Sample records for general factors exposure

  1. The Exposure Rate Conversion Factor for Nuclear Fallout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spriggs, G D

    2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fallout is comprised of approximately 2000 radionuclides. About 1000 of these radionuclides are either primary fission products or activated fission products that are created during the burn process. The exposure rate one meter above the surface produced by this complex mixture of radionuclides varies rapidly with time since many of the radionuclides are short-lived and decay numerous times before reaching a stable isotope. As a result, the mixture of radionuclides changes rapidly with time. Using a new code developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the mixture of radionuclides at any given point in time can be calculated. The code also calculates the exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for all 3864 individual isotopes contained in its database based on the total gamma energy released per decay. Based on the combination of isotope mixture and individual ECFs, the time-dependent variation of the composite exposure rate conversion factor for nuclear fallout can be easily calculated. As example of this new capability, a simple test case corresponding to a 10 kt, uranium-plutonium fuel has been calculated. The results for the time-dependent, composite ECF for this test case are shown in Figure 1. For comparison, we also calculated the composite exposure rate conversion factor using the conversion factors found in Federal Guidance Report No.12 (FGR-12) published by ORNL, which contains the conversion factors for approximately 1000 isotopes. As can be noted from Figure 1, the two functions agree reasonably well at times greater than about 30 minutes. However, they do not agree at early times since FGR-12 does not include all of the short-lived isotopes that are produced in nuclear fallout. It should also be noted that the composite ECF at one hour is 19.7 R/hr per Ci/m{sup 2}. This corresponds to 3148 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile, which agrees reasonably well with the value of 3000 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile as quoted by Glasstone. We have also tabulated the top 50 contributors to the exposure rate at various points in time following a detonation. These major contributors are given in Table 1.

  2. Geographical scenario uncertainty in generic fate and exposure factors of toxic pollutants for life-cycle impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Lundi, Sven; McKone, Thomas E.; van de Meent, D.

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In environmental life-cycle assessments (LCA), fate and exposure factors account for the general fate and exposure properties of chemicals under generic environmental conditions by means of 'evaluative' multi-media fate and exposure box models. To assess the effect of using different generic environmental conditions, fate and exposure factors of chemicals emitted under typical conditions of (1) Western Europe, (2) Australia and (3) the United States of America were compared with the multi-media fate and exposure box model USES-LCA. Comparing the results of the three evaluative environments, it was found that the uncertainty in fate and exposure factors for ecosystems and humans due to choice of an evaluative environment, as represented by the ratio of the 97.5th and 50th percentile, is between a factor 2 and 10. Particularly, fate and exposure factors of emissions causing effects in fresh water ecosystems and effects on human health have relatively high uncertainty. This uncertainty i s mainly caused by the continental difference in the average soil erosion rate, the dimensions of the fresh water and agricultural soil compartment, and the fraction of drinking water coming from ground water.

  3. Development and evaluation of probability density functions for a set of human exposure factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, R.L.; McKone, T.E.; Bodnar, A.; Jacobson, J.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to describe efforts carried out during 1998 and 1999 at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to assist the U.S. EPA in developing and ranking the robustness of a set of default probability distributions for exposure assessment factors. Among the current needs of the exposure-assessment community is the need to provide data for linking exposure, dose, and health information in ways that improve environmental surveillance, improve predictive models, and enhance risk assessment and risk management (NAS, 1994). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR) plays a lead role in developing national guidance and planning future activities that support the EPA Superfund Program. OERR is in the process of updating its 1989 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS) as part of the EPA Superfund reform activities. Volume III of RAGS, when completed in 1999 will provide guidance for conducting probabilistic risk assessments. This revised document will contain technical information including probability density functions (PDFs) and methods used to develop and evaluate these PDFs. The PDFs provided in this EPA document are limited to those relating to exposure factors.

  4. Determination of photon conversion factors relating exposure and dose for several extremity phantom designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, P.L.; Eichner, F.N.; Reece, W.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dosimetric measurements were performed to determine the exposure-to-dose conversion factors (Cx) for simple extremity phantoms suitable for extremity dosimeter performance testing. The phantoms studied represented the forearm or lower leg and the finger. Measurements were performed for solid plastic phantoms and for phantoms containing simulated bone material to determine the effect of backscattered radiations from the simulated bone to the phantom surface. Photon beam energies used for the measurements ranged from 16 keV to 1.25 MeV (average). The Cx factors for the finger phantoms did not vary significantly with phantom composition. The Cx factors in the arm/leg phantoms with the bone simulant material differed significantly from those for the solid plastic phantom over the energy range of 40-100 keV. This effect was attributed to the preferential absorption of the lower energy backscattered photons by the higher atomic number material that was contained in the bone-simulant insert. The position of the bone-simulating material below the surface of the phantom was more important than its size or level of bone equivalency. For calibrations and dosimeter testing, Al was found adequate as a bone-simulating material.

  5. Near Threshold Neutral Pion Electroproduction at High Momentum Transfers and Generalized Form Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Khetarpal; P. Stoler; I. G. Aznauryan; V. Kubarovsky; K. P. Adhikari; D. Adikaram; M. Aghasyan; M. J. Amaryan; M. D. Anderson; S. Anefalos Pereira; M. Anghinolfi; H. Avakian; H. Baghdasaryan; J. Ball; N. A. Baltzell; M. Battaglieri; V. Batourine; I. Bedlinskiy; A. S. Biselli; J. Bono; S. Boiarinov; W. J. Briscoe; W. K. Brooks; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; G. Charles; P. L. Cole; M. Contalbrigo; V. Crede; A. D'Angelo; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; C. Djalali; D. Doughty; M. Dugger; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; S. Fegan; R. Fersch; J. A. Fleming; A. Fradi; M. Y. Gabrielyan; M. Garçon; N. Gevorgyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; W. Gohn; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; K. A. Griffioen; B. Guegan; M. Guidal; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; C. Hanretty; N. Harrison; K. Hicks; D. Ho; M. Holtrop; C. E. Hyde; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; E. L. Isupov; H. S. Jo; K. Joo; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; A. Kim; W. Kim; F. J. Klein; S. Koirala; A. Kubarovsky; S. V. Kuleshov; N. D. Kvaltine; S. Lewis; K. Livingston; H. Y. Lu; I. J. D. MacGregor; Y. Mao; D. Martinez; M. Mayer; B. McKinnon; C. A. Meyer; T. Mineeva; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; R. A. Montgomery; H. Moutarde; E. Munevar; C. Munoz Camacho; P. Nadel-Turonski; R. Nasseripour; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Paremuzyan; K. Park; S. Park; E. Pasyuk; E. Phelps; J. J. Phillips; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; D. Protopopescu; A. J. R. Puckett; B. A. Raue; G. Ricco; D. Rimal; M. Ripani; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; F. Sabatié; M. S. Saini; C. Salgado; N. A. Saylor; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; H. Seraydaryan; Y. G. Sharabian; G. D. Smith; D. I. Sober; D. Sokhan; S. S. Stepanyan; S. Stepanyan; I. I. Strakovsky; S. Strauch; M. Taiuti; W. Tang; C. E. Taylor; S. Tkachenko; M. Ungaro; B. Vernarsky; H. Voskanyan; E. Voutier; N. K. Walford; L. B. Weinstein; D. P. Weygand; M. H. Wood; N. Zachariou; J. Zhang; Z. W. Zhao; I. Zonta

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the measurement of near threshold neutral pion electroproduction cross sections and the extraction of the associated structure functions on the proton in the kinematic range $Q^2$ from 2 to 4.5 GeV$^2$ and $W$ from 1.08 to 1.16 GeV. These measurements allow us to access the dominant pion-nucleon s-wave multipoles $E_{0+}$ and $S_{0+}$ in the near-threshold region. In the light-cone sum-rule framework (LCSR), these multipoles are related to the generalized form factors $G_1^{\\pi^0 p}(Q^2)$ and $G_2^{\\pi^0 p}(Q^2)$. The data are compared to these generalized form factors and the results for $G_1^{\\pi^0 p}(Q^2)$ are found to be in good agreement with the LCSR predictions, but the level of agreement with $G_2^{\\pi^0 p}(Q^2)$ is poor.

  6. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via ?*p ? n?+ at high Q2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, K; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Bennett, R P; et al

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the n?+ channel at relatively high momentum transfer (Q2 up to 4.2 GeV2). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole (E0+), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor G1 within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor GA. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly 4? CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754-GeV electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the ?-N multipole E0+/GD were measuredmore »using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost Q2 independent.« less

  7. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via ?*p ? n?+ at high Q2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, K; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Bennett, R P; Biselli, A S; Bookwalter, C; Boiarinov, S; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Euginio, P; Fedotov, G; Fradi, A; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Graham, L; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Khandaker, M; Khertarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, A; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kvaltine, N D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Pappalardo, L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, S; Anefalos Pereira, S; Phelps, E; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabati ee, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, E S; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, C E; Tian, Y; Tkachenko, S; Trivedi, A; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vlassov, A V; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the n?+ channel at relatively high momentum transfer (Q2 up to 4.2 GeV2). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole (E0+), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor G1 within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor GA. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly 4? CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754-GeV electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the ?-N multipole E0+/GD were measured using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost Q2 independent.

  8. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via $?^* p \\to n?^+$ at high $Q^2$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kijun Park; Ralf Gothe; Krishna Adhikari; Dasuni Adikaram-Mudiyanselage; Marco Anghinolfi; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Jacques Ball; Marco Battaglieri; Vitaly Baturin; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Robert Bennett; Angela Biselli; Craig Bookwalter; Sergey Boyarinov; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Volker Burkert; Daniel Carman; Andrea Celentano; Shloka Chandavar; Gabriel Charles; Philip Cole; Marco Contalbrigo; Volker Crede; Annalisa D'Angelo; Aji Daniel; Natalya Dashyan; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Alexandre Deur; Chaden Djalali; David Doughty; Raphael Dupre; Ahmed El Alaoui; Lamiaa Elfassi; Paul Eugenio; Gleb Fedotov; Ahmed Fradi; Marianna Gabrielyan; Nerses Gevorgyan; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Wesley Gohn; Evgeny Golovach; Lewis Graham; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Lei Guo; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Charles Hanretty; David Heddle; Kenneth Hicks; Maurik Holtrop; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Evgeny Isupov; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Mahbubul Khandaker; Puneet Khetarpal; Andrey Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; A. Kubarovsky; Valery Kubarovsky; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Nicholas Kvaltine; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; Ian MacGregor; Nikolai Markov; Michael Mayer; Bryan McKinnon; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Taisiya Mineeva; Marco Mirazita; Viktor Mokeev; Herve Moutarde; Edwin Munevar Espitia; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Michael Paolone; Luciano Pappalardo; Rafayel Paremuzyan; Seungkyung Park; Sergio Pereira; Evan Phelps; Silvia Pisano; Oleg Pogorelko; Sergey Pozdnyakov; John Price; Sebastien Procureur; Yelena Prok; Giovanni Ricco; Dipak Rimal; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; Franck Sabatie; Mukesh Saini; Carlos Salgado; Diane Schott; Reinhard Schumacher; Heghine Seraydaryan; Youri Sharabian; Elton Smith; Gregory Smith; Daniel Sober; Daria Sokhan; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Paul Stoler; Igor Strakovski; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Wei Tang; Charles Taylor; Ye Tian; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Arjun Trivedi; Maurizio Ungaro; Brian Vernarsky; Alexander Vlasov; Eric Voutier; Daniel Watts; Dennis Weygand; Michael Wood; Nicholas Zachariou; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao; N. Kalantarians; C. E. Hyde

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the $n\\pi^+$ channel at relatively high momentum transfer ($Q^2$ up to 4.2 $\\rm{GeV^2}$). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole ($E_{0+}$), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor $G_1$ within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor $G_A$. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly $4\\pi$ CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754 $\\rm{GeV}$ electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the $\\pi-N$-multipole $E_{0+}/G_D$ were measured using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost $Q^2$ independent.

  9. Study of confinement/deconfinement transition in AdS/QCD with generalized warp factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shobhit Sachan

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study analytical solutions of charged black holes and thermally charged AdS with generalized warped factors in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton system. We calculate Euclidean action for charged AdS and thermally charged AdS. The actions in both backgrounds are regularized by the method of background subtraction. The study of phase transition between charged black hole and thermally charged AdS gives an insight to the confinement/deconfinement transition. The plots of grand potential vs temperature and chemical potential vs transition temperature are obtained.

  10. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  11. Testing general relativity with compact coalescing binaries: comparing exact and predictive methods to compute the Bayes factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Del Pozzo; Katherine Grover; Ilya Mandel; Alberto Vecchio

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The second generation of gravitational-wave detectors is scheduled to start operations in 2015. Gravitational-wave signatures of compact binary coalescences could be used to accurately test the strong-field dynamical predictions of general relativity. Computationally expensive data analysis pipelines, including TIGER, have been developed to carry out such tests. As a means to cheaply assess whether a particular deviation from general relativity can be detected, Cornish et al. and Vallisneri recently proposed an approximate scheme to compute the Bayes factor between a general-relativity gravitational-wave model and a model representing a class of alternative theories of gravity parametrised by one additional parameter. This approximate scheme is based on only two easy-to-compute quantities: the signal-to-noise ratio of the signal and the fitting factor between the signal and the manifold of possible waveforms within general relativity. In this work, we compare the prediction from the approximate formula against an exact numerical calculation of the Bayes factor using the lalinference library. We find that, using frequency-domain waveforms, the approximate scheme predicts exact results with good accuracy, providing the correct scaling with the signal-to-noise ratio at a fitting factor value of 0.992 and the correct scaling with the fitting factor at a signal-to-noise ratio of 20, down to a fitting factor of $\\sim$ 0.9. We extend the framework for the approximate calculation of the Bayes factor which significantly increases its range of validity, at least to fitting factors of $\\sim$ 0.7 or higher.

  12. Electric and Weak Electric Dipole Form Factors for Heavy Fermions in a General Two Higgs Doublet Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Gomez-Dumm; G. A. Gonzalez-Sprinberg

    1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The electric and weak electric dipole form factors for heavy fermions are calculated in the context of the most general two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM). We find that the large top mass can produce a significant enhancement of the electric dipole form factor in the case of the b and c quarks. This effect can be used to distinguish between different 2HDM scenarios.

  13. Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. • land use • water use • CO2 emissions • radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

  14. Integration of D-dimensional 2-factor spaces cosmological models by reducing to the generalized Emden-Fowler equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. R. Gavrilov; V. N. Melnikov

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The D-dimensional cosmological model on the manifold $M = R \\times M_{1} \\times M_{2}$ describing the evolution of 2 Einsteinian factor spaces, $M_1$ and $M_2$, in the presence of multicomponent perfect fluid source is considered. The barotropic equation of state for mass-energy densities and the pressures of the components is assumed in each space. When the number of the non Ricci-flat factor spaces and the number of the perfect fluid components are both equal to 2, the Einstein equations for the model are reduced to the generalized Emden-Fowler (second-order ordinary differential) equation, which has been recently investigated by Zaitsev and Polyanin within discrete-group analysis. Using the integrable classes of this equation one generates the integrable cosmological models. The corresponding metrics are presented. The method is demonstrated for the special model with Ricci-flat spaces $M_1,M_2$ and the 2-component perfect fluid source.

  15. A general moment NRIXS approach to the determination of equilibrium Fe isotopic fractionation factors: application to goethite and jarosite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dauphas, N; Alp, E E; Golden, D C; Sio, C K; Tissot, F L H; Hu, M; Zhao, J; Gao, L; Morris, R V

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the reduced partition function ratios for iron isotopes in goethite FeO(OH), potassium-jarosite KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6, and hydronium-jarosite (H3O)Fe3(SO4)2(OH)6, by Nuclear Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering (NRIXS, also known as Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy -NRVS- or Nuclear Inelastic Scattering -NIS) at the Advanced Photon Source. These measurements were made on synthetic minerals enriched in 57Fe. A new method (i.e., the general moment approach) is presented to calculate {\\beta}-factors from the moments of the NRIXS spectrum S(E). The first term in the moment expansion controls iron isotopic fractionation at high temperature and corresponds to the mean force constant of the iron bonds, a quantity that is readily measured and often reported in NRIXS studies.

  16. Gestational and Early Life Exposures as Risk Factors for Childhood Lymphoma, Leukemia, and Wilms' Tumors: an Exploration of Birth Characteristics, Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections, and Pesticide Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcotte, Erin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    risk factors for acute leukemia in the Jerusalem PerinatalRisk factors for acute leukemia in children: a review.of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Int J Cancer,

  17. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 564 (2006) 319323 Passive monitoring of the equilibrium factor inside a radon exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    . r 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. PACS: 29.40; 23.60 Keywords: Radon progeny; Equilibrium-lived radon progeny contributes about half of the total exposure of human beings to ionizing radiation, but instead to its short-lived progeny. Exposure to radon progeny is measured through the product of PAEC Ã? t

  18. Exposure chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moss, Owen R. (Kennewick, WA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  19. Maternal exposure to metals—Concentrations and predictors of exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callan, A.C., E-mail: a.callan@ecu.edu.au [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia); Hinwood, A.L.; Ramalingam, M.; Boyce, M. [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia)] [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia); Heyworth, J. [School Population Health, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)] [School Population Health, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McCafferty, P. [ChemCentre, PO Box 1250, Bentley, WA 6983 (Australia)] [ChemCentre, PO Box 1250, Bentley, WA 6983 (Australia); Odland, J.Ø. [Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway)] [Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of metals are important for biological function but have also been shown to impact health at elevated concentrations, whereas others have no known biological function. Pregnant women are a vulnerable population and measures to reduce exposure in this group are important. We undertook a study of maternal exposure to the metals, aluminium, arsenic, copper, cobalt, chromium, lithium, manganese, nickel, selenium, tin, uranium and zinc in 173 participants across Western Australia. Each participant provided a whole blood and urine sample, as well as drinking water, residential soil and dust samples and completed a questionnaire. In general the concentrations of metals in all samples were low with the notable exception of uranium (blood U mean 0.07 µg/L, range <0.01–0.25 µg/L; urinary U mean 0.018 µg/g creatinine, range <0.01–0.199 µg/g creatinine). Factors that influenced biological concentrations were consumption of fish which increased urinary arsenic concentrations, hobbies (including mechanics and welding) which increased blood manganese concentrations and iron/folic acid supplement use which was associated with decreased concentrations of aluminium and nickel in urine and manganese in blood. Environmental concentrations of aluminium, copper and lithium were found to influence biological concentrations, but this was not the case for other environmental metals concentrations. Further work is underway to explore the influence of diet on biological metals concentrations in more detail. The high concentrations of uranium require further investigation. -- Highlights: • High concentrations of uranium with respect to international literature. • Environmental concentrations of Al, Cu and Li influenced urinary concentrations. • Exposure to mechanics/welding hobbies increased blood Mn concentrations. • Iron/Folic acid supplements reduced biological concentrations of Al, Ni and Mn.

  20. WON EXPOSURE AND LUNG CANCER RISK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    As information on indoor air quality accumulated * it became apparent that radon and its progeny are invariably present in indoor environments and that concentrations may reach unacceptably high levels. The lung cancer excess anong miners exposed to radon progeny raised concern that exposure to radon progeny might also cause lung cancer in the general population. This presentation first provides an ovemiew of radon daughter carcinogenesis, and then reviews the recent BEIR IV report. The report described a statistical model * based on analysis of data from four studies of miners, for estimating the lung cancer risk associated with exposure to radon progeny. Tbe analyses showed that the risk of radon exposure declines with time since exposure and with increasing age. The BEIR IV committee concluded that radon progeny and cigarette smoking interact in a multiplicative fashion and that exposure-dose relationships are similar for exposure in homes and in mines.

  1. Track 3: Exposure Hazards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

  2. The effects of low environmental cadmium exposure on bone density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trzcinka-Ochocka, M., E-mail: ochocka@imp.lodz.pl [Department of Chemical Hazards, Laboratory of Biomonitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Jakubowski, M. [Department of Chemical Hazards, Laboratory of Biomonitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)] [Department of Chemical Hazards, Laboratory of Biomonitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Szymczak, W. [Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland) [Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Insitute of Psychology, University of Lodz (Poland); Janasik, B.; Brodzka, R. [Department of Chemical Hazards, Laboratory of Biomonitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)] [Department of Chemical Hazards, Laboratory of Biomonitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent epidemiological data indicate that low environmental exposure to cadmium, as shown by cadmium body burden (Cd-U), is associated with renal dysfunction as well as an increased risk of cadmium-induced bone disorders. The present study was designed to assess the effects of low environmental cadmium exposure, at the level sufficient to induce kidney damage, on bone metabolism and mineral density (BMD). The project was conducted in the area contaminated with cadmium, nearby a zinc smelter located in the region of Poland where heavy industry prevails. The study population comprised 170 women (mean age=39.7; 18-70 years) and 100 men (mean age=31.9; 18-76 years). Urinary and blood cadmium and the markers of renal tubular dysfunction ({beta}{sub 2}M-U RBP, NAG), glomerular dysfunction (Alb-U and {beta}{sub 2}M-S) and bone metabolism markers (BAP-S, CTX-S) as well as forearm BMD, were measured. The results of this study based on simple dose-effect analysis showed the relationship between increasing cadmium concentrations and an increased excretion of renal dysfunction markers and decreasing bone density. However, the results of the multivariate analysis did not indicate the association between exposure to cadmium and decrease in bone density. They showed that the most important factors that have impact on bone density are body weight and age in the female subjects and body weight and calcium excretion in males. Our investigation revealed that the excretion of low molecular weight proteins occurred at a lower level of cadmium exposure than the possible loss of bone mass. It seems that renal tubular markers are the most sensitive and significant indicators of early health effects of cadmium intoxication in the general population. The correlation of urinary cadmium concentration with markers of kidney dysfunction was observed in the absence of significant correlations with bone effects. Our findings did not indicate any effects of environmental cadmium exposure on bone density.

  3. Cadmium, lead and mercury exposure in non smoking pregnant women

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinwood, A.L., E-mail: a.hinwood@ecu.edu.au [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia); Callan, A.C.; Ramalingam, M.; Boyce, M. [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia)] [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia); Heyworth, J. [School Population Health, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)] [School Population Health, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McCafferty, P. [ChemCentre, PO Box 1250, Bentley, WA 6983 (Australia)] [ChemCentre, PO Box 1250, Bentley, WA 6983 (Australia); Odland, J.Ø. [Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway)] [Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent literature suggests that exposure to low concentrations of heavy metals may affect both maternal and child health. This study aimed to determine the biological heavy metals concentrations of pregnant women as well as environmental and dietary factors that may influence exposure concentrations. One hundred and seventy three pregnant women were recruited from Western Australia, each providing a sample of blood, first morning void urine, residential soil, dust and drinking water samples. Participants also completed a questionnaire which included a food frequency component. All biological and environmental samples were analysed for heavy metals using ICP-MS. Biological and environmental concentrations of lead and mercury were generally low (Median Pb Drinking Water (DW) 0.04 µg/L; Pb soil <3.0 µg/g; Pb dust 16.5 µg/g; Pb blood 3.67 µg/L; Pb urine 0.55; µg/L Hg DW <0.03; Hg soil <1.0 µg/g; Hg dust <1.0 µg/g; Hg blood 0.46 µg/L; Hg urine <0.40 µg/L). Cadmium concentrations were low in environmental samples (Median CdDW 0.02 µg/L; Cdsoil <0.30 ug/g; Cddust <0.30) but elevated in urine samples (Median 0.55 µg/L, creatinine corrected 0.70 µg/g (range <0.2–7.06 µg/g creatinine) compared with other studies of pregnant women. Predictors of increased biological metals concentrations in regression models for blood cadmium were residing in the Great Southern region of Western Australia and not using iron/folic acid supplements and for urinary cadmium was having lower household annual income. However, these factors explained little of the variation in respective biological metals concentrations. The importance of establishing factors that influence low human exposure concentrations is becoming critical in efforts to reduce exposures and hence the potential for adverse health effects. -- Highlights: • Biological heavy metals concentrations in women in their 3rd trimester of pregnancy. • Exposure assessment including environmental, lifestyle and activity data. • Urinary cadmium concentrations were elevated in this group of pregnant women. • Blood lead and mercury concentrations were below recommended biological guideline values.

  4. High Exposure Facility Technical Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Gregory L.; Stithem, Arthur R.; Murphy, Mark K.; Smith, Alex K.

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Exposure Facility is a collimated high-level gamma irradiator that is located in the basement of the 318 building. It was custom developed by PNNL back in 1982 to meet the needs for high range radiological instrument calibrations and dosimeter irradiations. At the time no commercially available product existed that could create exposure rates up to 20,000 R/h. This document is intended to pass on the design criteria that was employed to create this unique facility, while maintaining compliance with ANSI N543-1974, "General Safety Standard for Installations Using Non-Medical X-Ray and Sealed Gamma-Ray Sources, Energies up to 10 MeV."

  5. Methodological Issues in Exposure Assessment for Studies of Childhood Leukemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slusky, Danna Aharon

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JA. Epidemiology of acute leukemia in children and adults.A. Risk factors for acute leukemia in children: a review.exposure and the risk of acute leukemia in children with

  6. Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Bingham, Carl (Lakewood, CO); Goggin, Rita (Englewood, CO); Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO); Netter, Judy C. (Westminster, CO)

    2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Process and apparatus for providing ultra accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing of samples under controlled weathering without introducing unrealistic failure mechanisms in exposed materials and without breaking reciprocity relationships between flux exposure levels and cumulative dose that includes multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity at high levels of natural sunlight comprising: a) concentrating solar flux uniformly; b) directing the controlled uniform sunlight onto sample materials in a chamber enclosing multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity to allow the sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a sufficient period of time in days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth of representative weathering of the sample materials.

  7. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Instructions for preparing occupational exposure data for submittal to the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) repository.

  8. Parental occupational exposures and risk of childhood cancer: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, L.M.; Hicks, A.M.; Peters, J.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors reviewed the literature in order to summarize the present knowledge on the association between parental occupational exposures to chemicals and the risk of childhood malignancy. The 32 studies pertaining to this topic were evaluated by considering various study qualities such as sample size, specificity of outcome, confounding, exposure specificity, and control selection. When evaluating the findings from any epidemiologic study, the potential sources of bias have to be considered. The selection of subjects, misclassification of exposure or outcome, and confounding from extraneous factors can contribute to a biased estimate of effect. Studies done to minimize these potential biases will be more valid, and these studies should be given the most weight when parental occupational exposures are evaluated as risk factors for childhood malignancy. We conclude that the preponderance of evidence supports the hypothesis that occupational exposure of parents to chemicals increases the risk of childhood malignancy. The parental occupational exposures implicated in childhood malignancy risk are exposure to chemicals including paints, petroleum products, solvents (especially chlorinated hydrocarbons) and pesticides, and exposure to metals. The available data do not allow the identification of specific etiologic agents within these categories of compounds. Future epidemiologic and toxicologic studies should be designed to pursue these leads. 49 references.

  9. Modifiers of Exposure-Response Estimates for Lung Cancer among Miners Exposed to Radon Progeny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard W. Hornung; James Deddens; Robert Roscoe

    The association between lung cancer and exposure to radon decay products has been well established. Despite agreement on this point, there is still some degree of uncertainty regarding characteristics of the exposure-response relationship. The use of studies of underground miners to estimate lung cancer risks due to residential radon exposure depends upon a better understanding of factors potentially modifying the exposure-response relationship. Given the diversity in study populations regarding smoking status, mining conditions, risk analysis methodology, and referent populations, the risk estimates across studies are quite similar. However, several factors partially contributing to differences in risk estimates are modified by attained age, time since last exposure, exposure rate, and cigarette smoking patterns. There is growing agreement across studies that relative risk decreases with attained age and time since last exposure. Several studies have also found an inverse exposure-rate effect, i.e., low exposure rates for protracted duration of exposure are more hazardous than equivalent cumulative exposures received at higher rates for shorter periods of time. Additionally, the interaction between radon exposure and cigarette smoking appears to be intermediate between additive and multiplicative in a growing number of studies. Quantitative estimates of these modifying factors are given using a new analysis of data from the latest update of the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort.- Environ Health Perspect 1 03(Suppl 2):49-53 (1995)

  10. Electrothermal controlled-exposure technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, John Mapes

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technology is presented for exposing the contents of microfabricated cavities in a substrate. These contents are hermetically sealed until exposure is triggered by an electronic signal. The exposure mechanism uses ...

  11. Arsenic exposure in children living near a former copper smelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binder, S.; Forney, D.; Kaye, W.; Paschal, D.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 10,000 people live in communities surrounding the former copper smelter at Anaconda, Montana. Most of these people live in the town of Anaconda, which is generally upwind of the smelter. The smelter ceased operations in 1980, after almost a century of ore processing. Soil and dust on the smelter site and in the vicinity remain contaminated with arsenic, although at this time air and drinking water arsenic levels are not elevated. Results of soil and dust sampling for arsenic in the communities around the smelter are reported. In the town of Anaconda, surface soil arsenic levels from residential sites have averaged around 100 ppm or greater. Young children are generally believed to be the population with the most nonoccupational exposure to soil. Several models of exposure to environmental arsenic in the Anaconda area have predicted that children living in all communities surrounding the smelter would be having significant and measurable exposure to arsenic. Two exposures surveys, conducted while the smelter was operative, demonstrated that excess exposure to arsenic was occurring in young children. Until the present surveys, no exposure data had been collected since the smelter was closed.

  12. General Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours,Dioxide andNationalallGeneralGeneral

  13. General Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey Campbelllong version)Confinement |GeneralGeneral

  14. General Recommendations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey Campbelllong version)Confinement |GeneralGeneral»

  15. Diagnostic health risk assessment of electronic waste on the general population in developing countries' scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazzoli, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.frazzoli@iss.i [Food and Veterinary Toxicology Unit and WHO/FAO Collaborating Centre for Veterinary Public Health - Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy); Orisakwe, Orish Ebere [Toxicology Unit, Department of Pharmacology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, College of Health Sciences Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Anambra State (Nigeria); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy); Dragone, Roberto [Institute of Nanostructured Materials (ISMN), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, at the Department of Chemistry of the 'Sapienza' University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto [Food and Veterinary Toxicology Unit and WHO/FAO Collaborating Centre for Veterinary Public Health - Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    E-waste is the generic name for technological waste. Even though aspects related to e-waste environmental pollution and human exposure are known, scientific assessments are missing so far on the actual risks for health sustainability of the general population exposed to e-waste scenarios, such as illicit dumping, crude recycling and improper treatment and disposal. In fact, further to occupational and direct local exposure, e-waste scenarios may impact on the environment-to-food chain, thus eliciting a widespread and repeated exposure of the general population to mixtures of toxicants, mainly toxic chemical elements, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and persistent organic pollutants. In the absence of any clear policy on e-waste flow management, the situation in the e-waste receiver countries may become quite scary; accordingly, here we address a diagnostic risk assessment of health issues potentially elicited by e-waste related mixtures of toxicants. Scientific evidence available so far (mainly from China) is discussed with special attention to the concept of health sustainability, i.e. the poor health burden heritage perpetuated through the mother-to-child dyad. Endocrine disruption and neurotoxicity are specifically considered as examples of main health burden issues relevant to perpetuation through life cycle and across generations; toxicological information are considered along with available data on environmental and food contamination and human internal exposure. The risk from exposure to e-waste related mixtures of toxicants of vulnerable subpopulation like breast-fed infants is given special attention. The diagnostic risk assessment demonstrates how e-waste exposure poses an actual public health emergency, as it may entrain significant health risks also for generations to come. Exposure scenarios as well as specific chemicals of major concern may vary in different contexts; for instance, only limited information is available on e-waste related exposures in a major site of e-waste dumping such as West Africa. Therefore, considerations are also given on data gaps possibly fitting a systematic risk assessment of the e-waste health impacts in different subscenarios as well as possible protective factors for exposed subpopulations.

  16. Receptor modeling assessment of particle total exposure assessment methodology data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakovleva, E.; Hopke, P.K.; Wallace, L.

    1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from the 1991 Particle Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (PTEAM) study in Riverside, CA, were analyzed using a new receptor modeling method. In this study, ambient (outdoor), indoor, and personal particulate matter (PM) concentrations and elemental concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} were measured for a number of participants. These measurements made is possible to relate the pollution to which people were exposed throughout their daily activities with the outdoor air conditions. Personal daytime concentrations of the PM{sub 10} and majority of elements were significantly higher than outdoor or indoor concentrations, suggesting that a significant part of personal aerosol exposure is the result of personal daily activities. Possible sources of additional particulate mass include resuspension of particles that penetrate from the outdoors and formation of new particles during cooking, smoking, etc. Positive matrix factorization analysis was performed to describe the sources of personal exposure. To identify relative contribution of different sources, regression of the particulate matter mass against the factor contributions was performed. Major sources of PM{sub 2.5} were oil combustion, nonferrous metal operations, and motor vehicles. The mass contributions of particles from these sources were similar for outdoor air and personal exposure. Personal exposure to particles from these sources can be controlled by changing outdoor sources. The primary source of PM{sub 10} was soil.

  17. Youth Exposure to Community Violence and Psychological Adjustment: The Role of Cognitive Appraisals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drerup, Lauren

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to community violence (CV) is a significant risk factor that many urban youth experience. CV is significantly predictive of a host of psychological difficulties; however, not all youth experience psychological problems and actually exhibit...

  18. General Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours,Dioxide andNationalallGeneral

  19. General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey Campbelllong version)ConfinementGeneral Tables The

  20. General Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGene ControlsCounsel Law StudentGeneral

  1. Cardiovascular effects of lead exposure.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaziri, N D; Gonick, H C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    air quality standards for lead exposure, 2006. ReferencesM, Wen SW. Environmental lead level and pregnancy-inducedDong W, Poulter N. Blood lead and blood pressure: evidence

  2. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  3. MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

  5. Stochastic Microenvironment Models for Air Pollution Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naihua Duan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    human exposure to air pollution." SIMS Technical Report No.human exposure to air pollution." Environment International.Annual Meeting of the A i r Pollution Control Association,

  6. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Protocol Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Method of Measuring Exposure to Pedestrian Accident Risk.Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 14, 1982, pp 397-405.Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Protocol Report,

  7. Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aerts, Sam, E-mail: sam.aerts@intec.ugent.be; Deschrijver, Dirk; Verloock, Leen; Dhaene, Tom; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a novel methodology is proposed to create heat maps that accurately pinpoint the outdoor locations with elevated exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in an extensive urban region (or, hotspots), and that would allow local authorities and epidemiologists to efficiently assess the locations and spectral composition of these hotspots, while at the same time developing a global picture of the exposure in the area. Moreover, no prior knowledge about the presence of radiofrequency radiation sources (e.g., base station parameters) is required. After building a surrogate model from the available data using kriging, the proposed method makes use of an iterative sampling strategy that selects new measurement locations at spots which are deemed to contain the most valuable information—inside hotspots or in search of them—based on the prediction uncertainty of the model. The method was tested and validated in an urban subarea of Ghent, Belgium with a size of approximately 1 km{sup 2}. In total, 600 input and 50 validation measurements were performed using a broadband probe. Five hotspots were discovered and assessed, with maximum total electric-field strengths ranging from 1.3 to 3.1 V/m, satisfying the reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection for exposure of the general public to RF-EMF. Spectrum analyzer measurements in these hotspots revealed five radiofrequency signals with a relevant contribution to the exposure. The radiofrequency radiation emitted by 900 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) base stations was always dominant, with contributions ranging from 45% to 100%. Finally, validation of the subsequent surrogate models shows high prediction accuracy, with the final model featuring an average relative error of less than 2 dB (factor 1.26 in electric-field strength), a correlation coefficient of 0.7, and a specificity of 0.96. -- Highlights: • We present an iterative measurement and modeling method for outdoor RF-EMF exposure. • Hotspots are rapidly identified, and accurately characterized. • An accurate graphical representation, or heat map, is created, using kriging. • Random validation shows good correlation (0.7) and low relative errors (2 dB)

  8. Ultra-Accelerated Natural Sunlight Exposure Testing Facilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO)

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted concentrator apparatus for providing ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing for sample materials under controlled weathering conditions comprising: facets that receive incident natural sunlight, transmits VIS/NIR and reflects UV/VIS onto a secondary reflector that delivers a uniform flux of UV/VIS onto a sample exposure plane located near a center of a facet array in a chamber that provide concurrent levels of temperature and/or relative humidity at high levels of up to 100.times. of natural sunlight that allow sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a significant period of time of about 3 to 10 days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth representative weathering of sample materials.

  9. Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing facilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Jorgensen, Gary J.

    2003-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted concentrator apparatus for providing ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing for sample materials under controlled weathering conditions comprising: facets that receive incident natural sunlight, transmits VIS/NIR and reflects UV/VIS to deliver a uniform flux of UV/VIS onto a sample exposure plane located near a center of a facet array in chamber means that provide concurrent levels of temperature and/or relative humidity at high levels of up to 100.times. of natural sunlight that allow sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a significant period of time of about 3 to 10 days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth representative weathering of sample materials.

  10. Factors Affecting Photosynthesis!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudela, Raphael M.

    Factors Affecting Photosynthesis! Temperature Eppley (1972) Light Sverdrup's Critical Depth-493, but the general concept is still valid! ! #12;PB opt & Temperature! #12;Photosynthesis & Temperature! Remember: in the laboratory, we can measure photosynthesis versus irradiance (PvsE) and calculate Ek, Pmax, and alpha

  11. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A. (CP Industries, McKeesport, PA)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  12. Vitiligo: A good prognostic factor in melanoma?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunha, Daniela; Pacheco, Fernando Assis; Cardoso, Jorge

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with intermediate to thick melanomas (>1 mm) with the use ofgood prognostic factor in melanoma? Daniela Cunha, Fernandoimmunologic therapy for melanoma is generally regarded as a

  13. Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

  14. Attorney-Adviser (General)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Assistant General Counsel for General Law is responsible for providing legal review and general legal services to DOE with regard to matters involving: fiscal, personnel, labor relations,...

  15. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1977 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1977.

  16. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1978 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eleventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1978.

  17. RADON DAUGHTER EXPOSURES IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DAUGHTER EXPOSURES IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS A.V. Nero,DAUGHTER EXPOSURES IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS A.V. Nero,vs. VENTILATION IN ENERGY EFFICIENT HOUSES Air change rate(

  18. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1984.

  19. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1976 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ninth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1976.

  20. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1975 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for ERDA & ERDA Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and its contractor employees during 1975.

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1985 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1985.

  2. Biomarkers of exposure to complex environmental mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naufal, Ziad Sami

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Maternal exposure to genotoxic chemicals may produce a variety of adverse birth outcomes. Depending on the dose and duration of exposure, adverse birth outcomes can range from premature or low-birth weight, to congenital ...

  3. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1981 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fourteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1981.

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1986 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nineteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1986.

  5. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1980 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Thirteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1980.

  6. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1979 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Twelfth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1979.

  7. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1982 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fifteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1982.

  8. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1983 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sixteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1983.

  9. Light, Nearwork, and Visual Environment Risk Factors in Myopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Amanda Aleksandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of time outdoors and light levels as risk factors for myopiaH. C. (1995). Constant light produces severe cornealNg, H. , & Phillips, J. (2011) Light exposure patterns in

  10. Assessing human exposure to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaune, W.T. [EM Factors, Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews published literature and current problems relating to the assessment of occupational and residential human exposures to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Available occupational exposure data suggest that the class of job titles known as electrical workers may be an effective surrogate for time-weighted-average (TWA) magnetic-field (but not electric-field) exposure. Current research in occupational-exposure assessment is directed to the construction of job-exposure matrices based on electric- and magnetic-field measurements and estimates of worker exposures to chemicals and other factors of interest. Recent work has identified five principal sources of residential magnetic fields: electric power transmission lines, electric power distribution lines, ground currents, home wiring, and home appliances. Existing residential-exposure assessments have used one or more of the following techniques: questionnaires, wiring configuration coding, theoretical field calculations, spot electric- and magnetic-field measurements, fixed-site magnetic-field recordings, personal-exposure measurements, and geomagnetic-field measurements. Available normal-power magnetic-field data for residences differ substantially between studies. It is not known if these differences are due to geographical differences, differences in measurement protocols, or instrumentation differences. Available data suggest, but are far from proving, that spot measurements may be more effective than wire codes as predictors of long-term historical magnetic-field exposure. Two studies find that away-from-home TWA magnetic-field exposures are less variable than at home exposures. The importance of home appliances as contributors to total residential magnetic-field exposure is not known at this time. It also is not known what characteristics (if any) of residential electric and magnetic fields are determinants of human health effects. 41 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Review and validation of exposure assessment methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Eduardo

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the sampling of ordinary workplaces lead to overrated uptake estimates. Eisen et al. '"' revealed that exposure data from only one season would erroneously estimate exposures in a study of dust exposures in granite sheds (summer exposures were significantly... is not available. To illustrate, Schneider et al. '" showed how spectrometry analysis of the sediment of undisturbed dust deposited on an old ventilation duct painted a picture of how the chemical makeup of paint used in a manufacturing plant changed over several...

  12. Lead Exposure Alters the Development of Agonistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delville, Yvon

    Lead Exposure Alters the Development of Agonistic Behavior in Golden Hamsters M. Catalina Cervantes@mail.utexas.edu ABSTRACT: We tested the effects of exposure to different doses of lead acetate (either 0, 25, 100, or 400-specific effect of lead exposure on the development of aggression during puberty at doses resulting in blood

  13. The Hybrid Generalized Parton Distributions Parametrization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, S. [University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, 800 West Main St., Whitewater, Wisconsin 53190 (United States); Honkanen, H. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Liuti, S. [University of Virginia, 382 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Taneja, S. K. [Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the ERBL region of the unpolarized Generalized Parton Distributions using the phenomenological constraints obtained from recent measurements of the ep{yields}e'{gamma}p reaction, from the nucleon form factor data, and from deep inelastic inclusive measurements.

  14. Generalized correlation for foam flow in tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotter, Carol Lynnette

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Data collected allow for the determination of material parameters. The corresponding friction factors and generalized Reynolds numbers are calculated and their relationship examined. Results indicate that the flow of foam follows the same f = 16/NRe,gen...

  15. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Automated Pedestrian Counting Devices Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bu, Fanping; Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    291. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Draft ProtocolEstimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Draft Protocol39. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Draft Protocol

  16. A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

  17. Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms. A population-based study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in 6 cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms; 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalences of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared with unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR = 1.53, 95% Cl = 1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory symptoms and disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

  18. Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms: a population-based study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in six cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms. 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or to fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalence of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared to unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR=1.53, 95% CI=1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

  19. Development of new VOC exposure metrics and their relationship to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' symptoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ten Brinke, JoAnn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are suspected to contribute significantly to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' (SBS), a complex of subchronic symptoms that occurs during and in general decreases away from occupancy of the building in question. A new approach takes into account individual VOC potencies, as well as the highly correlated nature of the complex VOC mixtures found indoors. The new VOC metrics are statistically significant predictors of symptom outcomes from the California Healthy Buildings Study data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the hypothesis that a summary measure of the VOC mixture, other risk factors, and covariates for each worker will lead to better prediction of symptom outcome. VOC metrics based on animal irritancy measures and principal component analysis had the most influence in the prediction of eye, dermal, and nasal symptoms. After adjustment, a water-based paints and solvents source was found to be associated with dermal and eye irritation. The more typical VOC exposure metrics used in prior analyses were not useful in symptom prediction in the adjusted model (total VOC (TVOC), or sum of individually identified VOCs ({Sigma}VOC{sub i})). Also not useful were three other VOC metrics that took into account potency, but did not adjust for the highly correlated nature of the data set, or the presence of VOCs that were not measured. High TVOC values (2--7 mg m{sup {minus}3}) due to the presence of liquid-process photocopiers observed in several study spaces significantly influenced symptoms. Analyses without the high TVOC values reduced, but did not eliminate the ability of the VOC exposure metric based on irritancy and principal component analysis to explain symptom outcome.

  20. Lead exposure at uncovered outdoor firing ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, R.L.; Hicks, A.M.; O'Leary, L.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excessive lead exposure in shooting instructors at indoor firing ranges and covered outdoor firing ranges has been documented. The City of Los Angeles assessed exposure of its full-time shooting instructors at uncovered outdoor ranges via air monitoring and blood lead-level measurements. Results of these tests revealed that significant lead exposure and absorption can occur at outdoor firing ranges. The use of copper-jacketed ammunition may decrease air lead levels and decrease lead absorption by range instructors.

  1. In-vacuum exposure shutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Terry A.; Replogle, William C.; Bernardez, Luis J.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-vacuum radiation exposure shutter device can be employed to regulate a large footprint light beam. The shutter device includes (a) a source of radiation that generates an energy beam; (2) a shutter that includes (i) a frame defining an aperture toward which the energy beam is directed and (ii) a plurality of blades that are secured to the frame; and (3) device that rotates the shutter to cause the plurality of blades to intercept or allow the energy beam to travel through the aperture. Each blade can have a substantially planar surface and the plurality of blades are secured to the frame such that the planar surfaces of the plurality of blades are substantially parallel to each other. The shutter device is particularly suited for operation in a vacuum environment and can achieve shuttering speeds from about 0.1 second to 0.001 second or faster.

  2. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 2001 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its operations, including radiological, to ensure the safety and health of all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures to levels that are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). The 2001 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides a summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE, and energy research.

  3. Exposure assessment in ergonomic epidemiology Is there something specific to the assessment of biomechanical exposures?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Exposure assessment in ergonomic epidemiology Is there something specific to the assessment.leclerc@st-maurice.inserm.fr Key words : ergonomics, work, exposure, cancer In this issue of the Journal the authors of two articles in "ergonomic epidemiology" stress several necessary qualities of exposure data: they must

  4. Health risk assessment of environmental exposure to trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.P.; Farrar, D.G.; de Rooij, C.G. (Epidemiology Unit, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (England))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the animal data showed trichloroethylene (TRI) to be of low acute toxicity. Repeated exposure showed that the target organs were the liver, and to a lesser extent, the kidney. TRI is not mutagenic or only marginally mutagenic. There is no evidence of fetotoxicity or teratogenicity. TRI is judged not to exhibit chronic neurotoxicity. Lifetime bioassays resulted in tumors in both the mouse and the rat. However, because of qualitative and quantitative metabolic differences between rodent and human, no one suitable tumor site can be chosen for human health risk assessment. In addition, of the several epidemiology studies, none has demonstrated a positive association for increased tumor incidence. A review of the health effects in humans shows TRI to be of low acute toxicity and, following chronic high doses, to be hepatotoxic. Environmental exposure to TRI is mainly via the atmosphere, while the contribution from exposure to drinking water and foodstuffs is negligible. The total body burden was calculated as 22 micrograms/day. The safety margin approach based on human health effects showed that TRI levels are well within the safety margin for the human no-observable-effect level (10,000 times lower). The total body burden represents a risk of 1.4 X 10(-5) by linearized multistage modeling. Therefore, by either methodological approach to risk assessment, the environmental occurrence of TRI does not represent a significant health risk to the general population or to the population in areas close to industrial activities. 66 references.

  5. 14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    + ) = the incident solar irradiance in relative energy units; F = factor modifying that flux as a function of ozone14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems Warwick F in these ecosystems may also be more vulnerable to UV toxicity because of the inhibiting effects of cold tempera

  6. Statistical Methods and Software for the Analysis of Occupational Exposure Data with Non-detectable Values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frome, EL

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental exposure measurements are, in general, positive and may be subject to left censoring; i.e,. the measured value is less than a ''detection limit''. In occupational monitoring, strategies for assessing workplace exposures typically focus on the mean exposure level or the probability that any measurement exceeds a limit. Parametric methods used to determine acceptable levels of exposure, are often based on a two parameter lognormal distribution. The mean exposure level, an upper percentile, and the exceedance fraction are used to characterize exposure levels, and confidence limits are used to describe the uncertainty in these estimates. Statistical methods for random samples (without non-detects) from the lognormal distribution are well known for each of these situations. In this report, methods for estimating these quantities based on the maximum likelihood method for randomly left censored lognormal data are described and graphical methods are used to evaluate the lognormal assumption. If the lognormal model is in doubt and an alternative distribution for the exposure profile of a similar exposure group is not available, then nonparametric methods for left censored data are used. The mean exposure level, along with the upper confidence limit, is obtained using the product limit estimate, and the upper confidence limit on an upper percentile (i.e., the upper tolerance limit) is obtained using a nonparametric approach. All of these methods are well known but computational complexity has limited their use in routine data analysis with left censored data. The recent development of the R environment for statistical data analysis and graphics has greatly enhanced the availability of high-quality nonproprietary (open source) software that serves as the basis for implementing the methods in this paper.

  7. Perinatal lead exposure sensitizes rats to the rewarding effects of cocaine, but not cocaine/3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine(MDMA) combinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardon, Aaron Lynn

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Early-age lead exposure has been shown to have various behavioral effects later in life, including learning deficits and mental retardation. Recent evidence indicates that early lead exposure may serve as a risk factor for drug abuse later in life...

  8. Generalized concatenated quantum codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grassl, Markus

    We discuss the concept of generalized concatenated quantum codes. This generalized concatenation method provides a systematical way for constructing good quantum codes, both stabilizer codes and nonadditive codes. Using ...

  9. A General Relativistic Generalization of Bell Inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladan Pankovic

    2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work a general relativistic generalization of Bell inequality is suggested. Namely,it is proved that practically in any general relativistic metric there is a generalization of Bell inequality.It can be satisfied within theories of local (subluminal) hidden variables, but it cannot be satisfied in the general case within standard quantum mechanical formalism or within theories of nonlocal (superluminal) hidden variables. It is shown too that within theories of nonlocal hidden variables but not in the standard quantum mechanical formalism a paradox appears in the situation when one of the correlated subsystems arrives at a Schwarzschild black hole. Namely, there is no way that black hole horizon obstructs superluminal influences between spin of the subsystem without horizon and spin of the subsystem within horizon,or simply speaking,there is none black hole horizon nor "no hair" theorem for subsystems with correlated spins. It implies that standard quantum mechanical formalism yields unique consistent and complete description of the quantum mechanical phenomenons.

  10. An evaluation of the Gilian TRACEAIR Organic Vapor Monitoring Diffusive Badge in measuring short-term exposure levels of benzene under field conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Mark Edward

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to evaluate the performance of the Gilian TRACEAIR Organic Vapor Monitoring I (OVMI) Diffusive Badge in measuring short-term benzene exposures under field conditions. In general, a diffusive badge is a device which...

  11. Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis &...

  12. alcohol exposure related: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    no occupational exposure to asbestos. Discussion: These cases illustrate that take-home asbestos exposure may lead to pleural disease at higher rates than commonly...

  13. assessing inhalation exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Total- Body Radiation Exposure Dosimetry CiteSeer Summary: The risk of radiation exposure, due to accidental or malicious release of ionizing radiation, is a major public...

  14. acute radiation exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plant species. Search method: In nature, most alpha radiation exposure is caused by radon progeny. Exposure is particularly high below ground, and is also elevated on plant...

  15. aircrew radiation exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plant species. Search method: In nature, most alpha radiation exposure is caused by radon progeny. Exposure is particularly high below ground, and is also elevated on plant...

  16. Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thrall, Karla D. (3804 Alder Lake Ct., West Richland, WA 99353); Kenny, Donald V. (6947 Sparrow La., Worthington, OH 43235); Endres, George W. R. (2112 Briarwood Ct., Richland, WA 99352); Sisk, Daniel R. (1211 Marshall Ave., Richland, WA 99352)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose.

  17. Determination of a peak benzene exposure to consumers at typical self-service gasoline stations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carapezza, Ted

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the public exposure to benzene at the self-serv1ce gas pump seems of paramount importance dur1ng this time of the highly publicized benzene hazard and increased gasoline consumption. These factors produced the amtivating effect for th1s research effort wh... Table ~Pa e I. HUMAN INHALATION EXPOSURE TO GASOLINE VAPOR. I I. SELF-SERVICE GASOLINE STATIONS . III. SAMPLING RESULTS IV. FIELD DATA: STATION I V. FIELD DATA: STATION II VI. FIEI D DATA: STATION III. VI I. FIELD DATA: STATION IV . VIII...

  18. Generalized finite element method for multiscale analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Lin

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    by the Partition of Unity Method (PUM). It is shown that the p-version of the Generalized FEM using mesh-based handbook functions is capable of achieving very high accuracy. It is also analyzed that the effect of the main factors affecting the accuracy...

  19. Generalizations of quantum statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. W. Greenberg

    2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We review generalizations of quantum statistics, including parabose, parafermi, and quon statistics, but not including anyon statistics, which is special to two dimensions.

  20. Generalized discoid lupus erythematosus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was diagnostic of discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE).A minority of patients with DLE progress to develop systemicalthough generalized DLE is more frequently associated with

  1. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

  2. An Attack on RSA Using LSBs of Multiples of the Prime Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitaj, Abderrahmane

    An Attack on RSA Using LSBs of Multiples of the Prime Factors Abderrahmane Nitaj Laboratoire de attack on RSA with d in polynomial time under special conditions. For example, various partial key exposure attacks on RSA and some

  3. Lead Exposure Management Plan 1.0. Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Lead Exposure Management Plan 1.0. Policy CSUF has developed the Lead Exposure Management Plan to reduce occupational and environmental exposure to lead, a potent neurotoxin and carcinogen that causes considers the nature of the task involved, confirmed and presumed exposures, and the lead content

  4. Generalized Galilean Genesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishi, Sakine

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The galilean genesis scenario is an alternative to inflation in which the universe starts expanding from Minkowski in the asymptotic past by violating the null energy condition stably. Several concrete models of galilean genesis have been constructed so far within the context of galileon-type scalar-field theories. We give a generic, unified description of the galilean genesis scenario in terms of the Horndeski theory, i.e., the most general scalar-tensor theory with second-order field equations. In doing so we generalize the previous models to have a new parameter (denoted by {\\alpha}) which results in controlling the evolution of the Hubble rate. The background dynamics is investigated to show that the generalized galilean genesis solution is an attractor, similarly to the original model. We also study the nature of primordial perturbations in the generalized galilean genesis scenario. In all the models described by our generalized genesis Lagrangian, amplification of tensor perturbations does not occur as ...

  5. Exposure Levels for Chemical Threat Compounds; Information to Facilitate Chemical Incident Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Public Health Command] [U.S. Army Public Health Command; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure Standards, Limits and Guidelines for Chemical Threat Compunds ABSTRACT Exposure criteria for chemical warfare (CW) agents and certain toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) used as CW agents (such as chlorine fill in an improvised explosive device) have been developed for protection of the civilian general public, civilian employees in chemical agent processing facilities and deployed military populations. In addition, compound-specific concentrations have been developed to serve as how clean is clean enough clearance criteria guiding facility recovery following chemical terrorist or other hazardous release events. Such criteria are also useful to verify compound absence, identify containment boundaries and expedite facility recovery following chemical threat release. There is no single right value or concentration appropriate for all chemical hazard control applications. It is acknowledged that locating and comparing the many sources of CW agent and TIC exposure criteria has not been previously well-defined. This paper summarizes many of these estimates and assembles critical documentation regarding their derivation and use.

  6. Hazard-evaluation and technical-assistance report HETA 90-122-l2073, technical assistance to San Francisco General Hospital and Medical Center, San Francisco, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, C.E.; Seitz, T.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the Director of the Environmental Health and Safety Department of the San Francisco General Hospital and Medical Center, located in San Francisco, California, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at that site. Concern existed about exposures to hazards while operating the germicidal lamp at the facility. Germicidal lamps were used to disinfect the air in tuberculosis and aerosolized pentamidine clinics. The workers wore no protective eye wear. All rooms used a 30 watt germicidal lamp. Lower wattage bulbs in the smaller rooms would have reduced occupational ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Reflectance levels of UV radiation were quite high and varied. Worker exposure to germicidal lamp UV levels was dependent on many factors, some of the most important ones being the position of the bulb in the room, age of the bulb, obstruction of the UV radiation by objects near the bulb, and the height of the worker. While there are no consensus guidelines available on ventilation systems designed for areas where germicidal lamps are used, the provision of good room air distribution and mixing is recommended to prevent stagnant air conditions or short circuiting of supply air within the room. Bulb changers need to be aware of the need for protective clothing and gloves for protection from both the UV radiation levels as well as possible glass breakage.

  7. Reproductive toxicity of low-level lead exposure in men

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telisman, Spomenka [Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Ksaverska cesta 2, P.O. Box 291, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: telisman@imi.hr; Colak, Bozo [University Clinic for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases 'Vuk Vrhovac', Zagreb (Croatia); Pizent, Alica; Jurasovic, Jasna [Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Ksaverska cesta 2, P.O. Box 291, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Cvitkovic, Petar [University Clinic for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases 'Vuk Vrhovac', Zagreb (Croatia)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameters of semen quality, seminal plasma indicators of secretory function of the prostate and seminal vesicles, sex hormones in serum, and biomarkers of lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and selenium body burden were measured in 240 Croatian men 19-52 years of age. The subjects had no occupational exposure to metals and no known other reasons suspected of influencing male reproductive function or metal metabolism. After adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol, blood cadmium, and serum copper, zinc, and selenium by multiple regression, significant (P<0.05) associations of blood lead (BPb), {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), and/or erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) with reproductive parameters indicated a lead-related increase in immature sperm concentration, in percentages of pathologic sperm, wide sperm, round sperm, and short sperm, in serum levels of testosterone and estradiol, and a decrease in seminal plasma zinc and in serum prolactin. These reproductive effects were observed at low-level lead exposure (BPb median 49 {mu}g/L, range 11-149 {mu}g/L in the 240 subjects) common for general populations worldwide. The observed significant synergistic effect of BPb and blood cadmium on increasing serum testosterone, and additive effect of a decrease in serum selenium on increasing serum testosterone, may have implications on the initiation and development of prostate cancer because testosterone augments the progress of prostate cancer in its early stages.

  8. Long-Term Materials Test Program: materials exposure test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Long Term Materials Test Program is designed to identify promising corrosion resistant materials for coal-fired gas turbine applications. Resistance of materials to long term accelerated corrosion will be determined through realistic PFB environmental exposure of candidate turbine materials for up to 14,000 hours. Selected materials also will be evaluated for their ability to withstand the combined erosive and corrosive aspects of the PFB effluent. A pressurized fluidized bed combustor facility has been constructed at the General Electric Coal Utilization Research Laboratory at Malta, New York. The 12-inch diameter combustor will burn high sulfur coal with moderate-to-high chlorine and alkali levels and utilize dolomite as the sulfur sorbent. Hot gas cleanup is achieved using three stages of cyclone separators. Downstream of the cylone separators, a low velocity test section (approx. 30 ft/s) capable of housing 180 pin specimens 1/4'' diameter has been installed to assess the corrosion resistance of the various materials at three different temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1600/sup 0/F. Following the low velocity test section is a high velocity test section consisting of four cascades of airfoil shaped specimens, six specimens per cascade. This high velocity test section is being used to evaluate the combined effects of erosion and corrosion on the degradation of gas turbine materials at gas velocities of 800 to 1400 ft/s. This report summarizes the materials selection and materials exposure test plan for the Long Term Materials Test.

  9. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.; Fox, E.; Kane, M.; Staack, G.

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of tritium gas exposure on various polymers have been studied over the last several years. Despite the deleterious effects of beta exposure on many material properties, structural polymers continued to be used in tritium systems. Improved understanding of the tritium effects will allow more resistant materials to be selected. Currently polymers find use mainly in tritium gas sealing applications (eg. valve stem tips, O-rings). Future uses being evaluated including polymeric based cracking of tritiated water, and polymer-based sensors of tritium.

  10. Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thrall, K.D.; Kenny, D.V.; Endres, G.W.R.; Sisk, D.R.

    1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose. 7 figs.

  11. Generalized interaction in multigravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duplij, Steven

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general approach to description of multigravity models in D-dimensional space-time is presented. Different possibilities of generalization of the invariant volume are given. Then a most general form of the interaction potential is constructed, which for bigravity coincides with the Pauli-Fierz model. A thorough analysis of the model along the 3+1 expansion formalism is done. It is shown that the absence of ghosts the considered bigravity model is equivalent in the weak field limit to the massive gravity (the Pauli-Fierz model). Thus, on the concrete example it is shown, that the interaction between metrics leads to nonvanishing mass of graviton.

  12. Evaluation of exposure limits to toxic gases for nuclear reactor control room operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahlum, D.D.; Sasser, L.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have evaluated ammonia, chlorine, Halon (actually a generic name for several halogenated hydro-carbons), and sulfur dioxide for their possible effects during an acute two-minute exposure in order to derive recommendations for maximum exposure levels. To perform this evaluation, we conducted a search to find the most pertinent literature regarding toxicity in humans and in experimental animals. Much of the literature is at least a decade old, not an unexpected finding since acute exposures are less often performed now than they were a few years ago. In most cases, the studies did not specifically examine the effects of two-minute exposures; thus, extrapolations had to be made from studies of longer-exposure periods. Whenever possible, we gave the greatest weight to human data, with experimental animal data serving to strengthen the conclusion arrived at from consideration of the human data. Although certain individuals show hypersensitivity to materials like sulfur dioxide, we have not attempted to factor this information into the recommendations. After our evaluation of the data in the literature, we held a small workshop. Major participants in this workshop were three consultants, all of whom were Diplomates of the American Board of Toxicology, and staff from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Our preliminary recommendations for two-minute exposure limits and the rationale for them were discussed and consensus reached on final recommendations. These recommendations are: (1) ammonia-300 to 400-ppm; (2) chlorine-30 ppm; (3) Halon 1301-5%; Halon 1211-2%; and (4) sulfur dioxide-100 ppm. Control room operators should be able to tolerate two-minute exposures to these levels, don fresh-air masks, and continue to operate the reactor if the toxic material is eliminated, or safely shut down the reactor if the toxic gas remains. 96 refs., 9 tabs.

  13. General plot information: incline of land in degree: direction of exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    /heavy abandoned vehicles none some many/heavy graffiti none some many/heavy injured plants none some many, water bottles, bonfire sites, privies) sports equipment/facilities none some many/heavy within radius

  14. Construction of Generalized Connections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fleischhack

    2006-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a construction method for mappings between generalized connections, comprising, e.g., the action of gauge transformations, diffeomorphisms and Weyl transformations. Moreover, criteria for continuity and measure preservation are stated.

  15. General Engineer (Chief Engineer)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Office of the Manager. If selected for this position you will serve as a General Engineer (Chief Engineer) in the Office of the Manager for the Department of Energy,...

  16. General com Technology community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Campus IT General com m unity Technology community ITsystem owners Campus Council for Information Technology (CCFIT) · ~30 members · Advisory evaluation and review role · Input from faculty, staff, students formal representation on steering team and subcommittees Technology Support Program · Technology support

  17. General relativity and experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Damour

    1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

  18. Generalizing twisted gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duenas-Vidal, Alvaro; Vazquez-Mozo, Miguel A. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the twisting of gauge symmetry in noncommutative gauge theories and show how this can be generalized to a whole continuous family of twisted gauge invariances. The physical relevance of these twisted invariances is discussed.

  19. Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

  20. Generalized Concatenated Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Grassl; Peter Shor; Graeme Smith; John Smolin; Bei Zeng

    2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the concept of generalized concatenated quantum codes. This generalized concatenation method provides a systematical way for constructing good quantum codes, both stabilizer codes and nonadditive codes. Using this method, we construct families of new single-error-correcting nonadditive quantum codes, in both binary and nonbinary cases, which not only outperform any stabilizer codes for finite block length, but also asymptotically achieve the quantum Hamming bound for large block length.

  1. Generalized Fusion Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofer Aharony

    1993-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, DiFrancesco and Zuber have characterized the RCFTs which have a description in terms of a fusion potential in one variable, and proposed a generalized potential to describe other theories. In this note we give a simple criterion to determine when such a generalized description is possible. We also determine which RCFTs can be described by a fusion potential in more than one variable, finding that in fact all RCFTs can be described in such a way, as conjectured by Gepner.

  2. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  3. Quantitative Finance To apear Efficient Factor GARCH Models and Factor-DCC Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jegelka, Stefanie

    Quantitative Finance To apear Efficient Factor GARCH Models and Factor-DCC Models Kun Zhang KZHANG of Hong Kong Hong Kong Abstract We reveal that in the estimation of univariate GARCH or multivariate generalized or- thogonal GARCH (GO-GARCH) models, maximizing the likelihood is equivalent to making

  4. Developing and evaluating distributions for probabilistic human exposure assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research carried out at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to assist the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in developing a consistent yet flexible approach for evaluating the inputs to probabilistic risk assessments. The U.S. EPA Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR) recently released Volume 3 Part A of Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS), as an update to the existing two-volume set of RAGS. The update provides policy and technical guidance on performing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Consequently, EPA risk managers and decision-makers need to review and evaluate the adequacy of PRAs for supporting regulatory decisions. A critical part of evaluating a PRA is the problem of evaluating or judging the adequacy of input distributions PRA. Although the overarching theme of this report is the need to improve the ease and consistency of the regulatory review process, the specific objectives are presented in two parts. The objective of Part 1 is to develop a consistent yet flexible process for evaluating distributions in a PRA by identifying the critical attributes of an exposure factor distribution and discussing how these attributes relate to the task-specific adequacy of the input. This objective is carried out with emphasis on the perspective of a risk manager or decision-maker. The proposed evaluation procedure provides consistency to the review process without a loss of flexibility. As a result, the approach described in Part 1 provides an opportunity to apply a single review framework for all EPA regions and yet provide the regional risk manager with the flexibility to deal with site- and case-specific issues in the PRA process. However, as the number of inputs to a PRA increases, so does the complexity of the process for calculating, communicating and managing risk. As a result, there is increasing effort required of both the risk professionals performing the analysis and the risk manager reviewing it. For deterministic risk assessments, the use of default inputs has improved the ease and the consistency of both performing and reviewing assessments. By analogy, it is expected that similar advantage will be seen in the field of probabilistic risk assessment through the introduction of default distributions. In Part 2 of this report, we consider when a default distribution might be appropriate for use in PRA and work towards development of recommended task-specific distributions for several frequently used exposure factors. An approach that we develop using body weight and exposure duration as case studies offers a transparent way for developing task-specific exposure factor distributions. A third case study using water intake highlights the need for further study aimed at improving the relevance of ''short-term'' data before recommendations on task-specific distributions of water intake can be made.

  5. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Elmore, Logan R [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

  6. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Approaches to a Statewide Pedestrian Exposure Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pedestrian Exposure to Risk of Road Accident in New Zealand.Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 27, No. 3, 1995, pp.Automated Traffic Accident Surveillance and Analysis System,

  7. DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

  8. Noncommutative General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xavier Calmet; Archil Kobakhidze

    2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We define a theory of noncommutative general relativity for canonical noncommutative spaces. We find a subclass of general coordinate transformations acting on canonical noncommutative spacetimes to be volume-preserving transformations. Local Lorentz invariance is treated as a gauge theory with the spin connection field taken in the so(3,1) enveloping algebra. The resulting theory appears to be a noncommutative extension of the unimodular theory of gravitation. We compute the leading order noncommutative correction to the action and derive the noncommutative correction to the equations of motion of the weak gravitation field.

  9. Noncommutative general relativity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calmet, Xavier [Service de Physique Theorique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP225, Boulevard du Triomphe (Campus plaine), B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Kobakhidze, Archil [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, 0177 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States)

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We define a theory of noncommutative general relativity for canonical noncommutative spaces. We find a subclass of general coordinate transformations acting on canonical noncommutative spacetimes to be volume-preserving transformations. Local Lorentz invariance is treated as a gauge theory with the spin connection field taken in the so(3,1) enveloping algebra. The resulting theory appears to be a noncommutative extension of the unimodular theory of gravitation. We compute the leading order noncommutative correction to the action and derive the noncommutative correction to the equations of motion of the weak gravitation field.

  10. 8Li General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 U . SHe GeneralLi

  11. An Examination of Different Explanations for the Mere Exposure Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xiang; Singh, Surendra N.; Ahluwalia, Rohini

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article investigates two competing explanations of the mere exposure effect— the cognition-based perceptual fluency/misattribution theory (PF/M) and the affect-based hedonic fluency model (HFM)—under incidental exposure ...

  12. General Syllabus Physics 45100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    General Syllabus Physics 45100 Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Designation: Undergraduate Catalog description: 45100: Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Temperature; equation of state; work and statistical mechanics; low-temperature physics; the Third Law. 3 HR./Wk.; 3 CR. Prerequisites: Physics 35100

  13. DRILLING MACHINES GENERAL INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    TC 9-524 Chapter 4 DRILLING MACHINES GENERAL INFORMATION PURPOSE This chapter contains basic information pertaining to drilling machines. A drilling machine comes in many shapes and sizes, from small hand-held power drills to bench mounted and finally floor-mounted models. They can perform operations

  14. Communication Definitions... general definition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ian L.

    Communication Definitions... general definition "the process of conveying information from a sender to a receiver with the use of a medium in which the communicated information is understood the same way by both sender and receiver" (Wikipedia)! Biological communication Action by one organism (individual

  15. Generalization of Conformal Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. I. Garas'ko

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Conformal transformations of a Euclidean (complex) plane have some kind of completeness (sufficiency) for the solution of many mathematical and physical-mathematical problems formulated on this plane. There is no such completeness in the case of Euclidean, pseudo-Euclidean and polynumber spaces of dimension greater than two. In the present paper we show that using the concepts of analogical geometries allows us to generalize conformal transformations not only to the case of Euclidean or pseudo-Euclidean spaces, but also to the case of Finsler spaces, analogous to the spaces of affine connectedness. Examples of such transformations in the case of complex and hypercomplex numbers H_4 are presented. In the general case such transformations form a group of transitions, the elements of which can be viewed as transitions between projective Euclidean geometries of a distinguished class fixed by the choice of metric geometry admitting affine coordinates. The correlation between functions realizing generalized conformal transformations and generalized analytical functions can appear to be productive for the solution of fundamental problems in theoretical and mathematical physics.

  16. GENERAL CIRCULATION Energy Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grotjahn, Richard

    process. PE is useful for global energy balance. Solar radiant energy does not reach the Earth equally everywhere. On average, the tropics receive and absorb far more solar energy annually than the polar regionsGENERAL CIRCULATION Contents Energy Cycle Mean Characteristics Momentum Budget Overview Energy

  17. Optimization Under Generalized Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lodwick, Weldon

    11 Optimization Under Generalized Uncertainty Optimization Modeling Math 4794/5794: Spring 2013 Weldon A. Lodwick Weldon.Lodwick@ucdenver.edu 2/14/2013 Optimization Modeling - Spring 2013 #12 in the context of optimization problems. The theoretical frame-work for these notes is interval analysis. From

  18. HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDERSON, T.J.

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

  19. A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Operating Experience Program, requires collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. DOE System of...

  20. Pesticide exposure and sprayer design: ergonomics evaluation to reduce pesticide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pesticide exposure and sprayer design: ergonomics evaluation to reduce pesticide exposure Sonia of operator exposure to plant protection products through the introduction of ergonomics to the design process. It is suggested that a systematic ergonomics evaluation of sprayer interfaces with the view of reducing direct

  1. Chapter 2. Assessment and Remediation of Residential Lead Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 2. Assessment and Remediation of Residential Lead Exposure Prepared by Thomas D. Matte, MD of Residential Lead Exposure Table 2.1. Summary of Recommendations for Assessment and Remediation of Residential Lead Exposure Make prompt and effective environmental management for children with EBLLs the highest

  2. Personal/Mobile Exposure Monitors D K Arvind & Michael Walters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Personal/Mobile Exposure Monitors D K Arvind & Michael Walters School of Informatics dka · Personal/Mobile Exposure Monitoring · Mapping the public space using numerous personal/mobile exposure Technology grant from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (C523881) · .... and industrial

  3. Comparing Accelerated Testing and Outdoor Exposure

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ISE Stress-factors at operation of PV-modules Moisture causes hydrolysis and corrosion (Acetic acid from EVA) Electrical potentials introduce leakage currents and...

  4. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Wasiolek

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis is one of the technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), referred to in this report as the biosphere model. ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'' is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1 (based on BSC 2006 [DIRS 176938]). This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This analysis report defines and justifies values of atmospheric mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of the biosphere model to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception. This report is concerned primarily with the physical attributes of airborne particulate matter, such as the airborne concentrations of particles and their sizes. The conditions of receptor exposure (duration of exposure in various microenvironments), breathing rates, and dosimetry of inhaled particulates are discussed in more detail in ''Characteristics of the Receptor for the Biosphere Model'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172827]).

  5. Regulation XVI: GENERAL UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regulation XVI: GENERAL UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS APPLICATION AND INTERPRETATION 1. Unless stated otherwise, these and the following Regulations apply to students in all Faculties, including the International Faculty: General Regulations for First Degrees; General Regulations for Higher Degrees

  6. Environmental Factors and Breast Cancer Risk For millions of women whose lives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    their health history, past environmental exposures, and lifestyle. The participants will be given yearly follow Gene The impact of family history on breast cancer risk suggests that genetic factors play an importantEnvironmental Factors and Breast Cancer Risk For millions of women whose lives have been affected

  7. DNA Damage-inducible Genes as Biomarkers for Exposures to Environmental Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil F. Johnson; Thomas R. Carpenter; Richard J. Jaramillo; Teresa A. Liberati

    A biodosimetric approach to determine alpha-particle dose to the respiratory tract epithelium from known exposures to radon has been developed in the rat. Cytotoxicity assays have been used to obtain dose-conversion factors for cumulative exposures typical of those encountered by underground uranium miners. However, this approach is not sensitive enough to derive doseconversion factors for indoor radon exposures. The expression of DNA damage-inducible genes is being investigated as a biomarker of exposure to radon progeny. Exposure of cultures of A549 cells to alpha particles resulted in an increase in the protein levels of the DNA damage-inducible genes, p53, Cip1, and Gadd45. These protein changes were associated with a transient arrest of cells passing through the cell cycle. This arrest was typified by an increase in the number of cells in the G, and G2 phases and a decrease in the number of cells in the S phase. The effect of inhaled alpha particles (radon progeny) in rats was examined in the epithelial cells of the lateral wall of the anterior nasal cavity. Exposures to radon progeny resulted in a significant increase in the number of cells in the G, phase and a decrease in the number of cells in the S phase. These cell-cycle changes were concomitant with an increase in the number of cells containing DNA strand breaks. These results suggest a commonality between cell-cycle events in vitro and in vivo following exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition to ionizing radiation, A549 cells were exposed to 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, methyl methanesulphonate, crocidolite asbestos, and glass microfiber. These studies showed that physical and chemical agents induce different expression patterns of p53, Cipl, and Gaddl 53 proteins and they could be used to discriminate between toxic and nontoxic materials such as asbestos and glass microfiber. The measurement of gene expression in A549 cells may provide a means to identify a broad spectrum of physical and chemical toxicants encountered in the environment. Environ Health Perspect 1 05(Suppl 4):913-918 (1997) Key words: radiation, fibers, chemicals, DNA damage-inducible genes

  8. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Knop; P. H. Hauschildt; E. Baron

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general method to calculate radiative transfer including scattering in the continuum as well as in lines in spherically symmetric systems that are influenced by the effects of general relativity (GR). We utilize a comoving wavelength ansatz that allows to resolve spectral lines throughout the atmosphere. The used numerical solution is an operator splitting (OS) technique that uses a characteristic formal solution. The bending of photon paths and the wavelength shifts due to the effects of GR are fully taken into account, as is the treatment of image generation in a curved spacetime. We describe the algorithm we use and demonstrate the effects of GR on the radiative transport of a two level atom line in a neutron star like atmosphere for various combinations of continuous and line scattering coefficients. In addition, we present grey continuum models and discuss the effects of different scattering albedos on the emergent spectra and the determination of effective temperatures and radii of neutron star atmospheres.

  9. Strains in General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Fernando de Felice; Andrea Geralico

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The definition of relative accelerations and strains among a set of comoving particles is studied in connection with the geometric properties of the frame adapted to a "fiducial observer." We find that a relativistically complete and correct definition of strains must take into account the transport law of the chosen spatial triad along the observer's congruence. We use special congruences of (accelerated) test particles in some familiar spacetimes to elucidate such a point. The celebrated idea of Szekeres' compass of inertia, arising when studying geodesic deviation among a set of free-falling particles, is here generalized to the case of accelerated particles. In doing so we have naturally contributed to the theory of relativistic gravity gradiometer. Moreover, our analysis was made in an observer-dependent form, a fact that would be very useful when thinking about general relativistic tests on space stations orbiting compact objects like black holes and also in other interesting gravitational situations.

  10. Comparison study of the sensitivities of some indices of DDT exposure in human blood and urine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nhachi, C.F.B.; Loewenson, R. (Univ. of Zimbabwe (South Africa))

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although exposure to DDT (2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl1)1,1,1,-trichloroethane) is not normally associated with fatality or chronic adverse effects to human life, it is a known hazard to the ecosystem. Blood levels of DDT and some of its derivatives have been used to assess extent of exposure or the body load of DDT in humans. In experimental studies, ingestion of DDT has been associated with reduced liver stores of vitamin A, and increased serum levels of vitamin A. The same study also revealed a significant correlation of vitamin A and DDE serum levels. Generally an increase in excreted 17-B-hydroxycortisone has been associated with DDT exposure. Increased excretion of 6-B-hydroxycortisol has been noted in workers who were involved in the formulation of DDT. The objective of this study was to compare the sensitivities of some indices of DDT exposure in humans. The indices which were compared are serum vitamin A and DDE levels and urinary 17-B-hydroxycortisol.

  11. Historical Exposures to Chemicals at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant: A Pilot Retrospective Exposure Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janeen Denise Robertson

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a mortality study of white males who had worked at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant between 1952 and 1979, an increased number of deaths from benign and unspecified intracranial neoplasms was found. A case-control study nested within this cohort investigated the hypothesis that an association existed between brain tumor death and exposure to either internally deposited plutonium or external ionizing radiation. There was no statistically significant association found between estimated radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium and the development of brain tumors. Exposure by job or work area showed no significant difference between the cohort and the control groups. An update of the study found elevated risk estimates for (1) all lymphopoietic neoplasms, and (2) all causes of death in employees with body burdens greater than or equal to two nanocuries of plutonium. There was an excess of brain tumors for the entire cohort. Similar cohort studies conducted on worker populations from other plutonium handling facilities have not yet shown any elevated risks for brain tumors. Historically, the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant used large quantities of chemicals in their production operations. The use of solvents, particularly carbon tetrachloride, was unique to Rocky Flats. No investigation of the possible confounding effects of chemical exposures was done in the initial studies. The objectives of the present study are to (1) investigate the history of chemical use at the Rocky Flats facility; (2) locate and analyze chemical monitoring information in order to assess employee exposure to the chemicals that were used in the highest volume; and (3) determine the feasibility of establishing a chemical exposure assessment model that could be used in future epidemiology studies.

  12. DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

  13. Characterization of guinea pig transfer factor collected by In vivo exposure to antilymphocyte gamma globulin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Robert Stanley

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abbreviations used in this thesis; DNCB, 2, 4-dinitrochloro- benzene; KLH, keyhole limpet hemocyanin; DNFBp 2p4-dinitroflouro- benzene; DS, double stranded; SS, single stranded; BCG, Bacille Calmette-Guerin; PPD, purified protein derivative; ALS, anti..., 8, 10, 36-39), diphtheria toxoid (11), coccidioidin (13, 40-42), histoplasmin (13, 41, 42), keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) (38), Candida antigens (14), bacterial spores (40, 41. , , modified serum components (44), mumps virus, leprosy bacillus...

  14. Toxic Volatile Organic Compounds in Environmental Tobacco Smoke: Emission Factors for Modeling Exposures of California Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Hodgson, A.T.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acrylate Ethy lbenzene 3-Methyl- 1-butanol Pyridine Pyrroleethyl acrylate, 3-methyl-1-butanol, N-nitrosodiethylamineEthylbenzene Formaldehyde 3-Methyl-1-butanol Phenol Styrene

  15. Generalized dynamical thermostating technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laird, Brian Bostian; Leimkuhler, Benedict J.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    EXTENDED NOSE´ THERMOSTAT In this section, we show that the Nose´ approach ~and its corresponding real-time version—Nose´-Poincare´! is only the simplest realization of a vast range of generalized thermo- stating Hamiltonians. In particular, we show below... reason for the difficulty encountered in thermo- stating molecular systems with stiff bonds that are weakly coupled to the rest of the system @10#. The unthermostated Hamiltonian for this system is H ~ p ,q !5 p2 2 1 q2 2 , where we have assumed unit mass...

  16. General Employee Radiological Training

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil EnergyFullGOof Energy General

  17. 8He General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 U . SHe General Tables

  18. 9Be General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 U . SHeBBe General Table

  19. 9C General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 U . SHeBBe GeneralC

  20. 9He General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 U . SHeBBe GeneralCHeHe

  1. 9Li General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 U . SHeBBeLi General

  2. A = 5 General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 Ut68AJ02)5 General

  3. A = 6 General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 Ut68AJ02)5 General6

  4. A = 7 General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 Ut68AJ02)5 General67

  5. A = 8 General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 Ut68AJ02)5 General678

  6. A = 9 General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 Ut68AJ02)5 General6789

  7. GENERAL TERMS & CONDITIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey Campbell isOklahoma City,GENERAL TERMS &

  8. GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF AGREEMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding OpportunityF G F ! ( ! (U.S.GENERAL

  9. General Infrastructure Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGene ControlsCounsel Law StudentGeneralOn

  10. General User Proposals (GUPs)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGene ControlsCounselGeneral User Proposals

  11. 10B General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less is more:culturingProtonAPRIL/MAY9Hydrate ModelingB General

  12. Chemico-Biological Interactions 166 (2007) 264276 Chemical process-based reconstruction of exposures for an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Keywords: Chloroprene; Vinyl chloride; Plastics; Synthetic rubber; Exposure reconstruction; Occupational

  13. Power Factor Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

  14. Poison Control Center Management of Benzocaine Exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suchard, Jeffrey; Rudkin, Scott

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V:3, Jul-Sep 2004 Page 55 Poison Control Center Managementthe American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC)answering the general poison information line of each PCC

  15. Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Kent

    2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

  16. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  17. Generalized quantum secret sharing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Srikanth, R. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Optics Group, Raman Research Institute, Bangalore-560080 (India)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore a generalization of quantum secret sharing (QSS) in which classical shares play a complementary role to quantum shares, exploring further consequences of an idea first studied by Nascimento, Mueller-Quade, and Imai [Phys. Rev. A 64, 042311 (2001)]. We examine three ways, termed inflation, compression, and twin thresholding, by which the proportion of classical shares can be augmented. This has the important application that it reduces quantum (information processing) players by replacing them with their classical counterparts, thereby making quantum secret sharing considerably easier and less expensive to implement in a practical setting. In compression, a QSS scheme is turned into an equivalent scheme with fewer quantum players, compensated for by suitable classical shares. In inflation, a QSS scheme is enlarged by adding only classical shares and players. In a twin-threshold scheme, we invoke two separate thresholds for classical and quantum shares based on the idea of information dilution.

  18. Environmental radiation exposure: Regulation, monitoring, and assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.Y.; Yu, C.; Hong, K.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive releases to the environment from nuclear facilities constitute a public health concern. Protecting the public from such releases can be achieved through the establishment and enforcement of regulatory standards. In the United States, numerous standards have been promulgated to regulate release control at nuclear facilities. Most recent standards are more restrictive than those in the past and require that radioactivity levels be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Environmental monitoring programs and radiological dose assessment are means of ensuring compliance with regulations. Environmental monitoring programs provide empirical information on releases, such as the concentrations of released radioactivity in environmental media, while radiological dose assessment provides the analytical means of quantifying dose exposures for demonstrating compliance.

  19. Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers two one-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR linearly decreased with HCHO exposure, with estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children.

  20. ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Radiation Exposure Data Collection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview Argonne Electronic Medical Records System Beryllium Testing and Surveillance Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) U.S. Department of Energy...

  1. atomic oxygen exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and equivalent sun hours for each tray aboard LDEF . 58 12 Estimated orbital temperature variations for LDPE while aboard LDEF . . . . . . . . 59 13 Mass vs. exposure...

  2. analysis phase exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurements and set up test Haddadi, Hamed 2 Dual exposure, two-photon, conformal phase mask lithography for three dimensional silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystals...

  3. Risk assessment and management of radiofrequency radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabala, Dana [Railways Medical Clinic Cluj-Napoca, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Bilascu Gheorghe St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Railways Medical Clinic Cluj-Napoca, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Bilascu Gheorghe St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) industry managers, occupational physicians, security department, and other practitioners must be advised on the basic of biophysics and the health effects of RF electromagnetic fields so as to guide the management of exposure. Information on biophysics of RFR and biological/heath effects is derived from standard texts, literature and clinical experiences. Emergency treatment and ongoing care is outlined, with clinical approach integrating the circumstances of exposure and the patient's symptoms. Experimental risk assessment model in RFR chronic exposure is proposed. Planning for assessment and monitoring exposure, ongoing care, safety measures and work protection are outlining the proper management.

  4. air pollution exposures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13 Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study MIT - DSpace Summary: Abstract Background While air pollution...

  5. air crew exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E. 18 Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study MIT - DSpace Summary: Abstract Background While air pollution...

  6. air pollution exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E. 9 Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study MIT - DSpace Summary: Abstract Background While air pollution...

  7. air pollutant exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E. 9 Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study MIT - DSpace Summary: Abstract Background While air pollution...

  8. air endotoxin exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E. 17 Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study MIT - DSpace Summary: Abstract Background While air pollution...

  9. agricultural chemical exposures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is available in 17 academic Stuart, Steven J. 146 PHYSICS DIVISION CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: Exposure to Hazardous...

  10. agricultural chemical exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is available in 17 academic Stuart, Steven J. 146 PHYSICS DIVISION CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: Exposure to Hazardous...

  11. A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analysis & Reporting A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting September 2012 This pamphlet is intended to provide a short summary...

  12. accidental chronic exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some... and the first scientific report was made in 1951. "" Problems associated with its exposure are: occupational asthma, acute and obstructive pulmonary dysfunction, "" and...

  13. arsenic exposure treated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 A pilot study of children's exposure to CCA-treated wood from playground equipment Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: possible health risks...

  14. allergens assessing exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cockroaches observed and with indications of recent cockroach activity. CONCLUSIONS: Household cockroach allergen exposure is characterized in a nationally representative context....

  15. Optimization Online - Minimizing Risk Exposure when the Choice of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erick Delage

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 30, 2015 ... Minimizing Risk Exposure when the Choice of a Risk Measure is Ambiguous. Erick Delage(erick.delage ***at*** hec.ca) Jonathan Y.

  16. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  17. General anesthesia, sleep, and coma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Emery N.

    In the United States, nearly 60,000 patients per day receive general anesthesia for surgery.1 General anesthesia is a drug-induced, reversible condition that includes specific behavioral and physiological traits — ...

  18. General anesthesia, sleep and coma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiff, Nicholas D.

    In the United States, nearly 60,000 patients per day receive general anesthesia for surgery.1 General anesthesia is a drug-induced, reversible condition that includes specific behavioral and physiological traits — ...

  19. Decision support for the general aviation pilot 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcorn, W. P.; Lee, K. A.; Ward, D. T.; Trang, J. A.; Krishnamurthy, K.; Crump, J. W.; Branham, P. A.; Woo, D. L. Y.; Ren-Jye Yu; Robbins, A. C.; Painter, John H.; Kelly, W. E. III

    1997-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    simulator. Pilot participation in all phases of development and evaluation is the norm. Flight tests have begun on an instrumented research light twin owned by the 0-7803-4053-1/97/$10.00 @ 1997 IEEE products A d services.? factor, a component... will depend on how successful the industry is in stimulating the development of new general aviation Authorized licensed use limited to: Texas A M University. Downloaded on February 16,2010 at 15:01:09 EST from IEEE Xplore. Restrictions apply...

  20. Syn-fuels: general

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The General Accounting Office recently published results of a study conducted for the US Congress entitled, ''Oil and Natural Gas From Alaska, Canada, and Mexico - Only Limited Help for US.'' Copies are available from the GPO as report number EMD-80-72. From this, the GAO made the following observations: (1) The gap between domestic consumption and production of conventional oil and gas can be expected to widen during the 1980's and 1990's, and our import dependency can be expected to continue. This observation is made with consideration of Alaskan production, which, regardless of how promising it may appear to be, requires long lead times for production to come on line and is subject to uncertainty. (2) Concentrated effort should be made to increase our domestic production, including the development of synthetic fuels, and unconventional oil and gas resources. (3) The decline in domestic production cannot be offset by synfuels development during the 1980's and 1990's because of lead times and other constraints, but unconventional gas appears to offer more promise because several technologies are already operational on a commercial basis.

  1. Generalized Multicoincidence Analysis Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Smith, Leon E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Ellis, J. E.; Valsan, Andrei B.; Mengesha, Wondwosen

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to conduct automated trace radionuclide analysis at or near the sample collection point would provide a valuable tool for emergency response, nuclear forensics and environmental monitoring. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing systems for this purpose based on dual gamma-ray spectrometers, e.g. NaI(TI) or HPGe, combined with thin organic scintillator sensors to detect light charged particles. Translating the coincident signatures recorded by these systems, which include , and , into the concentration of detectable radionuclides in the sample requires generalized multicoincidence analysis tools. The development and validation of the Coincidence Lookup Library, which currently contains the probabilities of single and coincidence signatures from more than 420 isotopes, is described. Also discussed is a method to calculate the probability of observing a coincidence signature which incorporates true coincidence summing effects. These effects are particularly important for high-geometric-efficiency detection systems. Finally, a process for validating the integrated analysis software package is demonstrated using GEANT 4 simulations of the prototype detector systems.

  2. An Evaluation of the Importance of Hand Exposures Using Rubber Latex Gloves as Sampling Dosimeters for Assessing Pesticide Exposures in Strawberry Harvesters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sankaran, Gayatri

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studies as harvesters wore rubber latex gloves supplied byof Hand Exposures Using Rubber Latex Gloves as Samplingof Hand Exposures Using Rubber Latex Gloves as Sampling

  3. Power Factor Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    motor power: 117.7 V x 5.1 A = 600 W? = 0.6 kW? NOT the power measured by meter #12;Page 9 PSERC: displacement power factor: angle between voltage and current = 0 degrees pf = cos(0 degrees) = 1.0 true powerPage 1 PSERC Power Factor and Reactive Power Ward Jewell Wichita State University Power Systems

  4. GUIDELINES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GUIDELINES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN PREGNANT AND LACTATING WOMEN;GUIDELINES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN PREGNANT AND LACTATING WOMEN and Disease Registry Christopher Portier, PhD Director Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning

  5. Modeling Contaminant Exposure in a Single-Family House

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    occupational exposure to household contaminants in a single-family house under different ventilation, heating the performance of two heating systems, two cooling systems and three ventilation systems in summer and winter, Contaminant exposure, Stratification, Ventilation system performance Abstract This study simulated

  6. Exposure In Wireless Sensor Networks: Theory And Practical Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exposure In Wireless Sensor Networks: Theory And Practical Solutions Seapahn Megerian1 , Farinaz}@cs.ucla.edu, farinaz@eecs.berkeley.edu, gangqu@eng.umd.edu, gforce@ucla.edu Abstract Wireless ad-hoc sensor networks behavior of exposure and the proposed algorithm for its calculation. Keywords: wireless sensor network

  7. Modeling Human Metabolism of Benzene Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Modeling Human Metabolism of Benzene Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures Sungkyoon) models to investigate nonlinear relationships between levels of benzene metabolites (E,E- muconic acid, S-phenylmercapturic acid, phenol, hydroqui- none, and catechol) and benzene exposure among 386 exposed and control workers

  8. LIGHTNING EXPOSURE OF WIND TURBINES University of Toronto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehn, Peter W.

    LIGHTNING EXPOSURE OF WIND TURBINES Dale Dolan University of Toronto e-mail: dale@ecf.utoronto.ca Abstract This paper applies the electrogeometric model of lightning exposure to a wind turbine to compute. For a typical 45 m wind turbine, the probability of being struck by a downward negative flash, as predicted

  9. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON EPDM ELASTOMER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.

    2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of four formulations of ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM) elastomer were exposed to initially pure tritium gas at one atmosphere and ambient temperature for various times up to about 420 days in closed containers. Two formulations were carbon-black-filled commercial formulations, and two were the equivalent formulations without filler synthesized for this work. Tritium effects on the samples were characterized by measuring the sample volume, mass, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties and by noting changes in appearance. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature increased significantly with tritium exposure, and the unfilled formulations ceased to behave as elastomers after the longest tritium exposure. The filled formulations were more resistant to tritium exposure. Tritium exposure made all samples significantly stiffer and therefore much less able to form a reliable seal when employed as O-rings. No consistent change of volume or density was observed; there was a systematic lowering of sample mass with tritium exposure. In addition, the significant radiolytic production of gas, mainly protium (H{sub 2}) and HT, by the samples when exposed to tritium was characterized by measuring total pressure in the container at the end of each exposure and by mass spectroscopy of a gas sample at the end of each exposure. The total pressure in the containers more than doubled after {approx}420 days tritium exposure.

  10. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung cancer in men: evidence consistently demonstrated that workplace exposure to it increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Few of lung cancer, and 2,053 controls recruited from 8 Canadian provinces between 1994 and 1997. Self

  11. Health risk assessment of environmental exposure to 1,1,1-trichloroethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verschuuren, H.G.; de Rooij, C.G. (Dow Europe, Horgen (Switzerland))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986 a survey was published by CEFIC on the occurrence of chlorinated solvents in ambient air, in surface water, and in ground water. The present article concentrates on 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-T), and puts into perspective the environmental occurrence and the toxicity. Critical toxicological data are briefly discussed. As no evidence of a carcinogenic effect of 1,1,1-T is apparent, the no-adverse-effect levels in chronic inhalation exposure in rats (875 ppm) and mice (1500 ppm) form the basis for the estimation of potential risk to human health. Environmental exposure to 1,1,1-T is mainly via the atmosphere (120 micrograms/day); the contributions of drinking water (2 micrograms/day) and food (3 micrograms/kg) are negligible. Safety margins are calculated by comparing the no-adverse-effect levels in rat and mouse studies with the total body burden. Safety margins are also calculated after converting no-adverse-effect levels into estimated internal dose levels by physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. Safety margins vary with the starting point, but are of the order of 10(5) for the general population and more than 10(4) for the population close to industrial activities. It may be concluded that the risk of a potential health effect resulting from environmental exposure to 1,1,1-trichloroethane is negligible. 43 references.

  12. Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D. (Univ. of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson (USA))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers during two 1-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR decreased linearly with HCHO exposure, with the estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children. The effects in asthmatic children exposed to HCHO below 50 ppb were greater than in healthy ones. The effects in adults were less evident: decrements in PEFR due to HCHO over 40 ppb were seen only in the morning, and mainly in smokers.

  13. RUNNING HEAD: Subaerial Exposure Unconformities on the Vercors Carbonate Platform Subaerial Exposure Unconformities on the Vercors Carbonate Platform (SE France)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouke, Bruce W.

    1 RUNNING HEAD: Subaerial Exposure Unconformities on the Vercors Carbonate Platform Subaerial Exposure Unconformities on the Vercors Carbonate Platform (SE France) and their Sequence Stratigraphic carbonate platform (SE France), shows that the most prominent break in depositional style does not coincide

  14. Corrosion of candidate materials in Lake Rotokawa geothermal exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estill, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion rates were determined for CDA 613, CDA 715, A-36 carbon steel, 1020 carbon steel, and Alloy 825 flat coupons which were exposed to geothermal spring water at Paraiki site number 9 near Lake Rotokawa, New Zealand. Qualitative observations of the corrosion performance of Type 304L stainless steel and CDA 102 exposed to the same environment were noted. CDA 715, Alloy 825, 1020 carbon steel, and other alloys are being considered for the materials of construction for high-level radioactive waste containers for the United States civilian radioactive waste disposal program. Alloys CDA 613 and CDA 102 were tested to provide copper-based materials for corrosion performance comparison purposes. A36 was tested to provide a carbon steel baseline material for comparison purposes, and alloy 304L stainless steel was tested to provide an austenitic stainless steel baseline material for comparison purposes. In an effort to gather corrosion data from an environment that is rooted in natural sources of water and rock, samples of some of the proposed container materials were exposed to a geothermal spring environment. At the proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, currently under consideration for high-level nuclear waste disposal, transient groundwater may come in contact with waste containers over the course of a 10,000-year disposal period. The geothermal springs environment, while extremely more aggressive than the anticipated general environment at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, could have similarities to the environment that arises at selected local sites on a container as a result of crevice corrosion, pitting corrosion, microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), or the concentration of the ionic species due to repetitive evaporation or boiling of the groundwater near the containers. The corrosion rates were based on weight loss data obtained after six weeks exposure in a 90{degrees}C, low-pH spring with relatively high concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and Cl{sup -}.

  15. Assessing residential exposure to urban noise using environmental models: does the size of the local living

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Assessing residential exposure to urban noise using environmental models: does the size on the quantification of the exposure level in a surface defined as the subject's exposure area. For residential residential buildings. Twelve noise exposure indicators have been used to assess inhabitants' exposure

  16. Indoor risk factors for cough and their relation to wheeze and sensitization in Chilean young adults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potts, J.F.; Rona, R.J.; Oyarzun, M.J.; Amigo, H.; Bustos, P. [Kings College London, London (United Kingdom). Dept. for Public Health Science

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We assessed the effects of indoor risk factors, including smoking, on different types of cough and on cough and wheeze in combination. Our sample was composed of 1232 men and women residing in a semi-rural area of Chile. We used a standardized questionnaire, sensitization to 8 allergens, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine to assess cough and wheeze characteristics. Information was gathered on dampness, mold, ventilation, heating, housing quality, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Most exposures were associated with cough alone or cough in combination with wheeze. Smoking, past smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure were strongly associated with dry cough and wheeze. The use of coal for heating was associated with dry cough. Leaks, mold, and lack of kitchen ventilation were associated with cough and wheeze. Nocturnal cough and productive cough were associated with specific types of sensitization, but dry cough was not. Productive cough was associated with hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Several different types of indoor exposures, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, are important contributors to morbidity associated with cough and wheeze. A vigorous preventive strategy designed to lower exposures to indoor risk factors would lower rates of respiratory morbidity.

  17. Dynamic One and Two Pile Nim Games Using Generalized Bases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    Dynamic One and Two Pile Nim Games Using Generalized Bases Arthur Holshouser 3600 Bullard St with a class of combinatorial games consisting of one-pile and two-pile counter pickup games for which a number of factors including the number of counters removed on the last move, the sizes of the piles

  18. General Vehicle Performance Specifications for the UPRM AUV Vehicle Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    General Vehicle Performance Specifications for the UPRM AUV Vehicle Specifications Vehicle Characteristics Specification Maximum Depth 700m with 1.5 safety factor Vehicle power 2kWHr Li Ion Rechargeable Transducer 700m rated Paroscientific Depth Sensor will be integrated into the vehicle navigation stream

  19. LA-2271 CHEMISTRY-GENERAL

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ed. LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ALAMOS NEW MEXICO REPORT WRITTEN: August 1958 REPORT DISTRIBUTED: March 17, 1959 COMPRESSIBILITY FACTORS...

  20. Dynamics of generalized tachyon field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong-Jia Yang; Jingzhao Qi

    2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the dynamics of generalized tachyon field in FRW spacetime. We obtain the autonomous dynamical system for the general case. Because the general autonomous dynamical system cannot be solved analytically, we discuss two cases in detail: $\\beta=1$ and $\\beta=2$. We find the critical points and study their stability. At these critical points, we also consider the stability of the generalized tachyon field, which is as important as the stability of critical points. The possible final states of the universe are discussed.

  1. Digestive System general organization throughout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houde, Peter

    Digestive System general organization throughout: mucosa, submucosa, muscularis externa, serosa digestive glands salivary pancreas liver (lobes: right, left, caudate, quadrate, diaphragmatic surface, bare

  2. Schriftenreihe ,,Studium Generale" In Vorbereitung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    Schriftenreihe ,,Studium Generale" In Vorbereitung SS 2013 Evolution WS 2012/13 Arm und Reich Katastrophen (Wintersemester 2011/12) Gerhard Paul: Titanic ­ Hindenburg ­ Tschernobyl ­ Tsunami: Visuelle

  3. Contaminants in Buildings and Occupied Spaces as Risk Factors forOccupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: Findings from the U.S. EPABASE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Mirer, A.; Lei-Gomez, Q.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Most reported research into environmental risk factors for these symptoms has focused on ventilation system-related factors, dampness, and particle removal through filtration and cleaning, with relatively few studies of other potential sources of indoor contaminants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and a diverse set of potential indoor and outdoor sources for indoor pollutants. Although most of the investigated risk factors showed no apparent association with building-related symptoms, some interesting associations resulted. Increased prevalence of symptoms was associated with carpets older than one year (lower respiratory symptoms), non-carpeted floors (upper and lower respiratory symptoms), older furniture (eye and skin symptoms), infrequent vacuuming (upper respiratory, eye, and skin symptoms and headache), and masonry exterior walls (cough, eye symptoms, and fatigue/concentration difficulty). For the many potential risk factors assessed, almost none had been investigated previously, and many associations found here may have been by chance. Additional confirmatory research focused on risk factors initially identified here is needed, using more objective measures of health outcomes and risk factors or exposures.

  4. Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

  5. Comparative assessment of standards development for radiation and other hazardous exposures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, J.J. [Jerry J. Cohen, Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Kathren, R.L. [Washington State Univ.-Tri Cities, Richland, WA (United States); Smith, C.F. [Booz-Allen & Hamilton, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental question in development of standards for allowable exposure is, {open_quotes}What levels of safety are the standards intended to achieve?{close_quotes} This question has clearly not received the attention it deserves. A comparative assessment of standards for radiation and other physical and chemical hazards indicates that differing concerns may have motivated their developmental process. In most cases, the organization formulating the standards stated their objective in general terms such as, {open_quotes}to ensure safety,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}to protect worker`s health,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}to cause no undue stress,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}to avoid adverse health effects,{close_quotes} or to {open_quotes}maintain exposure levels as low as reasonably achievable.{close_quotes} It was generally recognized that absolute safety was unachievable, and therefore, some {open_quotes}reasonable{close_quotes} level of safety would need to be determined. The problem is made even more complex with the understanding that there can be a wide range in individual sensitivity to various harmful agents.

  6. Allergy arising from exposure to airborne contaminants in an insect rearing facility: Health effects and exposure control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, D.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In agricultural crop improvement, yield under various stress conditions and limiting factors is assessed experimentally. Of the stresses on plants which affect yield are those due to insects. Ostrinia nubilalis, the European corn borer (corn borer) is a major pest in sweet and field corn in the U.S. There are many ways to fight crop pests such as the corn borer, including (1) application of chemical insecticides, (2) application of natural predators and, (3) improving crop resistance through plant genetics programs. Randomized field trials are used to determine the effectiveness of pest management programs. These trials frequently consist of randomly selected crop plots to which well-defined input regimes are instituted. For example, corn borers might be released onto crop plots in several densities at various stages of crop development, then sprayed with different levels of pesticide. These experiments are duplicated across regions and, in some cases across the country, to determine, in this instance for example, the best pesticide application rate for a given pest density and crop development stage. In order to release these pests onto crop plots, one must have an adequate supply of the insect pest. In winter months studies are carried out in the laboratory to examine chemical and natural pesticide effectiveness, as well as such things as the role of pheromones in moth behavior. The advantage in field trials is that yield data can be garnered directly. In this country, insects are raised for crop research primarily through the US Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with public Land Grant Universities and, by the private sector agricultural concerns - seed companies and others. This study quantifies the airborne allergen exposure of persons working in a Land Grant University entomology lab were allergy to European corn borer was suspected.

  7. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  8. Electromagetic proton form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Y Hussein

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic form factors are crucial to our understanding of the proton internal structure, and thus provide a strong constraint of the distributions of the charge and magnetization current within the proton. We adopted the quark-parton model for calculating and understanding the charge structure of the proton interms of the electromagnetic form factors. A remarkable agreement with the available experimental evidence is found.

  9. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stagner, L.; Heidbrink, W. W. [University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, “Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry,” J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, “Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes,” Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5–11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  10. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

  11. Generalized Transforms and Special Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Dattoli; E. Sabia

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the properties of different type of transforms by means of operational methods and discuss the relevant interplay with many families of special functions. We consider in particular the binomial transform and its generalizations. A general method, based on the use of the Fourier transform technique, is proposed for the study of the properties of functions of operators.

  12. QUALITY MANAGEMENT AGENDA General Agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 QUALITY MANAGEMENT AGENDA General Agenda A week before study commences, the following matters a meeting for the following purposes: 1. Read the report that is related to quality management for the previous term. 2. Conduct a general review of the procedures of quality management and reinforcement

  13. External dose-rate conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a tabulation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides in the environment. This report was prepared in conjunction with criteria for limiting dose equivalents to members of the public from operations of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The dose-rate conversion factors are provided for use by the DOE and its contractors in performing calculations of external dose equivalents to members of the public. The dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons presented in this report are based on a methodology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. However, some adjustments of the previously documented methodology have been made in obtaining the dose-rate conversion factors in this report. 42 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  14. Hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syukurilla, L., E-mail: tmart@fisika.ui.ac.id; Mart, T., E-mail: tmart@fisika.ui.ac.id [Department Fisika, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, 164242 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have revisited the effect of hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction process by utilizing an isobaric model developed for kaon photoproduction off the proton. The model is able to reproduce the available experimental data nicely as well as to reveal the origin of the second peak in the total cross section, which was the main source of confusion for decades. Different from our previous study, in the present work we explore the possibility of using different hadronic form factors in each of the K?N vertices. The use of different hadronic form factors, e.g. dipole, Gaussian, and generalized dipole, has been found to produce a more flexible isobar model, which can provide a significant improvement in the model.

  15. Occupational and environmental human lead exposure in Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paoliello, M.M.B. [Departamento de Patologia, Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas, Centro de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Avenida Robert Koch 60, 86038-440 Londrina, Parana (Brazil)]. E-mail: monibas@sercomtel.com.br; De Capitani, E.M. [Centro de Controle de Intoxicacoes, Hospital Universitario da UNICAMP, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil)

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review of data on assessment of exposure and adverse effects due to environmental and occupational lead exposure in Brazil. Epidemiological investigations on children lead exposure around industrial and mining areas have shown that lead contamination is an actual source of concern. Lead in gasoline has been phasing out since the 1980s, and it is now completely discontinued. The last lead mining and lead refining plant was closed in 1995, leaving residual environmental lead contamination which has recently been investigated using a multidisciplinary approach. Moreover, there are hundreds of small battery recycling plants and secondary smelting facilities all over the country, which produce focal urban areas of lead contamination. Current regulatory limits for workplace lead exposure have shown to be inadequate as safety limits according to a few studies carried out lately.

  16. Multiplexed photography : single-exposure capture of multiple camera settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Paul Elijah

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The space of camera settings is large and individual settings can vary dramatically from scene to scene. This thesis explores methods for capturing and manipulating multiple camera settings in a single exposure. Multiplexing ...

  17. Exposure to Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyante (MDI) among polyurethane roof workers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narvaez-Cuevas, Carmen Lourdes

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cross-sectional study was done to evaluate the association between methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) exposure and respiratory system deterioration among permanent male workers. The studied company, located in Puerto ...

  18. The Reduction of Retinal Autofluorescence Caused by Light Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is important because several clinical procedures (such as slit- lamp examination, fundus photography has led to the theory that light exposure plays a role in some retinal diseases including age

  19. Evaluation and recommendations for reduction of a silica dust exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruben, Raymond L

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exposure. Measurements of static pressure and linear flow rate were used to analyze the ventilation system and show why it was not working. Changes are recommended to improve the ventilation system performance and thereby to improve workers' protection....

  20. Access to Medical and Exposure Records 1.0 Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    : A. Any hazardous waste regulated by the Solid Waste Disposal Act, amended by the Resource for medical/exposure records access is to improve the detection, treatment and prevention of occupational

  1. acute phenobarbital exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The clinical outcomes are strongly dependent on (more) Han, Lina 2010-01-01 48 Chemical Exposure and Intestinal Function CiteSeer Summary: The particular substances that are...

  2. alpha inhalation exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This work describes a pilot study to calculate lung dose from the deposition of radon progeny, via estimates of cumulative exposure derived from in vivo measurements of sup 2...

  3. ash inhalation exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This work describes a pilot study to calculate lung dose from the deposition of radon progeny, via estimates of cumulative exposure derived from in vivo measurements of sup 2...

  4. acute inhalation exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This work describes a pilot study to calculate lung dose from the deposition of radon progeny, via estimates of cumulative exposure derived from in vivo measurements of sup 2...

  5. atm radiation exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are more sensitive to both X-ray and heavy ion exposure than to high-LET radiation damage. Mice haplodeficient for the ATM gene and wildtypes were exposed to 325 m that not...

  6. assess trihalomethane exposures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brinkman; Sydney M. Gordon; W. Dana Fl; Marjorie Romkes; Kenneth P. Cantor 7 Articles Assessing Exposure to Disinfection By-products in Women of Reproductive CiteSeer Summary:...

  7. air particulate exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Research Commuters Exposure to Particulate Matter Air Pollution Is Affected by Mode of Transport, Fuel Type, and Route CiteSeer Summary: Ba...

  8. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of early exposure results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKay, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the early health effects associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 34 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: number of early fatalities, number of cases of prodromal vomiting, population dose within 10 mi of the reactor, population dose within 1000 mi of the reactor, individual early fatality probability within 1 mi of the reactor, and maximum early fatality distance. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: scaling factor for horizontal dispersion, dry deposition velocity, inhalation protection factor for nonevacuees, groundshine shielding factor for nonevacuees, early fatality hazard function alpha value for bone marrow exposure, and scaling factor for vertical dispersion.

  9. Louisiana Title V General Permits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, B.E.; Neal, T.L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 requires federal operating permits for all major sources of air pollution. In 1992, Title 40, Part 70 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR Part 70) codified the law s requirements. These federal regulations, entitled Operating Permit Program, define the minimum requirements for state administered operating permit programs. The intent of Title V is to put into one document all requirements of an operating permit. General Permits for oil and gas facilities may be preferred if the facility can comply with all permit requirements. If greater flexibility than allowed by the General Permit is required, then the facility should apply for an individual Title V permit. General Permits are designed to streamline the permitting process, shorten the time it takes to obtain approval for initial and modified permits. The advantages of the General Permit include reduced paperwork and greater consistency because the permits are standardized. There should be less uncertainty because permit requirements will be known at the time of application. Approval times for Initial and modified General Permits should be reduced. Lengthy public notice procedures (and possible hearings) will be required for only the initial approval of the General Permit and not for each applicant to the permit. A disadvantage of General Permits is reduced flexibility since the facility must comply with the requirements of a standardized permit.

  10. Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: ExposureAssessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human exposure assessment is a key step in estimating the environmental and public health burdens that result chemical emissions in the life cycle of an industrial product or service. This column presents the third in a series of overviews of the state of the art in integrated environmental assessment - earlier columns described emissions estimation (Frey and Small, 2003) and fate and transport modeling (Ramaswami, et al., 2004). When combined, these first two assessment elements provide estimates of ambient concentrations in the environment. Here we discuss how both models and measurements are used to translate ambient concentrations into metrics of human and ecological exposure, the necessary precursors to impact assessment. Exposure assessment is the process of measuring and/or modeling the magnitude, frequency and duration of contact between a potentially harmful agent and a target population, including the size and characteristics of that population (IPCS, 2001; Zartarian, et al., 2005). Ideally the exposure assessment process should characterize the sources, routes, pathways, and uncertainties in the assessment. Route of exposure refers to the way that an agent enters the receptor during an exposure event. Humans contact pollutants through three routes--inhalation, ingestion, and dermal uptake. Inhalation occurs in both outdoor environments and indoor environments where most people spend the majority of their time. Ingestion includes both water and food, as well as soil and dust uptake due to hand-to-mouth activity. Dermal uptake occurs through contacts with consumer products; indoor and outdoor surfaces; the water supply during washing or bathing; ambient surface waters during swimming or boating; soil during activities such as work, gardening, and play; and, to a lesser extent, from the air that surrounds us. An exposure pathway is the course that a pollutant takes from an ambient environmental medium (air, soil, water, biota, etc), to an exposure medium (indoor air, food, tap water, etc.) and to an exposed individual. Exposure scenarios are used to define plausible pathways for human contact. Recognition of the multiple pathways possible for exposure highlights the importance of a multimedia, multipathway exposure framework.

  11. Alveolar breath sampling and analysis to assess exposures to methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) during motor vehicle refueling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstrom, A.B.; Pleil, J.D. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we present a sampling and analytical methodology that can be used to assess consumers` exposures to methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) that may result from routine vehicle refueling operations. The method is based on the collection of alveolar breath samples using evacuated one-liter stainless steel canisters and analysis using a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer equipped with a patented `valveless` cryogenic preconcentrator. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, a series of breath samples was collected from two individuals (the person pumping the fuel and a nearby observer) immediately before and for 64 min after a vehicle was refueled with premium grade gasoline. Results demonstrate low levels of MTBE in both subjects` breaths before refueling, and levels that increased by a factor of 35 to 100 after the exposure. Breath elimination models fitted to the post exposure measurements indicate that the half-life of MTBE in the first physiological compartment was between 1.3 and 2.9 min. Analysis of the resulting models suggests that breath elimination of MTBE during the 64 min monitoring period was approximately 155 {mu}g for the refueling subject while it was only 30 {mu}g for the nearby observer. This analysis also shows that the post exposure breath elimination of other gasoline constituents was consistent with previously published observations. 20 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanamala, Naveena, E-mail: wqu1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Hatfield, Meghan K., E-mail: wla4@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Farcas, Mariana T., E-mail: woe7@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Schwegler-Berry, Diane [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Hummer, Jon A., E-mail: qzh3@cdc.gov [Office of Mine Safety and Health Research/NIOSH/CDC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Shurin, Michael R., E-mail: shurinmr@upmc.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Birch, M. Eileen, E-mail: mib2@cdc.gov [NIOSH/CDC, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226 (United States); Gutkin, Dmitriy W., E-mail: dwgutkin@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kisin, Elena, E-mail: edk8@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Kagan, Valerian E., E-mail: kagan@pitt.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bugarski, Aleksandar D., E-mail: zjl1@cdc.gov [Office of Mine Safety and Health Research/NIOSH/CDC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Shvedova, Anna A., E-mail: ats1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Department Physiology and Pharmacology, WVU, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-based D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. - Highlights: • Exposure of mice to BDPM caused higher pulmonary toxicity compared to DPM. • Oxidative stress and inflammation were higher in BD vs to D exposed mice. • Inflammatory lymphocyte infiltrates were seen only in lungs of mice exposed to BD. • Ineffective clearance, prolonged PM retention was present only after BD exposure.

  13. Acute cardiovascular effects of exposure to air pollution: components, vascular mechanisms and protecting the public 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langrish, Jeremy Patrick

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to air pollution, particularly fine and ultrafine particulate matter derived from combustion sources, has been consistently associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent controlled exposure ...

  14. Estimated effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences within Los Alamos county in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many millions of office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the workplace are lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were then used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about nine times greater exposure at home than while in the office (691 mrem yr{sup -1} versus 78 mrem yr{sup -1}). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was 896 mrem yr{sup -1}. These effective dose rates are contrasted against the 100 mrem yr{sup -1} threshold for regulation of a 'radiological worker' defined in the Department of Energy regulations occupational exposure and the 10 mrem yr{sup -1} air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  15. Exposure to Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyante (MDI) among polyurethane roof workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narvaez-Cuevas, Carmen Lourdes

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the typical symptoms of asthma, "' i. e. , recurrent episodes of difficulty in breathing, wheezing (especially on expiration), cough and thick mucus production. "' The asthmatic reaction may develop immediately or some time after the first exposure. Some... hyperreactivity, chronic deterioration in lung function, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. '" At high isocyanate exposures, all employees can experience conjunctival irritation, nasal congestion, scratchy throat, nonproductive cough, and dyspnea. For longer...

  16. Multi-factor authentication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  17. Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

  18. Evaluation of exposures of hospital employees to anesthetic gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambeth, J.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hospital employees who work in hospital operating and recovery rooms are often exposed to a number of anesthetic gases. There is evidence to support the belief that such exposures have led to higher rates of miscarriages and spontaneous abortions of pregnancies among women directly exposed to these gases than among women not exposed. Most of the studies assessing exposure levels were conducted prior to the widespread use of scavenging systems. Air sampling was conducted in hospital operatories and recovery rooms of three large hospitals to assess the current exposure levels in these areas and determine the effectiveness of these systems in reducing exposures to fluoride-containing anesthetic gases. It was determined that recovery-room personnel are exposed to levels of anesthesia gases that often approach and exceed the recommended Threshold Limit Value-Time Weighted Average (TLV-TWA) of 2.0 ppm. Recovery-room personnel do not have the protection from exposure provided by scavenging systems in operating rooms. Operating-room personnel were exposed to anesthesia gas levels above the TLV-TWA only when patients were masked, or connected and disconnected from the scavenging systems. Recovery-room personnel also need to be protected from exposure to anesthesia gases by a scavenging system.

  19. Climate change and health: Indoor heat exposure in vulnerable populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White-Newsome, Jalonne L., E-mail: jalonne@umich.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences Department, 109 S. Observatory, SPH II, Rm. M6314, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Sanchez, Brisa N., E-mail: brisa@umich.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Biostatistics Department, M4164 SPH II, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States); Jolliet, Olivier, E-mail: ojolliet@umich.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences Department, 6622 SPH tower, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States)] [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences Department, 6622 SPH tower, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States); Zhang, Zhenzhen, E-mail: zhzh@umich.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Biostatistics Department, M4164 SPH II, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States)] [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Biostatistics Department, M4164 SPH II, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States); Parker, Edith A., E-mail: Edith-Parker@uiowa.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Health Behavior and Health Education Department, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States); Timothy Dvonch, J., E-mail: dvonch@umich.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences Department, 1415 Washington Heights, 6642 SPH Tower, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); O'Neill, Marie S., E-mail: marieo@umich.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences Department, 6631 SPH Tower, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Climate change is increasing the frequency of heat waves and hot weather in many urban environments. Older people are more vulnerable to heat exposure but spend most of their time indoors. Few published studies have addressed indoor heat exposure in residences occupied by an elderly population. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between outdoor and indoor temperatures in homes occupied by the elderly and determine other predictors of indoor temperature. Materials and methods: We collected hourly indoor temperature measurements of 30 different homes; outdoor temperature, dewpoint temperature, and solar radiation data during summer 2009 in Detroit, MI. We used mixed linear regression to model indoor temperatures' responsiveness to weather, housing and environmental characteristics, and evaluated our ability to predict indoor heat exposures based on outdoor conditions. Results: Average maximum indoor temperature for all locations was 34.85 Degree-Sign C, 13.8 Degree-Sign C higher than average maximum outdoor temperature. Indoor temperatures of single family homes constructed of vinyl paneling or wood siding were more sensitive than brick homes to outdoor temperature changes and internal heat gains. Outdoor temperature, solar radiation, and dewpoint temperature predicted 38% of the variability of indoor temperatures. Conclusions: Indoor exposures to heat in Detroit exceed the comfort range among elderly occupants, and can be predicted using outdoor temperatures, characteristics of the housing stock and surroundings to improve heat exposure assessment for epidemiological investigations. Weatherizing homes and modifying home surroundings could mitigate indoor heat exposure among the elderly.

  20. Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Lynn C.

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M™ 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit. Noise dosimetry sampling was performed on a random basis and was representative of the different work activities within the four shops. Twenty three percent of the noise samples exceeded the occupational exposure limit of 85 decibels for an 8-hour time-weightedaverage. Work activities where noise levels were higher included use of impact wrenches and grinding wheels.

  1. Generalized solution to multispecies transport equations coupled with a first-order reaction network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Generalized solution to multispecies transport equations coupled with a first-order reaction for deriving analytical solutions to multispecies transport equations coupled with multiparent, serial multispecies transport equations with different retardation factors. Mathematical steps are provided

  2. Measurement and Analysis of Radio-frequency Radiation Exposure Level from Different Mobile Base Transceiver Stations in Ajaokuta and Environs, Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ushie, P O; Bolaji, Ayinmode; Osahun, O D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the result of a preliminary assessment of radio-frequency radiation exposure from selected mobile base stations in Ajaokuta environs. The Power density of RF radiation within a radial distance of 125m was measured. Although values fluctuated due to the influence of other factors, including wave interference from other electromagnetic sources around reference base stations, we show from analysis that radiation exposure level is below the standard limit (4.5W/sqm for 900MHz and 9W/sqm for 18000MHz) set by the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and other regulatory agencies.

  3. NSED INTERNSHIP APPLICATION General Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    NSED INTERNSHIP APPLICATION General Information: Name) ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ Internship Specifics: Have you made or do you plan to make arrangements to receive academic credit for your internship at the Florida Program for Shark Research? Yes___ No___ Requested Dates of Internship (Specific

  4. ISAF INTERNSHIP APPLICATION General Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    ISAF INTERNSHIP APPLICATION General Information: Name) ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ Internship Specifics: Have you made or do you plan to make arrangements to receive academic credit for your internship at the Florida Program for Shark Research? Yes___ No___ Requested Dates of Internship (Specific

  5. Generalized Concatenation for Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grassl, Markus

    We show how good quantum error-correcting codes can be constructed using generalized concatenation. The inner codes are quantum codes, the outer codes can be linear or nonlinear classical codes. Many new good codes are ...

  6. Distribution ICategory: General Reactor Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlyakhter, Ilya

    --- Distribution ICategory: General Reactor Technology (UC-520) ANl-92/23 AR(;ONNE NATIONAL, progressively by Huygens, Maxwell and Roentgen, mankind has learned to observe it, measure it, control it

  7. Geometric Analysis and General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Andersson

    2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses methods of geometric analysis in general relativity, with special focus on the role of "critical surfaces" such as minimal surfaces, marginal surface, maximal surfaces and null surfaces.

  8. Geometrical optics in general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Loinger

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    General relativity includes geometrical optics. This basic fact has relevant consequences that concern the physical meaning of the discontinuity surfaces propagated in the gravitational field - as it was first emphasized by Levi-Civita.

  9. DIVISION 16 -ELECTRICAL 16000 GENERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVISION 16 - ELECTRICAL _____________________________________________________________ 16000 GENERAL A. Design Considerations 1. All drawing, specifications and construction shall conform to the following: National Electrical Code National Electrical Safety Code National Fire Protection Association

  10. General Services Administration Photovoltaics Project in Sacramento...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    General Services Administration Photovoltaics Project in Sacramento, California General Services Administration Photovoltaics Project in Sacramento, California Document describes a...

  11. Public Health FAT FACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    : THE UNITED STATES SPENDS MORE ON HEALTH CARE THAN ANY OTHER COUNTRY. YET WE CONTINUE TO FALL FAR BEHIND States spends an astonishing percent of our gross domestic product on health care--significantly moreColumbia Public Health HOT TOPIC Climate Change FAT FACTORS Obesity Prevention BOOK SMART

  12. Factors Affecting Photosynthesis!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudela, Raphael M.

    grow faster, die younger as temperature increases ·In general, warm water species are smaller and have transporters (nutrients) It slows down (curves) because the dark reactions can't process fast enough Light and NADPH Therefore, some of the energy from PSII and PSI goes to nutrients, NOT to the Calvin- Benson

  13. General Laser Control Measures Operating instructions for a specific laser are found in the manual for that laser.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huennekens, John

    General Laser Control Measures Operating instructions for a specific laser are found in the manual for that laser. There are several procedures that will reduce the potential for exposure to laser beams. 1. The beam from Class IIIB and Class IV lasers should be terminated in highly absorbent, non specular

  14. Health effects of Halon 1301 exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holness, D.L.; House, R.A. (Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto (Canada))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accidental discharge of a Halon 1301 system is reported. Thirty-one workers were assessed, 22 who were present at the time of the discharge, and 9 who worked the next shift. The incident was complicated by a small Freon-22 leak several hours later. Throat, eye, and nasal irritation and lightheadedness were reported by the majority of workers. Workers present during the halon discharge reported significantly more lightheadedness, headache, voice change, cough, and a fast heartbeat than did those who worked the later shift. These differences were significant even after correcting for confounding factors such as age, sex, and sense of anxiety at the time of the incident. The possible causes for the irritant symptoms include breakdown products of Halon 1301 and Freon-22 or contaminants from the halon discharge system. Although these irritant effects may not be an effect of Halon 1301 alone, they may occur in these discharge situations, and workers should be advised of this possibility. The possible cardiac and central nervous system effects also should be considered. The importance of a clear-cut protocol to deal with such incidents as well as worker education are discussed.

  15. EFFECTS OF ONE WEEK TRITIUM EXPOSURE ON EPDM ELASTOMER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E

    2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents test results for the exposure of four formulations of EPDM (ethylene-propylene diene monomer) elastomer to tritium gas at one atmosphere for approximately one week and characterization of material property changes and changes to the exposure gas during exposure. All EPDM samples were provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Material properties that were characterized include mass, sample dimensions, appearance, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical property data per ASTM standards. No change of glass transition temperature due to the short tritium gas exposure was observed. Filled and unfilled formulations of Dupont{reg_sign} Nordel{trademark} 1440 had a slightly higher glass transition temperature than filled and unfilled formulations of Uniroyal{reg_sign} Royalene{reg_sign} 580H; filled formulations had the same glass transition as unfilled. The exposed samples appeared the same as before exposure--there was no evidence of discoloration, and no residue on stainless steel spacers contacting the samples during exposure was observed. The exposed samples remained flexible--all formulations passed a break test without failing. The unique properties of polymers make them ideal for certain components in gas handling systems. Specifically, the resiliency of elastomers is ideal for sealing surfaces, for example in valves. EPDM, initially developed in the 1960s, is a hydrocarbon polymer used extensively for sealing applications. EPDM is used for its excellent combination of properties including high/low-temperature resistance, radiation resistance, aging resistance, and good mechanical properties. This report summarizes initial work to characterize effects of tritium gas exposure on samples of four types of EPDM elastomer: graphite filled and unfilled formulations of Nordel{trademark} 1440 and Royalene{reg_sign} 580H.

  16. Possible Generalizations within Braneworld Scenarios: Torsion fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J M Hoff da Silva; Roldao da Rocha

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Chapter we introduce the aspects in which torsion can influence the formalism of braneworld scenarios in general, and also how it is possible to measure such kind of effects, namely, for instance, the blackstring transverse area corrections and variation of quasar luminosity due to those corrections. We analyze the projected effective Einstein equation in a 4-dimensional arbitrary manifold embedded in a 5-dimensional Riemann-Cartan manifold. The Israel-Darmois matching conditions are investigated, in the context where the torsion discontinuity is orthogonal to the brane. Unexpectedly, the presence of torsion terms in the connection does not modify such conditions whatsoever, despite of the modification in the extrinsic curvature and in the connection. Then, by imposing the Z2-symmetry, the Einstein equation obtained via Gauss-Codazzi formalism is extended, in order to now encompass the torsion terms. We also show that the factors involving contorsion change drastically the effective Einstein equation on the brane, as well as the effective cosmological constant. Also, we present gravitational aspects of braneworld models endowed with torsion terms both in the bulk and on the brane. In order to investigate a conceivable and measurable gravitational effect, arising genuinely from bulk torsion terms, we analyze the variation in the black hole area by the presence of torsion. Furthermore, we extend the well known results about consistency conditions in a framework that incorporates brane torsion terms. It is shown, in a rough estimate, that the resulting effects are generally suppressed by the internal space volume.

  17. Odd orders in Shor's factoring algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Lawson

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Shor's factoring algorithm (SFA) finds the prime factors of a number, $N=p_1 p_2$, exponentially faster than the best known classical algorithm. Responsible for the speed-up is a subroutine called the quantum order finding algorithm (QOFA) which calculates the order -- the smallest integer, $r$, satisfying $a^r \\mod N =1$, where $a$ is a randomly chosen integer coprime to $N$ (meaning their greatest common divisor is one, $\\gcd(a, N) =1$). Given $r$, and with probability not less than $1/2$, the factors are given by $p_1 = \\gcd (a^{\\frac{r}{2}} - 1, N)$ and $p_2 = \\gcd (a^{\\frac{r}{2}} + 1, N)$. For odd $r$ it is assumed the factors cannot be found (since $a^{\\frac{r}{2}}$ is not generally integer) and the QOFA is relaunched with a different value of $a$. But a recent paper [E. Martin-Lopez: Nat Photon {\\bf 6}, 773 (2012)] noted that the factors can sometimes be found from odd orders if the coprime is square. This raises the question of improving SFA's success probability by considering odd orders. We show that an improvement is possible, though it is small. We present two techniques for retrieving the order from apparently useless runs of the QOFA: not discarding odd orders; and looking out for new order finding relations in the case of failure. In terms of efficiency, using our techniques is equivalent to avoiding square coprimes and disregarding odd orders, which is simpler in practice. Even still, our techniques may be useful in the near future, while demonstrations are restricted to factoring small numbers. The most convincing demonstrations of the QOFA are those that return a non-power-of-two order, making odd orders that lead to the factors attractive to experimentalists.

  18. Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictions from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations, supplemented by appropriate responses by local responders and the general population within the hazard zones, regional planning is essential to success. The remainder of this Executive Summary provides summary guidance for response planning in three areas: (1) Public Protection Strategy details the importance of early, adequate shelter followed by informed evacuation. (2) Responder Priorities identify how to protect response personnel, perform regional situational assessment, and support public safety. (3) Key Planning Considerations refute common myths and provide important information on planning how to respond in the aftermath of nuclear terrorism.

  19. Review article Formaldehyde in China: Production, consumption, exposure levels, and health effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    formaldehyde exposure, concentrations in homes, office buildings, workshops, public places, and food often

  20. High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCampo, J A; Raft, P D

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates

  1. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index Journal Cited Half-Life 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: CZECHOSLOVAK MATHEMATICAL JOURNAL Mark Journal Title ISSN Total Cites Impact Factor 5-Year Impact Factor Immediacy Index Citable Items

  2. Panel Data Analysis of Regulatory Factors Shaping Environmental Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earnhart, Dietrich H.

    2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    and the influence of regulatory factors in general, this paper examines a specific demonstration of environmental perfor- mance: biological oxygen demand (BOD) wastewater dis- charges by large (“major”) municipal wastewater treatment plants in Kansas during... example, limit levels). To analyze the effects of these regulatory factors on envi- ronmental performance, this particular empirical analysis examines the wastewater discharges by large municipal wastewater treatment facilities in the state of Kansas...

  3. Quantization of general linear electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, Sergio; Schuller, Frederic P. [Albert Einstein Institute, Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    General linear electrodynamics allow for an arbitrary linear constitutive relation between the field strength 2-form and induction 2-form density if crucial hyperbolicity and energy conditions are satisfied, which render the theory predictive and physically interpretable. Taking into account the higher-order polynomial dispersion relation and associated causal structure of general linear electrodynamics, we carefully develop its Hamiltonian formulation from first principles. Canonical quantization of the resulting constrained system then results in a quantum vacuum which is sensitive to the constitutive tensor of the classical theory. As an application we calculate the Casimir effect in a birefringent linear optical medium.

  4. On-site radiation exposure in severe reactor accidents: Scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warman, E.A.; Karahalios, P.; Celnick, J.; McInall, S.; Frank, S. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a scoping study of onsite radiation exposures which could take place in each of three types of postulated reactor accidents are presented. The accident types are (1) a fuel handling accident at a Mark III BWR; an interfacing system LOCA or V sequence at a PWR; and and Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) at a Mark I BWR. Both external and internal dose pathways are considered. The results of the study indicate the prohibitively high radiation doses could be received in some plant areas if personnel were to remain there. However, times of the order of a few minutes to a few hours, depending on the type of accident, would be available before life-threatening doses would be accumulated assuming that the provided full face respiratory protection equipment were used promptly. Special attention was given radiation doses possibly received by control room personnel for several control room air in-leakage assumptions. For occupancy during severe accidents it would be advisable for control room personnel to use self-contained apparatus (SCBA) to limit exposure via inhalation. The results of this study will be useful to individuals responsible for accident management procedures. It is indicated that it will be important for each plant to develop estimates of the time of onset of prohibitively high radiation levels in various important plant areas. It is concluded that respiratory protection is a major factor owing to the large inhalation doses which might otherwise be encountered. 20 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Fusion reactor high vacuum pumping: Charcoal cryosorber tritium exposure results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedgley, D.W.; Walthers, C.R.; Jenkins, E.M. (Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments, have shown the practically of using activated charcoal (coconut charcoal) at 4{degrees}K to pump helium and hydrogen isotopes for a fusion reactor. Both speed and capacity for deuterium/helium and tritium/helium-3 mixtures were shown to be satisfactory. The long term effects of tritium on the charcoal/cement system developed by Grumman and LLNL were not known and a program was undertaken to see what, if any, effect long term tritium exposure has on the cryosorber. Several charcoal on aluminum test samples were subjected to six months exposure of tritium at approximately 77{degrees}K. The tritium was scanned several times with a residual gas analyzer and the speed-capacity performance of the samples was measured before, approximately half way through and after the exposure. Modest effects were noted which would not seriously restrict charcoal's use as a cryosorber for fusion reactor high vacuum pumping applications. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Military use of depleted uranium assessment of prolonged population exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannardi, C

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is an exposure assessment for a population living in an area contaminated by use of depleted uranium (DU) weapons. RESRAD 5.91 code is used to evaluate the average effective dose delivered from 1, 10, 20 cm depths of contaminated soil, in a residential farmer scenario. Critical pathway and group are identified in soil inhalation or ingestion and children playing with the soil, respectively. From available information on DU released on targeted sites, both critical and average exposure can leave to toxicological hazards; annual dose limit for population can be exceeded on short-term period (years) for soil inhalation. As a consequence, in targeted sites cleaning up must be planned on the basis of measured concentration, when available, while special cautions have to be adopted altogether to reduce unaware exposures, taking into account the amount of the avertable dose.

  7. Integrity evaluation of lower thermal shield under exposure to HFBR environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassir, M.; Weeks, J.; Bandyopadhyay, K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Shewmon, P. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of exposure to the HFBR environment on the carbon steel in the HFBR lower thermal shield were evaluated. Corrosion was found to be a non-significant degradation process. Radiation embrittlement has occurred; portions of the plate closest to the reactor are currently operating in the lower-shelf region of the Charpy impact curve (i.e., below the fracture toughness transition temperature). In this region, the effects of radiation on the mechanical properties of carbon steel are believed to have been saturated, so that no further deterioration is anticipated. A fracture toughness analysis shows that a large factor of safety (> 1.5) exists against propagation of credible hypothetical flaws. Therefore, the existing lower thermal shield structure is suitable for continued operation of the HFBR.

  8. Structural Biochemistry I General Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    Structural Biochemistry I Fall 2007 General Information Lectures: Room 147, Nanaline Duke Building August 27 - October 12, 2007 MWF 3:05-3:55 PM Course Website: http-1235 (Lab 1); 660-1634 (Lab 2) Office hours: Mondays ­ 5 ­ 6pm ­ Room 247 Nanaline Duke Text: Branden

  9. Generalized Dirac operators and superconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Roepstorff; Ch. Vehns

    1999-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the supersymmetric version of Dirac's theory, chiral models in field theory, and the quest of a geometric fundament for the Standard Model, we describe an approach to the differential geometry of vector bundles on (semi)-Riemannian manifolds based on the concepts of superspaces, superalgebras, superconnections, and generalized Dirac operators. In doing so we stay within the realm of commutative geometry.

  10. Generalized Concatenation for Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Grassl; Peter W. Shor; Bei Zeng

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how good quantum error-correcting codes can be constructed using generalized concatenation. The inner codes are quantum codes, the outer codes can be linear or nonlinear classical codes. Many new good codes are found, including both stabilizer codes as well as so-called nonadditive codes.

  11. Generalized teleportation and entanglement recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergii Strelchuk; Micha? Horodecki; Jonathan Oppenheim

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce new teleportation protocols which are generalizations of the original teleportation protocols that use the Pauli group [Bennett, et al. Physical Review Letters, 70(13) 1895-1899] and the port-based teleportation protocols, introduced by Hiroshima and Ishizaka [Physical Review Letters, 101(24) 240501], that use the symmetric permutation group. We derive sufficient condition for a set of operations, which in general need not form a group, to give rise to a teleportation protocol and provide examples of such schemes. This generalization leads to protocols with novel properties and is needed to push forward new schemes of computation based on them. Port-based teleportation protocols and our generalizations use a large resource state consisting of N singlets to teleport only a single qubit state reliably. We provide two distinct protocols which recycle the resource state to teleport multiple states with error linearly increasing with their number. The first protocol consists of sequentially teleporting qubit states, and the second teleports them in a bulk.

  12. Hazard Sampling Dialog General Layout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tao

    1 Hazard Sampling Dialog General Layout The dialog's purpose is to display information about the hazardous material being sampled by the UGV so either the system or the UV specialist can identify the risk level of the hazard. The dialog is associated with the hazmat reading icons (Table 1). Components

  13. Wind Turbine Blockset General Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Turbine Blockset in Saber General Overview and Description of the Models Florin Iov, Adrian Turbine Blockset in Saber Abstract. This report presents a new developed Saber Toolbox for wind turbine, optimize and design wind turbines". The report provides a quick overview of the Saber and then explains

  14. Generalized parton distributions of nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzey, V. [Theory Center, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent theoretical results on generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of nuclei, emphasizing the following three roles of nuclear GPDs: (i) complementarity to free proton GPDs, (ii) the enhancement of traditional nuclear effects such nuclear binding, EMC effect, nuclear shadowing, and (iii) an access to novel nuclear effects such as medium modifications of bound nucleons.

  15. Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure in an object, such as a reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure at regions of interest within the object.

  16. Prime number generation and factor elimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vineet Kumar

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have presented a multivariate polynomial function termed as factor elimination function,by which, we can generate prime numbers. This function's mapping behavior can explain the irregularities in the occurrence of prime numbers on the number line. Generally the different categories of prime numbers found till date, satisfy the form of this function. We present some absolute and probabilistic conditions for the primality of the number generated by this method. This function is capable of leading to highly efficient algorithms for generating prime numbers.

  17. Further Analysis of Accelerated Exposure Testing of Thin-Glass Mirror Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, C. E.; Terwilliger, K.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) companies have deployed thin-glass mirrors produced by wet-silver processes on {approx}1-mmthick, relatively lightweight glass. These mirrors are bonded to metal substrates in commercial installations and have the confidence of the CSP industry. Initial hemispherical reflectance is {approx}93%-96%, and the cost is {approx}$16.1/m{sup 2}-$43.0/m{sup 2}. However, corrosion was observed in mirror elements of operational solar systems deployed outdoors for 2 years. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Advanced Materials Team has been investigating this problem. First, it was noted that this corrosion is very similar to the corrosion bands and spots observed on small (45 mm x 67 mm) thin-glass mirrors laminated to metal substrates with several different types of adhesives and subjected to accelerated exposure testing (AET) at NREL. The corrosion appears as dark splotches in the center of the mirror, with a corresponding 5%-20% loss in reflectivity. Secondly, two significant changes in mirror manufacture have occurred in the wet-chemistry process because of environmental concerns. The first is the method of forming a copper-free reflective mirror, and the second is the use of lead-free paints. However, the copper-free process requires stringent quality control and the lead-free paints were developed for interior applications. A test matrix of 84 combinations of sample constructions (mirror type/backprotective paint/adhesive/substrate) was devised for AET as a designed experiment to identify the most-promising mirrors, paints, and adhesives for use with concentrator designs. Two types of accelerated exposure were used: an Atlas Ci5000 WeatherOmeter (CI5000) and a BlueM damp-heat chamber. Based on an analysis of variance (ANOVA), the various factors and interactions were modeled. These samples now have more than 36 months of accelerated exposure, and most samples have completed their test cycle. We will discuss the results of the final exposure testing of these mirror samples. Glass mirrors with copper back-layers and heavily leaded paints have been considered robust for outdoor use. However, the basic mirror composition of the new mirrors is radically different from that of historically durable solar mirrors, and the outdoor durability must be determined.

  18. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P., E-mail: waalkes@niehs.nih.gov

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 ?M cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the relationship between cadmium and lung cancer.

  19. CAirTOX: A compartment model for assessing the fate of and human exposure to toxic-chemical emissions to air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, T.E.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAirTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in making a risk assessment of toxic air emissions. With CAirTOX, one can address how contaminants released to an air basin can lead to contamination of soil, food, surface water, and sediments. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure assessments. The multimedia transport and transformation model is a steady-state, but non-equilibrium model that can be used to assess concentrations of contaminants released continuously to air. In Part 1, the authors describe the multimedia transport and transformation model used to determine the fate of air emissions. In Part 2, they describe inputs and data needs for CAirTOX and the development of a set of landscape factors, which can be used to represent regional air basin/water-shed systems in California. In Part 3, they describe the multiple-pathway exposure scenarios and exposure algorithms. In Part 4, they compare the HRA approach and results and the CAirTOX exposure equations. In Part 5, they consider model sensitivity and uncertainty to determine how variability and uncertainty in model inputs affects the precision, accuracy, and credibility of the model output.

  20. Mortality and cancer experience of Quebec aluminum reduction plant workers. Part I: The reduction plants and coal tar pitch volatile (CTPV) exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavoue, J.; Gerin, M.; Cote, J.; Lapointe, R. [University of Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the exposure assessment and job-exposure matrix (JEM) used to estimate coal tar pitch volatile (CTPV) exposure for a study of mortality and cancer incidence in aluminum smelter workers in Quebec, Canada. Historical CTPV exposure was assessed by estimating benzene-soluble material (BSM) and benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) levels for combinations of job and time period. Estimates were derived by using several procedures including averaging measurement data, a deterministic mathematical model using process-related correction factors, and expert-based extrapolation. The JEM comprised 28,910 jobs, covering 7 facilities from 1916 to 1999. Estimated exposures ranged from 0.01 {mu} g/m{sup 3} to 68.08 {mu} g/m{sup 3} (B(a)P) and 0.01 mg/m{sup 3} to 3.64 mg/m{sup 3} (BSW) and were lowest before 1940 and after 1980. This methodology constitutes an improvement compared with methods used for previous studies of the Quebec cohort.

  1. Generalized isospin, generalized mass groups, and generalized Gell-Mann--Okubo formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaudoin, N; Sandapen, R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current concepts of isospin and baryon mass groups are only well-adapted to deal with baryon multiplets involving both the u and d quarks, and some other quark k. In this paper, we generalize isospin and mass groups to accommodate baryon multiplets involving quarks of any flavor, and the Gell-Mann--Okubo (GMO) formalism is generalized accordingly. Generalized isospin proves to be a simple and valuable framework when working in non-udk baryon multiplets, and provides new quantum numbers that allows us to distinguish \\Lambda-like baryons from \\Sigma-like baryons in the non-udk multiplets. The generalized GMO formalism allows us to quantify the quality of flavor symmetries seen in baryon multiplets, and also allows us to predict the masses of all observable J^P = 1/2^+ and 3/2^+ baryons with an estimated accuracy on the order of 50 MeV in the worst cases, on mass scales that span anywhere from 1000 MeV to 15000 MeV.

  2. Trade and Exposure Kathryn M.E. Dominguez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    Trade and Exposure Kathryn M.E. Dominguez Ford School of Public Policy, Department of Economics Are firms that engage in trade more vulnerable to exchange rate risk? In this paper we examine the relationship between exchange rate movements, firm value and trade. Our empirical work tests whether exchange

  3. Occupational exposures to uranium: processes, hazards, and regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Fisher, D.R.; McCormack, W.D.; Hoenes, G.R.; Marks, S.; Moore, R.H.; Quilici, D.G.; Breitenstein, B.D.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Uranium Registry (USUR) was formed in 1978 to investigate potential hazards from occupational exposure to uranium and to assess the need for special health-related studies of uranium workers. This report provides a summary of Registry work done to date. The history of the uranium industry is outlined first, and the current commercial uranium industry (mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication) is described. This description includes information on basic processes and areas of greatest potential radiological exposure. In addition, inactive commercial facilities and other uranium operations are discussed. Regulation of the commercial production industry for uranium fuel is reported, including the historic development of regulations and the current regulatory agencies and procedures for each phase of the industry. A review of radiological health practices in the industry - facility monitoring, exposure control, exposure evaluation, and record-keeping - is presented. A discussion of the nonradiological hazards of the industry is provided, and the final section describes the tissue program developed as part of the Registry.

  4. EPa`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Exposure issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, M.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Three major issues to be dealt with over the next ten years in the exposure assessment field are: consistency in terminology, the impact of computer technology on the choice of data and modeling, and conceptual issues such as the use of time-weighted averages.

  5. adolescent ethanol exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adolescent ethanol exposure First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Impulsivity and trauma...

  6. acute exposure nuclear: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exposure nuclear First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Behavioral and physiological effects...

  7. An exposure assessment survey of the Mont Belvieu polyethylene plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Thomas Franklin

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . These data, along with historical monitoring data, were then used to assign an exposure rating for the overall worker group and for job tasks performed in each worker group. Toxicology data of each stressor were used to rate the health effects associated...

  8. Implied Risk Exposures Sylvain Benoit Christophe Hurlin Christophe Prignony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's cost of capital. Second, they are used by banking regulators to set banks'regulatory capital. During and bank's risk exposures. While the latter is typically unknown to the public, we show how to estimate-at-Risk, Regulatory Capital JEL Classi...cation: G21, G28, G32 University of Orléans, Laboratoire d'Economie d

  9. Exposure assessment strategies for non-routine work operations (NORWO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, V.; Johnson, J.; Chiusano, S.; McLouth, L.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This meeting is the second in a series of a cooperative effort between the Industrial Hygiene Division of the Office of Health (EH-40) and the Office of Oversight (EM-23) to gain input for the development of a section on NORWO exposure assessment in the Exposure Assessment Strategies and HAZWOPER technical guidance manuals. The first day of the meeting was dedicated to a seminar relating to AIHA Strategy for Occupational Exposure Assessment to NORWO situations. Jeff Miller and Tom Weeda of Radian were the course instructors. The course covered how the elements of basic characterization, prioritization, monitoring and decision making could apply to NORWO situations. Several examples of applications of statistical analysis for decision making were illustrated. In addition, the seminar brought forth some points that need additional examination before the strategy can be applied to NORWO. They are: should qualitative and semi-quantitative data be applied to statistical decision making; should professional judgment be balanced with an acceptable degree of statistical certainty; and the need for development of a standardized application of statistics for the DOE Health & Safety community. The remaining two days of the meeting were devoted to the continued development of guidelines to measure and document, in a technically correct and consistent manner, the exposures DOE environmental restoration and waste management (ERWM) workers receive during NORWO and reflects the perspectives and experiences of the attendees. Formal presentations were given by representatives from Hanford and INEL.

  10. Occupational exposure to DDT among mosquito control sprayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nhachi, C.F.B.; Kasilo, O.J. (Univ. of Zimbabwe, Harare (Zimbabwe))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DDT, a broad action insecticide whose use is restricted or banned in most industrialized countries is still often used for vector control in many tropical and developing countries. Despite the fact that DDT is accumulative and persistant in the ecosystem use of such substitutes as malathion or propoxur is not popular because these increases costs by 3.4 to 8.5 fold. As such DDT is economically attractive to poorer countries. As far as can be ascertained no systemic poisoning has resulted from occupational exposure to DDT. Due to the large particle size, the amount of DDT inhaled by workers is far less than the amount reaching exposed portions of skin. As such occupational exposure is mainly dermal or tropical. Occupational exposure to DDT studies have been done before. The present study is an analysis of some characteristics, (i.e. age, body size, relationship between plasma vitamin A and DDE levels, and smoking habits), of occupational exposure to DDT among spraymen in a Zimbabwe population.

  11. DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) Data Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Nimi; Hagemeyer, Derek

    2012-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This slide show presents the 2011 draft data for DOE occupational radiation exposure.Clarification is given on Reporting Data regarding: reporting Total Organ Dose (TOD); reporting Total Skin Dose (TSD), and Total Extremity Dose (TExD) ; and Special individuals reporting.

  12. Causal Analysis of the Unanticipated Extremity Exposure at HFEF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. James; Charles R. Posegate; Thomas P. Zahn; Alan G. Wagner

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the unintended extremity exposure to an operator while handling a metallurgical mount sample of irradiated fuel following an off-scale high beta radiation reading of the sample. The decision was made to continue working after the meter indicated high off-scale by the HPT Supervisor, which resulted in the operator at the next operation being exposed.

  13. Indoor exposure to radiation in the case of an outdoorrelease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Jayaraman, Buvana

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report quantifies the effectiveness of ''sheltering in place'' in a commercial building in the event of an outdoor radiological release. The indoor exposure to airborne particles is calculated by solving the mass balance equation that accounts for the loss of particles due to deposition, filtration and exhaust. Quantitative estimates of shelter-inplace effectiveness are provided for typical commercial buildings.

  14. Residential insecticide exposure during pregnancy among African American and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Residential insecticide exposure during pregnancy among African American and Dominican mothers and newborns from NYC R Whyatt, V Rauh, H Andrews, D Barr, D Camann, F Perera #12;Residential Pesticide Use 85 for Children's Environmental Health #12;Regulatory action to phase out residential use of chlorpyrifos

  15. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

  16. Dynamic Models for Insect Mortality Due to Exposure to Insecticides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    insecticide Margosan-O (MO) on pea aphids (A. pisum). Broad bean plants which had grown to a height of 25 cm were sprayed with water (control) or one of six concentrations of MO. Effects of MO on both neonate exposure, three pots had been treated per concentration of MO or water, for a total of 30 aphids per

  17. accident exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accident exposure First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Estimating Pedestrian Accident...

  18. Generalized Hyper-Ramsey Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanon-Willette, T; Taichenachev, A V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive an exact generalization of the Ramsey transition probability to improve ultra-high precision measurement and quantum state engineering when a particle is subjected to controllable separated oscillating fields. The phase-shift accumulated at the end of the interrogation scheme and associated to the particle wave-function is offering a very high-level control of quantum states in various laser parameters conditions. The Generalized Hyper-Ramsey Resonance based on independent manipulation of interaction time, field amplitude and frequency detuning is presented to increase performances in the next generation of atomic, molecular and nuclear clocks, to upgrade high resolution frequency measurement in Penning trap mass spectrometry, for a better control of light induced frequency shifts in matter wave interferometer and quantum information processing.

  19. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices.

  20. Generalized parton distributions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vadim Guzey

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of nuclei describe the distribution of quarks and gluons in nuclei probed in hard exclusive reactions, such as e.g. deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS). Nuclear GPDs and nuclear DVCS allow us to study new aspects of many traditional nuclear effects (nuclear shadowing, EMC effect, medium modifications of the bound nucleons) as well as to access novel nuclear effects. In my talk, I review recent theoretical progress in the area of nuclear GPDs.

  1. Factors Affecting Cotton Producers' Choice of Marketing Outlet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Jason 1979-

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies 4 Adoption Studies Employing Multinomial Logistic Regression ?.. 5 Hedging Studies ?????????????????????.. 8 Marketing Studies ????????????????????... 12 Non-cotton and General Commodity Marketing Studies ????. 12 Cotton Marketing Studies... Employing Multinomial Logistic Regression This paper will model the factors that influence several qualitative choices (cash marketing outlets) among cotton producers. The objective of qualitative choice modeling is to determine each explanatory...

  2. BASELINE PARAMETER UPDATE FOR HUMAN HEALTH INPUT AND TRANSFER FACTORS FOR RADIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffield, T; Patricia Lee, P

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to update parameters utilized in Human Health Exposure calculations and Bioaccumulation Transfer Factors utilized at SRS for Performance Assessment modeling. The reason for the update is to utilize more recent information issued, validate information currently used and correct minor inconsistencies between modeling efforts performed in SRS contiguous areas of the heavy industrialized central site usage areas called the General Separations Area (GSA). SRS parameters utilized were compared to a number of other DOE facilities and generic national/global references to establish relevance of the parameters selected and/or verify the regional differences of the southeast USA. The parameters selected were specifically chosen to be expected values along with identifying a range for these values versus the overly conservative specification of parameters for estimating an annual dose to the maximum exposed individual (MEI). The end uses are to establish a standardized source for these parameters that is up to date with existing data and maintain it via review of any future issued national references to evaluate the need for changes as new information is released. These reviews are to be added to this document by revision.

  3. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTING POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, M.; Clark, E.; Lascola, R.

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of beta (tritium) and gamma irradiation on the surface electrical conductivity of two types of conducting polymer films are documented to determine their potential use as a sensing and surveillance device for the tritium facility. It was shown that surface conductivity was significantly reduced by irradiation with both gamma and tritium gas. In order to compare the results from the two radiation sources, an approximate dose equivalence was calculated. The materials were also sensitive to small radiation doses (<10{sup 5} rad), showing that there is a measurable response to relatively small total doses of tritium gas. Spectroscopy was also used to confirm the mechanism by which this sensing device would operate in order to calibrate this sensor for potential use. It was determined that one material (polyaniline) was very sensitive to oxidation while the other material (PEDOT-PSS) was not. However, polyaniline provided the best response as a sensing material, and it is suggested that an oxygen-impermeable, radiation-transparent coating be applied to this material for future device prototype fabrication. A great deal of interest has developed in recent years in the area of conducting polymers due to the high levels of conductivity that can be achieved, some comparable to that of metals [Gerard 2002]. Additionally, the desirable physical and chemical properties of a polymer are retained and can be exploited for various applications, including light emitting diodes (LED), anti-static packaging, electronic coatings, and sensors. The electron transfer mechanism is generally accepted as one of electron 'hopping' through delocalized electrons in the conjugated backbone, although other mechanisms have been proposed based on the type of polymer and dopant [Inzelt 2000, Gerard 2002]. The conducting polymer polyaniline (PANi) is of particular interest because there are extensive studies on the modulation of the conductivity by changing either the oxidation state of the main backbone chain, or by protonation of the imine groups [de Acevedo, 1999]. There are several types of radiation sensors commercially available, including ionization chambers, geiger counters, proportional counters, scintillators and solid state detectors. Each type has advantages, although many of these sensors require expensive electronics for signal amplification, are large and bulky, have limited battery life or require expensive materials for fabrication. A radiation sensor constructed of a polymeric material could be flexible, light, and the geometry designed to suit the application. Very simple and inexpensive electronics would be necessary to measure the change in conductivity with exposure to radiation and provide an alarm system when a set change of conductivity occurs in the sensor that corresponds to a predetermined radiation dose having been absorbed by the polymer. The advantages of using a polymeric sensor of this type rather than those currently in use are the flexibility of sensor geometry and relatively low cost. It is anticipated that these sensors can be made small enough for glovebox applications or have the ability to monitor the air tritium levels in places where a traditional monitor cannot be placed. There have been a few studies on the changes in conductivity of polyaniline specifically for radiation detection [de Acevedo, 1999; Lima Pacheco, 2003], but there have been no reports on the effects of tritium (beta radiation) on conducting polymers, such as polyaniline or polythiophene. The direct implementation of conducting polymers as radiation sensor materials has not yet been commercialized due to differing responses with total dose, dose rate, etc. Some have reported a large increase in the surface conductivity with radiation dose while others report a marked decrease in conductive properties; these differing observations may reflect the competing mechanisms of chain scission and cross-linking. However, it is clear that the radiation dose effects on conducting polymers must be fully understood before these materials can be used

  4. Dense LU Factorization on Multicore Supercomputer Nodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lifflander, Jonathan [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Miller, Phil [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Venkataraman, Ramprasad [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Arya, Anshu [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Jones, Terry R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kale, Laxmikant V [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense LU factorization is a prominent benchmark used to rank the performance of supercomputers. Many implementations, including the reference code HPL, use block-cyclic distributions of matrix blocks onto a two-dimensional process grid. The process grid dimensions drive a trade-off between communication and computation and are architecture- and implementation-sensitive. We show how the critical panel factorization steps can be made less communication-bound by overlapping asynchronous collectives for pivot identification and exchange with the computation of rank-k updates. By shifting this trade-off, a modified block-cyclic distribution can beneficially exploit more available parallelism on the critical path, and reduce panel factorization's memory hierarchy contention on now-ubiquitous multi-core architectures. The missed parallelism in traditional block-cyclic distributions arises because active panel factorization, triangular solves, and subsequent broadcasts are spread over single process columns or rows (respectively) of the process grid. Increasing one dimension of the process grid decreases the number of distinct processes in the other dimension. To increase parallelism in both dimensions, periodic 'rotation' is applied to the process grid to recover the row-parallelism lost by a tall process grid. During active panel factorization, rank-1 updates stream through memory with minimal reuse. In a column-major process grid, the performance of this access pattern degrades as too many streaming processors contend for access to memory. A block-cyclic mapping in the more popular row-major order does not encounter this problem, but consequently sacrifices node and network locality in the critical pivoting steps. We introduce 'striding' to vary between the two extremes of row- and column-major process grids. As a test-bed for further mapping experiments, we describe a dense LU implementation that allows a block distribution to be defined as a general function of block to processor. Other mappings can be tested with only small, local changes to the code.

  5. From General Mechanics to General Motors: Lynn Gantt's EcoCAR Experience

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    How Lynn Gantt’s EcoCAR experience took him from studying general mechanics to working at General Motors.

  6. Dirac equation in low dimensions: The factorization method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Sanchez-Monroy; C. J. Quimbay

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general approach to solve the (1+1) and (2+1)-dimensional Dirac equation in the presence of static scalar, pseudoscalar and gauge potentials, for the case in which the potentials have the same functional form and thus the factorization method can be applied. We show that the presence of electric potentials in the Dirac equation leads to a two Klein-Gordon equations including an energy-dependent potential. We then generalize the factorization method for the case of energy-dependent Hamiltonians. Additionally, the shape invariance is generalized for a specific class of energy-dependent Hamiltonians. We also present a condition for the absence of the Klein's paradox (stability of the Dirac sea), showing how Dirac particles in low dimensions can be confined for a wide family of potentials.

  7. Improved accuracy general remapping algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukowicz, J.K.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most numerical methods in fluid dynamics can be classified as being either Lagrangian or Eulerian. An important group of methods, however, is a combination of both. These methods generally derive from the ALE (Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian) method of Hirt et al. A computational cycle in these methods is divided into two main phases: a lagrangian phase and a rezone or remap phase (these two terms are used interchangeably). The remapping phase conservtively transfers quantities, calculated in the Lagrangian phase, from the Lagrangian mesh to some other specified mesh. For example, in a given time step the remap phase may be omitted, in which case the computation is purely Lagrangian, or the remapping may be back to the original mesh, in which case the computation is Eulerian. The remapping step, therefore, corresponds to the effect of the advection terms in Eulerian equations. It may also be viewed as a conservative interpolation procedure from one mesh to another, and so it is also useful in other more general applications, such as in adaptive mesh computations. In this paper a new method is extended to the case of a more accurate density distribution: the density distribution within a cell is allowed to be linear, while preserving the average value of density over the cell. The orientation of this planar surface is given by the average local density gradient. Such a linear distribution, while more accurate in general, can cause undershoots or overshoots in regions of rapidly changing densities. This is avoided by placing monotonicity limits on the allowable gradients, similar to those used by Van Leer in one-dimension.

  8. Generalization of a theorem of Carathéodory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvino Ciccariello; Antonio Cervellino

    2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Carath\\'eodory showed that $n$ complex numbers $c_1,...,c_n$ can uniquely be written in the form $c_p=\\sum_{j=1}^m \\rho_j {\\epsilon_j}^p$ with $p=1,...,n$, where the $\\epsilon_j$s are different unimodular complex numbers, the $\\rho_j$s are strictly positive numbers and integer $m$ never exceeds $n$. We give the conditions to be obeyed for the former property to hold true if the $\\rho_j$s are simply required to be real and different from zero. It turns out that the number of the possible choices of the signs of the $\\rho_j$s are {at most} equal to the number of the different eigenvalues of the Hermitian Toeplitz matrix whose $i,j$-th entry is $c_{j-i}$, where $c_{-p}$ is equal to the complex conjugate of $c_{p}$ and $c_{0}=0$. This generalization is relevant for neutron scattering. Its proof is made possible by a lemma - which is an interesting side result - that establishes a necessary and sufficient condition for the unimodularity of the roots of a polynomial based only on the polynomial coefficients. Keywords: Toeplitz matrix factorization, unimodular roots, neutron scattering, signal theory, inverse problems. PACS: 61.12.Bt, 02.30.Zz, 89.70.+c, 02.10.Yn, 02.50.Ga

  9. The thermodynamics of general anesthesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heimburg, T; Heimburg, Thomas; Jackson, Andrew D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that the action of general anesthetics is proportional to their partition coefficient in lipid membranes (Meyer-Overton rule). This solubility is, however, directly related to the depression of the temperature of the melting transition found close to body temperature in biomembranes. We propose a thermodynamic extension of the Meyer-Overton rule which is based on free energy changes in the system and thus automatically incorporates the effects of melting point depression. This model provides a quantitative explanation of the pressure reversal of anesthesia. Further, it explains why inflammation and the addition of divalent cations reduce the effectiveness of anesthesia.

  10. A study of generalized inverses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinney, Nancy Lee

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPENDIX A A FORTRAN IV COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR CALCULATING THE GENERALIZED INVERSE OF A MATRIX. VITA PAGE 17 17 23 32 35 38 38 46 53 53 53 59 65 68 71 92 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1 Least-Square Solution. . 2 Specific Least... are as follows. We extend the definition of a diagonaL matrix to all mxn matrices. We call an mxn matrix D a diagonal matrix of d. = 0 ij for i P j, i = l, . . . , m and j = l, . . . , n. Thus the only entries in D that may be nonzero are the d, i = I...

  11. A Generalized Coupon Collector Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Weiyu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides analysis to a generalized version of the coupon collector problem, in which the collector gets $d$ distinct coupons each run and she chooses the one that she has the least so far. On the asymptotic case when the number of coupons $n$ goes to infinity, we show that on average $\\frac{n\\log n}{d} + \\frac{n}{d}(m-1)\\log\\log{n}+O(mn)$ runs are needed to collect $m$ sets of coupons. An efficient exact algorithm is also developed for any finite case to compute the average needed runs exactly. Numerical examples are provided to verify our theoretical predictions.

  12. General Relativity in Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulf Leonhardt; Thomas G. Philbin

    2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In electrical engineering metamaterials have been developed that offer unprecedented control over electromagnetic fields. Here we show that general relativity lends the theoretical tools for designing devices made of such versatile materials. Given a desired device function, the theory describes the electromagnetic properties that turn this function into fact. We consider media that facilitate space-time transformations and include negative refraction. Our theory unifies the concepts operating behind the scenes of perfect invisibility devices, perfect lenses, the optical Aharonov-Bohm effect and electromagnetic analogs of the event horizon, and may lead to further applications.

  13. Generalized Superconductors and Holographic Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhash Mahapatra; Prabwal Phukon; Tapobrata Sarkar

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study generalized holographic s-wave superconductors in four dimensional R-charged black hole and Lifshitz black hole backgrounds, in the probe limit. We first establish the superconducting nature of the boundary theories, and then study their optical properties. Numerical analysis indicates that a negative Depine-Lakhtakia index may appear at low frequencies in the theory dual to the R-charged black hole, for certain temperature ranges, for specific values of the charge parameter. The corresponding cut-off values for these are numerically established in several cases. Such effects are seen to be absent in the Lifshitz background where this index is always positive.

  14. Generalized Klein-Nishina formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krajewska, K; Kami?ski, J Z

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized Klein-Nishina formula for Compton scattering of charged particles by a finite train of pulses is derived in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. The formula also applies to classical Thomson scattering provided that frequencies of generated radiation are smaller that the cut-off frequency. The validity of the formula for incident pulses of different durations is illustrated by numerical examples. The positions of the well-resolved Compton peaks, with the clear labeling by integer orders, opens up the possibility of the precise diagnostics of properties of relativistically intense, short laser pulses. This includes their peak intensity, the carrier-envelope phase, and their polarization properties.

  15. Generalized Klein-Nishina formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Krajewska; F. Cajiao Vélez; J. Z. Kami?ski

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized Klein-Nishina formula for Compton scattering of charged particles by a finite train of pulses is derived in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. The formula also applies to classical Thomson scattering provided that frequencies of generated radiation are smaller that the cut-off frequency. The validity of the formula for incident pulses of different durations is illustrated by numerical examples. The positions of the well-resolved Compton peaks, with the clear labeling by integer orders, opens up the possibility of the precise diagnostics of properties of relativistically intense, short laser pulses. This includes their peak intensity, the carrier-envelope phase, and their polarization properties.

  16. II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37EnergySubmit ait'sII. GENERAL COMPLIANCE

  17. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Linlong [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Magdalou, Jacques [UMR 7561 CNRS-Nancy Université, Faculté de Médicine, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Chen, Liaobin [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE + ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE + HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE + HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a “two-programming” hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is “the first programming”, and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as “the second programming”. - Highlights: • Prenatal ethanol exposure increase the susceptibility of NAFLD in female offspring. • Prenatal ethanol exposure reprograms fetal liver’s glucose and lipid metabolism . • Prenatal ethanol exposure cause the adaptive change of glucocorticoid-IGF1 axis.

  18. ANTI-APOPTOTIC FACTOR z-Val-Ala-Asp-FLUOROMETHYLKETONE PROMOTES THE SURVIVAL OF COCHLEAR HAIR CELLS IN A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avraham, Karen

    ANTI-APOPTOTIC FACTOR z-Val-Ala-Asp-FLUOROMETHYLKETONE PROMOTES THE SURVIVAL OF COCHLEAR HAIR CELLS- gin. A large effort is being made to protect hair cells from cell death after exposure to noise or drugs that can cause hearing loss. Our research focused on protecting hair cells from cell death

  19. Biogeochemical processes governing exposure and uptake of organic pollutant compounds in aquatic organisms. Environmental Health Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John W. Farrington

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews current knowledge of biogeochemical cycles of pollutant organic chemicals in aquatic ecosystems with a focus on coastal ecosystems. There is a bias toward discussng chemkal and geochemical aspects ofbiogeochemical cycles and an emphasis on hydrophobic organic compounds such as polynuckar aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated organic compounds used as pesticides. The complexity of mixtures of pollutant organic compounds, their various modes of entering ecosystems, and their physical chemical forms are discussed. Important factors that influence bioavailability and disposition (e.g., organism-water partitioning, uptake via food, food meb transfer) are reviewed. These factors include solubilities of chemicals; partitioning of chemicals between solid surfaces, colloids, and soluble phases; variables rates of sorption, desorption; and physiological status of organism. It appears that more emphasis on considering food as a source of uptake and bioaccumulation is important in benthic and epibenthic ecosystems when sediment-associated pollutants are a nt source of input to an aquatic ecosystem. Progress with mathematical models for exposure and uptake of contaminant chemicals is discussed briefly.

  20. Design and construction of a general purpose Human Factors Environmental Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennigan, James Kerness

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was constructed slight)y difierent to accommodate the corner post (see Appendix 2). The corner. post vas constructed a! d drive!! in place, where five 1/4 x 4-inc!h )ag bol. ts in the back edge~ attached the back side, corner post& and right side panel firm]y...

  1. Exploring Risk and Protective Factors Among African American Males in Alternative and General Education Settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossley, Tia Billy

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    education and discipline needs. As such, they pose a challenge for many educators (Foley & Pang, 2006; Tsang, 2004). For the purpose of this paper, an alternative school setting refers to any public nontraditional school setting that services students who...

  2. Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr-! air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency for radioactive air emissions.

  3. Heavy to light baryon transition form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, X. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil] [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil; [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China); Huang, T. [CCAST (World Laboratory) P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080, People`s Republic of (China)] [CCAST (World Laboratory) P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080, People`s Republic of (China); [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China); Li, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, Stech found form factor relations for heavy to light transitions based on two simple dynamical assumptions for a spectator particle. In this paper we generalize his approach to the case of baryons and find that for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} ({ital Q}={ital b} or {ital c}) only one independent form factor remains in the limit {ital m}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{infinity}. Furthermore, combining with the model of Guo and Kroll we determine both of the two form factors for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} in the heavy quark limit. The results are applied to {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} which is not clarified both theoretically and experimentally. It is found that the branching ratio of {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} is of order 10{sup {minus}5}. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Electronic dose conversion technique using a NaI(Tl) detector for assessment of exposure dose rate from environmental radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, G.; Kim, H.K. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Woo, H.; Oh, G. [Korea Electric Power Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Electric Power Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Ha, D.K. [Samchang Enterprise Co., Anyang (Korea, Republic of)] [Samchang Enterprise Co., Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electronic dose conversion technique to assess the exposure dose rate due to environmental radiation especially from terrestrial sources was developed. For a 2 x 2 inch cylindrical NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, pulse-height spectra were obtained for gamma-rays of energy up to 3 MeV by Monte Carlo simulation. Based on the simulation results and the experimentally fitted energy resolution, dose conversion factors were calculated by a numerical decomposition method. These calculated dose conversion factors were, then, electronically implemented to a developed dose conversion unit (DCU) which is a microprocessor-controlled single channel analyzer (SCA) with variable discrimination levels. The simulated spectra were confirmed by measurement of several monoenergetic gamma spectra with a multichannel analyzer (MCA). The converted exposure dose rates from the implemented dose conversion algorithm in the DCU were also evaluated for a field test in the vicinity of the nuclear power plant at Kori as well as for several standard sources, and the results were in good agreement with separate measurement by a high pressure ionization chamber (HPIC) within a 6.4% deviation.

  5. Estimating pollutant exposures from coal fired power plants in a rural region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batterman, S. A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical issue in epidemiological studies of ambient air pollution is the measurement of pollutant exposure in the study population. Accurate characterization of air quality is necessary in any study relating exposure ...

  6. TRAFFIC-RELATED AIR POLLUTION. A PILOT EXPOSURE1 ASSESSMENT IN BEIRUT, LEBANON2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the use of biomarkers of exposure to benzene and BD. Personal benzene, toluene,30 ethylbenzene, and xylene as biomarker of exposure to BD in humans. Traffic policemen, who are exposed to46 hal-00914713,version1-25Jan

  7. Fluoxetine Exposure during Adolescence Alters Responses to Aversive Stimuli in Adulthood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iniguez, Sergio D.

    The mechanisms underlying the enduring neurobiological consequences of antidepressant exposure during adolescence are poorly understood. Here, we assessed the long-term effects of exposure to fluoxetine (FLX), a selective ...

  8. A single-particle characterisation of a mobile Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System for exposure studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freney, Evelyn; Heal, Mathew R; Donovan, Robert J; Mills, Nicholas; Newby, David; Donaldson, Ken; Fokkens, Paul; Cassee, Flemming

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enrichment System (VACES) contained within the Mobile Ambient Particle Concentrator Exposure Laboratory (MAPCEL). The data were collected during a study of human exposure to CAPs, in Edinburgh (UK), in February-March 2004. The air flow prior to, and post...

  9. Analysis of Optics and Mask Contamination in SEMATECH EUV Micro-Exposure Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wuest, Andrea

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of Optics and Mask Contamination in SEMATECHMioro^Exposure Tools IEUVI Optics Contamination/Lifetime TWG

  10. Inorganic arsenic exposure and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coronado-Gonzalez, Jose Antonio [Clinical Epidemiologic Research Unit, General Regional Hospital 1 'Gabriel Mancera', Mexican Institute of the Social Security, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Razo, Luz Maria del [Toxicology Departament, Cinvestav, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo [School of Medicine, Durango State Juarez University, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico); Biomedical Research Center, Coahuila, Autonomous University, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Sanmiguel-Salazar, Francisca [Biomedical Research Center, Coahuila, Autonomous University, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Escobedo-de la Pena, Jorge [Clinical Epidemiologic Research Unit, General Regional Hospital 1 'Gabriel Mancera', Mexican Institute of the Social Security, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: jorgeep@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inorganic arsenic exposure in drinking water has been recently related to diabetes mellitus. To evaluate this relationship the authors conducted in 2003, a case-control study in an arseniasis-endemic region from Coahuila, a northern state of Mexico with a high incidence of diabetes. The present analysis includes 200 cases and 200 controls. Cases were obtained from a previous cross-sectional study conducted in that region. Diagnosis of diabetes was established following the American Diabetes Association criteria, with two fasting glucose values {>=}126 mg/100 ml ({>=}7.0 mmol/l) or a history of diabetes treated with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. The next subject studied, subsequent to the identification of a case in the cross-sectional study was taken as control. Inorganic arsenic exposure was measured through total arsenic concentrations in urine, measured by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Subjects with intermediate total arsenic concentration in urine (63.5-104 {mu}g/g creatinine) had two-fold higher risk of having diabetes (odds ratio=2.16; 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.79), but the risk was almost three times greater in subjects with higher concentrations of total arsenic in urine (odds ratio=2.84; 95% confidence interval: 1.64, 4.92). This data provides additional evidence that inorganic arsenic exposure may be diabetogenic.

  11. Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bishop, Kenneth P. (Rio Rancho, NM); Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gaspar, Susan M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hickman, Kirt C. (Albuquerque, NM); McNeil, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Naqvi, S. Sohail H. (Albuquerque, NM); Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipton, Gary D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

  12. Compton Scattering and Generalized Polarizabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Scherer

    2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, real and virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon have attracted considerable interest from both the experimental and theoretical sides. Real Compton scattering gives access to the so-called electromagnetic polarizabilities containing the structure information beyond the global properties of the nucleon such as its charge, mass, and magnetic moment. These polarizabilities have an intuitive interpretation in terms of induced dipole moments and thus characterize the response of the constituents of the nucleon to a soft external stimulus. The virtual Compton scattering reaction $e^-p\\to e^-p\\gamma$ allows one to map out the {\\em local} response to external fields and can be described in terms of generalized electromagnetic polarizabilities. A simple classical interpretation in terms of the induced electric and magnetic polarization densities is proposed. We will discuss experimental results for the polarizabilities of the proton and compare them with theoretical predictions.

  13. Orbifold resolutions with general profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Wulzer

    2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A very general class of resolved versions of the C/Z_N, T^2/Z_N and S^1/Z_2 orbifolds is considered and the free theory of 6D chiral fermions studied on it. As the orbifold limit is taken, localized 4D chiral massless fermions are seen to arise at the fixed points. Their number, location and chirality is found to be independent on the detailed profile of the resolving space and to agree with the result of hep-th/0409229, in which a particular resolution was employed. As a consistency check of the resolution procedure, the massive equation is numerically studied. In particular, for S^1/Z_2, the "resolved" mass--spectrum and wave functions in the internal space are seen to correctly reproduce the usual orbifold ones, as the orbifold limit is taken.

  14. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buniy, Roman V., E-mail: roman.buniy@gmail.com [Schmid College of Science, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom); Kephart, Thomas W., E-mail: tom.kephart@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ?{sub ?}trF{sub ??}F{sup ??}d{sup 4}x subject to the local constraint ?{sup ????}trF{sub ??}F{sub ??}=0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity.

  15. Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL BENZENE EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR PARENT-CHILD PAIRS IN ROUEN, FRANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 ENVIRONMENTAL BENZENE EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR PARENT-CHILD PAIRS IN ROUEN, FRANCE Amin KOUNIALIa environmental benzene exposure. In this study we compared personal benzene exposure and inhalation uptake in a group of children to those of their parents. We also compared levels of urinary benzene metabolites

  17. Maternal exposure to cadmium during gestation perturbs the vascular system of the adult rat offspring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronco, Ana Maria, E-mail: amronco@inta.cl [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Montenegro, Marcela; Castillo, Paula; Urrutia, Manuel [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Saez, Daniel [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Hirsch, Sandra [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Zepeda, Ramiro [Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Llanos, Miguel N. [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several cardiovascular diseases (CVD) observed in adulthood have been associated with environmental influences during fetal growth. Here, we show that maternal exposure to cadmium, a ubiquitously distributed heavy metal and main component of cigarette smoke is able to induce cardiovascular morpho-functional changes in the offspring at adult age. Heart morphology and vascular reactivity were evaluated in the adult offspring of rats exposed to 30 ppm of cadmium during pregnancy. Echocardiographic examination shows altered heart morphology characterized by a concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. Also, we observed a reduced endothelium-dependent reactivity in isolated aortic rings of adult offspring, while endothelium-independent reactivity remained unaltered. These effects were associated with an increase of hem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression in the aortas of adult offspring. The expression of HO-1 was higher in females than males, a finding likely related to the sex-dependent expression of the vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), which was lower in the adult female. All these long-term consequences were observed along with normal birth weights and absence of detectable levels of cadmium in fetal and adult tissues of the offspring. In placental tissues however, cadmium levels were detected and correlated with increased NF-{kappa}B expression - a transcription factor sensitive to inflammation and oxidative stress - suggesting a placentary mechanism that affect genes related to the development of the cardiovascular system. Our results provide, for the first time, direct experimental evidence supporting that exposure to cadmium during pregnancy reprograms cardiovascular development of the offspring which in turn may conduce to a long term increased risk of CVD.

  18. Tritium: a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carsten, A.L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The somatic, cytogenetic and genetic effects of single and chronic tritiated water (HTO) ingestion in mice was investigated. This study serves not only as an evaluation of tritium toxicity (TRITOX) but due to its design involving long-term low concentration ingestion of HTO may serve as a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure in general. Long-term studies involved animals maintained on HTO at concentrations of 0.3 ..mu..Ci/ml, 1.0 ..mu..Ci/ml, 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml or depth dose equivalent chronic external exposures to /sup 137/Cs gamma rays. Maintenance on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml resulted in no effect on growth, life-time shortening or bone marrow cellularity, but did result in a reduction of bone marrow stem cells, an increase in DLM's in second generation animals maintained on this regimen and cytogenetic effects as indicated by increased sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's) in bone marrow cells, increased chromosome aberrations in the regenerating liver and an increase in micronuclei in red blood cells. Biochemical and microdosimetry studies showed that animals placed on the HTO regimen reached tritium equilibrium in the body water in approximately 17 to 21 days with a more gradual increase in bound tritium. When animals maintained for 180 days on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml HTO were placed on a tap water regimen, the tritium level in tissue dropped from the equilibrium value of 2.02 ..mu..Ci/ml before withdrawal to 0.001 ..mu..Ci/ml at 28 days. 18 references.

  19. Changes in the peripheral blood transcriptome associated with occupational benzene exposure identified by cross-comparison on two microarray platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    Changes in the peripheral blood transcriptome associated with occupational benzene exposure Available online 20 January 2009 Keywords: Benzene exposure Gene expression Human blood Toxicogenomics expression changes associated with well-characterized occupational benzene exposure in the peripheral blood

  20. Exposure-Relevant Ozone Chemistry in Occupied Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Beverly Kaye

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    linseed oil, similar oils, and products containing or coatedaldehydes and skin oil oxidation products. A model of massreactions with cleaning products, a pine-oil general-purpose

  1. Effects of composition and exposure on the solar reflectance of Portland cement concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem

    2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing the solar reflectance (albedo) of a paved surface keeps it cooler in the sun, reducing convection of heat from pavement to air and thereby decreasing the ambient air temperature. Simulations of the influence of pavement albedo on air temperature in Los Angeles predict that increasing the albedo of 1,250 km2 of pavement by 0.25 would save cooling energy worth $15M yr-1, and reduce smog-related medical and lost-work expenses by $76M yr-1. Most sidewalks and a small fraction of roads and parking areas are paved with portland cement concrete, which can be made quite reflective through suitable choice of cement and aggregate. Variations with composition and environmental exposure of the albedos of portland cement concrete pavements were investigated through laboratory fabrication and exposure of 32 mixes of concrete. Twenty-four mixes yielded substandard, ''rough'' concretes due to high, unmet aggregate water demand. The albedos of the remaining eight ''smooth'' concrete mixes ranged from 0.41 to 0.77 (mean 0.59). Simulated weathering, soiling, and abrasion each reduced average concrete albedo (mean decreases 0.06, 0.05, and 0.19, respectively), though some samples became slightly more reflective through weathering or soiling. Simulated rain (wetting) strongly depressed the albedos of concretes (mean decrease 0.23) until their surfaces were dried. Concrete albedo grew as the cement hydration reaction progressed (mean increase 0.08), but stabilized within six weeks of casting. White-cement concretes were on average significantly more reflective than gray-cement concretes. The albedo of the most-reflective white-cement concrete was 0.18 to 0.39 higher than that of the most-reflective gray-cement concrete, depending on state of exposure. Concrete albedo generally correlated with cement albedo and sand albedo, and, after abrasion, with rock albedo. Cement albedo had a disproportionately strong influence on the reflectance of concrete. Efflorescence and surface carbonation whitened some gray-cement mixes.

  2. Building a completely positive factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 19, 2009 ... Abstract. Using a bordering approach, and building upon an already known factorization of a principal block, we establish sufficient conditions.

  3. An Evaluation of the Importance of Hand Exposures Using Rubber Latex Gloves as Sampling Dosimeters for Assessing Pesticide Exposures in Strawberry Harvesters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sankaran, Gayatri

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model. American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal 61,exposures. American Industrial Hygiene Association journal,State. American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, 60(

  4. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    2000-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Alloy 22 is an extremely Corrosion Resistant Material, with a very stable passive film. Based upon exposures in the LTCTF, the GC rates of Alloy 22 are typically below the level of detection, with four outliers having reported rates up to 0.75 #mu#m per year. In any event, over the 10,000 year life of the repository, GC of the Alloy 22 (assumed to be 2 cm thick) should not be life limiting. Because measured corrosion potentials are far below threshold potentials, localized breakdown of the passive film is unlikely under plausible conditions, even in SSW at 120 deg C. The pH in ambient-temperature crevices formed from Alloy 22 have been determined experimentally, with only modest lowering of the crevice pH observed under plausible conditions. Extreme lowering of the crevice pH was only observed under situations where the applied potential at the crevice mouth was sufficient to result in catastrophic breakdown of the passive film above the threshold potential in non-buffered conditions not characteristic of the Yucca Mountain environment. In cases where naturally ocurring buffers are present in the crevice solution, little or no lowering of the pH was observed, even with significant applied potential. With exposures of twelve months, no evidence of crevice corrosion has been observed in SDW, SCW and SAW at temperatures up to 90 deg C. An abstracted model has been presented, with parameters determined experimentally, that should enable performance assessment to account for the general and localized corrosion of this material. A feature of this model is the use of the materials specification to limit the range of corrosion and threshold potentials, thereby making sure that substandard materials prone to localized attack are avoided. Model validation will be covered in part by a companion SMR on abstraction of this model.

  5. Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand Michael D. Ernst, research advisor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskov, Barbara

    Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand David Saff Michael D. Ernst, research and Subject Descriptors: D.2.5 (Testing and Debug­ ging): Testing tools General Terms: Algorithms, Design, Performance, Verification Keywords: test factoring, mock objects, unit testing 1. Problem: slow, unfocused

  6. Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand Michael D. Ernst, research advisor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskov, Barbara

    Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand David Saff Michael D. Ernst, research and Subject Descriptors: D.2.5 (Testing and Debug- ging): Testing tools General Terms: Algorithms, Design, Performance, Verification Keywords: test factoring, mock objects, unit testing 1. Problem: slow, unfocused

  7. Generalized space and linear momentum operators in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa, Bruno G. da, E-mail: bruno.costa@ifsertao-pe.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Sertão Pernambucano, Campus Petrolina, BR 407, km 08, 56314-520 Petrolina, Pernambuco (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, R. Barão de Jeremoabo s/n, 40170-115 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Borges, Ernesto P., E-mail: ernesto@ufba.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, R. Barão de Jeremoabo s/n, 40170-115 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a modification of a recently introduced generalized translation operator, by including a q-exponential factor, which implies in the definition of a Hermitian deformed linear momentum operator p{sup ^}{sub q}, and its canonically conjugate deformed position operator x{sup ^}{sub q}. A canonical transformation leads the Hamiltonian of a position-dependent mass particle to another Hamiltonian of a particle with constant mass in a conservative force field of a deformed phase space. The equation of motion for the classical phase space may be expressed in terms of the generalized dual q-derivative. A position-dependent mass confined in an infinite square potential well is shown as an instance. Uncertainty and correspondence principles are analyzed.

  8. Author's personal copy Identifying general laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    three operating conditions are met: volatile chemical sources are controlled by local ventilation or localized exhaust points. In labora- tories, general ventilation is intended to control small sourcesAuthor's personal copy FEATURE Identifying general laboratory ventilation requirements using

  9. Subcritical inhomogeneous percolation on general Yilun Shang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subcritical inhomogeneous percolation on general graphs Yilun Shang Institute for Cyber Security] and transitive graphs [5, 15]. Host graphs with more general degree distributions have been analyzed by [8

  10. RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services.6.1/1 Recycling & General Waste Management Department: Estates & Facilities Management Site: Swansea University recycling and waste management facilities in Swansea university To ensure that Waste Management Objectives

  11. Modeling Timed Concurrent Systems using Generalized Ultrametrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Timed Concurrent Systems using Generalized Ultrametrics Xiaojun Liu Eleftherios Matsikoudis Edward A. Lee Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley to lists, requires prior specific permission. #12;Modeling Timed Concurrent Systems using Generalized

  12. The generalized Schrödinger–Langevin equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargueño, Pedro, E-mail: p.bargueno@uniandes.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad de los Andes, Apartado Aéreo 4976, Bogotá, Distrito Capital (Colombia); Miret-Artés, Salvador, E-mail: s.miret@iff.csic.es [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, for a Brownian particle interacting with a heat bath, we derive a generalization of the so-called Schrödinger–Langevin or Kostin equation. This generalization is based on a nonlinear interaction model providing a state-dependent dissipation process exhibiting multiplicative noise. Two straightforward applications to the measurement process are then analyzed, continuous and weak measurements in terms of the quantum Bohmian trajectory formalism. Finally, it is also shown that the generalized uncertainty principle, which appears in some approaches to quantum gravity, can be expressed in terms of this generalized equation. -- Highlights: •We generalize the Kostin equation for arbitrary system–bath coupling. •This generalization is developed both in the Schrödinger and Bohmian formalisms. •We write the generalized Kostin equation for two measurement problems. •We reformulate the generalized uncertainty principle in terms of this equation.

  13. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: Applications of Mathematics Mark Journal Title ISSN Total- life APPL MATH-CZECH 0862-7940 240 0.222 0.549 0.054 37 7.3 >10.0 Cited Journal Citing Journal Source

  14. On the configuration space topology in general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domenico Giulini

    1993-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The configuration-space topology in canonical General Relativity depends on the choice of the initial data 3-manifold. If the latter is represented as a connected sum of prime 3-manifolds, the topology receives contributions from all configuration spaces associated to each individual prime factor. There are by now strong results available concerning the diffeomorphism group of prime 3-manifolds which are exploited to examine the topology of the configuration spaces in terms of their homotopy groups. We explicitly show how to obtain these for the class of homogeneous spherical primes, and communicate the results for all other known primes except the non-sufficiently large ones of infinite fundamental group.

  15. Generalized Parton Distributions from Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering at HERMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Guidal; H. Moutarde

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The HERMES collaboration has recently published a set of (correlated) beam charge, beam spin and target spin relative asymmetries for the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering process. This reaction allows in principle to access the Generalized Parton Distributions of the nucleon. We have fitted, in the QCD leading-order and leading-twist handbag approximation, but in a model independent way, this set of data and we report our results for the extracted Compton Form Factors. In particular, we are able to extract constrains on the $H$ GPD.

  16. Generalized Parton Distributions from Deep Virtual Compton Scattering at CLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Guidal

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed the beam spin asymmetry and the longitudinally polarized target spin asymmetry of the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process, recently measured by the Jefferson Lab CLAS collaboration. Our aim is to extract information about the Generalized Parton Distributions of the proton. By fitting these data, in a largely model-independent procedure, we are able to extract numerical values for the two Compton Form Factors $H_{Im}$ and $\\tilde{H}_{Im}$ with uncertainties, in average, of the order of 30%.

  17. Unruh effect for general trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obadia, N.; Milgrom, M. [Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider two-level detectors coupled to a scalar field and moving on arbitrary trajectories in Minkowski space-time. We first derive a generic expression for the response function using a (novel) regularization procedure based on the Feynman prescription that is explicitly causal, and we compare it to other expressions used in the literature. We then use this expression to study, analytically and numerically, the time dependence of the response function in various nonstationarity situations. We show that, generically, the response function decreases like a power in the detector's level spacing, E, for high E. It is only for stationary worldlines that the response function decays faster than any power law, in keeping with the known exponential behavior for some stationary cases. Under some conditions the (time-dependent) response function for a nonstationary worldline is well approximated by the value of the response function for a stationary worldline having the same instantaneous acceleration, torsion, and hypertorsion. While we cannot offer general conditions for this to apply, we discuss special cases; in particular, the low-energy limit for linear space trajectories.

  18. SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON. TRANSFORM AND DOUBLE BEAMFORMING: A CURVELET. TRANSFORM PERSPECTIVE. M V DE ...

  19. A Generalization of A Leibniz Geometrical Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihaly Bencze; Florin Popovici; Florentin Smarandache

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we present a generalization of a Leibniz's geometrical theorem and an application of it.

  20. Impact of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene exposure on connexin gap junction proteins in cultured rat ovaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesan, Shanthi, E-mail: shanthig@iastate.edu; Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) destroys ovarian follicles in a concentration-dependent manner. The impact of DMBA on connexin (CX) proteins that mediate communication between follicular cell types along with pro-apoptotic factors p53 and Bax were investigated. Postnatal day (PND) 4 Fisher 344 rat ovaries were cultured for 4 days in vehicle medium (1% DMSO) followed by a single exposure to vehicle control (1% DMSO) or DMBA (12.5 nM or 75 nM) and cultured for 4 or 8 days. RT-PCR was performed to quantify Cx37, Cx43, p53 and Bax mRNA level. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were performed to determine CX37 or CX43 level and/or localization. Cx37 mRNA and protein increased (P < 0.05) at 4 days of 12.5 nM DMBA exposure. Relative to vehicle control-treated ovaries, mRNA encoding Cx43 decreased (P < 0.05) but CX43 protein increased (P < 0.05) at 4 days by both DMBA exposures. mRNA expression of pro-apoptotic p53 was decreased (P < 0.05) but no changes in Bax expression were observed after 4 days of DMBA exposures. In contrast, after 8 days, DMBA decreased Cx37 and Cx43 mRNA and protein but increased both p53 and Bax mRNA levels. CX43 protein was located between granulosa cells, while CX37 was located at the oocyte cell surface of all follicle stages. These findings support that DMBA exposure impacts ovarian Cx37 and Cx43 mRNA and protein prior to both observed changes in pro-apoptotic p53 and Bax and follicle loss. It is possible that such interference in follicular cell communication is detrimental to follicle viability, and may play a role in DMBA-induced follicular atresia. - Highlights: • DMBA increases Cx37 and Cx43 expression prior to follicle loss. • During follicle loss both Cx37 and Cx43 expressions are reduced. • CX43 protein is absent in follicle remnants lacking an oocyte.

  1. Portland General Electric Co. Pilot Evaluation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland General Electric Co. Pilot Evaluation and Impact Measurement Revised: October 22, 2004 Portland General Electric Co. 2 Pilot Evaluation and Impact Measurement Forward to Revised Report Space Heat Portland General Electric Co. 3 Executive Summary On August 30, 2002, PGE filed Advice No. 02

  2. Another Generalization of Wiener's Attack on RSA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitaj, Abderrahmane

    Another Generalization of Wiener's Attack on RSA Abderrahmane NITAJ Universit´e de Caen, France Casablanca, June 12, 2008 Abderrahmane NITAJ Another Generalization of Wiener's Attack on RSA #12;RSA and Wiener The new attack Conclusion RSA setting Wiener's attack Generalizations Colour conventions Red

  3. Comment on Ashtekar: Generalization of Wigner's Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan W. Roberts

    2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashtekar (2013) has illustrated that two of the available roads to testing for time asymmetry can be generalized beyond the structure of quantum theory, to much more general formulations of mechanics. The purpose of this note is to show that a third road to T-violation, which I have called "Wigner's Principle," can be generalized in this way as well.

  4. Stimulation of erythrocyte phosphatidylserine exposure by mercury ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisele, Kerstin [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Lang, Philipp A. [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Kempe, Daniela S. [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Klarl, Barbara A. [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Niemoeller, Olivier [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Wieder, Thomas [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Huber, Stephan M. [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Duranton, Christophe [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Lang, Florian [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)]. E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The sequelae of mercury intoxication include induction of apoptosis. In nucleated cells, Hg{sup 2+}-induced apoptosis involves mitochondrial damage. The present study has been performed to elucidate effects of Hg{sup 2+} in erythrocytes which lack mitochondria but are able to undergo apoptosis-like alterations of the cell membrane. Previous studies have documented that activation of a Ca{sup 2+}-sensitive erythrocyte scramblase leads to exposure of phosphatidylserine at the erythrocyte surface, a typical feature of apoptotic cells. The erythrocyte scramblase is activated by osmotic shock, oxidative stress and/or energy depletion which increase cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} activity and/or activate a sphingomyelinase leading to formation of ceramide. Ceramide sensitizes the scramblase to Ca{sup 2+}. The present experiments explored the effect of Hg{sup 2+} ions on erythrocytes. Phosphatidylserine exposure after mercury treatment was estimated from annexin binding as determined in FACS analysis. Exposure to Hg{sup 2+} (1 {mu}M) indeed significantly increased annexin binding from 2.3 {+-} 0.5% (control condition) to 23 {+-} 6% (n = 6). This effect was paralleled by activation of a clotrimazole-sensitive K{sup +}-selective conductance as measured by patch-clamp recordings and by transient cell shrinkage. Further experiments revealed also an increase of ceramide formation by {approx}66% (n = 7) after challenge with mercury (1 {mu}M). In conclusion, mercury ions activate a clotrimazole-sensitive K{sup +}-selective conductance leading to transient cell shrinkage. Moreover, Hg{sup 2+} increases ceramide formation. The observed mechanisms could similarly participate in the triggering of apoptosis in nucleated cells by Hg{sup 2+}.

  5. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Abstract:...

  6. Generalized direct Lyapunov method for the analysis of stability and attraction in general time systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Druzhinina, O V; Shestakov, A A [Moscow State University of Railway Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized direct Lyapunov method is put forward for the study of stability and attraction in general time systems of the following types: the classical dynamical system in the sense of Birkhoff, the general system in the sense of Zubov, the general system in the sense of Seibert, the general system with delay, and the general 'input-output' system. For such systems, with the help of generalized Lyapunov functions with respect to two filters, two quasifilters, or two filter bases, necessary and sufficient conditions for stability and attraction are obtained under minimal assumptions about the mathematical structure of the general system.

  7. Lucky exposures: diffraction limited astronomical imaging through the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tubbs, Robert Nigel

    2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    brightness are circled in red in d). In panels a)—c) the blurring effect of the PSFs re-distributes the flux from the point sources over a wider area of the image leading to a substantial reduction in the peak pixel values in the images. can be improved... to this method as the Lucky Exposures technique. A number of other authors have published results using very similar methods, particularly 1.3. Performance of ground-based high resolution imaging techniques 11 for solar and planetary observations. Observations...

  8. Helium Compton Form Factor Measurements at CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voutier, Eric J.-M. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of the parton content of nuclei, as encoded via the generalized parton distributions (GPDs), can be accessed via the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process contributing to the cross section for leptoproduction of real photons. Similarly to the scattering of light by a material, DVCS provides information about the dynamics and the spatial structure of hadrons. The sensitivity of this process to the lepton beam polarization allows to single-out the DVCS amplitude in terms of Compton form factors that contain GPDs information. The beam spin asymmetry of the $^4$He($\\vec {\\mathrm e}$,e$' \\gamma ^4$He) process was measured in the experimental Hall B of the Jefferson Laboratory to extract the real and imaginary parts of the twist-2 Compton form factor of the $^4$He nucleus. The experimental results reported here demonstrate the relevance of this method for such a goal, and suggest the dominance of the Bethe-Heitler amplitude to the unpolarized process in the kinematic range explored by the experiment.

  9. Protocols of radiocontaminant air monitoring for inhalation exposure estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J.H.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring the plutonium and americium particle emissions from soils contaminated during atmospheric nuclear testing or due to accidental releases is important for several reasons. First, it is important to quantify the extent of potential human exposure from inhalation of alpha-emitting particles, which is the major exposure pathway from transuranic radionuclides. Second, the information provided by resuspension monitoring is the basis of criteria that determine the target soil concentrations for management and cleanup of contaminated soil sites. There are other radioactive aerosols, such as the fission products (cesium and strontium) and neutron-activation products (europium isotopes), which may be resuspended and therefore necessary to monitor as well. This Standard Protocol (SP) provides the method used for radiocontaminant air monitoring by the Health and Ecological Assessment Division (formerly Environmental Sciences Division), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as developed and tested at Nevada Test Site (NTS) and in the Marshall Islands. The objective of this SP is to document the applications and methods of monitoring of all the relevant variables. This protocol deals only with measuring air concentrations of radionuclides and total suspended particulates (TSP, or {open_quotes}dust{close_quotes}). A separate protocol presents the more difficult measurements required to determine transuranic aerosol emission rates, or {open_quotes}resuspension rate{close_quotes}.

  10. Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felak, R. P.

    UTILITY & REGULATORY FACTORS AFFECTiNG COGENERATION & INDEPENDENT POWER PLANT DESIGN & OPERATION Richard P. Felak General Electric Company Schenectady, New York ABSTRACT In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner... should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design. reliability/ availabilitY, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples...

  11. Risk factors for equine laminitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polzer, John Patrick

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    logistic regression to assess age, breed, sex, and seasonality as risk factors for equine laminitis. There were 70 acute cases, 183 chronic cases, and 779 controls. No statistical association was found between age, breed, sex, or seasonality...

  12. Electrical and Production Load Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Tapajyoti

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Load factors are an important simplification of electrical energy use data and depend on the ratio of average demand to peak demand. Based on operating hours of a facility they serve as an important benchmarking tool for ...

  13. Factors Affecting Option Premium Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jason; Smith, Jackie; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Waller, Mark L.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors Affecting Option Premium Values Jason Johnson, Jackie Smith, Kevin Dhuyvetter and Mark Waller* Put Options Hedging in the futures market with options is much like buying an insurance policy to protect commodity sellers against declining...

  14. Electrical and Production Load Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Tapajyoti

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Load factors are an important simplification of electrical energy use data and depend on the ratio of average demand to peak demand. Based on operating hours of a facility they serve as an important benchmarking tool for the industrial sector...

  15. Integer factorization is in P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    owner

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    can be solved by a deterministic Turing machine in polynomial time(see e.g.. Cormen et al. (2009)). Theorem 5. Integer factorization is in FP. Algorithm 2 can be ...

  16. Automatic Test Factoring for Java

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saff, David

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Test factoring creates fast, focused unit tests from slow system-widetests; each new unit test exercises only a subset of the functionalityexercised by the system test. Augmenting a test suite with factoredunit tests ...

  17. Human Factors of Reporting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.W.

    Johnson,C.W. P. Carayon (ed.), A Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare and Patient Safety, Lawrence Erlbaum, London, UK. pp 715-750 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

  18. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of chronic exposure results with the MACCS reactor accident consequence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D.; Rollstin, J.A. [Gram, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the chronic exposure pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 75 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing season dose, crop long-term dose, water ingestion dose, milk growing season dose, long-term groundshine dose, long-term inhalation dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, total latent cancer fatalities, area-dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, population-dependent cost, total economic cost, condemnation area, condemnation population, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: dry deposition velocity, transfer of cesium from animal feed to milk, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meat, ground concentration of Cs-134 at which the disposal of milk products will be initiated, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, maximum allowable ground concentration of Sr-90 for production of crops, fraction of cesium entering surface water that is consumed in drinking water, groundshine shielding factor, scale factor defining resuspension, dose reduction associated with decontamination, and ground concentration of 1-131 at which disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season.

  19. Radiant-interchange configuration factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddin, Thomas Edward

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an important role in any situation involving radiant interchange. The engineer desiring to compute the radiant heat transfer in a system is usually discouraged from performing more than a superficial estimation because of the excessive amount of time... Monitor System using the Fortran IV Compiler and the Macro Assembly Program. Listings of the programs appear in the appendices. CHAPTER II THE GEOMETRY OF THE BLACK BODY CONFIGURATION FACTOR 2. 1 Derivation of the Configuration Factor To evaluate...

  20. Transformation of paraxial matrices at a general interface between two general media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Transformation of paraxial matrices at a general interface between two general media Ludek Klimes for transforming these paraxial matrices at a general smooth interface between two general media. The transformation equations are applicable to both real­valued and complex­valued paraxial matrices. The equations

  1. Renal function in relation to low levels of cadmium exposure in a group of smelter workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazantzis, G.; Armstrong, B.G.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Blood and urine samples were obtained from 274 smelter workers and urine samples from 48 controls. Cadmium, ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin, and creatinine were estimated in blood and urine, and total protein in urine. Concentrations of cadmium in urine (mean 2.0 nmole/mmole creatinine) and blood (mean 21.8 nmole/L) observed in the smelter workers confirmed that this group had absorbed more cadmium than the general population, but less than most other occupationally exposed groups studied. Mean ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin in urine was not significantly different in the smelter workers and the controls. The mean total protein in urine was 20% higher in the smelter workers, a difference which was significant. There was no consistent picture within the smelter workers of a relationship between history of cadmium exposure and the effect measures of ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin in urine and blood, total protein in urine, creatinine clearance and relative ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin clearance. Small but significant positive correlation coefficients were observed between cadmium in urine and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin in urine, total protein in urine and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin clearance although these may be artifactual. 14 references, 12 tables.

  2. TASK 2.5.5 NATURAL EXPOSURE TESTING IN CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL; Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Ronnen, Levinson [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Akbari, Hashem [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Berhahl, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne particulate matter that settles on a roof can either reflect or absorb incoming solar radiation, dependent on the chemical content and size of the particles. These light scattering and absorption processes occur within a few microns of the surface, and can affect the solar reflectance of the roof. Wilkes et al. (2000) tested 24 different roof coatings on a low-slope test stand and observed about a 25% decrease in the solar reflectance of white-coated and aluminum-coated surfaces as the time of exposure increased; however, the decrease leveled off after 2 years. SPRI Inc. and its affiliates studied the effect of climatic exposure on the surface properties of white thermoplastic single-ply membranes and determined that membranes lose from 30 to 50% of their reflectance over 3 years (Miller et al. 2002). The CMRC and its affiliates AISI, NamZAC, MBMA, MCA and NCCA exposed unpainted and painted metal roofing on both steep- and low-slope test roofs and found that after 3 years, the painted polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) metal roofs lost less than 5% of their original reflectance (Miller et al. 2004). The results of the three different weathering studies are very interesting in terms of their solar reflectance after 3 years of exposure. The white thermoplastic membrane and white ceramic coating with white topcoat had original reflectance measures that were about 20 percentage points higher than the painted metal; however, after 3-years of field exposure the solar reflectance of the painted metal exceeds that of the thermoplastic membrane and equals that of the coating. The long-term loss of reflectance appears driven by the ability of the particulate matter to cling to the roof and resist being washed off by wind and or rain. Miller et al. (2002) discovered that aerosol deposition introduced biomass of complex microbial consortia onto the test roofs and the combination of contaminants and biomass accelerated the loss of solar reflectance for the thermoplastic membranes and the roof coatings. Airborne contaminants and biomass were also detected on the painted metal roofs; however, the loss of solar reflectance was less than 5% for the painted metal roofs. The chemistry of the PVDF paint resin system uses similar organic film bonding to that responsible for Teflon , making it extremely chemical resistant and dirt shedding. Miller and Rudolph (2003) found the PVDF painted metals maintained solar reflectance even after 30 years of climatic exposure. Therefore the reduction of roof reflectance is closely related to the composition of the roof and to the chemical profile of the contaminants soiling the roof. Contaminants collected from samples of roof products exposed at seven California weathering sites were analyzed for elements and carbons to characterize the chemical profile of the particles soiling each roof sample and to identify those elements that degrade or enhance solar reflectance. The losses in solar reflectance varied from site to site and also varied at a give site based on the color of the coupon. The least drop in reflectance was observed in the alpine climate of McArthur while the largest drop occurred in sites near urban development. Light color samples were soiled after just one year of exposure. The darker color coupons did not show the same seasonal variations in solar reflectance as observed for the lighter colors. However, after an additional year of exposure the samples at all sites regained most of their solar reflectance due to rain and/or wind washing. The loss of reflectance appears cyclical with the onset of seasons having more rainfall. Solar reflectance of the cool pigmented coupons always exceeded that of the conventional pigmented coupons. Climatic soiling did not cause the cool pigmented roof coupons to lose any more solar reflectance than their conventional pigmented counterparts. The effect of roof slope appears to have more of an effect on lighter color roofs whose solar reflectance exceeds at least 0.5 and visually shows the accumulation of airborne contaminants. The thermal emittance r

  3. Calculation of Accurate Hexagonal Discontinuity Factors for PARCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pounders. J., Bandini, B. R. , Xu, Y, and Downar, T. J.

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we derive a methodology for calculating discontinuity factors consistent with the Triangle-based Polynomial Expansion Nodal (TPEN) method implemented in PARCS for hexagonal reactor geometries. The accuracy of coarse-mesh nodal methods is greatly enhanced by permitting flux discontinuities at node boundaries, but the practice of calculating discontinuity factors from infinite-medium (zero-current) single bundle calculations may not be sufficiently accurate for more challenging problems in which there is a large amount of internodal neutron streaming. The authors therefore derive a TPEN-based method for calculating discontinuity factors that are exact with respect to generalized equivalence theory. The method is validated by reproducing the reference solution for a small hexagonal core.

  4. General Relativistic Thermoelectric Effects in Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Ahmedov

    2007-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the general-relativistic contributions to occur in the electromagnetic properties of a superconductor with a heat flow. The appearance of general-relativistic contribution to the magnetic flux through a superconducting thermoelectric bimetallic circuit is shown. A response of the Josephson junctions to a heat flow is investigated in the general-relativistic framework. Some gravitothermoelectric effects which are observable in the superconducting state in the Earth's gravitational field are considered.

  5. Cumulative exposure to arsenic and its relationship to respiratory cancer among copper-smelter employees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee-Feldstein, A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To explore the role of arsenic as a human carcinogen, the respiratory cancer-mortality experience (1938 to 1977) of 8045 white-male smelter employees in Montana was examined relative to cumulative exposure to arsenic trioxide and was compared with that of the white male population of the same region. Exposure to arsenic was estimated for various work areas from industrial-hygiene reports of average concentrations present in the smelter. Respiratory cancer mortality was analyzed further by time period of first employment and maximum lifetime exposure to arsenic trioxide. When exposure was estimated with arithmetic means of measured concentrations among men first employed prior to 1925, respiratory cancer mortality increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group, ranging from two to nine times expected; among those first employed in the period 1925 to 1947 it also increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group.

  6. Arsenic exposure, smoking, and lung cancer in smelter workers--a case-control study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaerup, L.P.; Pershagen, G. (Department of Environmental Hygiene, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1991-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cohort of 3,916 Swedish copper smelter workers employed for at least 3 months between 1928 and 1967 was followed up through 1981. Arsenic exposure was estimated for different time periods at each workplace within the smelter. Detailed job records were linked to the exposure matrix, thus forming individual cumulative arsenic exposure measures for each smelter worker. Smoking history was collected for 107 lung cancer cases and 214 controls from the cohort. Lung cancer risks were positively related to cumulative arsenic exposure with smoking standardized relative risks ranging from 0.7 to 8.7 in different exposure groups. A negative confounding by smoking was suggested in the higher exposure categories. The interaction between arsenic and smoking for the risk of developing lung cancer was intermediate between additive and multiplicative and appeared less pronounced among heavy smokers.

  7. Cumulative exposure to arsenic and its relationship to respiratory cancer among copper smelter employees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee-Feldstein, A.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To explore the role of arsenic as a human carcinogen, the respiratory cancer mortality experience (1938 to 1977) of 8,045 while male smelter employees in Montana was examined relative to cumulative exposure to arsenic trioxide and was compared with that of the white male population of the same region. Exposure to arsenic was estimated for various work areas from industrial hygiene reports of average concentrations present in the smelter. Respiratory cancer mortality was analyzed further by time period of first employment and maximum lifetime exposure to arsenic trioxide. When exposure was estimated with arithmetic means of measured concentrations among men first employed prior to 1925, respiratory cancer mortality increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group, ranging from two to nine times expected; among those first employed in the period 1925 to 1947 it also increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group.

  8. Cosmic ray exposure histories of Apollo 14, Apollo 15, and Apollo 16 rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eugster, O.; Eberhardt, P.

    1984-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The regolith exposure history of six rocks returned by the Apollo 14, 15, and 16 missions is studied based on the cosmogenic noble gas isotopes. For each sample, the complete set of all stable noble gas isotopes and the radiaoctive isotope Kr-81 were measured. Kr-81-Kr exposure ages are calculated for rocks for which a single-stage exposure can be demonstrated. A two-stage model exposure history is derived for multistage-exposure basalt 14310 based on the amounts and isotopic ratios of the cosmogenic noble gases. The apparent Kr-81-Kr age, the depth-sensitive isostopic ratios, and fission Xe-136 results lead to the conclusion that this sample was preexposed 1.75 AE ago to cosmic rays for a duration of 350 m.y. Basalt 15058 and anorthosite 15415 also reveal multistage exposures. 44 references.

  9. Exposure-Relevant Ozone Chemistry in Occupied Spaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Beverly Kaye

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone, an ambient pollutant, is transformed into other airborne pollutants in the indoor environment. In this dissertation, the type and amount of byproducts that result from ozone reactions with common indoor surfaces, surface residues, and vapors were determined, pollutant concentrations were related to occupant exposure, and frameworks were developed to predict byproduct concentrations under various indoor conditions. In Chapter 2, an analysis is presented of secondary organic aerosol formation from the reaction of ozone with gas-phase, terpene-containing consumer products in small chamber experiments under conditions relevant for residential and commercial buildings. The full particle size distribution was continuously monitored, and ultrafine and fine particle concentrations were in the range of 10 to>300 mu g m-3. Particle nucleation and growth dynamics were characterized.Chapter 3 presents an investigation of ozone reactions with aircraft cabin surfaces including carpet, seat fabric, plastics, and laundered and worn clothing fabric. Small chamber experiments were used to determine ozone deposition velocities, ozone reaction probabilities, byproduct emission rates, and byproduct yields for each surface category. The most commonly detected byproducts included C1?C10 saturated aldehydes and skin oil oxidation products. For all materials, emission rates were higher with ozone than without. Experimental results were used to predict byproduct exposure in the cabin and compare to other environments. Byproduct levels are predicted to be similar to ozone levels in the cabin, which have been found to be tens to low hundreds of ppb in the absence of an ozone converter. In Chapter 4, a model is presented that predicts ozone uptake by and byproduct emission from residual chemicals on surfaces. The effects of input parameters (residue surface concentration, ozone concentration, reactivity of the residue and the surface, near-surface airflow conditions, and byproduct yield) were explored. In Chapter 5, the reaction of ozone with permethrin, a residual insecticide used in aircraft cabins, to form phosgene is investigated. A derivatization technique was developed to detect phosgene at low levels, and chamber experiments were conducted with permethrin-coated cabin materials. It was determined that phosgene formation, if it occurs in the aircraft cabin, is not likely to exceed the relevant, health-based phosgene exposure guidelines.

  10. Generalized Modeling of Enrichment Cascades That Include Minor Isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Charles F [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The monitoring of enrichment operations may require innovative analysis to allow for imperfect or missing data. The presence of minor isotopes may help or hurt - they can complicate a calculation or provide additional data to corroborate a calculation. However, they must be considered in a rigorous analysis, especially in cases involving reuse. This study considers matched-abundanceratio cascades that involve at least three isotopes and allows generalized input that does not require all feed assays or the enrichment factor to be specified. Calculations are based on the equations developed for the MSTAR code but are generalized to allow input of various combinations of assays, flows, and other cascade properties. Traditional cascade models have required specification of the enrichment factor, all feed assays, and the product and waste assays of the primary enriched component. The calculation would then produce the numbers of stages in the enriching and stripping sections and the remaining assays in waste and product streams. In cases where the enrichment factor or feed assays were not known, analysis was difficult or impossible. However, if other quantities are known (e.g., additional assays in waste or product streams), a reliable calculation is still possible with the new code, but such nonstandard input may introduce additional numerical difficulties into the calculation. Thus, the minimum input requirements for a stable solution are discussed, and a sample problem with a non-unique solution is described. Both heuristic and mathematically required guidelines are given to assist the application of cascade modeling to situations involving such non-standard input. As a result, this work provides both a calculational tool and specific guidance for evaluation of enrichment cascades in which traditional input data are either flawed or unknown. It is useful for cases involving minor isotopes, especially if the minor isotope assays are desired (or required) to be important contributors to the overall analysis.

  11. About the Applied Physics Career Applied physics is a general term for physics which is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    About the Applied Physics Career Applied physics is a general term for physics which is intended" physics and engineering. "Applied" is distinguished from "pure" by a subtle combination of factors not be designing something in particular, but rather is using physics or conducting physics research with the aim

  12. The Economic Productivity of Urban Areas: Disentangling General Scale Effects from Local Exceptionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;The Economic Productivity of Urban Areas: Disentangling General Scale Effects from Local The factors that explain differences in the economic productivity of urban areas have remained difficult of economic activity in a city in terms of a production function, together with a scaling perspective

  13. A Reanalysis of Curvature in the Dose Response for Cancer and Modifications by Age at Exposure Following Radiation Therapy for Benign Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, Mark P., E-mail: mark.little@nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kleinerman, Ruth A. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose response for various cancer endpoints and modifiers by age and time. Methods and Materials: Reanalysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by cancer endpoint (stomach, pancreas, lung, leukemia, all other). Results: There are statistically significant (P<.05) excess risks for all cancer and for lung cancer and borderline statistically significant risks for stomach cancer (P=.07), and leukemia (P=.06), with excess relative risks Gy{sup -1} of 0.024 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.011, 0.039), 0.559 (95% CI 0.221, 1.021), 0.042 (95% CI -0.002, 0.119), and 1.087 (95% CI -0.018, 4.925), respectively. There is statistically significant (P=.007) excess risk of pancreatic cancer when adjusted for dose-response curvature. General downward curvature is apparent in the dose response, statistically significant (P<.05) for all cancers, pancreatic cancer, and all other cancers (ie, other than stomach, pancreas, lung, leukemia). There are indications of reduction in relative risk with increasing age at exposure (for all cancers, pancreatic cancer), but no evidence for quadratic variations in relative risk with age at exposure. If a linear-exponential dose response is used, there is no significant heterogeneity in the dose response among the 5 endpoints considered or in the speed of variation of relative risk with age at exposure. The risks are generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in groups of nuclear workers. Conclusions: There are excess risks for various malignancies in this data set. Generally there is a marked downward curvature in the dose response and significant reduction in relative risk with increasing age at exposure. The consistency of risks with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in groups of nuclear workers implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

  14. EPA - National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System General...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Permit for Discharges from Construction Activities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: EPA -...

  15. Discrete generalized multigroup theory and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Lei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops a fundamentally new discrete generalized multigroup energy expansion theory for the linear Boltzmann transport equation. Discrete orthogonal polynomials are used, in conjunction with the traditional ...

  16. Cooperation with the Office of Inspector General

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish responsibilities and requirements for cooperating with the Department of Energy Office of Inspector General. Cancels DOE O 221.2.

  17. Cooperation with the Office of Inspector General

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy for cooperating with the Office of Inspector General (OIG). Cancels DOE 2320.1C

  18. General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical...

  19. Cost of Fuel to General Electricity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the topic of the cost of fuel to general electricity for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  20. Oil and Gas General Provisions (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter describes general provisions for the exploration and development of oil and gas resources in Montana. The chapter addresses royalty interests, regulations for the lease of local...

  1. Chapter 63 General Standards of Performance (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 63, entitled Air Quality: General Standards of Performance, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and...

  2. Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides general regulations regarding hazardous waste, including landfills. Specific passages refer to the...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: General Electric Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and development agreements (CRADAs) with Northrop Grumman Information Systems and General Electric Global Research that will broadly add to the Labs' research. "These...

  4. FAQS Reference Guide – General Technical Base

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the December 2007 edition of DOE-STD-1146-2007, General Technical Base Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  5. Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Generalized...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Generalized Siting Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Chart: Washington Energy...

  6. Proton radioactivity within a generalized liquid drop model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Dong; H. F. Zhang; G. Royer

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton radioactivity half-lives of spherical proton emitters are investigated theoretically. The potential barriers preventing the emission of protons are determined in the quasimolecular shape path within a generalized liquid drop model (GLDM) including the proximity effects between nuclei in a neck and the mass and charge asymmetry. The penetrability is calculated with the WKB approximation. The spectroscopic factor has been taken into account in half-life calculation, which is obtained by employing the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory combined with the BCS method with the force NL3. The half-lives within the GLDM are compared with the experimental data and other theoretical values. The GLDM works quite well for spherical proton emitters when the spectroscopic factors are considered, indicating the necessity of introducing the spectroscopic factor and the success of the GLDM for proton emission. Finally, we present two formulas for proton emission half-life calculation similar to the Viola-Seaborg formulas and Royer's formulas of alpha decay.

  7. $ ?^- p \\rightarrow D^- ?_{c}^{+} $ within the Generalized Parton Picture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Kofler; Peter Kroll; Wolfgang Schweiger

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the reaction $ \\pi^- p \\rightarrow D^- \\Lambda_{c}^{+} $ within the generalized parton picture. The process is described by a handbag-type mechanism with the charm-quark mass acting as the hard scale. As in the case of preceding work on $\\bar{p} p \\rightarrow \\bar{\\Lambda}^-_c \\Lambda_{c}^{+} $ we argue that the process amplitude factorizes into one for the perturbatively calculable partonic subprocess $\\bar{u} u\\rightarrow \\bar{c} c$ and hadronic matrix elements that can be parameterized in terms of generalized parton distributions. Modeling the generalized parton distributions by overlaps of (valence-quark) light-cone wave functions for the hadrons involved, we obtain numerical results for unpolarized differential and integrated cross sections as well as spin observables. Our approach works well above the production threshold ($s \\gtrsim 20 $GeV$^2$) in the forward hemisphere and predicts unpolarized cross sections of the order of nb, a finding that could be of interest in view of plans to measure $ \\pi^- p \\rightarrow D^- \\Lambda_{c}^{+} $ at J-PARC.

  8. Predicting the radiation exposure of terrestrial wildlife in the Chernobyl exclusion zone : an international comparison of approaches.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beresford, N. A.; Barnett, C. L.; Brown, J. E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Copplestone, D.; Gaschak, S.; Hosseini, A.; Howard, B. J.; Kamboj, S.; Nedveckaite, T.; Olyslaegers, G.; Smith, J. T.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Vives-Lynch, S.; Yu, C.; Environmental Science Division; Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority; England and Wales Environment Agency; International Radioecology Lab.; Inst. of Physics, Radiation Protection,; Belgian Nuclear Research Centre; Univ. of Portsmouth; Westlakes Research Inst.

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There is now general acknowledgement that there is a requirement to demonstrate that species other than humans are protected from anthropogenic releases of radioactivity. A number of approaches have been developed for estimating the exposure of wildlife and some of these are being used to conduct regulatory assessments. There is a requirement to compare the outputs of such approaches against available data sets to ensure that they are robust and fit for purpose. In this paper we describe the application of seven approaches for predicting the whole-body ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am and Pu isotope) activity concentrations and absorbed dose rates for a range of terrestrial species within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Predictions are compared against available measurement data, including estimates of external dose rate recorded by thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to rodent species. Potential reasons for differences between predictions between the various approaches and the available data are explored.

  9. Ecological hazards of MTBE exposure: A research agenda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsen, T.; Hall, L.; Rice, D.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel oxygenates are used in metropolitan areas across the United States in order to reduce the amount of carbon monoxide released into the atmosphere during the winter. The most commonly used fuel oxygenate is Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Its widespread use has resulted in releases into the environment. To date there has been only minimal effort to investigate ecological impacts caused by exposure to concentrations of MTBE typically found in environmental media. Research into the potential for MTBE to adversely affect ecological receptors is essential. Acquisition of such baselines data is especially critical in light of continuing inputs and potential accumulation of MTBE in environmental media. A research Agenda is included in this report and addresses: Assessing Ecological Impacts, Potential Ecological Impacts of MTBE (aquatic organisms, terrestrial organisms), Potential Ecological Endpoints, and A Summary of Research Needs.

  10. Occupational Radiation Exposure Analysis of US ITER DCLL TBM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, Brad J; Cadwallader, Lee C; Dagher, Mohamad

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis that was performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for anticipated maintenance activities for this TBM concept and its ancillary systems. The QADMOD code was used to model the PbLi cooling loop of this TBM concept by specifying gamma ray source terms that simulated radioactive material within the piping, valves, heat exchanger, permeator, pump, drain tank, and cold trap of this cooling system. Estimates of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and the time required to perform these tasks where developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This report details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

  11. Analyses Of Two End-User Software Vulnerability Exposure Metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason L. Wright; Miles McQueen; Lawrence Wellman

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The risk due to software vulnerabilities will not be completely resolved in the near future. Instead, putting reliable vulnerability measures into the hands of end-users so that informed decisions can be made regarding the relative security exposure incurred by choosing one software package over another is of importance. To that end, we propose two new security metrics, average active vulnerabilities (AAV) and vulnerability free days (VFD). These metrics capture both the speed with which new vulnerabilities are reported to vendors and the rate at which software vendors fix them. We then examine how the metrics are computed using currently available datasets and demonstrate their estimation in a simulation experiment using four different browsers as a case study. Finally, we discuss how the metrics may be used by the various stakeholders of software and to software usage decisions.

  12. Containment remedies: Minimizing hazard, not just exposure, cuts liabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirschhorn, J.S. [Hirschhorn and Associates, Wheaton, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An important consequence of the trend to reduce Superfund cleanup costs has been a definite shift away from treatment to pure containment remedies. The issue that merits more attention, however, is whether reductions in short term costs may be offset by longer term liabilities. Containment remedies that focus entirely on reducing exposures and hence risk are vulnerable to various failures of key components that may not necessarily be prevented by operation and maintenance programs. A sensible alternative is to also include some hazard reduction, especially by in situ technology. By doing so, longer term liabilities associated with various failure modes of containment remedies can be greatly reduced. Corporate accounting systems ignore such liabilities. The insurance industry, large companies, brownfield developers, and the government are currently ignoring liabilities that inevitably will become all too real, because pure containment remedies are not permanently effective.

  13. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION . Jacobexposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Sinceto nuclear explo ions or medical radiation, describes the

  14. Review of Multi-Person Exposure Calls to a Regional Poison Control Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Brent W; Skinner, Carl G; Kleiman, Richard J; Geller, Robert J; Chang, Arthur S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure Calls to a Regional Poison Control Center Brent W.Medicine and the Georgia Poison Center, Atlanta, GA †of Pediatrics and the Georgia Poison Center, Atlanta, GA

  15. Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. Sullivan (2009). Natural Gas Variability in California:Singer (2012). Impact of Natural Gas Appliances on PollutantPollutant Exposures in Natural Gas Cooking Burners, LBNL

  16. Assessing Uncertainty in Spatial Exposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial analysis of air pollution and mor- tality in Loslinking chronic air pollution exposure to health outcomes. J2006. Bayesian modeling of air pollution health effects with

  17. Investigating the book-tax income gap : factors which affect the gap and details regarding its most significant component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidman, Jeri

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) In total, my thesis suggests that recent changes in the book-tax income gap may be exogenous and transitory, due to changes to the calculation of book income, general business conditions or other factors which ...

  18. General Message Flow Modulator Ann E. Siebert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Robert Stephen

    General Message Flow Modulator Ann E. Siebert Donald I. Good Technical Report #42 March 1984 (512) 471-1901 #12;Abstract The general message flow modulator is a high level design of a family of mechanisms for controlling the flow of messages from a source to a destination. This family of mechanisms has

  19. FCEDS General Education Requirements (Updated 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    FCEDS General Education Requirements (Updated 2013) This proposal outlines a plan that would allow a transfer student to apply an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree to meet the General Education requirements of the Family and Consumer Sciences Education and Studies (FCEDS) curriculum. The required

  20. General Adaptive Replacement Policies Yannis Smaragdakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smaragdakis, Yannis

    General Adaptive Replacement Policies Yannis Smaragdakis College of Computing Georgia Institute of Technology yannis@cc.gatech.edu ABSTRACT We propose a general scheme for creating adaptive replace- ment any two existing replacement policies so that the resulting policy provably can never perform worse

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY GENERAL SAFETY MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY GENERAL SAFETY MANUAL May 10, 2002 #12;i Acknowledgements Environmental Health and Safety gratefully acknowledges the assistance provided by the University Safety Council extremely helpful. #12;ii Environmental Health and Safety General Safety Manual Table of Contents Section

  2. Rotating figures of equilibrium in General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Papakostas

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalization of the notion of surfaces of revolution in the spaces of General Relativity is presented. We apply this definition to the case of Carter's family [A] of solutions and we study the Kerr's metric with respect the above mentioned foliation.

  3. ORIGINAL PAPER A general theory of ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    ORIGINAL PAPER A general theory of ecology Samuel M. Scheiner & Michael R. Willig Received: 9 of ecology have existed for the past half century; ecologists simply have failed to explicitly recognize them. We present a general theory of ecology and show how it relates to ecology's numerous constituent

  4. THE GENERALIZED POVERTY INDEX GANE SAMB LO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE GENERALIZED POVERTY INDEX GANE SAMB LO Abstract. We introduce the General Poverty Index (GPI), which summarizes most of the known and availbale poverty indices, in the form GPI = ( A(Q, N, Z) NB(Q, N (·) are given measurable functions, Q is the number of the poor in the population P of size N, Z is the poverty

  5. Planning Organization & Logistics Deputy Director General

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adin, Ron

    " Planning Organization & Logistics Deputy Director General Tel: 03 531 8553 : Fax: 03 535 4925 : P-O.Logistics@mail.biu.ac.il Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900, Israel · www.6. , . , . #12; " Planning Organization & Logistics Deputy Director General Tel: 03 531 8553 : Fax: 03 535

  6. Secret Santa, Generalized (and Some Enumerative Problems)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Rob

    Secret Santa, Generalized (and Some Enumerative Problems) Rob Donnelly May 17, 2006 #12;Secret Santa, Generalized May 17, 2006 The Original Secret Santa Problem The Original Secret Santa Problem/she takes A mathematical interpretation of Secret Santa The question essentially asks for the pro- portion

  7. Optimization Online - Integer Factorization is in P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuly Shipilevsky

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 31, 2012 ... Integer Factorization is in P. Yuly Shipilevsky (yulysh2000 ***at*** yahoo.ca). Abstract: A polynomial-time algorithm for integer factorization, ...

  8. PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support...

  9. PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General...

  10. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  11. Generalized Graph States Based on Hadamard Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawn X Cui; Nengkun Yu; Bei Zeng

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Graph states are widely used in quantum information theory, including entanglement theory, quantum error correction, and one-way quantum computing. Graph states have a nice structure related to a certain graph, which is given by either a stabilizer group or an encoding circuit, both can be directly given by the graph. To generalize graph states, whose stabilizer groups are abelian subgroups of the Pauli group, one approach taken is to study non-abelian stabilizers. In this work, we propose to generalize graph states based on the encoding circuit, which is completely determined by the graph and a Hadamard matrix. We study the entanglement structures of these generalized graph states, and show that they are all maximally mixed locally. We also explore the relationship between the equivalence of Hadamard matrices and local equivalence of the corresponding generalized graph states. This leads to a natural generalization of the Pauli $(X,Z)$ pairs, which characterizes the local symmetries of these generalized graph states. Our approach is also naturally generalized to construct graph quantum codes which are beyond stabilizer codes.

  12. Physiological Stress Responses to Prolonged Exposure to MS-222 and Surgical Implantation in Juvenile Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Katie A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Seaburg, Adam; Skalski, John R.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    While many studies have investigated the effects of transmitters on fish condition, behavior, and survival, to our knowledge, no studies have taken into account anesthetic exposure time in addition to tag and surgery effects. We investigated stress responses to prolonged MS-222 exposure after stage 4 induction in surgically implanted juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Survival, tag loss, plasma cortisol concentration, and blood [Na+], [K+], [Ca2+], and pH were measured immediately following anesthetic exposure and surgical implantation and 1, 7, and 14 days post-treatment. Despite the prolonged anesthetic exposure, 3-15 minutes post Stage 4 induction, there were no mortalities or tag loss in any treatment. MS-222 was effective at delaying immediate cortisol release during surgical implantation; however, osmotic disturbances resulted, which were more pronounced in longer anesthetic time exposures. From day 1 to day 14, [Na+], [Ca2+], and pH significantly decreased, while cortisol significantly increased. The cortisol increase was exacerbated by surgical implantation. There was a significant interaction between MS-222 time exposure and observation day for [Na+], [Ca2+], [K+], and pH; variations were seen in the longer time exposures, although not consistently. In conclusion, stress response patterns suggest stress associated with surgical implantation is amplified with increased exposure to MS-222.

  13. Marginal costs of freeway traffic congestion with on-road pollution exposure externality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Marginal costs of freeway traffic congestion with on-road pollution exposure externality Alexander August 2012 Received in revised form 6 March 2013 Accepted 23 September 2013 Keywords: External costs Traffic congestion On-road In-vehicle Pollution exposure Vehicle emissions a b s t r a c t The health cost

  14. Protocol for the Cross-Sectional Exposure Assessment of Case-Children with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protocol for the Cross-Sectional Exposure Assessment of Case-Children with Leukemia (Acute Lymphocytic and Acute Myelocytic Leukemias) and a Reference Population in Churchill County, Nevada with leukemia (acute lymphocytic leukemia [ALL] and acute myelocytic leukemia [AML]). The exposures of case

  15. Formaldehyde exposure and leukemia: A new meta-analysis and potential Luoping Zhang a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    lymphocytic leukemia; AML, acute myeloid leukemia; ATSDR, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease RegistryReview Formaldehyde exposure and leukemia: A new meta-analysis and potential mechanisms Luoping between leukemia and occupational exposure to formaldehyde''. Here, we review the epidemiological studies

  16. How Perceived Exposure to Environmental Harm Influences Environmental Behavior in Urban China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, M. Nils

    Á Pro-environmental behavior INTRODUCTION Environmental degradation and the impact it has on society attitudes, perceived exposure to environmental harm tends to have more impact on individuals' environmentalREPORT How Perceived Exposure to Environmental Harm Influences Environmental Behavior in Urban

  17. Identification of sources of lead exposure in French children by lead isotope analysis: a cross-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Identification of sources of lead exposure in French children by lead isotope analysis: a cross://www.ehjournal.net/content/10/1/75 (28 August 2011) #12;RESEARCH Open Access Identification of sources of lead exposure in French children by lead isotope analysis: a cross- sectional study Youssef Oulhote1,2,3* , Barbara Le Bot

  18. Chemico-Biological Interactions 166 (2007) 277284 Chemical process based reconstruction of exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of exposures for an epidemiological study III. Analysis of industrial hygiene samples Thomas A. Halla,, Nurtan ( -CD) and other substances, all available industrial hygiene exposure monitoring data were collected and summarized. From discussions with on-site industrial hygiene personnel, it was apparent that these data were

  19. UNDERSTANDING THE GENETIC CONSEQUENCES OF ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANT EXPOSURE: CHERNOBYL AS A MODEL SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Robert J.

    UNDERSTANDING THE GENETIC CONSEQUENCES OF ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANT EXPOSURE: CHERNOBYL AS A MODEL to Chernobyl radiation. Our results suggest that genetic diversity in radioactive regions of Ukraine to elucidate the effects of toxicant exposure. Keywords--Chernobyl Bank vole Population genetics Comparative

  20. Bigazzi, Figliozzi, and Clifton 1 Motorists' Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollution:1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Bigazzi, Figliozzi, and Clifton 1 1 Motorists' Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollution:1 Modeling to traffic-related pollution. Large peak-period trip exposures are5 primarily the result of increased pollutants (3), which progressively degrade urban20 air quality (4). Because of coincident vehicle and human

  1. Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    iPage | i Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking. LBNL4885E #12;Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners distributions resulting from use of natural gas cooking appliances across households in California. The model

  2. White Pine Emission Trends of Monoterpenes and Sesquiterpenes After Acute Ozone Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    White Pine Emission Trends of Monoterpenes and Sesquiterpenes After Acute Ozone Exposure Daniel M on a large scale in forests. Monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions from trees significantly contribute investigates the effect of an abiotic stress, specifically acute ozone exposure, on the terpene emissions

  3. Literature Review of the Effects of UV Exposure on PV Modules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint presentation, originally presented at the NREL 2013 PV Module Reliability Workshop on Feb. 26-27, 2013 in Denver, CO, presents the literature review of the effects of prolonged UV exposure of PV modules, with a particular emphasis on UV exposure testing using artificial light sources, including fluorescent, Xenon, and metal halide lamps.

  4. Consequences of a multi-generation exposure to uranium on Caenorhabditis elegans life parameters and sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Consequences of a multi-generation exposure to uranium on Caenorhabditis elegans life parameters) Consequences of a multi- generation exposure to uranium on Caenorhabditis el- egans life parametersM of uranium. Several gen- erations were selected to assess growth, reproduction, survival, and dose

  5. Assessment of dermal exposure to benzene and toluene in shoe manufacturing by activated carbon cloth patches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Assessment of dermal exposure to benzene and toluene in shoe manufacturing by activated carbon activated carbon cloth (ACC) patches to study the probability and extent of dermal exposure to benzene for the contribution from the air through passive absorption of benzene and toluene on the ACC patches. Systemic

  6. Exposure Measurement Error in Time-Series Studies of Air Pollution: Concepts and Consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    1 Exposure Measurement Error in Time-Series Studies of Air Pollution: Concepts and Consequences S in time-series studies 1 11/11/99 Keywords: measurement error, air pollution, time series, exposure of air pollution and health. Because measurement error may have substantial implications for interpreting

  7. Edinburgh Research Explorer Comparison of models for estimation of long-term exposure to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    -term exposure to air pollution in cohort studies' Atmospheric Environment, vol 62, pp. 530-539., 10.1016/j to Air Pollution in Cohort Studies Beverland, I.J.* Department of Civil Engineering, University.L. and Agius, R.M. (2012) Comparison of models for estimation of long-term exposure to air pollution in cohort

  8. The effect of sudden solar exposure on thermophysiological parameters and on plasma prolactin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The effect of sudden solar exposure on thermophysiological parameters and on plasma prolactin. Material and methods. The experiment was carried out at the I.N.R.A. farm « Gardel in Grande- Terre supplement. Water was available ad libitum. Measurement frequency. ― Four days before solar exposure

  9. Adaptive hybrid mean and median filtering of high-ISO long-exposure sensor noise for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabie, Tamer

    Adaptive hybrid mean and median filtering of high-ISO long-exposure sensor noise for digital for Standardization (ISO) and long- exposure settings. The problem lies in the fact that the algorithm must deal, namely blue-channel noise and JPEG blocking artifacts, common in high-ISO digital camera images. A third

  10. Reconciliation of generalized refraction with diffraction theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larouche, Stéphane

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When an electromagnetic wave is obliquely incident on the interface between two homogeneous media with different refractive indices, the requirement of phase continuity across the interface generally leads to a shift in the trajectory of the wave. When a linearly position dependent phase shift is imposed at the interface, the resulting refraction may be described using a generalized version of Snell's law. In this Letter, we establish a formal equivalence between generalized refraction and blazed diffraction gratings, further discussing the relative merits of the two approaches.

  11. Exposure of Polymeric Glazing Materials Using NREL's Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, C.; Jorgensen, G.; Wylie, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS) selectively reflects and concentrates natural sunlight ultraviolet irradiance below 475 nm onto exposed samples to provide accelerated weathering of materials while keeping samples within realistic temperature limits. This paper will explain the design and implementation of the UAWS which allow it to simulate the effect of years of weathering in weeks of exposure. Exposure chamber design and instrumentation will be discussed for both a prototype UAWS used to test glazing samples as well as a commercial version of UAWS. Candidate polymeric glazing materials have been subjected to accelerated exposure testing at a light intensity level of up to 50 UV suns for an equivalent outdoor exposure in Miami, FL exceeding 15 years. Samples include an impact modified acrylic, fiberglass, and polycarbonate having several thin UV-screening coatings. Concurrent exposure is carried out for identical sample sets at two different temperatures to allow thermal effects to be quantified along with resistance to UV.

  12. Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systemsfor Occupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: the EPA BASE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Mirer, A.; Seppanen, O.; Brunner, G.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Characteristics of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in office buildings that increase risk of indoor contaminants or reduce effectiveness of ventilation may cause adverse exposures and subsequent increase in these symptoms among occupants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. EPA from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations adjusted for potential personal and building confounders. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and selected HVAC system characteristics. Among factors of HVAC design or configuration: Outdoor air intakes less than 60 m above the ground were associated with approximately doubled odds of most symptoms assessed. Sealed (non-operable) windows were associated with increases in skin and eye symptoms (ORs= 1.9, 1.3, respectively). Outdoor air intake without an intake fan was associated with an increase in eye symptoms (OR=1.7). Local cooling coils were associated with increased headache (OR=1.5). Among factors of HVAC condition, maintenance, or operation: the presence of humidification systems in good condition was associated with an increase in headache (OR=1.4), whereas the presence of humidification systems in poor condition was associated with increases in fatigue/difficulty concentrating, as well as upper respiratory symptoms (ORs=1.8, 1.5). No regularly scheduled inspections for HVAC components was associated with increased eye symptoms, cough and upper respiratory symptoms (ORs=2.2, 1.6, 1.5). Less frequent cleaning of cooling coils or drip pans was associated with increased headache (OR=1.6). Fair or poor condition of duct liner was associated with increased upper respiratory symptoms (OR=1.4). Most of the many potential risk factors assessed here had not been investigated previously, and associations found with single symptoms may have been by chance, including several associations that were the reverse of expected. Risk factors newly identified in these analyses that deserve attention include outdoor air intakes less than 60 m above the ground, lack of operable windows, poorly maintained humidification systems, and lack of scheduled inspection for HVAC systems. Infrequent cleaning of cooling coils and drain pans were associated with increases in several symptoms in these as well as prior analyses of BASE data. Replication of these findings is needed, using more objective measurements of both exposure and health response. Confirmation of the specific HVAC factors responsible for increased symptoms in buildings, and development of prevention strategies could have major public health and economic benefits worldwide.

  13. The thermodynamics of general and local anesthesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graesboll, Kaare; Heimburg, Thomas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General anesthetics are known to cause depression of the freezing point of transitions in biomembranes. This is a consequence of ideal mixing of the anesthetic drugs in the membrane fluid phase and exclusion from the solid phase. Such a generic law provides physical justification of the famous Meyer-Overton rule. We show here that general anesthetics, barbiturates and local anesthetics all display the same effect on melting transitions. Their effect is reversed by hydrostatic pressure. Thus, the thermodynamic behavior of local anesthetics is very similar to that of general anesthetics. We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of heat capacity profiles of membranes in the presence of anesthetics. This analysis is able to describe experimentally observed calorimetric profiles and permits prediction of the anesthetic features of arbitrary molecules. In addition, we discuss the thermodynamic origin of the cutoff-effect of long-chain alcohols and the additivity of the effect of general and local anesthetics.

  14. Methylphenidate Actively Induces Emergence from General Anesthesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solt, Ken

    Background: Although accumulating evidence suggests that arousal pathways in the brain play important roles in emergence from general anesthesia, the roles of monoaminergic arousal circuits are unclear. In this study, the ...

  15. General approach to automation of FLASH subsystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    General approach to automation of FLASH subsystems Boguslaw Kosda #12;Agenda Motivation Nature of automation software for high energy experiments. Ultimate role of the automation software: Maximization of lasers availability. Automation of routine activities as startup, shutdown ... Continuous monitoring

  16. Inventories and capacity utilization in general equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trupkin, Danilo Rogelio

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this dissertation is to gain a better understanding, in thecontext of a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium framework, of the role of inventories and capacity utilization (of both capital and labor) and, in particular...

  17. Total Energy Management in General Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeKoker, N.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of General Motors' energy management program with special emphasis on energy conservation. Included is a description of the total program organization, plant guidelines, communication and motivation techniques...

  18. General overview of the Nigerian construction industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dantata, Sanusi (Sanusi A.)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to investigate and provide a general overview of the Nigerian construction industry, its role in the national economy, the main participants in the industry, the problems that they face, and ...

  19. Luminous Efficacy Standards for General Purpose Lights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assembly Bill 178, adopted in June 2007, established efficacy* standards for general purpose lights sold in the state of Nevada. The bill set the required efficacy at 25 lumens per watt (lm/W) of...

  20. Coordination of General Accounting Office Activities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The order provides policies, procedures, and responsibilities for the coordination of General Accounting Office activities and actions required when GAO reports contain recommendations pertaining to the DOE. Cancels DOE O 2340.1B.

  1. Generalized Parton Distributions from Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Renner

    2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the LHPC Collaboration's lattice QCD calculations of the generalized parton distributions of the nucleon and highlight those aspects of nucleon structure best illuminated by lattice QCD, the nucleon's spin decomposition and transverse quark structure.

  2. Thresholding Multivariate Regression and Generalized Principal Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Ranye

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    the curse of dimensionality. It is desirable to estimate the regression coefficient matrix by low-rank matrices constructed from its SVD. We reduce such regression problems to sparse SVD problems for cor- related data matrices and generalize the fast...

  3. Portland General Electric- Heat Pump Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Portland General Electric's (PGE) Heat Pump Rebate Program offers residential customers a $200 rebate for an energy-efficient heat pump installed to PGE’s standards by a PGE-approved contractor....

  4. Experimental Observation of a Generalized Gibbs Ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim Langen; Sebastian Erne; Remi Geiger; Bernhard Rauer; Thomas Schweigler; Maximilian Kuhnert; Wolfgang Rohringer; Igor E. Mazets; Thomas Gasenzer; Jörg Schmiedmayer

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The connection between the non-equilibrium dynamics of isolated quantum many-body systems and statistical mechanics is a fundamental open question. It is generally believed that the unitary quantum evolution of a sufficiently complex system leads to an apparent maximum-entropy state that can be described by thermodynamical ensembles. However, conventional ensembles fail to describe the large class of systems that exhibit non-trivial conserved quantities. Instead, generalized ensembles have been predicted to maximize entropy in these systems. In our experiments we explicitly show that a degenerate one-dimensional Bose gas relaxes to a state that can be described by such a generalized ensemble. This is verified through a detailed study of correlation functions up to 10th order. The applicability of the generalized ensemble description for isolated quantum many-body systems points to a natural emergence of classical statistical properties from the microscopic unitary quantum evolution.

  5. The General Postgraduate Program: Workshop Academic Writing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanke-Bourgeois, Martin

    The General Postgraduate Program: Workshop Academic Writing Amanda Habbershaw, Translator and English Trainer Course Description Nowadays success in science involves publishing articles the formal English required for scientific and academic texts. The objective of this workshop is to improve

  6. West Virginia University 1 General Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Minors General Statement Each academic unit in the University may to assure that completion of a minor is appropriately recognized and posted to the student's transcript: 1

  7. A Generalization of Euler's Theorem on Congruencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florentin Smarandache

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theorem which generalizes the classical Euler's theorem on congruencies: if $(a,m)=1$ then $a^ \\phi(m) \\equiv 1 (mod m)$ for the case when $a$ and $m$ are not relatively primes.

  8. Interdisciplinary Physical Scientist/General Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as an Interdisciplinary Physical Scientist/General Engineer for the Bioenergy Technologies Office in the DOE-EERE Office of Transportation.

  9. Assignment 1: Game theory General remarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steels, Luc

    Assignment 1: Game theory General remarks: _ Mail your results person, as long as she is alive, may shoot at any surviving person. First of survival; among outcomes in which her survival probability is the same, she wants

  10. Assignment 1: Game theory General remarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steels, Luc

    Assignment 1: Game theory General remarks: _ Deadline 16 bullet. Each person, as long as she is alive, may shoot at any surviving of survival; among outcomes in which her survival probability is the same, she wants

  11. DIVISION 6 -WOOD AND PLASTICS 06000 GENERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVISION 6 - WOOD AND PLASTICS ________________________________________________________________________ 06000 GENERAL 1. For both woods and plastics, special attention is called to matters of flame spread-dried. 3. For exterior wood or plastic framed structures, see Division 4 for dimensions of Sample Panel

  12. Generalized one-dimensional, steady, compressible flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, F.M. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present development and testing of a generalized method for analytically examining 1D steady flow of perfect gases allows area change, heat transfer, friction, and mass injection. Generalized flow functions are developed, and sample tables are calculated and tested for both simple cases and combined changes. Normal shocks are noted to occur from the supersonic portion of these loci to the subsonic portion, in a manner analogous to simple-change behavior. 9 refs.

  13. Geometric phases for generalized squeezed coherent states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Seshadri; S. Lakshmibala; V. Balakrishnan

    1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple technique is used to obtain a general formula for the Berry phase (and the corresponding Hannay angle) for an arbitrary Hamiltonian with an equally-spaced spectrum and appropriate ladder operators connecting the eigenstates. The formalism is first applied to a general deformation of the oscillator involving both squeezing and displacement. Earlier results are shown to emerge as special cases. The analysis is then extended to multiphoton squeezed coherent states and the corresponding anholonomies deduced.

  14. Epidemiologic methodology for investigating the contribution of herd management factors to Brucella abortus infection in beef cattle herds in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Bruce Stephen

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    21 22 23 23 24 25 27 28 28 31 32 34 34 1. Factors Associated With Purchasing Practices 2. Adjacent Herd History . B. Post Exposure Factors I. Strain 19 Vaccination Level of Herd 2. Herd Size 3. Cattle Density 4. Calving Season C... VIII. DATA MANAGEMENT A. BIS Number B. Calving Season C. Cattle Density D. Proportion of Herd Strain 19 Vaccinated E. Segregation of Breeding Stock F. Adjacent to Infected Herd G. Class of Cattle Purchased H. Overall Frequency of Purchase I...

  15. Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

  16. Chemical factors that control lignin polymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangha, Amandeep K [ORNL] [ORNL; Davison, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL; Standaert, Robert F [ORNL] [ORNL; Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignin is a complex, branched polymer that reinforces plant tissue. Understanding the factors that govern lignin structure is of central importance to the development of technologies for converting lignocellulosic biomass into fuels because lignin imparts resistance to chemical, enzymatic and mechanical deconstruction. Lignin is formed by enzymatic oxidation of phenolic monomers (monolignols) of three main types, guaiacyl (G), syringyl (S) and p- hydroxyphenyl (H). It is known that increasing the relative abundance of H subunits results in lower molecular-weight lignin polymers, and hence more easily deconstructed biomass, but it is not known why. Here, we report an analysis of frontier molecular orbitals in mono-, di- and trilignols, calculated using density functional theory, which points to a requirement of strong p- electron density on the reacting phenolic oxygen atom of the neutral precursor for enzymatic oxidation to occur. This model is consistent with a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism and for the first time explains why H subunits in certain linkages ( - or -5) react poorly and tend to cap the polymer. In general, -5 linkages with either a G or H terminus are predicted to inhibit elongation. More broadly, the model correctly accounts for the reactivity of the phenolic groups in a diverse set of dilignols comprising H and G subunits. Thus, we provide a coherent framework for understanding the propensity toward growth or termination of different terminal subunits in lignin.

  17. Atmospheric PSF Interpolation for Weak Lensing in Short Exposure Imaging Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, C.; Marshall, P.J.; Jernigan, J.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Kahn, S.M.; Gull, S.F.; AlSayyad, Y.; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Bard, D.; Connolly, A.; Gibson, R.R.; Gilmore, K.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Hodge, M.A.; Jones, L.; Krughoff, S.; Lorenz, S.; Marshall, S.; Meert, A.

    2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A main science goal for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is to measure the cosmic shear signal from weak lensing to extreme accuracy. One difficulty, however, is that with the short exposure time ({approx_equal}15 seconds) proposed, the spatial variation of the Point Spread Function (PSF) shapes may be dominated by the atmosphere, in addition to optics errors. While optics errors mainly cause the PSF to vary on angular scales similar or larger than a single CCD sensor, the atmosphere generates stochastic structures on a wide range of angular scales. It thus becomes a challenge to infer the multi-scale, complex atmospheric PSF patterns by interpolating the sparsely sampled stars in the field. In this paper we present a new method, psfent, for interpolating the PSF shape parameters, based on reconstructing underlying shape parameter maps with a multi-scale maximum entropy algorithm. We demonstrate, using images from the LSST Photon Simulator, the performance of our approach relative to a 5th-order polynomial fit (representing the current standard) and a simple boxcar smoothing technique. Quantitatively, psfent predicts more accurate PSF models in all scenarios and the residual PSF errors are spatially less correlated. This improvement in PSF interpolation leads to a factor of 3.5 lower systematic errors in the shear power spectrum on scales smaller than {approx} 13, compared to polynomial fitting. We estimate that with psfent and for stellar densities greater than {approx_equal}1/arcmin{sup 2}, the spurious shear correlation from PSF interpolation, after combining a complete 10-year dataset from LSST, is lower than the corresponding statistical uncertainties on the cosmic shear power spectrum, even under a conservative scenario.

  18. Dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake modifies the effect of cadmium exposure on markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colacino, Justin A.; Arthur, Anna E.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Rozek, Laura S., E-mail: rozekl@umich.edu

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chronic cadmium exposure may cause disease through induction of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. Factors that mitigate cadmium toxicity and could serve as interventions in exposed populations have not been well characterized. We used data from the 2003–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to quantify diet's role in modifying associations between cadmium exposure and oxidative stress and inflammation. We created a composite antioxidant and anti-inflammatory diet score (ADS) by ranking participants by quintile of intake across a panel of 19 nutrients. We identified associations and effect modification between ADS, urinary cadmium, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation by multiple linear regression. An interquartile range increase in urinary cadmium was associated with a 47.5%, 8.8%, and 3.7% increase in C-reactive protein (CRP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), respectively. An interquartile range increase in ADS was associated with an 7.4%, 3.3%, 5.2%, and 2.5% decrease in CRP, GGT, ALP, and total white blood cell count respectively, and a 3.0% increase in serum bilirubin. ADS significantly attenuated the association between cadmium exposure, CRP and ALP. Dietary interventions may provide a route to reduce the impact of cadmium toxicity on the population level. - Highlights: • Cadmium may cause chronic disease through oxidative stress or inflammation. • We developed a score to quantify dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake. • Cadmium was associated with markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. • Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake mitigated the effects of cadmium exposure. • Dietary interventions may be effective against chronic cadmium toxicity.

  19. Possible Upper limits on Lorentz Factors in High Energy Astrophysical Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe. The relativistic effect on the blast wave associated with the GRB introduces the gamma factor. Here we put an upper limit on the gamma factor via constraints on maximal power allowed by general relativity and hence set upper limits on other observable quantities such as deceleration distance. Also upper limits are set on the high energy particle radiation due to constraints set by cosmic microwave background radiation.

  20. A test of resuspension factor models against Chernobyl data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garger, E.K. [Ukrainian Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. of Radioecology; Anspaugh, L.R.; Shinn, J.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After the accident at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP), stationary air samplers were operated at Chernobyl and Baryshevka, cities which are 16 km and 150 km, respectively, from the NPP. Other air samplers were operated simultaneously, but intermittently, at locations within the 30 km zone at distances of 4-25 km from the NPP. These data were used to check the validity of time dependent models of the resuspension factor K (m{sup -1}). Seven different models were examined, three of which are discussed in the paper. Data from the stationary air samplers were averaged over one day or one month; dam from the intermittent air samplers were averaged over three days in 1986 and over four hours in 1991. The concentrations of eight radionuclides were measured at ten points during the same time period (14-17 September 1986). The calculated resuspension factors range from 6 x 10{sup -9} m{sup -1} to 3 x 10{sup -6} m{sup -1}. Data for the spatial means of K are given for certain time periods in 1986 and 1991; also presented are the calculated values according to the models. The experimental data and the calculated values differ by up to more than one order of magnitude. Also analysed was the temporal change in experimental values of K and these values were compared with model predictions. The annual means of the resuspension factor as determined experimentally and as calculated with the models are presented. The model derived from empirical data measured in Neuherberg after the Chernobyl accident agrees best with the data. The Garland model systematically gives results lower than the experimental values, and the calculated values of K from the Linsley model are consistently conservative. Also considered were the uncertainty of K due to fluctuations in air concentrations and possible biological effects of episodic exposures.