Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gef ghi insolation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Insolation integrator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electric signal representative of the rate of insolation is integrated to determine if it is adequate for operation of a solar energy collection system.

Dougherty, John J. (Norristown, PA); Rudge, George T. (Lansdale, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Global Environment Fund GEF | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF Jump to: navigation,

3

RESEARCH LETTERS Vibrating insoles and balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and such changes have been associated with diminished motor performance. Input noise can enhance sensory and motor be substantially reduced through the application of mechanical noise to the feet via vibrating insoles. We usedRESEARCH LETTERS Vibrating insoles and balance control in elderly people Attila A Priplata, James B

Collins, James J.

4

Kenya-GEF Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: EdenOverviewKanematsuKasEnergy InformationKenya-GEF

5

Site insolation and wind power characteristics: technical report Midwest region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This phase of the Site Insolation and Wind Power Characteristics Study was performed to provide statistical information on the expected future availability of solar and wind power at various sites in the Midwest Region of the US Historic data (SOLMET), at 22 National Weather Service stations with hourly solar insolation and collateral meteorological information, were interrogated to provide an estimate of future trends. Solar data are global radiation incident on a horizontal surface, and wind data represent wind power normal to the air flow. Selected insolation and wind power conditions were investigated for their occurrence and persistence, for defined periods of time, on a monthly basis. Global horizontal insolation is related to inclined surfaces at each site. Ratios are provided, monthly, for multiplying global insolation to obtain insolation estimates on south-facing surfaces inclined at different angles with respect to the horizontal. Also, joint probability distribution tables are constructed showing the number of occurrences, out of a finite sample size, of daily average solar and wind power within selected intervals, by month. Information of this nature is intended as an aid to preliminary planning activities for the design and operation of solar and wind energy utilization and conversion systems.

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Thng tin pht t my ghi m v khon chi tr phc li Bo Him Tht Nghip gn nht c th tip cn 24 ting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thông tin phát t máy ghi âm v khon chi tr phúc li Bo Him Tht Nghip gn nht có th tip cn 24 ting mt chiu, Th Hai n Th Sáu, hoc vào nhng ngày cui tun. Thông tin chi tr phúc li UI c cp nht hng ngày, và phn ánh sinh hot h s vào ngày làm vic trc ó. nhn c thông tin v khon chi tr ca mình, xin làm nhng s la chn

7

Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis of Fibrous Insulation Materials Using the ZonalGEF Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis of Fibrous Insulation Materials Using the Zonal­GEF Method Walter to analyze radiative heat transfer in high porosity insulation materials which have a large scattering for LI900, a material used in the insulation tile for the space shuttle. Comparisons are presented

Yuen, Walter W.

8

Insolation data manual and direct normal solar radiation data manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Insolation Data Manual presents monthly averaged data which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service (NWS) stations, principally in the United States. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24--25 years of data, generally from 1952--1975, and listed for each location. Insolation values represent monthly average daily totals of global radiation on a horizontal surface and are depicted using the three units of measurement: kJ/m{sup 2} per day, Btu/ft{sup 2} per day and langleys per day. Average daily maximum, minimum and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3 C (65 F). For each station, global {bar K}{sub T} (cloudiness index) values were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. Global {bar K}{sub T} is an index of cloudiness and indicates fractional transmittance of horizontal radiation, from the top of the atmosphere to the earth's surface. The second section of this volume presents long-term monthly and annual averages of direct normal solar radiation for 235 NWS stations, including a discussion of the basic derivation process. This effort is in response to a generally recognized need for reliable direct normal data and the recent availability of 23 years of hourly averages for 235 stations. The relative inaccessibility of these data on microfiche further justifies reproducing at least the long-term averages in a useful format. In addition to a definition of terms and an overview of the ADIPA model, a discussion of model validation results is presented.

none,

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Site insolation and wind power characteristics, technical report northeast region. Vol. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This phase of the Site Insolation and Wind Power Characteristics Study was performed to provide statistical information on the expected future availability of solar and wind power at various sites in the Northeast Region of the US Historic data (SOLMET), at 8 National Weather Service stations with hourly solar insolation and collateral meteorological information, were interrogated to provide an estimate of future trends. Solar data are global radiation incident on a horizontal surface, and wind data represent wind power normal to the air flow. Selected insolation and wind power conditions were investigated for their occurrence and persistence, for defined periods of time, on a monthly basis. Global horizontal insolation are related to inclined surfaces at each site. Ratios are provided, monthly, for multiplying global insolation to obtain insolation estimates on south-facing surfaces inclined at different angles with respect to the horizontal.

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

IHT: Tools for Computing Insolation Absorption by Particle Laden Flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes IHT, a toolkit for computing radiative heat exchange between particles. Well suited for insolation absorption computations, it is also has potential applications in combustion (sooting flames), biomass gasification processes and similar processes. The algorithm is based on the 'Photon Monte Carlo' approach and implemented in a library that can be interfaced with a variety of computational fluid dynamics codes to analyze radiative heat transfer in particle-laden flows. The emphasis in this report is on the data structures and organization of IHT for developers seeking to use the IHT toolkit to add Photon Monte Carlo capabilities to their own codes.

Grout, R. W.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Photovoltaic Potential and Insolation Maps (Canada) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: EnergyInformation Insolation Maps (Canada)

12

Safety Shoe and Insole Reimbursement Form Requisitioner: -Submit to supervisor for signature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Shoe and Insole Reimbursement Form Requisitioner: - Submit to supervisor for signature. _________________________________________________ POSITION ____________________________________________________________________ DID YOU PURCHASE SAFETY TOES Safety Shoes or other footwear under the provisions outlined in the Collective Agreement

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

13

Effects of the Mount Pinatubo eruption on solar insolation: Four case studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southwest Technology Development Institute staff analyzed solar insolation data from four sites recorded during the years 1990 through 1992. Analyses were performed to identify and quantify the effects on insolation caused by the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines on June 15th and 16th, 1991. The four monitoring stations that supplied the raw data for this report were: The Southwest Region Experiment Station in Las Cruces, New Mexico; The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado; The Solar Insolation Monitor Program station operated by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company in Carrisa Plains, California; and The Solar Insolation monitor station at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Data from each of the sites were recorded by dedicated datalogging equipment. Every effort was made to prevent data acquisition system problems (e.g., drift of the datalogger clock) from influencing the accuracy of the results.

Rosenthal, A.L.; Robert, J.M. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Site insolation and wind power characteristics: technical report western region (south section)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This phase of the Site Insolation and Wind Power Characteristics Study was performed to provide statistical information on the expected future availability of solar and wind power at various sites in the Western Region (South Section) of the US Historic data (SOLMET), at 22 National Weather Service stations with hourly solar insolation and collateral meteorological information, were interrogated to provide an estimate of future trends. Solar data are global radiation incident on a horizontal surface, and wind data represent wind power normal to the air flow. Selected insolation and wind power conditions were investigated for their occurrence and persistence, for defined periods of time, on a monthly basis. Global horizontal insolation is related to inclined surfaces at each site. Ratios are provided, monthly, for multiplying global insolation to obtain insolation estimates on south-facing surfaces inclined at different angles with respect to the horizontal. Also, joint probability distribution tables are constructed showing the number of occurrences, out of a finite sample size, of daily average solar and wind power within selected intervals, by month. Information of this nature is intended as an aid to preliminary planning activities for the design and operation of solar and wind energy utilization and conversion systems.

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Site insolation and wind power characteristics: technical report western region (north section)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This phase of the Site Insolation and Wind Power Characteristics Study was performed to provide statistical information on the expected future availability of solar and wind power at various sites in the Western Region (North Section) of the US Historic data (SOLMET), at 21 National Weather Service stations with hourly solar insolation and collateral meteorological information, were interrogated to provide an estimate of future trends. Solar data are global radiation incident on a horizontal surface, and wind data represent wind power normal to the air flow. Selected insolation and wind power conditions were investigated for their occurrence and persistence, for defined periods of time, on a monthly basis. Global horizontal insolation is related to inclined surfaces at each site. Ratios are provided, monthly, for multiplying global insolation to obtain insolation estimates on south-facing surfaces inclined at different angles with respect to the horizontal. Also, joint probability distribution tables are constructed showing the number of occurrences, out of a finite sample size, of daily average solar and wind power within selected intervals, by month. Information of this nature is intended as an aid to preliminary planning activities for the design and operation of solar and wind energy utilization and conversion systems.

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Northsouth topographic slope asymmetry on Mars: Evidence for insolation-related erosion at high obliquity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

asymmetry. Specifically, we suggest that summertime melting of ground ice on pole-facing slopes occurred, asymmetric troughs in the polar cap deposits of Mars have been interpreted to be due to insolation derived from the gridded topo- graphic map are affected by strongly anisotropic errors. The slopes along

Head III, James William

17

Transforming on-grid renewable energy markets. A review of UNDP-GEF support for feed-in tariffs and related price and market-access instruments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a Global Environment Facility (GEF) founding implementing agency, UNDP has worked on over 230 GEF-supported clean energy projects in close to 100 developing countries since 1992. About 100 of these projects in 80 countries have focused on renewable energy, supported by approximately US $ 293 million in GEF funds and leveraging US $1.48 billion in associated co-financing from national governments, international organizations, the private sector and non-governmental organizations. As part of UNDP efforts to codify and share lessons learnt from these initiatives, this report addresses how scarce public resources can be used to catalyze larger private financial flows for renewable energy. It provides an overview of UNDP-GEF’s extensive work supporting development of national renewable energy policies such as feed-in tariffs. In these activities UNDP-GEF assists developing countries to assess key risks and barriers to technology diffusion and then to identify a mix of policy and financial de-risking measures to remove these barriers and drive investment. This approach is illustrated through three case studies in Uruguay, Mauritius and Kazakhstan. This report is complemented by a companion publication presenting an innovative UNDP financial modeling tool to assist policymakers in appraising different public instruments to promote clean energy.

Glemarec, Yannick; Rickerson, Wilson; Waissbein, Oliver

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Insolation-oriented model of photovoltaic module using Matlab/Simulink  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel model of photovoltaic (PV) module which is implemented and analyzed using Matlab/Simulink software package. Taking the effect of sunlight irradiance on the cell temperature, the proposed model takes ambient temperature as reference input and uses the solar insolation as a unique varying parameter. The cell temperature is then explicitly affected by the sunlight intensity. The output current and power characteristics are simulated and analyzed using the proposed PV model. The model verification has been confirmed through an experimental measurement. The impact of solar irradiation on cell temperature makes the output characteristic more practical. In addition, the insolation-oriented PV model enables the dynamics of PV power system to be analyzed and optimized more easily by applying the environmental parameters of ambient temperature and solar irradiance. (author)

Tsai, Huan-Liang [Electrical Engineering Department, Da-Yeh University, No. 168, University Rd., Dah-Tsuen, Chang-Hua, 51591 Taiwan (China)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Insights into the Molecular Activation Mechanism of the RhoA-specific Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor, PDZRhoGEF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PDZRhoGEF (PRG) belongs to a small family of RhoA-specific nucleotide exchange factors that mediates signaling through select G-protein-coupled receptors via G{alpha}{sub 12/13} and activates RhoA by catalyzing the exchange of GDP to GTP. PRG is a multidomain protein composed of PDZ, regulators of G-protein signaling-like (RGSL), Dbl-homology (DH), and pleckstrin-homology (PH) domains. It is autoinhibited in cytosol and is believed to undergo a conformational rearrangement and translocation to the membrane for full activation, although the molecular details of the regulation mechanism are not clear. It has been shown recently that the main autoregulatory elements of PDZRhoGEF, the autoinhibitory 'activation box' and the 'GEF switch,' which is required for full activation, are located directly upstream of the catalytic DH domain and its RhoA binding surface, emphasizing the functional role of the RGSL-DH linker. Here, using a combination of biophysical and biochemical methods, we show that the mechanism of PRG regulation is yet more complex and may involve an additional autoinhibitory element in the form of a molten globule region within the linker between RGSL and DH domains. We propose a novel, two-tier model of autoinhibition where the activation box and the molten globule region act synergistically to impair the ability of RhoA to bind to the catalytic DH-PH tandem. The molten globule region and the activation box become less ordered in the PRG-RhoA complex and dissociate from the RhoA-binding site, which may constitute a critical step leading to PRG activation.

Bielnicki, Jakub A.; Shkumatov, Alexander V.; Derewenda, Urszula; Somlyo, Avril V.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S. (EMBL); (UV)

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

20

Activation of p115-RhoGEF Requires Direct Association of G[alpha subscript 13] and the Dbl Homology Domain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RGS-containing RhoGEFs (RGS-RhoGEFs) represent a direct link between the G{sub 12} class of heterotrimeric G proteins and the monomeric GTPases. In addition to the canonical Dbl homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology domains that carry out the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward RhoA, these RhoGEFs also possess RGS homology (RH) domains that interact with activated {alpha} subunits of G{sub 12} and G{sub 13}. Although the GEF activity of p115-RhoGEF (p115), an RGS-RhoGEF, can be stimulated by G{alpha}{sub 13}, the exact mechanism of the stimulation has remained unclear. Using combined studies with small angle x-ray scattering, biochemistry, and mutagenesis, we identify an additional binding site for activated G{alpha}{sub 13} in the DH domain of p115. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals that the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} docks onto the DH domain, opposite to the surface of DH that binds RhoA. Mutation of a single tryptophan residue in the {alpha}3b helix of DH reduces binding to activated G{alpha}{sub 13} and ablates the stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Complementary mutations at the predicted DH-binding site in the {alpha}B-{alpha}C loop of the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} also affect stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Although the GAP activity of p115 is not required for stimulation by G{alpha}{sub 13}, two hydrophobic motifs in RH outside of the consensus RGS box are critical for this process. Therefore, the binding of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the RH domain facilitates direct association of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the DH domain to regulate its exchange activity. This study provides new insight into the mechanism of regulation of the RGS-RhoGEF and broadens our understanding of G protein signaling.

Chen, Zhe; Guo, Liang; Hadas, Jana; Gutowski, Stephen; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C. (IIT); (UTSMC); (Montana)

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gef ghi insolation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Galactic Cosmic Rays and Insolation are the Main Drivers of Global Climate of the Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energy-balance model of global climate, which takes into account a nontrivial role of galactic cosmic rays, is developed. The model is described by the fold catastrophe equation relative to increment of temperature, where galactic cosmic rays and insolation are control parameters. The comparison of the results of a computer simulation of time-dependent solution of the presented model and oxygen isotope records of deep-sea core V28-238 over the past 730 kyr are presented. The climate evolution in future 100 kyr is also predicted.

V. D. Rusov; I. V. Radin; A. V. Glushkov; V. N. Vaschenko; V. N. Pavlovich; T. N. Zelentsova; O. T. Mihalys; V. A. Tarasov; A. Kolos

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

22

Effects of regional insolation differences upon advanced solar thermal electric power plant performance and energy costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study determines the performance and cost of four 10 MWe advanced solar thermal electric power plants sited in various regions of the continental United States. The solar plants are conceptualized to begin commercial operation in the year 2000. It is assumed that major subsystem performance will have improved substantially as compared to that of pilot plants currently operating or under construction. The net average annual system efficiency is therefore roughly twice that of current solar thermal electric power plant designs. Similarly, capital costs reflecting goals based on high-volume mass production that are considered to be appropriate for the year 2000 have been used. These costs, which are approximately an order of magnitude below the costs of current experimental projects, are believed to be achievable as a result of the anticipated sizeable solar penetration into the energy market in the 1990 to 2000 timeframe. The paraboloidal dish, central receiver, cylindrical parabolic trough, and compound parabolic concentrators comprise the advanced collector concepts studied. All concepts exhibit their best performance when sited in regional areas such as the sunbelt where the annual insolation is high. The regional variation in solar plant performance has been assessed in relation to the expected rise in the future cost of residential and commercial electricity in the same regions. A discussion of the regional insolation data base, a description of the solar systems performance and costs, and a presentation of a range for the forecast cost of conventional electricity by region and nationally over the next several decades are given.

Latta, A.F.; Bowyer, J.M.; Fujita, T.; Richter, P.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

MUTESHIFTSPEAKERINTERCOM 6MNO5JKL4GHI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and registration activities. CERTIFICATION Comdial's Quality Management System Is Certified To The ISO 9001

24

The Influence of Orbital Forcing of Tropical Insolation on the Climate and1 Isotopic Composition of Precipitation in South America2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Precipitation in South America2 Xiaojuan Liu and David S. Battisti3 Department of Atmospheric Sciences-19-2014) of the AMS LATEX template1 #12;ABSTRACT The 18O of calcite (18Oc) in speleothems from South America is well in insolation in changing the climate of South America. Using an isotope-enabled atmospheric general circulation

Battisti, David

25

Characterization of RopGEFs in maize  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dedicator of Cytokinesis) proteins lack the conventional DHThe lack of correspondence between maize proteins recognizedlack of chaperones leading to incorrect folding of proteins

Lee, Ah Young

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Turkmenistan-GEF Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:ToyoTurkey: Energy Resources Jump

27

Global Environment Facility (GEF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to: navigation,GigaCrete Inc JumpGland,GlenrockGlobal Energy

28

Global Environment Facility (GEF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to: navigation,GigaCrete Inc JumpGland,GlenrockGlobal EnergyGlobal

29

File:NREL-bhutan-10kmsolar-ghi.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdf JumpApschem.pdfMarcelluswatermgmt.pdf Jumpdir.pdf Jumpdni.pdf Jump

30

Peru-GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

& the Caribbean1 Contents 1 Program Overview 1.1 Program Focus 1.2 Environment and Sustainable Development 2 References Program Overview "Across Latin America and the...

31

UNEP-GEF Renewable Energy Project Financial Risk Management in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financial Risk Management 1 "This UNEPGEF targeted research project aims to catalyse new thinking in the risk management area, examining existing instruments and approaches and...

32

Armenia-GEF Climate Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo Feng Bio Energy CoClimate Projects Jump to: navigation,

33

UNDP/GEF-Cambodia-Sustainable Forest Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:ToyoTurkey:S ArmyMeasuring

34

GEF-Knowledge Management Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpen EnergyBoard" form. To create aGA SNC Solar JumpGCWind

35

Investing in Sustainable Transport and Urban Systems: The GEF Experience |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (bot load)InternationalRenewable Energy CouncilWind LLCInvesOpen

36

GEF-Colombia-Geothermal Energy Grant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (TheEtelligence (SmartHomeFremont,using

37

Surface Radiation from GOES: A Physical Approach; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models to compute Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) have been in development over the last 3 decades. These models can be classified as empirical or physical, based on the approach. Empirical models relate ground based observations with satellite measurements and use these relations to compute surface radiation. Physical models consider the radiation received from the earth at the satellite and create retrievals to estimate surface radiation. While empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation for the solar energy industry the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from NOAA that computes GHI using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the GOES satellites. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and uses those properties in a radiative transfer model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, University of Wisconsin and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a 4 km GHI and DNI product every 30 minutes. This paper presents an outline of the methodology and a comprehensive validation using high quality ground based solar data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) (http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/surfrad/sitepage.html) and Integrated Surface Insolation Study (ISIS) http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/isis/isissites.html), the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sun Spot One (SS1) stations.

Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Peru-GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOski Energy LLCPascoagPerformance Home Ocop'sCountriesand

39

Peru-GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange CountyPennsylvania/GeothermalLLCInformationand

40

UNDP-GEF Fuel Cell Bus Programme: Update | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save Energy Now Jump to:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gef ghi insolation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

UNEP-GEF Renewable Energy Project Financial Risk Management in Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401 et seq. - Utah UndergroundPortal(FIRM) | Open

42

On the origins of the ice ages : insolation forcing, age models, and nonlinear climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis revolves about the relationship between orbital forcing and climate variability. To place paleo and modern climate variability in context, the spectrum of temperature variability is estimated from time-scales ...

Huybers, Peter, 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Exclusive 0 production at HERMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

internen HERMES Target streute, das mit transversal polarisiertem atomaren Wasserstoff gef¨ullt war. Durch

44

Intra-hour Direct Normal Irradiance solar forecasting using genetic programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on an Eppley SMT-3 Solar Tracker. The SMT-3 can orient in aPSP mounted on a SMT-3 Solar Tracker. All of the DNI, GHI

Queener, Benjamin Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Stellar and Planetary Properties of K2 Campaign 1 Candidates and Validation of 18 Systems, Including a Planet Receiving Earth-like Insolation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extended Kepler mission, K2, is now providing photometry of new fields every three months in a search for transiting planets. In a recent study, Foreman-Mackey and collaborators presented a list of 36 planet candidates orbiting 31 stars in K2 Campaign 1. In this contribution, we present stellar and planetary properties for all systems. We combine ground-based seeing-limited survey data and adaptive optics imaging with an automated transit analysis scheme to validate 18 candidates as planets and identify 6 candidates as likely false positives. Of particular interest is EPIC 201912552, a bright (K=8.9) M2 dwarf hosting a 2.24 \\pm 0.25 Earth radius planet with an equilibrium temperature of 271 \\pm 16 K and an orbital period of 33 days. We also present two new open-source software packages that enabled this analysis: isochrones, a flexible tool for fitting theoretical stellar models to observational data to determine stellar properties, and vespa, a new general-purpose procedure to calculate false positive pr...

Montet, Benjamin T; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Johnson, John Asher; Hogg, David W; Bowler, Brendan P; Latham, David W; Bieryla, Allyson; Mann, Andrew W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

15 Millionen aus DFG-Programmen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foto zeigt Spuren geladener Teilchen in einer mit flüssigem Wasserstoff gefüllten Blasenkammer. Die

47

Designing PV Incentive Programs to Promote Performance: A Review of Current Practice in the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements of solar insolation and power output, and caneach system’s AC power output, solar insolation, and windof each system’s AC power output, solar insolation, and wind

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Designing PV Incentive Programs to Promote System Performance: A Review of Current Practice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements of solar insolation and power output, and caneach system’s AC power output, solar insolation, and windof each system’s AC power output, solar insolation, and wind

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

An Intelligent Solar Powered Battery Buffered EV Charging Station with Solar Electricity Forecasting and EV Charging Load Projection Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar insolation and the solar panel characteristics. Theinsolation on the assigned solar panel for a clear sky wassolar insolation on the solar panel varies with the change

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Rankine thermodynamics matches Californiaconsidered, using average California solar insolation dataelectricity. Solar Rankine thermodynamics matches California

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY INVESTING IN OUR PLANET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agrofuelsfrom the Production and Use ofJatropha Oil in Mali under the Regional: SPWA-CC: GEF Strategic Program for

Monique Barbut

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Collection de tirs part du Prof. Drig (en italique= pas prsent dans les bibliothques genevoises)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19 1968 2 Andren, A. Due copie dello Hades di Agorakritos? RPAA 1963 2 Andreae, B. Gefässkörper und

Loewith, Robbie

53

Solar variability of four sites across the state of Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four Sites Across the State of Colorado Matthew Lave and Jansites across the state of Colorado were analyzed. GHI at thesites across the state of Colorado. This choice is motivated

Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

For the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory Page C.1 6/20/2011 Appendix C: Vocabulary The following cell or module Global Irradiance (GHI) Total solar radiation on a horizontal surface Direct Normal

Oregon, University of

55

C-A/AP/#241 Beam Evolution with Time in Electron Cooling and in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aSDYH C` `CUCRWX GQ GHI QDI GHWG HW` aIID S`IE VQX GHI aIWU FXQTGH ESI GQ CDGXWaIWU `YWGGIXCDF QV e id idg e d df dee ed ge d f e fdk me ee f e f e fd ee dd e ef ee d e fd de fd f ed d dk ee ef e id idg e d df dee ed k me ee f e

56

Global Assessments and Guidelines for Sustainable Liquid Biofuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Assessments and Guidelines for Sustainable Liquid Biofuel Production in Developing Countries Biofuel Production in Developing Countries FINAL REPORT A GEF Targeted Research Project Organized by Bernd for Sustainable Liquid Biofuels. A GEF Targeted Research Project. Heidelberg/Paris/Utrecht/Darmstadt, 29 February

57

Telsiai Siauliai PanevezysKlaipedaVezaiciai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The UNDP/GEF Baltic Wind Atlas Ole Rathmann The UNDP/GEF Regional Baltic Wind Energy Programme Risø In the frame of the Regional Baltic Wind Energy Programme, sponsored by the Global Environment Facility through to primo October 2001. The measured data have been analysed according to the "Wind Atlas Method", implying

58

Dark Shadows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010. Quantifying PV power Output Variability. Solar Energysolar insolation meters and similarly sited wind anemometers (scaled to create a time series of wind power output)Power Systems Clouds can cause significant ramps in solar insolation and PV plant output

Mills, Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Understanding Variability and Uncertainty of Photovoltaics for Integration with the Electric Power System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar insolation meters and similarly sited wind anemometers (scaled to create a time series of wind power output)Power Systems Clouds can cause significant ramps in solar insolation and PV plant output

Mills, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Sub-Hour Solar Data for Power System Modeling From Static Spatial Variability Analysis: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High penetration renewable integration studies need high quality solar power data with spatial-temporal correlations that are representative of a real system. This paper will summarize the research relating sequential point-source sub-hour global horizontal irradiance (GHI) values to static, spatially distributed GHI values. This research led to the development of an algorithm for generating coherent sub-hour datasets that span distances ranging from 10 km to 4,000 km. The algorithm, in brief, generates synthetic GHI values at an interval of one-minute, for a specific location, using SUNY/Clean Power Research, satellite-derived, hourly irradiance values for the nearest grid cell to that location and grid cells within 40 km.

Hummon, M.; Ibanez, E.; Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gef ghi insolation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

! "#$ %& '( )* +,-./01 2! 3$4 56 789 +,-./0 :; ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"> [?F & S°! G? +,- ./0G "yE'! 1 S°F (" l]m & ± ²2 J"³ STiA $U Viz ¡?+ ) Gw ¡? , -1 #12; ³ P ´G 8H$4°! >?$4 ! c +,- @ABC! 78$ DE 789 ÿJ1 " ./0F 56 1 GHI J"#12;E EU î V :; 1 GHI J" ! STiA $U VE 22¹ �³ ".$S 3Z #¤ 78 +,- @ABC1 ./01 #12; ¡ª +,-1 Z Sx$U )¤ ³ 3Z STiA $U V 22 '% S°! ö� 7&$U VE p

Kim, Kwangjo

62

A Second-Site Noncomplementation Screen for Modifiers of Rho1 Signaling during Imaginal Disc Morpogenesis in Drosophila  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+/+ RhoGEF2 11-3b 21 31 (239) 25 75 (61) Rho1 E3.10 +/+ RhoGEF2 11-3b 21 20 (143) 25 20 (30) Rho1 k02107b +/+ RhoGEF2 11-3b 21 80 (5) 25 100 (9) Rho1 J3.8 +/+ RhoGEF2 11-3b 21 55 (62) 25 91 (22) Rho1 E(br)246 +/+ zip E(br) 21 50 (82) 25 66 (44) Rho1 E...(br)233 +/+ zip E(br) 21 20 (102) 25 66 (29) Rho1 E3.10 +/+ zip E(br) 21 ND 25 33 (12) Rho1 k02107b +/+ zip E(br) 21 ND 25 ND Rho1 J3.8 +/+ zip E(br) 21 95 (20) 25 97 (30) a Balanced, Rho heterozygous mutant virgin females were crossed to either w 1118...

Patch, Kistie; Stewart, Shannon; Welch, Aaron; Ward, Robert

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

Product Quality Assurance for Off-Grid Lighting in Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar home systems (SHSs) projects in Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and China,solar home systems procurement procedures used in World Bank and GEF-assisted Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, China and

Mills, Evan; World Bank

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy in China. ” Renewable Energy 36 (5): 1374-1378. Chen,GoC/World Bank/GEF China Renewable Energy Scale-up Programwind power systems. ” Renewable Energy 35: 218-225. Lechon

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Teilnehmer des deutsch-ukrainisch-polnischen Seminars in Tscherniwzi 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Teilnehmer des deutsch-ukrainisch-polnischen Seminars in Tscherniwzi 2012 BAYHOST & die Ukraine. Gefördert durch den DAAD veranstaltete BAYHOST zwei Deutsch - Ukrainische Seminare, die sich dem Thema

Schubart, Christoph

66

Climate Change Adaptation: Getting Ahead of the Curve1 Alexis Saba, Michela Biasutti, Michael B. Gerrard,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate change adaptation in developing countries. Other sources of financing, from multilateral GEF: Global Environment Facility IPCC: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change LDCs: Least Developed! 1 ! Climate Change Adaptation: Getting Ahead of the Curve1 Alexis Saba, Michela Biasutti, Michael

Biasutti, Michela

67

Deformable geometry design with controlled mechanical property based on 3D printing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Deformable products exist broadly in different industries. These deformable products undergo deformation to achieve specific mechanical properties. Custom made insoles are applied to redistribute plantar… (more)

Li, Yongqiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Solar: monthly latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of aerosols in the atmosphere to calculate the monthly average daily total insolation (sun and sky) falling on a horizontal surface. Existing ground measurement stations are used...

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - appalachian spruce fir Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

topography, and potential insolation on the Summary: United States (Noss et al. 1995; White and Miller 1998). Appalachian montane spruce-fir forests... by wind, with natural...

70

DISTRIBUTED ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: A PRELIMINARY REPORT, VOLUME I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paul Berdahl et al. , California Solar Data Hanual, LawrenceBerkeley Laboratory, California Solar Data Manual, Draft,here. The solar insolation falling upon California is more

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

ORGANIZATIONAL, INTERFACE AND FINANCIAL BARRIERS TO THE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY ENERGY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

date. In California, the California Solar Energy industrieswould total $1,400. California Solar credits cover 55% ofstudies of solar insolation, while in California the state

Schladale, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Modern stalagmite oxygen isotopic composition and its implications of climatic change from a high-elevation cave in the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau over the past 50 years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appeared in southern China, where solar insolation decreaseddicate that the solar radiation in China monsoon regions isdownwelling surface solar radiation in China from National

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Technoeconomic Analysis of Photoelectrochemical (PEC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................... 29 3.5 Solar Insolation .................................................. 37 3.6 Solar Shadowing ............................................................................................................ 41 3.6.1 Type 3 Panel Separation Distance for Minimal Shadowing................................... 41

74

Selling Random Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ramps in wind or solar power output, the system operatorin solar insolation and subsequent electric power output.and solar power density to manage the corresponding output

Bitar, Eilyan Yamen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Coastal-inland solar radiation difference study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to quantify the characteristics of solar insolation in the coastal zone and to determine the effect of the sea breeze circulation on the global insolation. In order to satisfy these objectives, a six station sampling network was established in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina, where previous evidence has indicated that the sea breeze circulation is almost a daily occurrence from late May through October. Three sites (Sloop Point, Onslow Beach, and Cape Fear Technical Institute (CFTI)) were located near the coast (coastal sites) to assess the insolation at the coast. A site (Clinton) was located in an area seldom affected by the sea breeze (about 100 km from the coast). Two additional sites, Wallace and Ellis Airport, located between the coastal sites and the control site, were to be used to assess the transient impact of the sea breeze upon the insolation. Pyranometers were located at each site to measure the global insolation. Direct normal insolation measured by a pyrheliometer and ultraviolet radiation measured by uv radiometers were observed at the Sloop Point and Clinton sites only. Data were collected during the calendar year 1978. The results of the study indicated that the global insolation had greater variability over the network during the summer season (June, July, and August). During the summer, there was a systematicdiurnal variation of the difference in global insolation between the inland and the coastal sites.

Bach, W.D. Jr.; Vukovich, F.M.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

DOI: 10.1126/science.1204132 , 1417 (2011);332Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

separated by 350 km) over an enormous area of Saturn's north- ern mid-latitudes. The increased insolation; but the initial instability presumably occurred at deep levels where solar insolation has no influence. The large energy and material vertically over great distances, perturbing strato- spheric zonal jets, exciting wave

Socquet, Anne

77

COMPARISON OF PROPORTIONAL AND ON/OFF SOLAR COLLECTOR LOOP CONTROL STRATEGIES USING A DYNAMIC COLLECTOR MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high gain: insolation = 2292 BTU/ft 2 -da~ 7224 watt-hrs/m -low gain: insolation= 1146 BTU/ft 2-dat 3612 watt-hrs/m -day°F (46.1°C) capacitance= 0.7 BTU/ft 2-°F {14.3 kJ;m 2- 0 c)

Schiller, Steven R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Greenbelt Homes Pilot Energy Efficiency Program Phase 1 Summary: Existing Conditions and Baseline Energy Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-year pilot energy efficiency retrofit project has been undertaken by Greenbelt Homes, Inc, (GHI) a 1,566 co-operative of circa 1930 and '40 homes. The three predominate construction methods of the townhomes in the community are materials common to the area and climate zone including 8" CMU block, wood frame with brick veneer and wood frame with vinyl siding. GHI has established a pilot project that will serve as a basis for decision making for the roll out of a decade-long community upgrade program that will incorporate energy efficiency to the building envelope and equipment with the modernization of other systems like plumbing, mechanical equipment, and cladding.

Wiehagen, J.; Del Bianco, M.; Wood, A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Evaluating Solar Resource Data Obtained from Multiple Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar radiation resource measurements from radiometers are used to predict and evaluate the performance of photovoltaic and concentrating solar power systems, validate satellite-based models for estimating solar resources, and advance research in solar forecasting and climate change. This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances (GHI) and direct normal irradiances (DNI). These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband irradiometers, and a pyranometer with a shading ring deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL). The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference GHI and DNI.

Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Andreas, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

NE Pacific St. NE Pacific St.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lake W ashington Ship Canal NE Pacific St. NE Pacific St. NE Boat St. 15th Ave NE 15thAveNE UniversityWayNE BrooklynAveNE NE Pacific St. MontlakeBlvdNE MontlakeBlvdNE Pacific Place NE University Burke-Gilman Trail METRO NW A CD D EF F GHI H J RR BB CC EE AA Rotunda Cafe Ocean Sciences Hitchcock

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gef ghi insolation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Rac GTP Exchange Factor TIAM-1 Acts with CDC-42 and the Guidance Receptor UNC-40/DCC in Neuronal Protrusion and Axon Guidance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-73 does not control CED-10/Rac downstream of UNC-6/Netrin in attractive axon guidance. Here we show that C. elegans TIAM-1 is a Rac-specific GEF that links CDC-42 and Rac signaling in lamellipodia and filopodia formation downstream of UNC-40/DCC. We...

Demarco, Rafael Senos; Struckhoff, Eric Charles; Lundquist, Erik A.

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

82

contact@x-bay.de www.x-bay.de  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

durch ein kleines Loch mit Wasserstoff gefüllt und anschlie�end an- gezündet wird, gibt einen lau- ten Knall von sich. Warum? ,,Sauerstoff und Wasserstoff vermischen sich in der Dose zu Knallgas", erklärte

Schmidt, Matthias

83

A l u m n i C a m p u s N E U E M A T E R I A L I E N Ionen und Autos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- fähiger Energiespeicher. WAS DIE MOBILIT�T VON ELEKTROAUTOS MIT DER MOBILIT�T VON LITHIUM wieder ein- schränkt. Selbstverständlich muss der Energiespeicher auch sicher sein. Gut ein Jahr ist nun- zellen hatten dazu geführt, dass in mehreren Flugzeugen der Energiespeicher in Flam- men aufging. Ein

Vollmer, Heribert

84

L E I B N I Z U N I V E R S I T T H A N N O V E RN E U E M A T E R I A L I E N Ionen und Autos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Entwicklung leistungs- fähiger Energiespeicher. WAS DIE MOBILIT�T VON ELEKTROAUTOS MIT DER MOBILIT�T VON wieder ein- schränkt. Selbstverständlich muss der Energiespeicher auch sicher sein. Gut ein Jahr ist nun- zellen hatten dazu geführt, dass in mehreren Flugzeugen der Energiespeicher in Flam- men aufging. Ein

Vollmer, Heribert

85

AN AXON'S JOURNEY TO FIND ITS PATH: IN VIVO CHARACTERIZATION OF THE MODULATORS AND EFFECTORS OF THE RAC GTPASE SIGNALING PATHWAY INVOLVED IN AXON GUIDANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ced-10. Along with other evidence, this suggested that there were other molecules involved in the control of Rac GTPases in this process. I performed a candidate-based genetic screen in the C. elegans genome in order to find other DH-containing GEFs...

Demarco, Rafael Senos

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

86

National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan a National Master Plan (NMP) for waste-to-energy as one of the activities under UNDP/GEF assisted project. The NMP provides a framework for waste-to-energy programme for the country besides a means of processing

Columbia University

87

Statistics beyond Physics -Misused in Public ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistics beyond Physics - Misused in Public ? S. KOBE Institut für Theoretische Physik Technische are three kinds of lies: Lies, damned lies, and statistics" attributed by Mark TWAIN to the 19th Century gefälscht habe. (Do not trust any statistics you did not fake yourself.)" attributed by ... to the 20th

Kobe, Sigismund

88

CROSS VALIDATION OF SATELLITE RADIATION TRANSFER MODELS DURING SWERA PROJECT IN BRAZIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) project. SWERA is a multinational project financed by UNEP-GEF aimed at performing a detailed survey of solar and wind energy resources of various developing satellite data and climatological information; (2) SUNY-Albany model: a statistical satellite method based

Heinemann, Detlev

89

Document (562k)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TIMES THE MAXIMUM SIZE TOTAL CAPITAL COST M ST YR OPERATION TOTAL CAPITAL COST M CURRENT LEVELIZED ENERGY COST MILLS KWHR LEVELIZED ENERGY COST MILLS KWHR CURRENT DAY HOUR INSOL...

90

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Palm Springs solar insolation, and California electricityConcentrating Solar Power in California, NREL/SR-550-39291,generation from wind and solar in California could be very

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Diurnal Characteristics of Precipitation Features Over the East Pacific: A Comparison of the EPIC and TEPPS Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over the central American land mass. Sub-MCS features in both regions have a broad peak extending change in solar insolation (Hendon and Woodberry, 1993). Indeed, it has been argued that the ability

Rutledge, Steven

92

FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar insulation.    PV variable voltage input DC-DC converter with peak power trackersolar insolation.    PV variable voltage input DC-DC converter with peak power tracker

Lesieutre, Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar generation output from the CPUC’s 33% Renewable Integration Study based on 2005 weather datasolar generation output based on 2005 baseline load and insolation from a CPUC 33% Renewable Integration Study, and weather data

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

SHORT-TERM FORECASTING OF SOLAR RADIATION BASED ON SATELLITE DATA WITH STATISTICAL METHODS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT-TERM FORECASTING OF SOLAR RADIATION BASED ON SATELLITE DATA WITH STATISTICAL METHODS Annette governing the insolation, forecasting of solar radiation makes the description of development of the cloud

Heinemann, Detlev

95

Mohammad Azari Thomas Perkins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microturbine 1mW/cm2 microelectromechanical turbine at 30 liters/min Heel Strike W with dielectric elastomer, 250­700 mW with hydraulic piezoelectric actuator, 10 mW with piezoelectric insole

Nasipuri, Asis

96

Model, proxy and isotopic perspectives on the East African Humid Period Jessica E. Tierney a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, , Sophie C. Lewis b , Benjamin I. Cook a,c , Allegra N. LeGrande c , Gavin A. Schmidt c a Lamont of the AHP is fairly well understood: increased solar insolation in the North African subtropics during

97

Experiments with a time-dependent, zonally averaged, seasonal, enery balance climatic model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

planetary albedo a~ insolation Q~ albedo constant b , mixing temperature T ~ and 0 0he consistency factor c 20 Presen zonal values of extraterrestrial -2 insolation for the middle of the month (Wm ). . . . . 23 Zonal values of planetary albedo... values of the fraction of ocean, f~ R from (22), model determined R, and the five sets of R4. 30 Nomenclature used for model experiment. ". . . 32 The difference between observed and experiment Cl(R1) mean annual temperatures, AT; the model...

Thompson, Starley Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

98

Solar Radiometric Data Quality Assessment of SIRS, SKYRAD and GNDRAD Measurements (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar radiation is the driving force for the earth's weather and climate. Understanding the elements of this dynamic energy balance requires accurate measurements of broadband solar irradiance. Since the mid-1990's the ARM Program has deployed pyrheliometers and pyranometers for the measurement of direct normal irradiance (DNI), global horizontal irradiance (GHI), diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI), and upwelling shortwave (US) radiation at permanent and mobile field research sites. This poster summarizes the basis for assessing the broadband solar radiation data available from the SIRS, SKYRAD, and GNDRAD measurement systems and provides examples of data inspections.

Habte, A.; Stoffel, T.; Reda, I.; Wilcox, S.; Kutchenreiter, M.; Gotseff, P.; Anderberg, M.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Global Feed-in Tariffs Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF Jump to:

100

Global Forest Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF Jump to:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gef ghi insolation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Global Fuel Economy Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF Jump to:Risk

102

Global Industry Analysts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF Jump

103

Global Renewable Resource Potential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF JumpNetwork Jump

104

Global Seawater Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF JumpNetwork

105

Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) Data Base | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF JumpNetworkMarket

106

Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF

107

Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Regional variations of days of autonomy for solar energy applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A problem faced by designers of stand-alone solar installations is the sizing of the collector area and storage capacity. From a curve of the minimum possible insolation over any period of days for a given site, a functional relationship between the collector-area and storage-capacity that provides a 0% probability of not meeting load (PNML) can be derived. This permits evaluating the regional variations in days-of-autonomy required to provide 100% reliability. Such variations are shown for Texas based on recent insolation data.

Grindle, E. II; Vliet, G.C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The climatic and hydrologic history of southern Nevada during the late Quaternary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding climate change during the expected life span of a potential high-level nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires estimates of future climate boundary conditions. These climate boundary conditions are governed by changes in the Earth's orbital properties (eccentricity, obliquity, precession) that determine insolation. Subcycles of the 400,000 year insolation-controlled climate cycles last approximately 100,000 years. This report describes the changes which have occurred in the climatic history of Southern Nevada during the past 400,000 years. These changes provide a basis for understanding the changes which may occur during the long-term future in this area.

Forester, R.M.; Bradbury, J.P.; Carter, C.; Elvidge-Tuma, A.B.; Hemphill, M.L.; Lundstrom, S.C.; Mahan, S.A.; Marshall, B.D.; Neymark, L.A.; Paces, J.B.; Sharpe, S.E.; Whelan, J.F.; Wigand, P.E.

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

110

Technical Report NREL/TP-550-44082  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I-V current versus voltage ICE internal combustion engine IGBT insolated gate bipolar transistor IR alternating current AC/DC AC-to-DC ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers atm atmosphere CG combustible-ionized DOE U.S. Department of Energy EPC Engineering Procurement & Construction E-Stop Emergency Stop FPGA

111

-k Science Service Featwe ? LHY TIE 'iP,ATiEER 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regulator. It has been called a 1lsavings bank f o r solar energy, receiving deposits i n seasons of excessive insolation and pay- ing them back i n seasons of prsnt.11 the great extremes of heat and cold 7 amounts of heat, they Naturally, then, marine climates are spared Since . exert a steadying and moderating

112

1088 VOLUME 15J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2002 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1088 VOLUME 15J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2002 American Meteorological Society NOTES instability: the latter predominantly generates the seasonal phase locking of ENSO but has little effect periodic forcing, such as the annual cycle of solar insolation or monsoon wind. Using a conceptual ENSO

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

113

Regional climate responses to geoengineering with tropical and Arctic SO2 injections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional climate responses to geoengineering with tropical and Arctic SO2 injections Alan Robock,1 insolation and cool Earth, has been suggested as an emergency response to geoengineer the planet in response aerosols cooling the planet, the volcano analog actually argues against geoengineering because of ozone

Robock, Alan

114

Contribution of Atmospheric Circulation to Inception of the Laurentide Ice Sheet at 116 kyr BP*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was insufficient for inception at 116 kyr BP. Remote cooling or local feedbacks that amplify the impact. An additional cooling of 4°C together with adjustments for Eemian incident radiation is required for perennial that cooling resulting from modest decreases in local insolation in response to Milankovitch radiation forcing

Howat, Ian M.

115

An Attracting Jormungand Climate State for an Energy Balance Model with Ice Line Coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evidence exists indicating continental ice sheets flowed into the ocean near the equator during. A planet is warmed by incoming solar radiation (or insolation), while it loses heat energy through the emission of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) to space. The extent to which the surface and clouds reflect

Wilmer, Elizabeth

116

Journal of Climate, 2005, Vol 18, p 2903-2921 Maintenance of the Sea-Ice Edge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

location the principal drivers of the oceanic heat flux that melts sea ice are absorbed solar radiation radiation is the largest component of the ocean energy budget, and the large seasonal range of insolation pole depends primarily on coastlines, ice motion, and the melt rate at the ice-ocean interface. At any

Bitz, Cecilia

117

Modeling Climate Dynamically James Walsh and Richard McGehee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to tropical latitudes, leaving a narrow strip of open ocean water about the equator? Can mathematical models and present day evidence. Global climate is determined by the radiation balance of the planet. The Earth warms through the absorption of incoming solar radiation (or insolation). Due to the shortwave nature

Wilmer, Elizabeth

118

When Did the Anthropocene Begin? Observations and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Interglacial Glacial Northern hemisphere summer solar radiation, 65°N 18O Strong Weak Warm Earth: more CO2 in atmosphere, less CO2 dissolved in ocean. Cold Earth Warm Earth: more wetlands, more methane in atmosphere trends following 7 insolation maxima (circles) Northern hemisphere summer, solar radiation for past 800

Anisimov, Mikhail

119

Solar Forecasting System and Irradiance Variability Characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Energy Reliability As part of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-EE0003507 Under Task 3.1: Photovoltaic Systems Reliability Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-EE0003507 Hawai`i Energy Sustainability Program Subtask 3.1 Photovoltaic Systems: Report 3 Development of data base allowing managed access to statewide PV and insolation

120

Project focus: Complete design of an interactive solar panel system to be situated on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project focus: · Complete design of an interactive solar panel system to be situated on top the effective area · Two types of solar cells: · 3 panel configurations: · Real-time power output data Si panels with 30.0o tilt c) 10 CdTe panels; 38.5o tilt · Solar insolation recorder, thermometer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gef ghi insolation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ADAPTIVE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ACTIVE ANKLE-FOOT ORTHOSIS FOR ANKLE ASSISTING AND REHABILITATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADAPTIVE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ACTIVE ANKLE-FOOT ORTHOSIS FOR ANKLE ASSISTING AND REHABILITATION ADAPTIVE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ACTIVE ANKLE-FOOT ORTHOSIS FOR ANKLE ASSISTING AND REHABILITATION Ivanka Veneva]. The sensor system has mounted into two basic components: insole for the healthy leg and ankle- foot orthoses

Mustakerov, Ivan

122

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ACTIVE ANKLE-FOOT ORTHOSIS AND GAIT ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ACTIVE ANKLE-FOOT ORTHOSIS AND GAIT ANALYSIS CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ACTIVE ANKLE system has mounted into two basic components: insole for the healthy leg and ankle-foot orthoses. Proposed ankle-foot orthosis is with one degree of freedom which foot segment is connected to the shank

Mustakerov, Ivan

123

THE GLOBAL TROPICAL MOORED BUOY ARRAY M. J. McPhaden(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan, Email: andouk@jamstec.go.jp, masumoto, USA, Email: michael.j.mcphaden@noaa.gov 2 Research Institute for Global Change, Japan Agency. Intense insolation also leads to the highest open ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in tropics

124

A solar concentrating photovoltaic / thermal collector J.S. Coventry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A solar concentrating photovoltaic / thermal collector J.S. Coventry Centre for Sustainable Energy.Coventry@anu.edu.au Abstract Australia is a good location for solar concentrator applications. Current activities in Australia OF THE SOLAR RESOURCE IN AUSTRALIA Australia has relatively high solar insolation, as shown in figure 1

125

117Copyright ECOLOGICAL BULLETINS, 2013 Ecological Bulletins 54: 117140, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

insolation or available energy, temperature, and precipitation) is characteristic of elevational gradients along mixed forest (tabonuco ­ palo colorado ­ elfin forest) and palm forest transects. Similarly, community level aspects of biodiversity varied with elevation in a consistent manner in both mixed forest

Willig, Michael

126

Different orbital rhythms in the Asian summer monsoon records from North and South China during the Pleistocene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

summer monsoon North China South China solar insolation glacial­interglacial cycles Pleistocene Here weDifferent orbital rhythms in the Asian summer monsoon records from North and South China during, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi'an 710075, China b Paleomagnetism

Utrecht, Universiteit

127

ESTIMATING GROUND-LEVEL SOLAR RADIATION AND EVAPOTRANSPIRATION IN PUERTO RICO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REMOTE SENSING Eric. W. Harmsen1 , John Mecikalski2 , Vanessa Acaron3 and Jayson Maldonado3 1 Department insolation, other meteorological variables (e.g., net radiation, soil heat flux, air temperature dew point remote sensing product. As a practical example of the use of the methodology, the Hargraeves-Samani ETo

Gilbes, Fernando

128

PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY VOL. 154, NO. 2, JUNE 2010 1 Read 14 November 2008, as part of the symposium "Action Not Words."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of glaciers, which can be viewed as the world's water towers, threatens water resources that are essential by atmospheric, oceanic, cryospheric, and vegetative changes, and ex- ternally by changes in the amount of solar. Incoming solar (or insolation) changes influence terrestrial temperatures and oceanic and atmospheric

Howat, Ian M.

129

The Arctic Ocean--a Canadian perspective from IPY H. Melling & R. Francois & P. G. Myers & W. Perrie &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resulting from ice melt. Careful experiments have revealed that Arctic phytoplankton growth is constrained with the atmosphere is dramatically reduced by its ice cap. Sea ice inhibits transfers of vapour and heat reflectivity and latent heat reduce the ocean's absorption of sunshine, and slow ice melting until insolation

Long, Bernard

130

Changes in the hydrological cycle, ocean circulation, and carbon/ nutrient cycling during the last interglacial and glacial transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; published 27 October 2007. [1] A complex Earth system model has been forced by insolation changes system model with prognostic atmospheric pCO2 is integrated for the first time over 20,000 a of the last an important benchmark for the validation of current climate models. [3] In this study a fully complex Earth

Winguth, Arne

131

[SKRIV INN FIRMANAVN] Peer-Reviewed Term Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 radiation energy received on a given surface21 area and recorded during a given time.22 23 Figure with December. The lines30 throughout the figure are lines of constant solar31 flux. The black areas represent periods of no32 solar insolation, which exist at the North Pole33 when you have polar nights in the winter

Russell, Lynn

132

Printed in the United States of America Available from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODEL FOR DIRECT AND DIFFUSE INSOLATION ON HORIZONTAL SURFACES RICHARD E. BIRD ROLAND L. HULSTROM FEBRUARY 1981 PREPARED UNDER TASK No. 1093.00 Solar Energy Research Institute A Division of Midwest J. V. Dave of IBM for providing data sets from his Spherical Harmonics code. Richard E. Bird Senior

133

Noise-Enhanced Balance Control in Patients with Diabetes and Patients with Stroke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with stroke, resulting in diminished motor performance. Recently, it has been shown that input noise can mechanical noise applied to the soles of the feet via vibrating insoles can be used to improve quietNoise-Enhanced Balance Control in Patients with Diabetes and Patients with Stroke Attila A

Collins, James J.

134

Optimal operating conditions and configurations for humidification-dehumidification desalination cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency by recapturing this energy, by separating the evaporation and condensation processes maximum system temperature out outlet p product/condensate total sum of all components trans transferred w have high solar insolation, which suggests that solar powered desalination could be very beneficial

Lienhard V, John H.

135

Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 137: 129147, January 2011 Part A Annual cycle of the West African monsoon: regional circulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is maintained at the coast, rather than steadily moving inland with the solar insolation, due to persistent warm annual cycle in rainfall that remains a challenge to understand and predict (e.g. Cook and Vizy, 2006 to the peak solar heating is due to the interactions that occur between the land, the atmosphere and the ocean

Zhang, Chidong

136

Cooling load estimation methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described. Correlations are described that permit auxiliary cooling estimates from monthly average insolation and weather data. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy required of a given building.

McFarland, R.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Hausaufgabe 6: Aufgabe 3-20: Ein 0,12 m-Tank enthlt gesttigtes R-134a bei 800 kPa. Zu Beginn sind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hausaufgabe 6: Aufgabe 3-20: Ein 0,12 m³-Tank enthält gesättigtes R-134a bei 800 kPa. Zu Beginn sind 25% des Tanks mit flüssigem R-134a gefüllt. Der Rest mit gasförmigem R-134a. Ein Ventil am Boden des Tanks wird geöffnet und flüssiges Kühlmittel tritt aus. Von au�en wird dem Kühlmittel Wärme

Peters, Norbert

138

Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF Jump to:Risk Exposure

139

Global Green Growth Forum (3GF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF Jump to:RiskGF) Jump

140

Global Green Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF Jump to:RiskGF)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gef ghi insolation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Global Renewable Energy Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF JumpNetwork Jump to:

142

Global Timber Market and Forestry Data Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,OpenBusGEF JumpNetworkMarket and

143

Satellite-Based Solar Resource Data Sets for India 2002-2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new 10-km hourly solar resource product was created for India. This product was created using satellite radiances from the Meteosat series of satellites. The product contains global horizontal irradiances (GHI) and direct normal irradiances (DNI) for the period from 2002 to 2011. An additional solar resource data set covering the period from January 2012 to June 2012 was created solely for validation because this period overlaps ground measurements that were made available from the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy's (MNRE's) National Institute for Solar Energy for five stations that are part of MNRE's solar resource network. These measurements were quality checked using the SERI QC software and used to validate the satellite product. A comparison of the satellite product to the ground measurements for the five stations shows good agreement. This report also presents a comparison of the new version of solar resource data to the previous version, which covered the period from 2002 to 2008.

Sengupta, M.; Perez, R.; Gueymard, C.; Anderberg, M.; Gotseff, P.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus: Effect of Strain A On Corn Inbreds, Single- and Double-Cross Hybrids.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of harvest, according to the following scale: Seed set rating 1. No apparent effect of MDMV - 95 to 100 percent. 2. Slight reduction in seed set - 75 to 95 percent. 3. Severe reduction in seed set - 25 to 75 percent. 4. Very poor seed set - Less than 25....71 kl 57.48 gh 62.59 de 51.08 i j 60.50 fgh 60.73 fgf 56.39 ghi 57.56 gh 42.32 kl 56.95 gh 81.03 b 95.89 a Uni{IOCU 1 ated 42.95 k** 48.54 j** 65.74 ef** 65.61 ef 48.54 j 72 .64 cd** 61.98 fg 59.11 gh 74.40 c** 57.51 gh** 55.70 hi...

Toler, R.W.; Bockholt, A.J.; Alston, F.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Evaluation of phase change materials for thermal regulation enhancement of building integrated photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regulating the temperature of building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) using phase change materials (PCMs) reduces the loss of temperature dependent photovoltaic (PV) efficiency. Five PCMs were selected for evaluation all with melting temperatures {proportional_to}25 {+-} 4 C and heat of fusion between 140 and 213 kJ/kg. Experiments were conducted at three insolation intensities to evaluate the performance of each PCM in four different PV/PCM systems. The effect on thermal regulation of PV was determined by changing the (i) mass of PCM and (ii) thermal conductivities of the PCM and PV/PCM system. A maximum temperature reduction of 18 C was achieved for 30 min while 10 C temperature reduction was maintained for 5 h at -1000 W/m{sup 2} insolation. (author)

Hasan, A.; Norton, B. [Dublin Energy Lab., Focas Institute, School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St., Dublin 8 (Ireland); McCormack, S.J. [Department of Civil, Structure and Environmental Engineering, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 1 (Ireland); Huang, M.J. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, N. Ireland, BT370QB (United Kingdom)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility at Pioneer Mill Co. , Ltd  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are reported of a conceptual design study of the retrofit of a solar central receiver system to an existing cogeneration facility at a Hawaii raw sugar factory. Background information on the site, the existing facility, and the project organization is given. Then the results are presented o the work to select the site specific configuration, including the working fluid, receiver concept, heliostat field site, and the determination of the solar facility size and of the role of thermal storage. The system selected would use water-steam as its working fluid in a twin-cavity receiver collecting sunlight from 41,420 m/sup 2/ of heliostat mirrors. The lates version of the system specification is appended, as are descriptions of work to measure site insolation and a site insolation mathematical model and interface data for the local utility. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

April, 27, 2010 Forms of Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. With a solar insolation of 1,700 kWh/m²/yr an average household needs 8 to 10 square meters of solar panels Coal Methane Nuclear Oil Renewable Wind Solar Hydro Ethanol?? #12;#12;Carbon Based Energy Coal.77 2.99 0.55 0.89 1.27 #12;R e n e w a b l e s Wind, Solar, Hydro, Geothermal #12;Wind Turbines Cradle

Toohey, Darin W.

148

Specification for the unified heliostat array  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance and design requirements for the Unified Heliostat Array are established. The Unified Heliostat Array is an array of heliostats on a common terraced structure. Requirements are given for designing and evaluating the individual heliostats. Representative site conditions to be encountered and survived by the array are described, including wind loading, precipitation, insolation, and earthquake, and soil properties are described. Heliostat design load calculations and preliminary design point calculations are presented. (LEW)

Not Available

1980-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

149

Physical Building Information Modeling for Solar Building Design and Simulation- Annual Report 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information from BIM to Radiance. For Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV), we have researched on how to build solar models in BIM that can calculate solar position and solar insolation. 1.2 Research on BIM simplification methods, BIM topology, and data... we will continue investigating the use of Modelica to integrate the daylighting modeling with thermal modeling. 4 c) BIPV prototypes We have developed a Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) prototype in the BIM (Autodesk Revit) platform...

Yan, W.; Haberl, J.; Clayton, M.; Jeong, W.; Kim, J.; Kota, S.; Alcocer, J.; Dixit, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Comparison of two techniques for the simulation of PV systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For several years, MIT Lincoln Laboratory has conducted computer simulations of the performance of photovoltaic solar energy systems in order to size system components, to define designs of potential economic feasibility, to test various control schemes, and to monitor the performance of working systems in the field. When used as an aid-to-design, these hourly simulations step through a full year's worth of insolation and weather data at a specific geographical site. These data are available on computer tapes in the SOLMET format from the National Climatic Center. More recently, a simulation technique has been developed that does not require marching through time but instead works with probability-density functions of daily values of insolation and load as inputs while still providing estimates of the usual measures of system performance (e.g., auxiliary energy required, surplus energy thrown away, fraction of load displaced). Results obtained compare well with results previously obtained from an hourly simulation of a daytime radio station. This technique may be used to study the effect on system performance of varying degrees of correlation of load with insolation and to test the sensitivity of economic analyses to variations in utility escalation rate (discounted for inflation), PV module and balance-of-system costs.

Bucciarelli, L.L.; Grossman, B.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Comparative potency approach based on H2AX assay for estimating the genotoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) constitute a family of over one hundred compounds and can generally be found in complex mixtures. PAHs metabolites cause DNA damage which can lead to the development of carcinogenesis. Toxicity assessment of PAH complex mixtures is currently expressed in terms of toxic equivalents, based on Toxicity Equivalent Factors (TEFs). However, the definition of new TEFs for a large number of PAH could overcome some limitations of the current method and improve cancer risk assessment. The current investigation aimed at deriving the relative potency factors of PAHs, based on their genotoxic effect measured in vitro and analyzed with mathematical models. For this purpose, we used a new genotoxic assay (?H2AX) with two human cell lines (HepG2 and LS-174T) to analyze the genotoxic properties of 13 selected PAHs at low doses after 24 h treatment. The dose–response for genotoxic effects was modeled with a Hill model; equivalency between PAHs at low dose was assessed by applying constraints to the model parameters. In the two cell lines tested, we observed a clear dose–response for genotoxic effects for 11 tested compounds. LS-174T was on average ten times more sensitive than HepG2 towards PAHs regarding genotoxicity. We developed new TEFs, which we named Genotoxic Equivalent Factor (GEF). Calculated GEF for the tested PAHs were generally higher than the TEF usually used. Our study proposed a new in vitro based method for the establishment of relevant TEFs for PAHs to improve cancer risk assessment. -- Highlights: ? Examination of the genotoxic properties of 13 PAHs on two human cell lines. ? Modelization with a Hill model of the genotoxic dose–response. ? First investigation of the genotoxicity of benzo[c]fluorene on human cell lines. ? Establishment of relevant TEFs for PAHs to improve cancer risk assessment.

Audebert, M., E-mail: marc.audebert@toulouse.inra.fr [INRA UMR1331, TOXALIM (Research Center in Food Toxicology), 180 chemin de Tournefeuille, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, INP, ENVT, EIP, UPS, UMR1331, Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France); Zeman, F.; Beaudoin, R.; Péry, A. [Unité “Modèles pour l'écotoxicologie et la toxicologie” (METO), INERIS, BP2, F-60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France)] [Unité “Modèles pour l'écotoxicologie et la toxicologie” (METO), INERIS, BP2, F-60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Cravedi, J.-P. [INRA UMR1331, TOXALIM (Research Center in Food Toxicology), 180 chemin de Tournefeuille, F-31027 Toulouse (France) [INRA UMR1331, TOXALIM (Research Center in Food Toxicology), 180 chemin de Tournefeuille, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, INP, ENVT, EIP, UPS, UMR1331, Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Impact of Geoengineering Schemes on the Global Hydrological Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rapidly rising CO{sub 2} level in the atmosphere has led to proposals of climate stabilization via 'Geoengineering' schemes that would mitigate climate change by intentionally reducing the solar radiation incident on earth's surface. In this paper, we address the impact of these climate stabilization schemes on the global hydrological cycle, using equilibrium simulations from an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean model. We show that insolation reductions sufficient to offset global-scale temperature increases lead to a decrease in the intensity of the global hydrologic cycle. This occurs because solar forcing is more effective in driving changes in global mean evaporation than is CO{sub 2} forcing of a similar magnitude. In the model used here, the hydrologic sensitivity, defined as the percentage change in global mean precipitation per degree warming, is 2.4% for solar forcing, but only 1.5% for CO{sub 2} forcing. Although other models and the climate system itself may differ quantitatively from this result, the conclusion can be understood based on simple considerations of the surface energy budget and thus is likely to be robust. Compared to changing temperature by altering greenhouse gas concentrations, changing temperature by varying insolation results in larger changes in net radiative fluxes at the surface; these are compensated by larger changes in latent and sensible heat fluxes. Hence the hydrological cycle is more sensitive to temperature adjustment via changes in insolation than changes in greenhouse gases. This implies that an alteration in solar forcing might offset temperature changes or hydrological changes from greenhouse warming, but could not cancel both at once.

Bala, G; Duffy, P; Taylor, K

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

153

Testing of the METSTAT model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The METSTAT model is a comprehensive model for estimating insolation on an hourly basis from cloud cover and other meteorological data. However, the METSTAT model does not reproduce the statistics found in measured daily data during periods of extensive cloud cover. In this study, METSTAT modeled estimates and measured hourly solar radiation data from Burns and Eugene Oregon are examined and compared. A source of the discrepancy between the modeled and measured data is identified. Slight modifications to the METSTAT model that significantly reduce the discrepancy are demonstrated for the Burns and Eugene sites.

Vignola, F. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Physics Dept.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Handbook of secondary storage batteries and charge regulators in photovoltaic systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar photovoltaic systems often require battery subsystems to store reserve electrical energy for times of zero insolation. This handbook is designed to help the system designer make optimum choices of battery type, battery size and charge control circuits. Typical battery performance characteristics are summarized for four types of lead-acid batteries: pure lead, lead-calcium and lead-antimony pasted flat plate and lead-antimony tubular positive types. Similar data is also provided for pocket plate nickel cadmium batteries. Economics play a significant role in battery selection. Relative costs of each battery type are summarized under a variety of operating regimes expected for solar PV installations.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The effect of component efficiency and operating conditions on the 50-kW dish Stirling system in Riyadh, Saudia Arabia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper deals with the development of a weather data base and the performance prediction of a 50-kW dish Stirling system. An analysis of direct solar insolation data for 1985 from the site in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia was made to determine the available solar energy. A parameter study was done of the effects of component efficiencies and operating conditions on instantaneous and yearly average system efficiency using the prepared weather data. The system performance was found to be most affected by wind, mirror reflectivity, and exact placement of the receiver in the focal point of the mirror.

Noyes, G.W. (Deutsche Forshungsanstait fur Luft-und Raumfahrt, Inst. fur Technische Thermodynamik, Pfaffenwaldrign 38-40, 7000 Stuttgart 80 (DE))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF PHOTOVOLTAIC CELL WITH AND WITHOUT THERMAL SINK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The following paper presents concisely the operation principles of photovoltaic cells and their main parameters. The efficiency of photovoltaic (PV) cell drop as their operating temperature increases especially under high insolation levels. The aim of the paper is to improve the performance of PV cell by dissipating excess heat, there by maintaining effective temperature of the cell which will enhance performance of the system. The work also deals with the comparing of the performance of PV cell with and without heat sink. During the study an optimum performance temperature was determined and heat sink mechanisms are used to maintain the determined temperature in PV cell.

Rob Res; Pramod N; K S Shashishekar; Pramod N; K S Shashishekar

157

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

International Data Base for the U.S. Renewable Energy Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Data Base for the US Renewable Energy Industry was developed to provide the US renewable energy industry with background data for identifying and analyzing promising foreign market opportunities for their products and services. Specifically, the data base provides the following information for 161 developed and developing countries: (1) General Country Data--consisting of general energy indicators; (2) Energy Demand Data--covering commercial primary energy consumption; (3) Energy Resource Data--identifying annual average insolation, wind power, and river flow data; (4) Power System Data--indicating a wide range of electrical parameters; and (5) Business Data--including currency and credit worthiness data.

none

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Solar Thermal Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Solar cogeneration: Cimarron River station, Central Telephone and Utilities-Western Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The site-specific conceptual design progress is described for a solar central receiver cogeneration facility at a Kansas utility. The process is described which led to the selection of the preferred solar cogeneration facility. The status of the conceptual design is presented. The evaluation of system performance is described. A test program is described that is to determine the magnitude of impact that local environmental factors have on collector system performance and to measure the direct normal insolation at the cogeneration facility site. The system specification is appended. (LEW)

Harder, J.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gef ghi insolation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

An analytical model and performance data for a cylindrical parabolic collector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating solar collectors provide higher fluid temperatures than flat-plate, an important advantage in many applications. The parabolic cylinder is one of the most popular types of concentrating collectors because of its relatively simple construction and tracking configuration. A mathematical model was developed for one such collector in order to predict thermal efficiency as a function of solar insolation. An experiment was then devised in an attempt to verify this model. Discrepancies between predicted and observed values are discussed, and suggestions are made for improving the model and the experimental procedure.

Ford, F.M.; Stewart, W.E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Analytical model and performance data for a cylindrical parabolic collector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating solar collectors provide higher fluid temperatures than flat-plate, an important advantage in many applications. The parabolic cylinder is one of the most popular types of concentrating collectors because of its relatively simple construction and tracking configuration. A mathematical model was developed for one such collector in order to predict thermal efficiency as a function of solar insolation. An experiment was then devised in an attempt to verify this model. Discrepancies between predicted and observed values are discussed, and suggestions are made for improving the model and the experimental procedure.

Ford, F.M.; Stewart, W.E. Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Physical Building Information Modeling for Solar Building Design and Simulation- Annual Report 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 6 Figure 6. Radiance rendering of the wall. c) BIM to BiPV We developed a Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BiPV) prototype in a BIM platform (Autodesk Revit) to calculate solar position and determine the amount of solar insolation from given... as the weather file. ? The room is lifted up from the earth, so the floor slab is not attached to the ground. ? This one room model consists of a roof, a floor, and four walls. ? No windows and doors are installed. ? All building components are made up of a...

Yan, W.; Haberl, J.; Clayton, M.; Jeong, W.; Kim, J.; Kota, S.; Alcocer, J.; Dixit, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Experimental performance evaluation of line-focus sun trackers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two sun trackers have been tested for tracking accuracy on an sun tracker. Both performed well during the entire test period. Their tracking performance as a function of insolation level was established, and their overall tracking accuracy (rms tracking error) was calculated. Both the flux-line and the shadowband tracker were found to have an effective rms error of about 1 milliradian. This information was used to determine the impact that the two trackers have on the annual energy performance of typical parabolic trough concentrating collectors. One milliradian rms tracking errors were found to result in negligibly small annual performance losses.

Gee, R.C.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Photovoltaics Economic Calculator (United States) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: EnergyInformation Insolation Maps

166

Photovoltaics Value Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: EnergyInformation Insolation MapsValue

167

Physical model of a fractured reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: EnergyInformation Insolation MapsValueof a

168

Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: EnergyInformation Insolation MapsValueof

169

Picosun | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: EnergyInformation Insolation

170

Pierre, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: EnergyInformation Insolation(Redirected from

171

Pigeon Creek | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: EnergyInformation Insolation(Redirected

172

Pike Research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: EnergyInformation Insolation(RedirectedPike

173

Los Alamos National Laboratory passive solar program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in passive solar tasks performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for FY-81 is documented. A third volume of the Passive Solar Design Handbook is nearly complete. Twenty-eight configurations of sunspaces were studied using the solar load ratio method of predicting performance; the configuration showing best performance is discussed. The minimum level of insolation needed to generate convective flow in the thermosiphon test rig is noted and measured. Information is also included on test room performance, off-peak auxiliary electric heating for a passive home, free convection experiment, monitored buildings, and technical support to the US Department of Energy.

Neeper, D.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

PASSOLAR: a program library for estimating the annual performance of passive solar buildings with programmable calculators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Passive Solar Design Handbook, Volume 2, by J. Douglas Balcomb et al. describes in detail a method by which the performance of passive solar buildings can be estimated with the help of handheld calculators and a great number of tables and charts. PASSOLAR consists of a number of programs in the form of magnetic cards, which contain this method together with all the charts and tables. This reduces the necessary time to estimate the annual performance of direct gain, Trombe wall or water wall systems from hours to minutes. PASSOLAR allows the use of additional algorithms for the calculating of the insolation on the tilted surface and of shading effects.

Graeff, R.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Estimating solar access of typical residential rooftops: A case study in San Jose, CA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shadows cast by trees and buildings can limit the solar access of rooftop solar-energy systems, including photovoltaic panels and thermal collectors. This study characterizes rooftop shading in a residential neighborhood of San Jose, CA, one of four regions analyzed in a wider study of the solar access of California homes.High-resolution orthophotos and LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) measurements of surface height were used to create a digital elevation model of all trees and buildings in a 4 km2 residential neighborhood. Hourly shading of roofing planes (the flat elements of roofs) was computed geometrically from the digital elevation model. Parcel boundaries were used to determine the extent to which roofing planes were shaded by trees and buildings in neighboring parcels.In the year in which surface heights were measured (2005), shadows from all sources ("total shading") reduced the insolation received by S-, SW-, and W-facing residential roofing planes in the study area by 13 - 16percent. Shadows cast by trees and buildings in neighboring parcels reduced insolation by no more than 2percent. After 30 years of simulated maximal tree growth, annual total shading increased to 19 - 22percent, and annual extraparcel shading increased to 3 - 4percent.

Levinson, Ronnen M.; Gupta, Smita; Akbari, Hashem; Pomerantz, Melvin

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

176

Current performance and potential improvements in solar thermal industrial heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A representive current state-of-the-art system using parabolic trough technology was developed using data from a system recently installed in Tehachapi, California. A simulation model was used to estimate the annual energy output from the system at three different insolation locations. Based on discussions with industry personnel and within NREL, we identified a number of technology improvements that offer the potential for increasing the energy performance and reducing the energy-cost of the baseline system. The technology improvements modeled included an evacuated-tube receiver, an antireflective coating on the receiver tube, an improved absorber material, a cleaner reflecting surface, a reflecting surface that can withstand contact cleaning, and two silver reflectors. The properties associated with the improvements were incorporated into the model simulation at the three insolation locations to determine if there were any performance gains. The results showed that there was a potential for a more am 50% improvement in the annual energy delivered by a 2677 m{sup 2} system incorporating a combination of the enumerated technology improvements. We discuss the commercial and technological status of each design improvement and present performance predictions for the trough-design improvements.

Hale, M.J.; Williams, T.; Barker, G.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Current performance and potential improvements in solar thermal industrial heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A representive current state-of-the-art system using parabolic trough technology was developed using data from a system recently installed in Tehachapi, California. A simulation model was used to estimate the annual energy output from the system at three different insolation locations. Based on discussions with industry personnel and within NREL, we identified a number of technology improvements that offer the potential for increasing the energy performance and reducing the energy-cost of the baseline system. The technology improvements modeled included an evacuated-tube receiver, an antireflective coating on the receiver tube, an improved absorber material, a cleaner reflecting surface, a reflecting surface that can withstand contact cleaning, and two silver reflectors. The properties associated with the improvements were incorporated into the model simulation at the three insolation locations to determine if there were any performance gains. The results showed that there was a potential for a more am 50% improvement in the annual energy delivered by a 2677 m[sup 2] system incorporating a combination of the enumerated technology improvements. We discuss the commercial and technological status of each design improvement and present performance predictions for the trough-design improvements.

Hale, M.J.; Williams, T.; Barker, G.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Case histories of EVA encapsulant discoloration in fielded modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of case histories of EVA-based encapsulant discoloration in fielded modules in the U. S. reveals that the problem is limited to areas of the West and Southwest that have comparatively high solar insolation and ambient temperature. There have been no reported cases of discolored EVA encapsulant from modules fielded in the Northeast, Central U. S., or Western Europe. The absence of hard data regarding module operating temperatures, solar insolation, onset of discoloration, and quantitative information regarding the degree of discoloration has made correlation between various fabrication, placement, and operating conditions and incidence of discoloration difficult it not impossible. However, the degree of discoloration does appear to correlate with increasing average daily direct normal solar radiation and approximate maximum module operating temperature, as estimated from maximum ambient temperatures. It is clear that the discoloration problem is not limited to the modules of any one manufacturer, however, the rate and degree of discoloration do appear to vary from company to company. Also, discoloration is not limited to EVA encapsulant sheet from any one supplier.

Agro, S.; Galica, J.; Holley, W.H.; Yorgensen, R.S. (Springborn Laboratories Inc., Enfield, Connecticut 06082 (United States))

1994-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Data from the National Renewable Energy Library and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The SWERA Programme provides easy access to credible renewable energy data to stimulate investment in, and development of, renewable energy technologies. The Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) started in 2001 to advance the large-scale use of renewable energy technologies by increasing the availability and accessibility of high-quality solar and wind resource information. SWERA began as a pilot project with funding from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and managed by the United Nations Environment Programme's (UNEP) Division of Technology, Industry and Economics (DTIE) in collaboration with more than 25 partners around the world. With the success of the project in 13 pilot countries SWERA expanded in 2006 into a full programme. Its expanded mission is to provide high quality information on renewable energy resources for countries and regions around the world, along with the tools needed to apply these data in ways that facilitate renewable energy policies and investments.[from the SWERA Guide at http://swera.unep.net/index.php?id=sweraguide_chp1] DOE and, in particular, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been a functioning partner from the beginning. NREL was part of the original technical team involved in mapping, database, and GIS activities. Solar, wind, and meteorological data for selected countries can be accessed through a variety of different tools and interfaces.

180

Environmental data for sites in the National Solar Data Network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental information collected at the sites of the National Solar Data Network is presented in the form of tables for each solar site. The sites are grouped into 12 zones, each of which consists of several adjacent states. The insolation table presents the total, diffuse, direct, maximum, and extraterrestrial radiation for the solar site. It also shows the ratio of total to extraterrestrial radiation as a percent. The temperature table gives the average, daytime, nighttime, maximum, minimum and inlet-water temperatures for the solar site. All of the passive and some of the active solar sites are equipped with wind sensors which provide information for two wind tables furnishing wind speed and direction. For some sites, a humidity table provides relative humidity values for day and night. It also gives values for the maximum and minimum humidity for each day. A technical discussion of the instruments and measurements used to obtain these data tables is included. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gef ghi insolation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Solar Radiation Modeling and Measurements for Renewable Energy Applications: Data and Model Quality; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurement and modeling of broadband and spectral terrestrial solar radiation is important for the evaluation and deployment of solar renewable energy systems. We discuss recent developments in the calibration of broadband solar radiometric instrumentation and improving broadband solar radiation measurement accuracy. An improved diffuse sky reference and radiometer calibration and characterization software and for outdoor pyranometer calibrations is outlined. Several broadband solar radiation model approaches, including some developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, for estimating direct beam, total hemispherical and diffuse sky radiation are briefly reviewed. The latter include the Bird clear sky model for global, direct beam, and diffuse terrestrial solar radiation; the Direct Insolation Simulation Code (DISC) for estimating direct beam radiation from global measurements; and the METSTAT (Meteorological and Statistical) and Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) models that estimate solar radiation from meteorological data. We conclude that currently the best model uncertainties are representative of the uncertainty in measured data.

Myers, D. R.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hodges residence: performance of a direct gain passive solar home in Iowa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented for the performance of the Hodges Residence, a 2200-square-foot earth-sheltered direct gain passive solar home in Ames, Iowa, during the 1979-80 heating season, its first occupied season. No night insulation was used on its 500 square feet of double-pane glass. Total auxiliary heat required was 43 GJ (41 MBTU) gross and 26 GJ (25 MBTU) net, amounting, respectively, to 60 and 36 kJ/C/sup 0/-day-m/sup 2/ (2.9 and 1.8 BTU/F/sup 0/-day-ft/sup 2/). The heating season was unusually cloudy and included the cloudiest January in the 21 years of Ames insolation measurements. Results are also presented for the performance of the hollow-core floor which serves as the main storage mass and for the comfort range in the house.

Hodges, L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Test results, Industrial Solar Technology parabolic trough solar collector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories and Industrial Solar Technology are cost-sharing development of advanced parabolic trough technology. As part of this effort, several configurations of an IST solar collector were tested to determine the collector efficiency and thermal losses with black chrome and black nickel receiver selective coatings, combined with aluminized film and silver film reflectors, using standard Pyrex{reg_sign} and anti-reflective coated Pyrex{reg_sign} glass receiver envelopes. The development effort has been successful, producing an advanced collector with 77% optical efficiency, using silver-film reflectors, a black nickel receiver coating, and a solgel anti-reflective glass receiver envelope. For each receiver configuration, performance equations were empirically derived relating collector efficiency and thermal losses to the operating temperature. Finally, equations were derived showing collector performance as a function of input insolation value, incident angle, and operating temperature.

Dudley, V.E. [EG and G MSI, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R.; Matthews, C.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Solar resource: Utility load-matching assessment. Interim subcontract report, 20 September 1991--19 December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed to estimate the load-matching capability of photovoltaics (PV) for a selected group of utilities in the continental United States. The report provides an initial quantitative estimate of this capability for 20 utilities. This characteristic is important because it may indicate that the effective capacity, hence the value, of PV is higher than is traditionally assigned to such non-controllable, non-dispatchable resources. Load-matching capability is determined experimentally by analyzing the interaction between the load requirements of each utility and the output of locally sited PV systems. This type of investigation requires site- and time-specific insolation data that are not commonly available. Here, the needed data were inferred from geostationary satellite remote sensing of the Earth`s cloud cover. A secondary objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of this approach. The results of this investigation are presented in this report.

Perez, R.; Seals, R.; Stewart, R. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Texasgulf solar cogeneration program. Mid-term topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of technical activities of the Texasgulf Solar Cogeneration Program at the Comanche Creek Sulfur Mine is described. The program efforts reported focus on preparation of a system specification, selection of a site-specific configuration, conceptual design, and facility performance. Trade-off studies performed to select the site-specific cogeneration facility configuration that would be the basis for the conceptual design efforts are described. Study areas included solar system size, thermal energy storage, and field piping. The conceptual design status is described for the various subsystems of the Comanche Creek cogeneration facility. The subsystems include the collector, receiver, master control, fossil energy, energy storage, superheat boiler, electric power generation, and process heat subsystems. Computer models for insolation and performance are also briefly discussed. Appended is the system specification. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Progress in passive solar energy systems. Volume 8. Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents the papers given at a conference sponsored by the US DOE, the Solar Energy Research Institute, SolarVision, Inc., and the Southern California Solar Energy Society. The topics considered at the conference included sizing solar energy systems for agricultural applications, a farm scale ethanol production plant, the EEC wind energy RandD program, the passive solar performance assessment of an earth-sheltered house, the ARCO 1 MW photovoltaic power plant, the performance of a dendritic web photovoltaic module, second generation point focused concentrators, linear fresnel lens concentrating photovoltaic collectors, photovoltaic conversion efficiency, amorphous silicon thin film solar cells, a photovoltaic system for a shopping center, photovoltaic power generation for the utility industry, spectral solar radiation, and the analysis of insolation data.

Hayes, J.; Andrejko, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Automated Fresnel lens tester system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An automated data collection system controlled by a desktop computer has been developed for testing Fresnel concentrators (lenses) intended for solar energy applications. The system maps the two-dimensional irradiance pattern (image) formed in a plane parallel to the lens, whereas the lens and detector assembly track the sun. A point detector silicon diode (0.5-mm-dia active area) measures the irradiance at each point of an operator-defined rectilinear grid of data positions. Comparison with a second detector measuring solar insolation levels results in solar concentration ratios over the image plane. Summation of image plane energies allows calculation of lens efficiencies for various solar cell sizes. Various graphical plots of concentration ratio data help to visualize energy distribution patterns.

Phipps, G.S.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A novel power block for CSP systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) and in particular parabolic trough, is a proven large-scale solar power technology. However, CSP cost is not yet competitive with conventional alternatives unless subsidized. Current CSP plants typically include a condensing steam cycle power block which was preferably designed for a continuous operation and higher operating conditions and therefore, limits the overall plant cost effectiveness and deployment. The drawbacks of this power block are as follows: (i) no power generation during low insolation periods (ii) expensive, large condenser (typically water cooled) due to the poor extracted steam properties (high specific volume, sub-atmospheric pressure) and (iii) high installation and operation costs. In the current study, a different power block scheme is proposed to eliminate these obstacles. This power block includes a top Rankine cycle with a back pressure steam turbine and a bottoming Kalina cycle comprising another back pressure turbine and using ammonia-water mixture as a working fluid. The bottoming (moderate temperature) cycle allows power production during low insolation periods. Because of the superior ammonia-water vapor properties, the condensing system requirements are much less demanding and the operation costs are lowered. Accordingly, air cooled condensers can be used with lower economical penalty. Another advantage is that back pressure steam turbines have a less complex design than condensing steam turbines which make their costs lower. All of these improvements could make the combined cycle unit more cost effective. This unit can be applicable in both parabolic trough and central receiver (solar tower) plants. The potential advantage of the new power block is illustrated by a detailed techno-economical analysis of two 50 MW parabolic trough power plants, comparing between the standard and the novel power block. The results indicate that the proposed plant suggests a 4-11% electricity cost saving. (author)

Mittelman, Gur [ASP Ltd., Advanced Solar Power, Industrial Zone, Be'er Tuviyya (Israel); Epstein, Michael [Solar Research Facilities Unit, Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Analysis of Hanford-based Options for Sustainable DOE Facilities on the West Coast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale conventional energy projects result in lower costs of energy (COE). This is true for most renewable energy projects as well. The Office of Science is interested in its facilities meeting the renewable energy mandates set by Congress and the Administration. Those facilities on the west coast include a cluster in the Bay Area of California and at Hanford in central Washington State. Land constraints at the California facilities do not permit large scale projects. The Hanford Reservation has land and solar insolation available for a large scale solar project as well as access to a regional transmission system that can provide power to facilities in California. The premise of this study is that a large-scale solar project at Hanford may be able to provide renewable energy sufficient to meet the needs of select Office of Science facilities on the west coast at a COE that is competitive with costs in California despite the lower solar insolation values at Hanford. The study concludes that although the cost of solar projects continues to decline, estimated costs for a large-scale project at Hanford are still not competitive with avoided power costs for Office of Science facilities on the west coast. Further, although it is possible to transmit power from a solar project at Hanford to California facilities, the costs of doing so add additional costs. Consequently, development of a large- scale solar project at Hanford to meet the renewable goals of Office of Science facilities on the west coast is currently uneconomic. This may change as solar costs decrease and California-based facilities face increasing costs for conventional and renewable energy produced in the state. PNNL should monitor those cost trends.

Warwick, William M.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359681.975000 m Bottom: 4447251.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4441550.552290 m Left: 271445.053363 m Right: 359825.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144691.792023 m Left: 285531.662851 m Right: 348694.182686 m Bottom: 4097005.210304 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolored County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

DOPPLER SIGNATURES OF THE ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION ON HOT JUPITERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The meteorology of hot Jupiters has been characterized primarily with thermal measurements, but recent observations suggest the possibility of directly detecting the winds by observing the Doppler shift of spectral lines seen during transit. Motivated by these observations, we show how Doppler measurements can place powerful constraints on the meteorology. We show that the atmospheric circulation-and Doppler signature-of hot Jupiters splits into two regimes. Under weak stellar insolation, the day-night thermal forcing generates fast zonal jet streams from the interaction of atmospheric waves with the mean flow. In this regime, air along the terminator (as seen during transit) flows toward Earth in some regions and away from Earth in others, leading to a Doppler signature exhibiting superposed blueshifted and redshifted components. Under intense stellar insolation, however, the strong thermal forcing damps these planetary-scale waves, inhibiting their ability to generate jets. Strong frictional drag likewise damps these waves and inhibits jet formation. As a result, this second regime exhibits a circulation dominated by high-altitude, day-to-night airflow, leading to a predominantly blueshifted Doppler signature during transit. We present state-of-the-art circulation models including non-gray radiative transfer to quantify this regime shift and the resulting Doppler signatures; these models suggest that cool planets like GJ 436b lie in the first regime, HD 189733b is transitional, while planets hotter than HD 209458b lie in the second regime. Moreover, we show how the amplitude of the Doppler shifts constrains the strength of frictional drag in the upper atmospheres of hot Jupiters. If due to winds, the {approx}2 km s{sup -1} blueshift inferred on HD 209458b may require drag time constants as short as 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} s, possibly the result of Lorentz-force braking on this planet's hot dayside.

Showman, Adam P.; Lewis, Nikole K. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, 1629 University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)] [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, 1629 University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Shabram, Megan, E-mail: showman@lpl.arizona.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gef ghi insolation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 2. Conceptual design, Sections 5 and 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains the detailed conceptual design and cost/performance estimates and an assessment of the commercial scale solar central receiver hybrid power system. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Metallic phase-change materials for solar dynamic energy storage systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar (thermal) dynamic power systems for satellites require a heat storage system that is capable of operating the engine during eclipse. The conventional approach to this thermal storage problem is to use the latent heat of fluoride salts, which would melt during insolation and freeze during eclipse. Although candidate fluorides have large heats of fusion per unit mass, their poor thermal conductivity limits the rate at which energy can be transferred to and from the storage device. System performance is further limited by the high parasitic mass of the superalloy canisters needed to contain the salt. This report describes a new thermal storage system in which the phase-change material (PCM) is a metal (typically germanium) contained in modular graphite canisters. These modules exhibit good thermal conductivity and low parasitic mass, and they are physically and chemically stable. Prototype modules have survived over 600 melt/freeze cycles without degradation. Advanced concepts to further improve performance are described. These concepts include the selection of ternary eutectic alloys to provide a wider range of useful melting temperatures and the use of infiltration to control the location of liquid alloy and to compensate for differences in thermal expansion. 13 refs., 18 figs.

Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Solar feasibility study for site-specific industrial-process-heat applications. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study addresses the technical feasibility of solar energy in industrial process heat (IPH) applications in Mid-America. The study was one of two contracted efforts covering the MASEC 12-state region comprised of: Illinois, Michigan, North Dakota, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, Iowa, Missouri, South Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska, Wisconsin. The results of our study are encouraging to the potential future role of solar energy in supplying process heat to a varied range of industries and applications. We identified and developed Case Study documentation of twenty feasible solar IPH applications covering eight major SIC groups within the Mid-American region. The geographical distribution of these applications for the existing range of solar insolation levels are shown and the characteristics of the applications are summarized. The results of the study include process identification, analysis of process heat requirements, selection of preliminary solar system characteristics, and estimation of system performance and cost. These are included in each of the 20 Case Studies. The body of the report is divided into two primary discussion sections dealing with the Study Methodology employed in the effort and the Follow-On Potential of the identified applications with regard to possible demonstration projects. The 20 applications are rated with respect to their relative overall viability and procedures are discussed for possible demonstration project embarkment. Also, a possible extension of this present feasibility study for late-comer industrial firms expressing interest appears worthy of consideration.

Murray, O.L.

1980-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

206

Effects of sulfate aerosol on the central Pennsylvania surface shortwave radiation budget. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface radiation measurements are taken simultaneously with measurements of meteorological variables including temperature, pressure, relative humidity, and visibility to evaluate the impact of sulfate haze on the surface radiation budget. A relationship is sought between flux losses due only to aerosol and relative humidity, visibility or both, with the goal of facilitating parameterization of sulfate hazes by climate modelers. At the same time, a rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) is compared with a more costly sun photometer to determine the feasibility of substituting the former for the latter in future research. It is found that depletion of surface radiation due to aerosol is typically ten to twenty percent of initial insolation, and that the losses can be correlated with zenith angle, relative humidity and optical depth. In the case of flux loss as a function of optical depth, the two are related in a nearly linear fashion. It is also discovered that the RSR has a predictable error owing to a wider field of view than the sun photometer, and can be used as a replacement for the former by correcting for the error.

Guimond, P.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Photovoltaic solar system connected to the electric power grid operating as active power generator and reactive power compensator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the case of photovoltaic (PV) systems acting as distributed generation (DG) systems, the DC energy that is produced is fed to the grid through the power-conditioning unit (inverter). The majority of contemporary inverters used in DG systems are current source inverters (CSI) operating at unity power factor. If, however, we assume that voltage source inverters (VSI) can replace CSIs, we can generate reactive power proportionally to the remaining unused capacity at any given time. According to the theory of instantaneous power, the inverter reactive power can be regulated by changing the amplitude of its output voltage. In addition, the inverter active power can be adjusted by modifying the phase angle of its output voltage. Based on such theory, both the active power supply and the reactive power compensation (RPC) can be carried out simultaneously. When the insolation is weak or the PV modules are inoperative at night, the RPC feature of a PV system can still be used to improve the inverter utilisation factor. Some MATLAB simulation results are included here to show the feasibility of the method. (author)

Albuquerque, Fabio L.; Moraes, Adelio J.; Guimaraes, Geraldo C.; Sanhueza, Sergio M.R.; Vaz, Alexandre R. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Uberlandia-MG, CEP 38400-902 (Brazil)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Opportunities and Challenges for Solar Minigrid Development in Rural India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this report is to inform investors about the potential of solar minigrid technologies to serve India's rural market. Under the US-India Energy Dialogue, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is supporting the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE)'s Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission (JNNSM) in performing a business-case and policy-oriented analysis on the deployment of solar minigrids in India. The JNNSM scheme targets the development of 2GW of off-grid solar power by 2022 and provides large subsidies to meet this target. NREL worked with electricity capacity and demand data supplied by the Ladakh Renewable Energy Development Agency (LREDA) from Leh District, to develop a technical approach for solar minigrid development. Based on the NREL-developed, simulated solar insolation data for the city of Leh, a 250-kW solar photovoltaic (PV) system can produce 427,737 kWh over a 12-month period. The business case analysis, based on several different scenarios and JNNSM incentives shows the cost of power ranges from Rs. 6.3/kWh (US$0.126) to Rs. 9/kWh (US$0.18). At these rates, solar power is a cheaper alternative to diesel. An assessment of the macro-environment elements--including political, economic, environmental, social, and technological--was also performed to identify factors that may impact India?s energy development initiatives.

Thirumurthy, N.; Harrington, L.; Martin, D.; Thomas, L.; Takpa, J.; Gergan, R.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Remote Area Power Supply (RAPS) load and resource profiles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997, an international team interested in the development of Remote Area Power Supply (RAPS) systems for rural electrification projects around the world was organized by the International Lead Zinc Research Organization (ILZRO) with the support of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The team focused on defining load and resource profiles for RAPS systems. They identified single family homes, small communities, and villages as candidates for RAPS applications, and defined several different size/power requirements for each. Based on renewable energy and resource data, the team devised a ''strawman'' series of load profiles. A RAPS system typically consists of a renewable and/or conventional generator, power conversion equipment, and a battery. The purpose of this report is to present data and information on insolation levels and load requirements for ''typical'' homes, small communities, and larger villages around the world in order to facilitate the development of robust design practices for RAPS systems, and especially for the storage battery component. These systems could have significant impact on areas of the world that would otherwise not be served by conventional electrical grids.

Giles, Lauren (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC); Skolnik, Edward G. (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC); Marchionini, Brian (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC); Fall, Ndeye K. (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Regional Per Capita Solar Electric Footprint for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we quantify the state-by-state per-capita 'solar electric footprint' for the United States. We use state-level data on population, electricity consumption, economic activity and solar insolation, along with solar photovoltaic (PV) array packing density data to develop a range of estimates of the solar electric footprint. We find that the solar electric footprint, defined as the land area required to supply all end-use electricity from solar photovoltaics, is about 181 m2 per person in the United States. Two key factors that influence the magnitude of the state-level solar electric footprint include how industrial energy is allocated (based on location of use vs. where goods are consumed) and the assumed distribution of PV configurations (flat rooftop vs. fixed tilt vs. tracking). The solar electric footprint is about 0.6% of the total land area of the United States with state-level estimates ranging from less than 0.1% for Wyoming to about 9% for New Jersey. We also compare the solar electric footprint to a number of other land uses. For example, we find that the solar electric footprint is equal to less than 2% of the land dedicated to cropland and grazing in the United States.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Impacts of Array Configuration on Land Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m{sup 2}. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m{sup 2} when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Yearly average performance of the principal solar collector types  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of hour-by-hour simulations for 26 meteorological stations are used to derive universal correlations for the yearly total energy that can be delivered by the principal solar collector types: flat plate, evacuated tubes, CPC, single- and dual-axis tracking collectors, and central receiver. The correlations are first- and second-order polynomials in yearly average insolation, latitude, and threshold (= heat loss/optical efficiency). With these correlations, the yearly collectible energy can be found by multiplying the coordinates of a single graph by the collector parameters, which reproduces the results of hour-by-hour simulations with an accuracy (rms error) of 2% for flat plates and 2% to 4% for concentrators. This method can be applied to collectors that operate year-around in such a way that no collected energy is discarded, including photovoltaic systems, solar-augmented industrial process heat systems, and solar thermal power systems. The method is also recommended for rating collectors of different type or manufacturer by yearly average performance, evaluating the effects of collector degradation, the benefits of collector cleaning, and the gains from collector improvements (due to enhanced optical efficiency or decreased heat loss per absorber surface). For most of these applications, the method is accurate enough to replace a system simulation.

Rabl, A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

GLIESE 581D IS THE FIRST DISCOVERED TERRESTRIAL-MASS EXOPLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been suggested that the recently discovered exoplanet GJ581d might be able to support liquid water due to its relatively low mass and orbital distance. However, GJ581d receives 35% less stellar energy than Mars and is probably locked in tidal resonance, with extremely low insolation at the poles and possibly a permanent night side. Under such conditions, it is unknown whether any habitable climate on the planet would be able to withstand global glaciation and/or atmospheric collapse. Here we present three-dimensional climate simulations which demonstrate that GJ581d will have a stable atmosphere and surface liquid water for a wide range of plausible cases, making it the first confirmed super-Earth (exoplanet of 2-10 Earth masses) in the habitable zone. We find that atmospheres with over 10 bar CO{sub 2} and varying amounts of background gas (e.g., N{sub 2}) yield global mean temperatures above 0{sup 0}C for both land and ocean-covered surfaces. Based on the emitted IR radiation calculated by the model, we propose observational tests that will allow these cases to be distinguished from other possible scenarios in the future.

Wordsworth, Robin D.; Forget, Francois; Millour, Ehouarn; Charnay, Benjamin; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste [Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Paris (France); Selsis, Franck [CNRS, UMR 5804, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Bordeaux, 2 rue de l'Observatoire, BP 89, F-33271 Floirac Cedex (France)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Development of an efficient family size solar dryer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the air heater is the most important component in a solar food drying system, improving its performance is desirable, especially when the space available for the dryer is limited and its cost is to be kept as low as possible. The solar system considered is the forced convection type, in which air is driven inside the heater by using a small suction fan of low power consumption. In this work, two configurations of air heaters were tested to increase heat gain without much increase in size or cost. This could be achieved by elongating the air path through the collector or by using two glass covers, between which the air is allowed to flow before it enters the heater. For both configurations, an inexpensive reflecting surface is used to increase heat input. Experimental results show an average increase of daily energy input of 40% and 57% for the first and second heater, respectively. This, in turn, increases the thermal efficiency of both heaters. Although the second type is more efficient than the first, it is accompanied by an increase in power consumption. Tests show that for ratios of temperature rise/insolation up to 0.03, the first type is better from the thermal and economical points of view. However, as this ratio increases, the second type becomes more efficient and economical.

Khattab, N.M. [National Research Center, Cairo (Egypt). Solar Energy Dept.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Spearfish High School, Sparfish, South Dakota solar energy system performance evaluation, September 1980-June 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spearfish High School in South Dakota contains 43,000 square feet of conditioned space. Its active solar energy system is designed to supply 57% of the space heating and 50% of the hot water demand. The system is equipped with 8034 square feet of flat plate collectors, 4017 cubic feet of rock bin sensible heat storage, and auxiliary equipment including 8 heat pumps, 6 of which are solar supplied and instrumented, air conditioning units, and natural-gas-fired boilers. Performance data are given for the system including the solar fraction, solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor and solar system coefficient of performance. Insolation, solar energy utilization and operation data are also given. The performance of the collector, storage, domestic hot water and space heating subsystems, the operating energy, energy savings, and weather conditions are also evaluated. Appended are a system description, performance evaluation techniques and equations, site history, long-term weather data, sensor technology, and typical monthly data. (LEW)

Howard, B.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume I. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. A summary of results of Phase I is given in this volume. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

U.S. Solar Resource Maps and Tools from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Solar maps provide monthly average daily total solar resource information on grid cells. The insolation values represent the resource available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south at an angle from horizontal to equal to the latitude of the collector location. [Copied from http://www.nrel.gov/gis/solar.html] Several types of solar maps are made available. The U.S. Solar resource maps show the resource potential for energy from photovoltaics and from concentrating solar power (CSP). Both sets of maps are available in low or high resolution. A dynamic map based on version 2 of PVWATTS calculates electrical energy performance estimates for a grid-connected photovoltaic system. The map of U.S. Solar Measurement Station Locations is also dynamic, showing the spatial distribution of measurement stations across the U.S. that are monitored by programs and agencies such as DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program or NREL's Cooperative Network for Renewable Resource Measurements (CONFRRM). Clicking on a station location will take the user to the website of that station. Finally, static map images providing solar resource information averaged by month are also available.

218

Optical Albedo Theory of Strongly-Irradiated Giant Planets: The Case of HD 209458b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate a new suite of albedo models for close-in extrasolar giant planets and compare with the recent stringent upper limit for HD 209458b of Rowe et al. using MOST. We find that all models without scattering clouds are consistent with this optical limit. We explore the dependence on wavelength and waveband, metallicity, the degree of heat redistribution, and the possible presence of thermal inversions and find a rich diversity of behaviors. Measurements of transiting extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) at short wavelengths by MOST, Kepler, and CoRoT, as well as by proposed dedicated multi-band missions, can complement measurements in the near- and mid-IR using {\\it Spitzer} and JWST. Collectively, such measurements can help determine metallicity, compositions, atmospheric temperatures, and the cause of thermal inversions (when they arise) for EGPs with a broad range of radii, masses, degrees of stellar insolation, and ages. With this paper, we reappraise and highlight the diagnostic potential of albedo measurements of hot EGPs shortward of $\\sim$1.3 $\\mu$m.

A. Burrows; L. Ibgui; I. Hubeny

2008-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Large climate-moderating envelopes for enclosed structures: a preliminary evaluation of energy conservation potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation was made of the basic impacts of putting a large secondary enclosure around a number of functions and thereby creating a Large Climate Moderating Envelope (LCME). This study is a preliminary estimate of the energy conservation benefits of an LCME. A hypothetical LMCE design was chosen and a coupled fluid dynamic and energy transport analysis was performed to estimate the energy conservation potential of this design. The heat transfer models included insolation, outside air temperature and wind, thermal radiation exchange with the sky, and between the fabric and ground and thermal storage in the earth mass beneath the LCME. The energy transported within the fluid by the buoyancy driven circulation was modeled as an incompressible fluid utilizing the Boussinesq approximation. The climatic conditions were assumed to vary in smooth repeating daily cycles. The numerical simulation of climatic variation was continued until the results within the LCME achieved a repeating daily cycle. The results for selected seasonally characteristic days were utilized to estimate the annual energy consumption of structures within an LCME relative to similar structures exposed to the exterior environment. The relative annual energy savings for summer-dominated climates was estimated to be approx. 70%. The energy savings for a winter-dominated climate LCME were estimated to be somewhat smaller but the LCME concept could offer significant benefits for agricultural applications for this type of climate.

Wendt, R.L.; Giles, G.E.; Park, J.E.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

EC/MS 573 Solar Energy Systems (This course is jointly offered as MS 573 Course)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Course Description: This course is designed for first year graduate and senior undergraduate students from engineering disciplines and is intended to educate students in the design and applications of solar energy engineering. It will focus on fundamentals of solar energy conversion, photovoltaic and photothermal engineering, optical systems, photoelectrochemical cells for hydrogen generation, and energy storage and distribution systems. The course covers solar energy insolation and global energy needs, current trends in solar plants, thin film solar cells, and solar cell material science. Design and installation of solar panels for residential and industrial applications and connections to the national grid and cost analysis will be discussed. In addition, basic manufacturing processes for the production of solar panels, environmental impacts, and the related system engineering aspects will be included to provide a comprehensive state-of-the art approach to solar energy utilization. Course Goals: 1. Learn the fundamentals of solar energy conversion systems, available solar energy and the local and national needs, photovoltaic and photothermal engineering applications, emerging technologies,

unknown authors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gef ghi insolation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

25 kWe solar thermal stirling hydraulic engine system: Final conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the conceptual design and analysis of a solar thermal free-piston Stirling hydraulic engine system designed to deliver 25 kWe when coupled to the 11-meter Test Bed Concentrator at Sandia National Laboratories. A manufacturing cost assessment for 10,000 units per year was made by Pioneer Engineering and Manufacturing. The design meets all program objectives including a 60,000-hr design life, dynamic balancing, fully automated control, >33.3% overall system efficiency, properly conditioned power, maximum utilization of annualized insolation, and projected production costs of $300/kW. The system incorporates a simple, rugged, reliable pool boiler reflux heat pipe to transfer heat from the solar receiver to the Stirling engine. The free-piston engine produces high-pressure hydraulic flow which powers a commercial hydraulic motor that, in turn, drives a commercial rotary induction generator. The Stirling hydraulic engine uses hermetic bellows seals to separate helium working gas from hydraulic fluid which provides hydrodynamic lubrication to all moving parts. Maximum utilization of highly refined, field proven commercial components for electric power generation minimizes development cost and risk. The engine design is based on a highly refined Stirling hydraulic engine developed over 20 years as a fully implantable artificial heart power source. 4 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Discovery of a Transiting Planet Near the Snow-Line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In most theories of planet formation, the snow-line represents a boundary between the emergence of the interior rocky planets and the exterior ice giants. The wide separation of the snow-line makes the discovery of transiting worlds challenging, yet transits would allow for detailed subsequent characterization. We present the discovery of Kepler-421b, a Uranus-sized exoplanet transiting a G9/K0 dwarf once every 704.2 days in a near-circular orbit. Using public Kepler photometry, we demonstrate that the two observed transits can be uniquely attributed to the 704.2 day period. Detailed light curve analysis with BLENDER validates the planetary nature of Kepler-421b to >4 sigmas confidence. Kepler-421b receives the same insolation as a body at ~2AU in the Solar System and for a Uranian albedo would have an effective temperature of ~180K. Using a time-dependent model for the protoplanetary disk, we estimate that Kepler-421b's present semi-major axis was beyond the snow-line after ~3Myr, indicating that Kepler-421b...

Kipping, David M; Buchhave, Lars A; Kenyon, Scott J; Henze, Christopher E; Isaacson, Howard; Kolbl, Rea; Marcy, Geoff W; Bryson, Stephen T; Stassun, Keivan G; Bastien, Fabienne A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Design and experimental testing of the performance of an outdoor LiBr/H{sub 2}O solar thermal absorption cooling system with a cold store  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A domestic-scale prototype experimental solar cooling system has been developed based on a LiBr/H{sub 2}O absorption system and tested during the 2007 summer and autumn months in Cardiff University, UK. The system consisted of a 12 m{sup 2} vacuum tube solar collector, a 4.5 kW LiBr/H{sub 2}O absorption chiller, a 1000 l cold storage tank and a 6 kW fan coil. The system performance, as well as the performances of the individual components in the system, were evaluated based on the physical measurements of the daily solar radiation, ambient temperature, inlet and outlet fluid temperatures, mass flow rates and electrical consumption by component. The average coefficient of thermal performance (COP) of the system was 0.58, based on the thermal cooling power output per unit of available thermal solar energy from the 12 m{sup 2} Thermomax DF100 vacuum tube collector on a hot sunny day with average peak insolation of 800 W/m{sup 2} (between 11 and 13.30 h) and ambient temperature of 24 C. The system produced an electrical COP of 3.6. Experimental results prove the feasibility of the new concept of cold store at this scale, with chilled water temperatures as low as 7.4 C, demonstrating its potential use in cooling domestic scale buildings. (author)

Agyenim, Francis; Knight, Ian; Rhodes, Michael [The Welsh School of Architecture, Bute Building, King Edward VII Avenue, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF10 3NB Wales (United Kingdom)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Orbital Resonance and Solar Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of planetary moves, encoded in DE406 ephemerides. We show resonance cycles between most planets in Solar System, of differing quality. The most precise resonance - between Earth and Venus, which not only stabilizes orbits of both planets, locks planet Venus rotation in tidal locking, but also affects the Sun: This resonance group (E+V) also influences Sunspot cycles - the position of syzygy between Earth and Venus, when the barycenter of the resonance group most closely approaches the Sun and stops for some time, relative to Jupiter planet, well matches the Sunspot cycle of 11 years, not only for the last 400 years of measured Sunspot cycles, but also in 1000 years of historical record of "severe winters". We show, how cycles in angular momentum of Earth and Venus planets match with the Sunspot cycle and how the main cycle in angular momentum of the whole Solar system (854-year cycle of Jupiter/Saturn) matches with climatologic data, assumed to show connection with Solar output power and insolation. We show the possible connections between E+V events and Solar global p-Mode frequency changes. We futher show angular momentum tables and charts for individual planets, as encoded in DE405 and DE406 ephemerides. We show, that inner planets orbit on heliocentric trajectories whereas outer planets orbit on barycentric trajectories.

P. A. Semi

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

225

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Impacts of Array Configuration on Land-Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m2. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m2 when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A Side of Mercury Not Seen By Mariner 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

More than 60,000 images of Mercury were taken at ~29 deg elevation during two sunrises, at 820 nm, and through a 1.35 m diameter off-axis aperture on the SOAR telescope. The sharpest resolve 0.2" (140 km) and cover 190-300 deg longitude -- a swath unseen by the Mariner 10 spacecraft -- at complementary phase angles to previous ground-based optical imagery. Our view is comparable to that of the Moon through weak binoculars. Evident are the large crater Mozart shadowed on the terminator, fresh rayed craters, and other albedo features keyed to topography and radar reflectivity, including the putative huge ``Basin S'' on the limb. Classical bright feature Liguria resolves across the northwest boundary of the Caloris basin into a bright splotch centered on a sharp, 20 km diameter radar crater, and is the brightest feature within a prominent darker ``cap'' (Hermean feature Solitudo Phoenicis) that covers the northern hemisphere between longitudes 140-250 deg. The cap may result from space weathering that darkens via a magnetically enhanced flux of the solar wind, or that reddens low latitudes via high solar insolation.

Gerald Cecil; Dmitry Rashkeev

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

228

Final report on "Modeling Diurnal Variations of California Land Biosphere CO2 Fluxes"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Mediterranean climates, the season of water availability (winter) is out of phase with the season of light availability and atmospheric demand for moisture (summer). Multi-year half-hourly observations of sap flow velocities in 26 evergreen trees in a small watershed in Northern California show that different species of evergreen trees have different seasonalities of transpiration: Douglas-firs respond immediately to the first winter rain, while Pacific madrones have peak transpiration in the dry summer. Using these observations, we have derived species-specific parameterization of normalized sap flow velocities in terms of insolation, vapor pressure deficit and near-surface soil moisture. A simple 1-D boundary layer model showed that afternoon temperatures may be higher by 1 degree Celsius in an area with Douglas-firs than with Pacific madrones. The results point to the need to develop a new representation of subsurface moisture, in particular pools beneath the organic soil mantle and the vadose zone. Our ongoing and future work includes coupling our new parameterization of transpiration with new representation of sub-surface moisture in saprolite and weathered bedrock. The results will be implemented in a regional climate model to explore vegetation-climate feedbacks, especially in the dry season.

Fung, Inez

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

229

Thermal control system and method for a passive solar storage wall  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a system and method for controlling the storing and elease of thermal energy from a thermal storage wall wherein said wall is capable of storing thermal energy from insolation of solar radiation. The system and method includes a device such as a plurality of louvers spaced a predetermined distance from the thermal wall for regulating the release of thermal energy from the thermal wall. This regulating device is made from a material which is substantially transparent to the incoming solar radiation so that when it is in any operative position, the thermal storage wall substantially receives all of the impacting solar radiation. The material in the regulating device is further capable of being substantially opaque to thermal energy so that when the device is substantially closed, thermal release of energy from the storage wall is substantially minimized. An adjustment device is interconnected with the regulating mechanism for selectively opening and closing it in order to regulate the release of thermal energy from the wall.

Ortega, Joseph K. E. (Westminister, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Experimental study of a fiber absorber-suppressor modified Trombe wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study has been conducted to ascertain the effects of introducing fiber bed absorbers on Trombe wall passive solar collectors. Two identical, Trombe wall passive solar units were constructed that incorporate the basic components of masonry collector-storage walls: glazings, masonry and thermal insulation. Both units were extensively instrumented with thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and insolation are also measured. In the first part of the study the two Trombe wall units were tested with a single glass cover. The thermal performance of both units was found to be virtually identical. In the second part of the study a single cover Trombe wall unit was compared with a double cover unit and the latter was found to have higher air gap and masonry wall temperatures and heat fluxes. In the final phase of the experiment, an absorbing, scattering and emitting fiberglass-like material was placed in the air gap of the single gazed wall. Tests were conducted to compare the solar-thermal performance, heat loss and gain characteristics between the units with and without the fiber absorber-suppressor. This experiment showed that the fiber bed served to decouple the wall at night from its exterior environment and to reduce the heat losses. The modified Trombe wall with the fiber absorber-suppressor out-performed the double glazed Trombe wall system by approximately ten percent gain in useable thermal energy. Also, the fiber bed eliminates one glazing thereby reducing system cost as well.

Choudhury, D; Birkebak, R C

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 1. Conceptual design, Sections 1 through 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume presents in detail the market analysis, parametric analysis, and the selection process for the preferred system. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Review of the WECC EDT phase 2 EIM benefits analysis and results report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A region-wide Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) was recently proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In order for the Western Area Power Administration (Western) to make more informed decisions regarding its involvement in the EIM, Western asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to review the EIM benefits study (the October 2011 revision) performed by Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc. (E3). Key components of the E3 analysis made use of results from a study conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); therefore, we also reviewed the NREL work. This report examines E3 and NREL methods and models used in the EIM study. Estimating EIM benefits is very challenging because of the complex nature of the Western Interconnection (WI), the variability and uncertainty of renewable energy resources, and the complex decisions and potentially strategic bidding of market participants. Furthermore, methodologies used for some of the more challenging aspects of the EIM have not yet matured. This review is complimentary of several components of the EIM study. Analysts and modelers clearly took great care when conducting detailed simulations of the WI using well-established industry tools under stringent time and budget constraints. However, it is our opinion that the following aspects of the study and the interpretation of model results could be improved upon in future analyses. The hurdle rate methodology used to estimate current market inefficiencies does not directly model the underlying causes of sub-optimal dispatch and power flows. It assumes that differences between historical flows and modeled flows can be attributed solely to market inefficiencies. However, flow differences between model results and historical data can be attributed to numerous simplifying assumptions used in the model and in the input data. We suggest that alternative approaches be explored in order to better estimate the benefits of introducing market structures like the EIM. In addition to more efficient energy transactions in the WI, the EIM would reduce the amount of flexibility reserves needed to accommodate forecast errors associated with variable production from wind and solar energy resources. The modeling approach takes full advantage of variable resource diversity over the entire market footprint, but the projected reduction in flexibility reserves may be overly optimistic. While some reduction would undoubtedly occur, the EIM is only an energy market and would therefore not realize the same reduction in reserves as an ancillary services market. In our opinion the methodology does not adequately capture the impact of transmission constraints on the deployment of flexibility reserves. Estimates of flexibility reserves assume that forecast errors follow a normal distribution. Improved estimates could be obtained by using other probability distributions to estimate up and down reserves to capture the underlying uncertainty of these resources under specific operating conditions. Also, the use of a persistence forecast method for solar is questionable, because solar insolation follows a deterministic pattern dictated by the sun's path through the sky. We suggest a more rigorous method for forecasting solar insolation using the sun's relatively predictable daily pattern at specific locations. The EIM study considered only one scenario for hydropower resources. While this scenario is within the normal range over the WI footprint, it represents a severe drought condition in the Colorado River Basin from which Western schedules power. Given hydropower's prominent role in the WI, we recommend simulating a range of hydropower conditions since the relationship between water availability and WI dispatch costs is nonlinear. Also, the representation of specific operational constraints faced by hydropower operators in the WI needs improvements. The model used in the study cannot fully capture all of the EIM impacts and complexities of power system operations. In particular, a primary benefit of the EIM is a shorter dispa

Veselka, T.D.; Poch, L.A.; Botterud, A. (Decision and Information Sciences)

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

233

THE EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION ON HOT JOVIAN ATMOSPHERES: HEAT REDISTRIBUTION AND ENERGY DISSIPATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hot Jupiters, due to the proximity to their parent stars, are subjected to a strong irradiating flux that governs their radiative and dynamical properties. We compute a suite of three-dimensional circulation models with dual-band radiative transfer, exploring a relevant range of irradiation temperatures, both with and without temperature inversions. We find that, for irradiation temperatures T{sub irr} {approx}< 2000 K, heat redistribution is very efficient, producing comparable dayside and nightside fluxes. For T{sub irr} Almost-Equal-To 2200-2400 K, the redistribution starts to break down, resulting in a high day-night flux contrast. Our simulations indicate that the efficiency of redistribution is primarily governed by the ratio of advective to radiative timescales. Models with temperature inversions display a higher day-night contrast due to the deposition of starlight at higher altitudes, but we find this opacity-driven effect to be secondary compared to the effects of irradiation. The hotspot offset from the substellar point is large when insolation is weak and redistribution is efficient, and decreases as redistribution breaks down. The atmospheric flow can be potentially subjected to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (as indicated by the Richardson number) only in the uppermost layers, with a depth that penetrates down to pressures of a few millibars at most. Shocks penetrate deeper, down to several bars in the hottest model. Ohmic dissipation generally occurs down to deeper levels than shock dissipation (to tens of bars), but the penetration depth varies with the atmospheric opacity. The total dissipated Ohmic power increases steeply with the strength of the irradiating flux and the dissipation depth recedes into the atmosphere, favoring radius inflation in the most irradiated objects. A survey of the existing data, as well as the inferences made from them, reveals that our results are broadly consistent with the observational trends.

Perna, Rosalba [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Heng, Kevin [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Astronomy, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Pont, Frederic [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

Variability of Power from Large-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Scenarios in the State of Gujarat: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

Parsons, B.; Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Variability of Photovoltaic Power in the State of Gujarat Using High Resolution Solar Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Weekley, A.; Lopez, A.; Zhang, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Parsons, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Solar access of residential rooftops in four California cities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shadows cast by trees and buildings can limit the solar access of rooftop solar-energy systems, including photovoltaic panels and thermal collectors. This study characterizes residential rooftop shading in Sacramento, San Jose, Los Angeles and San Diego, CA. Our analysis can be used to better estimate power production and/or thermal collection by rooftop solar-energy equipment. It can also be considered when designing programs to plant shade trees. High-resolution orthophotos and LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) measurements of surface height were used to create a digital elevation model of all trees and buildings in a well-treed 2.5-4 km{sup 2} residential neighborhood. On-hour shading of roofing planes (the flat elements of roofs) was computed geometrically from the digital elevation model. Values in future years were determined by repeating these calculations after simulating tree growth. Parcel boundaries were used to determine the extent to which roofing planes were shaded by trees and buildings in neighboring parcels. For the subset of S+SW+W-facing planes on which solar equipment is commonly installed for maximum solar access, absolute light loss in spring, summer and fall peaked about two to four hours after sunrise and about two to four hours before sunset. The fraction of annual insolation lost to shading increased from 0.07-0.08 in the year of surface-height measurement to 0.11-0.14 after 30 years of tree growth. Only about 10% of this loss results from shading by trees and buildings in neighboring parcels.

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Pomerantz, Melvin

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

237

Test and Post-Test Analysis of a Thermacore, Inc. Nickel Powder Wick Heat Pipe Solar Reciever  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a cradle-to-grave fabrication and postmortem analysis of a sodium-filled heat pipe solar receiver. The Stirling Thermal Motors Gen. H engine was tested with the Thermacore, Inc. heat pipe receiver on Sandia's Test Bed Concentrator II in the fall of 1996. Although engine performance was significantly increased relative to a direct insolation version of the receiver, hot spots did develop on the heat pipe receiver dome. Over the course of a couple of weeks, after tests were completed, the sodium was distilled out of this receiver, and the front dome was removed. Several failure spots and/or cracks (dubbed volcanoes ) were present on the surface of the wick. Postmortem analysis indicates that the cracks in the wick of the heat pipe are not a product of corrosive oxide action. Voids formed within the wick (created either by mechanical or thermal means) serve to concentrate phosphorous from the electroless plating into the liquid sodium. The presence of phosphorous has an apparently harmful effect on the wick. Examination of a virgin piece of the nickel wick material treated in the same manner as the bulk, prior to the introduction of sodium, would be the best baseline sample for comparison. This sample could be analyzed for phosphorous migration into the wick and determine if there is any initial crack formation from the sintering process. Utiortunately a sample of this material was not available during the preparation of this report. Continued work to determine the mechanism of crack formation could significantly increase the hours of available lifetime testing for future solar thermal heat pipe receivers

Adkins, Douglas R.; Andraka, Charles E.; Diver, Jr., Richard B.; Echelmeyer, Kenneth H.; Moreno, James B.; Moss, Timothy A.; Rawlinson, K. Scott; Showalter, Steven K.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Test and Post-Test Analysis of a Thermacore, Inc. Nickel Powder Wick Heat Pipe Solar Reciever  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a cradle-to-grave fabrication and postmortem analysis of a sodium-filled heat pipe solar receiver. The Stirling Thermal Motors Gen. H engine was tested with the Thermacore, Inc. heat pipe receiver on Sandia's Test Bed Concentrator II in the fall of 1996. Although engine performance was significantly increased relative to a direct insolation version of the receiver, hot spots did develop on the heat pipe receiver dome. Over the course of a couple of weeks, after tests were completed, the sodium was distilled out of this receiver, and the front dome was removed. Several failure spots and/or cracks (dubbed "volcanoes") were present on the surface of the wick. Postmortem analysis indicates that the cracks in the wick of the heat pipe are not a product of corrosive oxide action. Voids formed within the wick (created either by mechanical or thermal means) serve to concentrate phosphorous from the electroless plating into the liquid sodium. The presence of phosphorous has an apparently harmful effect on the wick. Examination of a virgin piece of the nickel wick material treated in the same manner as the bulk, prior to the introduction of sodium, would be the best baseline sample for comparison. This sample could be analyzed for phosphorous migration into the wick and determine if there is any initial crack formation from the sintering process. Utiortunately a sample of this material was not available during the preparation of this report. Continued work to determine the mechanism of crack formation could significantly increase the hours of available lifetime testing for future solar thermal heat pipe receivers

Adkins, Douglas R.; Andraka, Charles E.; Diver, Jr., Richard B.; Echelmeyer, Kenneth H.; Moreno, James B.; Moss, Timothy A.; Rawlinson, K. Scott; Showalter, Steven K.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Reconstructing Past Ocean Salinity ((delta)18Owater)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature and salinity are two of the key properties of ocean water masses. The distribution of these two independent but related characteristics reflects the interplay of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the uneven distribution of heat loss and gain by the ocean, with that of precipitation, evaporation, and the freezing and melting of ice. Temperature and salinity to a large extent, determine the density of a parcel of water. Small differences in temperature and salinity can increase or decrease the density of a water parcel, which can lead to convection. Once removed from the surface of the ocean where 'local' changes in temperature and salinity can occur, the water parcel retains its distinct relationship between (potential) temperature and salinity. We can take advantage of this 'conservative' behavior where changes only occur as a result of mixing processes, to track the movement of water in the deep ocean (Figure 1). The distribution of density in the ocean is directly related to horizontal pressure gradients and thus (geostrophic) ocean currents. During the Quaternary when we have had systematic growth and decay of large land based ice sheets, salinity has had to change. A quick scaling argument following that of Broecker and Peng [1982] is: the modern ocean has a mean salinity of 34.7 psu and is on average 3500m deep. During glacial maxima sea level was on the order of {approx}120m lower than present. Simply scaling the loss of freshwater (3-4%) requires an average increase in salinity a similar percentage or to {approx}35.9psu. Because much of the deep ocean is of similar temperature, small changes in salinity have a large impact on density, yielding a potentially different distribution of water masses and control of the density driven (thermohaline) ocean circulation. It is partly for this reason that reconstructions of past salinity are of interest to paleoceanographers.

Guilderson, T P; Pak, D K

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

240

The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gef ghi insolation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

On the Size Distribution of Close-In Extrasolar Giant Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The precisions of extrasolar planet radius measurements are reaching the point at which meaningful and discriminatory comparisons with theoretical predictions are can be made. However, care must be taken to account for selection effects in the transit surveys that detect the transiting planets for which radius measurements are possible. Here I identify one such selection effect, such that the number of planets with radius R_p detected in a signal-to-noise ratio limited transit survey is proportional to R_p^alpha, with alpha~4-6. In the presence of a dispersion sigma in the intrinsic distribution of planet radii, this selection effect translates to bias b in the radii of observed planets. Detected planets are, on average, larger by a fractional amount b ~ alpha (sigma/)^2 relative to the mean radius of the underlying distribution. I argue that the intrinsic dispersion in planetary radii is likely to be in the range sigma = (0.05-0.13)R_J, where the lower bound is that expected theoretically solely from the variance in stellar insolation, and the upper bound is the 95% c.l. upper limit from the scatter in observed radii. Assuming an arbitrary but plausible value of sigma/~10%, and thus b~6%, I infer a mean intrinsic radius of close-in massive extrasolar planets of =(1.03+/-0.01)R_J. This value reinforces the case for HD209458b having an anomalously large radius, and may be inconsistent with coreless models of irradiated giant planets.

B. Scott Gaudi

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

242

Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Use of a Geothermal-Solar Hybrid Power Plant to Mitigate Declines in Geothermal Resource Productivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many, if not all, geothermal resources are subject to decreasing productivity manifested in the form of decreasing brine temperature, flow rate, or both during the life span of the associated power generation project. The impacts of resource productivity decline on power plant performance can be significant; a reduction in heat input to a power plant not only decreases the thermal energy available for conversion to electrical power, but also adversely impacts the power plant conversion efficiency. The reduction in power generation is directly correlated to a reduction in revenues from power sales. Further, projects with Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) contracts in place may be subject to significant economic penalties if power generation falls below the default level specified. A potential solution to restoring the performance of a power plant operating from a declining productivity geothermal resource involves the use of solar thermal energy to restore the thermal input to the geothermal power plant. There are numerous technical merits associated with a renewable geothermal-solar hybrid plant in which the two heat sources share a common power block. The geo-solar hybrid plant could provide a better match to typical electrical power demand profiles than a stand-alone geothermal plant. The hybrid plant could also eliminate the stand-alone concentrated solar power plant thermal storage requirement for operation during times of low or no solar insolation. This paper identifies hybrid plant configurations and economic conditions for which solar thermal retrofit of a geothermal power plant could improve project economics. The net present value of the concentrated solar thermal retrofit of an air-cooled binary geothermal plant is presented as functions of both solar collector array cost and electricity sales price.

Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Observations of nonmethane hydrocarbons and oxygenated volatile organic compounds at a rural site in the southeastern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of an extensive range of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) including alkanes, alkenes, and aromatics, and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) including alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes were conducted for several weeks during the summer of 1995 as part of the Southern Oxidants Study (SOS) at a rural experimental site (Youth, Inc.) 32 km southeast of Nashville, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. These measurements were conducted to (1) determine the absolute magnitude and variability of oxygenated compounds found in a contemporary rural region; (2) assess the importance of the measured ambient levels of OVOCs on a photochemical reactivity basis relative to the more commonly determined NMHCs; and (3) to evaluate our ability to accurately measure oxygenates by the current techniques employed under a field study scenario. Several other physical (temperature, insolation, etc.), meteorological (wind velocity, wind direction, atmospheric structure, and boundary layer height), and chemical (criterion pollutants, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO, O{sub 3}, etc.) parameters were measured concurrently with the NMHC and OVOC measurements. During the study period, OVOCs were consistently the dominant compounds present, and methanol and acetone had the highest mixing ratios. Although OVOCs made up the majority of the volatile organic compound component on a mass basis, a substantial sink for OH was isoprene and its immediate oxidation products, methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone. In combination with CO and formaldehyde, these compounds comprised about 85{percent} of the observed OH reactivity at the site. Acetaldehyde and methanol were responsible for an additional 10{percent}, with the NMHCs and remaining OVOCs making up the final 5{percent} of the measured OH reactivity at the site. These observed patterns reinforce recent studies which find OVOCs to be an important component of the rural troposphere. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

Riemer, Daniel; Pos, Willer; Milne, Peter; Farmer, Charlesk; Zika, Rod [Division of Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [Atmospheric Sciences, Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, Alabama (United States)] Apel, Eric [Atmospheric Chemistry Group, Mantech Environmental Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States)] Olszyna, Ken [National Environmental Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA. Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States)] Kliendienst, Tad [Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan (United States)] Lonneman, William [Departments of Chemistry, and Earth and Atmospheric Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana (United States); Shepson, Paul; Starn, Tim

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Sun Valley Photovoltaic Power Project, Phase 1. Final report, June 1, 1978-February 28, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An application experiment was devised for fabrication, installation, operation, and evaluation of a concentrating photovoltaic system for direct conversion of sunlight to electricity. If the experiment is performed, the photovoltaic system will be connected to an electric motor load and to an electric utility system. Provisions will be made to allow the motor load to be supplied with power from either the photovoltaic system or the utility system. When the demand of the motor load is low, the photovoltaic system will deliver excess power to the utility system for use elsewhere. Thus, the experimental installation has been designed with sufficient flexibility to enable several modes of operation to be evaluated. This type of application is a typical example of on-site power generation at an individual load center involving two-way energy exchange with the adjacent utility system. Because a growing market for photovoltaic systems in this type of application is expected in the 1980's, the experiment will provide needed information in a timely manner. The experiment was devised jointly by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) and its subcontractor, Spectrolab, Inc. LADWP will furnish a site and operate the equipment after installation. The subcontractor will manufacture and furnish a concentrating photovoltaic array with a power rating of approximately 200 kilowatts at one kilowatt per square meter of insolation. Other required equipment will be purchased to specification from appropriate suppliers. The photovoltaic system represents a state-of-the-art design at the time this report was prepared. However, minor design improvements may be made prior to and during system installation. All phases of fabrication, installation and operation will be documented through formal reports. The results of the experiment will contribute to the goals of the National Photovoltaic Conversion Program.

Goodman, Jr, F R

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Analysis of concentrating PV-T systems for the commercial/industrial sector. Volume II. PV-T state-of-the-art survey and site/application pair selection and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a project to develop feasibility assessments, design procedures, and reference designs for total energy systems that could use actively cooled concentrating photovoltaic collectors, a survey was conducted to provide an overview of available photovoltaic-thermal (PV-T) technology. General issues associated with the design and installation of a PV-T system are identified. Electrical and thermal efficiencies for the line-focus Fresnel, the linear parabolic trough, and the point-focus Fresnel collectors are specified as a function of operating temperature, ambient temperature, and insolation. For current PV-T technologies, the line-focus Fresnel collector proved to have the highest thermal and electrical efficiencies, lowest array cost, and lowest land area requirement. But a separate feasibility analysis involving 11 site/application pairs showed that for most applications, the cost of the photovoltaic portion of a PV-T system is not recovered through the displacement of an electrical load, and use of a thermal-only system to displace the thermal load would be a more economical alternative. PV-T systems are not feasible for applications that have a small thermal load, a large steam requirement, or a high load return temperature. SAND82-7157/3 identifies the technical issues involved in designing a photovoltaic-thermal system and provides guidance for resolving such issues. Detailed PV-T system designs for three selected applications and the results of a trade-off study for these applications are presented in SAND82-7157/4. A summary of the major results of this entire study and conclusions concerning PV-T systems and applications is presented in SAND82-7157/1.

Schwinkendorf, W.E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Variability of Power from Large-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Scenarios in the State of Gujarat (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

Parsons, B.; Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A performance data network for solar process heat systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solar process heat (SPH) data network has been developed to access remote-site performance data from operational solar heat systems. Each SPH system in the data network is outfitted with monitoring equipment and a datalogger. The datalogger is accessed via modem from the data network computer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The dataloggers collect both ten-minute and hourly data and download it to the data network every 24-hours for archiving, processing, and plotting. The system data collected includes energy delivered (fluid temperatures and flow rates) and site meteorological conditions, such as solar insolation and ambient temperature. The SPH performance data network was created for collecting performance data from SPH systems that are serving in industrial applications or from systems using technologies that show promise for industrial applications. The network will be used to identify areas of SPH technology needing further development, to correlate computer models with actual performance, and to improve the credibility of SPH technology. The SPH data network also provides a centralized bank of user-friendly performance data that will give prospective SPH users an indication of how actual systems perform. There are currently three systems being monitored and archived under the SPH data network: two are parabolic trough systems and the third is a flat-plate system. The two trough systems both heat water for prisons; the hot water is used for personal hygiene, kitchen operations, and laundry. The flat plate system heats water for meat processing at a slaughter house. We plan to connect another parabolic trough system to the network during the first months of 1996. We continue to look for good examples of systems using other types of collector technologies and systems serving new applications (such as absorption chilling) to include in the SPH performance data network.

Barker, G.; Hale, M.J.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Boosting CSP Production with Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combining concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage shows promise for increasing grid flexibility by providing firm system capacity with a high ramp rate and acceptable part-load operation. When backed by energy storage capability, CSP can supplement photovoltaics by adding generation from solar resources during periods of low solar insolation. The falling cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) - generated electricity has led to a rapid increase in the deployment of PV and projections that PV could play a significant role in the future U.S. electric sector. The solar resource itself is virtually unlimited; however, the actual contribution of PV electricity is limited by several factors related to the current grid. The first is the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal electricity demand patterns. The second is the limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate this highly variable generation resource. At high penetration of solar generation, increased grid flexibility will be needed to fully utilize the variable and uncertain output from PV generation and to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. Energy storage is one way to increase grid flexibility, and many storage options are available or under development. In this article, however, we consider a technology already beginning to be used at scale - thermal energy storage (TES) deployed with concentrating solar power (CSP). PV and CSP are both deployable in areas of high direct normal irradiance such as the U.S. Southwest. The role of these two technologies is dependent on their costs and relative value, including how their value to the grid changes as a function of what percentage of total generation they contribute to the grid, and how they may actually work together to increase overall usefulness of the solar resource. Both PV and CSP use solar energy to generate electricity. A key difference is the ability of CSP to utilize high-efficiency TES, which turns CSP into a partially dispatchable resource. The addition of TES produces additional value by shifting the delivery of solar energy to periods of peak demand, providing firm capacity and ancillary services, and reducing integration challenges. Given the dispatchability of CSP enabled by TES, it is possible that PV and CSP are at least partially complementary. The dispatchability of CSP with TES can enable higher overall penetration of the grid by solar energy by providing solar-generated electricity during periods of cloudy weather or at night, when PV-generated power is unavailable. Such systems also have the potential to improve grid flexibility, thereby enabling greater penetration of PV energy (and other variable generation sources such as wind) than if PV were deployed without CSP.

Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An increasing number of energy efficient appliances operate on direct current (DC) internally, offering the potential to use DC from renewable energy systems directly and avoiding the losses inherent in converting power to alternating current (AC) and back. This paper investigates that potential for net-metered residences with on-site photovoltaics (PV) by modeling the net power draw of the ‘direct-DC house’ with respect to today’s typical configuration, assuming identical DC-internal loads. Power draws were modeled for houses in 14 U.S. cities, using hourly, simulated PV-system output and residential loads. The latter were adjusted to reflect a 33% load reduction, representative of the most efficient DC-internal technology, based on an analysis of 32 electricity end-uses. The model tested the effect of climate, electric vehicle (EV) loads, electricity storage, and load shifting on electricity savings; a sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine how future changes in the efficiencies of power system components might affect savings potential. Based on this work, we estimate that net-metered PV residences could save 5% of their total electricity load for houses without storage and 14% for houses with storage. Based on residential PV penetration projections for year 2035 obtained from the National Energy Modeling System (2.7% for the reference case and 11.2% for the extended policy case), direct-DC could save the nation 10 trillion Btu (without storage) or 40 trillion Btu (with storage). Shifting the cooling load by two hours earlier in the day (pre-cooling) has negligible benefits for energy savings. Direct-DC provides no energy savings benefits for EV charging, to the extent that charging occurs at night. However, if charging occurred during the day, for example with employees charging while at work, the benefits would be large. Direct-DC energy savings are sensitive to power system and appliance conversion efficiencies but are not significantly influenced by climate. While direct-DC for residential applications will most likely arise as a spin-off of developments in the commercial sector—because of lower barriers to market entry and larger energy benefits resulting from the higher coincidence between load and insolation—this paper demonstrates that there are substantial benefits in the residential sector as well. Among residential applications, space cooling derives the largest energy savings from being delivered by a direct-DC system. It is the largest load for the average residence on a national basis and is particularly so in high-load regions. It is also the load with highest solar coincidence.

Garbesi, Karina; Vossos, Vagelis; Sanstad, Alan; Burch, Gabriel

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

251

Process analysis and economics of biophotolysis of water. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a preliminary cost analysis of the biophotolysis of water and was prepared as part of the work of Annex 10 of the IEA Hydrogen agreement. Biophotolysis is the conversion of water and solar energy to hydrogen and oxygen using microalgae. In laboratory experiments at low light intensities, algal photosynthesis and some biophotolysis reactions exhibit highlight conversion efficiencies that could be extrapolated to about 10% solar efficiencies if photosynthesis were to saturate at full sunlight intensities. The most promising approach to achieving the critical goal of high conversion efficiencies at full sunlight intensities, one that appears within the capabilities of modern biotechnology, is to genetically control the pigment content of algal cells such that the photosynthetic apparatus does not capture more photons than it can utilize. A two-stage indirect biophotolysis system was conceptualized and general design parameters extrapolated. The process comprises open ponds for the CO{sub 2}fixation stage, an algal concentration step, a dark adaptation and fermentation stage, and a closed tubular photobioreactor in which hydrogen production would take place. A preliminary cost analysis for a 200 hectare (ha) system, including 140 ha of open algal ponds and 14 ha of photobioreactors was carried out. The cost analysis was based on prior studies for algal mass cultures for fuels production and a conceptual analysis of a hypothetical photochemical processes, as well as the assumption that the photobioreactors would cost about $100/m(sup 2). Assuming a very favorable location, with 21 megajoules (MJ)/m{sup 2} total insolation, and a solar conversion efficiency of 10% based on CO{sub 2} fixation in the large algal ponds, an overall cost of $10/gigajoule (GJ) is projected. Of this, almost half is due to the photobioreactors, one fourth to the open pond system, and the remainder to the H{sub 2} handling and general support systems. It must be cautioned that these are highly preliminary, incomplete, and optimistic estimates. Biophotolysis processes, indirect or direct, clearly require considerable basic and applied R and D before a more detailed evaluation of their potential and plausible economics can be carried out. For example, it is not yet clear which type of algae, green algae, or cyanobacteria, would be preferred in biophotolysis. If lower-cost photobioreactors can be developed, then small-scale (<1 ha) single-stage biophotolysis processes may become economically feasible. A major basic and applied R and D effort will be required to develop such biophotolysis processes.

Benemann, J.R.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

A study of algal biomass potential in selected Canadian regions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dynamic assessment model has been developed for evaluating the potential algal biomass and extracted biocrude productivity and costs, using nutrient and water resources available from waste streams in four regions of Canada (western British Columbia, Alberta oil fields, southern Ontario, and Nova Scotia). The purpose of this model is to help identify optimal locations in Canada for algae cultivation and biofuel production. The model uses spatially referenced data across the four regions for nitrogen and phosphorous loads in municipal wastewaters, and CO{sub 2} in exhaust streams from a variety of large industrial sources. Other data inputs include land cover, and solar insolation. Model users can develop estimates of resource potential by manipulating model assumptions in a graphic user interface, and updated results are viewed in real time. Resource potential by location can be viewed in terms of biomass production potential, potential CO{sub 2} fixed, biocrude production potential, and area required. The cost of producing algal biomass can be estimated using an approximation of the distance to move CO{sub 2} and water to the desired land parcel and an estimation of capital and operating costs for a theoretical open pond facility. Preliminary results suggest that in most cases, the CO{sub 2} resource is plentiful compared to other necessary nutrients (especially nitrogen), and that siting and prospects for successful large-scale algae cultivation efforts in Canada will be driven by availability of those other nutrients and the efficiency with which they can be used and re-used. Cost curves based on optimal possible siting of an open pond system are shown. The cost of energy for maintaining optimal growth temperatures is not considered in this effort, and additional research in this area, which has not been well studied at these latitudes, will be important in refining the costs of algal biomass production. The model will be used by NRC-IMB Canada to identify promising locations for both demonstration and pilot-scale algal cultivation projects, including the production potential of using wastewater, and potential land use considerations.

Passell, Howard David; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment: Science and Operations Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ganges Valley region is one of the largest and most rapidly developing sections of the Indian subcontinent. The Ganges River, which provides the region with water needed for sustaining life, is fed primarily by snow and rainfall associated with Indian summer monsoons. Impacts of changes in precipitation patterns, temperature, and the flow of the snow-fed rivers can be immense. Recent satellite-based measurements have indicated that the upper Ganges Valley has some of the highest persistently observed aerosol optical depth values. The aerosol layer covers a vast region, extending across the Indo-Gangetic Plain to the Bay of Bengal during the winter and early spring of each year. The persistent winter fog in the region is already a cause of much concern, and several studies have been proposed to understand the economic, scientific, and societal dimensions of this problem. During the INDian Ocean EXperiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from this region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. This is one of the few regions showing a trend toward increasing surface dimming and enhanced mid-tropospheric warming. Increasing air pollution over this region could modify the radiative balance through direct, indirect, and semi-indirect effects associated with aerosols. The consequences of aerosols and associated pollution for surface insolation over the Ganges Valley and monsoons, in particular, are not well understood. The proposed field study is designed for use of (1) the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure relevant radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol optical characteristics over mainland India during an extended period of 9–12 months and (2) the G-1 aircraft and surface sites to measure relevant aerosol chemical, physical, and optical characteristics in the Ganges Valley during a period of 6–12 weeks. The aerosols in this region have complex sources, including burning of coal, biomass, and biofuels; automobile emissions; and dust. The extended AMF deployment will enable measurements under different regimes of the climate and aerosol abundance—in the wet monsoon period with low aerosol loading; in the dry, hot summer with aerosols dispersed throughout the atmospheric column; and in the cool, dry winter with aerosols confined mostly to the boundary later and mid-troposphere. Each regime, in addition, has its own distinct radiative and atmospheric dynamic drivers. The aircraft operational phase will assist in characterizing the aerosols at times when they have been observed to be at the highest concentrations. A number of agencies in India will collaborate with the proposed field study and provide support in terms of planning, aircraft measurements, and surface sites. The high concentration of aerosols in the upper Ganges Valley, together with hypotheses involving several possible mechanisms with direct impacts on the hydrologic cycle of the region, gives us a unique opportunity to generate data sets that will be useful both in understanding the processes at work and in providing answers regarding the effects of aerosols on climate in a region where the perturbation is the highest.

Kotamarthi, VR

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z