National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gender males females

  1. Male Female

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2010 CLF % Male Female Hispanic or Latino 5.17% 4.79% White 38.33% 34.03% Black or African American 5.49% 6.53% Asian 1.97% 1.93% American Indian or Alaska Native 0.55% 0.53%...

  2. Gender Equality and Female Empowerment Policy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GENDER EQUALITY AND FEMALE EMPOWERMENT POLICY USAID POLICY MARCH 2012 "Achieving our objectives for global development will demand accelerated efforts to achieve gender equality and women's empowerment. Otherwise, peace and prosperity will have their own glass ceiling." Hillary Clinton JANUARY 2012 USAID GENDER EQUALITY AND FEMALE EMPOWERMENT POLICY MARCH 2012 WASHINGTON, DC i Photo credits: Cover (clockwise from top left): Erwin Rose/USAID;The Hunger Project; Unilever Tea Tanzania,

  3. Gender-specific reduction of hepatic Mrp2 expression by high-fat diet protects female mice from ANIT toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Bo; Csanaky, Ivn L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Patni, Meghan; Chen, Qi; Ma, Xiaochao; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Weir, Scott; Broward, Melinda; Klaassen, Curtis D.; University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, KS ; Guo, Grace L.

    2012-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that feeding a high-fat diet (HFD) to rodents affects the expression of genes involved in drug transport. However, gender-specific effects of HFD on drug transport are not known. The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2, Abcc2) is a transporter highly expressed in the hepatocyte canalicular membrane and is important for biliary excretion of glutathione-conjugated chemicals. The current study showed that hepatic Mrp2 expression was reduced by HFD feeding only in female, but not male, C57BL/6J mice. In order to determine whether down-regulation of Mrp2 in female mice altered chemical disposition and toxicity, the biliary excretion and hepatotoxicity of the Mrp2 substrate, ?-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT), were assessed in male and female mice fed control diet or HFD for 4 weeks. ANIT-induced biliary injury is a commonly used model of experimental cholestasis and has been shown to be dependent upon Mrp2-mediated efflux of an ANIT glutathione conjugate that selectively injures biliary epithelial cells. Interestingly, HFD feeding significantly reduced early-phase biliary ANIT excretion in female mice and largely protected against ANIT-induced liver injury. In summary, the current study showed that, at least in mice, HFD feeding can differentially regulate Mrp2 expression and function and depending upon the chemical exposure may enhance or reduce susceptibility to toxicity. Taken together, these data provide a novel interaction between diet and gender in regulating hepatobiliary excretion and susceptibility to injury. -- Highlights: ? High-fat diet decreases hepatic Mrp2 expression only in female but not in male mice. ? HFD significantly reduces early-phase biliary ANIT excretion in female mice. ? HFD protects female mice against ANIT-induced liver injury.

  4. Proportions of spontaneous mutations in males and females with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuchman, M.; Briede, T.; Matsuda, I.

    1995-01-02

    We used specific mutation analysis to estimate the proportions of males and females with ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency whose mutations occurred in the germ cells of one of the parents. The mutations were identified in the probands, and subsequently carrier testing was performed on their mothers and some of the grandmothers. Of 28 OTC deficient male,s only 2 (7%) had sporadic mutations (95% CI, 0.6-18.5%), whereas of 15 OTC deficient females, 12 (80%) had sporadic mutations (95% CI, 63-99%) (P < 0.001). Based on these results we estimated the male/female mutation rate ratio ({nu}/{mu}) in the OTC gene to be approximately 52. Assuming a fitness for males with OTC deficiency of 0 and the proportion of new female mutants at 0.80, the estimated fitness of heterozygous females is 0.4. Because of the difference in mutation rates between male and female germ cells, we suggest that 9/10 or higher, rather than the conventional 2/3 proportion, be applied when estimating prior risk of carrier status in a mother of one affected male. The prior risk of a mother of an affected female is much lower, approximately 2/10. 23 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Gender, Lies and Video Games: the Truth about Females and Computing

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Klawe, Maria M. [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States

    2009-09-01

    This talk explores how girls and women differ from boys and men in their uses of and attitudes towards computers and computing. From playing computer games to pursuing computing careers, the participation of females tends to be very low compared to that of males. Why is this? Opinions range from girls wanting to avoid the math and/or the geek image of programming to girls having better things to do with their lives. We discuss research findings on this issue, as well as initiatives designed to increase the participation of females in computing.

  6. Gender, Lies and Video Games: the Truth about Females and Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klawe, Maria M.

    2006-02-22

    This talk explores how girls and women differ from boys and men in their uses of and attitudes towards computers and computing. From playing computer games to pursuing computing careers, the participation of females tends to be very low compared to that of males. Why is this? Opinions range from girls wanting to avoid the math and/or the geek image of programming to girls having better things to do with their lives. We discuss research findings on this issue, as well as initiatives designed to increase the participation of females in computing.

  7. Transplacental arsenic plus postnatal 12-O-teradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate exposures associated with hepatocarcinogenesis induce similar aberrant gene expression patterns in male and female mouse liver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jie . E-mail: Liu6@niehs.nih.gov; Xie Yaxiong; Merrick, B. Alex; Shen Jun; Ducharme, Danica M.K.; Collins, Jennifer; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Logsdon, Daniel; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2006-06-15

    Our prior work shows that in utero arsenic exposure alone is a complete transplacental carcinogen, producing hepatocellular carcinoma in adult male offspring but not in females. In a follow-up study to potentially promote arsenic-initiated tumors, mice were exposed to arsenic (85 ppm) from gestation day 8 to 18 and then exposed to 12-O-teradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a well-known tumor promoter after weaning. The dermal application of TPA (2 {mu}g/0.1 ml acetone, twice/week for 21 weeks) after transplacental arsenic did not further increase arsenic-induced liver tumor formation in adult males but significantly increased liver tumor formation in adult females. Thus, for comparison, liver tumors and normal liver samples taken from adult male and female mice at necropsy were analyzed for aberrant gene/protein expression by microarray, real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Arsenic/TPA treatment resulted in increased expression of {alpha}-fetoprotein, k-ras, c-myc, estrogen receptor-{alpha}, cyclin D1, cdk2na, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, cytokeratin-8, cytokeratin-18, glutathione S-transferases and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in liver and liver tumors from both male and female mice. Arsenic/TPA also decreased the expression of BRCA1, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, CYP7B1, CYP2F2 and insulin-like growth factor-1 in normal and cancerous livers. Alterations in these gene products were associated with arsenic/TPA-induced liver tumors, regardless of sex. Thus, transplacental arsenic plus postnatal TPA exposure induced similar aberrant gene expression patterns in male and female mouse liver, which are persistent and potentially important to the mechanism of arsenic initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis.

  8. Evaluation of overall setup accuracy and adequate setup margins in pelvic image-guided radiotherapy: Comparison of the male and female patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laaksomaa, Marko; Kapanen, Mika; Tulijoki, Tapio; Peltola, Seppo; Hydynmaa, Simo; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated adequate setup margins for the radiotherapy (RT) of pelvic tumors based on overall position errors of bony landmarks. We also estimated the difference in setup accuracy between the male and female patients. Finally, we compared the patient rotation for 2 immobilization devices. The study cohort included consecutive 64 male and 64 female patients. Altogether, 1794 orthogonal setup images were analyzed. Observer-related deviation in image matching and the effect of patient rotation were explicitly determined. Overall systematic and random errors were calculated in 3 orthogonal directions. Anisotropic setup margins were evaluated based on residual errors after weekly image guidance. The van Herk formula was used to calculate the margins. Overall, 100 patients were immobilized with a house-made device. The patient rotation was compared against 28 patients immobilized with CIVCO's Kneefix and Feetfix. We found that the usually applied isotropic setup margin of 8 mm covered all the uncertainties related to patient setup for most RT treatments of the pelvis. However, margins of even 10.3 mm were needed for the female patients with very large pelvic target volumes centered either in the symphysis or in the sacrum containing both of these structures. This was because the effect of rotation (p ? 0.02) and the observer variation in image matching (p ? 0.04) were significantly larger for the female patients than for the male patients. Even with daily image guidance, the required margins remained larger for the women. Patient rotations were largest about the lateral axes. The difference between the required margins was only 1 mm for the 2 immobilization devices. The largest component of overall systematic position error came from patient rotation. This emphasizes the need for rotation correction. Overall, larger position errors and setup margins were observed for the female patients with pelvic cancer than for the male patients.

  9. Pesticide use knowledge and practices: A gender differences in Nepal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atreya, Kishor . E-mail: k.atreya@gmail.com

    2007-06-15

    It is important to understand gender difference on pesticide use knowledge, attitude and practices for identifying pesticide risks by gender and to recommend more gender-sensitive programs. However, very few studies have been conducted so far in Nepal. This study, thus, interviewed a total of 325 males and 109 females during 2005 to assess gender differences on pesticide use knowledge, attitude and practices. More than 50% females had never been to school and only <8% individuals were found trained in Integrated Pest Management (IPM). Almost all males and females did not smoke, drink and eat during pesticides application and also believed that pesticides are harmful to human health, livestock, plant diversity and their environment. However, there were gender differences on household decision on pesticides to be used (p<0.001), care of wind direction during spraying (p=0.032), prior knowledge on safety measures (p=0.016), reading and understanding of pesticides labels (p<0.001), awareness of the labels (p<0.001) and protective covers. Almost all respondents were aware of negative impacts of pesticide use on human health and environment irrespective of gender; however, females were at higher risk due to lower level of pesticide use safety and awareness. It is strongly recommended to initiate gender-sensitive educational and awareness activities, especially on pesticide use practices and safety precautions.

  10. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 1 1 7 3 2 7 5 55 18 PAY PLAN SES 3 EJ/EK 5 EN 05 13 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 43 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 23 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 * Reorganization, includes NA-SH and NA-00 employees. White 33.0% Associate Administrator for Infrastructure & Environment (NA-50) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 100 67 67.0% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic SES EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04

  11. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    76 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 27 24 86 134 65 24 192 171 1189 423 PAY PLAN SES 96 EX 4 EJ/EK 60 EN 05 39 EN 04 159 EN 03 21 EN 00 8 NN (Engineering) 398 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 1165 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 54 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 325 GS 15 3 GS 14 1 GS 13 1 GS 10 1 Total includes 2318 permanent and 17 temporary employees. DIVERSITY 2335 1559 66.8% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 33.2% National

  12. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    83 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 25 25 89 134 67 27 202 171 1198 426 PAY PLAN SES 94 EX 3 EJ/EK 52 EN 05 42 EN 04 173 EN 03 42 EN 00 23 NN (Engineering) 395 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 1157 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 51 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 327 GS 15 2 GS 14 1 ED 00 2 White 33.1% National Nuclear Security Administration As of September 5, 2015 DIVERSITY 2364 1581 66.9% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic SES EX EJ/EK

  13. Toxicokinetics of α-thujone following intravenous and gavage administration of α-thujone or α- and β-thujone mixture in male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waidyanatha, Suramya; Johnson, Jerry D.; Hong, S. Peter; Robinson, Veronica Godfrey; Gibbs, Seth; Graves, Steven W.; Hooth, Michelle J.; Smith, Cynthia S.

    2013-09-01

    Plants containing thujone have widespread use and hence have significant human exposure. α-Thujone caused seizures in rodents following gavage administration. We investigated the toxicokinetics of α-thujone in male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice following intravenous and gavage administration of α-thujone or a mixture of α- and β-thujone (which will be referred to as α,β-thujone). Absorption of α-thujone following gavage administration was rapid without any dose-, species-, sex- or test article-related effect. Absolute bioavailability of α-thujone following administration of α-thujone or α,β-thujone was generally higher in rats than in mice. In rats, females had higher bioavailability than males following administration of either test article although a sex difference was not observed in mice. C{sub max} and AUC{sub ∞} increased greater than proportional to the dose in female rats following administration of α-thujone and in male and female mice following administration of α,β-thujone suggesting possible saturation of elimination kinetics with increasing dose. Dose-adjusted AUC{sub ∞} for male and female rats was 5- to 15-fold and 3- to 24-fold higher than mice counterparts following administration of α-thujone and α,β-thujone, respectively (p-value < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Following both intravenous and gavage administration, α-thujone was distributed to the brains of rats and mice with females, in general, having higher brain:plasma ratios than males. These data are in support of the observed toxicity of α-thujone and α,β-thujone where females were more sensitive than males of both species to α-thujone-induced neurotoxicity. In general there was no difference in toxicokinetics between test articles when normalized to α-thujone concentration. - Highlights: • Absorption of α-thujone following gavage administration was rapid in rats and mice. • Rats undergo higher exposure to α-thujone than mice. • α-Thujone brain

  14. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 2 1 4 3 20 2 5 1 24 13 PAY PLAN SES 1 EJ/EK 2 EN 05 2 EN 04 21 EN 03 7 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 26 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 Livermore Field Office As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 75 55 73.3% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 26.7% SES EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 EN 03 NN NQ NU 1.3% 2.7% 2.7% 28.0% 9.3% 20.0% 34.7% 1.3% 2.7% 1.3% 5.3% 4.0% 26.7% 2.7% 6.7% 1.3%

  15. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 2 3 0 0 3 0 9 10 35 12 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 8 EN 05 1 EN 04 20 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 25 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 Los Alamos Field Office As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 74 49 66.2% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 33.8% SES EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 NN NQ NU 2.7% 10.8% 1.4% 27.0% 20.3% 33.8% 4.1% 2.7% 4.1% 0.0% 0.0% 4.1% 0.0% 12.2% 13.5% 47.3% 16.2%

  16. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 1 1 4 1 0 0 4 10 4 PAY PLAN SES 7 EX 2 EJ/EK 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 2 EN 00 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 10 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 National Nuclear Security Administration (NA-1) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 25 12 48.0% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 52.0% SES EX EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 EN 00 NQ NU 28.0% 8.0% 4.0% 4.0% 8.0% 4.0% 40.0% 4.0% 0.0% 4.0% 4.0% 16.0% 4.0% 0.0% 0.0%

  17. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 1 10 11 4 3 14 8 78 26 PAY PLAN SES 10 EX 1 EJ/EK 2 EN 05 8 EN 04 15 EN 03 6 NN (Engineering) 63 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 51 White 31.4% Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs (NA-10) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 156 107 68.6% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic SES EX EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 EN 03 NN NQ 6.4% 0.6% 1.3% 5.1% 9.6% 3.8% 40.4% 32.7% 0.6% 0.6% 6.4% 7.1% 2.6% 1.9%

  18. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 14 2 18 1 10 2 71 21 400 19 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 2 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 215 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 325 DIVERSITY 558 513 91.9% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 8.1% Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation (NA-15) As of March 21, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 04 NN NQ NU NV 0.4% 0.4% 0.2% 2.0% 38.5% 0.4% 58.2%

  19. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    91 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 0 3 17 3 6 8 10 70 58 PAY PLAN SES 12 EX 1 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 2 EN 03 1 EN 00 3 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 123 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 GS 15 1 Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear NonProliferation (NA-20) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 176 85 48.3% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 51.7% SES EX EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 EN 03 EN 00 NN NQ NU GS 15

  20. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 1 4 8 2 0 1 0 138 61 PAY PLAN SES 25 EJ/EK 2 EN 05 9 NN (Engineering) 72 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 91 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 16 * Includes NRLFO employees. Deputy Administrator for Naval Reactors (NA-30) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 215 145 67.4% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 32.6% SES EJ/EK EN 05 NN NQ NU 11.6% 0.9% 4.2% 33.5% 42.3% 7.4% 0.0% 0.5% 1.9% 3.7% 0.9%

  1. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 0 10 8 2 1 4 5 39 10 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 3 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 20 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 53 Associate Administrator for Emergency Operations (NA-40) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 79 55 69.6% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 30.4% SES EJ/EK EN 04 NN NQ 2.5% 3.8% 1.3% 25.3% 67.1% 0.0% 0.0% 12.7% 10.1% 2.5% 1.3% 5.1% 6.3% 49.4% 12.7% SUPERVISORS DISABILITY 7

  2. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 11 2 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 1 EN 04 1 EN 00 1 NN (Engineering) 5 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 4 DIVERSITY 14 12 85.7% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 14.3% Associate Administrator & Deputy Under Secretary for Counterterrorism & Counterproliferation (NA-80) As of March 21, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 04 EN 00 NN NQ 14.3% 7.1% 7.1% 7.1% 35.7% 28.6% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

  3. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 2 1 4 9 4 0 20 25 57 37 PAY PLAN SES 7 EJ/EK 3 EN 04 11 EN 00 3 NN (Engineering) 30 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 102 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management (NA-APM) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 159 87 54.7% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 45.3% SES EJ/EK EN 04 EN 00 NN NQ NU 4.4% 1.9% 6.9% 1.9% 18.9% 64.2% 1.9% 1.3% 0.6%

  4. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 0 3 3 0 1 0 1 4 2 PAY PLAN SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 8 GS 15 2 GS 14 1 GS 13 1 GS 10 1 Associate Administrator of External Affairs (NA-EA) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 14 7 50.0% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 50.0% SES NQ GS 15 GS 14 GS 13 GS 10 7.1% 57.1% 14.3% 7.1% 7.1% 7.1% 0.0% 0.0% 21.4% 21.4% 0.0% 7.1% 0.0% 7.1% 28.6% 14.3% SUPERVISORS DISABILITY 4

  5. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 0 1 2 0 1 4 7 12 9 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 30 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 Office of General Counsel (NA-GC) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 36 17 47.2% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 52.8% SES EJ/EK EN 03 NN NQ NU 5.6% 2.8% 2.8% 2.8% 83.3% 2.8% 0.0% 0.0% 2.8% 5.6% 0.0% 2.8% 11.1% 19.4% 33.3% 25.0% SUPERVISORS DISABILITY

  6. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 2 2 6 1 0 0 5 9 4 PAY PLAN SES 1 EJ/EK 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 27 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 Associate Administrator for Information Management & Chief Information Officer (NA-IM) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 30 13 43.3% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 56.7% SES EJ/EK NQ NU 3.3% 3.3% 90.0% 3.3% 3.3% 6.7% 6.7% 20.0% 3.3% 0.0% 0.0% 16.7% 30.0% 13.3% SUPERVISORS

  7. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 2 2 11 31 1 3 18 35 46 63 PAY PLAN SES 9 EJ/EK 1 EN 04 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 194 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 7 DIVERSITY 212 78 36.8% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 63.2% Associate Administrator for Management & Budget (NA-MB) As of March 21, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 04 NQ NU 4.2% 0.5% 0.5% 91.5% 3.3% 0.9% 0.9% 5.2% 14.6% 0.5% 1.4% 8.5% 16.5% 21.7% 29.7% SUPERVISORS

  8. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 1 2 3 2 2 6 5 44 12 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 2 EN 05 1 EN 04 23 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 23 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 Nevada Field Office As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 78 55 70.5% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 29.5% SES EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 NN NQ NU 2.6% 2.6% 1.3% 29.5% 32.1% 29.5% 2.6% 1.3% 1.3% 2.6% 3.8% 2.6% 2.6% 7.7% 6.4% 56.4% 15.4% SUPERVISORS

  9. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 3 2 2 2 0 13 10 33 15 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 4 EN 04 9 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 28 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 29 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 6 Sandia Field Office As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 80 50 62.5% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 37.5% SES EJ/EK EN 04 EN 03 NN NQ NU 2.5% 5.0% 11.3% 2.5% 35.0% 36.3% 7.5% 0.0% 3.8% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 0.0% 16.3% 12.5% 41.3% 18.8% SUPERVISORS

  10. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 1 2 3 0 0 0 0 22 8 PAY PLAN SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 9 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 16 White 33.3% Kansas City Field Office As of September 5, 2015 DIVERSITY 36 24 66.7% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic SES EN 05 EN 04 EN 03 NN NQ 2.8% 2.8% 25.0% 2.8% 22.2% 44.4% 0.0% 2.8% 5.6% 8.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 61.1% 22.2% Prepared by NNSA Office of Civil Rights

  11. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 2 1 4 4 20 2 5 1 24 13 PAY PLAN SES 1 EJ/EK 2 EN 05 2 EN 04 21 EN 03 7 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 27 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 DIVERSITY 76 55 72.4% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 27.6% Livermore Field Office As of September 5, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 EN 03 NN NQ NU 1.3% 2.6% 2.6% 27.6% 9.2% 19.7% 35.5% 1.3% 2.6% 1.3% 5.3% 5.3% 26.3% 2.6% 6.6% 1.3%

  12. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 2 3 1 0 2 0 10 10 35 12 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 7 EN 05 1 EN 04 22 EN 03 1 EN 00 2 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 25 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 DIVERSITY 75 50 66.7% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 33.3% Los Alamos Field Office As of September 5, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 EN 03 EN 00 NN NQ NU 2.7% 9.3% 1.3% 29.3% 1.3% 2.7% 16.0% 33.3% 4.0% 2.7% 4.0% 1.3% 0.0%

  13. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 2 1 5 12 4 0 20 27 54 37 PAY PLAN SES 4 EJ/EK 2 EN 04 11 EN 03 3 EN 00 6 NN (Engineering) 29 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 104 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management (NA-APM) As of September 5, 2015 DIVERSITY 162 85 52.5% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 47.5% SES EJ/EK EN 04 EN 03 EN 00 NN NQ NU 2.5% 1.2% 6.8% 1.9% 3.7%

  14. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 1 2 4 1 1 1 4 10 4 PAY PLAN SES 6 EX 2 EN 05 1 EN 04 1 EN 00 1 NN (Engineering) 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 15 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 Immediate Office of the Administrator (NA-1) As of September 5, 2015 DIVERSITY 28 14 50.0% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 50.0% SES EX EN 05 EN 04 EN 00 NN NQ NU 21.4% 7.1% 3.6% 3.6% 3.6% 3.6% 53.6% 3.6% 0.0% 3.6% 7.1% 14.3% 3.6%

  15. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 1 10 12 4 3 16 8 84 27 PAY PLAN SES 11 EJ/EK 2 EN 05 9 EN 04 15 EN 03 8 EN 00 5 NN (Engineering) 62 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 53 ED 00 1 Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs (NA-10) As of September 5, 2015 DIVERSITY 166 115 69.3% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 30.7% SES EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 EN 03 EN 00 NN NQ ED 00 6.6% 1.2% 5.4% 9.0% 4.8% 3.0% 37.3% 31.9% 0.6% 0.6%

  16. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 13 2 19 1 11 2 71 21 397 17 PAY PLAN SES 1 EJ/EK 2 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 210 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 327 White 7.8% Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation (NA-15) As of September 5, 2015 DIVERSITY 554 511 92.2% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic SES EJ/EK EN 04 NN NQ NU NV 0.2% 0.4% 0.2% 2.0% 37.9% 0.4%

  17. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    92 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 0 3 16 4 7 9 10 72 59 PAY PLAN SES 12 EX 1 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 EN 03 7 EN 00 4 NN (Engineering) 28 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 118 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 GS 15 1 ED 00 1 DIVERSITY 181 89 49.2% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 50.8% Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear NonProliferation (NA-20) As of September 5, 2015 SES EX EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 EN 03 EN 00 NN NQ

  18. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 1 4 6 3 0 1 0 81 21 PAY PLAN SES 26 EJ/EK 2 EN 05 11 NN (Engineering) 49 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 25 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 4 DIVERSITY 117 89 76.1% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 23.9% Deputy Administrator for Naval Reactors (NA-30) As of September 5, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 05 NN NQ NU 22.2% 1.7% 9.4% 41.9% 21.4% 3.4% 0.0% 0.9% 3.4% 5.1% 2.6% 0.0% 0.9% 0.0% 69.2% 17.9%

  19. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    6 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 0 10 9 2 1 4 5 39 11 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 3 EN 04 2 NN (Engineering) 18 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 56 DIVERSITY 81 55 67.9% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 32.1% Associate Administrator for Emergency Operations (NA-40) As of September 5, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 04 NN NQ 2.5% 3.7% 2.5% 22.2% 69.1% 0.0% 0.0% 12.3% 11.1% 2.5% 1.2% 4.9% 6.2% 48.1% 13.6% Prepared by NNSA Office of

  20. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 1 1 6 3 2 7 5 52 20 PAY PLAN SES 3 EJ/EK 4 EN 05 12 EN 04 9 EN 03 2 EN 00 3 NN (Engineering) 42 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 22 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 White 34.7% Associate Administrator for Safety, Infrastructure and Operations (NA-50) As of September 5, 2015 DIVERSITY 98 64 65.3% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic SES EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 EN 03 EN 00 NN NQ NU 3.1% 4.1% 12.2%

  1. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 2 4 6 0 0 7 14 27 18 PAY PLAN SES 3 NN (Engineering) 6 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 66 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 DIVERSITY 78 38 48.7% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 51.3% Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security (NA-70) As of September 5, 2015 SES NN NQ NU 3.8% 7.7% 84.6% 3.8% 0.0% 2.6% 5.1% 7.7% 0.0% 0.0% 9.0% 17.9% 34.6% 23.1% Prepared by NNSA Office of

  2. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 11 3 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 1 EN 04 1 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 5 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 4 Associate Administrator & Deputy Under Secretary for Counterterrorism & Counterproliferation (NA-80) As of September 5, 2015 DIVERSITY 15 12 80.0% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 20.0% SES EJ/EK EN 04 EN 03 NN NQ 13.3% 6.7% 6.7% 13.3% 33.3% 26.7% 0.0% 0.0%

  3. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 6 2 PAY PLAN SES 2 EN 03 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 7 GS 15 1 GS 14 1 DIVERSITY 12 7 58.3% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 41.7% Associate Administrator of External Affairs (NA-EA) As of September 5, 2015 SES EN 03 NQ GS 15 GS 14 16.7% 8.3% 58.3% 8.3% 8.3% 0.0% 0.0% 8.3% 16.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 8.3% 50.0% 16.7% Prepared by NNSA Office of Civil Rights

  4. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 1 1 2 0 1 5 7 11 8 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 2 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 29 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 DIVERSITY 36 17 47.2% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 52.8% Office of General Counsel (NA-GC) As of September 5, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 03 NN NQ NU 5.6% 2.8% 2.8% 5.6% 80.6% 2.8% 0.0% 2.8% 2.8% 5.6% 0.0% 2.8% 13.9% 19.4% 30.6% 22.2% Prepared by NNSA

  5. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 2 2 4 1 0 0 5 10 4 PAY PLAN SES 1 EJ/EK 1 EN 05 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 25 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 DIVERSITY 29 14 48.3% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 51.7% Associate Administrator for Information Management & Chief Information Officer (NA-IM) As of September 5, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 05 NQ NU 3.4% 3.4% 3.4% 86.2% 3.4% 3.4% 6.9% 6.9% 13.8% 3.4% 0.0% 0.0% 17.2%

  6. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 2 11 31 1 4 18 34 45 60 PAY PLAN SES 8 EJ/EK 1 EN 04 2 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 189 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 7 DIVERSITY 207 76 36.7% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 63.3% Associate Administrator for Management & Budget (NA-MB) As of September 5, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 04 NQ NU 3.9% 0.5% 1.0% 91.3% 3.4% 0.5% 1.0% 5.3% 15.0% 0.5% 1.9% 8.7% 16.4% 21.7% 29.0% Prepared by

  7. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 1 3 6 4 1 8 4 65 30 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 15 EN 05 1 EN 04 38 EN 03 7 EN 00 2 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 38 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 DIVERSITY 122 80 65.6% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 34.4% NNSA Production Office (NPO) As of September 5, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 EN 03 EN 00 NN NQ NU 1.6% 12.3% 0.8% 31.1% 5.7% 1.6% 13.1% 31.1% 2.5% 0.0% 0.8%

  8. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 66 41 PAY PLAN NN (Engineering) 30 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 70 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 12 DIVERSITY 112 68 60.7% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 39.3% Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office (NRLFO) As of September 5, 2015 NN NQ NU 26.8% 62.5% 10.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.8% 0.9% 0.9% 0.9% 0.0% 58.9% 36.6% Prepared by NNSA Office of Civil Rights (NA-1.2)

  9. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 1 2 3 2 2 6 5 43 11 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 2 EN 05 1 EN 04 23 NN (Engineering) 24 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 22 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 DIVERSITY 76 54 71.1% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 28.9% Nevada Field Office As of September 5, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 NN NQ NU 2.6% 2.6% 1.3% 30.3% 31.6% 28.9% 2.6% 1.3% 1.3% 2.6% 3.9% 2.6% 2.6% 7.9% 6.6% 56.6% 14.5% Prepared by

  10. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 3 2 1 2 0 13 10 31 15 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 4 EN 04 11 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 27 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 DIVERSITY 77 48 62.3% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 37.7% Sandia Field Office As of September 5, 2015 SES EJ/EK EN 04 EN 03 NN NQ NU 2.6% 5.2% 14.3% 2.6% 33.8% 35.1% 6.5% 0.0% 3.9% 2.6% 1.3% 2.6% 0.0% 16.9% 13.0% 40.3% 19.5%

  11. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 1 2 4 1 0 0 0 13 5 PAY PLAN SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 3 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 Savannah River Field Office As of September 5, 2015 DIVERSITY 26 16 61.5% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 38.5% SES EN 05 EN 04 NN NQ NU 3.8% 3.8% 11.5% 42.3% 34.6% 3.8% 0.0% 3.8% 7.7% 15.4% 3.8% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 50.0% 19.2% Prepared by NNSA Office

  12. Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilling, Thomas J.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Garden, Adam S.; Forastiere, Arlene; Kian Ang, K.; Movsas, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

  13. Gender Transition Guidelines, Workplace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gender Transition Guidelines, Workplace

  14. The effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation in Poland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talalaj, Izabela Anna Walery, Maria

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • An effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was presented. • The waste accumulation index is influenced by a number of unemployed women. • Greater share of women in society contributes to greater waste production. • A model describing the analyzed dependences was determined. - Abstract: In this study the effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was investigated. The data from 10-year period, from 2001 to 2010 year, were taken into consideration. The following parameters of gender and age structure were analyzed: men and woman quantity, female to male ratio, number of working, pre-working and post-working age men/women, number of unemployed men/women. The results have showed a strong correlation of annual per capita waste generation rate with number of unemployed women (r = 0.70) and female to male ratio (r = 0.81). This indicates that waste generation rate is more depended on ratio of men and women that on quantitative size of each group. Using the regression analysis a model describing the dependence between female to male ratio, number of unemployed woman and waste quantity was determined. The model explains 70% of waste quantity variation. Obtained results can be used both to improve waste management and to a fuller understanding of gender behavior.

  15. Blood cadmium levels are associated with a decline in lung function in males

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, Chang-Mo; Oh, In-Hwan; Lee, Jong-Keun; Park, Yoon Hyung; Choe, Bong-Keun; Yoon, Tai-Young; Choi, Joong-Myung

    2014-07-15

    Background: Cadmium exposure was found to cause a decline in lung function among the general population, but these findings were limited to smokers and gender differences were not explored. Objectives: To examine the relationship between cadmium and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) according to gender and smoking status in Korea. Methods: Cross-sectional data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2008 to 2011 were analyzed. COPD was defined by a pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s divided by forced vital capacity of <0.70. A logistic regression model was used to elucidate the association between blood cadmium levels and COPD according to gender and smoking status. Results: Among 3861 eligible participants, 3622 were included in the analysis. The prevalence of COPD demonstrated an increasing trend in males (P for trend<0.001), but not in females (P for trend=0.67). After adjusting for covariates, a higher blood cadmium level, but within the normal range, was associated with COPD in males, including those who had never-smoked (P for trend <0.001 and P for trend=0.008). However, a higher blood cadmium level was not significantly associated with COPD in females, including those who had never smoked (P for trend=0.39 and P for trend=0.43). Conclusions: A higher blood cadmium level, within the normal range, was associated with COPD in males, including those who had never smoked. However, there was no significant association between blood cadmium levels and COPD in females. - Highlights: • Elevated blood cadmium level is associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in male. • This association can be seen even in never smoked male. • However, this association is present only in male, but not in female.

  16. Unexpected gender difference in sensitivity to the acute toxicity of dioxin in mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Miettinen, Hanna; Sankari, Satu; Hegde, Nagabhooshan; Lindn, Jere; Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014 University of Helsinki

    2012-07-15

    The acute toxicity of the ubiquitous environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) varies widely among species and strains. Previous studies in rats have established that females are approximately 2-fold more sensitive to TCDD lethality than males. However, there is a surprising gap in the literature regarding possible gender-related sensitivity differences in mice. In the present study, by using three substrains of TCDD-sensitive C57BL/6 mice and transgenic mice on this background, we demonstrated that: 1) in contrast to the situation in rats, female mice are the more resistant gender; 2) the magnitude of the divergence between male and female mice depends on the substrain, but can amount to over 10-fold; 3) AH receptor protein expression levels or mutations in the primary structure of this receptor are not involved in the resistance of female mice of a C57BL/6 substrain, despite their acute LD{sub 50} for TCDD being over 5000 ?g/kg; 4) transgenic mice that globally express the rat wildtype AH receptor follow the mouse type of gender difference; 5) in gonadectomized mice, ovarian estrogens appear to enhance TCDD resistance, whereas testicular androgens seem to augment TCDD susceptibility; and 6) the gender difference correlates best with the severity of liver damage, which is also reflected in hepatic histopathology and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, especially IL-6. Hence, the two closely related rodent species most often employed in toxicological risk characterization studies, rat and mouse, represent opposite examples of the influence of gender on dioxin sensitivity, further complicating the risk assessment of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. -- Highlights: ? In contrast to rats, male mice are more sensitive to TCDD toxicity than female mice. ? The resistance of female C57BL/6Kuo mice matches or exceeds that of male DBA/2 mice. ? The resistance of female C57BL/6Kuo mice is not based on AHR structure or abundance. ? Both

  17. Effects of estrogen and gender on cataractogenesis induced by high-LET radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, M.A.; Rusek, A.; Valluri, S.; Garrett, J.; Lopez, J.; Caperell-Grant, A.; Mendonca, M.; Bigsby, R.; Dynlacht, J.

    2010-02-01

    Planning for long-duration manned lunar and interplanetary missions requires an understanding of radiation-induced cataractogenesis. Previously, it was demonstrated that low-linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation with 10 Gy of {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays resulted in an increased incidence of cataracts in male rats compared to female rats. This gender difference was not due to differences in estrogen, since male rats treated with the major secreted estrogen 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) showed an identical increase compared to untreated males. We now compare the incidence and rate of progression of cataracts induced by high-LET radiation in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats received a single dose of 1 Gy of 600 MeV {sup 56}Fe ions. Lens opacification was measured at 2-4 week intervals with a slit lamp. The incidence and rate of progression of radiation-induced cataracts was significantly increased in the animals in which estrogen was available from endogenous or exogenous sources. Male rats with E2 capsules implanted had significantly higher rates of progression compared to male rats with empty capsules implanted (P = 0.025) but not compared to the intact female rats. These results contrast with data obtained after low-LET irradiation and suggest the possibility that the different types of damage caused by high- and low-LET radiation may be influenced differentially by steroid sex hormones.

  18. Gender and snow crab occupational asthma in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howse, Dana; Gautrin, Denyse; Neis, Barbara . E-mail: bneis@mun.ca; Cartier, Andre; Horth-Susin, Lise; Jong, Michael; Swanson, Mark C.

    2006-06-15

    Fish and shellfish processing employs many thousands of people globally, with shellfish processing becoming more important in recent years. Shellfish processing is associated with multiple occupational health and safety (OHS) risks. Snow crab occupational asthma (OA) is work-related asthma associated with processing snow crab. We present a gender analysis of findings from a 3-year multifaceted study of snow crab OA in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The study was carried out in four snow crab processing communities between 2001 and 2004. An anonymous survey questionnaire on knowledge, beliefs, and concerns related to processing snow crab administered to 158 workers attending community meetings at the start of the research found that women were significantly more likely than men to associate certain health problems, especially chest tightness, difficulty breathing, and cough, with crab processing (P<0.001). Worker health assessments carried out with 215 processing workers (187 current/28 former; 120 female/95 male) found that female participants were more likely to be diagnosed as almost certain/highly probable snow crab OA and allergy (P=0.001) and to be sensitized to snow crab (P=0.01) than male participants. Work histories from the health assessments were used to classify processing jobs as male or female. Allergen sampling (211 allergen samples: 115 area, 96 personal breathing zone) indicated that the plant areas where these male jobs were concentrated were associated with lower levels of aerosolized crab allergens (the agents responsible for OA to snow crab) than areas associated with female jobs. This difference was statistically significant in the two plants with poor ventilation (p<0.001 and P=0.017 for these plants). A gender analysis of work history data showed that female health assessment participants were likely to have worked longer processing snow crab than males (5 years versus 3.5 years, respectively). Cross-referencing of work history results

  19. Guidance on the Use of Hand-Held Survey Meters for radiological Triage: Time-Dependent Detector Count Rates Corresponding to 50, 250, and 500 mSv Effective Dose for Adult Males and Adult Females

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolch, W.E.; Hurtado, J.L.; Lee, C.; Manger, Ryan P; Hertel, Nolan; Burgett, E.; Dickerson, W.

    2012-01-01

    In June 2006, the Radiation Studies Branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention held a workshop to explore rapid methods of facilitating radiological triage of large numbers of potentially contaminated individuals following detonation of a radiological dispersal device. Two options were discussed. The first was the use of traditional gamma cameras in nuclear medicine departments operated as makeshift wholebody counters. Guidance on this approach is currently available from the CDC. This approach would be feasible if a manageable number of individuals were involved, transportation to the relevant hospitals was quickly provided, and the medical staff at each facility had been previously trained in this non-traditional use of their radiopharmaceutical imaging devices. If, however, substantially larger numbers of individuals (100 s to 1,000 s) needed radiological screening, other options must be given to first responders, first receivers, and health physicists providing medical management. In this study, the second option of the workshop was investigated by the use of commercially available portable survey meters (either NaI or GM based) for assessing potential ranges of effective dose (G50, 50Y250, 250Y500, and 9500 mSv). Two hybrid computational phantoms were used to model an adult male and an adult female subject internally contaminated with 241Am, 60Cs, 137Cs, 131I, or 192Ir following an acute inhalation or ingestion intake. As a function of time following the exposure, the net count rates corresponding to committed effective doses of 50, 250, and 500 mSv were estimated via Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation for each of four different detector types, positions, and screening distances. Measured net count rates can be compared to these values, and an assignment of one of four possible effective dose ranges could be made. The method implicitly assumes that all external contamination has been removed prior to screening and that the measurements be

  20. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for gender selection in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colls, P.; Silver, L.; Olivera, G.; Weier, J.; Escudero, T.; Goodall, N.; Tomkin, G.; Munne, S.

    2009-08-20

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of gender selection for non medical reasons has been considered an unethical procedure by several authors and agencies in the Western society on the basis of disrupting the sex ratio, being discriminatory againsts women and disposal of normal embryos of the non desired gender. In this study, the analysis of a large series of PGD procedures for gender selection from a wide geographical area in the United States, shows that in general there is no deviation in preference towards any specific gender except for a preference of males in some ethnic populations of Chinese, Indian and Middle Eastern origin that represent a small percentage of the US population. In cases where only normal embryos of the non-desired gender are available, 45.5% of the couples elect to cancel the transfer, while 54.5% of them are open to have transferred embryos of the non-desired gender, this fact being strongly linked to cultural and ethnical background of the parents. In addition this study adds some evidence to the proposition that in couples with previous children of a given gender there is no biological predisposition towards producing embryos of that same gender. Based on these facts, it seems that objections to gender selection formulated by ethics committees and scientific societies are not well-founded.

  1. F.E. S.D. Gender

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MALE 633 154 79.9% 24.33% 100.0% 0 165 FEMALE 159 52 20.1% 32.70% 74.4% 0.008 2.1523224 X X X 41 11 COMPARISON 633 154 24.33% RACEETHNICITY 792 206 26.01% WHITE(NON-HISPANIC) 733 ...

  2. F.E. S.D. Gender

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 0 MALE 1.000 FEMALE 1.000 COMPARISON 0 0 0.00% RACEETHNICITY 0 0 WHITE(NON-HISPANIC) 1.000 BLACK(NON-HISPANIC) 1.000 AMERICAN-INDIAN (NON-HISPANIC) 1.000 ASIAN (NON-HISPANIC) ...

  3. Ethnic and gender differences in boredom proneness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, G.S.; Morales,

    1996-02-01

    Although boredom may exhibit many shared elements, culturally specific attitudes have also been found to exist. The present paper investigated boredom proneness among African-American college students. Data from 120 participants on the Boredom Proneness (BP) Scale was analyzed and compared to cross-cultural participants. African-American females scored significantly higher than African-American males. Scores were presented from two other studies to show a comparative look at boredom proneness in five other ethnic groups. African-American females are the only female ethnic group to score higher on the BP Scale than their male counterparts. Additionally, overall African-Americans, were found to have higher BP scores than their Western counterparts.

  4. LEAF Gender Mainstreaming Strategy & Checklist | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.leafasia.orgtoolsleaf-gender-mainstreaming-strategy-checklist Cost: Free Language: English LEAF Gender Mainstreaming Strategy & Checklist Screenshot Logo: LEAF Gender...

  5. Special Colloquium : Looking at High Energy Physics from a gender studies perspective

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Human actors, workplace cultures and knowledge production: Gender studies analyse the social constructions and cultural representations of gender. Using methods and tools from the humanities and social science, we look at all areas, including the natural sciences and technology, science education and research labs. After a short introduction to gender studies, the main focus of my talk will be the presentation of selected research findings on gender and high energy physics. You will hear about an ongoing research project on women in neutrino physics and learn about a study on the world of high energy physicists characterised by "rites of passage" and "male tales" told during a life in physics. I will also present a study on how the HEP community communicates, and research findings on the naming culture in HEP. Getting to know findings from another field on your own might contribute to create a high energy physics culture that is fair and welcoming to all genders.

  6. Jonathan Male | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jonathan Male About Us Jonathan Male - Director, Bioenergy Technologies Office Photo of Jonathan Male Dr. Jonathan Male is the Director for the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). In this role, he leads the Office's work to lower costs, reduce technical risk, and accelerate deployment of bioenergy and renewable chemicals technologies. He oversees research and development across the entire supply chain-from sustainable biomass

  7. Gender determination of avian embryo

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daum, Keith A.; Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  8. Crybb2 deficiency impairs fertility in female mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Qian; Sun, Li-Li; Xiang, Fen-Fen; Gao, Li; Jia, Yin; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Tao, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Li, Wen-Jie

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Crybb2 deletion impaired female fertility. • Crybb2 deletion dramatically affected the production of reproduction-related hormones and hormone response. • Crybb2 deletion impaired follicular development and inhibited the proliferation of granulosa cells. • Crybb2 deletion promoted follicular atresia and apoptosis in granulosa cells. - Abstract: Beta-B2-crystallin (CRYBB2), encoded by Crybb2 gene, is a major protein in the mammalian eye lens that plays an important role in maintaining the transparency of the ocular lens. However, CRYBB2 also plays important roles in many extra-lenticular tissues and organs such as the retina, brain and testis. Our previous studies demonstrated that male Crybb2 deficient (Crybb2{sup −/−}) mice have reduced fertility compared with wild-type (WT) mice, while female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice exhibited reduced ovary weights and shorter estrous cycle percentages. Here we specifically investigated the role of CRYBB2 in the female reproductive system. Our studies revealed that ovaries from female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice exhibited significantly reduced numbers of primordial, secondary and pre-ovulatory follicles when compared with WT mice, while the rate of atretic follicles was also increased. Additionally, fewer eggs were collected from the oviduct of Crybb2{sup −/−} female mice after superovulation. Estrogen levels were higher in the metestrus and diestrus cycles of female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice, while progesterone levels were lower in diestrus cycles. Furthermore, the expression of survival and cell cycle genes, Bcl-2, Cdk4 and Ccnd2, were significantly decreased in granulosa cells isolated from female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice, consistent with the predominant expression of CRYBB2 in ovarian granulosa cells. Our results reveal a critical role for CRYBB2 in female fertility and specific effects on the proliferation and survival status of ovarian granulosa cells.

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 13 White Female (W F) 5 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Savannah ...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 24 White Female (W F) 6 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Kansas City Field ...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 46 White Female (W F) 13 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Nevada ...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 13 Hispanic Female (H F) 10 White Male (W M) 43 White Female (W F) 11 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Los ...

  13. F.E. S.D. Gender

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    792 206 26.01% 79.9% MALE 633 154 79.9% 24.33% 100.0% 0 165 FEMALE 159 52 20.1% 32.70% 74.4% 0.008 2.1523224 X X X 41 11 COMPARISON 633 154 24.33% RACE/ETHNICITY 792 206 26.01% WHITE(NON-HISPANIC) 733 191 92.6% 26.06% 90.3% 0.219 0.2348801 191 0 BLACK(NON-HISPANIC) 10 1 1.3% 0.295 3 AMERICAN-INDIAN (NON-HISPANIC) 17 4 2.1% 23.53% 100.0% 0.312 0 4 ASIAN (NON-HISPANIC) 4 2 0.5% 0.263 1 1 HISPANIC (ALLRACES) 28 8 3.5% 28.57% 82.4% 0.257 0.3738043 7 1 COMPARISON 17 4 23.53% AGE 792 206 26.01% UNDER

  14. F.E. S.D. Gender

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 0 MALE 1.000 FEMALE 1.000 COMPARISON 0 0 0.00% RACE/ETHNICITY 0 0 WHITE(NON-HISPANIC) 1.000 BLACK(NON-HISPANIC) 1.000 AMERICAN-INDIAN (NON-HISPANIC) 1.000 ASIAN (NON-HISPANIC) 1.000 HISPANIC (ALLRACES) 1.000 COMPARISON 0 0 0.00% AGE 0 0 UNDER 40 0 0 40 AND OVER 0 0 1.000 45 AND OVER 0 0 1.000 50 AND OVER 0 0 1.000 55 AND OVER 0 0 1.000 60 AND OVER 0 0 1.000 COMPARISON 0 0 AGE BANDS 0 0 UNDER 40 40-44 1.000 45-49 1.000 50-54 1.000 55-59 1.000 60-64 1.000 65-69 1.000 70-74 1.000 75-79 1.000 80+

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of Employees 14 GENDER YEAR 2012 Males 9 Females 5 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 2 NN (Engineering) 4 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0...

  16. Inhalation reproductive toxicology studies: Male dominant lethal study of n-hexane in Swiss (CD-1) mice: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, T.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Evanoff, J.J.; Sasser, L.B.; Decker, J.R.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1988-08-01

    The straight-chain hydrocarbon, n-hexane, is a volatile, ubiquitous solvent routinely used in industrial environments; consequently, the opportunity for industrial, environmental or accidental exposure to hexane vapors is significant. Although myelinated nerve tissue is the primary target organ of hexane, the testes have also been identified as being sensitive to hexacarbon exposure. The objective of this study was to evaluate male dominant lethal effects in Swiss (CD-1) mice after exposure to 0, 200, 1000, or 5000 ppM n-hexane, 20 h/day for 5 consecutive days. Each exposure concentration consisted of 30 randomly selected, proven male breeders; 4 groups. The mice were weighed just prior to the first day of exposure and at weekly intervals until sacrifice. Ten males in each dose group were sacrificed one day after the cessation of exposure, and their testes and epididymides were removed for evaluation of the germinal epithelium. The remaining male mice, 20 per group, were individually housed in hanging wire-mesh breeding cages where they were mated with unexposed, virgin females for eight weekly intervals; new females were provided each week. The mated females were sacrificed 12 days after the last day of cohabitation and their reproductive status and the number and viability of the implants were recorded. The appearance and behavior of the male mice were unremarkable throughout the study period and no evidence of n-hexane toxicity was observed. 18 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Five Facts About the Gender Pay Gap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Over the past century, American women have made tremendous strides in increasing their labor market experience and their skills. On Equal Pay Day, however, we focus on a stubborn and troubling fact: Despite women’s gains, a large gender pay gap still exists.

  18. Progress on linking gender and sustainable energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farhar, B.

    2000-04-05

    The field of gender and energy has been identified as critical in global sustainable energy development and is increasingly important to decision makers. The theme of women and energy was of significance at the 1998 World Renewable Energy Congress in Florence, Italy. This paper traces further developments in this field by summarizing selected programmatic initiatives, meetings, and publications over the past 18 months.

  19. Hepatic injury induces contrasting response in liver and kidney to chemicals that are metabolically activated: Role of male sex hormone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young C. [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinrim-Dong, Kwanak-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: youckim@snu.ac.kr; Yim, Hye K.; Jung, Young S. [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinrim-Dong, Kwanak-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae H. [College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinrim-Dong, Kwanak-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Y. [College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, 344-2 Shinyong-Dong, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    Injury to liver, resulting in loss of its normal physiological/biochemical functions, may adversely affect a secondary organ. We examined the response of the liver and kidney to chemical substances that require metabolic activation for their toxicities in mice with a preceding liver injury. Carbon tetrachloride treatment 24 h prior to a challenging dose of carbon tetrachloride or acetaminophen decreased the resulting hepatotoxicity both in male and female mice as determined by histopathological examination and increases in serum enzyme activities. In contrast, the renal toxicity of the challenging toxicants was elevated markedly in male, but not in female mice. Partial hepatectomy also induced similar changes in the hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of a challenging toxicant, suggesting that the contrasting response of male liver and kidney was associated with the reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity. Carbon tetrachloride pretreatment or partial hepatectomy decreased the hepatic xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme activities in both sexes but elevated the renal p-nitrophenol hydroxylase, p-nitroanisole O-demethylase and aminopyrine N-demethylase activities significantly only in male mice. Increases in Cyp2e1 and Cyp2b expression were also evident in male kidney. Castration of males or testosterone administration to females diminished the sex-related differences in the renal response to an acute liver injury. The results indicate that reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity induced by liver injury may render secondary target organs susceptible to chemical substances activated in these organs. This effect may be sex-specific. It is also suggested that an integrated approach should be taken for proper assessment of chemical hazards.

  20. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iaccarino, Vittorio Venetucci, Pietro

    2012-12-15

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  1. Gender Equity in Materials Science and Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angus Rockett

    2008-12-01

    At the request of the University Materials Council, a national workshop was convened to examine 'Gender Equity Issues in Materials Science and Engineering.' The workshop considered causes of the historic underrepresentation of women in materials science and engineering (MSE), with a goal of developing strategies to increase the gender diversity of the discipline in universities and national laboratories. Specific workshop objectives were to examine efforts to level the playing field, understand implicit biases, develop methods to minimize bias in all aspects of training and employment, and create the means to implement a broadly inclusive, family-friendly work environment in MSE departments. Held May 18-20, 2008, at the Conference Center at the University of Maryland, the workshop included heads and chairs of university MSE departments and representatives of the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (DOE-BES), and the national laboratories. The following recommendations are made based on the outcomes of the discussions at the workshop. Many or all of these apply equally well to universities and national laboratories and should be considered in context of industrial environments as well. First, there should be a follow-up process by which the University Materials Council (UMC) reviews the status of women in the field of MSE on a periodic basis and determines what additional changes should be made to accelerate progress in gender equity. Second, all departments should strengthen documentation and enforcement of departmental procedures such that hiring, promotion, compensation, and tenure decisions are more transparent, that the reasons why a candidate was not selected or promoted are clear, and that faculty are less able to apply their biases to personnel decisions. Third, all departments should strengthen mentoring of junior faculty. Fourth, all departments must raise awareness of gender biases and work to

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2014 Males 11 Females 2 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 2 EJ/EK 1 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 5 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 0 African American Female (AA F) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 10 White Female (W F) 2 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2014 Males 7 Females 7 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 7 GS 15 1 GS 14 2 GS 13 2 GS 10 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 4 White Female (W F) 5 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER

  4. Gender Trends in Radiation Oncology in the United States: A 30-Year Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, Awad A.; Egleston, Brian; Holliday, Emma; Eastwick, Gary; Takita, Cristiane; Jagsi, Reshma

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although considerable research exists regarding the role of women in the medical profession in the United States, little work has described the participation of women in academic radiation oncology. We examined women's participation in authorship of radiation oncology literature, a visible and influential activity that merits specific attention. Methods and Materials: We examined the gender of first and senior US physician-authors of articles published in the Red Journal in 1980, 1990, 2000, 2004, 2010, and 2012. The significance of trends over time was evaluated using logistic regression. Results were compared with female representation in journals of general medicine and other major medical specialties. Findings were also placed in the context of trends in the representation of women among radiation oncology faculty and residents over the past 3 decades, using Association of American Medical Colleges data. Results: The proportion of women among Red Journal first authors increased from 13.4% in 1980 to 29.7% in 2012, and the proportion among senior authors increased from 3.2% to 22.6%. The proportion of women among radiation oncology full-time faculty increased from 11% to 26.7% from 1980 to 2012. The proportion of women among radiation oncology residents increased from 27.1% to 33.3% from 1980 to 2010. Conclusions: Female first and senior authorship in the Red Journal has increased significantly, as has women's participation among full-time faculty, but women remain underrepresented among radiation oncology residents compared with their representation in the medical student body. Understanding such trends is necessary to develop appropriately targeted interventions to improve gender equity in radiation oncology.

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    25 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 13 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 1 African American Female (AA F) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 24 White Female (W F) 6 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Kansas City

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    17 Females 18 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 30 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 2 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 7 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 2 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 10 White Female (W F) 3 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Associate

  7. Management of Male Breast Cancer in the United States: A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Emma C.; DeWitt, Peter; Fisher, Christine M.; Rabinovitch, Rachel

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze the stage-specific management of male breast cancer (MBC) with surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and relate them to outcomes and to female breast cancer (FBC). Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried for all primary invasive MBC and FBC diagnosed from 1973 to 2008. Analyzable data included age, race, registry, grade, stage, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, type of surgery, and use of RT. Stage was defined as localized (LocD): confined to the breast; regional (RegD): involving skin, chest wall, and/or regional lymph nodes; and distant: M1. The primary endpoint was cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 4276 cases of MBC and 718,587 cases of FBC were identified. Male breast cancer constituted 0.6% of all breast cancer. Comparing MBC with FBC, mastectomy (M) was used in 87.4% versus 38.3%, and breast-conserving surgery in 12.6% versus 52.6% (P<10{sup ?4}). For males with LocD, CSS was not significantly different for the 4.6% treated with lumpectomy/RT versus the 70% treated with M alone (hazard ratio [HR] 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49-3.61; P=.57). Postmastectomy RT was delivered in 33% of males with RegD and was not associated with an improvement in CSS (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.88-1.41; P=.37). There was a significant increase in the use of postmastectomy RT in MBC over time: 24.3%, 27.2%, and 36.8% for 1973-1987, 1988-1997, and 1998-2008, respectively (P<.0001). Cause-specific survival for MBC has improved: the largest significant change was identified for men diagnosed in 1998-2008 compared with 1973-1987 (HR 0.73; 95% CI 0.60-0.88; P=.0004). Conclusions: Surgical management of MBC is dramatically different than for FBC. The majority of males with LocD receive M despite equivalent CSS with lumpectomy/RT. Postmastectomy RT is greatly underutilized in MBC with RegD, although a CSS benefit was not demonstrated. Outcomes for MBC are improving, attributable to improved

  8. Closing the Gender Gap in Energy Policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Closing the Gender Gap in Energy Policy Closing the Gender Gap in Energy Policy April 7, 2011 - 3:07pm Addthis Melanie A. Kenderdine Melanie A. Kenderdine Director of the Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis What are the key facts? There's not just a shortage of women in technical energy-related fields, there's also a shortage of women in energy policy. Women hold only 27 percent of the science and engineering jobs in the United States. Editor's Note: Join the conversation surrounding

  9. Beyond the Resume: Personal Journeys of Female LANL Engineers and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologists August » Panel Discussion: Beyond the Resume Beyond the Resume: Personal Journeys of Female LANL Engineers and Technologists WHEN: Aug 03, 2016 11:30 AM - 12:15 PM WHERE: UNM-LA Student Center CONTACT: Heidi Hahn 505 665-4606 CATEGORY: Community INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Hear career advice and personal journeys through professional challenges, career turning points, leadership contributions and more from female LANL engineers and technologists from both

  10. Differential regulation of apoptosis in slow and fast twitch muscles of aged female F344BN rats

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rice, Kevin M.; Manne, Nandini D. P. K.; Gadde, Murali K.; Paturi, Satyanarayana; Arvapalli, Ravikumar; Blough, Eric

    2015-03-28

    Age-related muscle atrophy is characterized by decreases in muscle mass and is thought be mediated, at least in part, by increases in myocyte apoptosis. Recent data has demonstrated that the degree of muscle loss with aging may differ between males and females while other work has suggested that apoptosis as indicated by DNA fragmentation may be regulated differently in fast- and slow-twitch muscles. Herein, we investigate how aging affects the regulation of muscle apoptosis in the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles of young (6-month), aged (26-month), and very aged (30-month) female Fischer 344/NNiaHSD × Brown Norway/BiNiamore » (F344BN) rats. Tissue sections were stained with hydroethidium for ROS and protein extract was subjected to immunoblotting for assessing apoptotic markers. Our data suggest that decreases in muscle mass were associated with increased DNA fragmentation (TUNEL positive) and increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) as determined by hydroethidium staining in both the EDL and soleus. Similar to our previous work using aged male animals, we observed that the time course and magnitude of changes in Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3, caspase-9, and cleavage of α-fodrin protein were regulated differently between muscles. As a result, These data suggest that aging in the female F344BN rat is associated with decreases in muscle mass, elevations in ROS level, increased muscle cell DNA fragmentation, and alterations in cell membrane integrity and that apoptotic mechanisms may differ between fiber types.« less

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    White Male (W M) 26 White Female (W F) 16 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Livermore Field ... YEARS OF FEDERAL SERVICE SUPERVISOR RATIO AGE Livermore Field Office As of March 22, 2014 ...

  12. Becky Chamberlin-Overcoming gender bias in science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Becky Chamberlin Becky Chamberlin-Overcoming gender bias in science A nuclear forensics chemist and nonproliferation expert, Chamberlin is helping bring forward a more comprehensive effort on the science of detecting nuclear weapons development. March 11, 2014 Becky Chamberlin A nuclear forensics chemist and nonproliferation expert, Chamberlin is helping bring forward a more comprehensive effort on the science of detecting nuclear weapons development. Chamberlin says. "I think character,

  13. Age and gender specific biokinetic model for strontium in humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2015-03-01

    A biokinetic model for strontium in humans is necessary for quantification of internal doses due to strontium radioisotopes. The ICRP-recommended biokinetic model for strontium has limitation for use in a population study, because it is not gender specific and does not cover all age ranges. The extensive Techa River data set on 90Sr in humans (tens of thousands of measurements) is a unique source of data on long-term strontium retention for men and women of all ages at intake. These, as well as published data, were used for evaluation of age- and gender-specific parameters for a new compartment biokinetic model for strontium (Sr-AGe model). The Sr-AGe model has similar structure as the ICRP model for the alkaline earth elements. The following parameters were mainly reevaluated: gastro-intestinal absorption and parameters related to the processes of bone formation and resorption defining calcium and strontium transfers in skeletal compartments. The Sr-AGe model satisfactorily describes available data sets on strontium retention for different kinds of intake (dietary and intravenous) at different ages (080 years old) and demonstrates good agreement with data sets for different ethnic groups. The Sr-AGe model can be used for dose assessment in epidemiological studies of general population exposed to ingested strontium radioisotopes.

  14. Short-term exposure to 17alpha-ethynylestradiol decreases the fertility of sexually maturing male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Irv R.; Skillman, Ann D.; Nicolas, Jean-Marc; Cyr, Daniel G.; Nagler, James J.

    2003-06-01

    The synthetic estrogen 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2) is a commonly used oral contraceptive that has been increasingly detected in sewage effluents. This study determined whether EE2 exposure adversely affected reproduction in sexually maturing male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We exposed male trout to graded water concentrations of EE2 (10, 100, and 1,000 ng/ L) for 62 d leading up to the time of spawning. Semen and blood plasma samples were removed from each fish. Semen was used to fertilize groups of eggs from one nonexposed female. As a measure of fertility, eggs were incubated for 28 d after fertilization to determine the proportion that attained the eyed stage of embryonic development. Additional endpoints also measured included sperm motility, spermatocrit, gonadosomatic and hepatosomatic indices, testis histology, and circulating plasma levels of the sex steroids 17alpha, 20beta-dihydroxyprogesterone (17,20-DHP) and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). Exposure to 1,000 ng/L of EE2 caused complete mortality of the treatment group by day 57. Exposure to lower EE2 water concentrations (10 and 100 ng/L) caused an increase in sperm density, while a significant reduction in testis mass was observed only in the 100-ng/L exposure group. Most significantly, semen harvested from fish exposed to 10 and 100 ng/L EE2 caused an approximately 50% reduction in the number of eggs attaining the eyed stage of embryonic development. Plasma levels of 17,20-DHP in exposed fish were roughly twice the level of the controls, while levels of 11-KT were significantly reduced in fish exposed to 100 ng/L EE2. These results suggest that sexually maturing male rainbow trout are susceptible to detrimental reproductive effects of short-term exposures to environmentally relevant levels of EE2.

  15. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruheim, Kjersti, E-mail: Kjersti.bruheim@medisin.uio.n [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Guren, Marianne G. [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Dahl, Alv A. [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Clinical Cancer Research, the Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Skovlund, Eva [School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Balteskard, Lise [University Hospital of Northern Norway, Tromso (Norway); Carlsen, Erik [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Ulleval, Oslo (Norway); Fossa, Sophie D. [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Clinical Cancer Research, the Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Tveit, Kjell Magne [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  16. Gender differences in cadmium and cotinine levels in prepubertal children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fucic, A.; Plavec, D; Casteleyn, L.; Aerts, D.; Biot, P.; Katsonouri, A.; Cerna, M.; Knudsen, L.E.; Castano, A.; Rudnai, P.; Gutleb, A.; Ligocka, D.; Lupsa, I-R.; Berglund, M.; Horvat, M.; Halzlova, K.; Schoeters, G.; Koppen, G.; Hadjipanayis, A.; Krskova, A.; and others

    2015-08-15

    Susceptibility to environmental stressors has been described for fetal and early childhood development. However, the possible susceptibility of the prepubertal period, characterized by the orchestration of the organism towards sexual maturation and adulthood has been poorly investigated and exposure data are scarce. In the current study levels of cadmium (Cd), cotinine and creatinine in urine were analyzed in a subsample 216 children from 12 European countries within the DEMOCOPHES project. The children were divided into six age–sex groups: boys (6–8 years, 9–10 years and 11 years old), and girls (6–7 years, 8–9 years, 10–11 years). The number of subjects per group was between 23 and 53. The cut off values were set at 0.1 µg/L for Cd, and 0.8 µg/L for cotinine defined according to the highest limit of quantification. The levels of Cd and cotinine were adjusted for creatinine level. In the total subsample group, the median level of Cd was 0.180 µg/L (range 0.10–0.69 µg/L), and for cotinine the median wet weight value was 1.50 µg/L (range 0.80–39.91 µg/L). There was no significant difference in creatinine and cotinine levels between genders and age groups. There was a significant correlation between levels of cadmium and creatinine in all children of both genders. This shows that even at such low levels the possible effect of cadmium on kidney function was present and measurable. An increase in Cd levels was evident with age. Cadmium levels were significantly different between 6–7 year old girls, 11 year old boys and 10–11 year old girls. As there was a balanced distribution in the number of subjects from countries included in the study, bias due to data clustering was not probable. The impact of low Cd levels on kidney function and gender differences in Cd levels needs further investigation. - Highlights: • In 216 children from 6 to 11 years old the median level of Cd was 0.18 µg/L. • The median level of cotinine was 1.50 µg/L.

  17. Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

    2003-08-01

    The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

  18. Tracking the sources of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in birds: Foraging in waste management facilities results in higher DecaBDE exposure in males

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentes, Marie-Line; Mazerolle, Marc J.; Giroux, Jean-François; Patenaude-Monette, Martin; and others

    2015-04-15

    Differences in feeding ecology are now recognized as major determinants of inter-individual variations in contaminant profiles of free-ranging animals, but exceedingly little attention has been devoted to the role of habitat use. Marked inter-individual variations and high levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (e.g., DecaBDE) have previously been documented in ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis) breeding in a colony near Montreal (QC, Canada). However, the environmental sources of these compounds, and thus the reasons causing these large inter-individual variations remain unidentified. In the present study, we used GPS-based telemetry (±5 to 10 m precision) to track ring-billed gulls from this colony to reconstruct their movements at the landscape level. We related habitat use of individual gulls (n=76) to plasma concentrations (ng/g ww) and relative contributions (percentages) to Σ{sub 38}PBDEs of major congeners in the internationally restricted PentaBDE and current-use DecaBDE mixtures. Male gulls that visited waste management facilities (WMFs; i.e., landfills, wastewater treatment plants and related facilities; 25% of all GPS-tracked males) exhibited greater DecaBDE (concentrations and percentages) and lower PentaBDE (percentages) relative to those that did not. In contrast, no such relationships were found in females. Moreover, in males, DecaBDE (concentrations and percentages) increased with percentages of time spent in WMFs (i.e., ~5% of total foraging time), while PentaBDE (percentages) decreased. No relationships between percentages of time spent in other habitats (i.e., urban areas, agriculture fields, and St. Lawrence River) were found in either sex. These findings suggest that animals breeding in the vicinity of WMFs as well as mobile species that only use these sites for short stopovers to forage, could be at risk of enhanced DecaBDE exposure. - Highlights: • The study was conducted on breeding gulls with high levels of flame

  19. President Obama Signs New Directive to Strengthen our Work to Advance Gender Equality Worldwide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Today, President Obama took a critical step to institutionalize gender equality efforts by signing a Presidential Memorandum to strengthen and expand U.S. government capacity and coordination across all agencies to better promote gender equality and empower women and girls. In the Memorandum, President Obama reaffirmed that “promoting gender equality and advancing the status of all women and girls around the world remains one of the greatest unmet challenges of our time, and one that is vital to achieving our overall foreign policy objectives.”

  20. Repeated in utero and lactational 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin exposure affects male gonads in offspring, leading to sex ratio changes in F{sub 2} progeny

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeda, Masahiko . E-mail: ikedam@ys2.u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp; Tamura, Masashi; Yamashita, Junko; Suzuki, Chinatsu; Tomita, Takako

    2005-08-15

    The effects of in utero and lactational 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the reproductive system of male rat offspring (F{sub 1}) and the sex ratio of the subsequent generation (F{sub 2}) were examined. Female Holtzman rats were gavaged with an initial loading dose of 400 ng/kg TCDD prior to mating, followed by weekly maintenance doses of 80 ng/kg during mating, pregnancy, and the lactation period. Maternal exposure to TCDD had no significant effects on fetus/pup (F{sub 1}) mortality, litter size, or sex ratio on gestation day (GD) 20 or postnatal day (PND) 2. The TCDD concentration in maternal livers and adipose tissue on GD20 was 1.21 and 1.81 ng/kg, respectively, and decreased at weaning to 0.72 in the liver and 0.84 in the adipose tissue. In contrast, the TCDD concentration in pup livers was 1.32 ng/kg on PND2 and increased to 1.80 ng/kg at weaning. Ventral prostate weight of male offspring was significantly decreased by TCDD exposure on PND28 and 120 compared with that of controls. Weight of the testes, cauda epididymides, and seminal vesicle, and sperm number in the cauda epididymis were not changed by TCDD exposure at PND120. TCDD- or vehicle-exposed male offspring were mated with unexposed females. The sex ratio (percentage of male pups) of F{sub 2} offspring was significantly reduced in the TCDD-exposed group compared with controls. These results suggest that in utero and lactational TCDD exposures affect the development of male gonads in offspring (F{sub 1}), leading to changes in the sex ratio of the subsequent generation (F{sub 2})

  1. High-dose radioiodine treatment for differentiated thyroid carcinoma is not associated with change in female fertility or any genetic risk to the offspring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bal, Chandrasekhar . E-mail: csbal@hotmail.com; Kumar, Ajay; Tripathi, Madhavi; Chandrashekar, Narayana; Phom, Hentok; Murali, Nadig R.; Chandra, Prem; Pant, Gauri S.

    2005-10-01

    Background: We tried to evaluate the female fertility and genetic risk to the offspring from the exposure to high-dose {sup 131}I by assessing the pregnancy outcomes and health status of the children of female patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who had received therapeutic doses of {sup 131}I. Materials and Methods: From 1967 to 2002, a total of 1,282 women had been treated with {sup 131}I. Of these patients, 692 (54%) were in the reproductive age group (18-45 years). Forty women had a total of 50 pregnancies after high-dose {sup 131}I. Age at presentation ranged from 16 to 36 years (mean, 23 {+-} 4 years). Histopathology was papillary thyroid cancer in 32 cases and follicular thyroid cancer in 8 cases. Results: Single high-dose therapy was given in 30 cases, 2 doses were given in 7 cases, 3 doses were given in 2 cases, and four doses were given in 1 case in which lung metastases had occurred. In 37 patients (92%), disease was successfully ablated before pregnancy. Ovarian absorbed-radiation dose calculated by the MIRD method ranged from 3.5 to 60 cGy (mean, 12 {+-} 11 cGy). The interval between {sup 131}I therapy and pregnancy varied from 7 to 120 months (37.4 {+-} 28.2 months). Three spontaneous abortions occurred in 2 women. Forty-seven babies (20 females and 27 males) were born. Forty-four babies were healthy with normal birth weight and normal developmental milestones. Twenty women delivered their first baby after {sup 131}I therapy. The youngest child in our series is 11 months of age, and the oldest is 8.5 years of age. Conclusions: Female fertility is not affected by high-dose radioiodine treatment, and the therapy does not appear to be associated with any genetic risks to the offspring.

  2. Female Pelvic Vein Embolization: Indications, Techniques, and Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Anthony James

    2015-08-15

    Until recently, the main indication for pelvic vein embolization (PVE) in women was to treat pelvic venous congestion syndrome (PVC) but increasingly, patients with refluxing pelvic veins associated with leg varicosities are also being treated. A more unusual reason for PVE is to treat pelvic venous malformations, although such lesions may be treated with sclerotherapy alone. Embolotherapy for treating PVC has been performed for many years with several published studies included in this review, whilst an emerging indication for PVE is to treat lower limb varicosities associated with pelvic vein reflux. Neither group, however, has been subjected to an adequate randomized, controlled trial. Consequently, some of the information presented in this review should be considered anecdotal (level III evidence) at this stage, and a satisfactory ‘proof’ of clinical efficacy remains deficient until higher-level evidence is presented. Furthermore, a wide range of techniques not accepted by all are used, and some standardization will be required based on future mandatory prospective studies. Large studies have also clearly shown an unacceptably high recurrence rate of leg varicose veins following venous surgery. Furthermore, minimally or non-invasive imaging is now revealing that there is a refluxing pelvic venous source in a significant percentage of women with de novo leg varicose veins, and many more with recurrent varicosities. Considering that just over half the world’s population is female and a significant number of women not only have pelvic venous reflux, but also have associated leg varicosities, minimally invasive treatment of pelvic venous incompetence will become a common procedure.

  3. A unique nuclear receptor direct repeat 17 (DR17) is present within the upstream region of Schistosoma mansoni female-specific p14 gene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fantappie, Marcelo Rosado Furtado, Daniel Rodrigues; Rumjanek, Franklin David; LoVerde, Philip T.

    2008-07-11

    The eggs produced by sexually mature female Schistosma mansoni are responsible for the pathogenesis of the disease. The eggshell precursor gene p14 is expressed only in the vitelline cells of sexually mature female worms in response to a yet unidentified male stimulus. Herein, we report the identification of a novel nuclear receptor response element in the upstream region of the p14 gene. This element contains the canonical hexameric DNA core motif, 5'-PuGGTCA, composed of an atypically spaced direct repeat (DR17). Schistosome nuclear receptors SmRXR1 and SmNR1 specifically bound to the p14-DR17 element as a heterodimer. SmRXR1, but not SmNR1, bound to the motif as a monomer. Introduction of mutations in the TCA core sequence completely abolished the binding by SmRXR1/SmNR1 heterodimer. This finding supports our hypothesis that the expression of Schistosoma mansonip14 gene is regulated through the nuclear receptor signaling pathway.

  4. Fluorochemicals used in food packaging inhibit male sex hormone synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenmai, A.K.; Nielsen, F.K.; Pedersen, M.; Hadrup, N.; Trier, X.; Christensen, J.H.; Vinggaard, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    synthesis of male sex hormones. ► Generally, levels of estrogens and cortisol stayed unaffected or increased. ► The effect on steroid synthesis was specific on gene expression of Bzrp and CYP19.

  5. Skewed X-inactivation in a tumor tissue from a female patient with leiomyomatosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishino, T.; Jinno, Y.; Niikawa, N.

    1995-07-17

    Leiomyomatosis (multiple leiomyomas) is characterized by benign smooth muscle cell proliferations in the esophagus, tracheobronchial tree, and female genital tract. At least 3 genetically different hereditary leiomyomatoses have been identified. Among them, an X-linked leiomyomatosis is often associated with an Alport syndrome-like nephropathy. It has remained obscure whether the leiomyomata occur monoclonally or polyclonally. The clonality of various malignancies has been examined by analysis of X-inactivation patterns in female patients heterozygous for polymorphic alleles of X-linked genes. We examined the clonality of a leiomyoma in a female patient by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based X-inactivation assay. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Structural insight into the regulation of MOF in the male-specific...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structural insight into the regulation of MOF in the male-specific lethal complex and the non-specific lethal complex Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural insight ...

  7. WE-E-BRE-01: An Image-Based Skeletal Dosimetry Model for the ICRP Reference Adult Female - Internal Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Reilly, S; Maynard, M; Marshall, E; Bolch, W; Sinclair, L; Rajon, D; Wayson, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Limitations seen in previous skeletal dosimetry models, which are still employed in commonly used software today, include the lack of consideration of electron escape and cross-fire from cortical bone, the modeling of infinite spongiosa, the disregard of the effect of varying cellularity on active marrow self-irradiation, and the lack of use of the more recent ICRP definition of a 50 micron surrogate tissue region for the osteoprogenitor cells - shallow marrow. These limitations were addressed in the present dosimetry model. Methods: Electron transport was completed to determine specific absorbed fractions to active marrow and shallow marrow of the skeletal regions of the adult female. The bone macrostructure was obtained from the whole-body hybrid computational phantom of the UF series of reference phantoms, while the bone microstructure was derived from microCT images of skeletal region samples taken from a 45 year-old female cadaver. The target tissue regions were active marrow and shallow marrow. The source tissues were active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surfaces, cortical bone volume and cortical bone surfaces. The marrow cellularity was varied from 10 to 100 percent for active marrow self-irradiation. A total of 33 discrete electron energies, ranging from 1 keV to 10 MeV, were either simulated or modeled analytically. Results: The method of combining macro- and microstructure absorbed fractions calculated using MCNPX electron transport was found to yield results similar to those determined with the PIRT model for the UF adult male in the Hough et al. study. Conclusion: The calculated skeletal averaged absorbed fractions for each source-target combination were found to follow similar trends of more recent dosimetry models (image-based models) and did not follow current models used in nuclear medicine dosimetry at high energies (due to that models use of an infinite expanse of trabecular spongiosa)

  8. Fetal and neonatal exposure to nicotine leads to augmented hepatic and circulating triglycerides in adult male offspring due to increased expression of fatty acid synthase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Noelle; Nicholson, Catherine J.; Wong, Michael; Holloway, Alison C.; Hardy, Daniel B.

    2014-02-15

    While nicotine replacement therapy is assumed to be a safer alternative to smoking during pregnancy, the long-term consequences for the offspring remain elusive. Animal studies now suggest that maternal nicotine exposure during perinatal life leads to a wide range of adverse outcomes for the offspring including increased adiposity. The focus of this study was to investigate if nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation leads to alterations in hepatic triglyceride synthesis. Female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to receive daily subcutaneous injections of saline (vehicle) or nicotine bitartrate (1 mg/kg/day) for two weeks prior to mating until weaning. At postnatal day 180 (PND 180), nicotine exposed offspring exhibited significantly elevated levels of circulating and hepatic triglycerides in the male offspring. This was concomitant with increased expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), the critical hepatic enzyme in de novo triglyceride synthesis. Given that FAS is regulated by the nuclear receptor Liver X receptor (LXR?), we measured LXR? expression in both control and nicotine-exposed offspring. Nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation led to an increase in hepatic LXR? protein expression and enriched binding to the putative LXRE element on the FAS promoter in PND 180 male offspring. This was also associated with significantly enhanced acetylation of histone H3 [K9,14] surrounding the FAS promoter, a hallmark of chromatin activation. Collectively, these findings suggest that nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation leads to an increase in circulating and hepatic triglycerides long-term via changes in the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of the hepatic lipogenic pathway. - Highlights: Our data reveals the links nicotine exposure in utero and long-term hypertriglyceridemia. It is due to nicotine-induced augmented expression of hepatic FAS and LXR? activity. Moreover, this involves nicotine-induced enhanced acetylation of

  9. Daily movements of female white-tailed deer relative to parturition and breeding.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gino J. D'Angelo; Christopher E. Comer; John C. Kilgo; Cory D. Drennan; David A. Osborn; Karl V. Miller

    2005-10-01

    Abstract: To assess how white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) herd demographics influence reproductive behaviors, we examined 24-h diel movements of female whitetailed deer relative to parturition and breeding in a low-density population with a near even sex ratio at the Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina. We conducted a series of intensive, 24-h radio-tracking periods of 13 females during spring and fall 2002. We compared daily range (ha), rate of travel (m/h), and distance between extreme daily locations (m), among the periods of pre-parturition and post-parturition and pre-, peak-, and post-rut. From pre-parturition to post-parturition, we observed decreases in diel range size (?¢????38.2%), distance between extreme diel locations (?¢????17.0%), and diel rate of travel (?¢????18.2%). Diel range size, distance between extreme diel locations, and diel rate of travel during the pre-rut and rut exceeded those observed during post-rut. We further identified substantial increases in mobility during 12 24-h diel periods for eight females during our fall monitoring. Our data suggest that female white-tailed deer reduce mobility post-fawning following exaggerated movements during pre-parturition. Furthermore, despite a near equal sex ratio, estrous does may be required to actively seek potential mates due to low population density.

  10. Mutation analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in a male breast cancer population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, L.S.; Gayther, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J.

    1997-02-01

    A population-based series of 54 male breast cancer cases from Southern California were analyzed for germ-line mutations in the inherited breast/ovarian cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Nine (17%) of the patients had a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer in at least one first-degree relative. A further seven (13%) of the patients reported breast/ovarian cancer in at least one second-degree relative and in no first-degree relatives. No germ-line BRCA1 mutations were found. Two male breast cancer patients (4% of the total) were found to carry novel truncating mutations in the BRCA2 gene. Only one of the two male breast cancer patients carrying a BRCA2 mutation had a family history of cancer, with one case of ovarian cancer in a first-degree relative. The remaining eight cases (89%) of male breast cancer with a family history of breast/ovarian cancer in first-degree relatives remain unaccounted for by mutations in either the BRCA1 gene or the BRCA2 gene. 23 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. Anthropometry for WorldSID, a World-Harmonized Midsize Male Side Impact Crash Dummy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Moss; Z. Wang; M. Salloum; M. Reed; M. Van Ratingen; D. Cesari; R. Scherer; T. Uchimura; M. Beusenberg

    2000-06-19

    The WorldSID project is a global effort to design a new generation side impact crash test dummy under the direction of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The first WorldSID crash dummy will represent a world-harmonized mid-size adult male. This paper discusses the research and rationale undertaken to define the anthropometry of a world standard midsize male in the typical automotive seated posture. Various anthropometry databases are compared region by region and in terms of the key dimensions needed for crash dummy design. The Anthropometry for Motor Vehicle Occupants (AMVO) dataset, as established by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI), is selected as the basis for the WorldSID mid-size male, updated to include revisions to the pelvis bone location. The proposed mass of the dummy is 77.3kg with full arms. The rationale for the selected mass is discussed. The joint location and surface landmark database is appended to this paper.

  12. Metabolomics reveals metabolic changes in male reproductive cells exposed to thirdhand smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Bo; Chen, Minjian; Yao, Mengmeng; Ji, Xiaoli; Mao, Zhilei; Tang, Wei; Qiao, Shanlei; Schick, Suzaynn F.; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hang, Bo; Xia, Yankai

    2015-10-22

    Thirdhand smoke (THS) is a new term for the toxins in cigarette smoke that linger in the environment long after the cigarettes are extinguished. The effects of THS exposure on male reproduction have not yet been studied. In this study, metabolic changes in male germ cell lines (GC-2 and TM-4) were analyzed after THS treatment for 24 h. THS-loaded chromatography paper samples were generated in a laboratory chamber system and extracted in DMEM. At a paper: DMEM ratio of 50 μg/ml, cell viability in both cell lines was normal, as measured by the MTT assay and markers of cytotoxicity, cell cycle, apoptosis and ROS production were normal as measured by quantitative immunofluorescence. Metabolomic analysis was performed on methanol extracts of GC-2 and TM-4 cells. Furthermore, glutathione metabolism in GC-2 cells, and nucleic acid and ammonia metabolism in TM-4 cells, was changed significantly by THS treatment. RT-PCR analyses of mRNA for enzyme genes Gss and Ggt in GC-2 cells, and TK, SMS and Glna in TM-4 cells reinforced these findings, showing changes in the levels of enzymes involved in the relevant pathways. In conclusion, exposure to THS at very low concentrations caused distinct metabolic changes in two different types of male reproductive cell lines.

  13. Metabolomics reveals metabolic changes in male reproductive cells exposed to thirdhand smoke

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Bo; Chen, Minjian; Yao, Mengmeng; Ji, Xiaoli; Mao, Zhilei; Tang, Wei; Qiao, Shanlei; Schick, Suzaynn F.; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hang, Bo; et al

    2015-10-22

    Thirdhand smoke (THS) is a new term for the toxins in cigarette smoke that linger in the environment long after the cigarettes are extinguished. The effects of THS exposure on male reproduction have not yet been studied. In this study, metabolic changes in male germ cell lines (GC-2 and TM-4) were analyzed after THS treatment for 24 h. THS-loaded chromatography paper samples were generated in a laboratory chamber system and extracted in DMEM. At a paper: DMEM ratio of 50 μg/ml, cell viability in both cell lines was normal, as measured by the MTT assay and markers of cytotoxicity, cellmore » cycle, apoptosis and ROS production were normal as measured by quantitative immunofluorescence. Metabolomic analysis was performed on methanol extracts of GC-2 and TM-4 cells. Furthermore, glutathione metabolism in GC-2 cells, and nucleic acid and ammonia metabolism in TM-4 cells, was changed significantly by THS treatment. RT-PCR analyses of mRNA for enzyme genes Gss and Ggt in GC-2 cells, and TK, SMS and Glna in TM-4 cells reinforced these findings, showing changes in the levels of enzymes involved in the relevant pathways. In conclusion, exposure to THS at very low concentrations caused distinct metabolic changes in two different types of male reproductive cell lines.« less

  14. DIFFERENTIAL SENSITIVITY OF MALE GERM CELLS TO MAINSTREAM AND SIDESTREAM TOBACCO SMOKE IN THE MOUSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polyzos, Aris; Schmid, Thomas Ernst; Pina-Guzman, Belem; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Marchetti, Francesco

    2009-03-13

    Cigarette smoking in men has been associated with increased chromosomal abnormalities in sperm and with increased risks for spontaneous abortions, birth defects and neonatal death. Little is known, however, about the reproductive consequences of paternal exposure to second-hand smoke. We used a mouse model to investigate the effects of paternal exposure to sidestream (SS) smoke, the main constituent of second-hand smoke, on the genetic integrity and function of sperm, and to determine whether male germ cells were equally sensitive to mainstream (MS) and SS smoke. A series of sperm DNA quality and reproductive endpoints were investigated after exposing male mice for two weeks to MS or SS smoke. Our results indicated that: (i) only SS smoke significantly affected sperm motility; (ii) only MS smoke induced DNA strand breaks in sperm; (iii) both MS and SS smoke increased sperm chromatin structure abnormalities; and (iv) MS smoke affected both fertilization and the rate of early embryonic development, while SS smoke affected fertilization only. These results show that MS and SS smoke have differential effects on the genetic integrity and function of sperm and provide further evidence that male exposure to second-hand smoke, as well as direct cigarette smoke, may diminish a couple's chance for a successful pregnancy and the birth of a healthy baby.

  15. Estrous cycle affects the neurochemical and neurobehavioral profile of carvacrol-treated female rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trabace, L.; Zotti, M.; Morgese, M.G.; Tucci, P.; Colaianna, M.; Schiavone, S.; Avato, P.; Cuomo, V.

    2011-09-01

    Carvacrol is the major constituent of essential oils from aromatic plants. It showed antimicrobial, anticancer and antioxidant properties. Although it was approved for food use and included in the chemical flavorings list, no indication on its safety has been estimated. Since the use of plant extracts is relatively high among women, aim of this study was to evaluate carvacrol effects on female physiology and endocrine profiles by using female rats in proestrus and diestrus phases. Serotonin and metabolite tissue content in prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens, after carvacrol administration (0.15 and 0.45 g/kg p.o.), was measured. Drug effects in behavioral tests for alterations in motor activity, depression, anxiety-related behaviors and endocrine alterations were also investigated. While in proestrus carvacrol reduced serotonin and metabolite levels in both brain areas, no effects were observed in diestrus phase. Only in proestrus phase, carvacrol induced a depressive-like behavior in forced swimming test, without accompanying changes in ambulation. The improvement of performance in FST after subchronic treatment with fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) suggested a specific involvement of serotonergic system. No differences were found across the groups with regard to self-grooming behavior. Moreover, in proestrus phase, carvacrol reduced only estradiol levels without binding hypothalamic estradiol receptors. Our study showed an estrous-stage specific effect of carvacrol on depressive behaviors and endocrine parameters, involving serotonergic system. Given the wide carvacrol use not only as feed additive, but also as cosmetic essence and herbal remedy, our results suggest that an accurate investigation on the effects of its chronic exposure is warranted. - Highlights: > Carvacrol induced a depressive-like phenotype in rats, depending on ovarian cyclicity. > Carvacrol selectively reduced serotonin content in female rats in proestrus phase. > Carvacrol reduced serotonin levels

  16. Protection of the female reproductive system from natural and artificial insults

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tilly, Jonathan L.; Kolesnick, Richard N.

    2010-12-14

    Described are methods for protecting the female reproductive system against natural and artificial insults by administering to women a composition comprising an agent that antagonizes one or more acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) gene products. Specifically, methods disclosed herein serve to protect women's germline from damage resulting from cancer therapy regimens including chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In one aspect, the method preserves, enhances, or revives ovarian function in women, by administering to women a composition containing sphingosine-1-phosphate, or an analog thereof. Also disclosed are methods to prevent or ameliorate menopausal syndromes and to improve in vitro fertilization techniques.

  17. Increased bile acids in enterohepatic circulation by short-term calorie restriction in male mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2013-12-15

    Previous studies showed glucose and insulin signaling can regulate bile acid (BA) metabolism during fasting or feeding. However, limited knowledge is available on the effect of calorie restriction (CR), a well-known anti-aging intervention, on BA homeostasis. To address this, the present study utilized a doseresponse model of CR, where male C57BL/6 mice were fed 0, 15, 30, or 40% CR diets for one month, followed by BA profiling in various compartments of the enterohepatic circulation by UPLC-MS/MS technique. This study showed that 40% CR increased the BA pool size (162%) as well as total BAs in serum, gallbladder, and small intestinal contents. In addition, CR dose-dependently increased the concentrations of tauro-cholic acid (TCA) and many secondary BAs (produced by intestinal bacteria) in serum, such as tauro-deoxycholic acid (TDCA), DCA, lithocholic acid, ?-muricholic acid (?MCA), and hyodeoxycholic acid. Notably, 40% CR increased TDCA by over 1000% (serum, liver, and gallbladder). Interestingly, 40% CR increased the proportion of 12?-hydroxylated BAs (CA and DCA), which correlated with improved glucose tolerance and lipid parameters. The CR-induced increase in BAs correlated with increased expression of BA-synthetic (Cyp7a1) and conjugating enzymes (BAL), and the ileal BA-binding protein (Ibabp). These results suggest that CR increases BAs in male mice possibly through orchestrated increases in BA synthesis and conjugation in liver as well as intracellular transport in ileum. - Highlights: Dose response effects of short-term CR on BA homeostasis in male mice. CR increased the BA pool size and many individual BAs. CR altered BA composition (increased proportion of 12?-hydroxylated BAs). Increased mRNAs of BA enzymes in liver (Cyp7a1 and BAL) and ileal BA binding protein.

  18. Impact of Radiotherapy on Fertility, Pregnancy, and Neonatal Outcomes in Female Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation has many potential long-term effects on cancer survivors. Female cancer patients may experience decreased fertility depending on the site irradiated. Oncologists should be aware of these consequences and discuss options for fertility preservation before initiating therapy. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive review of the existing literature was conducted. Studies reporting the outcomes for female patients treated with cranio-spinal, abdominal, or pelvic radiation reporting fertility, pregnancy, or neonatal-related outcomes were reviewed. Results: Cranio-spinal irradiation elicited significant hormonal changes in women that affected their ability to become pregnant later in life. Women treated with abdomino-pelvic radiation have an increased rate of uterine dysfunction leading to miscarriage, preterm labor, low birth weight, and placental abnormalities. Early menopause results from low-dose ovarian radiation. Ovarian transposition may decrease the rates of ovarian dysfunction. Conclusions: There is a dose-dependent relationship between ovarian radiation therapy (RT) and premature menopause. Patients treated with RT must be aware of the impact of treatment on fertility and explore appropriate options.

  19. Atrazine-induced reproductive tract alterations after transplacental and/or lactational exposure in male Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, Jennifer L.; Enoch, Rolondo R.; Wolf, Douglas C.; Fenton, Suzanne E. . E-mail: fenton.suzanne@epa.gov

    2007-02-01

    Studies showed that early postnatal exposure to the herbicide atrazine (ATR) delayed preputial separation (PPS) and increased incidence of prostate inflammation in adult Wistar rats. A cross-fostering paradigm was used in this study to determine if gestational exposure to ATR would also result in altered puberty and reproductive tissue effects in the male rat. Timed-pregnant Long-Evans (LE) rats were dosed by gavage on gestational days (GD) 15-19 with 100 mg ATR/kg body weight (BW) or 1% methylcellulose (controls, C). On postnatal day (PND)1, half litters were cross-fostered, creating 4 treatment groups; C-C, ATR-C, C-ATR, and ATR-ATR (transplacental-milk as source, respectively). On PND4, male offspring in the ATR-ATR group weighed significantly less than the C-C males. ATR-ATR male pups had significantly delayed preputial separation (PPS). BWs at PPS for C-ATR and ATR-ATR males were reduced by 6% and 9%, respectively, from that of C-C. On PND120, lateral prostate weights of males in the ATR-ATR group were significantly increased over C-C. Histological examination of lateral and ventral prostates identified an increased distribution of inflammation in the lateral prostates of C-ATR males. By PND220, lateral prostate weights were significantly increased for ATR-C and ATR-ATR, but there were no significant changes in inflammation in either the lateral or ventral prostate. These results suggest that in LE rats, gestational ATR exposure delays PPS when male offspring suckle an ATR dam, but leads to increased lateral prostate weight via transplacental exposure alone. Inflammation present at PND120 does not increase in severity with time.

  20. Dose-response relationships for female radium dial workers: A new look

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, R.E.

    1994-05-01

    The values of initial systemic intake and of skeletal dose for all of the U.S. radium cases have recently been revised. This revision was required following the demonstrations by Rundo and by Keane that humans who were exposed to radium as adults lost radium at a rate that depended on the quantity of radium originally deposited within their bodies. These new values have been used to define new dose-response relationships for both the bone sarcomas and the carcinomas arising in the paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells induced by internally deposited radium. The population examined was employed in the U.S. dial painting industry prior to 1950 and consisted of 1530 female dial workers for whom radium body burden measurements were available. By the end of 1990, 46 cases of bone sarcomas and 19 cases of head carcinomas had been diagnosed in this cohort. The head carcinoma incidence can be adequately fitted by a simple linear function, as was found in previous analyses. The bone sarcoma cases were previously fitted by a dose-squared-exponential function. With the revised values of systemic intake, the sarcoma results could not be satisfactorily fitted with this expression. When the exponent on D was increased to larger values, excellent fits were obtained.

  1. The effects of UCP-1 polymorphisms on obesity phenotypes among Korean female subjects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Hyoung Doo; Kim, Kil Soo; Cha, Min Ho; Yoon, Yoosik . E-mail: ysyoon66@naver.com

    2005-09-23

    Three SNPs of UCP-1 including A-3826G, A-1766G, and Ala64Thr (G+1068A) were genotyped among 453 overweight Korean female subjects recruited from an obesity clinic. Four common haplotypes with frequency greater than 0.04 were constructed with three SNPs. For an accurate evaluation of the effects of UCP-1 polymorphism on body fat accumulation, all subjects were tested using computerized tomography to measure the cross-sectional fat tissue areas at abdominal and distal part of the body. By statistical analyses, ht4[GAA] showed a significant association with decreased abdominal fat tissue area (P = 0.02, dominant model), fat tissue area at thigh (P = 0.008, dominant model), body fat mass (P = 0.002, dominant model), and waist-to-hip ratio (P = 0.01, dominant model). In addition, ht3[GAG] was associated with the accelerated reduction of waist-to-hip ratio and body fat mass by very low calorie diet among subjects who finished one-month-weight control program (P = 0.05-0.006)

  2. Comparative pharmacokinetic study of the role of gender and developmental differences in occupational and environmental exposure to benzene. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.A.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, it shows that physiological differences between men and women result in gender-specific exposures with respect to benzene. Second, it assesses the potential for a lactating woman's occupational and personal benzene exposure to impact a nursing infant's exposure, highlighting the possibility of subjecting an infant to the effects of industrial chemicals via breast feeding. This study employs physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to investigate the influence of physiological parameters and to evaluate the ability of inhaled benzene to transfer from mother to infant through breastmilk. The models are run through scenarios that simulate occupational, smoking, and background exposures. The gender comparison is facilitated by a sensitivity analysis. The blood/air partition coefficient and maximum velocity of metabolism were found to substantially impact model output. These values were both higher in women and caused an increase in the percentage of benzene metabolized in all of the exposure scenarios. The study of lactating women and infants is essentially theoretical. There is evidence that over 65% of an infant's benzene exposure can be attributed to contaminated breastmilk. A large portion of the ingested exposure can be eliminated by adjusting the mother's working or nursing schedule. Benzene, Physiologically based pharmacokinetics, PBPK.

  3. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Linlong; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE + ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE + HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE + HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a “two-programming” hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is “the first programming”, and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as “the second programming”. - Highlights: • Prenatal ethanol exposure increase the susceptibility of NAFLD in female offspring. • Prenatal ethanol exposure reprograms fetal liver’s glucose and lipid metabolism . • Prenatal ethanol exposure cause

  4. An ethanolic extract of black cohosh causes hematological changes but not estrogenic effects in female rodents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercado-Feliciano, Minerva; Cora, Michelle C.; Witt, Kristine L.; Granville, Courtney A.; Hejtmancik, Milton R.; Fomby, Laurene; Knostman, Katherine A.; Ryan, Michael J.; Newbold, Retha; Smith, Cynthia; Foster, Paul M.; Vallant, Molly K.; Stout, Matthew D.

    2012-09-01

    Black cohosh rhizome (Actaea racemosa) is used as a remedy for pain and gynecological ailments; modern preparations are commonly sold as ethanolic extracts available as dietary supplements. Black cohosh was nominated to the National Toxicology Program (NTP) for toxicity testing due to its widespread use and lack of safety data. Several commercially available black cohosh extracts (BCE) were characterized by the NTP, and one with chemical composition closest to formulations available to consumers was used for all studies. Female B6C3F1/N mice and Wistar Han rats were given 0, 15 (rats only), 62.5 (mice only), 125, 250, 500, or 1000 mg/kg/day BCE by gavage for 90 days starting at weaning. BCE induced dose-dependent hematological changes consistent with a non-regenerative macrocytic anemia and increased frequencies of peripheral micronucleated red blood cells (RBC) in both species. Effects were more severe in mice, which had decreased RBC counts in all treatment groups and increased micronucleated RBC at doses above 125 mg/kg. Dose-dependent thymus and liver toxicity was observed in rats but not mice. No biologically significant effects were observed in other organs. Puberty was delayed 2.9 days at the highest treatment dose in rats; a similar magnitude delay in mice occurred in the 125 and 250 mg/kg groups but not at the higher doses. An additional uterotrophic assay conducted in mice exposed for 3 days to 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100 and 500 mg/kg found no estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activity. These are the first studies to observe adverse effects of BCE in rodents. -- Highlights: ? Mice and rats were dosed with black cohosh extract for 90 days starting at weaning. ? Hematological changes were consistent with a non-regenerative macrocytic anemia. ? Peripheral micronucleated red blood cell frequencies increased. ? Puberty was delayed 2.9 days in rats. ? No estrogenic/anti-estrogenic activity was seen in the uterotrophic assay.

  5. Cross-sectional relationships of exercise and age to adiposity in60,617 male runners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Paul T.; Pate, Russell R.

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this report is to assess in men whether exercise affects the estimated age-related increase in adiposity, and contrariwise, whether age affects the estimated exercise-related decrease in adiposity. Cross-sectional analyses of 64,911 male runners who provided data on their body mass index (97.6 percent), waist (91.1 percent), hip (47.1 percent), and chest circumferences (77.9 percent). Between 18 to 55 years old, the decline in BMI with weekly distance run (slope+-SE) was significantly greater in men 25-55 years old (slope+-:-0.036+-0.001 kg/m2 per km/wk) than in younger men (-0.020+-0.002 kg/m 2 per km/wk). Declines in waist circumference with running distance were also significantly greater in older than younger men (P<10-9 for trend),i.e., the slopes decreased progressively from -0.035+-0.004 cm per km/wk in 18-25 year old men to -0.097+-0.003 cm per km/wk in 50-55 year old men. Increases in BMI with age were greater for men who ran under 16km/wk than for longer distance runners. Waist circumference increased with age at all running levels, but the increase appeared to diminish by running further (0.259+-0.015 cm per year if running<8 km/wk and 0.154+-0.003 cm per year for>16 km/wk). In men over 50 years old, BMI declined -0.038+-0.001 kg/m2 per km/wk run when adjusted for age and declined -0.054+-0.003 kg/m2 (increased 0.021+-0.007 cm) per year of age when adjusted for running distance. Their waist circumference declined-0.096+-0.002 cm per km/wk run when adjusted for age and increased 0.021+-0.007 cm per year of age when adjusted for running distance. These cross-sectional data suggest that age and vigorous exercise interact with each other in affecting mens adiposity, and support the proposition that vigorous physical activity must increase with age to prevent middle-age weight gain. We estimate that a man who ran 16 km/wk at age 25 would need to increase their weekly running distance by 65.7 km/wk by age 50 in order to maintain his same waist

  6. *Permanent Resident Alien: Yes No

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Name: *Middle: *Last: *Gender (circle one): Male Female Is Visitor currently in the US? Yes No *Permanent Resident Alien: Yes No *Country of Citizenship: *Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy): *Country of Birth: *City of Birth: Affiliation or Company Info: *Institution or Company Name: Phone Number: Street (1): Fax Number: Street (2): E-mail Address: City: State: Zip Code: *Country of Employer: *Title or Position and Duties: First Name: Middle: Last: First Name: Middle: Last: First Name: Middle:

  7. Exposure to monocrotophos pesticide during sexual development causes the feminization/demasculinization of the reproductive traits and a reduction in the reproductive success of male guppies (Poecilia reticulata)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Hua; Li, Yun; Wang, Wei; Wu, Peng; Ru, Shaoguo

    2012-09-01

    Monocrotophos is a highly toxic organophosphorus pesticide that has been confirmed to be an endocrine‐disrupting chemical. To evaluate the influence of this pollutant on the reproductive system of male fish, we studied the sex steroid levels, reproductive traits, sex ratio, and reproductive success in male guppies (Poecilia reticulata) exposed to 40% monocrotophos pesticide at the nominal concentrations of 0.01, 0.10, and 1.00 mg/L for 90 days from birth to adulthood in a semi‐static exposure system. Radioimmunoassay and western blot analyses demonstrated that the long‐term exposure to monocrotophos pesticide during the sexual development of male guppies caused a significant increase in 17β‐estradiol levels and consequently induced vitellogenin synthesis, suggesting the feminization of the males. Monocrotophos pesticide also caused a significant decrease in testosterone levels, which consequently inhibited testis growth and reduced the sperm count and the area and intensity of their sexually attractive orange spots, which collectively indicated the significant demasculinization of the male sexual characteristics. Furthermore, these changes in the sexual characteristics at the cellular and organ levels translated into ecologically important effects on the reproductive success at the individual level, as measured by a decrease in offspring production and survival rate. The present study provides the first evidence that monocrotophos pesticide can cause severe reproductive abnormalities in fish due to its endocrine‐disrupting action. -- Highlights: ► Monocrotophos pesticide caused an increase in 17β‐estradiol levels of male guppies. ► Monocrotophos pesticide induced vitellogenin synthesis of male guppies. ► Monocrotophos pesticide caused a decrease in testosterone levels of male guppies. ► Monocrotophos pesticide caused demasculinization of male sexual characteristics. ► Monocrotophos pesticide caused a reduction in reproductive success of male

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 12 Hispanic Female (H F) 12 White Male (W M) 34 White Female ...

  9. Long-term Outcome of Peripherally Implanted Venous Access Ports in the Forearm in Female Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klösges, Laura Meyer, Carsten Boschewitz, Jack Andersson, Magnus; Rudlowski, Christian; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the long-term outcome of peripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm at our institution in a female patient collective.MethodsBetween June 2002 and May 2011, a total of 293 female patients with an underlying malignancy had 299 forearm ports implanted in our interventional radiology suite. The mean age of the cohort was 55 ± 12 years (range 26–81 years). The majority of women suffered from breast (59.5 %) or ovarian cancer (28.1 %). Complications were classified as infectious complications, thrombotic and nonthrombotic catheter dysfunction (dislocation of the catheter or port chamber, fracture with/without embolization or kinking of the catheter, port occlusion), and others.ResultsWe analyzed a total of 90,276 catheter days in 248 port systems (47 patients were lost to follow-up). The mean device service interval was 364 days per catheter (range 8–2,132, median 223 days, CI 311–415, SD 404). Sixty-seven early (≤30 days from implantation) or late complications (>30 days) occurred during the observation period (0.74/1,000 catheter days). Common complications were port infection (0.18/1,000 days), thrombotic dysfunction (0.12/1,000 days), and skin dehiscence (0.12/1,000 days). Nonthrombotic dysfunction occurred in a total of 21 cases (0.23/1,000 days) and seemed to cumulate on the venous catheter entry site on the distal upper arm.ConclusionPeripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm are a safe alternative to chest or upper-arm ports in female oncology patients. Special attention should be paid to signs of skin dehiscence and nonthrombotic dysfunction, especially when used for long-term treatment.

  10. Detection of eight BRCA1 mutations in 10 breast/ovarian cancer families, including 1 family with male breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sruewing, J.P.; Brody, L.C.; Erdos, M.R.

    1995-07-01

    Genetic epidemiological evidence suggests that mutations in BRCA1 may be responsible for approximately one half of early onset familial breast cancer and the majority of familial breast/ovarian cancer. The recent cloning of BRCA1 allows for the direct detection of mutations, but the feasibility of presymptomatic screening for cancer susceptibility is unknown. We analyzed genomic DNA from one affected individual from each of 24 families with at least three cases of ovarian or breast cancer, using SSCP assays. Variant SSCP bands were subcloned and sequenced. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization was used to verify sequence changes and to screen DNA from control individuals. Six frameshift and two missense mutations were detected in 10 different families. A frameshift mutation was detected in a male proband affected with both breast and prostate cancer. A 40-bp deletion was detected in a patient who developed intra-abdominal carcinomatosis 1 year after prophylactic oophorectomy. Mutations were detected throughout the gene, and only one was detected in more than a single family. These results provide further evidence that inherited breast and ovarian cancer can occur as a consequence of a wide array of BRCA1 mutations. These results suggests that development of a screening test for BRCA1 mutations will be technically challenging. The finding of a mutation in a family with male breast cancer, not previously thought to be related to BRCA1, also illustrates the potential difficulties of genetic counseling for individuals known to carry mutations. 37 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Differential expression of secretogranin II and chromogranin A genes in the female rat pituitary through sexual maturation and estrous cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anouar, Y.; Duval, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Secretogranin II (SgII) is a protein of pituitary secretory granules released by LHRH-stimulated gonadotrope cells. Estrogens and androgens are modulators of SgII release. Experiments were performed to determine the regulation of expression of the SgII gene in the female rat pituitary, during sexual maturation and according to the estrous cycle. Age- and cycle-related changes in SgII mRNA content were estimated through cytoplasmic slot blot; SgII content was determined by western blotting; maturation of the protein was controlled through (35S)sulfate labeling. Variations in chromogranin A (CgA), another protein of secretory granules, were analyzed in the same experimental conditions to assess the specificity of SgII regulation. The pituitary SgII concentration increased between days 7 and 21 (2.2-fold) and then declined to the initial 7-day-old value. Simultaneously, the CgA concentration went through a maximum between days 14 and 21 and then strongly dropped to barely detectable levels in the adult pituitary. The SgII mRNA concentration followed roughly the same pattern as the protein. Moreover, the sulfation level remained constant between days 14 and 60. These results demonstrated a regulatory mechanism operating, during sexual maturation, on the SgII gene and not on the protein processing or on storage/release steps. In the 4-day cycling females, the pituitary SgII mRNA and protein contents were the lowest during estrus. They then increased to their highest values in diestrus II. Moreover, the sulfation level of SgII was significantly higher during estrus than during any other stage. Due to its low content level, variations in pituitary CgA could not be demonstrated during the cycle.

  12. Seasonal Patterns of Melatonin, Cortisol, and Progesterone Secretion in Female Lambs Raised Beneath a 500-kV Transmission Line.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jack M.

    1992-06-01

    Although several kinds of biological effects of electric and magnetic fields have been reported from laboratory studies, few have been independently replicated. When this study was being planned, the suppression of nighttime melatonin in rodents was thought to represent one of the strongest known effects of these fields. The effect had been replicated by a single laboratory for 60-Hz electric fields, and by multiple laboratories for d-c magnetic fields. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the effect of electric and magnetic fields on melatonin would also occur in sheep exposed to a high voltage transmission line. The specific hypothesis tested by this experiment was as follows: The electrical environment produced by a 60-Hz, 500-kV transmission line causes a depression in nocturnal melatonin in chronically exposed female lambs. This may mimic effects of pinealectomy or constant long-day photoperiods, thus delaying the onset of reproductive cycles. Results of the study do not provide evidence to support the hypothesis. Melatonin concentrations in the sheep exposed to the transmission line showed the normal pattern of low daytime and high nighttime serum levels. As compared to the control group, there were no statistically significant group differences in the mean amplitude, phase, or duration of the nighttime melatonin elevation.

  13. Polychlorinated biphenyl 77 augments angiotensin II-induced atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms in male apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arsenescu, Violeta; Arsenescu, Razvan; Parulkar, Madhura; Karounos, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Baker, Nicki; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2011-11-15

    Infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) to hyperlipidemic mice augments atherosclerosis and causes formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Each of these AngII-induced vascular pathologies exhibit pronounced inflammation. Previous studies demonstrated that coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) promote inflammation in endothelial cells and adipocytes, two cell types implicated in AngII-induced vascular pathologies. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that administration of PCB77 to male apolipoprotein E (ApoE) -/- mice promotes AngII-induced atherosclerosis and AAA formation. Male ApoE-/- mice were administered vehicle or PCB77 (49 mg/kg, i.p.) during week 1 and 4 (2 divided doses/week) of AngII infusion. Body weights and total serum cholesterol concentrations were not influenced by administration of PCB77. Systolic blood pressure was increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle (156 {+-} 6 vs 137 {+-} 5 mmHg, respectively). The percentage of aortic arch covered by atherosclerotic lesions was increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle (2.0 {+-} 0.4 vs 0.9 {+-} 0.1%, respectively). Lumen diameters of abdominal aortas determined by in vivo ultrasound and external diameters of excised suprarenal aortas were increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle. In addition, AAA incidence increased from 47 to 85% in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77. Adipose tissue in close proximity to AAAs from mice administered PCB77 exhibited increased mRNA abundance of proinflammatory cytokines and elevated expression of components of the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensinogen, angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1aR)). These results demonstrate that PCB77 augments AngII-induced atherosclerosis and AAA formation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polychlorinated biphenyl 77 (PCB77) promotes AngII-induced hypertension. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCB77 augments Ang

  14. Gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol alters cardiac structure/function, protein expression and DNA methylation in adult male mice progeny

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haddad, Rami, E-mail: rami.haddad@mail.mcgill.ca [Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 chemin Cote Ste Catherine, Montral, Qubec, Canada H3T 1E2 (Canada) [Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 chemin Cote Ste Catherine, Montral, Qubec, Canada H3T 1E2 (Canada); Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, McGill University, 850 Sherbrooke Street, Montral, Qubec, Canada H3A 1A2 (Canada); Kasneci, Amanda, E-mail: amanda.kasneci@mail.mcgill.ca [Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 chemin Cote Ste Catherine, Montral, Qubec, Canada H3T 1E2 (Canada)] [Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 chemin Cote Ste Catherine, Montral, Qubec, Canada H3T 1E2 (Canada); Mepham, Kathryn, E-mail: katherine.mepham@mail.mcgill.ca [Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 chemin Cote Ste Catherine, Montral, Qubec, Canada H3T 1E2 (Canada) [Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 chemin Cote Ste Catherine, Montral, Qubec, Canada H3T 1E2 (Canada); Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, McGill University, 850 Sherbrooke Street, Montral, Qubec, Canada H3A 1A2 (Canada); Sebag, Igal A., E-mail: igal.sebag@mcgill.ca [Division of Cardiology, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 chemin Cote Ste Catherine, Montral, Qubec, Canada H3T 1E2 (Canada); and others

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women, and thus their fetuses, are exposed to many endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs). Fetal cardiomyocytes express sex hormone receptors making them potentially susceptible to re-programming by estrogenizing EDCs. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a proto-typical, non-steroidal estrogen. We hypothesized that changes in adult cardiac structure/function after gestational exposure to the test compound DES would be a proof in principle for the possibility of estrogenizing environmental EDCs to also alter the fetal heart. Vehicle (peanut oil) or DES (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 ?g/kg/da.) was orally delivered to pregnant C57bl/6n dams on gestation days 11.514.5. At 3 months, male progeny were left sedentary or were swim trained for 4 weeks. Echocardiography of isoflurane anesthetized mice revealed similar cardiac structure/function in all sedentary mice, but evidence of systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation after swim training at higher DES doses. The calcium homeostasis proteins, SERCA2a, phospholamban, phospho-serine 16 phospholamban and calsequestrin 2, are important for cardiac contraction and relaxation. Immunoblot analyses of ventricle homogenates showed increased expression of SERCA2a and calsequestrin 2 in DES mice and greater molecular remodeling of these proteins and phospho-serine 16 phospholamban in swim trained DES mice. DES increased cardiac DNA methyltransferase 3a expression and DNA methylation in the CpG island within the calsequestrin 2 promoter in heart. Thus, gestational DES epigenetically altered ventricular DNA, altered cardiac function and expression, and reduced the ability of adult progeny to cardiac remodel when physically challenged. We conclude that gestational exposure to estrogenizing EDCs may impact cardiac structure/function in adult males. -- Highlights: ? Gestational DES changes cardiac SERCA2a and CASQ2 expression. ? Echocardiography identified systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation. ? DES increased DNMT

  15. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 3 0 0 0 0 23 6 PAY PLAN SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 10 NN (Engineering) 7 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 15 Kansas City Field Office As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 34 24 70.6% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 29.4% SES EN 05 EN 04 NN NQ 2.9% 2.9% 29.4% 20.6% 44.1% 0.0% 2.9% 2.9% 8.8% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 67.6% 17.6% SUPERVISORS DISABILITY 2 SUPERVISORS RATIO VETERANS 9 RETIREMENT AGE 49.2 1 5 8 16 4 0 YEARS OF FEDERAL SERVICE 16.7 11 8 13 2 0 EDUCATION

  16. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 4 6 0 0 6 15 29 18 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 1 NN (Engineering) 7 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 67 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 DIVERSITY 80 39 48.8% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 51.3% Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security (NA-70) As of March 21, 2015 SES EJ/EK NN NQ NU 2.5% 1.3% 8.8% 83.8% 3.8% 0.0% 2.5% 5.0% 7.5% 0.0% 0.0% 7.5% 18.8% 36.3% 22.5% SUPERVISORS DISABILITY 7 SUPERVISORS RATIO VETERANS 29 RETIREMENT AGE 51.7 2 14 12 35

  17. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 3 6 5 1 6 4 60 29 PAY PLAN SES 2 EJ/EK 18 EN 05 1 EN 04 28 EN 03 3 NN (Engineering) 19 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 40 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 4 White 35.7% NNSA Production Office (NPO) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 115 74 64.3% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic SES EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 EN 03 NN NQ NU 1.7% 15.7% 0.9% 24.3% 2.6% 16.5% 34.8% 3.5% 0.0% 0.9% 2.6% 5.2% 4.3% 0.9% 5.2% 3.5% 52.2% 25.2% SUPERVISORS DISABILITY 11 SUPERVISORS RATIO VETERANS 24

  18. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 4 1 0 0 0 12 5 PAY PLAN SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 3 NN (Engineering) 10 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 Savannah River Field Office As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 25 15 60.0% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 40.0% SES EN 05 EN 04 NN NQ NU 4.0% 4.0% 12.0% 40.0% 36.0% 4.0% 0.0% 4.0% 8.0% 16.0% 4.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 48.0% 20.0% SUPERVISORS DISABILITY 1 SUPERVISORS RATIO VETERANS 4 RETIREMENT AGE 49.7 1 5 3 13 3 0 YEARS OF

  19. Effects of prenatal exposure to a low dose atrazine metabolite mixture on pubertal timing and prostate development of male Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanko, Jason; Enoch, Rolondo; Rayner, Jennifer L; Davis, Christine; Wolf, Douglas; Malarkey, David; Fenton, Suzanne

    2010-12-01

    The present study examines the postnatal reproductive development of male rats following prenatal exposure to an atrazine metabolite mixture (AMM) consisting of the herbicide atrazine and its environmental metabolites diaminochlorotriazine, hydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were treated by gavage with 0.09, 0.87, or 8.73 mg AMM/kg body weight (BW), vehicle, or 100 mg ATR/kg BW positive control, on gestation days 15 19. Preputial separation was significantly delayed in 0.87 mg and 8.73 mg AMM-exposed males. AMM-exposed males demonstrated a significant treatment-related increase in incidence and severity of inflammation in the prostate on postnatal day (PND) 120. A dose-dependent increase in epididymal fat masses and prostate foci were grossly visible in AMM-exposed offspring. These results indicate that a short, late prenatal exposure to mixture of chlorotriazine metabolites can cause chronic prostatitis in male LE rats. The mode of action for these effects is presently unclear.

  20. Workplace Gender Transition Guidelines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Progress Update 2014: Employers Take Charge U.S. Department of Energy's EV Everywhere Workplace 2 As the Workplace Charging Challenge nears its second anniversary, I am pleased to reflect on the continued rapid advancement of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), the exciting progress to date of our partners and ambassadors, and the phenomenal growth in the number of organizations that have joined the Challenge since its inception. What began as a commitment by 13 founding employer partners has now

  1. Altered gene expression in the brain and liver of female fathead minnows Pimephales promelas Rafinesque exposed to fadrozole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Knoebl, Iris; Larkin, Patrick; Miracle, Ann L.; Carter, Barbara J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2008-06-01

    The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) is a small fish species widely used for ecotoxicology research and regulatory testing in North America. This study used a novel 2000 gene oligonucleotide microarray to evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, on gene expression in the liver and brain tissue of exposed females. Exposure to 60 μg 1-1 fadrozole/L for 7 d, resulted in the significant (p<0.05; high-moderate agreement among multiple probes spotted on the array) up-regulation of approximately 47 genes in brain and 188 in liver, and the significant down-regulation of 61 genes in brain and 162 in liver. In particular, fadrozole exposure elicited significant up-regulation of five genes in brain involved in the cholesterol synthesis pathway and altered the expression of over a dozen cytoskeleton-related genes. In the liver, there was notable down-regulation of genes coding for vitellogenin precursors, vigillin, and fibroin-like ovulatory proteins which were consistent with an expected reduction in plasma estradiol concentrations as a result of fadrozole exposure and an associated reduction in measured plasma vitellogenin concentrations. These changes coincided with a general down-regulation of genes coding for non-mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and proteins that play a role in translation. With the exception of the fibroin-like ovulatory proteins, real-time PCR results largely corroborated the microarray responses. Overall, results of this study demonstrate the utility of high density oligonucleotide microarrays for unsupervised, discovery-driven, ecotoxicogenomics research with the fathead minnow and helped inform the subsequent development of a 22,000 gene microarray for the species.

  2. The obscure events contributing to the evolution of an incipient sex chromosome in Populus A retrospective working hypothesis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University; Slavov, Goncho T. [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Genetic determination of gender is a fundamental developmental and evolutionary process in plants. Although it appears that dioecy in Populus is partially genetically controlled, the precise gender-determining systems remain unclear. The recently-released second draft assembly and annotated gene set of the Populus genome provided an opportunity to re-visit this topic. We hypothesized that over evolutionary time, selective pressure has reformed the genome structure and gene composition in the peritelomeric region of the chromosome XIX which has resulted in a distinctive genome structure and cluster of genes contributing to gender determination in Populus. Multiple lines of evidence support this working hypothesis. First, the peritelomeric region of the chromosome XIX contains significantly fewer single nucleotide polymorphisms than the rest of Populus genome and has a distinct evolutionary history. Second, the peritelomeric end of chromosome XIX contains the largest cluster of the nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) class of disease resistances genes in the entire Populus genome. Third, there is a high occurrence of small microRNAs on chromosome XIX coincident to the region containing the putative gender-determining locus and the major cluster of NBS-LRR genes. Further, by analyzing the metabolomic profiles of floral bud in male and female Populus trees using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found there are gender-specific accumulations of phenolic glycosides. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into the genetic control of gender determination in Populus.

  3. The Impact of Post-Mastectomy Radiation Therapy on Male Breast Cancer Patients-A Case Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Edward; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Younus, Jawaid; Elfiki, Tarek; Stitt, Larry; Yau, Gary; Vujovic, Olga; Perera, Francisco; Lock, Michael; Tai, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of radiation management on male breast cancer (MBC) at London Regional Cancer Program (LRCP). Methods and Materials: Men with a diagnosis of breast cancer referred to LRCP were reviewed. The seventh American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system was used. Patients treated with and without post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) were analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was defined as time duration from diagnosis to first recurrence. Overall survival (OS) was defined as time duration from pathologic diagnosis to death or last follow-up with any death defined as an event. Survival estimates were obtained using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: From January 1977 to December 2006, 81 men had invasive ductal carcinoma. The median age was 65 (range, 35-87 years). There were 15 Stage I, 40 Stage II, 20 Stage III, and 6 Stage IV patients. Median follow-up time was 46 months (range, 1-225 months). Of the 75 patients treated with curative intent, 29 did not receive PMRT and 46 completed PMRT. Patients who received PMRT demonstrated no benefit in overall survival (p = 0.872) but significantly better local recurrence free survival (p < 0.001) compared with those who did not receive RT. There was trend toward improving locoregional recurrence with PMRT in patients with high-risk features (node-positive, advanced stage, and {<=}2 mm or unknown surgical margin). The median, 5-year, and 10-year disease-free survival and overall survival for the 75 patients were 77.7 months, 66.3%, 32.7%, and 91.2 months, 73.9%, and 36.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The experience at LRCP suggests that high-risk MBC patients should consider PMRT to improve their chance of local recurrence-free survival.

  4. Phorate-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage and transcriptional activation of p53 and caspase genes in male Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saquib, Quaiser; Attia, Sabry M.; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A.M.; Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, 12613 Giza ; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Giesy, John P.; Department of Biomedical and Veterinary Biosciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 5B3; Zoology Department and Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824 ; Musarrat, Javed; Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, AMU, Aligarh

    2012-02-15

    Male Wistar rats exposed to a systemic organophosphorus insecticide, phorate [O,O-diethyl S-[(ethylthio) methyl] phosphorothioate] at varying oral doses of 0.046, 0.092 or 0.184 mg phorate/kg bw for 14 days, exhibited substantial oxidative stress, cellular DNA damage and activation of apoptosis-related p53, caspase 3 and 9 genes. The histopathological changes including the pyknotic nuclei, inflammatory leukocyte infiltrations, renal necrosis, and cardiac myofiber degeneration were observed in the liver, kidney and heart tissues. Biochemical analysis of catalase and glutathione revealed significantly lesser activities of antioxidative enzymes and lipid peroxidation in tissues of phorate exposed rats. Furthermore, generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential in bone marrow cells confirmed phorate-induced oxidative stress. Significant DNA damage was measured through comet assay in terms of the Olive tail moment in bone marrow cells of treated animals as compared to control. Cell cycle analysis also demonstrated the G{sub 2}/M arrest and appearance of a distinctive SubG{sub 1} peak, which signified induction of apoptosis. Up-regulation of tumor suppressor p53 and caspase 3 and 9 genes, determined by quantitative real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, elucidated the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways in response to cellular stress. Overall, the results suggest that phorate induces genetic alterations and cellular toxicity, which can adversely affect the normal cellular functioning in rats. -- Highlights: ► This is the first report on molecular toxicity of phorate in an in vivo test system. ► Phorate induces biochemical and histological changes in liver, kidney and heart. ► Rats treated with phorate exhibited DNA damage in bone marrow cells. ► Phorate induces apoptosis, oxidative stress and alters mitochondrial fluorescence. ► Phorate induces transcriptional changes and enhanced

  5. The relationship between the bone mineral density and urinary cadmium concentration of residents in an industrial complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Minah; Paek, Domyung; Yoon, Chungsik

    2011-01-15

    Background: An association between cadmium exposure and bone mineral density (BMD) has been demonstrated in elderly women, but has not been well studied in youths and men. Some studies report either no or a weak association between cadmium exposure and bone damage. Objectives: This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the urinary cadmium (U-Cd) levels and BMD of females and males of all ages. Methods: A total of 804 residents near an industrial complex were surveyed in 2007. U-Cd and BMD on the heel (non-dominant calcaneus) were analyzed with AAS-GTA and Dual-Energy X-ray absorptiometry, respectively. Demographic characteristics were collected by structured questionnaires. Osteoporosis and osteopenia were defined by BMD cut-off values and T-scores set by the WHO; T score>-1, normal; -2.5females (0.64 {mu}g/g creatinine) were higher than those in males (0.48 {mu}g/g creatinine) (p<0.001). With the logistic regression model, osteopenia was associated with high U-Cd levels ({>=}1.0 {mu}g/g creatinine) in females (OR=2.92; 95% CI, 1.51-5.64) and in males (OR=3.37; 95% CI, 1.09-10.38). With the multiple linear regression model, the BMD of the adult group was negatively associated with U-Cd (<0.05), gender (female, p<0.001) and age (p<0.001). The BMD of participants who were {<=}19 years of age was negatively associated with gender (female, p<0.01), whereas it was positively associated with age and BMI (p<0.001). BMD was not associated with exercise, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, job or parental education. Conclusion: Results suggested that U-Cd might be associated with osteopenia as well as osteoporosis in both male and female adults. Age and female gender were negatively associated with BMD in the adult group, whereas age was positively

  6. Classifying sex biased congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubinsky, M.S. [Medical College of Wisconsin and Children`s Hospital, Milwaukee, WI (United States)] [Medical College of Wisconsin and Children`s Hospital, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1997-03-31

    The reasons for sex biases in congenital anomalies that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue anomalies are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some anomalies explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital anomalies. 42 refs., 7 tabs.

  7. Male Sterile2 Encodes a Plastid-Localized Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Required for Pollen Exine Development in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, W.; Shanklin, J.; Yu, X.-H.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; De Oliveira, S.; Schreiber, L.; Zhang, D.

    2011-10-01

    Male Sterile2 (MS2) is predicted to encode a fatty acid reductase required for pollen wall development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Transient expression of MS2 in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves resulted in the accumulation of significant levels of C16 and C18 fatty alcohols. Expression of MS2 fused with green fluorescent protein revealed that an amino-terminal transit peptide targets the MS2 to plastids. The plastidial localization of MS2 is biologically important because genetic complementation of MS2 in ms2 homozygous plants was dependent on the presence of its amino-terminal transit peptide or that of the Rubisco small subunit protein amino-terminal transit peptide. In addition, two domains, NAD(P)H-binding domain and sterile domain, conserved in MS2 and its homologs were also shown to be essential for MS2 function in pollen exine development by genetic complementation testing. Direct biochemical analysis revealed that purified recombinant MS2 enzyme is able to convert palmitoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein to the corresponding C16:0 alcohol with NAD(P)H as the preferred electron donor. Using optimized reaction conditions (i.e. at pH 6.0 and 30 C), MS2 exhibits a K{sub m} for 16:0-Acyl Carrier Protein of 23.3 {+-} 4.0 {mu}m, a V{sub max} of 38.3 {+-} 4.5 nmol mg{sup -1} min{sup -1}, and a catalytic efficiency/K{sub m} of 1,873 m{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Based on the high homology of MS2 to other characterized fatty acid reductases, it was surprising that MS2 showed no activity against palmitoyl- or other acyl-coenzyme A; however, this is consistent with its plastidial localization. In summary, genetic and biochemical evidence demonstrate an MS2-mediated conserved plastidial pathway for the production of fatty alcohols that are essential for pollen wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

  8. Use of genomic data in risk assessment case study: I. Evaluation of the dibutyl phthalate male reproductive development toxicity data set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makris, Susan L.; Euling, Susan Y.; Gray, L. Earl; Benson, Robert; Foster, Paul M.D.

    2013-09-15

    A case study was conducted, using dibutyl phthalate (DBP), to explore an approach to using toxicogenomic data in risk assessment. The toxicity and toxicogenomic data sets relative to DBP-related male reproductive developmental outcomes were considered conjointly to derive information about mode and mechanism of action. In this manuscript, we describe the case study evaluation of the toxicological database for DBP, focusing on identifying the full spectrum of male reproductive developmental effects. The data were assessed to 1) evaluate low dose and low incidence findings and 2) identify male reproductive toxicity endpoints without well-established modes of action (MOAs). These efforts led to the characterization of data gaps and research needs for the toxicity and toxicogenomic studies in a risk assessment context. Further, the identification of endpoints with unexplained MOAs in the toxicity data set was useful in the subsequent evaluation of the mechanistic information that the toxicogenomic data set evaluation could provide. The extensive analysis of the toxicology data set within the MOA context provided a resource of information for DBP in attempts to hypothesize MOAs (for endpoints without a well-established MOA) and to phenotypically anchor toxicogenomic and other mechanistic data both to toxicity endpoints and to available toxicogenomic data. This case study serves as an example of the steps that can be taken to develop a toxicological data source for a risk assessment, both in general and especially for risk assessments that include toxicogenomic data.

  9. The UV-absorber benzophenone-4 alters transcripts of genes involved in hormonal pathways in zebrafish (Danio rerio) eleuthero-embryos and adult males

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zucchi, Sara; Bluethgen, Nancy; Ieronimo, Andrea; Fent, Karl

    2011-01-15

    Benzophenone-4 (BP-4) is frequently used as UV-absorber in cosmetics and materials protection. Despite its frequent detection in the aquatic environment potential effects on aquatic life are unknown. In this study, we evaluate the effects of BP-4 in eleuthero-embryos and in the liver, testis and brain of adult male fish on the transcriptional level by focusing on target genes involved in hormonal pathways to provide a more complete toxicological profile of this important UV-absorber. Eleuthero-embryos and males of zebrafish were exposed up to 3 days after hatching and for 14 days, respectively, to BP-4 concentrations between 30 and 3000 {mu}g/L. In eleuthero-embryos transcripts of vtg1, vtg3, esr1, esr2b, hsd17ss3, cyp19b cyp19a, hhex and pax8 were induced at 3000 {mu}g/L BP-4, which points to a low estrogenic activity and interference with early thyroid development, respectively. In adult males BP-4 displayed multiple effects on gene expression in different tissues. In the liver vtg1, vtg3, esr1 and esr2b were down-regulated, while in the brain, vtg1, vtg3 and cyp19b transcripts were up-regulated. In conclusion, the transcription profile revealed that BP-4 interferes with the expression of genes involved in hormonal pathways and steroidogenesis. The effects of BP-4 differ in life stages and adult tissues and point to an estrogenic activity in eleuthero-embryos and adult brain, and an antiestrogenic activity in the liver. The results indicate that BP-4 interferes with the sex hormone system of fish, which is important for the risk assessment of this UV-absorber.

  10. Duke University and Duke University Medical Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Duke University and Duke University Medical Center Date Revised: 3/5/97; 4/25/01 PERSONNEL DOSIMETER REQUEST AND RADIATION EXPOSURE HISTORY 1. Name (Please print - Last name, First name, MI) 2. Duke Unique ID 3. Date of Birth 4. Age (in full years) 5. Gender (circle one) Male Female 6. WORK Telephone No. 7. Name of Department AND Authorized User X-rays Specify type of equipment: 8. Type of radiation to be monitored Radioactive Materials Specify radioisotopes: Other Specify: 9. Have you been

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 61 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 8 EN 04 22 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 28 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 3 African American Male (AA M) 0 African American Female (AA F) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 13 Hispanic Female (H F) 10 White Male (W M) 43 White Female (W F) 11

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 YEAR 2014 Males 57 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 3 EJ/EK 4 EN 04 2 NN (Engineering) 20 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 53 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 9 African American Female (AA F) 9 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 1 Hispanic Male (H M) 3 Hispanic Female (H F) 5 White Male (W M) 43 White Female (W F) 10 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    93 YEAR 2014 Males 50 Females 43 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 EJ/EK 3 NN (Engineering) 13 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 74 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 2 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 6 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 14 White Male (W M) 39 White Female (W F) 21 DIVERSITY

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 YEAR 2014 Males 9 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 7 ED 1 EJ/EK 1 EN 05 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 8 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 1 African American Female (AA F) 5 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 3 White Male (W M) 7 White Female (W F) 1 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 92 Females 43 YEAR 2014 SES 8 EX 1 EJ/EK 4 EN 05 9 EN 04 12 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 57 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 42 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 9 African American Female (AA F) 11 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 4 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 12 Hispanic Female (H F) 7 White Male (W M) 66 White Female (W F) 22 PAY PLAN

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 YEAR 2014 Males 162 Females 81 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 26 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 7 NN (Engineering) 77 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 108 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 22 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 9 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 2 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 154 White Female (W F)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    16 YEAR 2014 Males 72 Females 144 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 8 EJ/EK 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 198 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 9 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 2 African American Male (AA M) 10 African American Female (AA F) 38 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 3 Hispanic Male (H M) 15 Hispanic Female (H F) 33 White Male (W M) 44 White Female (W F) 68 DIVERSITY TOTAL

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 YEAR 2014 Males 48 Females 33 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 8 EN 04 10 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 29 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 3 African American Male (AA M) 0 African American Female (AA F) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 12 Hispanic Female (H F) 12 White Male (W M) 34 White Female

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    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 10 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 4 African American Female (AA F) 4 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 13 White Female (W F) 5

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 20 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 3 EJ/EK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 28 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 1 African American Female (AA F) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 1 Hispanic Male (H M) 4 Hispanic Female (H F) 7 White Male (W M) 13 White Female (W F) 11

  1. Differential cardiotoxicity in response to chronic doxorubicin treatment in male spontaneous hypertension-heart failure (SHHF), spontaneously hypertensive (SHR), and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharkey, Leslie C.; Radin, M. Judith; Heller, Lois; Rogers, Lynette K.; Tobias, Anthony; Matise, Ilze; Wang, Qi; Apple, Fred S.; McCune, Sylvia A.

    2013-11-15

    Life threatening complications from chemotherapy occur frequently in cancer survivors, however little is known about genetic risk factors. We treated male normotensive rats (WKY) and strains with hypertension (SHR) and hypertension with cardiomyopathy (SHHF) with 8 weekly doses of doxorubicin (DOX) followed by 12 weeks of observation to test the hypothesis that genetic cardiovascular disease would worsen delayed cardiotoxicity. Compared with WKY, SHR demonstrated weight loss, decreased systolic blood pressure, increased kidney weights, greater cardiac and renal histopathologic lesions and greater mortality. SHHF showed growth restriction, increased kidney weights and renal histopathology but no effect on systolic blood pressure or mortality. SHHF had less severe cardiac lesions than SHR. We evaluated cardiac soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) content and arachidonic acid metabolites after acute DOX exposure as potential mediators of genetic risk. Before DOX, SHHF and SHR had significantly greater cardiac sEH and decreased epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) (4 of 4 isomers in SHHF and 2 of 4 isomers in SHR) than WKY. After DOX, sEH was unchanged in all strains, but SHHF and SHR rats increased EETs to a level similar to WKY. Leukotriene D4 increased after treatment in SHR. Genetic predisposition to heart failure superimposed on genetic hypertension failed to generate greater toxicity compared with hypertension alone. The relative resistance of DOX-treated SHHF males to the cardiotoxic effects of DOX in the delayed phase despite progression of genetic disease was unexpected and a key finding. Strain differences in arachidonic acid metabolism may contribute to variation in response to DOX toxicity. - Highlights: Late doxorubicin toxicity evaluated in normal, hypertensive, and cardiomyopathic rats. Hypertension enhances the delayed toxicity of doxorubicin. Genetic predisposition to cardiomyopathy did not further enhance toxicity. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids increased in

  2. Improving in vitro Sertoli cell/gonocyte co-culture model for assessing male reproductive toxicity: Lessons learned from comparisons of cytotoxicity versus genomic responses to phthalates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Xiaozhong; Hong, Sung Woo; Moreira, Estefania G.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2009-09-15

    Gonocytes exist in the neonatal testis and represent a transient population of male germ-line stem cells. It has been shown that stem cell self-renewal and progeny production is probably controlled by the neighboring differentiated cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) in vivo known as niches. Recently, we developed an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) Sertoli cell/gonocyte co-culture (SGC) model with ECM overlay, which creates an in vivo-like niche and supports germ-line stem cell functioning within a 3D environment. In this study, we applied morphological and cytotoxicity evaluations, as well as microarray-based gene expression to examine the effects of different phthalate esters (PE) on this model. Known in vivo male developmentally toxic PEs (DTPE) and developmentally non-toxic PEs (DNTPE) were evaluated. We observed that DTPE induced significantly greater dose-dependent morphological changes, a decrease in cell viability and an increase in cytotoxicity compared to those treated with DNTPE. Moreover, the gene expression was more greatly altered by DTPE than by DNTPE and non-supervised cluster analysis allowed the discrimination of DTPE from the DNTPE. Our systems-based GO-Quant analysis showed significant alterations in the gene pathways involved in cell cycle, phosphate transport and apoptosis regulation with DTPE but not with DNTPE treatment. Disruptions of steroidogenesis related-gene expression such as Star, Cyp19a1, Hsd17b8, and Nr4a3 were observed in the DTPE group, but not in the DNTPE group. In summary, our observation on cell viability, cytotoxicity, and microarray-based gene expression analysis induced by PEs demonstrate that our in vitro 3D-SGC system mimicked in vivo responses for PEs and suggests that the 3D-SGC system might be useful in identifying developmental reproductive toxicants.

  3. Genome structure and emerging evidence of an incipient sex chromosome in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Tongming; DiFazio, Stephen P; Gunter, Lee E; Zhang, Xinye; Sewell, Mitchell; Woolbright, Dr. Scott; Allan, Dr. Gery; Kelleher, Colin; Douglas, Carl; Wang, Prof. Mingxiu; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2008-01-01

    The genus Populus consists of dioecious woody species with largely unknown genetic mechanisms for gender determination. We have discovered genetic and genomic features in the peritelomeric region of chromosome XIX that suggest this region of the Populus genome is in the process of developing characteristics of a sex chromosome. We have identified a gender-associated locus that consistently maps to this region. Furthermore, comparison of genetic maps across multiple Populus families reveals consistently distorted segregation within this region. We have intensively characterized this region using an F1 interspecific cross involving the female genotype that was used for genome sequencing. This region shows suppressed recombination and high divergence between the alternate haplotypes, as revealed by dense map-based genome assembly using microsatellite markers. The suppressed recombination, distorted segregation, and haplotype divergence were observed only for the maternal parent in this cross. Furthermore, the progeny of this cross showed a strongly male-biased sex ratio, in agreement with Haldane's rule that postulates that the heterogametic sex is more likely to be absent, rare, or sterile in interspecific crosses. Together, these results support the role of chromosome XIX in sex determination and suggest that sex determination in Populus occurs through a ZW system in which the female is the heterogametic gender.

  4. The pulmonary response of white and black adults to six concentrations of ozone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seal, E. Jr.; McDonnell, W.F.; House, D.E.; Salaam, S.A.; Dewitt, P.J.; Butler, S.O.; Green, J.; Raggio, L. )

    1993-04-01

    Many early studies of respiratory responsiveness to ozone (O3) were done on healthy, young, white males. The purpose of this study was to determine whether gender or race differences in O3 response exist among white and black, males and females, and to develop concentration-response curves for each of the gender-race groups. Three hundred seventy-two subjects (n > 90 in each gender-race group), ages 18 to 35 yr, were exposed once for 2.33 h to 0.0 (purified air), 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, 0.30, or 0.40 ppm O3. Each exposure was preceded by baseline pulmonary function tests and a symptom questionnaire. The first 2 h of exposure included alternating 15-min periods of rest and exercise on a motorized treadmill producing a minute ventilation (VE) of 25 L/min/m2 body surface area (BSA). After exposure, subjects completed a set of pulmonary function tests and a symptom questionnaire. Lung function and symptom responses were expressed as percent change from baseline and analyzed using a nonparametric two factor analysis of variance. Three primary variables were analyzed: FEV1, specific airway resistance (SRaw), and cough. Statistical analysis demonstrated no significant differences in response to O3 among the individual gender-race groups. For the group as a whole, changes in the variables FEV1, SRaw, and cough were first noted at 0.12, 0.18, and 0.18 ppm O3, respectively. Adjusted for exercise difference, concentration-response curves for FEV1 and cough among white males were consistent with previous reports (1).

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    34 YEAR 2012 Males 66 Females 68 YEAR 2012 SES 6 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 110 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 22 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 27 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 21 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 5 Hispanic Female (H F) 3 White Male (W M) 26 White Female (W F) 16

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 25 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 25 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 46 White Female (W F) 13

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    563 YEAR 2014 Males 517 Females 46 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 2 EJ/EK 2 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 218 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 327 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 14 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 2 African American Male (AA M) 18 African American Female (AA F) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 8 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 76 Hispanic Female (H F) 21 White Male

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    89 YEAR 2014 Males 98 Females 91 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 14 EX 1 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 32 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 130 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 GS 15 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 14 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 7 Hispanic Male (H M) 7 Hispanic Female (H F) 10 White Male

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    74 YEAR 2014 Males 96 Females 78 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 8 EJ/EK 4 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 34 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 113 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 11 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 5 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 25 Hispanic Female (H F) 25 White Male (W M) 61 White

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    26 YEAR 2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL 1 EJ/EK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 44 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 7 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 4 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 1 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 68 White

  12. Sex ratios, bill deformities, and PCBs in nestling double-crested cormorants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stromborg, K.L. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Green Bay, WI (United States); Sileo, L. [National Biological Service, Madison, WI (United States); Tuinen, P. van [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Deformed double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) nestlings examined from 1988--1992 had a sex ratio highly skewed toward females (66 of 81) compared to normal nestlings (43 of 80) (P < 0.005). The collection site, Green Bay, WI, is heavily contaminated with PCBs and the possibility of gender alteration was investigated in a designed study by comparing the sex of nestling birds determined using three techniques. These nestlings were collected at five sites, both contaminated and uncontaminated. Genetic sex was determined by cytogenetic techniques and phenotypic sex was determined by macroscopic and histologic examination of gonads. Differences between techniques resulted in a few instances of classifying genetic males as females by one or the other gonadal examinations. Sex ratios of the nestlings from the five sites were compared to binomial distributions assuming equal probabilities of males and females. Sex ratios of normal nestlings were not different from expected regardless of sex determination technique (P > 0.10). Deformed nestlings sexed cytogenetically or histologically did not differ from expected (P > 0.40), but deformed nestlings tended to be classified , macroscopically as females at a higher rate than expected (P = 0.092). The observed sex ratios obtained by macroscopic techniques did not differ between the 1968--1992 observational study and the designed study (P > 0.50). Histologic examination suggested two explanations for the skewed sex ratio: nestlings with undeterminable macroscopic sex usually had testes and, some gonads which grossly resembled ovaries were, in fact, testes. If phenotypic gender alteration is present in these birds, it is more evident at the gross structural level than at the histologic level.

  13. Diethyl hexyl phthalate-induced changes in insulin signaling molecules and the protective role of antioxidant vitamins in gastrocnemius muscle of adult male rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Chinnapaiyan; Khan, Adam Ismail; Balaji, Venkataraman; Selvaraj, Jayaraman; Balasubramanian, Karundevi

    2011-12-15

    Diethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP) is an endocrine disruptor, it influences various organ systems in human beings and experimental animals. DEHP reduced the serum testosterone and increased the blood glucose, estradiol, T{sub 3} and T{sub 4} in rats. However, the effect of DEHP on insulin signaling and glucose oxidation in skeletal muscle is not known. Adult male albino rats were divided into four groups: Group I: Control; Groups II and III: DEHP treated (dissolved in olive oil at a dose of 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight, respectively, once daily through gastric intubation for 30 days); and Group IV: DEHP (100 mg/kg body weight) plus vitamins E (50 mg/kg body weight) and C (100 mg/kg body weight) dissolved in olive oil and distilled water, respectively, once daily through gastric intubation for 30 days. On completion of treatment, animals were euthanized and perfused (whole body); gastrocnemius muscle was dissected out and subjected to assessment of various parameters. DEHP treatment increased the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, hydroxyl radical levels and lipid peroxidation which disrupt the membrane integrity and insulin receptor. DEHP impaired the insulin signal transduction, glucose uptake and oxidation through decreased expression of plasma membrane GLUT4, which may partly be responsible for the elevation of fasting blood glucose level. The present study suggests that DEHP exposure affects glucose oxidation in skeletal muscle and is mediated through enhanced lipid peroxidation, impaired insulin signaling and GLUT4 expression in plasma membrane. Antioxidant vitamins (C and E) have a protective role against the adverse effect of DEHP. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DEHP treatment significantly decreased serum insulin and testosterone levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased ROS and decreased glucose uptake were observed in DEHP treated animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired insulin signaling in gastrocnemius muscle was observed in DEHP treatment. Black

  14. Reactive oxygen species on bone mineral density and mechanics in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) knockout mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smietana, Michael J.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2250 GG Brown, 2350 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109; Program in Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2250 GG Brown, 2350 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 ; Faulkner, John A.; Brooks, Susan V.; Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 ; Larkin, Lisa M.

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to be a factor in the onset of a number of age-associated conditions, including loss of BMD. {yields} Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) deficient mice have increased ROS, reduced bone mineral density, decreased bending stiffness, and decreased strength compared to WT controls. {yields} Increased ROS caused by the deficiency of Sod1, may be responsible for the changes in BMD and bone mechanics and therefore represent an appropriate model for studying mechanisms of age-associated bone loss. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a role in a number of degenerative conditions including osteoporosis. Mice deficient in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) (Sod1{sup -/-} mice) have elevated oxidative stress and decreased muscle mass and strength compared to wild-type mice (WT) and appear to have an accelerated muscular aging phenotype. Thus, Sod1{sup -/-} mice may be a good model for evaluating the effects of free radical generation on diseases associated with aging. In this experiment, we tested the hypothesis that the structural integrity of bone as measured by bending stiffness (EI; N/mm{sup 2}) and strength (MPa) is diminished in Sod1{sup -/-} compared to WT mice. Femurs were obtained from male and female WT and Sod1{sup -/-} mice at 8 months of age and three-point bending tests were used to determine bending stiffness and strength. Bones were also analyzed for bone mineral density (BMD; mg/cc) using micro-computed tomography. Femurs were approximately equal in length across all groups, and there were no significant differences in BMD or EI with respect to gender in either genotype. Although male and female mice demonstrated similar properties within each genotype, Sod1{sup -/-} mice exhibited lower BMD and EI of femurs from both males and females compared with gender matched WT mice. Strength of femurs was also lower in Sod1{sup -/-} mice compared to WT as well as between genders. These

  15. High power connection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Christopher E.; Beer, Robert C.; McCall, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    A high power connection system adapted for automotive environments which provides environmental and EMI shielding includes a female connector, a male connector, and a panel mount. The female connector includes a female connector base and a snap fitted female connector cover. The male connector includes a male connector base and a snap fitted male connector cover. The female connector base has at least one female power terminal cavity for seatably receiving a respective female power terminal. The male connector base has at least one male power terminal cavity for seatably receiving a respective male power terminal. The female connector is covered by a cover seal and a conductive shroud. A pair of lock arms protrude outward from the front end of the male connector base, pass through the panel mount and interface with a lever of a lever rotatably connected to the shroud to thereby mechanically assist mating of the male and female connectors. Safety terminals in the male and female connectors provide a last-to-connect-first-to-break connection with an HVIL circuit.

  16. Predicting Individual Affect of Health Interventions to Reduce HPV Prevalence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Courtney D.; Mihalcea, Rada; Mikler, Armin R.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2011-04-01

    Recently, human papilloma virus has been implicated to cause several throat and oral cancers and hpv is established to cause most cervical cancers. A human papilloma virus vaccine has been proven successful to reduce infection incidence in FDA clinical trials and it is currently available in the United States. Current intervention policy targets adolescent females for vaccination; however, the expansion of suggested guidelines may extend to other age groups and males as well. This research takes a first step towards automatically predicting personal beliefs, regarding health intervention, on the spread of disease. Using linguistic or statistical approaches, sentiment analysis determines a texts affective content. Self-reported HPV vaccination beliefs published in web and social media are analyzed for affect polarity and leveraged as knowledge inputs to epidemic models. With this in mind, we have developed a discrete-time model to facilitate predicting impact on the reduction of HPV prevalence due to arbitrary age and gender targeted vaccination schemes.

  17. Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conferences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadeau, Joseph H.

    2013-11-25

    The 6th Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conference was held at the Minoa Palace Conference Center, Chania, Crete, Greece (16-21 June 2008). The Organizing Committee was composed of Joe Nadeau (CWRU, Cleveland), Rudi Balling (German Research Centre, Brauschweig), David Galas (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Lee Hood (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Diane Isonaka (Seattle), Fotis Kafatos (Imperial College, London), John Lambris (Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia),Harris Lewin (Univ. of Indiana, Urbana-Champaign), Edison Liu (Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore), and Shankar Subramaniam (Univ. California, San Diego). A total of 101 individuals from 21 countries participated in the conference: USA (48), Canada (5), France (5), Austria (4), Germany (3), Italy (3), UK (3), Greece (2), New Zealand (2), Singapore (2), Argentina (1), Australia (1), Cuba (1), Denmark (1), Japan (1), Mexico (1), Netherlands (1), Spain (1), Sweden (1), Switzerland (1). With respect to speakers, 29 were established faculty members and 13 were graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. With respect to gender representation, among speakers, 13 were female and 28 were male, and among all participants 43 were female and 58 were male. Program these included the following topics: Cancer Pathways and Networks (Day 1), Metabolic Disease Networks (Day 2), Day 3 ? Organs, Pathways and Stem Cells (Day 3), and Day 4 ? Inflammation, Immunity, Microbes and the Environment (Day 4). Proceedings of the Conference were not published.

  18. Insertion tube methods and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Casper, William L.; Clark, Don T.; Grover, Blair K.; Mathewson, Rodney O.; Seymour, Craig A.

    2007-02-20

    A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

  19. Subsurface drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Casper, William L.; Clark, Don T.; Grover, Blair K.; Mathewson, Rodney O.; Seymour, Craig A.

    2008-10-07

    A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    42 YEAR 2014 Males 36 Females 6 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 2 EJEK 5 EN 05 7 EN 04 6 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2012 Males 65 Females 29 YEAR 2012 SES 3 EJEK 5 EN 04 3 NN (Engineering) 21 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 61 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2011 Males 21 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 3 EJEK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American...

  3. YEAR

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    92 YEAR 2012 Males 52 Females 40 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 7 EN 04 13 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 38 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0...

  4. YEAR

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    11 YEAR 2012 Males 78 Females 33 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 9 EN 05 1 EN 04 33 NN (Engineering) 32 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 2...

  5. YEAR

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    02 YEAR 2011 Males 48 Females 54 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 13 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 80 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 27 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 15 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

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    31 YEAR 2013 Males 20 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,...

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    16 YEAR 2012 Males 84 Females 32 YEAR 2012 SES 26 EJEK 2 EN 05 9 NN (Engineering) 39 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 10 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  9. YEAR

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    86 YEAR 2012 Males 103 Females 183 YEAR 2012 SES 7 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 1 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 202 NU (TechAdmin Support) 30 NF (Future Ldrs) 45 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    80 YEAR 2012 Males 51 Females 29 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 22 EN 04 21 NN (Engineering) 14 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 21 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 YEAR 2012 Males 30 Females 11 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 9 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 17 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    96 YEAR 2013 Males 69 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 9 EN 04 27 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2012 Males 19 Females 12 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    40 YEAR 2011 Males 68 Females 72 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 115 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian...

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    00 YEAR 2012 Males 48 Females 52 YEAR 2012 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 80 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 YEAR 2012 Males 21 Females 22 YEAR 2012 SES 3 EJEK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  17. A fragile X male with a broad smear on southern blot analysis representing 100-500 CGG repeats and no methylation at the EagI site of the FMR-1 gene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lachiewicz, A.M.; Spiridigliozzi, G.A.; McConkie-Rosell, A.

    1996-08-09

    Fragile X DNA studies were carried out on all obligate carriers of a large fragile X family with 10 mentally retarded individuals. One 64-year-old carrier man with an altered FMR-1 allele was not described as being mentally retarded or as having any limitations in function. He was married, raised 8 children, and worked as an auto mechanic. On examination, he had macrocephaly and mild macroorchidism but few of the other typical physical findings of males with fragile X syndrome. His Full Scale IQ is 73, and his Vineland Adaptive Behavior Composite is 73. On the Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery-Revised, he achieved standard scores of 64 in Reading, 55 in Math, and 83 in Knowledge. His DNA findings showed a broad smear on Southern blot analysis of 100-500 CGG repeats and no methylation at the EagI site upstream of the FMR-1 protein coding region. His FMR-1 protein production is 12% of normal. His daughters all have large premutations, with somatic instability in the size of the CGG repeat lengths. They all have evidence of academic underachievement and 2 have physical characteristics frequently described in individuals with fragile X. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Microsoft Word - Zn-DTPA Insert_2 Pages.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... gmbh Langes Feld 13, 31789 Hameln, Germany Date of report: Unique patient identifier Patient ID Name: Date of birth: Sex: Male Female Address: Phone: Hospitalization: No Yes Where? ...

  19. EEO PRECOMPLAINT COUNSELING INTAKE FORM

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NATIONAL ORIGIN (SPECIFY) SEX ( ) FEMALE ( ) MALE DISABILITY ( ) MENTAL ( ) PHYSICAL AGE (SPECIFY DATE OF BIRTH) REPRISAL (List prior EEO activity, case number if known, and date ...

  20. EEO Complaint Equal Employment Opportunity: Collaborating for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    inference of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, genetic ... RELIGION (or lack of religion) SEX (MaleFemale) (including sexual harassment) ...

  1. V:\\!__ODD-N.UMB\\!DOE_548.43

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15. Age ||| Under 3 months 3 to 12 months Over 12 months 16. Sex: Female Male InjuryIllness (OSHA Information) 20. Injury Code (10) 23. ...

  2. Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... higher participation rates among males. The program modified its marketing strategy to target more females, based on evaluation findings. Evaluations in 2005 and ...

  3. Regulatory Analysis on Criteria

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... For other implants involving NUREG-1492 the lungs, brain, pancreas, etc., tissue shielding values of similar magnitude can be assumed for an adult male and female. However, for ...

  4. \\\\Athena\\tsoshare\\Dosimetry\\Dosimetry Forms\\RPR 1A RADIATION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Int.: Previous (maiden) or other surnames known by: Permanent Address: Soc. Sec. No.: Sex: Male Female Birth date: Month Day Year Job Title or Duties: Department: Room Number:...

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    446 YEAR 2014 Males 1626 Females 820 YEAR 2014 SES 97 EX 2 ED 1 SL 1 EJ/EK 84 EN 05 38 EN 04 162 EN 03 18 NN (Engineering) 427 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 1216 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 66 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 327 GS 15 2 GS 14 2 GS 13 2 GS 10 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 27 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 24 African American Male (AA M) 90 African American Female (AA F) 141 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 63 Asian American Pacific Islander Female

  6. Microsoft Word - SIP Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page 1 of 1 Los Alamos National Security, LLC SURVIVOR INCOME PROGRAM (SIP) BENEFIT APPLICATION EMPLOYEE INFORMATION Name of Deceased: Male Female SSN: Z: DOB: DOD: Age: Married? ...

  7. Gender and Transport | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from the LEDS Global Partnership. When to Use This Tool While building a low emission strategy for your country's transportation system, this tool is most useful during these...

  8. Sex-dependent Differences in Intestinal Tumorigenesis Induced in Apc1638N/+ Mice by Exposure to {gamma} Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trani, Daniela; Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia; Maastricht Radiation Oncology Lab, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, University of Maastricht ; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia ; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Hartmann, Dan P.; Datta, Kamal; Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia ; Fornace, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of 1 and 5 Gy radiation doses and to investigate the interplay of gender and radiation with regard to intestinal tumorigenesis in an adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutant mouse model. Methods and Materials: Apc1638N/+ female and male mice were exposed whole body to either 1 Gy or 5 Gy of {gamma} rays and euthanized when most of the treated mice became moribund. Small and large intestines were processed to determine tumor burden, distribution, and grade. Expression of proliferation marker Ki-67 and estrogen receptor (ER)-{alpha} were also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: We observed that, with both 1 Gy and 5 Gy of {gamma} rays, females displayed reduced susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis compared with males. As for radiation effect on small intestinal tumor progression, although no substantial differences were found in the relative frequency and degree of dysplasia of adenomas in irradiated animals compared with controls, invasive carcinomas were found in 1-Gy- and 5-Gy-irradiated animals. Radiation exposure was also shown to induce an increase in protein levels of proliferation marker Ki-67 and sex-hormone receptor ER-{alpha} in both non tumor mucosa and intestinal tumors from irradiated male mice. Conclusions: We observed important sex-dependent differences in susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc1638N/+ mutants. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that exposure to radiation doses as low as 1 Gy can induce a significant increase in intestinal tumor multiplicity as well as enhance tumor progression in vivo.

  9. Chronic treatment with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) during pregnancy and lactation in the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colciago, A.; Casati, L.; Mornati, O.; Vergoni, A.V.; Santagostino, A.; Celotti, F. Negri-Cesi, P.

    2009-08-15

    The gender-specific expression pattern of aromatase and 5alpha-reductases (5alpha-R) during brain development provides neurons the right amount of estradiol and DHT to induce a dimorphic organization of the structure. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are endocrine disruptive pollutants; exposure to PCBs through placental transfer and breast-feeding may adversely affect the organizational action of sex steroid, resulting in long-term alteration of reproductive neuroendocrinology. The study was aimed at: a) evaluating the hypothalamic expression of aromatase, 5alpha-R1 and 5alpha-R2 in fetuses (GD20), infant (PN12), weaning (PN21) and young adult (PN60) male and female rats exposed to PCBs during development; b) correlating these parameters with the time of testicular descent, puberty onset, estrous cyclicity and copulatory behavior; c) evaluating possible alterations of some non reproductive behaviors (locomotion, learning and memory, depression/anxiety behavior). A reconstituted mixture of four indicator congeners (PCB 126, 138, 153 and 180) was injected subcutaneously to dams at the dose of 10 mg/kg daily from GD15 to GD19 and then twice a week till weanling. The results indicated that developmental PCB exposure produced important changes in the dimorphic hypothalamic expression of both aromatase and the 5alpha-Rs, which were still evident in adult animals. We observed that female puberty onset occurs earlier than in control animals without cycle irregularity, while testicular descent in males was delayed. A slight but significant impairment of sexual behavior and an important alteration in memory retention were also noted specifically in males. We conclude that PCBs might affect the dimorphic neuroendocrine control of reproductive system and of other neurobiological processes.

  10. Subacute effects of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) on hepatic gene expression profiles in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canton, Rocio F. [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: rfcanton@gmail.com; Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M.; Hoogenboom, Ron L.A.P. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Center, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE Wageningen (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H.; Ven, Leo T.M. van der [National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Laboratory for Heath Protection Research, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Berg, Martin van den [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Heneweer, Marjoke [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Center, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2008-09-01

    Hexabromoyclododecane (HBCD), used as flame retardant (FR) mainly in textile industry and in polystyrene foam manufacture, has been identified as a contaminant at levels comparable to other brominated FRs (BFRs). HBCD levels in biota are increasing slowly and seem to reflect the local market demand. The toxicological database of HBCD is too limited to perform at present a solid risk assessment, combining data from exposure and effect studies. In order to fill in some gaps, a 28-day HBCD repeated dose study (OECD407) was done in Wistar rats. In the present work liver tissues from these animals were used for gene expression profile analysis. Results show clear gender specificity with females having a higher number of regulated genes and therefore being more sensitive to HBCD than males. Several specific pathways were found to be affected by HBCD exposure, like PPAR-mediated regulation of lipid metabolism, triacylglycerol metabolism, cholesterol biosynthesis, and phase I and II pathways. These results were corroborated with quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Cholesterol biosynthesis and lipid metabolism were especially down-regulated in females. Genes involved in phase I and II metabolism were up-regulated predominantly in males, which could explain the observed lower HBCD hepatic disposition in male rats in this 28-day study. These sex-specific differences in gene expression profiles could also underlie sex-specific differences in toxicity (e.g. decreased thyroid hormone or increased serum cholesterol levels). To our knowledge, this is the fist study that describes the changes in rat hepatic gene profiles caused by this commonly used flame retardant.

  11. Kinetics of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in blood and of DEHP metabolites in urine of male volunteers after single ingestion of ring-deuterated DEHP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, Winfried; Numtip, Wanwiwa; Vlkel, Wolfgang; Seckin, Elcim; Csandy, Gyrgy A.; Institut fr Toxikologie und Umwelthygiene, Technische Universitt Mnchen, Mnchen ; Ptz, Christian; and others

    2012-10-15

    The plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is suspected to induce antiandrogenic effects in men via its metabolite mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP). However, there is only little information on the kinetic behavior of DEHP and its metabolites in humans. The toxikokinetics of DEHP was investigated in four male volunteers (2861 y) who ingested a single dose (645 20 ?g/kg body weight) of ring-deuterated DEHP (DEHP-D{sub 4}). Concentrations of DEHP-D{sub 4}, of free ring-deuterated MEHP (MEHP-D{sub 4}), and the sum of free and glucuronidated MEHP-D{sub 4} were measured in blood for up to 24 h; amounts of the monoesters MEHP-D{sub 4}, ring-deuterated mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate and ring-deuterated mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate were determined in urine for up to 46 h after ingestion. The bioavailability of DEHP-D{sub 4} was surprisingly high with an area under the concentration-time curve until 24 h (AUC) amounting to 50% of that of free MEHP-D{sub 4}. The AUC of free MEHP-D{sub 4} normalized to DEHP-D{sub 4} dose and body weight (AUC/D) was 2.1 and 8.1 times, that of DEHP-D{sub 4} even 50 and 100 times higher than the corresponding AUC/D values obtained earlier in rat and marmoset, respectively. Time courses of the compounds in blood and urine of the volunteers oscillated widely. Terminal elimination half-lives were short (4.36.6 h). Total amounts of metabolites in 22-h urine are correlated linearly with the AUC of free MEHP-D{sub 4} in blood, the parameter regarded as relevant for risk assessment. -- Highlights: ? After DEHP intake, DEHP and MEHP in blood show oscillating time courses. ? Dose-related blood levels of DEHP are 50 times higher in humans than in rats. ? Dose-related blood levels of free MEHP are 2 times higher in humans than in rats. ? Elimination of DEHP and its metabolites is short with half-lives of 4.3-6.6 h.

  12. Sex-based differences in gene expression in hippocampus following postnatal lead exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, J.S. Anderson, D.W.; Sonnenahalli, H.; Vadigepalli, R.

    2011-10-15

    The influence of sex as an effect modifier of childhood lead poisoning has received little systematic attention. Considering the paucity of information available concerning the interactive effects of lead and sex on the brain, the current study examined the interactive effects of lead and sex on gene expression patterns in the hippocampus, a structure involved in learning and memory. Male or female rats were fed either 1500 ppm lead-containing chow or control chow for 30 days beginning at weaning.Blood lead levels were 26.7 {+-} 2.1 {mu}g/dl and 27.1 {+-} 1.7 {mu}g/dl for females and males, respectively. The expression of 175 unique genes was differentially regulated between control male and female rats. A total of 167 unique genes were differentially expressed in response to lead in either males or females. Lead exposure had a significant effect without a significant difference between male and female responses in 77 of these genes. In another set of 71 genes, there were significant differences in male vs. female response. A third set of 30 genes was differentially expressed in opposite directions in males vs. females, with the majority of genes expressed at a lower level in females than in males. Highly differentially expressed genes in males and females following lead exposure were associated with diverse biological pathways and functions. These results show that a brief exposure to lead produced significant changes in expression of a variety of genes in the hippocampus and that the response of the brain to a given lead exposure may vary depending on sex. - Highlights: > Postnatal lead exposure has a significant effect on hippocampal gene expression patterns. > At least one set of genes was affected in opposite directions in males and females. > Differentially expressed genes were associated with diverse biological pathways.

  13. Cancer risk estimates from radiation therapy for heterotopic ossification prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Berris, Theoharris; Damilakis, John; Lyraraki, Efrossyni

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a frequent complication following total hip arthroplasty. This study was conducted to calculate the radiation dose to organs-at-risk and estimate the probability of cancer induction from radiotherapy for HO prophylaxis.Methods: Hip irradiation for HO with a 6 MV photon beam was simulated with the aid of a Monte Carlo model. A realistic humanoid phantom representing an average adult patient was implemented in Monte Carlo environment for dosimetric calculations. The average out-of-field radiation dose to stomach, liver, lung, prostate, bladder, thyroid, breast, uterus, and ovary was calculated. The organ-equivalent-dose to colon, that was partly included within the treatment field, was also determined. Organ dose calculations were carried out using three different field sizes. The dependence of organ doses upon the block insertion into primary beam for shielding colon and prosthesis was investigated. The lifetime attributable risk for cancer development was estimated using organ, age, and gender-specific risk coefficients.Results: For a typical target dose of 7 Gy, organ doses varied from 1.0 to 741.1 mGy by the field dimensions and organ location relative to the field edge. Blocked field irradiations resulted in a dose range of 1.4146.3 mGy. The most probable detriment from open field treatment of male patients was colon cancer with a high risk of 564.3 10{sup ?5} to 837.4 10{sup ?5} depending upon the organ dose magnitude and the patient's age. The corresponding colon cancer risk for female patients was (372.2541.0) 10{sup ?5}. The probability of bladder cancer development was more than 113.7 10{sup ?5} and 110.3 10{sup ?5} for males and females, respectively. The cancer risk range to other individual organs was reduced to (0.00368.5) 10{sup ?5}.Conclusions: The risk for cancer induction from radiation therapy for HO prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty varies considerably by the treatment parameters

  14. The hyperthermia mediated by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) is sensitive to sex differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyeth, Richard P.; Mills, Edward M.; Ullman, Alison; Kenaston, M. Alexander; Burwell, Johanna; Sprague, Jon E.

    2009-02-15

    Female subjects have been reported to be less sensitive to the hyperthermic effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamine (MDMA) than males. Studies were designed to examine the cellular mechanisms involved in these sex sensitive differences. Gonadectomized female and male rats were treated with a 200 {mu}g 100 {mu}L{sup -1} of estrogen or 100 {mu}g 100 {mu}L{sup -1} of testosterone respectively every 5 days for a total of three doses. Rats were then challenged with either saline or MDMA (20 mg kg{sup -1}, sc). Rats were then euthanized and aortas were constricted, in vitro, by serial phenylephrine (Phe) addition with or without the inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, g-nitro-L-Arginine-Methyl Ester (L-NAME). Skeletal muscle uncoupling protein-3 (UCP3) expression was measured as well as plasma norepinephrine (NE) levels. All males but no females developed hyperthermia following MDMA treatment. The EC{sub 50} for Phe dose response curves increased only in the females treated with MDMA and T{sub max} for Phe increased following L-NAME only in the females. Both males and females demonstrated an increase in plasma NE following MDMA treatment; however, males displayed a significantly greater NE concentration. Skeletal muscle UCP3 expression was 80% less in females than in males. These results suggest that the inability of MDMA to induce a thermogenic response in the female subjects may be due to four sex-specific mechanisms: 1) Female subjects have reduced sympathetic activation following MDMA challenge; 2) Female vasculature is less sensitive to {alpha}{sub 1}-AR stimulation following MDMA challenge; 3) Female vasculature has an increased sensitivity to NO; 4) UCP3 expression in skeletal muscle is less in females.

  15. Female Scientists, Engineers Open Students' Eyes to Career Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    More than six dozen middle school girls visited INL to learn about career options in science and engineering at the annual My Amazing Future event organized by Idaho Women in Nuclear.

  16. Female physicists lead the way on Jefferson Lab experiment |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    continuous electron beam, operating at the highest energies currently available, toward liquid hydrogen and deuterium targets. A third target made of aluminum was used as a...

  17. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Becky Chamberlin-Overcoming gender bias in science March 11, 2014 Overcoming gender bias in science "Even if she is a girl..." Words like that might deter a female from loving math and science, especially when the disclaimer is announced to a large audience by a math teacher presenting a major award. Fortunately, Los Alamos chemist Becky Chamberlin didn't let gender bias stop her from studying science, achieving an Ivy League doctorate in chemistry. Success in science means much more

  18. SREL Reprint #3052

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the dorsum was positively correlated to body condition in both males and females. Body size was not correlated with hue or proportion of white area on the dorsum. To our...

  19. Dietary chromium and nickel enhance UV-carcinogenesis in skin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    chromium and nickel enhance UV-carcinogenesis in skin of hairless mice The skin cancer enhancing effect of chromium (in male mice) and nickel in UVR-irradiated female Skh1...

  20. SREL Reprint #3119

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Motherdaughter pairs were more common than fatherson pairs. These results coupled with a previous study showing a female-biased sex ratio suggest male-biased dispersal and the ...

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    69 YEAR 2014 Males 34 Females 35 YEAR 2014 SES 5 EJEK 1 EN 05 8 EN 04 5 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 22 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    558 YEAR 2013 Males 512 Females 46 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 2 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 220 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 321 YEAR 2013...

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    300 YEAR 2011 Males 109 Females 191 YEAR 2011 SES 9 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 2 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 203 NU (TechAdmin Support) 38 NF (Future Ldrs) 47 YEAR 2011 American Indian...

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 YEAR 2013 Males 48 Females 32 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 7 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 33 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska...

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Males 139 Females 88 YEAR 2012 SES 13 EX 1 EJEK 8 EN 05 23 EN 04 20 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 91 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 62 NU (TechAdmin Support) 7 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    137 YEAR 2013 Males 90 Females 47 YEAR 2013 SES 2 SL 1 EJEK 30 EN 04 30 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 45 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  7. First Name Last Name EMPLOYEE INFORMATION FORM

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Name Last Name EMPLOYEE INFORMATION FORM Date of Birth SSN Married Not Married Male Female ... PRIOR FEDERAL SERVICE To be Completed by Employee NSN 7540-00-634-4101 Previous Edition ...

  8. Gender Mainstreaming Guide for the Africa Biogas Partnership...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass Topics: Policiesdeployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.energia.orgfileadminfilesmediapubs...

  9. Method of installing subsurface barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-10-09

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  10. Method of sealing casings of subsurface materials management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-02-06

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  11. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kosteinik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2004-07-06

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  12. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-10-17

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  13. Subsurface materials management and containment system, components thereof and methods relating thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-04-18

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  14. Women @ Energy: Dianne Williams Wilburn

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Many STEM career paths are dominated by males. Women need mentors, both male and female, to encourage them to pursue STEM career paths. A lot of times someone just needs to be asked, have they ever thought of taking this class or applying to this school or considering a career in this area?"

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2012 Males 37 Females 7 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 6 EN 05 5 EN 04 7 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 17 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 2...

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 YEAR 2011 Males 38 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 EJEK 6 EN 05 5 EN 04 7 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 19 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 7 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 2...

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    78 YEAR 2012 Males 57 Females 21 YEAR 2012 SES 2 SL 1 EJEK 12 EN 04 21 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 24 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male...

  18. Induction of taxol metabolism in the rat by dexamethasone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, C.D.; Gondi, K.N.; Walle, T.

    1994-12-31

    The antitumor drug taxol was metabolized to two major metabolites (RM1 and RM2) in adult male and female rat liver microsomes. The male rats produced RM1 2.6 fold faster than the females, and they produced RM2 3 fold faster than the females. This correlated well with the sex differences noticed in liver microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A content (4.4 fold greater in male) and 6{beta}-hydroxylation of testosterone (2.4 fold greater in male). Taxol was metabolized to three major metabolites (RM1, RM2, and RM3) in adult male and female rat liver microsomes from rats pretreated with dexamethasone. Production of RM1 and RM2 was increased in these rats (2.3 and 3.3 fold respectively in males; 6.5 and 8.7 fold respectively in females) as compared to the untreated rats. These results compared well with the induction of CYP 3A proteins (3.5 fold in male, 10 fold in female) and induction of 6{beta}-hydroxylation (1.9 fold in males, 3.8 fold in females). RM3, which was produced only by the rats pretreated with dexamethasone, had a retention time of 0.58 relative to taxol which corresponds to 6{alpha}- hydroxytaxol, the major human metabolite of taxol. This study indicates that taxol metabolism in the rat is likely due to CYP 3A enzymes. Although the evidence points toward CYP 3A1 as the major isoform involved, it does not rule out others. The findings also suggest that CYP 3A1 is responsible for the induced metabolite, RM3.

  19. Sex-specific patterns and deregulation of endocrine pathways in the gene expression profiles of Bangladeshi adults exposed to arsenic contaminated drinking water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muñoz, Alexandra; Chervona, Yana; Hall, Megan; Kluz, Thomas; Gamble, Mary V.; Costa, Max

    2015-05-01

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water occurs globally and is associated with numerous diseases including skin, lung and bladder cancers, and cardiovascular disease. Recent research indicates that arsenic may be an endocrine disruptor. This study was conducted to evaluate the nature of gene expression changes among males and females exposed to arsenic contaminated water in Bangladesh at high and low doses. Twenty-nine (55% male) Bangladeshi adults with water arsenic exposure ranging from 50 to 1000 μg/L were selected from the Folic Acid Creatinine Trial. RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells for gene expression profiling using Affymetrix 1.0 ST arrays. Differentially expressed genes were assessed between high and low exposure groups for males and females separately and findings were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. There were 534 and 645 differentially expressed genes (p < 0.05) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of males and females, respectively, when high and low water arsenic exposure groups were compared. Only 43 genes overlapped between the two sexes, with 29 changing in opposite directions. Despite the difference in gene sets both males and females exhibited common biological changes including deregulation of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, deregulation of genes downstream of Sp1 (specificity protein 1) transcription factor, and prediction of estrogen receptor alpha as a key hub in cardiovascular networks. Arsenic-exposed adults exhibit sex-specific gene expression profiles that implicate involvement of the endocrine system. Due to arsenic's possible role as an endocrine disruptor, exposure thresholds for arsenic may require different parameters for males and females. - Highlights: • Males and females exhibit unique gene expression changes in response to arsenic. • Only 23 genes are common among the differentially expressed genes for the sexes. • Male and female gene lists exhibit common biological

  20. Baseline blood levels of manganese, lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc in residents of Beijing suburb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Long-Lian; Lu, Ling; Pan, Ya-Juan; Ding, Chun-Guang; Xu, Da-Yong; Huang, Chuan-Feng; Pan, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Wei

    2015-07-15

    Baseline blood concentrations of metals are important references for monitoring metal exposure in environmental and occupational settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood levels of manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) among the residents (aged 12–60 years old) living in the suburb southwest of Beijing in China and to compare the outcomes with reported values in various developed countries. Blood samples were collected from 648 subjects from March 2009 to February 2010. Metal concentrations in the whole blood were determined by ICP-MS. The geometric means of blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 11.4, 802.4, 4665, 42.6, and 0.68 µg/L, respectively. Male subjects had higher blood Pb than the females, while the females had higher blood Mn and Cu than the males. There was no gender difference for blood Cd and Zn. Smokers had higher blood Cu, Zn, and Cd than nonsmokers. There were significant age-related differences in blood levels of all metals studied; subjects in the 17–30 age group had higher blood levels of Mn, Pb, Cu, and Zn, while those in the 46–60 age group had higher Cd than the other age groups. A remarkably lower blood level of Cu and Zn in this population as compared with residents of other developed countries was noticed. Based on the current study, the normal reference ranges for the blood Mn were estimated to be 5.80–25.2 μg/L; for blood Cu, 541–1475 μg/L; for blood Zn, 2349–9492 μg/L; for blood Pb, <100 μg/L; and for blood Cd, <5.30 μg/L in the general population living in Beijing suburbs. - Highlights: • Baseline blood levels of metals in residents of Beijing suburb are investigated. • BMn and BPb in this cohort are higher than those in other developed countries. • Remarkably lower blood levels of Cu and Zn in this Chinese cohort are noticed. • The reference values for blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd are established.

  1. A set of 4D pediatric XCAT reference phantoms for multimodality research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Hannah Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Samei, E.; Segars, W. P.; Minhas, Anum; Frush, D.; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The authors previously developed an adult population of 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms for multimodality imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a reference set of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms consisting of male and female anatomies at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years. These models will serve as the foundation from which the authors will create a vast population of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric CT imaging protocols. Methods: Each phantom was based on a unique set of CT data from a normal patient obtained from the Duke University database. The datasets were selected to best match the reference values for height and weight for the different ages and genders according to ICRP Publication 89. The major organs and structures were segmented from the CT data and used to create an initial pediatric model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. The CT data covered the entire torso and part of the head. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the top of the head and the arms and legs using scaled versions of the XCAT adult models or additional models created from cadaver data. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from a template XCAT phantom (male or female 50th percentile adult) to the target pediatric model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. The masses of the organs in each phantom were matched to the reference values given in ICRP Publication 89. The new reference models were checked for anatomical accuracy via visual inspection. Results: The authors created a set of ten pediatric reference phantoms that have the same level of detail and functionality as the original XCAT phantom adults. Each consists of thousands of anatomical structures and includes parameterized models

  2. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2011-11-22

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  3. Duct Joining System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Proctor, John P.

    2001-02-27

    A duct joining system for providing an air-tight seal and mechanical connection for ducts and fittings is disclosed. The duct joining system includes a flexible gasket affixed to a male end of a duct or fitting. The flexible gasket is affixed at an angle relative to normal of the male end of the duct. The female end of the other duct includes a raised bead in which the flexible gasket is seated when the ducts are properly joined. The angled flexible gasket seated in the raised bead forms an air-tight seal as well as fastens or locks the male end to the female end. Alternatively, when a flexible duct is used, a band clamp with a raised bead is clamped over the female end of the flexible duct and over the male end of a fitting to provide an air tight seal and fastened connection.

  4. Duct joining system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Proctor, John P.; deKieffer, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    A duct joining system for providing an air-tight seal and mechanical connection for ducts and fittings is disclosed. The duct joining system includes a flexible gasket affixed to a male end of a duct or fitting. The flexible gasket is affixed at an angle relative to normal of the male end of the duct. The female end of the other duct includes a raised bead in which the flexible gasket is seated when the ducts are properly joined. The angled flexible gasket seated in the raised bead forms an air-tight seal as well as fastens or locks the male end to the female end. Alternatively, when a flexible duct is used, a band clamp with a raised bead is clamped over the female end of the flexible duct and over the male end of a fitting to provide an air tight seal and fastened connection.

  5. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2012-10-23

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  6. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2013-12-31

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assempbled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting regions of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  7. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 35 -5.41% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 27 25 -7.41% ↓ Females 10 10 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 1 0% / EN 05 1 1 0% / EN 04 11 10 -9.09% ↓ NN (Engineering) 8 8 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 14 15 7.14% ↑ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 0 -100% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 1 1 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 1 1 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 3 3 0% / Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 0 0 0% /

  8. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 79 -5.95% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 59 55 -6.78% ↓ Females 25 24 -4.00% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 3 3 0% / EJ/EK 4 4 0% / EN 04 2 1 -50.00% ↓ NN (Engineering) 20 20 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 55 51 -7.27% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 0 0 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 10 10 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 9 8 -11.11% ↓ Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 2 2 0% / Asian American Pacific

  9. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 87 -1.14% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 46 46 0% / Females 42 41 -2.38% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 0 -100% ↓ EJ/EK 4 2 -50.00% ↓ NN (Engineering) 12 12 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 68 70 2.94% ↑ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 3 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 2 2 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 5 5 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 5 6 20.00% ↑ Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 0 0 0% / Asian

  10. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 14 27.27% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 9 12 33.33% ↑ Females 2 2 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 SES 2 2 0% / EJ/EK 1 1 0% / EN 04 0 1 100% ↑ EN 00 0 1 100% ↑ NN (Engineering) 5 5 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 3 4 33.33% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 0 0 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 0 0 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 0 0 0% / Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 1 1 0% / Asian American Pacific