains with power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we develop a modeling and computational framework that allows for the determination of optimal carbon taxes applied to electric power plants in the context of electric power supply chain (generation/distribution/consumption) networks. ... Keywords: Carbon taxes, Electric power, Environmental policies, Network equilibria, Renewable energy, Supply chains, Variational inequalities

Anna Nagurney; Zugang Liu; Trisha Woolley

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Combined Heat and Power in Biofuels Production and Use of Biofuels for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rise of the biofuels industry presents electric utilities with two types of opportunities: combined heat and power (CHP) applications in biofuel production facilities using topping and bottoming power generation cycles and the use of the biofuels as a fuel in electric power generation. This report reviews production processes for ethanol and biodiesel, including the prospects for CHP applications, and describes power generation opportunities for the use of biofuels in power production, especially in ...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

418

Kansas Electric Power Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Power Coop Inc Place Kansas Utility Id 9961 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation...

419

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Capacity Capacity Conductor Characteristics Data Year Country NERC Region NERC Sub- region Type Operating (kV) Design (kV) Rating (MVa) Month Year From Terminal To Terminal Length (Miles) Type Pole Type Pole Material Size (MCM) Material Bundling Arrange- ment Present Ultimate Company Code Company Name Organizational Type Ownership (Percent) Project Name Level of Certainty Primary Driver 1 Primary Driver 2 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 300-399 5 2018 DeCordova Benbrook 27 OH 44372 Delivery 100 00TPIT0004 Conceptual Reliability 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 300-399 5 2018 Loma Alta Substation Rio Hondo Substation 35 OH 2409 BPUB 100 00TPITno07 Conceptual Reliability 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 121-150 6 2014 Highway 32 Wimberley 4 OH 14626 PEC 100 05TPIT0065 Planned Reliability 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 121-150 5 2018 Ennis Switch Ennis 6.32 OH 44372 Oncor Electric Delivery 100

420

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region 1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected megawatts and percent Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E FRCC 27,162 27,773 28,898 29,435 30,537 31,649 31,868 32,874 34,562 34,832 35,666 38,932 37,951 40,387 42,243 45,950 45,345 46,434 44,660 46,263 45,522 44,798 42,430 43,041 43,618 44,459 45,242 NPCC 46,016 45,952 46,007 46,380 47,465 48,290 48,950 50,240 51,760 53,450 54,270 55,888 55,164 53,936 51,580 57,402 60,879 58,221 59,896 55,730 56,232 62,313 59,757 60,325 60,791 61,344 61,865 Balance of Eastern Region 332,679 337,297 341,869 349,984 357,284 365,319

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Electric power annual 1998. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report, Electric Power Annual 1998 Volume 1 (EPAVI), is to provide a comprehensive overview of the electric power industry during the most recent year for which data have been collected, with an emphasis on the major changes that occurred. In response to the changes of 1998, this report has been expanded in scope. It begins with a general review of the year and incorporates new data on nonutility capacity and generation, transmission information, futures prices from the Commodity futures Trading commission, and wholesale spot market prices from the pennsylvania-new Jersey-Maryland Independent System Operator and the California Power Exchange. Electric utility statistics at the Census division and State levels on generation, fuel consumption, stocks, delivered cost of fossil fuels, sales to ultimate customers, average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold, and revenues from those retail sales can be found in Appendix A. The EPAVI is intended for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public.

NONE

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Practitioner Perspectives Matter: Public Policy and Private Investment in the U.S. Electric Power Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electric power plants, the volatility of natural gas marketsnatural gas overtook coal as the fuel of choice for new power plants,natural gas per kilowatthour generated), among investments in the electric power sector, coal-fired power plants

Barradale, Merrill Jones

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final report provides a summary of results of the Cost of Ownership Model and the circumstances under which a distributed fuel cell is economically viable. The analysis is based on a series of micro computer models estimate the capital and operations cost of a fuel cell central utility plant configuration. Using a survey of thermal and electrical demand profiles, the study defines a series of energy user classes. The energy user class demand requirements are entered into the central utility plant model to define the required size the fuel cell capacity and all supporting equipment. The central plant model includes provisions that enables the analyst to select optional plant features that are most appropriate to a fuel cell application, and that are cost effective. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. Other applications are also practical; however, such applications have a higher relative demand for thermal energy, a characteristic that is well-suited to a fuel cell application with its free source of hot water or steam. The analysis combines the capital and operation from the preceding models into a Cost of Ownership Model to compute the plant capital and operating costs as a function of capacity and principal features and compares these estimates to the estimated operating cost of the same central plant configuration without a fuel cell.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Handbook for Utility Participation in Biogas-Fueled Electric Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas is a methane-rich gas produced from the controlled biological degradation of organic wastes. Biogas is produced as part of the treatment of four general classes of wet waste streams: Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge Animal Manure Industrial Wastes Municipal Solid Waste in Sealed Landfills. The high methane content of biogas makes it suitable for fueling electric power generation. As energy prices increase, generation of electric power form biogas becomes increasingly attractive and the number of ...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

425

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

426

Reliability evaluation of electric power system including wind power and energy storage .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Global environmental concerns associated with conventional energy generation have led to the rapid growth of wind energy applications in electric power systems. Growing demand for… (more)

Hu, Po

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Power Pool Area Northwest Power Pool Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 118, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. This dataset contains data for the northwest power pool area of the U.S. Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Northwest Power Pool Area Renewable Energy Generation WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Northwest Power Pool Area - Reference (xls, 119.3 KiB)

428

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

429

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of  Electrical Power & Energy Systems,  27 (2005), Journal  of  Electrical  Power  &  Energy  Systems Journal of Electrical Power & Energy  Systems, 27 (2005), 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and tools related to the electric power  industry and its 2003.   American Electric Power.  Interstate transmission by  Means  of  Enhanced  Electric  Power  Systems  Control: 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7/22/2011 7/22/2011 Table of Contents 1. Commentary Page 1 2. Key Indicators of Generation, Consumption & Stocks Page 2 3. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Generation, Consumption and Stocks (Total) Page 3 4. Net Generation Trends Page 4 5. Fossil Fuel Consumption Trends Page 5 6. Fossil Fuel Stock Trends Page 6 7. Average Number of Days of Burn Non-Lignite Coal Page 7 8. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 8 9. Retail Sales Trends Page 9 10. Average Retail Price Trends Page 10 11. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 11 12. Documentation Page 12 Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: May 2011 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States experienced temperatures that were slightly below normal in May 2011.

432

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9/20/2011 9/20/2011 Table of Contents 1. Commentary Page 1 2. Key Indicators of Generation, Consumption & Stocks Page 2 3. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Generation, Consumption and Stocks (Total) Page 3 4. Net Generation Trends Page 4 5. Fossil Fuel Consumption Trends Page 5 6. Fossil Fuel Stock Trends Page 6 7. Average Number of Days of Burn Non-Lignite Coal Page 7 8. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 8 9. Retail Sales Trends Page 9 10. Average Retail Price Trends Page 10 11. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 11 12. Documentation Page 12 Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: July 2011 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States experienced temperatures

433

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6/24/2011 6/24/2011 Table of Contents 1. Commentary Page 1 2. Key Indicators of Generation, Consumption & Stocks Page 2 3. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Generation, Consumption and Stocks (Total) Page 3 4. Net Generation Trends Page 4 5. Fossil Fuel Consumption Trends Page 5 6. Fossil Fuel Stock Trends Page 6 7. Average Number of Days of Burn Non-Lignite Coal Page 7 8. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 8 9. Retail Sales Trends Page 9 10. Average Retail Price Trends Page 10 11. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 11 12. Documentation Page 12 Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: April 2011 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States experienced temperatures that were above normal in April 2011.

434

Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight… (more)

White, Daniel B., Jr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, ... Energy sources and percent share of total electricity generation in 2012 were:

437

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source

438

Cyber Security Recommendations for Digital I&C Systems Within Power Generation Facilities Unregulated by North American Electric Rel iability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil generating facilities represent a significant investment, as well as a primary source of revenue, for many electric utilities. The digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems of these generation facilities are essential to their successful operations. As such, the security of digital I&C systems is fundamental to ensure continued, reliable production. It is therefore prudent to employ appropriate ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

439

INTEGRATED CONTROL OF NEXT GENERATION POWER SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control methodologies provide the necessary data acquisition, analysis and corrective actions needed to maintain the state of an electric power system within acceptable operating limits. These methods are primarily software-based algorithms that are nonfunctional unless properly integrated with system data and the appropriate control devices. Components of the control of power systems today include protective relays, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), distribution automation (DA), feeder automation, software agents, sensors, control devices and communications. Necessary corrective actions are still accomplished using large electromechanical devices such as vacuum, oil and gas-insulated breakers, capacitor banks, regulators, transformer tap changers, reclosers, generators, and more recently FACTS (flexible AC transmission system) devices. The recent evolution of multi-agent system (MAS) technologies has been reviewed and effort made to integrate MAS into next generation power systems. A MAS can be defined as ��a loosely-coupled network of problem solvers that work together to solve problems that are beyond their individual capabilities��. These problem solvers, often called agents, are autonomous and may be heterogeneous in nature. This project has shown that a MAS has significant advantages over a single, monolithic, centralized problem solver for next generation power systems. Various communication media are being used in the electric power system today, including copper, optical fiber and power line carrier (PLC) as well as wireless technologies. These technologies have enabled the deployment of substation automation (SA) at many facilities. Recently, carrier and wireless technologies have been developed and demonstrated on a pilot basis. Hence, efforts have been made by this project to penetrate these communication technologies as an infrastructure for next generation power systems. This project has thus pursued efforts to use specific MAS methods as well as pertinent communications protocols to imbed and assess such technologies in a real electric power distribution system, specifically the Circuit of the Future (CoF) developed by Southern California Edison (SCE). By modeling the behavior and communication for the components of a MAS, the operation and control of the power distribution circuit have been enhanced. The use of MAS to model and integrate a power distribution circuit offers a significantly different approach to the design of next generation power systems. For example, ways to control a power distribution circuit that includes a micro-grid while considering the impacts of thermal constraints, and integrating voltage control and renewable energy sources on the main power system have been pursued. Both computer simulations and laboratory testbeds have been used to demonstrate such technologies in electric power distribution systems. An economic assessment of MAS in electric power systems was also performed during this project. A report on the economic feasibility of MAS for electric power systems was prepared, and particularly discusses the feasibility of incorporating MAS in transmission and distribution (T&D) systems. Also, the commercial viability of deploying MAS in T&D systems has been assessed by developing an initial case study using utility input to estimate the benefits of deploying MAS. In summary, the MAS approach, which had previously been investigated with good success by APERC for naval shipboard applications, has now been applied with promising results for enhancing an electric power distribution circuit, such as the Circuit of the Future developed by Southern California Edison. The results for next generation power systems include better ability to reconfigure circuits, improve protection and enhance reliability.

None

2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

440

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Kansas Corporation Commission This legislation permits the KCC to determine rate-making principles that will apply to a utility's investment in generation or transmission before constructing a facility or entering into a contract for purchasing power. There is no restriction on the type or the size of electric generating unit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

North American Electric Reliability Council Power Outage Update |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Outage Update Power Outage Update North American Electric Reliability Council Power Outage Update The bulk electric transmission system in the United States and Canada has been restored and is operating reliably. Many of the generating units that tripped off line during the outage have returned to service and additional generating units are expected to return to service over the weekend. Virtually all customers have been returned to electric service, although some customers will continue to experience rotating outages due to generating capacity availability. North American Electric Reliability Council Power Outage Update More Documents & Publications Electric System Update: Sunday August 17, 2003 North American Electric Reliability Council Outage Announcement NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance Report

442

World electric power plants database  

SciTech Connect

This global database provides records for 104,000 generating units in over 220 countries. These units include installed and projected facilities, central stations and distributed plants operated by utilities, independent power companies and commercial and self-generators. Each record includes information on: geographic location and operating company; technology, fuel and boiler; generator manufacturers; steam conditions; unit capacity and age; turbine/engine; architect/engineer and constructor; and pollution control equipment. The database is issued quarterly.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Sustainable Power Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Power Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Bicarbonate Buffer and Proton Transfer) isolation and selection of electricity- generating bacteria (3­5), (ii) selection and modification studies (11­21) to maintain a suitable pH for electricity- generating bacteria and/or to increase

Tullos, Desiree

444

Electrical Generating Capacities of Geothermal Slim Holes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Theoretical calculations are presented to estimate the electrical generating capacity of the hot fluids discharged from individual geothermal wells using small wellhead generating equipment over a wide range of reservoir and operating conditions. The purpose is to appraise the possibility of employing slim holes (instead of conventional production-size wells) to power such generators for remote off-grid applications such as rural electrification in developing countries. Frequently, the generating capacity desired is less than one megawatt, and can be as low as 100 kilowatts; if slim holes can be usefully employed, overall project costs will be significantly reduced. This report presents the final results of the study. Both self-discharging wells and wells equipped with downhole pumps (either of the ''lineshaft'' or the ''submersible'' type) are examined. Several power plant designs are considered, including conventional single-flash backpressure and condensing steam turbines, binary plants, double-flash steam plants, and steam turbine/binary hybrid designs. Well inside diameters from 75 mm to 300 mm are considered; well depths vary from 300 to 1200 meters. Reservoir temperatures from 100 C to 240 C are examined, as are a variety of reservoir pressures and CO2 contents and well productivity index values.

Pritchett, J.W.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Overview of M-C Power`s MCFC power generation system  

SciTech Connect

The IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell power generation system is a skid mounted power plant which efficiently generates electricity and useful thermal energy. The primary benefits are its high electric generation efficiency (50% or greater), modular capacities (500 kW to 3 MW per unit) and minimal environmental impacts (less than 1 ppM NO{sub x}). A cost effective, modular capacity fuel cell power plant provides the industry with an attractive alternative to large central station facilities, and its advantages have the potential to optimize the way electric power is generated and distributed to the users. Environmental issues are becoming the single most uncertain aspect of the power business. These issues may be manifested in air emissions permits or allowances for NO{sub x} or SO{sub 2}, energy taxes, CO{sub 2} limits, ``carbon taxes,`` etc. and may appear as siting permits for generation, transmission, or distribution facilities. Utilities are ``down-sizing`` with the goal of becoming the lowest cost supplier of electricity and are beginning to examine the concepts of ``energy service`` to improve their economic competitiveness. These issues are leading utilities to examine the benefits of distributed generation. Siting small capacity generation near the customer loads or at distribution substations can improve system efficiency and quality while reducing distribution system costs. The advantages that fuel cell power plants have over conventional technologies are critical to the success of these evolving opportunities in the power generation marketplace.

Benjamin, T.G.; Woods, R.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

An electrically powered binary star?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a model for stellar binary systems consisting of a magnetic and a non-magnetic white-dwarf pair which is powered principally by electrical energy. In our model the luminosity is caused by resistive heating of the stellar atmospheres due to induced currents driven within the binary. This process is reminiscent of the Jupiter-Io system, but greatly increased in power because of the larger companion and stronger magnetic field of the primary. Electrical power is an alternative stellar luminosity source, following on from nuclear fusion and accretion. We find that this source of heating is sufficient to account for the observed X-ray luminosity of the 9.5-min binary RX J1914+24, and provides an explanation for its puzzling characteristics.

Kinwah Wu; Mark Cropper; Gavin Ramsay; Kazuhiro Sekiguchi

2001-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

447

Electric power monthly, March 1998 with data for December 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 63 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

EA-200 American Electric Power Service Corporation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

200 American Electric Power Service Corporation EA-200 American Electric Power Service Corporation Order authorizing American Electric Power Service Corporation to export electric...

449

EA-200-A American Electric Power Service Corporation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A American Electric Power Service Corporation EA-200-A American Electric Power Service Corporation Order authorizing American Electric Power Service Corporation to export electric...

450

EA-200-B American Electric Power Service Corporation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B American Electric Power Service Corporation EA-200-B American Electric Power Service Corporation Order authorizing American Electric Power Service Corporation to export electric...

451

EA-64-A Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-A Basin Electric Power Cooperative EA-64-A Basin Electric Power Cooperative Order authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to export electric energy to Canada EA-64-A Basin...

452

electric generation | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(TCDB) advanced vehicles electric generation NREL OpenEI renewables tcdb This new web application collects cost and performance estimates and makes it available to everyone...

453

Permits for Electricity Generating Facilities (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All applicants for conditional permits for electricity generating facilities must provide opportunity for public participation and quantify expected air emissions from the proposed project.

454

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of the NREL Geothermal Policymakers' Guidebook for Electricity Generation with information directing people to the Web site for more in-depth information.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Composition of Electricity Generation Portfolios, Pivotal Dynamics, and Market Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use simulations to study how the diversification of electricity generation portfolios influences wholesale prices. We find that the relationship between technological diversification and market prices is mediated by the supply-to-demand ratio. In ... Keywords: electricity, market power, simulations, technology diversification

Albert Banal-Estaòol; Augusto Rupérez Micola

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Power Monthly Electric Power Monthly Data for October 2013 | Release Date: December 20, 2013 | Next Release: January 22, 2014 | full report Previous Issues Issue: November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012(Nov) January 2012(Oct) December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 May 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 January 2011 issues prior to 2011 Format: pdf zip Go New Addition: Use EIA's new interactive Electricity Data Browser to find generation, fuel consumption, sales, revenue and average price time series,

457

Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XXXXX XXXXX Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick April 2012 PNNL-XXXXX Electrical Generation for More- Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick April 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 iii Summary This report examines the potential for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to provide electrical generation on-board commercial aircraft. Unlike a turbine-based auxiliary power unit (APU) a solid oxide fuel cell power unit (SOFCPU) would be more efficient than using the main engine generators to generate

458

DOWNHOLE POWER GENERATION AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The second quarter of the project was dedicated to convert the conceptual designs for the wireless tool and power generator into mechanical and electrical drawings as well as software code to create the new system. The tasks accomplished during this report period were: (1) Basic mechanical design for the wireless communications system was created and the detailed drawings were started. (2) Basic design for the power generator system was created and the detailed machining drawings were started. The generator design was modified to provide a direct action between the wellbore fluid flow and the piezoelectric stack to generate energy. The new design eliminates the inefficiencies related to picking up outside the tubing wall the pressure fluctuations occurring inside the tubing walls. (3) The new piezoelectric acoustic generator design was created and ordered from the manufacturer. The system will be composed of 40 ceramic wafers electrically connected in parallel and compressed into a single generator assembly. (4) The acoustic two-way communications requirements were also defined and the software and hardware development were started. (5) The electrical hardware development required to transmit information to the surface and to receive commands from the surface was started.

Paul Tubel

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

459

Electric power annual 1995. Volume II  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Wisconsin Electric Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Power Co Electric Power Co Place Wisconsin Utility Id 20847 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png CP (Secondary) Commercial Cg 1 Commercial Cg 2 Option A Commercial Cg 2 Option B Commercial Cg 3 Commercial Cg-20 (Time of Use) Commercial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Thermal energy storage for power generation  

SciTech Connect

Studies strongly indicate that the United States will face widespread electrical power constraints in the 1990s, with most regions of the country experiencing capacity shortages by the year 2000. In many cases, the demand for increased power will occur during intermediate and peak demand periods. Much of this demand is expected to be met by oil- and natural gas-fired Brayton cycle turbines and combined-cycle plants. While natural gas is currently plentiful and reasonably priced, the availability of an economical long-term coal-fired option for peak and intermediate load power generation will give electric power utilities an option in case either the availability or cost of natural gas should deteriorate. 54 refs., 5 figs., 17 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Sathyanarayana, K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

South Mississippi Electric Power Association Smart Grid Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electric Power Association Smart Grid Project (Mississippi) South Mississippi Electric Power Association Smart Grid Project (Mississippi) Eligibility Rural Electric...

463

Electric Power Monthly – December 2009 Data issue  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0226 (2009/12) Electric Power Monthly December 2009 With Data for September 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and ...

464

Discussion of “Rural Alaska Electric Power Quality”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Poor electric power quality has repeatedly been blamed for electrical equipment malfunction and failures, even though data to substantiate this view ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

465

Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect

An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

EPRI Ergonomics Handbook for the Electric Power Industry: Ergonomic Interventions for Plant Operators and Mechanics in Fossil-Fueled Generating Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Committee Research Program has provided ergonomic information to the electric energy industry workforce since 1999. This is the sixth EPRI ergonomics handbook; it specifically focuses on tasks performed by plant operators and mechanics working in fossil-fueled generating stations and also addresses some tasks performed by steam services technicians. Fossil-fueled generating station operational and mechanical work is physically strenuous and can expose workers...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Electric power annual 1994. Volume 2, Operational and financial data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This year, the annual is published in two volumes. Volume I focused on US electric utilities and contained final 1994 data on net generation, fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost. This Volume II presents annual 1994 summary statistics for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are preliminary data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on form EIA-861) and for electric utility financial statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, and demand- side management. Final 1994 data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity and gross generation, as well as supply and disposition information, are also provided in Volume II. Technical notes and a glossary are included.

NONE

1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

468

Economic Study for Geothermal Steam Production of Electric Power  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of economic analyses of geothermal electric power production facilities using selected geothermal resource temperature characteristics and relates the cost of power and rate of return on investment thus obtained to those being experienced at present and as projected from nuclear and fossil-fuel generating facilities. The results are set down in a manner to permit easy economic comparison of the various options of electric power generation. It is intended that this study will be a management assist in evaluating the rate of return on invested project capital and the resulting cost of electricity generated from geothermal resources as related to existing alternative generation methods. The resulting electric energy cost is compared with the selected alternative electric generation and their costs.

1977-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

469

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data for September 2013 ... 2.2.C Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal ... The new Electricity Monthly Update features a major event or an ...

470

AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Capacity Generating Capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

471

Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Diesel Generator Tanks 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear power provides about 20 % of the total electricity generated in the United States. In 2005, this was about 782 Billion kWh of the total electricity generation (EIA 2006). 2 As with fossil-fueled electricity generating plants, electricity in a nuclear power plant is produced by heated steam that drives a turbine generator. In a nuclear power plant, however, nuclear fission reactions in the core produce heat that is absorbed by a liquid that flows through the system and is converted to steam. Nuclear power plants are highly efficient and have become more so over the last 25 years. Operational efficiency (also referred to as plant performance or electricity production) can be measured by the capacity factor. The capacity factor is the ratio of the actual amount of electricity generated to the maximum possible amount that could be generated in a given period of time – usually a year. Today, nuclear power plants operate at an average 90 % capacity factor (compared to 56 % in 1980) (EIA 2006a). Thus, although nuclear generating capacity has remained roughly constant since 1990, at about 99 gigawatts (or about 10 % of the total U.S. electric generating capacity), the amount of electricity produced has increased 33 % since that time because of increased capacity utilization. Nuclear plants have the highest capacity factors of

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increasing worldwide demand for premium power, emerging trend towards electric utility deregulation and distributed power generation, global environmental concerns and regulatory controls have accelerated the development of advanced fuel cell based power generation systems. Fuel cells convert chemical energy to electrical energy through electrochemical oxidation of gaseous and/or liquid fuels ranging from hydrogen to hydrocarbons. Electrochemical oxidation of fuels prevents the formation of Nox, while the higher efficiency of the systems reduces carbon dioxide emissions (kg/kWh). Among various fuel cell power generation systems currently being developed for stationary and mobile applications, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) offer higher efficiency (up to 80% overall efficiency in hybrid configurations), fuel flexibility, tolerance to CO poisoning, modularity, and use of non-noble construction materials of low strategic value. Tubular, planar, and monolithic cell and stack configurations are currently being developed for stationary and military applications. The current generation of fuel cells uses doped zirconia electrolyte, nickel cermet anode, doped Perovskite cathode electrodes and predominantly ceramic interconnection materials. Fuel cells and cell stacks operate in a temperature range of 800-1000 *C. Low cost ($400/kWe), modular (3-10kWe) SOFC technology development approach of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative of the USDOE will be presented and discussed. SOFC technology will be reviewed and future technology development needs will be addressed.

Singh, Prabhakar; Pederson, Larry R.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Viswanathan, Vish V.

2001-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

473

Neutron generator power supply modeling in EMMA  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has prime responsibility for neutron generator design and manufacturing, and is committed to developing predictive tools for modeling neutron generator performance. An important aspect of understanding component performance is explosively driven ferroelectric power supply modeling. EMMA (ElectroMechanical Modeling in ALEGRA) is a three dimensional compile time version of Sandia`s ALEGRA code. The code is built on top of the general ALEGRA framework for parallel shock-physics computations but also includes additional capability for modeling the electric potential field in dielectrics. The overall package includes shock propagation due to explosive detonation, depoling of ferroelectric ceramics, electric field calculation and coupling with a general lumped element circuit equation system. The AZTEC parallel iterative solver is used to solve for the electric potential. The DASPK differential algebraic equation package is used to solve the circuit equation system. Sample calculations are described.

Robinson, A.C.; Farnsworth, A.V.; Montgomery, S.T.; Peery, J.S; Merewether, K.O.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Market power and welfare effects in DC power flow electricity models with thermal line losses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nodal electric power network with Cournot-Nash interaction among power generators is formulated as a mixed complementarity problem. The model incorporates a direct current (DC) power flow approximation with thermal line losses to model real-time flows. ... Keywords: Electricity markets, Imperfect competition, Thermal line losses, Welfare measurement

Rastislav Ivanic; Paul V. Preckel; Zuwei Yu

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Radiation Control Program The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in Maine. The Legislature

476

Control system for wind-powered generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a system of wind-powered generators, a reliable yet inexpensive control system is desirable. Such a system would be completely automatic so it could be left unattended for long periods. It would respond to electrical representations of data such as bearing temperature, vibration, wind velocity, turbine velocity, torque, or any other pertinent data. It would respond by starting or stopping the turbine, controlling the loading, or sounding an alarm. A microprocessor-based controller capable of these functions is described.

Kroth, G.J.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Backup Power Options Alternative Backup Power Options Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options In addition to electric generators powered by fuel, homeowners and business owners may consider alternative backup power options. Battery-stored backup power-Allows you to continue operating lights, refrigerators and other appliances, fans, and communications during a power outage. These systems can connect to renewable sources of energy, like solar panels and small-scale wind generators, to help the batteries stay charged during an emergency. You can also recharge many of these battery systems with diesel generators. The length of time you will be able to draw electricity from your batteries will depend on the size of your

478

Central Electric Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name Central Electric Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 2849 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity...

479

Electric power monthly, February 1998 with data for November 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Prognostic Watch of the Electric Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A prognostic watch of the electric power system is framed up for prognostics of a threat of thermalisation.

Stefanov, Stefan Z

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generate electric power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Table Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power ... Form EIA?886, “Annual Survey of Alternative Fueled Vehicles”; ...

482

Coast Electric Power Association - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Coast Electric Power Association - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Heating & Cooling...

483

Electric Power Annual 2009 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

electric power industry statistics at the national level. The publication provides industry decision-makers, government policymakers,

484

Electric Power Metrology Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Contact principal investigators … more. Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid Last Updated Date: 10/03/2011 Our ...

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid. Summary: ... Related Programs and Projects: Smart Grid Interoperability Standards Project. Contact. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

486

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4.6.A Electricity Generation by State: 4.6.B Generation by State, Year-to-Date: Receipts of Petroleum Liquids Delivered for; 4.7.A Electricity ...

487

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

488

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

489

Changes related to "Environmentally Protective Power Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Environmentally Protective Power Generation EPPG" Environmentally Protective Power Generation EPPG Jump to:...

490

Renewable and Efficient Electric Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.8.1 Ideal Transformers 37 1.8.2 Magnetization Losses 40 Problems 44 2 Fundamentals of Electric Power 51 2Renewable and Efficient Electric Power Systems Gilbert M. Masters Stanford University A JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC., PUBLICATION #12;#12;Renewable and Efficient Electric Power Systems #12;#12;Renewable