National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gels cxs applied

  1. Apply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply Application Process Bringing together top, space science students with internationally recognized researchers at Los Alamos in an educational and collaborative atmosphere....

  2. Apply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal FacilityApplicantOffice ofApply Application

  3. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, David Glenn (Tucson, AZ); Pollard, John Randolph (Tucson, AZ); Brooks, Robert Aubrey (Tijeras, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  4. Gel-forming reagents and uses thereof for preparing microarrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golova, Julia (Burr Ridge, IL); Chernov, Boris (Burr Ridge, IL); Perov, Alexander (Woodridge, IL)

    2010-11-09

    New gel-forming reagents including monomers and cross-linkers, which can be applied to gel-drop microarray manufacturing by using co-polymerization approaches are disclosed. Compositions for the preparation of co-polymerization mixtures with new gel-forming monomers and cross-linker reagents are described herein. New co-polymerization compositions and cross-linkers with variable length linker groups between unsaturated C.dbd.C bonds that participate in the formation of gel networks are disclosed.

  5. Sol-Gel Manufactured Energetic Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Tillotson, Thomas M. (Tracy, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA); Swansiger, Rosalind W. (Livermore, CA); Fox, Glenn A. (Livermore, CA)

    2005-05-17

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  6. Sol-gel manufactured energetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Randall L.; Lee, Ronald S.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Swansiger, Rosalind W.; Fox, Glenn A.

    2003-12-23

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  7. Foam and gel methods for the decontamination of metallic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunez, Luis; Kaminski, Michael Donald

    2007-01-23

    Decontamination of nuclear facilities is necessary to reduce the radiation field during normal operations and decommissioning of complex equipment. In this invention, we discuss gel and foam based diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) chemical solutions that are unique in that these solutions can be applied at room temperature; provide protection to the base metal for continued applications of the equipment; and reduce the final waste form production to one step. The HEDPA gels and foams are formulated with benign chemicals, including various solvents, such as ionic liquids and reducing and complexing agents such as hydroxamic acids, and formaldehyde sulfoxylate. Gel and foam based HEDPA processes allow for decontamination of difficult to reach surfaces that are unmanageable with traditional aqueous process methods. Also, the gel and foam components are optimized to maximize the dissolution rate and assist in the chemical transformation of the gel and foam to a stable waste form.

  8. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adolf, Douglas B. (Albuquerque, NM); Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM); Segalman, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Witkowski, Walter R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots.

  9. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adolf, D.B.; Shahinpoor, M.; Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1993-10-05

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots. 11 figures.

  10. Gel polymer electrolytes for batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gur, Ilan; Singh, Mohit; Hudson, William

    2014-11-18

    Nanostructured gel polymer electrolytes that have both high ionic conductivity and high mechanical strength are disclosed. The electrolytes have at least two domains--one domain contains an ionically-conductive gel polymer and the other domain contains a rigid polymer that provides structure for the electrolyte. The domains are formed by block copolymers. The first block provides a polymer matrix that may or may not be conductive on by itself, but that can soak up a liquid electrolyte, thereby making a gel. An exemplary nanostructured gel polymer electrolyte has an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-4 S cm.sup.-1 at 25.degree. C.

  11. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petruska, Melissa A. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2007-06-05

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites.

  12. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petruska, Melissa A. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-06-12

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites

  13. CX-010520: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Silica Polymer Initiator Conformance Gel Applications in Geothermal Zonal Isolation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B3.11 Date: 06/17/2013 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  14. Gel Electrophoresis of Gold-DNA Nanoconjugates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pellegrino, T.; Sperling, R. A.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Parak, W. J.

    2007-01-01

    Gold-DNA conjugates were investigated in detail by a comprehensive gel electrophoresis study based on 1200 gels. A controlled number of single-stranded DNA of different length was attached specifically via thiol-Au bonds to phosphine-stabilized colloidal gold nanoparticles. Alternatively, the surface of the gold particles was saturated with single stranded DNA of different length either specifically via thiol-Au bonds or by nonspecific adsorption. From the experimentally determined electrophoretic mobilities, estimates for the effective diameters of the gold-DNA conjugates were derived by applying two different data treatment approaches. The first method is based on making a calibration curve for the relation between effectivemore »diameters and mobilities with gold nanoparticles of known diameter. The second method is based on Ferguson analysis which uses gold nanoparticles of known diameter as reference database. Our study shows that effective diameters derived from gel electrophoresis measurements are affected with a high error bar as the determined values strongly depend on the method of evaluation, though relative changes in size upon binding of molecules can be detected with high precision. Furthermore, in this study, the specific attachment of DNA via gold-thiol bonds to Au nanoparticles is compared to nonspecific adsorption of DNA. Also, the maximum number of DNA molecules that can be bound per particle was determined.« less

  15. A conjugated polymer plastic gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcazar Jorba, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    We present a gel route to process highly oriented conjugated polymer films and fibers. The incorporation of hexafluoroisopropanol, a strong and stable dipolar group, to the polythiophene backbone enhances the solubility ...

  16. Formaldehyde RNA Gel Wear gloves.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    29 Formaldehyde RNA Gel · Wear gloves. · Use tips and tubes that are RNase-free and reserved dH20 74 ml 55.5 222 1% Agarose 1 g 0.75 g 3 g 10X MOPS 10 ml 7.5 ml 30 ml 37% Formaldehyde 16 ml 12. C. Add 37% Formaldehyde (Fisher, ACS grade, 12.3M, final concentration = 2M) D. Pour gel and allow

  17. Pre-Cast Gel Electrophoresis Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Marc W.

    Novex® Pre-Cast Gel Electrophoresis Guide Version B January 27, 2003 IM-1002 Novex® Pre-Cast Gel Electrophoresis Guide General information and protocols for using Novex® pre-cast gels www.invitrogen.com tech.....................................................................................................................1 Novex® Pre-Cast Gels

  18. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhia, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-03-01

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  19. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riha, Brian D.

    2012-07-03

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  20. Capillary fracture of soft gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua B. Bostwick; Karen E. Daniels

    2013-10-16

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact-line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize i) the initiation process in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus and ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law $L\\propto t^{3/4}$. We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid/solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material, and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent.

  1. Mechanical response of active gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. B. Liverpool; M. C. Marchetti; J. -F. Joanny; J. Prost

    2008-07-18

    We study a model of an active gel of cross-linked semiflexible filaments with additional active linkers such as myosin II clusters. We show that the coupling of the elasticity of the semiflexible filaments to the mechanical properties of the motors leads to contractile behavior of the gel, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. The motors, however, soften the zero frequency elastic constant of the gel. When the collective motor dynamics is incorporated in the model, a stiffening of the network at high frequencies is obtained. The frequency controlling the crossover between low and high frequency network elasticity is estimated in terms of microscopic properties of motors and filaments, and can be as low as 10^(-3)Hz.

  2. Sol-gel derived sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sigman, Michael E.; Dindal, Amy B.

    2003-11-11

    Described is a method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles for the production of copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent material. The method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles comprises adding a basic solution to an aqueous metal alkoxide mixture for a pH.ltoreq.8 to hydrolyze the metal alkoxides. Then, allowing the mixture to react at room temperature for a precalculated period of time for the mixture to undergo an increased in viscosity to obtain a desired pore size and surface area. The copolymerized mixture is then added to an immiscible, nonpolar solvent that has been heated to a sufficient temperature wherein the copolymerized mixture forms a solid upon the addition. The solid is recovered from the mixture, and is ready for use in an active sampling trap or activated for use in a passive sampling trap.

  3. Timescales in creep and yielding of attractive gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Grenard; Thibaut Divoux; Nicolas Taberlet; Sébastien Manneville

    2013-11-27

    The stress-induced yielding scenario of colloidal gels is investigated under rough boundary conditions by means of rheometry coupled to local velocity measurements. Under an applied shear stress, the fluidization of gels made of attractive carbon black particles suspended in a mineral oil is shown to involve a previously unreported shear rate response $\\dot \\gamma (t)$ characterized by two well-defined and separated timescales $\\tau_c$ and $\\tau_f$. First $\\dot \\gamma(t)$ decreases as a weak power law strongly reminiscent of the primary creep observed in numerous crystalline and amorphous solids, coined the "Andrade creep." We show that the bulk deformation remains homogeneous at the micron scale, which demonstrates that if plastic events take place or if any shear transformation zone exists, such phenomena occur at a smaller scale. As a key result of this paper, the duration $\\tau_c$ of this creep regime decreases as a power law of the viscous stress, defined as the difference between the applied stress and the yield stress with an exponent ranging between 2 and 3 depending on the gel concentration. The end of this first regime is marked by a jump of the shear rate by several orders of magnitude, while the gel slowly slides as a solid block experiencing strong wall slip at both walls, despite rough boundary conditions. Finally, a second sudden increase of the shear rate is concomitant to the full fluidization of the material which ends up being homogeneously sheared. The corresponding fluidization time $\\tau_f$ robustly follows an exponential decay with the applied shear stress as already reported for smooth boundary conditions. Finally, we highlight a few features that are common to attractive colloidal gels and to solid materials by discussing our results in the framework of theoretical approaches of solid rupture (kinetic, fiber bundle, and transient network models).

  4. Commercial applications of block copolymer photonic gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lou, Sally S

    2008-01-01

    Block copolymer photonic gels are a simple and easily processed material which responds rapidly to environmental stimuli through a color change. The diblock copolymer that forms the gel self-assembles into a lamellar ...

  5. Spring-loaded polymeric gel actuators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, M.

    1995-02-14

    Spring-loaded electrically controllable polymeric gel actuators are disclosed. The polymeric gels can be polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylic acid, or polyacrylamide, and are contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as water plus acetone. The action of the gel is mechanically biased, allowing the expansive and contractile forces to be optimized for specific applications. 5 figs.

  6. Fluorography of Gels Using PPO Step Description SDS-PAGE Gel Agarose Gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    with plastic film, and place against pre-flashed film at -70°C. *DMSO may be re-used 10 times. Make hash platform. Use rotating platform. Use glass dish with glass top. Use glass dish with glass top. 1 Fixation solution. #AcCOOH is not re-used. Use a minimum volume (enough to cover gel). Discard after use. PPO stocks

  7. Active Gel Model of Amoeboid Cell Motility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Callan-Jones; R. Voituriez

    2013-02-01

    We develop a model of amoeboid cell motility based on active gel theory. Modeling the motile apparatus of a eukaryotic cell as a confined layer of finite length of poroelastic active gel permeated by a solvent, we first show that, due to active stress and gel turnover, an initially static and homogeneous layer can undergo a contractile-type instability to a polarized moving state in which the rear is enriched in gel polymer. This agrees qualitatively with motile cells containing an actomyosin-rich uropod at their rear. We find that the gel layer settles into a steadily moving, inhomogeneous state at long times, sustained by a balance between contractility and filament turnover. In addition, our model predicts an optimal value of the gel-susbstrate adhesion leading to maximum layer speed, in agreement with cell motility assays. The model may be relevant to motility of cells translocating in complex, confining environments that can be mimicked experimentally by cell migration through microchannels.

  8. Automated apparatus for producing gradient gels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, N.L.

    1983-11-10

    Apparatus for producing a gradient gel which serves as a standard medium for a two-dimensional analysis of proteins, the gel having a density gradient along its height formed by a variation in gel composition, with the apparatus including first and second pumping means each including a plurality of pumps on a common shaft and driven by a stepping motor capable of providing small incremental changes in pump outputs for the gel ingredients, the motors being controlled, by digital signals from a digital computer, a hollow form or cassette for receiving the gel composition, means for transferring the gel composition including a filler tube extending near the bottom of the cassette, adjustable horizontal and vertical arms for automatically removing and relocating the filler tube in the next cassette, and a digital computer programmed to automatically control the stepping motors, arm movements, and associated sensing operations involving the filling operation.

  9. Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozer, N.

    2010-01-01

    layer, (3) solid electrolyte or ion conductor, (4) ionof inorganic type solid electrolytes [20,21]. An all sol-gel

  10. Substituent effects on the sol-gel chemistry of organotrialkoxysilanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOY, DOUGLAS A.; BAUGHER, BRIGITTA M.; BAUGHER, COLLEEN R.; SCHNEIDER, DUANE A.; RAHIMIAN, KAMYAR

    2000-05-09

    Silsesquioxanes have been the subject of intensive study in the past and are becoming important again as a vehicle for introducing organic functionalities into hybrid organic-inorganic materials through sol-gel processing. Depending on the application, the target hybrid material may be required to be a highly cross-linked, insoluble gel or a soluble polymer that can be cast as a thin film or coating. The former has applications such as catalyst supports and separations media; the latter is an economically important method for surface modification or compatiblization for applying adhesives or introducing fillers. Polysilsesquioxanes are readily prepared through the hydrolysis and condensation of organotrialkoxysilanes, though organotriaminosilane and organotrihalosilane monomers can also be used. This paper explores the kinetics of the preparation route.

  11. Characterization of Sol-gel Encapsulated Proteins using Small-angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Guangming [ORNL; Zhang, Qiu [ORNL; Del Castillo, Alexis Rae [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Entrapment of biomolecules in silica-derived sol-gels has grown into a vibrant area of research since it was originally demonstrated. However, accessing the consequences of entrapment on biomolecules and the gel structure remains a major challenge in characterizing these biohybrid materials. We present the first demonstration that it is possible with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to study the conformation of dilute proteins that are entrapped in transparent and dense sol-gels. Using deuterium-labeled green fluorescent protein (GFP) and SANS with contrast variation, we demonstrate that the scattering signatures of the sol-gel and the protein can be separated. Analysis of the scattering curves of the sol-gels using a mass-fractal model shows that the size of the colloidal silica particles and the fractal dimensions of the gels were similar in the absence and presence of protein, demonstrating that GFP did not influence the reaction pathway for the formation of the gel. The major structural difference in the gels was that the pore size was increased 2-fold in the presence of the protein. At the contrast match point for silica, the scattering signal from GFP inside the gel became distinguishable over a wide q range. Simulated scattering curves representing a monomer, end-to-end dimer, and parallel dimer of the protein were calculated and compared to the experimental data. Our results show that the most likely structure of GFP is that of an end-to-end dimer. This approach can be readily applied and holds great potential for the structural characterization of complex biohybrid and other materials.

  12. Nonlinear Elasticity in Biological Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornelis Storm; Jennifer J. Pastore; Fred C. MacKintosh; Tom C. Lubensky; Paul A. Janmey

    2004-06-01

    Unlike most synthetic materials, biological materials often stiffen as they are deformed. This nonlinear elastic response, critical for the physiological function of some tissues, has been documented since at least the 19th century, but the molecular structure and the design principles responsible for it are unknown. Current models for this response require geometrically complex ordered structures unique to each material. In this Article we show that a much simpler molecular theory accounts for strain stiffening in a wide range of molecularly distinct biopolymer gels formed from purified cytoskeletal and extracellular proteins. This theory shows that systems of semi-flexible chains such as filamentous proteins arranged in an open crosslinked meshwork invariably stiffen at low strains without the need for a specific architecture or multiple elements with different intrinsic stiffnesses.

  13. Normal force controlled rheology for thermoreversible gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosi Mao; Thibaut Divoux; Patrick Snabre

    2015-08-07

    A wide range of thermoreversible gels are prepared by cooling down to ambient temperature hot aqueous solutions of polymers. During the sol-gel transition, such soft solids may experience a volume contraction leading to experimental issues regarding rheological measurements such as the stress-induced release of solvent, and the partial loss of contact between the sample and the shear cell. In this article, we revisit the formation of thermoreversible gels through a series of benchmark experiments conducted on agar gels in a plate-plate geometry. Monitoring the gelation with a constant gap results in an artificial drift of the gel elastic modulus $G'$ because of the sample contraction. We show that maintaining a constant normal force equals to zero instead of a constant gap allows $G'$ to reach a plateau as the gap variation compensates the sample contraction. The latter method provides a way to measure more reliably the gel linear properties with either rough or smooth boundary conditions, and allows us to quantify the sample contraction. Furthermore, we also unravel two subtle artifacts associated with metallic boundary conditions that may impact rheological measurements during the early stage of the gelation. We show that the slow oxidation of the plate by the solution and/or the presence of an oil layer around the sample, that is traditionally used to prevent evaporation, may both lead to a premature and artificial growth of $G'$ which should not be misinterpreted as the formation of a pre-gel. Finally, we illustrate the relevance of the controlled normal force protocol, by investigating the influence of thermal history on the mechanical properties of agar gels. Our work offers an extensive review of the artifacts associated with the rheology of thermoreversible gels and paves the way for a more systematic use of normal force controlled rheology.

  14. SILICA GEL BEHAVIOR UNDER DIFFERENT EGS CHEMICAL AND THERMAL CONDITIONS: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, J D; Ezzedine, S M; Bourcier, W; Roberts, S

    2012-01-19

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principal pathways for migration of water and contaminants in groundwater systems, fluids in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), oil and gas in petroleum reservoirs, carbon dioxide leakage from geological carbon sequestration, and radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. When dealing with EGS fracture networks, there are several major issues to consider, e.g., the minimization of hydraulic short circuits and losses of injected geothermal fluid to the surrounding formation, which in turn maximize heat extraction and economic production. Gel deployments to direct and control fluid flow have been extensively and successfully used in the oil industry for enhanced oil recovery. However, to the best of our knowledge, gels have not been applied to EGS to enhance heat extraction. In-situ gelling systems can either be organic or inorganic. Organic polymer gels are generally not thermostable to the typical temperatures of EGS systems. Inorganic gels, such as colloidal silica gels, however, may be ideal blocking agents for EGS systems if suitable gelation times can be achieved. In the current study, we explore colloidal silica gelation times and rheology as a function of SiO{sub 2} concentration, pH, salt concentration, and temperature, with preliminary results in the two-phase field above 100 C. Results at 25 C show that it may be possible to choose formulations that will gel in a reasonable and predictable amount of time at the temperatures of EGS systems.

  15. Applied Math

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    $author.value

    Current research topics by the Applied Math Faculty members include: Numerical analysis and applications of finite difference, finite element and spectral ...

  16. Sol-gel antireflective coating on plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, C.S.; Reed, S.T.

    1988-01-26

    An antireflection film made from reliquified sol-gel hydrolyzation, condensation polymeric reaction product of a silicon, alkoxides and/or metal alkoxides, or mixtures thereof. The film is particularly useful for coating plastics.

  17. Sol-gel antireflective coating on plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    An antireflection film made from a reliquified sol-gel hydrolyzation, condensation polymeric reaction product of a silicon, alkoxides and/or metal alkoxides, or mixtures thereof. The film is particularly useful for coating plastics.

  18. Sample collection system for gel electrophoresis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olivares, Jose A.; Stark, Peter C.; Dunbar, John M.; Hill, Karen K.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Roybal, Gustavo

    2004-09-21

    An automatic sample collection system for use with an electrophoretic slab gel system is presented. The collection system can be used with a slab gel have one or more lanes. A detector is used to detect particle bands on the slab gel within a detection zone. Such detectors may use a laser to excite fluorescently labeled particles. The fluorescent light emitted from the excited particles is transmitted to low-level light detection electronics. Upon the detection of a particle of interest within the detection zone, a syringe pump is activated, sending a stream of buffer solution across the lane of the slab gel. The buffer solution collects the sample of interest and carries it through a collection port into a sample collection vial.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Gels; Stress from Confined Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George W. Scherer

    2009-12-01

    Abstract for Grant DE-FG02-97ER45642 Period: 1997-2002 Mechanical Properties of Gels 2002-2008 Stress from Confined Fluids Principal investigator: Prof. George W. Scherer Dept. Civil & Env. Eng./PRISM Eng. Quad. E-319 Princeton, NJ 08544 USA Recipient organization: Trustees of Princeton University 4 New South Princeton, NJ 08544 USA Abstract: The initial stage of this project, entitled Mechanical Properties of Gels, was dedicated to characterizing and explaining the properties of inorganic gels. Such materials, made by sol-gel processing, are of interest for fabrication of films, fibers, optical devices, advanced insulation and other uses. However, their poor mechanical properties are an impediment in some applications, so understanding the origin of these properties could lead to enhanced performance. Novel experimental methods were developed and applied to measure the stiffness and permeability of gels and aerogels. Numerical simulations were developed to reproduce the growth process of the gels, resulting in structures whose mechanical properties matched the measurements. The models showed that the gels are formed by the growth of relatively robust clusters of molecules that are joined by tenuous links whose compliance compromises the stiffness of the structure. Therefore, synthetic methods that enhance the links could significantly increase the rigidity of such gels. The next stage of the project focused on Stress from Confined Fluids. The first problem of interest was the enhanced thermal expansion coefficient of water that we measured in the nanometric pores of cement paste. This could have a deleterious effect on the resistance of concrete to rapid heating in fires, because the excessive thermal expansion of water in the pores of the concrete could lead to spalling and collapse. A series of experiments demonstrated that the expansion of water increases as the pore size decreases. To explain this behavior, we undertook a collaboration with Prof. Stephen Garofalini (Rutgers), who has developed the best simulations of water ever reported by use of molecular dynamics. Simulated heating of water in small pores provided quantitative agreement with experiments, and showed that the origin of the high expansion is the altered structure of water in the first two molecular layers adjacent to the pore wall. The final focus of the project was to understand the damage done by crystals growing in small pores. For example, the primary cause of damage to ancient monuments in the Mediterranean Basin is growth of salt crystals in the pores of the stone. Salt may enter stone as a result of capillary rise of groundwater, by leaching of mortar joints, deposition of marine spray, or reactions with atmospheric pollutants (such as oxides of nitrogen or sulfur). As the water evaporates, the salt solution becomes supersaturated and crystals precipitate. Stress results, because the salt usually repels the minerals in the pore walls. Our goal was to identify the factors contributing to the repulsion, so that we could develop a chemical treatment to reduce the repulsion and hence the stress. (We have recently demonstrated an effective treatment as part of a separately funded study.) In collaboration with Prof. Garofalini, molecular dynamics simulations have been done that correctly reproduce the structure of water around dissolved ions of sodium and chloride. We simulated the interaction between crystals of sodium chloride and quartz, and found that this particular system exhibits attractive forces, in agreement with experiment. The origin of the attraction is the orientation of dipolar water molecules near the surfaces of the crystals. Similar calculations now must be done in systems, such as potassium chloride and quartz, where the interaction is repulsive. This grant supported the education of two doctoral students, Hang-Shing Ma (Ph.D., 2002) and Melanie Webb (Ph.D. expected 2010), three post-doctoral researchers, Joachim Gross, Gudrun Reichenauer, and Shuangyan (Sonia) Xu, and five undergraduates (for senior theses or independent projects

  20. Annular gel reactor for chemical pattern formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nosticzius, Zoltan (Budapest, HU); Horsthemke, Werner (Austin, TX); McCormick, William D. (Austin, TX); Swinney, Harry L. (Austin, TX); Tam, Wing Y. (Austin, TX)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an annular gel reactor suitable for the production and observation of spatiotemporal patterns created during a chemical reaction. The apparatus comprises a vessel having at least a first and second chamber separated one from the other by an annular polymer gel layer (or other fine porous medium) which is inert to the materials to be reacted but capable of allowing diffusion of the chemicals into it.

  1. Neutron detector using sol-gel absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Wallace, Steven A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    An neutron detector composed of fissionable material having ions of lithium, uranium, thorium, plutonium, or neptunium, contained within a glass film fabricated using a sol-gel method combined with a particle detector is disclosed. When the glass film is bombarded with neutrons, the fissionable material emits fission particles and electrons. Prompt emitting activated elements yielding a high energy electron contained within a sol-gel glass film in combination with a particle detector is also disclosed. The emissions resulting from neutron bombardment can then be detected using standard UV and particle detection methods well known in the art, such as microchannel plates, channeltrons, and silicon avalanche photodiodes.

  2. Characterization of gels prepared from silicon ethoxide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun, Su-Jin

    1990-01-01

    by heating to a high temperature, with low heating rates. Tg and Tc were correlated to water gt alcohol contents in presence of HCI or HF. Aerogels were found to have high pore volume, low bulk density, large pore size, and weak mechanical strength.... Structures of dried gels 2. 3, Densification 13 14 15 19 19 CHAPTER III 3. 1. Raw materials 3. 2. Xerogel preparation 3. 3. Aerogel preparation 3. 4. Characterization of dried gels 3, 4. 1. Mercury porosimetry 3. 4. 2. BET analysis 3. 4, 3...

  3. Hybrid sol-gel optical materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeigler, John M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01

    Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

  4. Hybrid sol-gel optical materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeigler, J.M.

    1993-04-20

    Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

  5. Hybrid sol-gel optical materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeigler, John M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

  6. Dna electrophoresis in photopolymerized polyacrylamide gels on a microfluidic device 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Chih-Cheng

    2009-05-15

    -throughput DNA gel electrophoresis. However, further progress toward dramatic improvements of separation performance over ultra-short distances requires a much more detailed understanding of the physics of DNA migration in the sieving gel matrix than is currently...

  7. Electroluminescence in ion gel gated organic polymer semiconductor transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, Shrivalli

    2011-07-12

    This thesis reports the light emission in ion gel gated, thin film organic semiconductor transistors and investigates the light emission mechanism behind these devices. We report that ion gel gated organic polymer semiconductor transistors emit...

  8. Physics of liquid crystals embedded in silica gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Sungil, 1967-

    2001-01-01

    Octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) embedded in silica aerosil gels have been studied by means of high resolution X-ray scattering experiments. The silica particles form a hydrogen-bonded fractal gel network that introduces quenched ...

  9. Gel bead composition for metal adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Woodward, Charlene A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Byers, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a gel bead comprising propylene glycol alginate and bone gelatin and is capable of removing metals such as Sr and Cs from solution without adding other adsorbents. The invention could have application to the nuclear industry's waste removal activities.

  10. Gel bead composition for metal adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Woodward, Charlene A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Byers, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is a gel bead comprising propylene glycol alginate and bone gelatin and is capable of removing metals such as Sr and Cs from solution without adding other adsorbents. The invention could have application to the nuclear industry's waste removal activities.

  11. Encapsulation of nanoclusters in dried gel materials via an inverse micelle/sol gel synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, A.; Yamanaka, S.A.; Kawola, J.S.; Showalter, S.K.; Loy, D.A.

    1998-09-29

    A dried gel material sterically entrapping nanoclusters of a catalytically active material and a process to make the material via an inverse micelle/sol-gel synthesis are disclosed. A surfactant is mixed with an apolar solvent to form an inverse micelle solution. A salt of a catalytically active material, such as gold chloride, is added along with a silica gel precursor to the solution to form a mixture. To the mixture are then added a reducing agent for the purpose of reducing the gold in the gold chloride to atomic gold to form the nanoclusters and a condensing agent to form the gel which sterically entraps the nanoclusters. The nanoclusters are normally in the average size range of from 5--10 nm in diameter with a monodisperse size distribution. 1 fig.

  12. Encapsulation of nanoclusters in dried gel materials via an inverse micelle/sol gel synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, Anthony (Albuquerque, NM); Yamanaka, Stacey A. (Dallas, TX); Kawola, Jeffrey S. (Albuquerque, NM); Showalter, Steven K. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A dried gel material sterically entrapping nanoclusters of a catalytically active material and a process to make the material via an inverse micelle/sol-gel synthesis. A surfactant is mixed with an apolar solvent to form an inverse micelle solution. A salt of a catalytically active material, such as gold chloride, is added along with a silica gel precursor to the solution to form a mixture. To the mixture are then added a reducing agent for the purpose of reducing the gold in the gold chloride to atomic gold to form the nanoclusters and a condensing agent to form the gel which sterically entraps the nanoclusters. The nanoclusters are normally in the average size range of from 5-10 nm in diameter with a monodisperse size distribution.

  13. Metal-doped organic gels and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA)

    2007-10-23

    Disclosed herein is a sol-gel polymerization process for synthesizing metal-doped organic gels. The process polymerizes metal salts of hydroxylated benzenes or hydroxylated benzene derivatives with alkyl or aryl aldehydes to form metal-doped, wet, organic gels. The gels can then be dried by supercritical solvent extraction to form metal-doped aerogels or by evaporation to form metal-doped xerogels. The aerogels and xerogels can then be pyrolyzed.

  14. Metal-doped organic gels and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Baumann, Theodore F.

    2003-09-02

    Disclosed herein is a sol-gel polymerization process for synthesizing metal-doped organic gels. The process polymerizes metal salts of hydroxylated benzenes or hydroxylated benzene derivatives with alkyl or aryl aldehydes to form metal-doped, wet, organic gels. The gels can then be dried by supercritical solvent extraction to form metal-doped aerogels or by evaporation to form metal-doped xerogels. The aerogels and xerogels can then be pyrolyzed.

  15. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Jack L.

    2014-06-17

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide gels contain a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous aluminum oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  16. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous cerium oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, Jack L; Chi, Anthony

    2013-05-07

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous cerium oxide gels contain a metal salt including cerium, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous cerium oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including cerium, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  17. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous hafnium oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, Jack L; Hunt, Rodney D; Montgomery, Frederick C

    2013-08-06

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous hafnium oxide gels contain a metal salt including hafnium, an acid, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous hafnium oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including hafnium, an acid, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  18. Applied combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    From the title, the reader is led to expect a broad practical treatise on combustion and combustion devices. Remarkably, for a book of modest dimension, the author is able to deliver. The text is organized into 12 Chapters, broadly treating three major areas: combustion fundamentals -- introduction (Ch. 1), thermodynamics (Ch. 2), fluid mechanics (Ch. 7), and kinetics (Ch. 8); fuels -- coal, municipal solid waste, and other solid fuels (Ch. 4), liquid (Ch. 5) and gaseous (Ch. 6) fuels; and combustion devices -- fuel cells (Ch. 3), boilers (Ch. 4), Otto (Ch. 10), diesel (Ch. 11), and Wankel (Ch. 10) engines and gas turbines (Ch. 12). Although each topic could warrant a complete text on its own, the author addresses each of these major themes with reasonable thoroughness. Also, the book is well documented with a bibliography, references, a good index, and many helpful tables and appendices. In short, Applied Combustion does admirably fulfill the author`s goal for a wide engineering science introduction to the general subject of combustion.

  19. Sol-gel method for encapsulating molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Bhatia, Rimple (Albuquerque, NM); Singh, Anup K. (San Francisco, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A method for encapsulating organic molecules, and in particular, biomolecules using sol-gel chemistry. A silica sol is prepared from an aqueous alkali metal silicate solution, such as a mixture of silicon dioxide and sodium or potassium oxide in water. The pH is adjusted to a suitably low value to stabilize the sol by minimizing the rate of siloxane condensation, thereby allowing storage stability of the sol prior to gelation. The organic molecules, generally in solution, is then added with the organic molecules being encapsulated in the sol matrix. After aging, either a thin film can be prepared or a gel can be formed with the encapsulated molecules. Depending upon the acid used, pH, and other processing conditions, the gelation time can be from one minute up to several days. In the method of the present invention, no alcohols are generated as by-products during the sol-gel and encapsulation steps. The organic molecules can be added at any desired pH value, where the pH value is generally chosen to achieve the desired reactivity of the organic molecules. The method of the present invention thereby presents a sufficiently mild encapsulation method to retain a significant portion of the activity of the biomolecules, compared with the activity of the biomolecules in free solution.

  20. Multiple yielding processes in a colloidal gel under large amplitude oscillatory stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Gibaud; Christophe Perge; Stefan B. Lindstrom; Nicolas Taberlet; Sebastien Manneville

    2015-08-24

    Fatigue refers to the changes in material properties caused by repeatedly applied loads. It has been widely studied for, e.g., construction materials, but much less has been done on soft materials. Here, we characterize the fatigue dynamics of a colloidal gel. Fatigue is induced by large amplitude oscillatory stress (LAOStress), and the local displacements of the gel are measured through high-frequency ultrasonic imaging. We show that fatigue eventually leads to rupture and fluidization. We evidence four successive steps associated with these dynamics: (i) the gel first remains solid, (ii) it then slides against the walls, (iii) the bulk of the sample becomes heterogeneous and displays solid-fluid coexistence, and (iv) it is finally fully fluidized. It is possible to homogeneously scale the duration of each step with respect to the stress oscillation amplitude $\\sigma_0$. The data are compatible with both exponential and power-law scalings with $\\sigma_0$, which hints at two possible interpretations in terms of delayed yielding in terms activated processes or of the Basquin law. Surprisingly, we find that the model parameters behave nonmonotonically as we change the oscillation frequency and/or the gel concentration.

  1. Development of Polymer Gel Systems to Improve Volumetric Sweep and Reduce Producing Water/Oil Ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2005-12-31

    Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of a 42-month research program that focused on the understanding of gelation chemistry and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work was conducted on a widely applied system in the field, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A rate equation that describes the reaction between chromium acetate and polymer molecules was regressed from experimental data. A mathematical model that describes the crosslinking reaction between two polymer molecules as a function of time was derived. The model was based on probability concepts and provides molecular-weight averages and molecular-weight distributions of the pre-gel aggregates as a function of time and initial system conditions. Average molecular weights of pre-gel aggregates were measured as a function of time and were comparable to model simulations. Experimental methods to determine molecular weight distributions of pre-gel aggregates were unsuccessful. Dissolution of carbonate minerals during the injection of gelants causes the pH of the gelant to increase. Chromium precipitates from solution at the higher pH values robbing the gelant of crosslinker. Experimental data on the transport of chromium acetate solutions through dolomite cores were obtained. A mathematical model that describes the transport of brine and chromium acetate solutions through rocks containing carbonate minerals was used to simulate the experimental results and data from literature. Gel treatments usually reduce the permeability to water to a greater extent than the permeability to oil is reduced. This phenomenon is referred to as disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR). Flow experiments were conducted in sandpacks to determine the effect of polymer and chromium concentrations on DPR. All gels studied reduced the permeability to water by a greater factor than the factor by which the oil permeability was reduced. Greater DPR was observed as the concentrations of polymer and chromium were increased. A conceptual model of the mechanisms responsible for DPR is presented. Primary features of the model are (1) the development of flow channels through the gel by dehydration and displacement of the gel and by re-connection of pre-treatment, residual oil volume and (2) high flow resistance in the channels during water flow is caused by significant saturations of oil remaining in the channels. A similar study of DPR was conducted in Berea sandstone cores. Both oil and water permeabilities were reduced by much smaller factors in Berea sandstone cores than in similar treatments in sandpacks. Poor maturation of the gelant in the Berea rock was thought to be caused by fluid-rock interactions that interfered with the gelation process.

  2. Static and dynamic properties of a reversible gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo I. Hurtado; Pinaki Chaudhuri; Ludovic Berthier; Walter Kob

    2008-11-10

    We study a microscopically realistic model of a physical gel and use computer simulations to investigate its static and dynamic properties at thermal equilibrium. The phase diagram comprises a sol phase, a coexistence region ending at a critical point, a gelation line, and an equilibrium gel phase unrelated to phase separation. The global structure of the gel is homogeneous, but the stress is supported by a fractal network. Gelation results in a dramatic slowing down of the dynamics, which can be used to locate the transition, which otherwise shows no structural signatures. Moreover, the equilibrium gel dynamics is highly heterogeneous as a result of the presence of particle families with different mobilities. An analysis of gel dynamics in terms of mobile and arrested particles allows us to elucidate several differences between the dynamics of equilibrium gels and that of glass-formers.

  3. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA); Carrano, Anthony V. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Koo, Jackson C. (San Ramon, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate.

  4. Author's personal copy Large deformation and electrochemistry of polyelectrolyte gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Wei

    Author's personal copy Large deformation and electrochemistry of polyelectrolyte gels Wei Hong and electrochemistry. A specific material model is described, including the effects of stretching the network, mixing

  5. Liquid and gel electrodes for transverse free flow electrophoresis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Liquid and gel electrodes for transverse free flow electrophoresis The present invention provides a mechanism for separating or isolating charged particles under the...

  6. Dispenser Printed Zinc Microbattery with an Ionic Liquid Gel Electrolyte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Christine Chihfan

    2010-01-01

    Electrically Conductive Oxide Aerogels: New Materials in2003). Electrochemical Properties of Vanadium Oxide Aerogelsand Aerogel Nanocomposites . Journal of Sol-Gel Science and

  7. Fingering to fracturing transition in a transient gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Foyart; Laurence Ramos; Serge Mora; Christian Ligoure

    2013-06-21

    Fracture processes are ubiquitous in soft materials, even in complex fluids, subjected to stresses. To investigate these processes in a simple geometry, we use a model self-assembled transient gel and study the instability patterns obtained in a radial Hele-Shaw cell when a low viscosity oil pushes the more viscous transient gel. Thanks to an analysis of the morphology of the patterns, we find a discontinuous transition between the standard Saffman-Taylor fingering instability and a fracturing instability as the oil injection rate increases. Our data suggest that the flow properties of the gel ahead of the finger tip controls the transition towards fracturing. By analyzing the displacement field of the gel in the vicinity of the fingers and cracks, we show that in the fingering regime, the oil gently pushes the gel, whereas in the fracturing regime, the crack tears apart the gel, resulting in a strong drop of the gel velocity ahead of the crack tip as compared to the tip velocity. We find a unique behavior for the whole displacement field of a gel around a crack, which is drastically different from that around a finger, and reveals the solid-like behavior of the gel at short time. Our experiments and analysis provide quantitative yet simple tools to unambiguously discriminate a finger from a crack in a visco-elastic material.

  8. Apparatus for the production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.; Scott, T.C.; Davison, B.H.

    1998-03-19

    An apparatus is described for the large-scale and continuous production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst. The apparatus is a columnar system based on the chemical cross-linking of hydrocolloidal gels that contain and immobilize a biocatalyst, the biocatalyst being a microorganism or an enzyme. Hydrocolloidal gels, such as alginate, carrageenan, and a mixture of bone gelatin and modified alginate, provide immobilization matrices that can be used to entrap and retain the biocatalyst while allowing effective contact with substrates and release of products. Such immobilized biocatalysts are generally formulated into small spheres or beads that have high concentrations of the biocatalyst within the gel matrix. The columnar system includes a gel dispersion nozzle submerged in a heated non-interacting liquid, typically an organic liquid, that is immiscible with water to allow efficient formation of spherical gel droplets, the non-interacting liquid having a specific gravity that is less than water so that the gel droplets will fall through the liquid by the force of gravity. The heated non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with a chilled upflowing non-interacting liquid that will provide sufficient residence time for the gel droplets as they fall through the liquid so that they will be cooled below the gelling temperature and form solid spheres. The upflowing non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with an upflowing temperature-controlled aqueous solution containing the necessary chemicals for cross-linking or fixing of the gel beads to add the necessary stability. The flow rates of the two liquid streams can be varied to control the proper residence time in each liquid section to accommodate the production of gel beads of differing settling velocities. A valve is provided for continuous removal of the stabilized gel beads from the bottom of the column. 1 fig.

  9. Apparatus for the production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus for the large-scale and continuous production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst. The apparatus is a columnar system based on the chemical cross-linking of hydrocolloidal gels that contain and immobilize a biocatalyst, the biocatalyst being a microorganism or an enzyme. Hydrocolloidal gels, such as alginate, carrageenan, and a mixture of bone gelatin and modified alginate, provide immobilization matrices that can be used to entrap and retain the biocatalyst while allowing effective contact with substrates and release of products. Such immobilized biocatalysts are generally formulated into small spheres or beads that have high concentrations of the biocatalyst within the gel matrix. The columnar system includes a gel dispersion nozzle submerged in a heated non-interacting liquid, typically an organic liquid, that is immiscible with water to allow efficient formation of spherical gel droplets, the non-interacting liquid having a specific gravity that is less than water so that the gel droplets will fall through the liquid by the force of gravity. The heated non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with a chilled upflowing non-interacting liquid that will provide sufficient residence time for the gel droplets as they fall through the liquid so that they will be cooled below the gelling temperature and form solid spheres. The upflowing non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with an upflowing temperature-controlled aqueous solution containing the necessary chemicals for cross-linking or fixing of the gel beads to add the necessary stability. The flow rates of the two liquid streams can be varied to control the proper residence time in each liquid section to accommodate the production of gel beads of differing settling velocities. A valve is provided for continuous removal of the stabilized gel beads from the bottom of the column.

  10. Tactile measurement with a GelSight sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Wenzhen, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    This thesis introduces a method of measuring contact force with GelSight. GelSight is an optical-based tactile sensor that uses a piece of coated elastomer as the contact medium. A camera records the distortion of the ...

  11. Pore-Level Examination of Gel Destruction During Oil Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    Pore-Level Examination of Gel Destruction During Oil Flow R.S. Seright, SPE, New Mexico Petroleum-scale X-ray computed microtomography (XMT) images were obtained at a variety of oil (hexadecane(III)-acetate-hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) gel]. For each pore in our image volume, we followed oil and water saturations

  12. Method for preparing hydrous zirconium oxide gels and spherules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, Jack L.

    2003-08-05

    Methods for preparing hydrous zirconium oxide spherules, hydrous zirconium oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, zirconium monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous zirconium oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, zirconium monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent having a desired crystallinity, zirconium oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, hydrous zirconium oxide fiber materials, zirconium oxide fiber materials, hydrous zirconium oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, zirconium oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite and spherules of barium zirconate. The hydrous zirconium oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process are useful as inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters and ceramics.

  13. Acceptability and Use of the Diaphragm and Replens® Lubricant Gel for HIV Prevention in Southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    G, et al. Diaphragm and lubricant gel for prevention of HIVT, et al. The diaphragm and lubricant gel for prevention ofDiaphragm and Replens Ò Lubricant Gel for HIV Prevention in

  14. Sol-gel coatings for optoelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avellaneda, C.O.; Macedo, M.A.; Florentino, A.O.; Aegerter, M.A. [Univ. of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Quimica

    1994-12-31

    Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} prepared by a sol-gel process in form of coatings and aerogels are new materials which present interesting properties: (a) The coatings present electrochromic properties and exhibit a blue coloration under Li{sup +} insertion with 100% reversible variation of the optical transmission in the visible and near infrared range between 80% and 200% and have a high chemical stability (tested up to 2,000 cycles). (b) They are semiconductor and present a photoelectric effect when illuminating in the UV region ({lambda} < 360 nm). These films are therefore very promising to be used in electrochromic devices, as electrodes for photoelectrochemical purpose and the development of nanocrystalline solar cell. (c) When prepared in aerogel form, the high BET surface area of the powders is a promising asset to use these new materials for catalytic purposes for air pollution control.

  15. Sol-gel processing of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tillotson, T.M.; Hrubesh, L.H.; Fox, G.L.; Simpson, R.L.; Lee, R.W.; Swansiger, R.W.; Simpson, L.R.

    1997-08-18

    As part of a new materials effort, we are exploring the use of sol- gel chemistry to manufacture energetic materials. Traditional manufacturing of energetic materials involves processing of granular solids. One application is the production of detonators where powders of energetic material and a binder are typically mixed and compacted at high pressure to make pellets. Performance properties are strongly dependent on particle size distribution, surface area of its constituents, homogeneity of the mix, and void volume. The goal is to produce detonators with fast energy release rate the are insensitive to unintended initiation. In this paper, we report results of our early work in this field of research, including the preparation of detonators from xerogel molding powders and aerogels, comparing the material properties with present state-of-the-art technology.

  16. Applied Mathematics Department of Applied Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applied Mathematics Department of Applied Mathematics 208 Engineering 1 Building 10 W. 32nd St, Graduate Studies: Xiaofan Li The Department of Applied Mathematics puts mathe- matics to work solving, such as how to construct methods for multi-criteria decision making (requiring discrete mathematics

  17. Fracture of a biopolymer gel as a viscoplastic disentanglement process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tristan Baumberger; Christiane Caroli; David Martina

    2006-07-05

    We present an extensive experimental study of mode-I, steady, slow crack dynamics in gelatin gels. Taking advantage of the sensitivity of the elastic stiffness to gel composition and history we confirm and extend the model for fracture of physical hydrogels which we proposed in a previous paper (Nature Materials, doi:10.1038/nmat1666 (2006)), which attributes decohesion to the viscoplastic pull-out of the network-constituting chains. So, we propose that, in contrast with chemically cross-linked ones, reversible gels fracture without chain scission.

  18. Sol-gel processing with inorganic metal salt precursors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2004-10-19

    Methods for sol-gel processing that generally involve mixing together an inorganic metal salt, water, and a water miscible alcohol or other organic solvent, at room temperature with a macromolecular dispersant material, such as hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) added. The resulting homogenous solution is incubated at a desired temperature and time to result in a desired product. The methods enable production of high quality sols and gels at lower temperatures than standard methods. The methods enable production of nanosize sols from inorganic metal salts. The methods offer sol-gel processing from inorganic metal salts.

  19. Nanodiamond gels in nonpolar media: Colloidal and rheological properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    Nanodiamond gels in nonpolar media: Colloidal and rheological properties Nancy A. Burns, Michael A revision received 21 July 2014; published 27 August 2014) Synopsis Nanodiamonds (ND), i.e., sp3 -hybridized

  20. Large deformation and electrochemistry of polyelectrolyte gels , Xuanhe Zhao b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    Large deformation and electrochemistry of polyelectrolyte gels Wei Hong a , Xuanhe Zhao b , Zhigang. This paper develops a field theory to couple large deformation and electrochemistry. A specific material

  1. Collagen scaffolds and injectable biopolymer gels for cardiac tissue engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Karen Kailin

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional biomaterial scaffolds have begun to shown promise for cell delivery for cardiac tissue engineering. Although various polymers and material forms have been explored, there is a need for: injectable gels ...

  2. Wall Adhesion and Constitutive Modelling of Strong Colloidal Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel R. Lester; Richard Buscall; Anthony D. Stickland; Peter J. Scales

    2014-06-24

    Wall adhesion effects during batch sedimentation of strongly flocculated colloidal gels are commonly assumed to be negligible. In this study in-situ measurements of colloidal gel rheology and solids volume fraction distribution suggest the contrary, where significant wall adhesion effects are observed in a 110mm diameter settling column. We develop and validate a mathematical model for the equilibrium stress state in the presence of wall adhesion under both viscoplastic and viscoelastic constitutive models. These formulations highlight fundamental issues regarding the constitutive modeling of colloidal gels, specifically the relative utility and validity of viscoplastic and viscoelastic rheological models under arbitrary tensorial loadings. The developed model is validated against experimental data, which points toward a novel method to estimate the shear and compressive yield strength of strongly flocculated colloidal gels from a series of equilibrium solids volume fraction profiles over various column widths.

  3. The role of quench rate in colloidal gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Patrick Royall; Alex Malins

    2012-03-03

    Interactions between colloidal particles have hitherto usually been fixed by the suspension composition. Recent experimental developments now enable the control of interactions \\emph{in-situ}. Here we use Brownian dynamics simulations to investigate the effect of controlling interactions on gelation, by "quenching" the system from an equilibrium fluid to a gel. We find that, contrary to the normal case of an instantaneous quench, where the local structure of the gel is highly disordered, controlled quenching results in a gel with a higher degree of local order. Under sufficiently slow quenching, local crystallisation is found, which is strongly enhanced when a monodisperse system is used. The higher the degree of local order, the smaller the mean squared displacement, indicating an enhancement of gel stability.

  4. Swelling and shrinking kinetics of a lamellar gel phase 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egelhaaf, Stefan U; Baker, M.E.; Shaw, N.; Fairhurst, David John

    2008-05-01

    We investigate the swelling and shrinking of L-beta lamellar gel phases composed of surfactant and fatty alcohol after contact with aqueous poly(ethyleneglycol) solutions. The height change Delta h(t) is diffusionlike with ...

  5. Sol-gel-derived Epitaxial Nanocomposite Thin Films with Large...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sol-gel-derived Epitaxial Nanocomposite Thin Films with Large Sharp Magnetoelectric Effect Home Author: B. Liu, T. Sun, J. He, V. P. Dravid Year: 2010 Abstract: Nanostructures of...

  6. Sol-gel chemistry by ring-opening polymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAHIMIAN,KAMYAR; LOY,DOUGLAS A.

    2000-02-07

    Sol-gel processing of materials is plagued by shrinkage during polymerization of the alkoxide monomers and processing (aging and drying) of the resulting gels. The authors have developed a new class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials based on the solventless ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of monomers bearing the 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-2,5-disilaoxacyclopentyl group, which permits them to drastically reduce shrinkage in sol-gel processed materials. Because the monomers are polymerized through a chain growth mechanism catalyzed by base rather than the step growth mechanism normally used in sol-gel systems, hydrolysis and condensation products are entirely eliminated. Furthermore, since water is not required for hydrolysis, an alcohol solvent is not necessary. Monomers with two disilaoxacyclopentyl groups, separated by a rigid phenylene group or a more flexible alkylene group, were prepared through disilylation of the corresponding diacetylenes, followed by ring closure and hydrogenation. Anionic polymerization of these materials, either neat or with 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-2,5-disila-1-oxacyclopentane as a copolymer, affords thermally stable transparent gels with no visible shrinkage. These materials provide an easy route to the introduction of sol-gel type materials in encapsulation of microelectronics, which they have successfully demonstrated.

  7. High surface area neodymium phosphate nano particles by modified aqueous sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankar, Sasidharan [Materials Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala (India)] [Materials Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala (India); Warrier, Krishna Gopakumar, E-mail: wwarrierkgk@yahoo.co.in [Materials Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala (India); Komban, Rajesh [Institut fuer Chemie, Anorganische Chemie 1, Universitaet Osnabrueck, Barbarastrasse 7, 49069 Osnabrueck (Germany)] [Institut fuer Chemie, Anorganische Chemie 1, Universitaet Osnabrueck, Barbarastrasse 7, 49069 Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Synthesis of nano rod shaped neodymium phosphate particles with specific surface area as high as 107 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and particles could be compacted and sintered at as low as 1300 Degree-Sign C to a density of 98.5% (theoretical) with an average grain size of {approx}1 {mu}m. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano size neodymium phosphate is synthesized and characterized using a novel modified aqueous sol gel process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific surface area above 100 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} achieved without the addition of any complexing agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High sintered density reported than the density obtained for powder synthesized through conventional solid state reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The particles are nano sized and have rod shape morphology and are retained at higher temperatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An average grain size of {approx}1 {mu}m obtained for sintered NdPO{sub 4} after thermal etching at 1400 Degree-Sign C. -- Abstract: Synthesis of nano rod shaped neodymium phosphate (NdPO{sub 4}) particles with specific surface area as high as 107 m{sup 2}g{sup -1} and an average length of 50 nm with aspect ratio 5 was achieved using modified sol gel method. Crystallite size calculated from the X-ray diffraction data by applying Scherer equation was 5 nm for the precursor gel after calcination at 400 Degree-Sign C. NdPO{sub 4} was first precipitated from neodymium nitrate solution using phosphoric acid followed by peptization using dilute nitric acid and further gelation in ammonia atmosphere. The calcined gel powders were further characterized by surface area (Brunauer-Emmet-Teller nitrogen adsorption analysis), Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis and FT-IR analysis. Transmission electron microscopy confirms the formation of rod like morphology from the sol, gel and the calcined particles in nano size range. These particles could be compacted and sintered at as low as 1300 Degree-Sign C to a density of 98.5% (theoretical) with an average grain size of {approx}1 {mu}m.

  8. Applications of Geothermally-Produced Colloidal Silica in Reservoir Management - Smart Gels

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hunt, Jonathan

    In enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) the reservoir permeability is often enhanced or created using hydraulic fracturing. In hydraulic fracturing, high fluid pressures are applied to confined zones in the subsurface usually using packers to fracture the host rock. This enhances rock permeability and therefore conductive heat transfer to the circulating geothermal fluid (e.g. water or supercritical carbon dioxide). The ultimate goal is to increase or improve the thermal energy production from the subsurface by either optimal designs of injection and production wells or by altering the fracture permeability to create different zones of circulation that can be exploited in geothermal heat extraction. Moreover, hydraulic fracturing can lead to the creation of undesirable short-circuits or fast flow-paths between the injection and extraction wells leading to a short thermal residence time, low heat recovery, and thus a short-life of the EGS. A potential remedy to these problems is to deploy a cementing (blocking, diverting) agent to minimize short-cuts and/or create new circulation cells for heat extraction. A potential diverting agent is the colloidal silica by-product that can be co-produced from geothermal fluids. Silica gels are abundant in various surface and subsurface applications, yet they have not been evaluated for EGS applications. In this study we are investigating the benefits of silica gel deployment on thermal response of an EGS, either by blocking short-circuiting undesirable pathways as a result of diverting the geofluid to other fractures; or creating, within fractures, new circulation cells for harvesting heat through newly active surface area contact. A significant advantage of colloidal silica is that it can be co-produced from geothermal fluids using an inexpensive membrane-based separation technology that was developed previously using DOE-GTP funding. This co-produced silica has properties that potentially make it useful as a fluid diversion agent for subsurface applications. Colloidal silica solutions exist as low-viscosity fluids during their “induction period” but then undergo a rapid increase in viscosity (gelation) to form a solid gel. The length of the induction period can be manipulated by varying the properties of the solution, such as silica concentration and colloid size. We believe it is possible to produce colloidal silica gels suitable for use as diverting agents for blocking undesirable fast-paths which result in short-circuiting the EGS once hydraulic fracturing has been deployed. In addition, the gels could be used in conventional geothermal fields to increase overall energy recovery by modifying flow.

  9. Applications of Geothermally-Produced Colloidal Silica in Reservoir Management - Smart Gels

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hunt, Jonathan

    2013-01-31

    In enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) the reservoir permeability is often enhanced or created using hydraulic fracturing. In hydraulic fracturing, high fluid pressures are applied to confined zones in the subsurface usually using packers to fracture the host rock. This enhances rock permeability and therefore conductive heat transfer to the circulating geothermal fluid (e.g. water or supercritical carbon dioxide). The ultimate goal is to increase or improve the thermal energy production from the subsurface by either optimal designs of injection and production wells or by altering the fracture permeability to create different zones of circulation that can be exploited in geothermal heat extraction. Moreover, hydraulic fracturing can lead to the creation of undesirable short-circuits or fast flow-paths between the injection and extraction wells leading to a short thermal residence time, low heat recovery, and thus a short-life of the EGS. A potential remedy to these problems is to deploy a cementing (blocking, diverting) agent to minimize short-cuts and/or create new circulation cells for heat extraction. A potential diverting agent is the colloidal silica by-product that can be co-produced from geothermal fluids. Silica gels are abundant in various surface and subsurface applications, yet they have not been evaluated for EGS applications. In this study we are investigating the benefits of silica gel deployment on thermal response of an EGS, either by blocking short-circuiting undesirable pathways as a result of diverting the geofluid to other fractures; or creating, within fractures, new circulation cells for harvesting heat through newly active surface area contact. A significant advantage of colloidal silica is that it can be co-produced from geothermal fluids using an inexpensive membrane-based separation technology that was developed previously using DOE-GTP funding. This co-produced silica has properties that potentially make it useful as a fluid diversion agent for subsurface applications. Colloidal silica solutions exist as low-viscosity fluids during their “induction period” but then undergo a rapid increase in viscosity (gelation) to form a solid gel. The length of the induction period can be manipulated by varying the properties of the solution, such as silica concentration and colloid size. We believe it is possible to produce colloidal silica gels suitable for use as diverting agents for blocking undesirable fast-paths which result in short-circuiting the EGS once hydraulic fracturing has been deployed. In addition, the gels could be used in conventional geothermal fields to increase overall energy recovery by modifying flow.

  10. "In-Gel" Trypsin Digestion Protocol for Proteins in SDS-PAGE Gel Slices ABRF Internal Protein Sequence Research Committee (11/97)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    98 "In-Gel" Trypsin Digestion Protocol for Proteins in SDS-PAGE Gel Slices ABRF Internal Protein Sequence Research Committee (11/97) Samples to be digested in the gel are run in as few lanes as possible and alkylated prior to electrophoresis. Note that an alternate buffer system is also provided for LysC digestion

  11. Method for preparing hydrous iron oxide gels and spherules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, Jack L.; Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.

    2003-07-29

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing hydrous iron oxide spherules, hydrous iron oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form composite sorbents and catalysts, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite of hydrous iron oxide fiber materials, iron oxide fiber materials, hydrous iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, dielectric spherules of barium, strontium, and lead ferrites and mixtures thereof, and composite catalytic spherules of barium or strontium ferrite embedded with oxides of Mg, Zn, Pb, Ce and mixtures thereof. These variations of hydrous iron oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process offer more useful forms of inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters, dielectrics, and ceramics.

  12. Sol-gel polymerization of tetraalkoxygermanium and organotrialkoxygermanium monomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baugher, B.M.; Loy, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Properties of Organic Materials Dept.

    1996-12-31

    While the sol-gel polymerizations of tetraalkoxy- and organotrialkoxysilanes have been extensively studied, there have been few reports of similar investigations with the analogous tetraalkoxygermanium and organotrialkoxygermanium compounds. Germanium alkoxides have received less attention due, in part to their higher cost, but also their greater reactivity towards hydrolysis and condensation reactions. Germanium oxide materials are potentially interesting because the Ge-O-Ge linkage is labile (compared with the siloxane bond in silica gels and polysilsequioxanes) opening up the possibility of further chemical modification of the polymeric architecture. This may permit hydrolytic reorganization of germanium oxide networks under relatively mild conditions. In this paper, the authors present the results of investigations of the sol-gel polymerizations of tetraethoxygermanium, tetraisopropoxygermanium, and methyltriethoxy-germanium to afford network materials as both xerogels and aerogels.

  13. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawelec, K. M. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk; Best, S. M.; Cameron, R. E.; Wardale, R. J. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation.

  14. All-solid-state proton battery using gel polymer electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Kuldeep, E-mail: mishkuldeep@gmail.com [Department of Applied Science and Humanities, ABES Engineering College, Ghaziabad-201009, India and Department of Physics and Materials Science and Engineering, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, Noida-201307 (India); Pundir, S. S.; Rai, D. K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science and Engineering, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, Noida-201307 (India)

    2014-04-24

    A proton conducting gel polymer electrolyte system; PMMA+NH{sub 4}SCN+EC/PC, has been prepared. The highest ionic conductivity obtained from the system is 2.5 × 10?4 S cm{sup ?1}. The optimized composition of the gel electrolyte has been used to fabricate a proton battery with Zn/ZnSO{sub 4}?7H{sub 2}O anode and MnO{sub 2} cathode. The open circuit voltage of the battery is 1.4 V and the highest energy density is 5.7 W h kg?1 for low current drain.

  15. MATHMATICS & APPLIED STATISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Jesse C.

    MATHMATICS & APPLIED STATISTICS Graduate Studies in Build Your Future with Graduate Study in Mathematics or Applied Statistics Our graduate programs can help you advance your career in education will deepen your knowledge and prepare you for further study. The Master of Science in Applied Statistics

  16. Applied Catalysis B: Environmental 37 (2002) 2735 NOx reduction by urea under lean conditions over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulari, Erdogan

    2002-01-01

    Applied Catalysis B: Environmental 37 (2002) 27­35 NOx reduction by urea under lean conditions over using a single step sol­gel process (designated as 2% Pt-SG) and tested its activity for NOx reduction and hydrothermally stable in the range of 150­500 C in the reduction of NOx by hy- drocarbons or oxygenated

  17. Electrophoretic extraction of proteins from two-dimensional electrophoresis gel spots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jian-Shi; Giometti, C.S.; Tollaksen, S.L.

    1987-09-04

    After two-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins or the like, resulting in a polyacrylamide gel slab having a pattern of protein gel spots thereon, an individual protein gel spot is cored out from the slab, to form a gel spot core which is placed in an extraction tube, with a dialysis membrane across the lower end of the tube. Replicate gel spots can be cored out from replicate gel slabs and placed in the extraction tube. Molten agarose gel is poured into the extraction tube where the agarose gel hardens to form an immobilizing gel, covering the gel spot cores. The upper end portion of the extraction tube is filled with a volume of buffer solution, and the upper end is closed by another dialysis membrane. Upper and lower bodies of a buffer solution are brought into contact with the upper and lower membranes and are provided with electrodes connected to the positive and negative terminals of a dc power supply, thereby producing an electrical current which flows through the upper membrane, the volume of buffer solution, the agarose, the gel spot cores and the lower membrane. The current causes the proteins to be extracted electrophoretically from the gel spot cores, so that the extracted proteins accumulate and are contained in the space between the agarose gel and the upper membrane. 8 figs.

  18. Solid-gel precursor solutions and methods for the fabrication of polymetallicsiloxane coating films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

    1993-01-01

    Solutions and preparation methods necessary for the fabrication of metal oxide cross-linked polysiloxane coating films are disclosed. The films are useful in provide heat resistance against oxidation, wear resistance, thermal insulation, and corrosion resistance of substrates. The sol-gel precursor solution comprises a mixture of a monomeric organoalkoxysilane, a metal alkoxide M(OR).sub.n (wherein M is Ti, Zr, Ge or Al; R is CH.sub.3, C.sub.2 H.sub.5 or C.sub.3 H.sub.7 ; and n is 3 or 4), methanol, water, HCl and NaOH. The invention provides a sol-gel solution, and a method of use thereof, which can be applied and processed at low temperatures (i.e., <1000.degree. C.). The substrate can be coated by immersing it in the above mentioned solution at ambient temperature. The substrate is then withdrawn from the solution. Next, the coated substrate is heated for a time sufficient and at a temperature sufficient to yield a solid coating. The coated substrate is then heated for a time sufficient, and temperature sufficient to produce a polymetallicsiloxane coating.

  19. Solid-gel precursor solutions and methods for the fabrication of polymetallicsiloxane coating films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

    1992-01-01

    Solutions and preparation methods necessary for the fabrication of metal oxide cross-linked polysiloxane coating films are disclosed. The films are useful in provide heat resistance against oxidation, wear resistance, thermal insulation, and corrosion resistance of substrates. The sol-gel precursor solution comprises a mixture of a monomeric organoalkoxysilane, a metal alkoxide M(OR).sub.n (wherein M is Ti, Zr, Ge or Al; R is CH.sub.3, C.sub.2 H.sub.5 or C.sub.3 H.sub.7 ; and n is 3 or 4), methanol, water, HCl and NaOH. The invention provides a sol-gel solution, and a method of use thereof, which can be applied and processed at low temperatures (i.e., <1000.degree. C.). The substrate can be coated by immersing it in the above mentioned solution at ambient temperature. The substrate is then withdrawn from the solution. Next, the coated substrate is heated for a time sufficient and at a temperature sufficient to yield a solid coating. The coated substrate is then heated for a time sufficient, and temperature sufficient to produce a polymetallicsiloxane coating.

  20. Solid-gel precursor solutions and methods for the fabrication of polymetallicsiloxane coating films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toshifumi Sugama.

    1993-04-06

    Solutions and preparation methods necessary for the fabrication of metal oxide cross-linked polysiloxane coating films are disclosed. The films are useful in provide heat resistance against oxidation, wear resistance, thermal insulation, and corrosion resistance of substrates. The sol-gel precursor solution comprises a mixture of a monomeric organoalkoxysilane, a metal alkoxide M(OR)[sub n] (wherein M is Ti, Zr, Ge or Al; R is CH[sub 3], C[sub 2]H[sub 5] or C[sub 3]H[sub 7]; and n is 3 or 4), methanol, water, HCl and NaOH. The invention provides a sol-gel solution, and a method of use thereof, which can be applied and processed at low temperatures (i.e., < 1,000 C.). The substrate can be coated by immersing it in the above mentioned solution at ambient temperature. The substrate is then withdrawn from the solution. Next, the coated substrate is heated for a time sufficient and at a temperature sufficient to yield a solid coating. The coated substrate is then heated for a time sufficient, and temperature sufficient to produce a polymetallicsiloxane coating.

  1. Micro-PIXE characterization of interactions between a sol-gel derived bioactive glass and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - 1 - Micro-PIXE characterization of interactions between a sol-gel derived bioactive glass the different steps of this bioactivity process via a complete micro-PIXE characterization of a sol- gel derived

  2. Demonstration of DeconGel (TM) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Building 2026

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cellular Bioengineering Inc. (CBI) has developed decontamination gels (DeconGel™ 1101, 1120 and 1121) that when dried allow efficient removal of contamination from surfaces in a peelable film that...

  3. Sol-gel matrices for direct colorimetric detection of analytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charych, Deborah H. (Albany, CA); Sasaki, Darryl (Albuquerque, NM); Yamanaka, Stacey (Dallas, TX)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the direct detection of analytes using color changes that occur in immobilized biopolymeric material in response to selective binding of analytes to their surface. In particular, the present invention provides methods and compositions related to the encapsulation of biopolymeric material into metal oxide glass using the sol-gel method.

  4. MECHANICAL PROPERTY CHARACTERIZATION OF SOL-GEL DERIVED NANOMATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    mechanical behavior of polysilicate aerogels, prepared using the sol-gel process. Two series of materials were prepared, derivatized with silylating agents, processed into coating solutions, and characterized properties of aerogel thin films were characterized. vi #12;Table of Contents Abstract

  5. Process for fabricating doped zinc oxide microsphere gel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bond, Walter D. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01

    A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel.

  6. Static and dynamic heterogeneities in irreversible gels and colloidal gelation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Coniglio; T. Abete; A. de Candia; E. Del Gado; A. Fierro

    2006-12-20

    We compare the slow dynamics of irreversible gels, colloidal gels, glasses and spin glasses by analyzing the behavior of the so called non-linear dynamical susceptibility, a quantity usually introduced to quantitatively characterize the dynamical heterogeneities. In glasses this quantity typically grows with the time, reaches a maximum and then decreases at large time, due to the transient nature of dynamical heterogeneities and to the absence of a diverging static correlation length. We have recently shown that in irreversible gels the dynamical susceptibility is instead an increasing function of the time, as in the case of spin glasses, and tends asymptotically to the mean cluster size. On the basis of molecular dynamics simulations, we here show that in colloidal gelation where clusters are not permanent, at very low temperature and volume fractions, i.e. when the lifetime of the bonds is much larger than the structural relaxation time, the non-linear susceptibility has a behavior similar to the one of the irreversible gel, followed, at higher volume fractions, by a crossover towards the behavior of glass forming liquids.

  7. Crystal Growth of Extended Solids by Nonaqueous Gel Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    governing the formation of 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D M-BTC porous frame- works. Apparently, the resulting framework dissolution/reprecipitation process,11 because it reacts with water and it is insoluble in common organic incorporated in gel: Holmes, H. N. Colloide Chemistry; Alexander, J., Ed.; Chemical Catalog Co.: New York, 1926

  8. Process for fabricating doped zinc oxide microsphere gel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

    1991-11-05

    Disclosed are a new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel. 4 figures.

  9. Multiple Contact Adsorption of Target Molecules by Heteropolymer Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Jeffrey

    Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305­8565, Japan; e-mail: k of Physics and Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. Introduction Polymer gels belong to the privileged class of the most actively studied polymer systems. The main

  10. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR Folding gels and shells: Designing reconfigurable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR Folding gels and shells: Designing reconfigurable 3D shapes and `mechanical and reconfigurable 3D shapes and properties. In particular, we have studied the use of photo-crosslinkable polymer films to prepare polymer sheets and multilayers containing stimuli-responsive hydrogel elements

  11. Mayenite Synthesized Using the Citrate Sol-Gel Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ude, Sabina N [ORNL] [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL] [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta A [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Kirkham, Melanie J [ORNL] [ORNL; Jones, Gregory L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A citrate sol-gel method has been used to synthesize mayenite (Ca12Al14O33). X-ray powder diffraction data show that the samples synthesized using the citrate sol-gel method contained CaAl2O4 and CaCO3 along with mayenite when fired ex-situ in air at 800 C but were single phase when fired at 900 C and above. Using high temperature x-ray diffraction, data collected in-situ in air at temperatures of 600 C and below showed only amorphous content; however, data collected at higher temperatures indicated the first phase to crystallize is CaCO3. High temperature x-ray diffraction data collected in 4% H2/96% N2 does not show the presence of CaCO3, and Ca12Al14O33 starts to form around 850 C. In comparison, x-ray powder diffraction data collected ex-situ on samples synthesized using traditional solid-state synthesis shows that single phase was not reached until samples were fired at 1350 C. DTA/TGA data collected either in a nitrogen environment or air on samples synthesized using the citrate gel method suggest the complete decomposition of metastable phases and the formation of mayenite at 900 C, although the phase evolution is very different depending on the environment. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements showed a slightly higher surface area of 7.4 0.1 m2/g in the citrate gel synthesized samples compared to solid-state synthesized sample with a surface area of 1.61 0.02 m2/g. SEM images show a larger particle size for samples synthesized using the solid-state method compared to those synthesized using the citrate gel method.

  12. Applied Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARC Privacy and Security Notice Skip over navigation Search the JLab Site Applied Research Center Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical...

  13. Applied Math Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The following sample of the publications has been made available to you by members of the Applied faculty through their personal homepages. Prof. Zhiqiang

  14. Applied Modern Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Applied Modern Physics From the first bionic eye to airport scanners that detect liquid explosives, our expertise in developing advanced diagnostics results in real-world...

  15. Stimuli-Responsive Smart Gels Realized via Modular Protein Design Tijana Z. Grove,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regan, Lynne

    Stimuli-Responsive Smart Gels Realized via Modular Protein Design Tijana Z. Grove, Chinedum O 26, 2010; E-mail: lynne.regan@yale.edu Abstract: Smart gels have a variety of applications, including that permits the creation of protein-based smart gels with encoded morphology, functionality

  16. INTRODUCTION APPLIED GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merriam, James

    GEOL 384.3 INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED GEOPHYSICS OUTLINE INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED GEOPHYSICS GEOL 384 unknowns; the ones we don't know we don't know. And if one looks throughout the history of geophysics he didn't really say geophysics. He said, " ... our country and other free countries ...". But I am

  17. Applied Music Curriculum Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    1 Applied Music Curriculum Guide The University of Louisiana at Lafayette School of Music #12;2 Revised Spring 2009 UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA, Lafayette SCHOOL OF MUSIC APPLIED MUSIC CURRICULUM GUIDE Dr. Garth Alper, Director DEGREES OFFERED Bachelor of Music with emphases in Performance, Theory

  18. The spin glass-like dynamics of gelatin gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan Parker; Valery Normand

    2003-06-03

    We show that there are several striking parallels between the dynamics of gelatin gels and spin glasses. In general, glassy systems retain a memory of their past history. A key characteristic differentiating spin glasses from most other glassy systems is that on cooling they appear to "forget" what happened just below the glass transition temperature, but the memory is recovered on heating. We show that gelatin gels also behave in this way. Both systems show critical scaling of the kinetics with temperature and undergo physical aging, that is they never reach equilibrium, but continue to harden indefinitely at a rate which is linear in log(time). The parallels between the dynamics of these two completely different kinds of condensed matter strongly suggest that they share an underlying theory.

  19. Kinetics of bond formation in crosslinked gelatin gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Abete; E. Del Gado; D. Hellio Serughetti; L. de Arcangelis; M. Djabourov; A. Coniglio

    2006-11-07

    In chemical crosslinking of gelatin solutions, two different time scales affect the kinetics of the gel formation in the experiments. We complement the experimental study with Monte Carlo numerical simulations of a lattice model. This approach shows that the two characteristic time scales are related to the formation of single bonds crosslinker-chain and of bridges between chains. In particular their ratio turns out to control the kinetics of the gel formation. We discuss the effect of the concentration of chains. Finally our results suggest that, by varying the probability of forming bridges as an independent parameter, one can finely tune the kinetics of the gelation via the ratio of the two characteristic times.

  20. Amino resin modified polymer gels for permeability control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, P.

    1989-03-07

    An aqueous cross-linked gel formed by a polysaccharide polymer, an aminoplast resin, and transitional metal ions is described, comprising: (a) water; (b) about 0.2 to about 5.0 wt. percent of a cross-linkable polysaccharide polymer selected from the group consisting of polysaccharide bipolymers and cellulose derivatives having at least one functional group selected from a member of the group consisting of an amine, an amide, a hydroxyl, or a thiol group; (c) about 0.02 to about 5.0 wt. percent of an aminoplast resin which reinforces the polymer; and (d) sufficient transitional metal ions to form a gel of a size and strength sufficient to close one or more permeable zones in a formation under substantially all pH conditions.

  1. Klutts 4/2004 Coomassie Staining of Protein Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doering, Tamara

    Rad catalog number 161-0786. Bio-Safe Coomassie: 1. Wash your gel for 10 minutes in water to remove SDS destain in water for an extended period (overnight, or even over a couple days). It might not help muchO and 50µL of 37% formaldehyde B. ~200mL of 50% Ethanol (in water) C. 100mL of a solution containing

  2. Synthesis of zirconium oxide nanoparticle by sol-gel technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, H. S.; Ahmad, A.; Hamzah, H. [School of Chemical Science and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia, 43600 Bangi (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Zirconium oxide nanoparticle is synthesized using sol-gel technique. Various mole ratio of ammonia solution and nitric acid relative to zirconium propoxide is added in the reaction to study the effect on the crystallinity and particle size on zirconium oxide particle. Zirconium oxide synthesized with nitric acid have the smallest particle size under FESEM image and show the increasing formation of crystalline tetragonal phase under XRD diffractogram.

  3. Analytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Architecture Information Technology & Management Integrated Building Delivery Landscape Architecture ManagementAnalytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics Architectural Engineering Architecture Architecture Electricity Markets Environmental Engineering Food Process Engineering Food Safety & Technology

  4. Sandia Energy - Applied & Computational Math

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied & Computational Math Home Energy Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Applied & Computational Math Applied & Computational Mathcwdd2015-03-26T13:34:5...

  5. KATAYUN (KATY) BARMAK Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    MEMBERSHIP OF PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES IEEE, Materials Research Society (MRS); American Physical Society (APS1 KATAYUN (KATY) BARMAK Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics Seeley W. Mudd. of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University 2011-present Philips Electronics Professor

  6. Stable, concentrated solutions of polyaniline using amines as gel inhibitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Tesuque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high-molecular weight polyaniline using amines as gel inhibitors. Certain amine compounds (gel inhibitors) are used to form highly concentrated, stable solutions of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in numerous organic solvents from which coatings, films and fibers are readily prepared without problems associated with rapid gelation which occurs when concentrated solutions are attempted without the use of the gel inhibitors of the present invention. Tertiary amines are used to solubilize low-molecular weight fractions (M.sub.w <120,000, M.sub.n <30,000) of the pernigraniline, emeraldine, and leucoemeraldine oxidation states of polyaniline as concentrated (>20 wt. %) polyaniline solutions, while primary and secondary amines are used to produce solutions having 15-40 wt % of high-molecular weight polyaniline [M.sub.w.gtoreq.120,000, M.sub.n.gtoreq.30,000]. Concentrated solutions of polyaniline co-polymers or ring and/or nitrogen-substituted polyanilines may also be prepared.

  7. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 233 (2004) 145153 Solgel transition study and pyrolysis of alumina-based gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulari, Erdogan

    2004-01-01

    and pyrolysis of alumina-based gels prepared from alumatrane precursor Bussarin Ksapabutra, Erdogan Gularib

  8. Aero-Sol-Gel (ASG) Reactor For Nano-Powder Synthesis G. Beaucage, J. Hyeon-Lee, D. J. Kohls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    Aero-Sol-Gel (ASG) Reactor For Nano-Powder Synthesis G. Beaucage, J. Hyeon-Lee, D. J. Kohls-structured oxides where sol- gel reactions are carried out in aerosol droplets. This aero-sol-gel reactor (ASG-scale structure and high specific surface areas (100 to 700 m2 /g) [1, 2]. This aero-sol- gel reactor (ASG

  9. Molding of Three-Dimensional Microstructures of Gels Min D. Tang, Andrew P. Golden, and Joe Tien*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tien, Joe

    Molding of Three-Dimensional Microstructures of Gels Min D. Tang, Andrew P. Golden, and Joe Tien for microfabrication of gels: the use of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps to mold, release, and stack gels into 3D structures, and the use of surface modification to promote the release or adhesion of molded gels

  10. Information Science, Computing, Applied Math

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Science, Computing, Applied Math science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Information Science, Computing, Applied Math National security depends on science...

  11. Apply for Beamtime

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal FacilityApplicantOffice ofApply ApplicationApply

  12. Journal of applied mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nov 11, 2009 ... Location: Engineering (Periodicals) ... wave propagation in such systems is examined in reference (4). Gassman (5, 6) has ... Now Research Scientist at Missile. Systems ... Presented at the Applied Mechanics Division Summer Conference,. Berkeley ..... This will be true in some cases for a water- saturated ...

  13. SUSTAINABILITY WHO CAN APPLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUNDED BY CALL FOR SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH STUDENT WHO CAN APPLY Undergraduate and graduate Participate in the Global Change & Sustainability Center's Research Symposium; attend workshops with faculty or publish in the U's student-run sustainability publication to be released in May 2014. Are you conducting

  14. APPLYING RESEARCH ON METACOGNITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    School of Medicine01/09/14 #12;Define metacognition and explain its importance in teaching and learning, understand key genetic terms.) Next, apply knowledge to determine inheritance patterns and to formulate students presume that a best response strategy is to relate everything they know about a subject figuring

  15. Structurally stable gel bead containing entrapped enzyme and method for manufacture thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, J.

    1998-12-08

    This research provides a structurally stable gel bead containing an entrapped enzyme and a method for its manufacture. The enzyme is covalently cross-linked to gelatin in the presence of glutaraldehyde prior to the formation of the gel bead, to prevent leakage of the enzyme. Propylene glycol alginate is then added to the mixture. Once the gel beads are formed, they are then soaked in glutaraldehyde, which imparts structural stability to the gel beads. This method can be used with many types of enzymes, such as proteases, carbohydrases, proteases, ligases, isomerases, oxidoreductases, and specialty enzymes. These and other enzymes can be immobilized in the gel beads and utilized in a number of enzymatic processes. Exogenously added ions are not required to maintain the structural stability of these gel beads. 7 figs.

  16. Structurally stable gel bead containing entrapped enzyme and method for manufacture thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A structurally stable gel bead containing an entrapped enzyme and a method for its manufacture. The enzyme is covalently cross-linked to gelatin in the presence of glutaraldehyde prior to the formation of the gel bead, to prevent leakage of the enzyme. Propylene glycol alginate is then added to the mixture. Once the gel beads are formed, they are then soaked in glutaraldehyde, which imparts structural stability to the gel beads. This method can be used with many types of enzymes, such as proteases, carbohydrases, proteases, ligases, isomerases, oxidoreductases, and specialty enzymes. These and other enzymes can be immobilized in the gel beads and utilized in a number of enzymatic processes. Exogenously added ions are not required to maintain the structural stability of these gel beads.

  17. The adiabatic adsorption-desorption characteristics of silica gel beds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barker, James Marshall

    1979-01-01

    -desorpt1on characteristics of silica gel beds are i nvest1gated . The mathematical equations that descry 1 be desiccant bed behav1or are formulated and solved numer1cally us1ng f1nite difference methods. The equat1ons are derived such that both... of the finite d1fference program. The functional relationships are sufficiently accurate for most design purposes, and are r ead1 ly adaptable for use 1 n parametric studies of desiccant air condi t1 on1ng systems . DEDICATION Dedicated to My Parents...

  18. Gel polymer electrolytes for batteries (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |productionPatent: FreeformArticle)Gamma sourceReport) |andGel polymer

  19. Solventless sol-gel chemistry through ring-opening polymerization of bridged disilaoxacyclopentanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAHIMIAN,KAMYAR; LOY,DOUGLAS A.

    2000-04-04

    Disilaoxacyclopentanes have proven to be excellent precursors to sol-gel type materials. These materials have shown promise as precursors for encapsulation and microelectronics applications. The polymers are highly crosslinked and are structurally similar to traditional sol-gels, but unlike typical sol-gels they are prepared without the use of solvents and water, they have low VOC's and show little shrinkage during processing.

  20. Structure, Mechanism and Applications of Sol-Gel Clad Fiber-Optic Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fellows Olteanu, Marta Sarah

    2010-01-01

    network. On the other hand, an aerogel forms when wet gel isdensity silica monoliths (aerogels) by hypercritical pointdrying, a low density aerogel is produced. On the other

  1. Cytocompatible gel formation of chitosan-glycerol phosphate solutions supplemented with hydroxyl ethyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buschmann, Michael

    Cytocompatible gel formation of chitosan-glycerol phosphate solutions supplemented with hydroxyl and sequence are vari- able. The primary amine on glucosamine imparts a polycationic character and permits

  2. Evaluation of Addition of Alkaline Solutions on Overall Quality and Functionality of Normal and Pale, Soft, and Exudative (PSE) Pork Gels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Sonia Yvette

    2011-02-22

    . As treatment levels increased, gels had higher pH, and lower L*, a*, and b* values. SP gels had lower pH, WHC, cook yields, and higher L*, a*, b*, and TPA values compared to PB, SB, PC, and SC gels. PC and SC gels had higher cook yields than normal control gels...

  3. Apparatus and method for the production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.; Scott, T.C.; Davison, B.H.

    1998-01-27

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for the large-scale and continuous production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst. The apparatus is a columnar system based on the chemical cross-linking of hydrocolloidal gels that contain and immobilize a biocatalyst, the biocatalyst being a microorganism or an enzyme. Hydrocolloidal gels, such as alginate, carrageenan, and a mixture of bone gelatin and modified alginate, provide immobilization matrices that can be used to entrap and retain the biocatalyst while allowing effective contact with substrates and release of products. Such immobilized biocatalysts are generally formulated into small spheres or beads that have high concentrations of the biocatalyst within the gel matrix. The columnar system includes a gel dispersion nozzle submerged in a heated non-interacting liquid, typically an organic liquid, that is immiscible with water to allow efficient formation of spherical gel droplets, the non-interacting liquid having a specific gravity that is less than water so that the gel droplets will fall through the liquid by the force of gravity. The heated non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with a chilled upflowing non-interacting liquid that will provide sufficient residence time for the gel droplets as they fall through the liquid so that they will be cooled below the gelling temperature and form solid spheres. The upflowing non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with an upflowing temperature-controlled aqueous solution containing the necessary chemicals for cross-linking or fixing of the gel beads to add the necessary stability. The flow rates of the two liquid streams can be varied to control the proper residence time in each liquid section to accommodate the production of gel beads of differing settling velocities. A valve is provided for continuous removal of the stabilized gel beads from the bottom of the column. 1 fig.

  4. Apparatus and method for the production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the large-scale and continuous production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst. The apparatus is a columnar system based on the chemical cross-linking of hydrocolloidal gels that contain and immobilize a biocatalyst, the biocatalyst being a microorganism or an enzyme. Hydrocolloidal gels, such as alginate, carrageenan, and a mixture of bone gelatin and modified alginate, provide immobilization matrices that can be used to entrap and retain the biocatalyst while allowing effective contact with substrates and release of products. Such immobilized biocatalysts are generally formulated into small spheres or beads that have high concentrations of the biocatalyst within the gel matrix. The columnar system includes a gel dispersion nozzle submerged in a heated non-interacting liquid, typically an organic liquid, that is immiscible with water to allow efficient formation of spherical gel droplets, the non-interacting liquid having a specific gravity that is less than water so that the gel droplets will fall through the liquid by the force of gravity. The heated non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with a chilled upflowing non-interacting liquid that will provide sufficient residence time for the gel droplets as they fall through the liquid so that they will be cooled below the gelling temperature and form solid spheres. The upflowing non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with an upflowing temperature-controlled aqueous solution containing the necessary chemicals for cross-linking or fixing of the gel beads to add the necessary stability. The flow rates of the two liquid streams can be varied to control the proper residence time in each liquid section to accommodate the production of gel beads of differing settling velocities. A valve is provided for continuous removal of the stabilized gel beads from the bottom of the column.

  5. ORISE: Applied health physics projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied health physics projects The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides applied health physics services to government agencies needing technical support...

  6. Applied ALARA techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work.

  7. Applied Science/Techniques

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActTools to someone byApplied Science/Techniques

  8. Proton Diffusion and T1 Relaxation in Polyacrylamide Gels: A Unified Approach Using Volume Averaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinsey, Stephen

    Proton Diffusion and T1 Relaxation in Polyacrylamide Gels: A Unified Approach Using Volume, Tallahassee, Florida Received January 13, 1998 The structure of polyacrylamide gels was studied using proton of the crosslinker concentration were accounted for by introducing the proton par- tition coefficient, Keq , between

  9. AIL Group, GRE, University of Dundee 2014 In-gel digestion of proteins separated by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamond, Angus I.

    AIL Group, GRE, University of Dundee 2014 In-gel digestion of proteins separated by SDS a SILAC IP (NOTE: To improve elution of proteins from beads and to save time during the digestion, we of cysteine-containing peptides from in-gel digests by opening the structure of proteins (disrupting

  10. Thermally Stable Gel Polymer Electrolytes Min-Kyu Song,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Thermally Stable Gel Polymer Electrolytes Min-Kyu Song,a Young-Taek Kim,a Yong Tae Kim,b Byung Won/polyvinylidene fluoride PEGDA/PVdF blend gel polymer electrolytes, low molecular weight (M 742) liquid PEGDA oligomer was mixed with PVdF-HFP dissolved in ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate/LiPF6 liquid electrolytes

  11. Measurement of chain tilt angle in fully hydrated bilayers of gel phase lecithins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    Measurement of chain tilt angle in fully hydrated bilayers of gel phase lecithins S. Tristram angle Otilt of the hydrocarbon chains has been determined for the fully hydrated gel phase of a series hydrocarbon chains, requiring each bilayer to scatter coherently rather than each monolayer. For DPPC, Otilt

  12. Effect of mechanical factors on the function of engineered human blood microvessels in microfluidic collagen gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tien, Joe

    Effect of mechanical factors on the function of engineered human blood microvessels in microfluidic the barrier function and stability of engineered human microvessels in microfluidic type I collagen gels in microfluidic collagen gels. Ó 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Early studies

  13. Efficiency of Solute Release from Thermoresponsive Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Gels: Electrochemical Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciszkowska, Malgorzata "Maggie"

    Efficiency of Solute Release from Thermoresponsive Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Gels and efficiency of release of probe species from thermoresponsive gels due to their volume phase transition that found for the uncharged ferrocene derivative. The larger release efficiency for the charged probes

  14. GEL-FREE ELECTROPHORESIS OF h-AND T2-DNA IN STRUCTURED PDMS MICROFLUIDIC DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielefeld, Universität

    which is usually performed in gels or entangled polymer solutions. The need of large amounts of analyte-linked gels or high viscosity polymer solutions in capillaries is not trivial. Furthermore, DNA fragment described in [11. Briefly, a flood exposure unit was used to expose a SU-8 coated S&wafer through a chromium

  15. Helicoidal precipitation patterns in silica and agarose gels Shibi Thomas a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rácz, Zoltán

    Helicoidal precipitation patterns in silica and agarose gels Shibi Thomas a , George Varghese b patterns grown in agarose and silica gels were studied using reaction­diffusion­precipitation processes a complex interplay among the unstable precipitation modes, the motion of the reaction front, and the noise

  16. APPLIED TECHNOLOGY Strategic Plan Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY Strategic Plan Summary #12;School of Applied Technology Strategic Plan Summary | 1 SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY STRATEGIC PLAN SUMMARY MISSION STATEMENT The mission Technology and Management program to achieve national visibility. #12;School of Applied Technology Strategic

  17. Optical fiber sensor having a sol-gel fiber core and a method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Shiquan; Jindal, Rajeev; Winstead, Christopher; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2006-06-06

    A simple, economic wet chemical procedure is described for making sol-gel fibers. The sol-gel fibers made from this process are transparent to ultraviolet, visible and near infrared light. Light can be guided in these fibers by using an organic polymer as a fiber cladding. Alternatively, air can be used as a low refractive index medium. The sol-gel fibers have a micro pore structure which allows molecules to diffuse into the fiber core from the surrounding environment. Chemical and biochemical reagents can be doped into the fiber core. The sol-gel fiber can be used as a transducer for constructing an optical fiber sensor. The optical fiber sensor having an active sol-gel fiber core is more sensitive than conventional evanescent wave absorption based optical fiber sensors.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of vinyl-bridged polysilsesquioxane sol-gel materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamanaka, S.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; McClain, M.D.; Loy, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    Vinyl-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels were formed through the use of sol-gel polymerization methods. Acid- and base-catalyzed samples were prepared from both the pure cis-(l) and pure trans-(2) isomers of 1, 2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethylene. Gelation times of the two isomers were compared. The trans monomer 2 formed gels within a week while the cis monomer I failed to gel-even after several months. Gelation of 1 could be promoted by the addition of a coordinating metal such as palladium. The resulting cis- and trans- vinyl-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels were then processed either by vacuum drying to afford xerogels or by extracting with supercritical carbon dioxide to afford aerogels. These vinylbridged polysilsesquioxanes were characterized by SEM, nitrogen sorption porosimetry, solid State {sub 29}Si and {sub 13}C NMR and x-ray powder diffraction.

  19. Amino resin modified xanthan polymer gels for permeability profile control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, P.

    1988-01-05

    A process for closing pores in a hydrocarbonaceous fluid bearing formation to obtain improved sweep efficiency during a water flood oil recovery operation wherein the process comprises injecting into the formation a gellable composition is described comprising: (a) water; (b) about 0.2 to about 5.0 wt. percent of a cross linkable polysaccharide biopolymer having at least one functional group selected from a member of the group consisting of an amine, an amide, a hydroxyl, or a thiol group; (c) about 0.02 to about 5.0 wt. percent of an aminoplast resin which reinforces the biopolymer; and (d) sufficient transitional metal ions to form a gel of a size and strength sufficient to close one or more permeable zones in the formation under substantially all pH conditions.

  20. Optimisation of X-ray micro-tomography for the low-dose analysis of highly-dosed gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    introduced the idea of a "polymer gel dosimeter" [1]. In this system, the ionising radiation sets in motion

  1. Aero-Sol-Gel Synthesis of Nanostructured Silica Jingyu Hyeon-Lee, Gregory Beaucage,*, and Sotiris E. Pratsinis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    Aero-Sol-Gel Synthesis of Nanostructured Silica Powders Jingyu Hyeon-Lee, Gregory Beaucage-temperature aero- sol-gel process. Hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and tetramethoxy- silane, an aero-sol- gel technique for production of powders with extremely high specific surface areas at room

  2. Gel'fand-Graev's Reconstruction Formula in the 3D Real Space --A Framework towards a General Interior Tomography Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    Gel'fand-Graev's Reconstruction Formula in the 3D Real Space -- A Framework towards a General-ye@uiowa.edu, hengyong-yu@ieee.org, ge-wang@ieee.org In [1-4], I. M. Gel'fand and M. I. Graev proposed inversion formulas for x-ray transforms in different spaces. In particular, Gel'fand-Graev's inversion formula [1

  3. Applied Bohmian Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Benseny; G. Albareda; A. S. Sanz; J. Mompart; X. Oriols

    2014-10-20

    Bohmian mechanics provides an explanation of quantum phenomena in terms of point particles guided by wave functions. This review focuses on the formalism of non-relativistic Bohmian mechanics, rather than its interpretation. Although the Bohmian and standard quantum theories have different formalisms, both give exactly the same predictions for all phenomena. Fifteen years ago, the quantum chemistry community began to study the practical usefulness of Bohmian mechanics. Since then, the scientific community has mainly applied it to study the (unitary) evolution of single-particle wave functions, either by developing efficient quantum trajectory algorithms or by providing a trajectory-based explanation of complicated quantum phenomena. Here we present a large list of examples showing how the Bohmian formalism provides a useful solution in different forefront research fields for this kind of problems (where the Bohmian and the quantum hydrodynamic formalisms coincide). In addition, this work also emphasizes that the Bohmian formalism can be a useful tool in other types of (non-unitary and nonlinear) quantum problems where the influence of the environment or the global wave function are unknown. This review contains also examples on the use of the Bohmian formalism for the many-body problem, decoherence and measurement processes. The ability of the Bohmian formalism to analyze this last type of problems for (open) quantum systems remains mainly unexplored by the scientific community. The authors of this review are convinced that the final status of the Bohmian theory among the scientific community will be greatly influenced by its potential success in these type of problems that present non-unitary and/or nonlinear quantum evolutions. A brief introduction of the Bohmian formalism and some of its extensions are presented in the last part of this review.

  4. Applying Mathematics.... ... to catch criminals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Michael

    Applying Mathematics.... ... to catch criminals Mike O'Leary Department of Mathematics Towson University Stevenson University Kappa Mu Epsion 2008 Mike O'Leary (Towson University) Applying mathematics Department Mike O'Leary (Towson University) Applying mathematics to catch criminals September 10, 2008 2 / 42

  5. Journal of Applied Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2004 41, 922­933 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing-scale, Sacramento River, succession, vegetation Journal of Applied Ecology (2004) 41, 922­933 Introduction More than@ucsc.edu). #12;923 Riparian forest restoration © 2004 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied Ecology, 41

  6. Journal of Applied Ecology 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2002 39, 960­970 © 2002 British Ecological Society Blackwell Science- tion, succession. Journal of Applied Ecology (2002) 39, 960­970 Introduction Efforts to reclaim@ucsc.edu). #12;961 Vegetation on reclaimed mines © 2002 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied Ecology

  7. Journal of Applied Ecology 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2007 44, 748­759 © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British, distribution, edge, marbled murrelets, model transferability, old-growth Journal of Applied Ecology (2007) 44-nesting Alcid © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied

  8. Direct formation of aerogels by sol-gel polymerizations of alkoxysilanes in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Yamanaka, A.; Carpenter, J.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    Sol-gel polymerization of alkoxysilanes in supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCD) was used to directly prepare aerogels. Polymerizations of tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) and 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)benzene (BESP) were performed by dissolving the monomers and formic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCD). Monolithic gels were obtained in under 12 hours. The silica and polysilsesquioxane gels were readily dried to afford aerogels by slowly venting the SCCD. The aerogels were high surface area mesoporous materials that were characterized by solid state NMR, SEM, TEM, and gas sorption porosimetry.

  9. Non-Shrinking Sol-Gel Type Polymers by Ring Opening Polymerizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Rahimian, K.

    1999-04-05

    We have designed a new class of cyclic siloxane compounds that behave as sol-gel systems when ring open polymerized using a hydroxide base. These monomers polymerize through chain growth polymerization. unlike conventional alkoxysilane sol-gel precursors, to form sol-gel polymers. They do not require solvent or water for polymerization, show no visible shrinkage or cracking during polymerization and are thermally stable. We have successfully utilized these materials in encapsulation of microelectronics. Current efforts are focused toward expanding this family of ROP monomers and optimization of their mechanical properties.

  10. Solventless sol-gel chemistry through ring-opening polymerization of bridged disilaoxacyclopentanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAHIMIAN,KAMYAR; LOY,DOUGLAS A.

    2000-05-01

    Ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of disilaoxacyclopentanes has proven to be an excellent approach to sol-gel type hybrid organic-inorganic materials. These materials have shown promise as precursors for encapsulation and microelectronics applications. The polymers are highly crosslinked and are structurally similar to traditional sol-gels, but unlike typical sol-gels they are prepared by an organic base or Bronsted acid (formic or triflic acid), without the use of solvents and water, they have low VOC's and show little shrinkage during processing.

  11. Microchannel gel electrophoretic separation systems and methods for preparing and using

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herr, Amy; Singh, Anup K; Throckmorton, Daniel J

    2013-09-03

    A micro-analytical platform for performing electrophoresis-based immunoassays was developed by integrating photopolymerized cross-linked polyacrylamide gels within a microfluidic device. The microfluidic immunoassays are performed by gel electrophoretic separation and quantifying analyte concentration based upon conventional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). To retain biological activity of proteins and maintain intact immune complexes, native PAGE conditions were employed. Both direct (non-competitive) and competitive immunoassay formats are demonstrated in microchips for detecting toxins and biomarkers (cytokines, c-reactive protein) in bodily fluids (serum, saliva, oral fluids). Further, a description of gradient gels fabrication is included, in an effort to describe methods we have developed for further optimization of on-chip PAGE immunoassays. The described chip-based PAGE immunoassay method enables immunoassays that are fast (minutes) and require very small amounts of sample (less than a few microliters). Use of microfabricated chips as a platform enables integration, parallel assays, automation and development of portable devices.

  12. Ammonia Sensors Based on Doped-Sol-Gel-Tipped Optical Fibers for Catalyst System Diagnostics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This work focuses on the development and application of optical fibers sensors tip-coated with sol gels that sequester a transducing material whose optical response is sensitive to NH3.

  13. Transparent ultralow-density silica aerogels prepared by a two-step sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tillotson, T.M.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1991-09-01

    Conventional silica sol-gel chemistry is limited for the production of transparent ultralow-density aerogels because (1) gelation is either slow or unachievable, and (2) even when gelation is achieved, the large pore sizes result in loss of transparency for aerogels <.020 g/cc. We have developed a two-step sol-gel process that circumvents the limitations of the conventional process and allows the formation of ultralow-density gels in a matter of hours. we have found that the gel time is dependent on the catalyst concentration. After supercritical extraction, the aerogels are transparent, uncracked tiles with densities as low as .003 g/cc. 6 figs., 11 refs.

  14. The physics and chemistry of semiconductor nanocrystals in sol-gel derived optical microcavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Yinthai

    2006-01-01

    The incorporation of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) into sol-gel derived matrices presents both novel applications as well as a robust platform in which to investigate the nonlinear optical properties of NCs. This thesis ...

  15. Molecular receptors in metal oxide sol-gel materials prepared via molecular imprinting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Darryl Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Daitch, Charles E. (Charlottesville, VA); Shea, Kenneth J. (Irvine, CA); Rush, Daniel J. (Philadelphia, PA)

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for molecularly imprinting the surface of a sol-gel material, by forming a solution comprised of a sol-gel material, a solvent, an imprinting molecule, and a functionalizing siloxane monomer of the form Si(OR).sub.3-n X.sub.n, wherein n is an integer between zero and three and X is a functional group capable of reacting with the imprinting molecule, evaporating the solvent, and removing the imprinting molecule to form the molecularly imprinted metal oxide sol-gel material. The use of metal oxide sol-gels allows the material porosity, pore size, density, surface area, hardness, electrostatic charge, polarity, optical density, and surface hydrophobicity to be tailored and be employed as sensors and in catalytic and separations operations.

  16. Thickness Measurement of Fracture Fluid Gel Filter Cake after Static Build Up and Shear Erosion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Ben

    2011-08-08

    . Despite proven economic benefit, the hydraulic fracture fluid damages the producing formation and the propped fracture. To analyze the gel damage effect quantitatively, the filter cake thickness is used as a parameter that has not been measured before...

  17. Effects of varying ethanol and water concentrations as a gold nanoparticle gel solvent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Thomas Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Striped gold nanoparticles are unique in several of their characteristics and applications. Recent experiments have determined a new medium with which contain the nanoparticles is that of a chemical gel. The nanoparticles ...

  18. Minimizing Water Production from Unconventional Gas Wells Using a Novel Environmentally Benign Polymer Gel System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gakhar, Kush

    2012-02-14

    PRODUCTION FROM UNCONVENTIONAL GAS WELLS USING A NOVEL ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN POLYMER GEL SYSTEM A Thesis by KUSH GAKHAR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2011 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering Minimizing Water Production from Unconventional Gas Wells Using a Novel Environmentally Benign Polymer Gel System...

  19. Method for separating contaminants from solution employing an organic-stabilized metal-hydroxy gel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, Donald H. (212 High Meadows, Richland, WA 99352)

    1996-01-01

    Metals and organics are extracted from solution by co-precipitating them with a gel comprising aluminum hydroxide and a complexing agent such as EDTA. After the gel is processed to remove the metals and organics, it can be recycled for further use by dissolving it in a high-pH solution, leaving no secondary waste stream. A number of alternative complexing agents perform better than EDTA.

  20. Micelle-Induced Curvature in a Water-Insoluble HIV-1 Env Peptide Revealed by NMR Dipolar Coupling Measurement in Stretched Polyacrylamide Gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, James

    Measurement in Stretched Polyacrylamide Gel James J. Chou, Joshua D. Kaufman, Stephen J. Stahl, Paul T

  1. Unsteady laminar pipe flow of a Carbopol gel. Part I: experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antoine Poumaere; Miguel Moyers-Gonzalez; Cathy Castelain; Teodor Burghelea

    2013-01-21

    A experimental study of low Reynolds numbers unsteady pipe flows of a yield stress shear thinning fluid (Carbopol- 980) is presented. The investigation of the solid-fluid transition in a rheometric flow in the presence and in the ab- sence of the wall slip reveals a coupling between the irreversible deformation states and the wall slip phenomenon. Particularly, the presence of wall slip nearly suppresses the scaling of the deformation power deficit associated to the rheological hysteresis with the rate at which the material is forced. The irreversible solid-fluid transition and the wall slip behaviour emerge in the same range of the applied stresses and thus, the two phenomena appear to be coupled to each other. In-situ measurements of the flow fields performed during an increasing/decreasing stepped pressure ramp reveal three distinct flow regimes: solid (pluglike), solid-fluid and fluid. The deformation power deficit associated with the hysteresis observed during the increasing/decreasing branches of the pressure ramps reveals a dependence on the rate at which the unsteady flow is driven consistent with that observed during the rheological measurements in the presence of slip. The dependence of the slip velocity on the wall shear stresses reveals a Navier-type slip behaviour only within the fluid flow regime, which indicates that the wall slip phenomenon is directly coupled to the solid-fluid transition. A universal scaling of the slip velocity with the wall velocity gradients is found and the slip length is independent on the characteristic time of forcing t0. The paper closes with a discussion of the main findings, their possible impact on our current understanding of the yielding and slip behaviour of Carbopol gels. Several steps worth being pursued by future experimental/theoretical studies are proposed.

  2. Sandia Energy - Applied Turbulent Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and they form the basis for the creation of validated submodels that bridge fundamental energy sciences with applied device engineering and optimization. Turbulent-combustion-lab...

  3. Characterization of Hafnia Powder Prepared from an Oxychloride Sol Gel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGilvery, Catriona M. [Imperial College, London; De Gendt, S [Imperial College, London; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; MacKenzie, M [Imperial College, London; Craven, A J [Imperial College, London; McComb, D W [Imperial College, London

    2011-01-01

    Hafnium containing compounds are of great importance to the semiconductor industry as a replacement for Si(O,N) with a high- gate dielectric. Whilst Hf is already being incorporated into working devices1, much is still to be understood about it. Here we investigate the crystallisation processes and chemistry of bulk HfO2 powders which will aid in interpretation of reactions and crystallisation events occurring in thin films used as gate dielectrics. Amorphous HfO2 powder was prepared via a sol-gel route using hafnium oxychloride (HfOCl2 xH2O) as a precursor. The powders were subjected to various heat treatments and analysed using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analysis techniques. It was found that a large change in the crystallisation pathway occurred when the sample was heated in an inert environment compared with in air. Instead of the expected monoclinic phase (m-HfO2), tetragonal HfO2 (t-HfO2) also formed under these conditions and was observed up to temperatures of ~760 C. The t-HfO2 particles, which are less than 30nm in size, eventually transform into m-HfO2 on further heating. Possible mechanisms for the crystallisation of t-HfO2 are discussed. It is proposed that within this temperature range t-HfO2 is stabilised due to the presence of oxygen vacancies in the inert environment, forming by the reduction of HfIV to HfIII. As the crystal grows in size as the temperature increases there are too few oxygen vacancies left in the structure to continue stabilising the t-HfO2 phase and so transformation to m-HfO2 occurs.

  4. The Foundations of Applied Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    The Foundations of Applied Mathematics John Baez Category-Theoretic Foundations of Mathematics Workshop May 5, 2013 #12;We often picture the flow of information about mathematics a bit like this: SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLIED MATHEMATICS PURE MATHEMATICS FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS #12;Of course

  5. Method for preparing hydrous titanium oxide spherules and other gel forms thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, Jack L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention are methods for preparing hydrous titanium oxide spherules, hydrous titanium oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, titanium monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous titanium oxide spherules having suspendible particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, titanium monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendible particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent having a desired crystallinity, titanium oxide spherules in the form of anatase, brookite or rutile, titanium oxide spherules having suspendible particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, hydrous titanium oxide fiber materials, titanium oxide fiber materials, hydrous titanium oxide fiber materials having suspendible particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, titanium oxide fiber materials having suspendible particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite and spherules of barium titanate. These variations of hydrous titanium oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process offer more useful forms of inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters and ceramics.

  6. Method for preparing hydrous titanium oxide spherules and other gel forms thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, J.L.

    1998-10-13

    The present invention are methods for preparing hydrous titanium oxide spherules, hydrous titanium oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, titanium monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous titanium oxide spherules having suspendible particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, titanium monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendible particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent having a desired crystallinity, titanium oxide spherules in the form of anatase, brookite or rutile, titanium oxide spherules having suspendible particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, hydrous titanium oxide fiber materials, titanium oxide fiber materials, hydrous titanium oxide fiber materials having suspendible particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, titanium oxide fiber materials having suspendible particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite and spherules of barium titanate. These variations of hydrous titanium oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process offer more useful forms of inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters and ceramics. 6 figs.

  7. Toward Nanostructured Thermoelectrics. Synthesis and Characterization of Lead Telluride Gels and Aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganguly, Shreyashi [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Brock, Stephanie L. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    2011-05-12

    The synthesis and characterization of lead telluride (PbTe) gels and aerogels with nanostructured features of potential benefit for enhanced thermoelectrics is reported. In this approach, discrete thiolate-capped PbTe nanoparticles were synthesized by a solution-based approach followed by oxidation-induced nanoparticle assembly with tetranitromethane or hydrogen peroxide to form wet gels. Drying of the wet gels by supercritical CO? extraction yielded aerogels, whereas xerogels were produced by ambient pressure bench top drying. The gels consist of an interconnected network of colloidal nanoparticles and pores with surface areas up to 74 m² g-1. The thermal stability of the nanostructures relative to nanoparticles was probed with the help of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The aerogels were observed to sublime at a higher temperature and over a larger range (425–500 °C) relative to the precursor nanoparticles. TGA-DSC suggests that organic capping groups can be removed in the region 250–450 °C, and melting of PbTe nanoparticles occurs near the temperature for bulk materials (ca. 920 °C). The good thermal stability combined with the presence of nanoscale interfaces suggests PbTe gels may show promise in thermoelectric devices.

  8. Encapsulation of gold nanoclusters in silica materials via an inverse micelle/sol-gel synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, A.; Kawola, J.S.; Loy, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yamanaka, S.A. [Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX (United States)] [Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Nanometer-sized gold particles were encapsulated in the micropores of xerogels and aerogels. The synthesis involves the sequential reduction of a gold salt followed by sol-gel processing in an inverse micelle solution. The inverse micelle solution solubilizes the metal salt and provides a microreactor for the nucleation, growth, and stabilization of the nanometer-sized clusters. Hydrolysis and condensation of an added siloxane precursor produces a wet gel embedding the particles. Characterization of the particle size and composition and the particle growth process was completed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction, and UV-visible absorption spectrometry. Characterization of the gel surface areas was completed with N{sub 2} porosimetry. Material properties determined as a function of the gel precursor (TEOS vs a prehydrolyzed form of TEOS), the water to gel precursor reaction stoichiometry, and surfactant concentration are discussed in terms of the unique solution chemistry occurring in the microheterogeneous inverse micelle solutions. 73 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Encapsulation of metal nanocluster catalysts in silica materials via an inverse micelle/sol-gel synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, A.; Kawola, J.S.; Yamanaka, S.A.; Loy, D.A.

    1997-05-01

    Nanometer sized metal particles were encapsulated in the micropores of xerogels and aerogels. The synthesis involves the sequential reduction of a metal salt followed by sol-gel processing in an inverse micelle solution. The inverse micelle solution solubilizes the metal salt and provides a micro-reactor for the nucleation, growth, and stabilization of the nanometer sized clusters. Hydrolysis and condensation of an added siloxane precursor produces a wet gel embedding the particles. Characterization of the particle size and composition and the particle growth process was completed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction, and UV-visible absorption spectrometry. Characterization of the gel surface areas was completed with N{sub 2} porosimetry. Material properties determined as a function of the gel precursor (TEOS vs. a pre-hydrolyzed form of TEOS), the water to gel precursor reaction stoichiometry, and surfactant concentration are discussed in terms of the unique solution chemistry occurring in the micro-heterogeneous inverse micelle solutions. Finally, catalyst development and catalyst activity of the materials are discussed. 1-hexene hydrogenation was chosen as a model reaction.

  10. Gel nanostructure in alkali-activated binders based on slag and fly ash, and effects of accelerated carbonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernal, Susan A.; Provis, John L.; Walkley, Brant; San Nicolas, Rackel; Gehman, John D.; Brice, David G.; Kilcullen, Adam R.; Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 ; Duxson, Peter; Deventer, Jannie S.J. van

    2013-11-15

    Binders formed through alkali-activation of slags and fly ashes, including ‘fly ash geopolymers’, provide appealing properties as binders for low-emissions concrete production. However, the changes in pH and pore solution chemistry induced during accelerated carbonation testing provide unrealistically low predictions of in-service carbonation resistance. The aluminosilicate gel remaining in an alkali-activated slag system after accelerated carbonation is highly polymerised, consistent with a decalcification mechanism, while fly ash-based binders mainly carbonate through precipitation of alkali salts (bicarbonates at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, or carbonates under natural exposure) from the pore solution, with little change in the binder gel identifiable by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In activated fly ash/slag blends, two distinct gels (C–A–S–H and N–A–S–H) are formed; under accelerated carbonation, the N–A–S–H gel behaves comparably to fly ash-based systems, while the C–A–S–H gel is decalcified similarly to alkali-activated slag. This provides new scope for durability optimisation, and for developing appropriate testing methodologies. -- Highlights: •C-A-S-H gel in alkali-activated slag decalcifies during accelerated carbonation. •Alkali-activated fly ash gel changes much less under CO{sub 2} exposure. •Blended slag-fly ash binder contains two coexisting gel types. •These two gels respond differently to carbonation. •Understanding of carbonation mechanisms is essential in developing test methods.

  11. GRADUATE BOOKLET Physics / Applied Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    GRADUATE BOOKLET Physics / Applied Physics This booklet contains rules, guidelines and general information about graduate studies in the Physics Department at Texas Tech University. It does not replace documents. Contents I. General Comments: Admission, general policies, deadlines, etc II. Minimum

  12. Modeling applied to problem solving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawl, Andrew

    We describe a modeling approach to help students learn expert problem solving. Models are used to present and hierarchically organize the syllabus content and apply it to problem solving, but students do not develop and ...

  13. IIT SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    . MANUFACTURINGTECHNOLOGY. #12;BE A LEADER OF THE NEXT INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION. An undergraduate degree in IndustrialINDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT IIT SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRIAL OPERATIONS. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT. INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES. SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT. SUSTAINABILITY

  14. Scaling between Structural Relaxation and Particle Caging in a Model Colloidal Gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristiano De Michele; Emanuela Del Gado; Dino Leporini

    2010-09-08

    In polymers melts and supercooled liquids, the glassy dynamics is characterized by the rattling of monomers or particles in the cage formed by their neighbors. Recently, a direct correlation in such systems, described by a universal scaling form, has been established between the rattling amplitude and the structural relaxation time. In this paper we analyze the glassy dynamics emerging from the formation of a persistent network in a model colloidal gel at very low density. The structural relaxation time of the gel network is compared with the mean squared displacement at short times, corresponding to the localization length associated to the presence of energetic bonds. Interestingly, we find that the same type of scaling as for the dense glassy systems holds. Our findings well elucidate the strong coupling between the cooperative rearrangements of the gel network and the single particle localization in the structure. Our results further indicate that the scaling captures indeed fundamental physical elements of glassy dynamics.

  15. Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Composite Prepared by Sol-Gel Synthesis and Spark Plasma Sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2009-02-13

    Energetic composite powders consisting of sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition tested and results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (Ta - WO{sub 3}) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17 g.cm{sup -3} or 93% relative density. In addition those parts were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus the sample retained its stored chemical energy.

  16. Sol-gel synthesis of hybrid organic-inorganic materials. Hexylene- and phenylene-bridged polysiloxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Jamison, G.M.; Baugher, B.M.; Myers, S.A.; Assink, R.A.; Shea, K.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    New highly cross-linked polysiloxanes were prepared by sol-gel polymerization of 1,6-bis(diethoxymethylsilyl)hexane (1) and 1,4-bis(diethoxymethylsilyl)benzene (2). Hydrolysis and condensation of 1 and 2 under acidic and basic conditions with 4 equiv of water led to the rapid formation of hexylene- and phenylene-bridged polysiloxane gels. The dry gels (xerogels) were intractable, insoluble materials that were noticeably hydrophobic, exhibiting no swelling in organic solvents or water. Most of the xerogels were high surface area, mesoporous materials. Hexylene-bridged polysiloxanes prepared under acidic conditions were always nonporous regardless of whether they were processed to afford xerogels or supercritically dried as aerogels. Hexylene-bridged polysiloxanes prepared under basic conditions and all of the phenylene-bridged polysiloxanes were mesoporous with surface areas as high as 1025 m{sup 2}/g. 35 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Polymerization of trialkoxysilanes. Effect of the organic substituent on the formation of gels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Baugher, B.M.; Schneider, D.A.

    1998-09-01

    Hydrolysis and condensation of trialkoxysilanes, R-Si(OR{prime}){sub 3}, generally leads to the formation of silsesquioxane oligomers and polymers. These polymers are composed of a monomer repeat unit, [R-SiO{sub 1.5}]{sub n}, with a single silicon atom attached to other repeat units in the polymer through one to three siloxane bonds. The remaining substituent is an organic group attached to the silicon through a silicon-carbon single bond. Silsesquioxanes have been the subject of intensive study in the past and are becoming important again as a vehicle for introducing organic functionalities into hybrid organic-inorganic materials through sol-gel processing. Despite all of this interest, there has not been a systematic study of the ability of trialkoxysilanes to form gels through the sol-gel process. In fact, it has been noted that silsesquioxanes are generally isolated as soluble resins rather than the highly crosslinked network polymers (gels) one would expect from a tri-functional monomer. In this study, the authors have examined the sol-gel chemistry of a variety of trialkoxysilanes with different organic substituents (R = H, Me, Et, n-Pr, i-Pr, n-Bu, i-Bu, t-Bu, n-octadecyl, n-dodecyl, cyclohexyl, vinyl, phenyl, benzyl, phenethyl), with methoxide or ethoxide substituents on silicon, at varying monomer concentrations ranging up to neat monomer, and with different catalysts (HCl, NaOH, formic acid, fluoride). Gels were prepared from tetramethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane at identical concentrations for purposes of comparison.

  18. Analysis of C-S-H gel and cement paste by small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Andrew J. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, NIST, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)]. E-mail: andrew.allen@nist.gov; Thomas, Jeffrey J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)]. E-mail: jthomas@northwestern.edu

    2007-03-15

    The role of small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) in the characterization of cement is briefly reviewed. The unique information obtainable from SANS analysis of C-S-H gel in hydrating cement is compared with that obtainable by other neutron methods. Implications for the nature of C-S-H gel, as detected by SANS, are considered in relation to current models. Finally, the application of the SANS method to cement paste is demonstrated by analyzing the effects of calcium chloride acceleration and sucrose retardation on the resulting hydrated microstructure.

  19. IEF and NEPHGE 2-D PAGE Basic tube gel recipe, 5 ml volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    40 IEF and NEPHGE 2-D PAGE Basic tube gel recipe, 5 ml volume: Urea 2.75 g (ultrapure only) ddH2O 1 overnight with 5% Chem-Solv prior to pouring gels. Lysis buffer recipe, 1 ml volume: Urea 0.55 g (ultrapure) ( - ) (+) Final, 20 mM NaOH and 10 mM H3PO4. Agarose sealer recipe, 10 ml volume: 5X upper (6.8) 2 ml ddH2O 6 ml ß

  20. Influence of aging time on porosity, morphology&structure of hexylene-bridged polysilsesouioxane gels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D. A. (Douglas A.); DeFriend, K. A. (Kimberly A.); Small, J. H. (James H.)

    2004-01-01

    Hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes are hybrid organic-inorganic materials prepared by the sol-gel polymerization of 1,6-bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane monomer 1. Previous studies showed that high surface area xerogels could be prepared from 2 with base catalyzed polymerizations while non-porous xerogels could be prepared with acidic catalysts. However, these xerogels were obtained from gels that had been aged for two weeks. The object of this study was to ascertain the influences of aging time (3, 7, 14, 28, 42, and 56 days) on the properties of the resulting xerogels.

  1. Sol-gel silica films embedding NIR- emitting Yb-quinolinolate complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figus, Cristiana, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Quochi, Francesco, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Piana, Giacomo; Saba, Michele; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Cagliari, SS 554 Bivio per Sestu, I-09042, Monserrato-Cagliari (Italy); Artizzu, Flavia [Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Cagliari and Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, University of Cagliari, SS 554 Bivio per Sestu, I-09042, Monserrato-Cagliari (Italy); Mercuri, Maria Laura; Serpe, Angela; Deplano, Paola [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, University of Cagliari, SS 554 Bivio per Sestu, I-09042, Monserrato-Cagliari (Italy)

    2014-10-21

    Sol-gel silica thin films embedding an ytterbium quinolinolato complex (YbClQ{sub 4}) have been obtained using different alkoxides. Homogeneous, crack- and defect-free thin films of optical quality have been successfully deposited on glass substrate by dip-coating. The silica thin films have been characterized by time-resolved photoluminescence. The luminescence properties of the YbClQ{sub 4} are preserved in silica films prepared through an optimized sol-gel approach. The excited state lifetime of the lanthanide is comparable to those observed in bulk and longer than the corresponding ones in solution.

  2. CX-009418: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electron Beam Melting CX(s) Applied: None applied. Date: 10/30/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Kansas City Site Office

  3. CX-009420: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Additive Manufacturing Using EOSINT M280 CX(s) Applied: None applied. Date: 10/30/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Kansas City Site Office

  4. CX-009419: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Magnetic Pulser CX(s) Applied: None applied. Date: 10/30/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Kansas City Site Office

  5. Self-assembled gels of liquid crystals: hydrogen-bonded aggregates formed in various liquid crystalline textures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yue

    Self-assembled gels of liquid crystals: hydrogen-bonded aggregates formed in various liquid as an Advance Article on the web 30th March 2001 An azobenzene-containing gelator can gel the nematic liquid crystal BL006 through self-assembly of hydrogen- bonded aggregates. Due to the high nematic

  6. 4516 Macromolecules 1994,27, 4516-4520 Studies of the Swelling and Drying Kinetics of Thin Gelatin Gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Chi

    4516 Macromolecules 1994,27, 4516-4520 Studies of the Swelling and Drying Kinetics of Thin Gelatin Received April 26, 1994. ABSTRACT Both the swelling and drying kinetics of thin gelatin gel films were discussed in termsof the difference in the size of gelatin gel. The experimentaldata obtainedin

  7. The role of cyclic AMP in normalizing the function of engineered human blood microvessels in microfluidic collagen gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tien, Joe

    in microfluidic collagen gels Keith H.K. Wong, James G. Truslow, Joe Tien* Department of Biomedical Engineering tissue engineering Collagen gels Permeability Microfluidic channels Cyclic AMP a b s t r a c t Nearly all developed methods to synthesize extracellular matrix-based scaffolds that contain open microfluidic networks

  8. Use of X-Ray Computed Microtomography to Understand Why Gels Reduce Permeability to Water More Than That to Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    That to Oil R. S. Seright * , New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center J. Liang, Idaho National was used to investigate why gels reduce permeability to water more than that to oil in strongly water 80 to 90 times more than that to oil. In Berea, the gel caused disproportionate permeability

  9. Na-A (LTA) zeolite synthesis directly from alumatrane and silatrane by sol-gel microwave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulari, Erdogan

    selectivity properties.1 Na-A zeolite has also been employed in gas separation membranes, to enhance membrane was produced on aAl2O3 support by dipping the support into the gel and then crystallizing the gel higher gas permeability with equal selectivity in permeation. A second technique of making Na-A zeolite

  10. X-Ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Fluid Partitioning in Drainage and Imbibition Before and After Gel Placement: Disproportionate Permeability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    or extrusion mechanisms for creating oil pathways. Our XMT studies provide interesting insights into imbibition(III)-acetate-HPAM gels reduced permeability to water much more than to oil. Our results suggest that permeability to water was reduced to low values because water must flow through gel itself, whereas oil pressing

  11. Applying for a Training Contract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , usual deadline is July 31, 2013 for entry in September 2015. Students should apply in the 2nd year aimed at 2nd year LLB students & final year non-law students. Competition for these places is often more will successfully complete the Legal Practice Course each year. From the point of view of the student, there can

  12. Applied Sustainability Political Science 319

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    1 Applied Sustainability Political Science 319 College of Charleston Spring 2013 Day/Time: TH 1 Address: fisherb@cofc.edu Office: 284 King Street, #206 (Office of Sustainability) Office Hours: by appt sustainability. It will focus on the development of semester-long sustainability projects, from conception

  13. Journal of Applied Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Len

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2006 43, 377­384 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd METHODOLOGICAL INSIGHTS Point transect sampling with traps, Etive House, Beechwood Park, Inverness IV2 3BW, UK Summary 1. The ability to monitor abundance of animal

  14. Applying the Continuous Monitoring Technical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by providing technical leadership for the nation's measurement and standards infrastructure. ITL develops tests of technical, physical, administrative, and management standards and guidelines for the cost-effective securityApplying the Continuous Monitoring Technical Reference Model to the Asset, Configuration

  15. temperature heat pumps applied to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Very high- temperature heat pumps applied to energy efficiency in industry Application of industrial heat pumps June 21 th 2012 J-L Peureux, E. Sapora, D. Bobelin EDF R&D #12;Achema 2012 Frankfurt There are thermal requirements in the industrial plant Treq Heat exchanger = Cons ~ 0 CO2 ~ -100% Treq

  16. Casting 12 BioRad Mini SDS PAGE Gels 1. Assemble multicasting chamber. Make sure ALL plates and spacers are flush with bottom. Clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    120 Casting 12 BioRad Mini SDS PAGE Gels 1. Assemble multicasting chamber. Make sure ALL plates, disassemble casting chamber. Carefully separate gels. Rinse with ddH2O. Remove excess polyacrylamide. Place

  17. Large amplitude oscillatory shear flow of gluten dough: A model power-law gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Trevor S. K.

    In a previous paper [T. S. K. Ng and G. H. McKinley, J. Rheol.52(2), 417–449 (2008)], we demonstrated that gluten gels can best be understood as a polymericnetwork with a power-law frequency response that reflects the ...

  18. Effect of an Oscillating Magnetic Field on the Release Properties of Magnetic Collagen Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spinu, Leonard

    -15 The oscillating magnetic field was generated by a plate demagnetizer or by moving a permanent magnet backEffect of an Oscillating Magnetic Field on the Release Properties of Magnetic Collagen Gels Vania M The paper describes the effect of an oscillating magnetic field (OMF) on the morphology and release

  19. In-gel digestion of immunoprecipitated proteins separated by SDS-PAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura

    In-gel digestion of immunoprecipitated proteins separated by SDS-PAGE (Lamond Lab / April 2008) ! Perform all the pipetting steps in a laminar flow hood. We routinely do our digestions in our TC room samples from beads NOTE: To improve elution of proteins from beads and to save time during the digestion

  20. SYPRO Orange and Red protein gel stains provide the following advantages over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    are designed for fast, simple, sensitive staining of proteins in electrophoretic gels. The staining properties " Small plastic box lids or sealable plastic bags Handling Packaging: Screw cap plastic vials contained) is stable for 3 months when stored in sterile detergent free glass or plastic bottles at 2-8°C in the dark

  1. Formation of creases on the surfaces of elastomers and gels Xuanhe Zhao,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Wei

    strains. The difference between the two modes of instability may be understood as follows. SubjectFormation of creases on the surfaces of elastomers and gels Wei Hong,1 Xuanhe Zhao,2 and Zhigang is expressed by a scaling relation. Critical conditions for creasing are determined for elastomers subject

  2. Designing Dual-functionalized Gels for Self-reconfiguration and Autonomous Motion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2015-04-30

    Human motion is enabled by the concerted expansion and contraction of interconnected muscles that are powered by inherent biochemical reactions. One of the challenges in the field of biomimicry is eliciting this form of motion from purely synthetic materials, which typically do not generate internalized reactions to drive mechanical action. Moreover, for practical applications, this bio-inspired motion must be readily controllable. Herein, we develop a computational model to design a new class of polymer gels where structural reconfigurations and internalized reactions are intimately linked to produce autonomous motion, which can be directed with light. These gels contain both spirobenzopyran (SP)more »chromophores and the ruthenium catalysts that drive the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. Importantly, both the SP moieties and the BZ reaction are photosensitive. When these dual-functionalized gels are exposed to non-uniform illumination, the localized contraction of the gel (due to the SP moieties) in the presence of traveling chemical waves (due to the BZ reaction) leads to new forms of spontaneous, self-sustained movement, which cannot be achieved by either of the mono-functionalized networks.« less

  3. Pro-Q Sapphire 365 Oligohistidine Gel StainMP 21876 Revised: 08.ebruary2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    acid Deionized, high quality water (dH2 O) Pro-Q Sapphire 365 Staining The Pro-Q Sapphire 365 stain run on standard-sized gels with larger well sizes may exhibit lower sen- sitivity, as the protein will be spread out in the well. .or weakly expressed proteins requiring higher sensitivity, we recommend one

  4. Pro-Q Sapphire 488 Oligohistidine Gel StainMP 21877 Revised: 08.ebruary2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    grade Glacial acetic acid Deionized, high quality water (dH2 O) Pro-Q Sapphire 488 Staining The Pro run on standard-sized gels with larger well sizes may exhibit lower sen- sitivity, as the protein will be spread out in the well. .or weakly expressed proteins requiring higher sensitivity, we recommend one

  5. Relaxation dynamics in a transient network fluid with competing gel and glass phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinaki Chaudhuri; Pablo I. Hurtado; Ludovic Berthier; Walter Kob

    2015-02-01

    We use computer simulations to study the relaxation dynamics of a model for oil-in-water microemulsion droplets linked with telechelic polymers. This system exhibits both gel and glass phases and we show that the competition between these two arrest mechanisms can result in a complex, three-step decay of the time correlation functions, controlled by two different localization lengthscales. For certain combinations of the parameters, this competition gives rise to an anomalous logarithmic decay of the correlation functions and a subdiffusive particle motion, which can be understood as a simple crossover effect between the two relaxation processes. We establish a simple criterion for this logarithmic decay to be observed. We also find a further logarithmically slow relaxation related to the relaxation of floppy clusters of particles in a crowded environment, in agreement with recent findings in other models for dense chemical gels. Finally, we characterize how the competition of gel and glass arrest mechanisms affects the dynamical heterogeneities and show that for certain combination of parameters these heterogeneities can be unusually large. By measuring the four-point dynamical susceptibility, we probe the cooperativity of the motion and find that with increasing coupling this cooperativity shows a maximum before it decreases again, indicating the change in the nature of the relaxation dynamics. Our results suggest that compressing gels to large densities produces novel arrested phases that have a new and complex dynamics.

  6. Nanoindentation and adhesion of sol-gel-derived hard coatings on polyester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Nanoindentation and adhesion of sol-gel-derived hard coatings on polyester C.M. Chan, G.Z. Cao,a) H coatings on modified polyester substrates. The silica network was modified by incorporating an organic, and mechanical properties of the coatings. Various low-temperature densification techniques were studied

  7. SolGel Electrophoretic Deposition for the Growth of Oxide Nanorods**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    ±gel processing is a wet chemical route for the synthesis and processing of inorganic and organic±inorganic hybrid materials. It is particularly useful in making complex metal oxides and temperature sensitive organic±inorganic and Guozhong Cao* 1. Introduction Metal oxides, particularly complex metal oxides, are impor- tant materials

  8. Stress effects in sol-gel derived ferroelectric thin films L. Lian and N. R. Sottosa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    Stress effects in sol-gel derived ferroelectric thin films L. Lian and N. R. Sottosa) Department 26 August 2003; accepted 19 October 2003 Residual stress development during processing of sol investigates the effects of stress on field-induced polarization switching in ferroelectric Pb Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3

  9. Shake-gels: shear-induced gelation of laponite/PEO mixtures J. Zebrowski a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    applications, in- cluding biological fluids, drilling muds, cosmetics, food and pharmaceuticals. In addition of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA c Department of Chemical Engineering, Center for Complex Fluids to vigorous shaking, which transforms them from a low viscosity fluid into a `shake-gel', a solid

  10. Designing Dual-functionalized Gels for Self-reconfiguration and Autonomous Motion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2015-04-30

    Human motion is enabled by the concerted expansion and contraction of interconnected muscles that are powered by inherent biochemical reactions. One of the challenges in the field of biomimicry is eliciting this form of motion from purely synthetic materials, which typically do not generate internalized reactions to drive mechanical action. Moreover, for practical applications, this bio-inspired motion must be readily controllable. Herein, we develop a computational model to design a new class of polymer gels where structural reconfigurations and internalized reactions are intimately linked to produce autonomous motion, which can be directed with light. These gels contain both spirobenzopyran (SP) chromophores and the ruthenium catalysts that drive the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. Importantly, both the SP moieties and the BZ reaction are photosensitive. When these dual-functionalized gels are exposed to non-uniform illumination, the localized contraction of the gel (due to the SP moieties) in the presence of traveling chemical waves (due to the BZ reaction) leads to new forms of spontaneous, self-sustained movement, which cannot be achieved by either of the mono-functionalized networks.

  11. Dialkylenecarbonate-Bridged Polysilsesquioxanes. Hybrid Organic Sol-Gels with a Thermally Labile Bridging Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Beach, J.V.; Baugher, B.M.; Assink, R.A.; Shea, K.J.; Tran, J.; Small, J.H.

    1999-04-21

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach for altering the properties of bridged polysilsesquioxane xerogels using post-processing modification of the polymeric network. The bridging organic group contains latent functionalities that can be liberated thermally, photochemically, or by chemical means after the gel has been processed to a xerogel. These modifications can produce changes in density, volubility, porosity, and or chemical properties of the material. Since every monomer possesses two latent functional groups, the technique allows for the introduction of high levels of functionality in hybrid organic-inorganic materials. Dialkylenecarbonate-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels were prepared by the sol-gel polymerization of bis(triethoxysilylpropyl)carbonate (1) and bis(triethoxysilylisobutyl)-carbonate (2). Thermal treatment of the resulting non-porous xerogels and aerogels at 300-350 C resulted in quantitative decarboxylation of the dialkylenecarbonate bridging groups to give new hydroxyalkyl and olefinic substituted polysilsesquioxane monolithic xerogels and aerogels that can not be directly prepared through direct sol-gel polymerization of organotrialkoxysilanes.

  12. Structure, dynamics, and rheology of colloid-polymer mixtures: From liquids to gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Andrew

    Düsseldorf, Germany 2 IESL-FORTH and Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of CreteStructure, dynamics, and rheology of colloid-polymer mixtures: From liquids to gels M. Laurati,1,a the structural, dynamical, and viscoelastic properties of colloid-polymer mixtures at intermediate colloid volume

  13. Investigations of the small-scale thermal behavior of sol-gel thermites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Mial E.; Farrow, Matthew; Tappan, Alexander Smith

    2009-02-01

    Sol-gel thermites, formulated from nanoporous oxides and dispersed fuel particles, may provide materials useful for small-scale, intense thermal sources, but understanding the factors affecting performance is critical prior to use. Work was conducted on understanding the synthesis conditions, thermal treatments, and additives that lead to different performance characteristics in iron oxide sol-gel thermites. Additionally, the safety properties of sol-gel thermites were investigated, especially those related to air sensitivity. Sol-gel thermites were synthesized using a variety of different techniques and there appear to be many viable routes to relatively equivalent thermites. These thermites were subjected to several different thermal treatments under argon in a differential scanning calorimeter, and it was shown that a 65 C hold for up to 200 minutes was effective for the removal of residual solvent, thus preventing boiling during the final thermal activation step. Vacuum-drying prior to this heating was shown to be even more effective at removing residual solvent. The addition of aluminum and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) reduced the total heat release per unit mass upon exposure to air, probably due to a decrease in the amount of reduced iron oxide species in the thermite. For the thermal activation step of heat treatment, three different temperatures were investigated. Thermal activation at 200 C resulted in increased ignition sensitivity over thermal activation at 232 C, and thermal activation at 300 C resulted in non-ignitable material. Non-sol-gel iron oxide did not exhibit any of the air-sensitivity observed in sol-gel iron oxide. In the DSC experiments, no bulk ignition of sol-gel thermites was observed upon exposure to air after thermal activation in argon; however ignition did occur when the material was heated in air after thermal treatment. In larger-scale experiments, up to a few hundred milligrams, no ignition was observed upon exposure to air after thermal activation in vacuum; however ignition by resistively-heated tungsten wire was possible. Thin films of thermite were fabricated using a dispersed mixture of aluminum and iron oxide particles, but ignition and propagation of these films was difficult. The only ignition and propagation observed was in a preheated sample.

  14. Magnetic resonance as a structural probe of a uranium (VI) sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.M.; Thompson, M.C.; Buchanan, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); King, R.B. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Garber, A.R. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1989-12-31

    NMR investigations on the ORNL process for sol-gel synthesis of microspherical nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}), has been useful in sorting out the chemical mechanism in the sol-gel steps. {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H NMR studies on the HMTA gelation agent (Hexamethylene tetramine, C{sub 6}H{sub l2}N{sub 4}) has revealed near quantitative stability of this adamantane-like compound in the sol-Gel process, contrary to its historical role as an ammonia source for gelation from the worldwide technical literature. {sub 17}0 NMR of uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup ++}) hydrolysis fragments produced in colloidal sols has revealed the selective formation of a uranyl trimer, [(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH){sub 3}]{sup +}, induced by basic hydrolysis with the HMTA gelation agent. Spectroscopic results show that trimer condensation occurs during sol-gel processing leading to layered polyanionic hydrous uranium oxides in which HMTAH{sup +} is occluded as an ``intercalation`` cation. Subsequent sol-gel processing of microspheres by ammonia washing results in in-situ ion exchange and formation of a layered hydrous ammonium uranate with a proposed structural formula of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 10}] {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}0. This compound is the precursor to sintered U0{sub 2} ceramic fuel.

  15. Magnetic resonance as a structural probe of a uranium (VI) sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.M.; Thompson, M.C.; Buchanan, B.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); King, R.B. (Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Garber, A.R. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-01-01

    NMR investigations on the ORNL process for sol-gel synthesis of microspherical nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}), has been useful in sorting out the chemical mechanism in the sol-gel steps. {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H NMR studies on the HMTA gelation agent (Hexamethylene tetramine, C{sub 6}H{sub l2}N{sub 4}) has revealed near quantitative stability of this adamantane-like compound in the sol-Gel process, contrary to its historical role as an ammonia source for gelation from the worldwide technical literature. {sub 17}0 NMR of uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup ++}) hydrolysis fragments produced in colloidal sols has revealed the selective formation of a uranyl trimer, ((UO{sub 2}){sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH){sub 3}){sup +}, induced by basic hydrolysis with the HMTA gelation agent. Spectroscopic results show that trimer condensation occurs during sol-gel processing leading to layered polyanionic hydrous uranium oxides in which HMTAH{sup +} is occluded as an intercalation'' cation. Subsequent sol-gel processing of microspheres by ammonia washing results in in-situ ion exchange and formation of a layered hydrous ammonium uranate with a proposed structural formula of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}((UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 10}) {center dot} 8H{sub 2}0. This compound is the precursor to sintered U0{sub 2} ceramic fuel.

  16. Applied Mathematics Conferences and Workshops | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Applied Mathematics Applied Mathematics Conferences And Workshops Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Applied Mathematics...

  17. Structural Modification of Sol-Gel Materials through Retro Diels-Alder Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHALTOUT,RAAFAT M.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCCLAIN,MARK D.; PRABAKAR,SHESHASAYANA; GREAVES,JOHN; SHEA,KENNETH J.

    1999-12-08

    Hydrolysis and condensation of organically bridged bis-triethoxysilanes, (EtO){sub 3}Si-R-Si(OEt){sub 3}, results in the formation of three dimensional organic/inorganic hybrid networks (Equation 1). Properties of these materials, including porosity, are dependent on the nature of the bridging group, R. Flexible groups (akylene-spacers longer than five carbons in length) polymerize under acidic conditions to give non-porous materials. Rigid groups (such as arylene-, alkynylene-, or alkenylene) form non-porous, microporous, and macroporous gels. In many cases the pore size distributions are quite narrow. One of the motivations for preparing hybrid organic-inorganic materials is to extend the range of properties available with sol-gel systems by incorporating organic groups into the inorganic network. For example, organically modified silica gels arc either prepared by co-polymerizing an organoalkoxysilane with a silica precursor or surface silylating the inorganic gel. This can serve to increase hydrophobicity or to introduce some reactive organic functionality. However, the type and orientation of these organic functionalities is difficult to control. Furthermore, many organoalkoxysilanes can act to inhibitor even prevent gelation, limiting the final density of organic functionalities. We have devised a new route for preparing highly functionalized pores in hybrid materials using bridging groups that are thermally converted into the desired functionalities after the gel has been obtained. In this paper, we present the preparation and characterization of bridged polysilsesquioxanes with Diels-Alder adducts as the bridging groups from the sol-gel polymerization of monomers 2 and 4. The bridging groups are constructed such that the retro Diela-Alder reaction releases the dienes and leaves the dienophiles as integral parts of the network polymers. In the rigid architecture of a xerogel, this loss of organic functionality should liberate sufficient space to modify the overall porosity. Furthermore, the new porosity will be functionalized with the dienophilic olefin bridging group. We also demonstrate that by changing the type of Diels-Alder adduct used as the bridging group, we can change the temperature at which the retro-Diels-Alder reaction will occur.

  18. International combustion engines; Applied thermosciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on thermodynamic analysis - from the requisite first law to more sophisticated applications - and engine design, this book is an introduction to internal combustion engines and their mechanics. It covers the many types of internal combustion engines, including spark ignition, compression ignition, and stratified charge engines, and examines processes, keeping equations of state simple by assuming constant specific heats. Equations are limited to heat engines and later applied to combustion engines. Topics include realistic equations of state, stroichiometry, predictions of chemical equilibrium, engine performance criteria, and friction, which is discussed in terms of the hydrodynamic theory of lubrication and experimental methods such as dimensional analysis.

  19. ORISE: Applied health physics projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE The 2014 surveyNuclearHow toContactUndergraduateApplied

  20. Sandia Energy - Applied Turbulent Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni >ScientificApplied Turbulent Combustion Home

  1. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and PAGE gels for protein separation and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Singh, Anup K.; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2012-12-11

    Disclosed is a novel microfluidic device enabling on-chip implementation of a two-dimensional separation methodology. Previously disclosed microscale immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are combined with perpendicular polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) microchannels to achieve orthogonal separations of biological samples. Device modifications enable inclusion of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the second dimension. The device can be fabricated to use either continuous IPG gels, or the microscale isoelectric fractionation membranes we have also previously disclosed, for the first dimension. The invention represents the first all-gel two-dimensional separation microdevice, with significantly higher resolution power over existing devices.

  2. Chaotic behavior of ion exchange phenomena in polymer gel electrolytes through irradiated polymeric membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sangeeta Rawat; Barnamala Saha; Awadhesh Prasad; Amita Chandra

    2012-04-18

    A desktop experiment has been done to show the nonlinearity in the I-V characteristics of an ion conducting electrochemical micro-system. Its chaotic dynamics is being reported for the first time which has been captured by an electronic circuit. Polyvinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropene (PVdF-HFP) gel electrolyte comprising of a combination of plasticizers (ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate) and salts have been prepared to study the exchange of ions through porous poly ethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes. The nonlinearity of this system is due to the ion exchange of the polymer gel electrolytes (PGEs) through a porous membrane. The different regimes of spiking and non-spiking chaotic motions are being presented. The possible applications are highlighted.

  3. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Ben Isaac; É. Fodor; P. Visco; F. van Wijland; N. S. Gov

    2015-07-03

    The internal dynamics of active gels, both in artificial (in-vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells, has been extensively studied by experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct non-thermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system, and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures" and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments, and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies.

  4. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac, E Ben; Visco, P; van Wijland, F; Gov, N S

    2015-01-01

    The internal dynamics of active gels, both in artificial (in-vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells, has been extensively studied by experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct non-thermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system, and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures" and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments, and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies.

  5. Composition for selective placement of polymer gels for profile control in thermal oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, P.; Shu, W.R.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes a cross-linked gel product obtained by activating components at a temperature greater than about 300{degrees}F. It comprises: water; a cross-linkable polymer selected from a member of the group consisting of polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl alcohol copolymers, and sulfonated polyvinyl alcohol which member has at least one functional group selected from a member of the group consisting of an amine, a hydroxyl, or a thiol group; a phenolic compound; and a water-dispersible aldehyde producing compound when heated to a temperature above about 300{degrees}F. in a formation yields sufficient formaldehyde to react with the phenolic compound thereby forming a phenolic resin which combines with the polymer and makes a solid cross-linked gel.

  6. Moisture sensor based on evanescent wave light scattering by porous sol-gel silica coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Shiquan; Singh, Jagdish P.; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2006-05-02

    An optical fiber moisture sensor that can be used to sense moisture present in gas phase in a wide range of concentrations is provided, as well techniques for making the same. The present invention includes a method that utilizes the light scattering phenomenon which occurs in a porous sol-gel silica by coating an optical fiber core with such silica. Thus, a porous sol-gel silica polymer coated on an optical fiber core forms the transducer of an optical fiber moisture sensor according to an embodiment. The resulting optical fiber sensor of the present invention can be used in various applications, including to sense moisture content in indoor/outdoor air, soil, concrete, and low/high temperature gas streams.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF POLYMER GEL SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE VOLUMETRIC SWEEP AND REDUCE PRODUCING WATER/OIL RATIOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Paul Willhite; Don W. Green; Stan McCool; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2004-02-01

    The objectives of the research are to improve the effectiveness of polymer gels to increase volumetric sweep efficiency of fluid displacement processes and to reduce water production in production wells. The research is based on experimental data and conceptual and mathematical models developed from interpretation of experimental data. This report describes two types of mathematical models that were developed. One model type simulates the chemical reactions where polymer molecules are crosslinked to form a 3-dimensional network or gel. The model is based on statistical probabilities of reactions and yields molecular weights averages and distributions as functions of conversion. The second model type simulates the transport of chromium acetate, a common polymer crosslinker, through porous dolomite rock and includes the mechanisms of dolomite dissolution and chromium precipitation. The chromium transport model reasonably agreed with experimental data.

  8. Agarose Mini-Gels 1. In 250 ml flask: Hoefer and Pharmacia BRL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    on top-loading balance and add back lost ddH2O after agarose is dissolved. 3. Hoefer and Pharmacia: Cool agarose to 50-55°C on bench for 10-15 minutes. DO NOT allow to cool below 50°C. Add 50 µl of 1000X. Cool for 15-30 minutes. To store gel, cover with plastic wrap and store at 4-25°C. BRL: Do not cool

  9. At the Intersection of Applied Formal Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmerman, Daniel M.

    of Technology University of Washington Tacoma NTU Graduate Seminar, - 7 January 2011 #12;Outline · Applied

  10. Building Reliable Software Applied Formal Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmerman, Daniel M.

    Institute of Technology University of Washington Tacoma #12;Outline · Applied Formal Methods · Correctness

  11. Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Fitzsimmons, Michael [LANL

    2013-01-25

    Michael Fitzsimmons from Los Alamos National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  12. Structure and transport properties of a porous magnetic gel via x-ray microtomography M. D. Rintoul,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    of experimental techniques. Such techniques include transmission microscopy 11 , scanning tunneling electron transport properties, such as the fluid permeability and trapping rate, of the gel. S1063-651X 96 06408

  13. Dynamic behavior of hydration water in calcium-silicate-hydrate gel: A quasielastic neutron scattering spectroscopy investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hua

    The translational dynamics of hydration water confined in calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel was studied by quasielastic neutron scattering spectroscopy in the temperature range from 280 to 230 K. The stretch exponent ...

  14. Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzsimmons, Michael [LANL] [LANL

    2012-06-01

    Michael Fitzsimmons from Los Alamos National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  15. Dialkylene carbonate-bridged polysilsesquioxanes. Hybrid organic-inorganic sol-gels with a thermally labile bridging group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Beach, J.V.; Baugher, B.M.; Assink, R.A.; Shea, K.J.; Tran, J.; Small, J.H.

    1999-11-01

    In this paper, the authors introduce a new approach for altering the properties of bridged polysilsesquioxane xerogels using postprocessing modification of the polymeric network. The bridging organic group contains latent functionalities that can be liberated thermally, photochemically, or chemically after the gel has been processed to a xerogel. These modifications can produce changes in density, solubility, porosity, and or chemical properties of the material. Since every monomer possesses two latent functional groups, the technique allows for the introduction of high levels of functionality in hybrid organic-inorganic materials. Dialkylene carbonate-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels were prepared by the sol-gel polymerization of bis(triethoxysilylpropyl) carbonate and bis(triethoxysilylisobutyl) carbonate. Thermal treatment of the resulting nonporous xerogels and aerogels at 300--350 C resulted in quantitative decarboxylation of the dialkylene carbonate bridging groups to give new hydroxyalkyl and olefinic substituted polysilsesquioxane monolithic xerogels and aerogels that cannot be directly prepared through direct sol-gel polymerization of organotrialkoxysilanes.

  16. Correction of Wall Adhesion Effects in the Centrifugal Compression of Strong Colloidal Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Buscall; Daniel R. Lester

    2014-10-09

    Several methods for measuring the compressive strength of strong particulate gels are available, including the centrifuge method, whereby the strength as a function of volume-fraction is obtained parametrically from the dependence of equilibrium sediment height upon acceleration. The analysis used conventionally due to Buscall & White (1987) ignores the possibility that the particulate network might adhere to the walls of the centrifuge tube, even though many types of cohesive particulate gel can be expected to. The neglect of adhesion is justifiable when the ratio of the shear to compressive strength is small, which it can be for many systems away from the gel-point, but never very near it. The errors arising from neglect of adhesion are investigated theoretically and quantified by synthesising equilibrium sediment height versus acceleration data for various degrees of adhesion and then analysing them in the conventional manner. Approximate correction factors suggested by dimensionless analysis are then tested. The errors introduced by certain other approximations made routinely in order to render the data-inversion practicable are analysed too. For example, it shown that the error introduced by treating the acceleration vector as approximately one-dimensional is minuscule for typical centrifuge dimensions, whereas making this assumption renders the data inversion tractable.

  17. The nature of the glass and gel transitions in sticky spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Patrick Royall; Stephen R. Williams; Hajime Tanaka

    2014-09-18

    Glasses and gels are the two dynamically arrested, disordered states of matter. Despite their importance, their similarities and differences remain elusive, especially at high density. We identify dynamical and structural signatures which distinguish the gel and glass transitions in a colloidal model system of hard and "sticky" spheres. Gelation is induced by crossing the gas-liquid phase-separation line and the resulting rapid densification of the colloid-rich phase leads to a sharp change in dynamics and local structure. Thus, we find that gelation is first-order-like and can occur at much higher densities than previously thought: far from being low-density networks, gels have a clear "thermodynamic" definition which nevertheless leads to a non-equilibrium state with a distinct local structure characteristic of a rapidly quenched glass. In contrast, approaching the glass transition, the dynamics slow continuously accompanied by the emergence of local five-fold symmetric structure. Our findings provide a general thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural basis upon which to distinguish gelation from vitrification.

  18. Composition for selective placement of polymer gels for profile control in thermal oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, P.; Shu, W.R.

    1991-12-10

    This patent describes a method for closing pores in a more permeable zone of a formation where a cross-linked gel is obtained by activating components at a temperature greater than about 300{degrees} F. It comprises making an aqueous mixture comprising: a water dispersible polymer selected from a member of the group consisting of polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl alcohol copolymer, and sulfonated polyvinyl alcohol which member has at least one functional group selected from a member of the group consisting of an amine, an amide, a hydroxyl, or a thiol group; a phenolic compound, and an aldehyde producing compound which when heated to a temperature above about 300{degrees} F. in a formation decomposes to yield an aldehyde and forms a phenolic resin which combines with the polymer and makes a solid gel sufficient to close one or more permeable zones in the formation; injecting the aqueous mixture into the more permeable zone; and allowing the mixture to remain in the zone for a time sufficient to reach a temperature above about 300{degrees} F. and form a solid gel sufficient to close pores in the zone.

  19. Solvent contribution to the stability of a physical gel characterized by quasi-elastic neutron scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sylvie Spagnoli; Isabelle Morfin; Miguel A. Gonzalez; Pierre Carcabal; Marie Plazanet

    2015-02-05

    The dynamics of a physical gel, namely the Low Molecular Mass Organic Gelator {\\textit Methyl-4,6-O-benzylidene-$\\alpha$ -D-mannopyranoside ($\\alpha$-manno)} in water and toluene are probed by neutron scattering. Using high gelator concentrations, we were able to determine, on a timescale from a few ps to 1 ns, the number of solvent molecules that are immobilised by the rigid network formed by the gelators. We found that only few toluene molecules per gelator participate to the network which is formed by hydrogen bonding between the gelators' sugar moieties. In water, however, the interactions leading to the gel formations are weaker, involving dipolar, hydrophobic or $\\pi-\\pi$ interactions and hydrogen bonds are formed between the gelators and the surrounding water. Therefore, around 10 to 14 water molecules per gelator are immobilised by the presence of the network. This study shows that neutron scattering can give valuable information about the behaviour of solvent confined in a molecular gel.

  20. Light-induced charge separation and storage in titanium oxide gels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuznetsov, A.I.; Kameneva, O.; Alexandrov, A.; Bityurin, N.; Marteau, Ph.; Chhor, K.; Kanaev, A.; Sanchez, C.

    2005-02-01

    We report on the interaction of light with a particular class of media--wet gels, which in contrast to sols of nanoparticles possess a macroscopic bulk structure, and which differ from conventional solids by the existence of the internal liquid-solid interface. We show, taking an absorption cross section of trapped electrons from Safrany, Gao, and Rabani [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 5848 (2000)], that a separation of charges with quantum efficiency as high as 46% appears under the band-gap irradiation of titanium oxide gels: electrons are stored in the gel network as Ti{sup 3+} centers, whereas holes are stored in the liquid phase. Under a prolonged UV-laser irradiation, more than 14% of Ti{sup 4+} centers can be converted into Ti{sup 3+}. Their lifetime can be extremely long and exceeds months at room temperature. The trapped electrons are responsible for a 'dark' absorption continuum covering the spectral range from 350 nm to 2.5 {mu}m.

  1. Synthesis of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Aerogels by a Non-Alkoxide Sol-Gel Route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chervin, C N; Clapsaddle, B J; Chiu, H W; Gash, A E; Satcher, Jr., J H; Kauzlarich, S M

    2005-02-11

    Homogeneous, nanocrystalline powders of yttria-stabilized zirconia were prepared using a nonalkoxide sol-gel method. Monolithic gels, free of precipitation, were prepared by addition of propylene oxide to aqueous solutions of Zr{sup 4+} and Y{sup 3+} chlorides at room temperature. The gels were dried with supercritical CO{sub 2}(l), resulting in amorphous aerogels that crystallized into cubic stabilized ZrO{sub 2} following calcination at 500 C. The aerogels and resulting crystalline products were characterized using in-situ temperature profile X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. TEM and N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption analysis of an aerogel indicated a porous network structure with a high surface area (409 m{sup 2}/g). The crystallized yttria-stabilized zirconia maintained high surface area (159 m{sup 2}/g) upon formation of homogeneous, nanoparticles ({approx}10 nm). Ionic conductivity at 1000 C of sintered YSZ (1500 C, 3 hours) prepared by this method, was 0.13 {+-} 0.02 {Omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1}. Activation energies for the conduction processes from 1000-550 C and 550-400 C, were 0.95 {+-} 0.09 and 1.12 {+-} 0.05 eV, respectively. This is the first reported synthesis and characterization of yttria-stabilized zirconia via an aerogel precursor.

  2. A dosimetric study of small photon fields using polymer gel and Gafchromic EBT films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassani, Hossein; Nedaie, Hassan Ali; Zahmatkesh, Mohammad Hassan; Shirani, Kaveh

    2014-04-01

    The use of small field sizes is increasingly becoming important in radiotherapy particularly since the introduction of stereotactic radiosurgery and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques. The reliable measurement of delivered dose from such fields with conventional dosimeters, such as ionization chambers, is a challenging task. In this work, methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatin initiated by copper polymer gel dosimeters are employed to measure dose in 3 dimensions. Field sizes of 5 × 5 mm{sup 2}, 10 × 10 mm{sup 2}, 20 × 20 mm{sup 2}, and 30 × 30 mm{sup 2} are investigated for a 6-MV x-rays. The results show an agreement with Gafchromic film, with some variation in measured doses near the edge of the fields, where the film data decrease more rapidly than the other methods. Dose penumbra widths obtained with gel dosimeters and Gafchormic film were generally in agreement with each other. The results of this work indicate that polymer gel dosimetry could be invaluable for the quantification of the 3-dimensional dose distribution in small field size.

  3. Synthesis of Sol-Gel Matrices for Encapsulation of Enzymes Using an Aqueous Route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, C.S.; Bhatia, R.B.; Brinker, C.J.; Harris, T.M.

    1998-11-23

    Sol-gel matrices are promising host materials for potential chemical and biosensor applications. Previous studies have focused on modified sol-gel routes using alkoxides for encapsulation of enzymes. However the formation of alcohol as a byproduct during hydrolysis and condensation reactions poses limitations. We report the immobilization of glucose oxidase and peroxidase in silica prepared by an aqueous route which may provide a more favorable environment for the biomolecules. A two step aqueous sol-gel procedure using sodium silicate as the precursor was developed to encapsulate the enzymes and the dye precursor, o-dianisidine. Glucose oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of glucose to give gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Peroxidase then catalyzes the reaction of the dye precursor with hydrogen peroxide to produce a colored product. The kinetics of the coupled enzymatic reactions were monitored by optical spectroscopy and compared to those occurring in tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) derived silica matrices developed by Yamanaka. Enhanced kinetics in the aqueous silicate matrices were related to differences in the host microstructure as elucidated by microstructural comparisons of the corresponding aerogels.

  4. Nanoscopic Dynamics of Phospholipid in Unilamellar Vesicles: Effect of Gel to Fluid Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Veerendra K [ORNL; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Anunciado, Divina B [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of phospholipids in unilamellar vesicles (ULV) is of interest in biology, medical, and food sciences since these molecules are widely used as biocompatible agents and a mimic of cell membrane systems. We have investigated the nanoscopic dynamics of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) phospholipid in ULV as a function of temperature using elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The dependence of the signal on the scattering momentum transfer, which is a critical advantage of neutron scattering techniques, allows the detailed analysis of the lipid motions that cannot be carried out by other means. In agreement with a differential scanning calorimetry measurement, a sharp rise in the elastic scattering intensity below ca. 296 K indicates a phase transition from the high-temperature fluid phase to the low-temperature solid gel phase. The microscopic lipid dynamics exhibits qualitative differences between the solid gel phase (in a measurement at 280 K) and the fluid phase (in a measurement at a physiological temperature of 310 K). The data analysis invariably shows the presence of two distinct motions: the whole lipid molecule motion within a monolayer, or lateral diffusion, and the relatively faster internal motion of the DMPC molecule. The lateral diffusion of the whole lipid molecule is found to be Fickian in character, whereas the internal lipid motions are of localized character, consistent with the structure of the vesicles. The lateral motion slows down by an order of magnitude in the solid gel phase, whereas for the internal motion not only the time scale, but also the character of the motion changes upon the phase transition. In the solid gel phase, the lipids are more ordered and undergo uniaxial rotational motion. However, in the fluid phase, the hydrogen atoms of the lipid tails undergo confined translation diffusion rather than uniaxial rotational diffusion. The localized translational diffusion of the hydrogen atoms of the lipid tails is a manifestation of the flexibility of the chains acquired in the fluid phase. Because of this flexibility, both the local diffusivity and the confinement volume for the hydrogen atoms increase linearly from near the lipid s polar head group to the end of its hydrophobic tail. Our results present a quantitative and detailed picture of the effect of the gel-fluid phase transition on the nanoscopic lipid dynamics in ULV. The data analysis approach developed here has a potential for probing the dynamic response of lipids to the presence of additional cell membrane components.

  5. CX-007571: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pulaski County - Wastewater CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/29/2011 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  6. CX-007596: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio Advanced Transportation Partnership CX(s) Applied: B5.23 Date: 01/25/2012 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-012729: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Sulfide Scavenger BOA (Multiple) CX(s) Applied: B5.2Date: 41880 Location(s): LouisianaOffices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  8. CX-008588: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    St. Petersburg Solar Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/19/2012 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  9. CX-008684: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Metaline Radio Station Upgrade Project CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 07/11/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. CX-010148: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Merritt Radio Station Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 04/18/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-008706: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tunk Mountain Radio Station Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 05/30/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. CX-012716: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    General Scientific Infrastructure Support for University of Wisconsin CX(s) Applied: B1.31Date: 41844 Location(s): WisconsinOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  13. CX-008543: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado State Energy Plan 2012 CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 06/25/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  14. CX-012333: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Support Buildings CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 06/03/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  15. CX-011165: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Heavy Mineral Separation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/07/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  16. CX-012817: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bell Maintenance Headquarters Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41890 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. CX-006225: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Infrastructure Upgrades - Materials and Fuel Complex (MFC)- Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06072011 Location(s): Idaho Falls,...

  18. CX-010791: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico Miocene Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Site Characterization Mega Transect CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08142013 Location(s): Texas...

  19. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Science | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination Establishment of an Easement for Enhanced Electrical Service to the Computational Sciences Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 08302011 Location(s):...

  20. CX-011634: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Closure Turf Installation CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 08/27/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office

  1. CX-008993: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-008993: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and Sheets CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 0822...

  2. CX-012776: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Catalyst Processing, KCP14-05 CX(s) Applied: NOT NOTEDDate: 41857 Location(s): MissouriOffices(s): Kansas City Site Office

  3. CX-008146: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Formation Evaluator Tools (Haliburton) CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 09/11/2011 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC

  4. CX-004095: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-004095: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thermal Transport Properties of Nanostructured Materials for Energy Conversion CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09...

  5. CX-008144: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Planned Repair of Flow Lines CX(s) Applied: B5.4 Date: 08/09/2011 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC

  6. CX-003164: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003164: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Biomass Production Across a Landscape CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 07262010...

  7. CX-012730: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace West Hackberry Radio Tower CX(s) Applied: B1.19Date: 41880 Location(s): LouisianaOffices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  8. CX-011069: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Induction Furnace Melting CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-010057: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eugene Substation Protective Relay Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 01/29/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. CX-011214: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sensitive Instrument Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/10/2013 Location(s): Iowa Offices(s): Ames Site Office

  11. CX-012795: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Bonneville Substation 23- Kilovolt Line Retermination CX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 41926 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. CX-010618: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: 0 Date: 07/19/2013 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-012789: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building 440 CNM Clean Room Expansion CX(s) Applied: B3.15Date: 41906 Location(s): IllinoisOffices(s): Argonne Site Office

  14. CX-008438: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biogas Reconditioning Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/27/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-008282: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biogas Reconditioning Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area PowerAdministratio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center October 26, 2009 CX-005544: Categorical Exclusion Determination Power Rate Formula for the Provo River Project of the Western Area Power Administration CX(s) Applied:...

  17. CX-012311: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Accelerator Test Facility II CX(s) Applied: B3.10 Date: 05/28/2014 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Brookhaven Site Office

  18. CX-008799: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jack Case Showers Projects CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/04/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  19. CX-010763: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-010763: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nevada Desert Research Institute- Photovoltaic Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 07172013 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s):...

  20. CX-012254: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - Vanderbilt CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/28/2014 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  1. CX-012253: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - OSU CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/27/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  2. CX-004351: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4351: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004351: Categorical Exclusion Determination Center for Development of Math, Science and Technology CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 1029...

  3. CX-003959: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    59: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003959: Categorical Exclusion Determination Federal Bureau of Investigation Radiological Dispersion Device Training CX(s) Applied: B1.2...

  4. CX-010689: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Generic CX Determination for Financial Assistance Awards CX(s) Applied: Unknown Date: 07/17/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Chicago Office

  5. CX-005987: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    87: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005987: Categorical Exclusion Determination Stion Corporation - Superstrate Device for High Efficiency Tandem Modules CX(s) Applied: A9,...

  6. Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (CX) Determinations By Date Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date August 25, 2015 CX-012469: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Analysis Services CX(s) Applied:...

  7. CX-100022: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-100022: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100022: Categorical Exclusion Determination EERE Demonstration for Advanced Retro-Commissioning Technology CX(s) Applied: A9,...

  8. CX-001378: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    378: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001378: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wackenhut Services, Incorporated Training Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.2 Date: 10282009...

  9. CX-012664: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SBIR/STTR Phase 0 Outreach and Assistance Program CX(s) Applied: A8Date: 41844 Location(s): IllinoisOffices(s): Chicago Office

  10. CX-007826: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    007826: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007826: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Crittenden City Facilities Re-Roofing CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01312012 Location(s):...

  11. CX-012433: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Computer Simulation and Prototype Construction and Testing CX(s) Applied: A9Date: 41878 Location(s): GeorgiaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-000310: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000310: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Jersey Revision 1 - Energy Efficiency Upgrades for State Buildings CX(s) Applied: A9, A11,...

  13. CX-009923: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-009923: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009923: Categorical Exclusion Determination Project Icebreaker CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01072013 Location(s): Ohio...

  14. CX-007056: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7056: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007056: Categorical Exclusion Determination Interstate Electrification Improvement CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09192011 Location(s):...

  15. CX-100290 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100290 Categorical Exclusion Determination Location, Location, Efficiency (Milwaukee, WI) Award Number: DE-EE0007069 CX(s) Applied: A9,...

  16. CX-003197: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003197: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low Cost High Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation CX(s) Applied:...

  17. CX-007370: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    370: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007370: Categorical Exclusion Determination Idaho-TRIBE-SHOSHONE-BANNOCK TRIBE OF THE FORT HALL RESERVATION OF IDAHO CX(s) Applied:...

  18. CX-008534: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Peter Wentz Geothermal CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 05/23/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  19. CX-008204: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energize Missouri HUG Finch CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  20. CX-008203: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energize Missouri HUG Demoret CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  1. CX-009442: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cutters Grove, Anoka CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.19 Date: 07/31/2012 Location(s): Minnesota Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  2. CX-007836: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building Retrofits CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 01/30/2012 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  3. CX-008241: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energize Missouri HUG Teter CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 05/15/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  4. CX-008205: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energize Missouri HUG Weaver CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  5. CX-012097: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Microgrid Demonstration Project CX(s) Applied: B5.15 Date: 03/24/2014 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  6. CX-002327: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Determination Central Facility Area and Advanced Test Reactor-Complex Analytical and Research and Development Laboratory Operation (Overarching) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05...

  7. CX-005162: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5162: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005162: Categorical Exclusion Determination Green Chemistry - CEAM Phase 3 - Working Bug LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02082011...

  8. CX-008545: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Energy Evolution and Diffusion Studies CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06/19/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  9. CX-012200: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determination of Excess Real Property CX(s) Applied: B1.36 Date: 05/01/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Legacy Management

  10. CX-100081: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-100081: Categorical Exclusion Determination Harnessing the Hydro-Electric Potential of Engineered Drops Award Number: DE-EE0005428 CX(s) Applied:...

  11. CX-012122: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    OCGen Module Mooring Project CX(s) Applied: B5.25 Date: 04/29/2014 Location(s): Maine Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  12. CX-006209: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Determination Missouri Independent Energy Efficiency Program: Anheuser-Busch - Brewery Energy Efficiency Retrofits CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07012011 Location(s): Saitn...

  13. CX-010109: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    09: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010109: Categorical Exclusion Determination Curecanti-Poncha 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Cross Bar Ranch Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3...

  14. CX-008683: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shaniko Radio Station Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 07/11/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-009698: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sale of Lakeside Radio Station CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 12/27/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-012231: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mica Peak Radio Station upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 06/09/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. CX-011190: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alberton Communication Site Construction CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 08/26/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. CX-010155: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Augspurger Radio Tower Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 04/03/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-011401: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minto Lodge Rehabilitation CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/19/2013 Location(s): Alaska Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  20. CX-010237: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pittsburgh Green Innovators Synergy Center CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02/28/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  1. CX-008973: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Petrography Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/01/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-010730: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paisley Geothermal Integration CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 08/09/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-008161: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prosser Hatchery Backup Generator Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 04/16/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-008700: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Natapoc Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/12/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. CX-012788: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bio-Aviation Fuel LCA with GREET CX(s) Applied: B5.15Date: 41906 Location(s): IllinoisOffices(s): Argonne Site Office

  6. CX-012718: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho State University Reactor Laboratory Modernization CX(s) Applied: B1.31Date: 41844 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  7. CX-012189: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Microbial Laboratory Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.12 Date: 05/06/2014 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Argonne Site Office

  8. CX-012317: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High Performance Computing Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 06/16/2014 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  9. CX-012725: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Materials and Fuel Complex (MFC)-782 Fire Sprinkler Installation CX(s) Applied: B2.2Date: 41829 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  10. CX-010515: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency Public Service Campaign CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06/14/2013 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  11. CX-007856: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sacramento Regional Energy Alliance CX(s) Applied: B5.23 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  12. CX-007858: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Solar Transformation Initiative CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-008250: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geotechnical Core Drilling for USGS 138 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04/18/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  14. CX-012110: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cowlitz Falls Fish Facility Access Agreement Extension CX(s) Applied: A2 Date: 04/02/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-009398: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Domestic Source Recovery CX(s) Applied: B2.6 Date: 11/01/2012 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Los Alamos Site Office

  16. CX-012705: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC)-703 Fire Alarm Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.2Date: 41858 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  17. CX-011250: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Determination Transforming Photovoltaic Installations Toward Dispatchable, Schedulable Energy Solutions CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.15 Date: 10172013 Location(s): Oregon...

  18. CX-005950: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Determination Wisconsin Clean Transportation Partnership: Riteway Bus Services Propane Fueling Infrastructure CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06012011 Location(s): Oak Creek,...

  19. CX-006893: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Exclusion Determination Ohio Advanced Transportation PartnershipFrito Lay Columbus Propane Fueling Infrastructure CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09282011 Location(s): Columbus,...

  20. CX-008535: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    King County Biogas and Nutrient Reduction CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/22/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  1. CX-011110: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advancements in Algal Biomass Yield CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  2. CX-010343: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bald Hill Farms Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 05/10/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-011630: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    9831 Wall Construction Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  4. CX-012816: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rogue-Gold Beach Access Road Improvement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41890 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. CX-011177: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hebo Substation Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/13/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-011184: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salmon Creek Pond Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. CX-008698: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poorman Ponds Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/12/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-009630: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ICP Routine Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/06/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  9. CX-009632: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    INTEC – Suspect RH-TRU (AMWTP) CX(s) Applied: NO CX GIVEN Date: 11/23/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  10. CX-012722: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Test Reactor Area (TRA)-653 Conference Room Modifications CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41829 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  11. CX-011564: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excess Facilities Deactivation and Demolition CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  12. CX-009753: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Propane Corridor Development Program CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 12/06/2012 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-012482: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mid-Atlantic Regional Infrastructure Development Project CX(s) Applied: B5.22Date: 41862 Location(s): MarylandOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-012002: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Raver-Covington Conductor Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/24/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-010772: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Water Security Test Bed (WSTB) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/17/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  16. CX-100159 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Pumps RIN: 1904-AC54 CX(s) Applied: B5.1

  17. CX-100160 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dehumidifiers RIN: 1904-AC81 CX(s) Applied: B5.1

  18. CX-012706: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Radiochemistry Laboratory (RCL) Supply Intake Filter Housing CX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 41858 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  19. CX-009295: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Regional Innovation Cluster CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/05/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-003226: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Exclusion Determination Parris Island Wind Resource Assessment; National Renewable Energy Laboratory Tracking Number 10-032 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 08042010...

  1. CX-010258: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bangladesh Meteorological Instrumentation Installation CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04/26/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  2. CX-008803: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Milling Machine Replacement Projects CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 05/14/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  3. CX-002355: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002355: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) Green Impact Zone Smart Grid Demonstration CX(s) Applied:...

  4. CX-010113: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Compression Stress Relaxometer CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/28/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  5. CX-012434: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Cost Titanium Casting Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41878 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-009587: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    City of Houston, Texas CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  7. CX-010261: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nevada State Energy Program Formula CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 04/26/2013 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  8. CX-009635: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    INTEC – U-233 Waste Stream Disposition CX(s) Applied: NO CX GIVEN Date: 12/15/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  9. CX-009019: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Determination CX-009019: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Catalyst-Assisted Manufacture of Olefins from Natural Gas Liquids: Prototype Development CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6...

  10. CX-011625: Categorical Exclusion Determinationc

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    9103 Second Floor Refurbishment CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  11. CX-008609: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vermont State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Vermont Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  12. CX-012790: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Haystack Butte Radio Site Land Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 41939 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-004247: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-004247: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolina Blue Skies Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 10142010 Location(s): Indian Trail,...

  14. CX-012655: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition of Access Road Easements CX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 41849 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-012809: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LURR 20140313 City of Vancouver Sewer Lateral CX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 41906 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-012651: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LURR20140464 - Spencer May - Fence Construction CX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 41858 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. CX-012632: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LURR 20140456 - Salmon Creek Avenue Pathway Project CX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 41885 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. CX-012808: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LURR 20140504 Ross Substation Comcast Fiber Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 41906 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-012637: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LURR 20140521 - David King - Sewer Line Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 41876 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. CX-010398: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Power Line Configuration CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 04/25/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  1. CX-010091: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Power Line Configuration 2013-1 CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 04/15/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  2. CX-002194: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-002194: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Demonstration Wind Turbine at Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04282010 Location(s):...

  3. CX-012812: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chemawa-Salem #1 & #2 Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41893 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-012469: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gas Analysis Services CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41876 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-010656: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stormwater Drainage Repair CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/18/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  6. CX-011995: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-011995: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hat Rock Tap Switching Station Equipment Transfer CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 04102014 Location(s):...

  7. CX-005991: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-005991: Categorical Exclusion Determination Prairie Village, Kansas Ground Source Heat Pump Relocation CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05252011 Location(s): Prairie Village,...

  8. CX-012118: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - Tufts CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/21/2014 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  9. CX-010437: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rocky Ridge Radio Station Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 05/31/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. CX-011239: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Security Upgrades at Multiple Substations CX(s) Applied: ? Date: 10/02/2013 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-012474: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Refractories/Ceramics Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41870 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-007418: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sidewalks to School CX(s) Applied: B1.13 Date: 12/13/2011 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-006211: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination Missouri Independent Energy Efficiency Program: Henniges Automotive - Process Air Compressor Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07182011 Location(s):...

  14. CX-009423: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Relay and Switchboard Panel Replacements CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 10/29/2012 Location(s): Arkansas Offices(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  15. CX-012310: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sawmill Creek Stream Bank Erosion CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/06/2014 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Argonne Site Office

  16. CX-009132: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Landfill Gas Utilization Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.21 Date: 08/02/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-012566: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Z-Area Fire Tank Painting CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41865 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  18. CX-007893: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SunShot Massachusetts CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 02/10/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  19. CX-012463: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reliable SOFC Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 41877 Location(s): ConnecticutOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-011626: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Line Yard Fence Project CX(s) Applied: B1.11 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  1. CX-010869: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nauticas Research Program CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/07/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Argonne Site Office

  2. CX-007407: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Floating Turbine CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 12/07/2011 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  3. CX-010768: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ZIRCEX Nuclear Fuel Dissolution Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/12/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  4. CX-012810: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    St. Johns-Keeler Minor Access Road Improvement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41901 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. CX-009513: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aquatic Invasive Mussels Monitoring CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 10/15/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-012658: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chief Joseph and Custer Substations Security Fence Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.11Date: 41843 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. CX-007549: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Harrisonville - Waste Water Treatment Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  8. CX-007550: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kearney - Waste Water Treatment Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  9. CX-007417: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shift CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/21/2011 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  10. CX-010532: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Various Demolition Jobs CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Fermi Site Office

  11. CX-012796: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Big Eddy-Redmond #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41919 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. CX-012818: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    La Pine-Chiloquin Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41887 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-012813: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Redmond-Pilot Butte #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41893 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-012799: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Malin-Hilltop Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41915 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-012805: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brasada-Harney #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41908 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-012798: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis Creek Tap Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41915 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. CX-009166: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes CX(s) Applied:...

  18. CX-011534: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grays River Confluence Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/08/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. Academic Plan Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Academic Plan Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering University of Toronto 2011 to 2016 Approved by Faculty Council October 6, 2011 #12;Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering Academic Plan Table ........................................................................................... 13 Chapter 4: Educating Future Engineers

  20. Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep Vadose Zone­ Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report #12;Prepared Tasks 25 References 25 Appendix: FY2012 Products for the Deep Vadose Zone­ Applied Field Research Initiative Contents #12;Message from the Deep Vadose Zone- Applied Field Research Initiative Project Manager

  1. Montana State University 1 Applied Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University 1 Applied Mathematics Option M 171Q Calculus I 4 or M 181Q 348 Techniques of Applied Math I 3 M 349 Techniques of Applied Mathematics II 3 M 386R Software Applications in Mathematics 3 M 441 Numerical Linear Algebra & Optimization 3 M 442 Numerical Solution

  2. Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohner, Martin

    Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics Most downloaded articles January - August 2004 1: a survey Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 141 (2002) 1-26 2. M. Z. Liu, M. H. Song and Z([t])*1 Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 166 (2004) 361-370 3. S. Kutluay, A. Esen and I

  3. Online Master of Science in Applied Psychology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    Online Master of Science in Applied Psychology #12;Online Master of Science in Applied Psychology of psychology to today's changing business environment. On behalf of the University of Southern California, I Psychology online program. Here at USC, we recognize the importance of applying psychology in many areas

  4. Solid phase immobilization of optically responsive liposomes insol-gel materials for chemical and biological sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamanaka, Stacey A.; Charych, Deborah H.; Loy, Douglas A.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.

    1997-04-01

    Liposomes enhanced with surface recognition groups have previously been found to have high affinity for heavy metal ions and virus particles with unique fluorescent and colorimetric responses, respectively. These lipid aggregate systems have now been successfully immobilized in a silica matrix via the sol-gel method, affording sensor materials that are robust, are easily handled, and offer optical clarity. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of preformed liposomes without modification of the aggregate structure. Lipid extraction studies of immobilized nonpolymerized liposomes showed no lipid leakage in aqueous solution over a period of 3 months. Heavy metal fluorescent sensor materials prepared with 5 percent N-[8-[1-octadecyl-2-(9-(1-pyrenyl)nonyl)-rac-glyceroyl]-3,6-dioxaoctyl]imino acid/distearylphosphatidylcholineliposomes exhibited a 4-50-fold enhancement in sensitivity to various metal ions compared to that of the liposomes in free solution. Through ionic attraction the anionic silicate surface, at the experimental pH of 7.4, may act as a preconcentrator of divalent metal ions, boosting the gel's internal metal concentration. Entrapped sialic acid-coated polydiacetylene liposomes responded with colorimetric signaling to influenza virus X31, although slower than the free liposomes in solution. The successful transport of the virus (50-100 nm diameter) reveals a large pore diameter of the gel connecting the liposome to the bulk solution. The porous and durable silica matrix additionally provides a protective barrier to biological attack (bacterial, fungal) and allows facile recycling of the liposome heavy metal sensor.

  5. Method For Removing Volatile Components From A Gel-Cast Ceramic Article

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klug, Frederic Joseph (Schenectady, NY); DeCarr, Sylvia Marie (Schenectady, NY)

    2004-09-07

    A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of liquid crystalline fluids: active gels and blue phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. E. Cates; O. Henrich; D. Marenduzzo; K. Stratford

    2010-09-06

    Lattice Boltzmann simulations have become a method of choice to solve the hydrodynamic equations of motion of a number of complex fluids. Here we review some recent applications of lattice Boltzmann to study the hydrodynamics of liquid crystalline materials. In particular, we focus on the study of (a) the exotic blue phases of cholesteric liquid crystals, and (b) active gels - a model system for actin plus myosin solutions or bacterial suspensions. In both cases lattice Boltzmann studies have proved useful to provide new insights into these complex materials.

  7. Hydrogen-bonded Silica Gels Dispersed in a Smectic Liquid Crystal: A Random Field XY System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Park; R. L. Leheny; R. J. Birgeneau; J. -L. Gallani; C. W. Garland; G. S. Iannacchione

    2001-12-05

    The effect on the nematic to smectic-A transition in octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) due to dispersions of hydrogen-bonded silica (aerosil) particles is characterized with high-resolution x-ray scattering. The particles form weak gels in 8CB creating a quenched disorder that replaces the transition with the growth of short range smectic correlations. The correlations include thermal critical fluctuations that dominate at high temperatures and a second contribution that quantitatively matches the static fluctuations of a random field system and becomes important at low temperatures.

  8. Dielectric function of sol-gel prepared nano-granular zinc oxide by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilliot, Mickaël, E-mail: mickael.gilliot@univ-reims.fr; Hadjadj, Aomar [LISM, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, Reims (France); Eypert, Céline [HORIBA Jobin Yvon S.A.S., Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-14

    ZnO thin films have been prepared by sol gel and deposited by spin coating. The dielectric function has been determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Ellipsometric spectra are inverted by a direct numerical method without using the standard fitting procedures. The obtained dielectric function presents a broad excitonic effect. The dielectric function is studied using Elliot excitonic theory including exciton plus band-to-band Coulomb interactions with standard Lorentzian broadening. A modification of this model dielectric function with independent bound and unbound exciton contributions is empirically proposed to improve modelling of the band gap excitonic peak.

  9. Method and apparatus for controlled size distribution of gel microspheres formed from aqueous dispersions. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryon, A.D.; Haas, P.A.; Vavruska, J.S.

    1982-01-19

    The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for making a population of dense, closely size-controlled microspheres by sol-gel procedures wherein said microspheres are characterized by a significant percentage of said population being within a predetermined, relatively narrow size range. This is accomplished by subjecting aqueous dispersions of a sol, within a water-immiscible organic liquid to a turbulent flow. Microsphere populations thus provided are useful in vibratory-packed processes for nuclear fuels to be irradiated in LWR- and FBR-type nuclear reactors.

  10. pH-sensitive methacrylic copolymer gels and the production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mallapragada, Surya K. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Brian C. (Lake Bluff, IA)

    2007-05-15

    The present invention provides novel gel forming methacrylic blocking copolymers that exhibit cationic pH-sensitive behavior as well as good water solubility. The copolymers are constructed by polymerization of a tertiary amine methacrylate with either a (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer, such as the commercially available Pluronic.RTM. polymers, or a poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether polymer. The polymers may be used for drug and gene delivery, protein separation, as structural supplements, and more.

  11. Method for molding ceramic powders using a water-based gel casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Omatete, Ogbemi O. (Lagos, NG)

    1991-07-02

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one monofunctional monomer and at least one difunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and a aqueous solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product any be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  12. Method for molding ceramic powders using a water-based gel casting process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jenny, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Omalete, Ogbemi O. (Lagos, NG)

    1992-09-08

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one monofunctional monomer and at least one difunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and a aqueous solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  13. Electroanalytical applications of screen-printable surfactant-induced sol-gel graphite composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guadalupe, Ana R. (San Juan, PR); Guo, Yizhu (San Juan, PR)

    2001-05-15

    A process for preparing sol-gel graphite composite electrodes is presented. This process preferably uses the surfactant bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) and eliminates the need for a cosolvent, an acidic catalyst, a cellulose binder and a thermal curing step from prior art processes. Fabrication of screen-printed electrodes by this process provides a simple approach for electroanalytical applications in aqueous and nonaqueous solvents. Examples of applications for such composite electrodes produced from this process include biochemical sensors such as disposable, single-use glucose sensors and ligand modified composite sensors for metal ion sensitive sensors.

  14. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, Janda K. (Sandia Park, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Neiser, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM); Moffatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties.

  15. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.K.; Reed, S.T.; Ashley, C.S.; Neiser, R.A.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1999-07-20

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties. 6 figs.

  16. New sol-gel synthetic route to transition and main-group metal oxide aerogels using inorganic salt precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gash, A E; Tillotson, T M; Satcher Jr, J H; Hrubesh, L W; Simpson, R L

    2000-09-12

    We have developed a new sol-gel route to synthesize several transition and main-group metal oxide aerogels. The approach is straightforward, inexpensive, versatile, and it produces monolithic microporous materials with high surface areas. Specifically, we report the use of epoxides as gelation agents for the sol-gel synthesis of chromia aerogels and xerogels from simple Cr(III) inorganic salts. The dependence of both gel formation and its rate was studied by varying the solvent used, the Cr(III) precursor salt, the epoxide/Cr(III) ratio, as well as the type of epoxide employed. All of these variables were shown to affect the rate of gel formation and provide a convenient control of this parameter. Dried chromia aerogels were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analyses, results of which will be presented. Our studies have shown that rigid monolithic gels can be prepared from many different metal ions salts, provided the formal oxidation state of the metal ion is greater than or equal to +3. Conversely, when di-valent transition metal salts are used precipitated solids are the products.

  17. Self-healing slip pulses and the friction of gelatin gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tristan Baumberger; Christiane Caroli; Olivier Ronsin

    2003-03-07

    We present an extensive experimental study and scaling analysis of friction of gelatin gels on glass. At low driving velocities, sliding occurs via propagation of periodic self-healing slip pulses whose velocity is limited by collective diffusion of the gel network. Healing can be attributed to a frictional instability occurring at the slip velocity $v = V_c$. For $v > V_c$, sliding is homogeneous and friction is ruled by the shear-thinning rheology of an interfacial layer of thickness of order the (nanometric) mesh size, containing a semi-dilute solution of polymer chain ends hanging from the network. Inspite of its high degree of confinement, the rheology of this system does not differ qualitatively from known bulk ones. The observed ageing of the static friction threshold reveals the slow increase of adhesive bonding between chain ends and glass. Such structural ageing is compatible with the existence of a velocity-weakening regime at velocities smaller than $V_c$, hence with the existence of the healing instability.

  18. Thio sol-gel process for the synthesis of titanium disulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sriram, M.A.; Kumta, P.N. (Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    Sulfides of transition metals (titanium, molybdenum, vanadium, tungsten, etc.) represent an important class of materials well-known for their catalytic and electrochemical properties. The catalytic properties make them potentially useful in hydrodesulfurization reactions, and their electrochemical response makes them suitable as active cathodes in rechargeable batteries. A thio sol-gel process for the synthesis of titanium disulfide using titanium alkoxide as the metal source is demonstrated. The alkoxide reacts at room temperature with H[sub 2]S to form a precipitate which is a precursor to the sulfide. Through infrared spectroscopy and chemical analysis of the powder and gas chromatographic analysis of the liquid byproducts of the reaction, it is shown that a partially sulfidized alkoxide precursor forms through the displacement of alkoxy groups from the alkoxide by sulfur-bearing thiol groups. This thiolysis reaction is very similar to that which occurs in the case of sol-gel reactions to form oxides. The alkoxy-thiol species then undergo condensation-polymerization by the liberation of H[sub 2]S. When it is heat-treated in H[sub 2]S, this precursor transforms to TiS[sub 2] at [approximately]700 C. Systematic heat treatments have been performed and the formation of TiS[sub 2] has been observed using X-ray diffractometry. The change in the morphology has also been studied using scanning electron microscopy.

  19. Non-equilibrium structure and dynamics in a microscopic model of thin film active gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Head; W. J. Briels; G. Gompper

    2014-02-26

    In the presence of ATP, molecular motors generate active force dipoles that drive suspensions of protein filaments far from thermodynamic equilibrium, leading to exotic dynamics and pattern formation. Microscopic modelling can help to quantify the relationship between individual motors plus filaments to organisation and dynamics on molecular and supra-molecular length scales. Here we present results of extensive numerical simulations of active gels where the motors and filaments are confined between two infinite parallel plates. Thermal fluctuations and excluded-volume interactions between filaments are included. A systematic variation of rates for motor motion, attachment and detachment, including a differential detachment rate from filament ends, reveals a range of non-equilibrium behaviour. Strong motor binding produces structured filament aggregates that we refer to as asters, bundles or layers, whose stability depends on motor speed and differential end-detachment. The gross features of the dependence of the observed structures on the motor rate and the filament concentration can be captured by a simple one-filament model. Loosely bound aggregates exhibit super-diffusive mass transport, where filament translocation scales with lag time with non-unique exponents that depend on motor kinetics. An empirical data collapse of filament speed as a function of motor speed and end-detachment is found, suggesting a dimensional reduction of the relevant parameter space. We conclude by discussing the perspectives of microscopic modelling in the field of active gels.

  20. A liquid contact line receding on a soft gel surface : dip-coating geometry investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kajiya, Tadashi; Royon, Laurent; Daerr, Adrian; Receveur, Mathieu; Limat, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of a liquid contact line receding on a hydrophobic soft gel (SBS-paraffin). In order to realize a well-defined geometry with an accurate control of velocity, a dip-coating setup was implemented. Provided that the elastic modulus is small enough, a significant deformation takes place near the contact line, which in turn drastically influences the wetting behaviour. Depending on the translation velocity of the substrate, the contact line exhibits different regimes of motions. Continuous motions are observed at high and low velocities, meanwhile two types of stick-slip motion, periodic and erratic, appear at intermediate velocities. We suggest that the observed transitions could be explained in terms of the competition between different frequencies, i.e., the frequency of the strain field variation induced by the contact line motion and the crossover frequency of the gel related to the material relaxation. Our results provide systematic views on how the wetting of liquid is modified by th...

  1. Building America Expert Meeting: Recommendations for Applying...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Expert Meeting: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems Building America Expert Meeting: Recommendations...

  2. Alumni & Industry Magazine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    grease, waste animal fats, recycled veg- etable oils and agricultural seed oils into biodiesel. BioxAlumni & Industry Magazine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry University of Toronto Volume 10

  3. Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Applied General Equilibrium (MIRAGE) AgencyCompany Organization: International Food Policy Research Institute, Centre d'Etudes Prospectives et d'Informations...

  4. Environmental Impact and Sustainability Applied General Equilibrium...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Model (ENVISAGE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Environmental Impact and Sustainability Applied General Equilibrium Model (ENVISAGE) Agency...

  5. Effects of NaCl, sucrose, and storage on rheological parameters of heat induced gels of liquid egg products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brough, Joan

    1988-01-01

    EFFECTS OF NaCl, SUCROSE, AND STORAGE ON RHEOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF HEAT INDUCED GELS OF LIQUID EGG PRODUCTS A Thesis by Joan Brough Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... and content by: C. W. Dill (Chair of Committee) F. A. Gardner (Member) R. L. Edwards (Member) G. C. Smith (Head of Department) December 1988 ABSTRACT Effects of NaC1, Sucrose, and Storage on Rheological Parameters of Heat Induced Gels of Liquid Egg...

  6. UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

  7. FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE ENGINEERING NEWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    in the race. After their two competition cars were totalled, they've now regroupFACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE ENGINEERING NEWS FALL 2014 / WINTER 2015 PROTECTING THE ENVIRONMENT -- USING NATURAL ENGINEERING SURVIVE AND THRIVE APPLIED RESEARCH FACILITY -- STAR -- TAKES OFF

  8. Disease management Applying Stylet Oil, Sulforix or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    1 Disease management Applying Stylet Oil, Sulforix or Armicarb now to vines with powdery mildew will reduce disease pressure next year. Do not apply Sulforix to sulfur-sensitive grapes. Bunch rots are best controlled by leaf pulling, but application of Fungastop may help reduce sour rot. Insect management Low

  9. Nuclear Facilities and Applied Technologies at Sandia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, Dave; Kaiser, Krista; Martin, Lonnie; Hanson, Don; Harms, Gary; Quirk, Tom

    2014-11-28

    The Nuclear Facilities and Applied Technologies organization at Sandia National Laboratories’ Technical Area Five (TA-V) is the leader in advancing nuclear technologies through applied radiation science and unique nuclear environments. This video describes the organization’s capabilities, facilities, and culture.

  10. INTRODUCTION "\\:}V' i-'~;;' r' ,In .l968~p~sek et a/.' predicted a possible discontinuous volume phase transition ,of a polymer gel on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Chi

    ~ the interaction of a polyelectrolyte gel with an oppositely charged surfactant presents three effects: (i) At lowT)gslightly. (ii) At higher ~;'f;;;Jr)~",:~ .surfactant concentration, surfa'0tant molecules inside the gel exceed.~ Their volume can change by hundred folds in water when the temperature " i,,' ,, varies by -I °C or less

  11. Molecular motors robustly drive active gels to a critically connected state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Alvarado; Michael Sheinman; Abhinav Sharma; Fred C. MacKintosh; Gijsje H. Koenderink

    2013-02-12

    Living systems often exhibit internal driving: active, molecular processes drive nonequilibrium phenomena such as metabolism or migration. Active gels constitute a fascinating class of internally driven matter, where molecular motors exert localized stresses inside polymer networks. There is evidence that network crosslinking is required to allow motors to induce macroscopic contraction. Yet a quantitative understanding of how network connectivity enables contraction is lacking. Here we show experimentally that myosin motors contract crosslinked actin polymer networks to clusters with a scale-free size distribution. This critical behavior occurs over an unexpectedly broad range of crosslink concentrations. To understand this robustness, we develop a quantitative model of contractile networks that takes into account network restructuring: motors reduce connectivity by forcing crosslinks to unbind. Paradoxically, to coordinate global contractions, motor activity should be low. Otherwise, motors drive initially well-connected networks to a critical state where ruptures form across the entire network.

  12. Hydrogen generation systems utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-07-14

    Systems, devices, and methods combine reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Multiple inlets of varied placement geometries deliver aqueous solution to the reaction. The reactant materials and aqueous solution are churned to control the state of the reaction. The aqueous solution can be recycled and returned to the reaction. One system operates over a range of temperatures and pressures and includes a hydrogen separator, a heat removal mechanism, and state of reaction control devices. The systems, devices, and methods of generating hydrogen provide thermally stable solids, near-instant reaction with the aqueous solutions, and a non-toxic liquid by-product.

  13. Hydrogen generation systems and methods utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-08-11

    Systems, devices, and methods combine thermally stable reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen and a non-toxic liquid by-product. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Springs and other pressurization mechanisms pressurize and deliver an aqueous solution to the reaction. A check valve and other pressure regulation mechanisms regulate the pressure of the aqueous solution delivered to the reactant fuel material in the reactor based upon characteristics of the pressurization mechanisms and can regulate the pressure of the delivered aqueous solution as a steady decay associated with the pressurization force. The pressure regulation mechanism can also prevent hydrogen gas from deflecting the pressure regulation mechanism.

  14. Radiation-induced refraction artifacts in the optical CT readout of polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Warren G.; Jirasek, Andrew; Wells, Derek M.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to demonstrate imaging artifacts that can occur during the optical computed tomography (CT) scanning of polymer gel dosimeters due to radiation-induced refractive index (RI) changes in polyacrylamide gels. Methods: A 1 L cylindrical polyacrylamide gel dosimeter was irradiated with 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} square beams of 6 MV photons. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner was used to image the dosimeter. Investigative optical CT scans were performed to examine two types of rayline bending: (i) bending within the plane of the fan-beam and (ii) bending out the plane of the fan-beam. To address structured errors, an iterative Savitzky–Golay (ISG) filtering routine was designed to filter 2D projections in sinogram space. For comparison, 2D projections were alternatively filtered using an adaptive-mean (AM) filter. Results: In-plane rayline bending was most notably observed in optical CT projections where rays of the fan-beam confronted a sustained dose gradient that was perpendicular to their trajectory but within the fan-beam plane. These errors caused distinct streaking artifacts in image reconstructions due to the refraction of higher intensity rays toward more opaque regions of the dosimeter. Out-of-plane rayline bending was observed in slices of the dosimeter that featured dose gradients perpendicular to the plane of the fan-beam. These errors caused widespread, severe overestimations of dose in image reconstructions due to the higher-than-actual opacity that is perceived by the scanner when light is bent off of the detector array. The ISG filtering routine outperformed AM filtering for both in-plane and out-of-plane rayline errors caused by radiation-induced RI changes. For in-plane rayline errors, streaks in an irradiated region (>7 Gy) were as high as 49% for unfiltered data, 14% for AM, and 6% for ISG. For out-of-plane rayline errors, overestimations of dose in a low-dose region (?50 cGy) were as high as 13 Gy for unfiltered data, 10 Gy for AM, and 3.1 Gy for ISG. The ISG routine also addressed unrelated artifacts that previously needed to be manually removed in sinogram space. However, the ISG routine blurred reconstructions, causing losses in spatial resolution of ?5 mm in the plane of the fan-beam and ?8 mm perpendicular to the fan-beam. Conclusions: This paper reveals a new category of imaging artifacts that can affect the optical CT readout of polyacrylamide gel dosimeters. Investigative scans show that radiation-induced RI changes can cause significant rayline errors when rays confront a prolonged dose gradient that runs perpendicular to their trajectory. In fan-beam optical CT, these errors manifested in two ways: (1) distinct streaking artifacts caused by in-plane rayline bending and (2) severe overestimations of opacity caused by rays bending out of the fan-beam plane and missing the detector array. Although the ISG filtering routine mitigated these errors better than an adaptive-mean filtering routine, it caused unacceptable losses in spatial resolution.

  15. Micro-fabrication of Carbon Structures by Pattern Miniaturization in Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandra S. Sharma; Ankur Verma; Manish M. Kulkarni; Devendra K. Upadhyay; Ashutosh Sharma

    2010-09-20

    A simple and novel method to fabricate and miniaturize surface and sub-surface micro-structures and micro-patterns in glassy carbon is proposed and demonstrated. An aqueous resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) sol is employed for micro-molding of the master-pattern to be replicated, followed by controlled drying and pyrolysis of the gel to reproduce an isotropically shrunk replica in carbon. The miniaturized version of the master-pattern thus replicated in carbon is about one order of magnitude smaller than original master by repeating three times the above cycle of molding and drying. The micro-fabrication method proposed will greatly enhance the toolbox for a facile fabrication of a variety of Carbon-MEMS and C-microfluidic devices.

  16. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, R.W.

    1995-12-19

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes{<=}1000{angstrom}, and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050 C to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors. 8 figs.

  17. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1995-01-01

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes.ltoreq.1000.ANG., and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050.degree. C. to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors.

  18. Organic carbon aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1998-04-28

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes .ltoreq.1000 .ANG., and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050.degree. C. to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors.

  19. Organic carbon aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, R.W.

    1998-04-28

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes {<=}1000 {angstrom}, and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050 C to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors. 8 figs.

  20. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, R.W.

    1996-09-17

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes {<=}1,000{angstrom}, and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1,050 C to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors. 8 figs.

  1. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1996-01-01

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes .ltoreq.1000.ANG., and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050.degree. C. to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors.

  2. Microstructure and nonlinear signatures of yielding in a heterogeneous colloidal gel under large amplitude oscillatory shear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Juntae; Helgeson, Matthew E.; Merger, Dimitri; Wilhelm, Manfred

    2014-09-01

    We investigate yielding in a colloidal gel that forms a heterogeneous structure, consisting of a two-phase bicontinuous network of colloid-rich domains of fractal clusters and colloid-poor domains. Combining large amplitude oscillatory shear measurements with simultaneous small and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (rheo-SANS/USANS), we characterize both the nonlinear mechanical processes and strain amplitude-dependent microstructure underlying yielding. We observe a broad, three-stage yielding process that evolves over an order of magnitude in strain amplitude between the onset of nonlinearity and flow. Analyzing the intracycle response as a sequence of physical processes reveals a transition from elastic straining to elastoplastic thinning (which dominates in region I) and eventually yielding (which evolves through region II) and flow (which saturates in region III), and allows quantification of instantaneous nonlinear parameters associated with yielding. These measures exhibit significant strain rate amplitude dependence above a characteristic frequency, which we argue is governed by poroelastic effects. Correlating these results with time-averaged rheo-USANS measurements reveals that the material passes through a cascade of structural breakdown from large to progressively smaller length scales. In region I, compression of the fractal domains leads to the formation of large voids. In regions II and III, cluster-cluster correlations become increasingly homogeneous, suggesting breakage and eventually depercolation of intercluster bonds at the yield point. All significant structural changes occur on the micron-scale, suggesting that large-scale rearrangements of hundreds or thousands of particles, rather than the homogeneous rearrangement of particle-particle bonds, dominate the initial yielding of heterogeneous colloidal gels.

  3. Role of slip between a probe particle and a gel in microrheology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry C. Fu; Vivek B. Shenoy; Thomas R. Powers

    2008-11-12

    In the technique of microrheology, macroscopic rheological parameters as well as information about local structure are deduced from the behavior of microscopic probe particles under thermal or active forcing. Microrheology requires knowledge of the relation between macroscopic parameters and the force felt by a particle in response to displacements. We investigate this response function for a spherical particle using the two-fluid model, in which the gel is represented by a polymer network coupled to a surrounding solvent via a drag force. We obtain an analytic solution for the response function in the limit of small volume fraction of the polymer network, and neglecting inertial effects. We use no-slip boundary conditions for the solvent at the surface of the sphere. The boundary condition for the network at the surface of the sphere is a kinetic friction law, for which the tangential stress of the network is proportional to relative velocity of the network and the sphere. This boundary condition encompasses both no-slip and frictionless boundary conditions as limits. Far from the sphere there is no relative motion between the solvent and network due to the coupling between them. However, the different boundary conditions on the solvent and network tend to produce different far-field motions. We show that the far field motion and the force on the sphere are controlled by the solvent boundary conditions at high frequency and by the network boundary conditions at low frequency. At low frequencies compression of the network can also affect the force on the sphere. We find the crossover frequencies at which the effects of sliding of the sphere past the polymer network and compression of the gel become important.

  4. Benign, 3D encapsulation of sensitive mammalian cells in porous silica gels formed by LysSil nanoparticle assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkoli, Efie

    are employed for complementary assessment of cell viability. Results suggest that the physiologically relevant instability and the lack of fine control over pore size [9,10,18,19], critical for immune protection [6,19,20]. Silica matrices (i.e., gels) serve as structurally robust alterna- tives to biopolymers

  5. Dialkylenecarbonate-Bridged Polysilsesquioxanes. Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Sol-Gels with a Thermally Labile Bridging Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assink, Roger A.; Baugher, Brigitta M.; Beach, James V.; Loy, Douglas A.; Shea, Kenneth J.; Small, James H.; Tran, Joseph

    1999-07-20

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach for altering the properties of bridged polysilsesquioxane xerogels using post-processing mobilization of the polymeric network. The bridging organic group contains latent functionalities that can be liberated thermally, photochemically, or by chemical means after the gel has been processed to a xerogel. These modifications can produce changes in density, volubility, porosity, and or chemical properties of the material. Since every monomer possesses two latent functional groups, the technique allows for the introduction of high levels of functionality in hybrid organic-inorganic materials. Dialkylenecarbonate-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels were prepared by the sol-gel polymerization of bis(triethoxysilylpropyl)carbonate (1) and bis(triethoxysilylisobutyl)-carbonate (2). Thermal treatment of the resulting non-porous xerogels and aerogels at 300-350 C resulted in quantitative decarboxylation of the dialkylenecarbonate bridging groups to give new hydroxyalkyl and olefinic substituted polysilsesquioxane monolithic xerogels and aerogels that can not be directly prepared through direct sol-gel polymerization of organotrialkoxysilanes.

  6. Hyaluronic Acid Gel Injection to Prevent Thermal Injury of Adjacent Gastrointestinal Tract during Percutaneous Liver Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasegawa, Takaaki, E-mail: hasegawat@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Takaki, Haruyuki; Miyagi, Hideki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Fujimori, Masashi; Sakuma, Hajime; Yamakado, Koichiro [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of hyaluronic acid gel injection to separate the gastrointestinal tract from the tumor during liver radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Eleven patients with liver tumors measuring 0.9-3.5 cm (mean {+-} standard deviation, 2.1 {+-} 0.8 cm) that were adjacent to the gastrointestinal tracts received RFA after the mixture of hyaluronic acid gel and contrast material (volume, 26.4 {+-} 14.5 mL; range, 10-60 mL) was injected between the tumor and the gastrointestinal tract under computed tomographic-fluoroscopic guidance. Each tumor was separated from the gastrointestinal tract by 1.0-1.5 cm (distance, 1.2 {+-} 0.2 cm) after injection of hyaluronic acid gel, and subsequent RFA was performed without any complications in all patients. Although tumor enhancement disappeared in all patients, local tumor progression was found in a patient (9.1 %, 1 of 11) during the follow-up of 5.5 {+-} 3.2 months (range, 0.4-9.9 months). In conclusion, hyaluronic acid gel injection is a safe and useful technique to avoid thermal injury of the adjacent gastrointestinal tract during liver RFA.

  7. Dense and optical transparent CdWO4 films by sol-gel processing for scintillation applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    using tungstic acid and cadmium nitrate as precursors and hydrogen peroxide as solvent; homogeneous fabrication of dense and optically transparent cadmium tungstate (CWO) films by sol-gel processing, nanostructures, and optical and x-ray scintillation properties are discussed in detail. I. INTRODUCTION Cadmium

  8. Journal of Sol-Gel Science and Technology 26, 143147, 2003 c 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Manufactured in The Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    gels (classical aerogels and composite aerogels) have been prepared by classical gelation and addition. Under isostatic pressure, aerogels display an irreversible shrinkage caused by plastic deformation temperature. The pore collapse mechanism is favored by the large pores structure of the composite aerogels

  9. 998 Biophysical Journal Volume 84 February 2003 9981009 Material Studies of Lipid Vesicles in the La and La-Gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderlick, T. Kyle

    temperature changes. This is exemplified, for example, by the almost fourfold change in the bending modulus temperatures/higher DPPC fractions they phase-separate into La and gel phases. We show that the elastic modulus derivatives, lipid vesicles, have been a subject of frequent study. This paper focuses on the properties

  10. The microstructure and rheology of a model, thixotropic nanoparticle gel under steady shear and large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min Kim, Jung; Kate Gurnon, A.; Wagner, Norman J., E-mail: wagnernj@udel.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Center for Neutron Science, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Eberle, Aaron P. R. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Porcar, Lionel [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 and Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2014-09-01

    The microstructure-rheology relationship for a model, thermoreversible nanoparticle gel is investigated using a new technique of time-resolved neutron scattering under steady and time-resolved large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) flows. A 21 vol. % gel is tested with varying strength of interparticle attraction. Shear-induced structural anisotropy is observed as butterfly scattering patterns and quantified through an alignment factor. Measurements in the plane of flow show significant, local anisotropy develops with alignment along the compressional axis of flow, providing new insights into how gels flow. The microstructure-rheology relationship is analyzed through a new type of structure-Lissajous plot that shows how the anisotropic microstructure is responsible for the observed LAOS response, which is beyond a response expected for a purely viscous gel with constant structure. The LAOS shear viscosities are observed to follow the “Delaware-Rutgers” rule. Rheological and microstructural data are successfully compared across a broad range of conditions by scaling the shear rate by the strength of attraction, providing a method to compare behavior between steady shear and LAOS experiments. However, important differences remain between the microstructures measured at comparatively high frequency in LAOS experiments and comparable steady shear experiments that illustrate the importance of measuring the microstructure to properly interpret the nonlinear, dynamic rheological response.

  11. Structure, Stability, and Formation Pathways of Colloidal Gels in Systems with Short-Range Attraction and Long-Range Repulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leunissen, Mirjam

    Structure, Stability, and Formation Pathways of Colloidal Gels in Systems with Short formed upon centrifugation of dilute suspensions of spherical colloids (radius 446 nm) that interact in concentrated suspensions of colloids with long-ranged repulsion and short-ranged attraction15 being a clear

  12. Synthesis of Mixed Ceramic MgxZn1-xO Nanofibers via Mg2+ Using Sol-Gel Electrospinning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Saad A.

    Synthesis of Mixed Ceramic MgxZn1-xO Nanofibers via Mg2+ Doping Using Sol-Gel Electrospinning Yakup the fibers and conversion of ceramic precursors into ceramic nanofibers, and the appearance of a range property, morphology, and porosity of the resulting nonwoven mat. Ceramic electrospun nanofibers

  13. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS 21, 2002, 251 255 Organic-inorganic sol-gel coating for corrosion protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS 21, 2002, 251­ 255 Organic-inorganic sol-gel coating or coatings. Through the modification of chemical composition of the coatings, such protec- tive coatings can strength and hydrophobicity. Various organic coatings have been studied for corrosion protection [4

  14. Design of Coordination Polymer Gels as Stable Catalytic Systems Bengang Xing, Ming-Fai Choi, and Bing Xu*[a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Bengang

    Kong University of Science & Technology Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (SAR) (China) Fax: (852)2358-1594 EDesign of Coordination Polymer Gels as Stable Catalytic Systems Bengang Xing, Ming-Fai Choi irreversibly in dimethylsulfoxide via the creation of cross-linked, three- dimensional coordination polymer net

  15. Sol-gel synthesis and characterization of tetra-alkoxysilane and bridged-polysilsesquioxane materials in non-polar solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamanaka, S.A.; Martino, A.; Kawola, J.S.; Loy, D.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Although the sol-gel method has widely been used for the encapsulation of molecules in porous glass materials, the variety of dopants has been limited by the solvents used in processing. Polar solvents, such as ethanol, methanol or tetrahydrofuran, are typically added as cosolvents to prevent phase separation between the organic metal alkoxide and water. Non-polar solvents are generally not suitable for sol-gel processing since they are immicible with the aqueous phase. Our study increases the availability of solvents that may be used in sol-gel processing and therefore expands the range of molecules suitable for encapsulation. Here, we report a novel method for preparing both silica sol-gel materials and bridged-polysilsesquioxane materials in a non-polar, hydrocarbon solvent. The method involves the formation of an inverse micelle upon addition of the surfactant, didodecyldimethylammonium bromide, to toluene. The dynamic nature of the micelle allows sol-gel reactions to occur between water (soluble in the polar core of the micelle) and the metal alkoxide precursor (soluble in the solvent phase). Materials prepared by this technique have been characterized by nitrogen sorption porosimetry, SEM, solid state {sup 29}Si NMR, TGA and XRD. Photochemical conversion of technetium fluorides and oxyfluorides is largely uninvestigated. Because technetium was introduced into U.S. uranium enrichment plants, decommissioning and decontamination of these plants will involve technetium fluorides and oxyfluorides. Photochemical conversion of such compounds may facilitate waste minimization and cost avoidance goals during plant clean-up. Photochemical fluorination using ultraviolet photolysis of a mixture of fluorine and oxygen gases is an effective means of converting solid, nonvolatile fluorides of fight actinides, such as U, Np, and Pu, into volatile hexafluorides thereby removing surface radioactive contamination.

  16. Roadmap: Applied Engineering Applied Engineering and Technology Management Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Applied Engineering ­ Applied Engineering and Technology Management ­ Bachelor of Science­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 21-May-12/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan TECH 43550 Computer-Aided Manufacturing 3 General Elective 6 #12;Roadmap: Applied Engineering

  17. apply to program Energy audit and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the country has the potential to improve the energy performance of one third of its building stock's demand for fossil fuel imports. Improving energy! SAV ING S! Homeowners apply to program Energy audit and retrofit plan Financing though grants

  18. 15.075 Applied Statistics, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newton, Elizabeth

    This course is an introduction to applied statistics and data analysis. Topics include collecting and exploring data, basic inference, simple and multiple linear regression, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods, and ...

  19. MSc Applied Mathematics Stochastic Operations Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    MSc Applied Mathematics Stochastic Operations Research Richard Boucherie #12;20150106Stochastic Operations Research #12;Stochastic Operations Research: Team http://www.utwente.nl/ewi/sor/staff/ 20150106Stochastic Operations Research #12;Operations Research: The World http

  20. Applying Ethical Principles to Information and Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Applying Ethical Principles to Information and Communication Technology Research A Companion Clayman, DHS Science & Technology · John Heidemann, University of California, ISI · Douglas Maughan, DHS Science & Technology · Jenny McNeill, SRI International · Peter Neumann, SRI International · Charlotte