National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gdp potential impacts

  1. China's Pathways to Achieving 40% ~ 45% Reduction in CO{sub 2} Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Ke, Jing

    2011-09-30

    Achieving China’s goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO{sub 2} per unit of GDP) by 40% to 45% percent below 2005 levels by 2020 will require the strengthening and expansion of energy efficiency policies across the buildings, industries and transport sectors. This study uses a bottom-up, end-use model and two scenarios -- an enhanced energy efficiency (E3) scenario and an alternative maximum technically feasible energy efficiency improvement (Max Tech) scenario – to evaluate what policies and technical improvements are needed to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. The findings from this study show that a determined approach by China can lead to the achievement of its 2020 goal. In particular, with full success in deepening its energy efficiency policies and programs but following the same general approach used during the 11th Five Year Plan, it is possible to achieve 49% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions per unit of GDP (CO{sub 2} emissions intensity) in 2020 from 2005 levels (E3 case). Under the more optimistic but feasible assumptions of development and penetration of advanced energy efficiency technology (Max Tech case), China could achieve a 56% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions intensity in 2020 relative to 2005 with cumulative reduction of energy use by 2700 Mtce and of CO{sub 2} emissions of 8107 Mt CO{sub 2} between 2010 and 2020. Energy savings and CO{sub 2} mitigation potential varies by sector but most of the energy savings potential is found in energy-intensive industry. At the same time, electricity savings and the associated emissions reduction are magnified by increasing renewable generation and improving coal generation efficiency, underscoring the dual importance of end-use efficiency improvements and power sector decarbonization.

  2. Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Potential Impacts to Utilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Potential Impacts to Utilities Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Workshop February 28, 2014 Frank Novachek Director, Corporate Planning 2...

  3. Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact, Chapter 6 from the Clean Energy Finance Guide, Third Edition

  4. New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To accelerate the Portsmouth GDP cleanup efforts left over from the Cold War, the Department of Energy made a huge step forward in our nuclear environmental cleanup efforts.

  5. Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet - Potential Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE has prepared a draft Environmental Assessment for Conducting Astrophysics and Other Basic Science Experiments at the WIPP Site. It examines the potential environmental consequences from conducting particular types of scientific experiments in an area of the WIPP underground called the experiment gallery. The environmental assessment also looks at the potential cumulative impacts of conducting experiments and operating the WIPP as a transuranic waste repository. This fact sheet presents

  6. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios ...

  7. Accommodation of GDP-Linked Sugars in the Active Site of GDP-Perosamine Synthase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Paul D.; Carney, Amanda E.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2009-01-12

    Perosamine (4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-d-mannose), or its N-acetylated form, is one of several dideoxy sugars found in the O-antigens of such infamous Gram-negative bacteria as Vibrio cholerae O1 and Escherichia coli O157:H7. It is added to the bacterial O-antigen via a nucleotide-linked version, namely GDP-perosamine. Three enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of GDP-perosamine starting from mannose 1-phosphate. The focus of this investigation is GDP-perosamine synthase from Caulobacter crescentus, which catalyzes the final step in GDP-perosamine synthesis, the conversion of GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose to GDP-perosamine. The enzyme is PLP-dependent and belongs to the aspartate aminotransferase superfamily. It contains the typically conserved active site lysine residue, which forms a Schiff base with the PLP cofactor. Two crystal structures were determined for this investigation: a site-directed mutant protein (K186A) complexed with GDP-perosamine and the wild-type enzyme complexed with an unnatural ligand, GDP-3-deoxyperosamine. These structures, determined to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, revealed the manner in which products, and presumably substrates, are accommodated within the active site pocket of GDP-perosamine synthase. Additional kinetic analyses using both the natural and unnatural substrates revealed that the K{sub m} for the unnatural substrate was unperturbed relative to that of the natural substrate, but the k{sub cat} was lowered by a factor of approximately 200. Taken together, these studies shed light on why GDP-perosamine synthase functions as an aminotransferase whereas another very similar PLP-dependent enzyme, GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose 3-dehydratase or ColD, catalyzes a dehydration reaction using the same substrate.

  8. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments The article reviews the results of that workshop, focusing on potential effects on ...

  9. Replacement of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) at the DOE gaseous diffusion plants: An assessment of global impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Socolof, M.L.; Saylor, R.E.; McCold, L.N.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) formerly operated two gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) for enriching uranium and maintained a third shutdown GDP. These plants maintain a large inventory of dichlorotetrafluorethane (CFC-114), a cholorofluorocarbon (CFC), as a coolant. The paper evaluates the global impacts of four alternatives to modify GDP coolant system operations for a three-year period beginning in 1996. Interim modification of GDP coolant system operations has the potential to reduce stratospheric ozone depletion from GDP coolant releases while a permanent solution is studied.

  10. Oil-Consumption-Weighted GDP: Description, Calculation, and Comparison

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    oil intensity-oil consumption as a share of GDP-varies for these groups based upon the GDP series used. May 2016 Vipin Arora, Tyler Hodge, and Tancred Lidderdale | U.S. Energy ...

  11. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Aquatic Environments | Department of Energy Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments The article reviews the results of that workshop, focusing on potential effects on freshwater, estuarine, and marine ecosystems, and we describe recent national and international developments. PDF icon

  12. Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012, and 2013 | Department of Energy , and 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012, and 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012, and 2013 PDF icon 4.6_ERI_2142_07_1001_DOE_Potential_Market_Impact_Dec2010.pdf

  13. Shared Solar: Current Landscape, Market Potential, and the Impact...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shared Solar: Current Landscape, Market Potential, and the Impact of Federal Securities Regulation David Feldman, 1 Anna M. Brockway, 2 Elaine Ulrich, 2 and Robert Margolis 1 1...

  14. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7891 April 2010 Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative S. Busche and E. Doris National ...

  15. Potential Economic Impact of Constructing and Operating Solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * NRELSR-550-35037 The Potential Economic Impact of Constructing and Operating Solar Power Generation Facilities in Nevada R. K. Schwer and M. Riddel Center for Business and ...

  16. Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012 and 2013 | Department of Energy and 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012 and 2013 A stuy of the potential impact of commerical markets of the Department of Energy's authoriziaton of uranium transfers to fund accelerated cleanup activities at the Portsmouth Site in Piketon, Ohio PDF icon

  17. EERE Success Story-Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development | Department of Energy Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development EERE Success Story-Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development April 15, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Partnering with EERE, Normandeau Associates of Bedford, New Hampshire, developed a tool that characterizes the risk for bird and bat species that may be susceptible to collisions with wind turbines. This tool will be used in environmental decision-making for the planning,

  18. Potential impacts of nanotechnology on energy transmission applications and needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-30

    The application of nanotechnologies to energy transmission has the potential to significantly impact both the deployed transmission technologies and the need for additional development. This could be a factor in assessing environmental impacts of right-of-way (ROW) development and use. For example, some nanotechnology applications may produce materials (e.g., cables) that are much stronger per unit volume than existing materials, enabling reduced footprints for construction and maintenance of electricity transmission lines. Other applications, such as more efficient lighting, lighter-weight materials for vehicle construction, and smaller batteries having greater storage capacities may reduce the need for long-distance transport of energy, and possibly reduce the need for extensive future ROW development and many attendant environmental impacts. This report introduces the field of nanotechnology, describes some of the ways in which processes and products developed with or incorporating nanomaterials differ from traditional processes and products, and identifies some examples of how nanotechnology may be used to reduce potential ROW impacts. Potential environmental, safety, and health impacts are also discussed.

  19. Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Introduction of the Enrichment Services Component of DOE Low Enriched Uranium Inventory During Calendar Year 2013 | Department of Energy Introduction of the Enrichment Services Component of DOE Low Enriched Uranium Inventory During Calendar Year 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of Introduction of the Enrichment Services Component of DOE Low Enriched Uranium Inventory During Calendar Year 2013 This report presents the results of a business analysis performed

  20. Structures of NodZ ?1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2012-02-01

    Crystal structures of the bacterial ?1,6-fucosyltransferase NodZ in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose are presented. Rhizobial NodZ ?1,6-fucosyltransferase (?1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5?-diphosphate-?-l-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signalling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two ?1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of ?1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzymeproduct complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-l-glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-terminal domain, which are conserved among ?1,2-, ?1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop located between strand ?C2 and helix ?C3. In addition, there is a shift of the ?C3 helix itself upon GDP-Fuc binding.

  1. Virtual impact: visualizing the potential effects of cosmic impact in human history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masse, W Bruce; Janecky, David R; Forte, Maurizio; Barrientos, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Current models indicate that catastrophic impacts by asteroids and comets capable of killing more than one quarter of Earth's human population have occurred on average once every million years; smaller impacts, such the 1908 Tunguska impact that leveled more than 2,000 square km of Siberian forest, occur every 200-300 years. Therefore, cosmic impact likely significantly affected hominine evolution and conceivably played a role in Holocene period human culture history. Regrettably, few archaeologists are trained to appreciate the nature and potential effects of cosmic impact. We have developed a conceptual model for an extensible set of educational and research tools based on virtual reality collaborative environments to engage archaeologists and the general public on the topic of the role of cosmic impact in human history. Our initial focus is on two documented asteroid impacts in Argentina during the period of 4000 to 1000 B.C. Campo del Cicio resulted in an energy release of around 2-3 megatons (100-150 times the Hiroshima atomic weapon), and left several craters and a strewn field covering 493 km{sup 2} in northeastern Argentina. Rio Cuarto was likely more than 1000 megatons and may have devastated an area greater than 50,000 km{sup 2} in central Argentina. We are focusing on reconstructions of these events and their potential effects on contemporary hunter and gatherers. Our vinual reality tools also introduce interactive variables (e.g., impactor physical properties, climate, vegetation, topography, and social complexity) to allow researchers and students to better investigate and evaluate the factors that significantly influence cosmic impact effects.

  2. CO2 Sequestration in Unmineable Coal Seams: Potential Environmental Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedges, S.W.; Soong, Yee; McCarthy Jones, J.R.; Harrison, D.K.; Irdi, G.A.; Frommell, E.A.; Dilmore, R.M.; Pique, P.J.; Brown, T.D

    2005-09-01

    An initial investigation into the potential environmental impacts of CO2 sequestration in unmineable coal seams has been conducted, focusing on changes in the produced water during enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) production using a CO2 injection process (CO2-ECBM). Two coals have been used in this study, the medium volatile bituminous Upper Freeport coal (APCS 1) of the Argonne Premium Coal Samples series, and an as-mined Pittsburgh #8 coal, which is a high volatile bituminous coal. Coal samples were reacted with either synthetic produced water or field collected produced water and gaseous carbon dioxide at 40 ?C and 50 bar to evaluate the potential for mobilizing toxic metals during CO2-ECBM/sequestration. Microscopic and x-ray diffraction analysis of the post-reaction coal samples clearly show evidence of chemical reaction, and chemical analysis of the produced water shows substantial changes in composition. These results suggest that changes to the produced water chemistry and the potential for mobilizing toxic trace elements from coalbeds are important factors to be considered when evaluating deep, unmineable coal seams for CO2 sequestration.

  3. Structures of NodZ [alpha]1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2012-03-26

    Rhizobial NodZ {alpha}1,6-fucosyltransferase ({alpha}1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5'-diphosphate-{beta}-L-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signaling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two {alpha}1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of {alpha}1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 {angstrom} resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzyme-product complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-L-glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 {angstrom} resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-terminal domain, which are conserved among {alpha}1,2-, {alpha}1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop located between strand {beta}C2 and helix {alpha}C3. In addition, there is a shift of the {alpha}C3 helix itself upon GDP-Fuc binding.

  4. Development Impact Assessment (DIA) Case Study: South Africa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Social impacts may include health (mortality and morbidity), poverty reduction, education, ... impacts and certain development impacts including GDP, employment, and povertywelfare. ...

  5. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, David; Warner, Ethan; Curley, Christina

    2015-04-23

    Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas that is released from the natural gas supply chain into the atmosphere as a result of fugitive emissions1 and venting2 . We assess five potential CH4 reduction scenarios from transmission, storage, and distribution (TS&D) using published literature on the costs and the estimated quantity of CH4 reduced. We utilize cost and methane inventory data from ICF (2014) and Warner et al. (forthcoming) as well as data from Barrett and McCulloch (2014) and the American Gas Association (AGA) (2013) to estimate that the implementation of these measures could support approximately 85,000 jobs annually from 2015 to 2019 and reduce CH4 emissions from natural gas TS&D by over 40%. Based on standard input/output analysis methodology, measures are estimated to support over $8 billion in GDP annually over the same time period and allow producers to recover approximately $912 million annually in captured gas.

  6. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study assessed five potential methane reduction scenarios from natural gas transmission, storage, and distribution (TS&D) infrastructure using published literature on the costs and the estimated quantity of methane reduced. The results show that implementation of these five measures could support approximately 85,000 jobs annually from 2015 to 2019 and reduce CH4 emissions from natural gas TS&D by over 40%. Based on standard input/output analysis methodology, measures are estimated to support over $8 billion in GDP annually over the same time period and allow producers to recover approximately $912 million annually in captured gas. Mitigation of methane emission reductions through repair, replacement and new technologies are found to support economic development and jobs. The study also found that a portfolio approach to infrastructure modernization may be appropriate to meaningfully improve safety, maintain or create high levels of employment, and significant losses of methane from across TS&D segments of natural gas systems.

  7. Potential impacts of Brayton- and Stirling-cycle engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heft, R.C.

    1980-11-15

    Two engine technologies (Brayton cycle and Stirling cycle) currently being pursued by the US Department of Energy were examined for their potential impacts if they achieved commercial viability. An economic analysis of the expected response of buyers to the attributes of the alternative engines was performed. Hedonic coefficients for vehicle fuel efficiency, performance and size were estimated for domestic cars based upon historical data. The marketplace value of the fuel efficiency enhancement provided by Brayton or Stirling engines was estimated. The effect upon various economic sectors of a large scale change-over from conventional to alternate engines was estimated using an economic input-output analysis. Primary effects were found in fuels refining, non-ferroalloy ores and ferroalloy smelting. Secondary effects were found in mining, transport, and capital financing. Under the assumption of 10 years for plant conversions and 1990 and 1995 as the introduction date for turine and Stirling engines respectively, the comparative fuel savings and present value of the future savings in fuel costs were estimated.

  8. EERE Success Story-Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    risk for bird and bat species that may be susceptible to collisions with wind turbines. ... Positive Impact Monitoring environmental risk of wind turbines. Normandeau Associates is ...

  9. WAP Memorandum 006: LIHEAP Transmittal # IM-2014-06 Potential Impact for

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WAP Grantee | Department of Energy 06: LIHEAP Transmittal # IM-2014-06 Potential Impact for WAP Grantee WAP Memorandum 006: LIHEAP Transmittal # IM-2014-06 Potential Impact for WAP Grantee Effective: September 7, 2014 LIHEAP Transmittal # IM-2014-06 Potential Impact for WAP Grantee PDF icon WAP Memorandum 006: LIHEAP Transmittal # IM-2014-06 Potential Impact for WAP Grantee More Documents & Publications WPN 16-1: Program Year 2016 Weatherization Grant Guidance WPN 15-1 Program Year 2015

  10. Roughness Optimization at High Modes for GDP CHx Microshells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theobald, M.; Dumay, B.; Chicanne, C.; Barnouin, J.; Legaie, O.; Baclet, P.

    2004-03-15

    For the ''Megajoule'' Laser (LMJ) facility of the CEA, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) is the nominal ablator to be used for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. These capsules contain the fusible deuterium-tritium mixture to achieve ignition. Coatings are prepared by glow discharge polymerization (GDP) with trans-2-butene and hydrogen. The films properties have been investigated. Laser fusion targets must have optimized characteristics: a diameter of about 2.4 mm for LMJ targets, a thickness up to 175 {mu}m, a sphericity and a thickness concentricity better than 99% and an outer and an inner roughness lower than 20 nm at high modes. The surface finish of these laser fusion targets must be extremely smooth to minimize hydrodynamic instabilities.Movchan and Demchishin, and later Thornton introduced a structure zone model (SZM) based on both evaporated and sputtered metals. They investigated the influence of base temperature and the sputtering gas pressure on structure and properties of thick polycrystalline coatings of nickel, titanium, tungsten, aluminum oxide. An original cross-sectional analysis by atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows amorphous materials characterization and permits to make an analogy between the amorphous GDP material and the existing model (SZM). The purpose of this work is to understand the relationship between the deposition parameters, the growing structures and the surface roughness.The coating structure as a function of deposition parameters was first studied on plane silicon substrates and then optimized on PAMS shells. By adjusting the coating parameters, the structures are modified, and in some case, the high modes roughness decreases dramatically.

  11. Refinery Outages: Description and Potential Impact on Petroleum Product Prices

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This report responds to a July 13, 2006 request from Chairman Jeff Bingaman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requested that the Energy Information Administration conduct a study of the impact that refinery shutdowns have had on the price of oil and gasoline.

  12. Cloning and characterization of GDP-perosamine synthetase (Per) from Escherichia coli O157:H7 and synthesis of GDP-perosamine in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Guohui; Liu Jun; Liu Xiang; Chen Min; Zhang Houcheng Wang, Peng George

    2007-11-23

    GDP-perosamine synthetase (Per, E.C. not yet classified) is important to the synthesis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 O-antigen. The mutant in per gene can disrupt the synthesis of O157 O-antigen. In this study, GDP-perosamine synthetase was cloned from E. coli O157:H7 and over-expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant His-tagged Per fusion protein was a decamer with molecular weight of 431 kDa. The optimal pH value of this recombinant protein was 7.5. The divalent ions had no significant effect on Per-catalyzed reaction. The K{sub m} and K{sub cat}/K{sub m} for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose were 0.09 mM and 2.1 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} S{sup -1}, and those for L-glutamate were 2 mM and 0.52 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}S{sup -1}, respectively. Per was used to synthesize GDP-perosamine from GDP-mannose together with recombinant GDP-mannose dehydratase (GMD, E.C. 4.2.1.47). The purified GDP-perosamine was identified by MS and NMR. In summary, this work provided a feasible approach for the synthesis of GDP-perosamine which can lead to the study of LPS biosynthesis of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7.

  13. 2014 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory On the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Markets | Department of Energy 4 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory On the Commercial Markets 2014 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory On the Commercial Markets Energy Resources International (ERI), Inc conducted this independent market impact analysis on DOE planned uranium sales and transfers during the period 2014 to 2033, based on information concerning quantities and schedules provided to ERI by DOE. PDF icon ERI Market

  14. Mechanical Properties of Thin GDP Shells Used as Cryogenic Direct Drive Targets at OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikroo, A.; Czechowicz, D.G.; Chen, K.C.; Dicken, M.; Morris, C.; Andrews, R.; Greenwood, A.; Castillo, E.

    2004-03-15

    Thin glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells are currently used as the targets for cryogenic direct drive laser fusion experiments. These shells need to be filled with nearly 1000 atm of D{sub 2} and cooled to cryogenic temperatures without failing due to buckling and bursting pressures they experience in this process. Therefore, the mechanical and permeation properties of these shells are of utmost importance in successful and rapid filling with D{sub 2}. In this paper, we present an overview of buckle and burst pressures of several different types of GDP shells. These include those made using traditional GDP deposition parameters ('standard GDP') using a high deposition pressure and using modified parameters ('strong GDP') of low deposition pressure that leads to more robust shells.

  15. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN GDP SHELLS USED AS CRYOGENIC DIRECT DRIVE TARGETS AT OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIKROO,A; CZECHOWICZ,D; CHEN,K.C; DICKEN,M; MORRIS,C; ANDREWS,R; GREENWOOD,A.L; CASTILLO,E

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Thin glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells are currently used as the targets for cryogenic direct drive laser fusion experiments. These shells need to be filled with nearly 1000 atm of D{sub 2} and cooled to cryogenic temperatures without failing due to buckling and bursting pressures they experience in this process. Therefore, the mechanical and permeation properties of these shells are of utmost importance in successful and rapid filling with D{sub 2}. In this paper, they present an overview of buckle and burst pressures of several different types of GDP shells. These include those made using traditional GDP deposition parameters (standard GDP) using a high deposition pressure and using modified parameters (strong GDP) of low deposition pressure that leads to more robust shells.

  16. Biochemical characterization of GDP-L-fucose de novo synthesis pathway in fungus Mortierella alpina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Yan; Perepelov, Andrei V.; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Hao; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Wei

    2010-01-22

    Mortierella alpina is a filamentous fungus commonly found in soil, which is able to produce large amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids. L-Fucose is an important sugar found in a diverse range of organisms, playing a variety of biological roles. In this study, we characterized the de novo biosynthetic pathway of GDP-L-fucose (the nucleotide-activated form of L-fucose) in M. alpina. Genes encoding GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-keto-6-deoxymannose 3,5-epimerase/4-reductase (GMER) were expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzymes were produced as His-tagged fusion proteins. Conversion of GDP-mannose to GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose by GMD and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose to GDP-L-fucose by GMER were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis, electro-spray ionization-mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The k{sub m} values of GMD for GDP-mannose and GMER for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose were determined to be 0.77 mM and 1.047 mM, respectively. Both NADH and NADPH may be used by GMER as the coenzyme. The optimum temperature and pH were determined to be 37 {sup o}C and pH 9.0 (GMD) or pH 7.0 (GMER). Divalent cations are not required for GMD and GMER activity, and the activities of both enzymes may be enhanced by DTT. To our knowledge this is the first report on the characterization of GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic pathway in fungi.

  17. Educational program on potential impacts of regulated underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titus, E.W.

    1995-12-01

    This paper defines a brief (three to four hours) and effective method of educating future environmental professionals, concerned citizens of the community, or local government officials about the long term residual contamination potential posed by underground storage tank sites (UST`s). The format will be designed so that the student will have a clear understanding of the function and capabilities of UST systems, the required monitoring and maintenance, and the extensive commitments necessary to remediate a contaminated site. Subject material covered will include regulation overview, system design and installation, current remediation technologies and future trends. The curriculum will be presented in lecture/workshop format, and will feature color photographs, sites studies and relevant maps. Hypothetical statistical and chemical analytical results will be supplied for interpretation. The student will synthesize, in participatory work groups, the information using some of the various types of UST evaluation systems and formats currently in use by the individual states. This approach exposes the student to participatory group planning and decision making. This type of learning experience would be of significant value because UST`s have left an indelible mark on many street corners across the country. A variety of factors, such as population shifts from urban to suburban areas, governmental regulations, and overhead costs, caused many business owners to want to close their existing UST sites and sell the property. With these closed or abandoned sites comes the potential for soil and groundwater contamination due to petroleum product spillage, or leaking UST`s still under the surface of the site. The goal of this comprehensive approach is to enable the student to make informed judgements as to both the current and long term risks of UST systems. As an additional benefit these individuals will gain a better understanding about their local environment.

  18. ERI-2142 17-1401 DOE Potential Market Impact CY2014-CY2033 April...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fuel 21 2.5. Summary of Published Market Prices 23 3. DOE Inventory Expected to Enter the ... Effect of DOE Inventory on Market Prices 36 4.1.1. Potential Impact of DOE ...

  19. ERI-2142 17-1401 DOE Potential Market Impact CY2014-CY2033 4...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fuel 21 2.5. Summary of Published Market Prices 23 3. DOE Inventory Expected to Enter the ... Effect of DOE Inventory on Market Prices 36 4.1.1. Potential Impact of DOE ...

  20. The potential impacts of sodium management on Frit Development for Coupled Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F. C.; Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.

    2015-06-10

    In this report, Section 2.0 provides a description of sodium management and its impact on the glass waste form, Section 3.0 provides background information on phase separation, Section 4.0 provides the impact of sodium management on SB9 frit development efforts and the results of a limited scoping study investigating phase separation in potential DWPF frits, and Section 5.0 discusses potential technical issues associated with using a phase separated frit for DWPF operations.

  1. The potential impact of ZT=4 thermoelectric materials on solar thermal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    energy conversion technologies. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: The potential impact of ZT=4 thermoelectric materials on solar thermal energy conversion technologies. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The potential impact of ZT=4 thermoelectric materials on solar thermal energy conversion technologies. State-of-the-art methodologies for the conversion of solar thermal power to electricity are based on conventional electromagnetic induction techniques. If

  2. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Mid-Atlantic Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.; Flores, F.; Zammit, D.; Kraemer, M.; Miles, J.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Mid-Atlantic region.

  3. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Great Lakes Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Great Lakes region.

  4. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores, F.; Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.

  5. Crystal structure of a tetrameric GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase from a bacterial GDP-D-rhamnose biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, N.A.; Mulichak, A.M.; Lam, J.S.; Rocchetta, H.L.; Garavito, R.M.

    2010-03-08

    D-Rhamnose is a rare 6-deoxy monosaccharide primarily found in the lipopolysaccharide of pathogenic bacteria, where it is involved in host-bacterium interactions and the establishment of infection. The biosynthesis of D-rhamnose proceeds through the conversion of GDP-D-mannose by GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) to GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose, which is subsequently reduced to GDP-D-rhamnose by a reductase. We have determined the crystal structure of GMD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in complex with NADPH and GDP. GMD belongs to the NDP-sugar modifying subfamily of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) enzymes, all of which exhibit bidomain structures and a conserved catalytic triad (Tyr-XXX-Lys and Ser/Thr). Although most members of this enzyme subfamily display homodimeric structures, this bacterial GMD forms a tetramer in the same fashion as the plant MUR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. The cofactor binding sites are adjoined across the tetramer interface, which brings the adenosyl phosphate moieties of the adjacent NADPH molecules to within 7 {angstrom} of each other. A short peptide segment (Arg35-Arg43) stretches into the neighboring monomer, making not only protein-protein interactions but also hydrogen bonding interactions with the neighboring cofactor. The interface hydrogen bonds made by the Arg35-Arg43 segment are generally conserved in GMD and MUR1, and the interacting residues are highly conserved among the sequences of bacterial and eukaryotic GMDs. Outside of the Arg35-Arg43 segment, residues involved in tetrameric contacts are also quite conserved across different species. These observations suggest that a tetramer is the preferred, and perhaps functionally relevant, oligomeric state for most bacterial and eukaryotic GMDs.

  6. The potential economic impact of constructing and operating solar power generation facilities in Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwer, R. K.; Riddel, M.

    2004-02-01

    Nevada has a vast potential for electricity generation using solar power. An examination of the stock of renewable resources in Nevada proves that the state has the potential to be a leader in renewable-electric generation--one of the best in the world. This study provides estimates on the economic impact in terms of employment, personal income, and gross state product (GSP) of developing a portion of Nevada's solar energy generation resources.

  7. Shared Solar. Current Landscape, Market Potential, and the Impact of Federal Securities Regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, David; Brockway, Anna M.; Ulrich, Elaine; Margolis, Robert

    2015-04-01

    This report provides a high-level overview of the current U.S. shared solar landscape and the impact that a given shared solar program’s structure has on requiring federal securities oversight, as well as an estimate of market potential for U.S. shared solar deployment.

  8. Shared Solar. Current Landscape, Market Potential, and the Impact of Federal Securities Regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, David; Brockway, Anna M.; Ulrich, Elaine; Margolis, Robert

    2015-04-07

    This report provides a high-level overview of the current U.S. shared solar landscape, the impact that a given shared solar program’s structure has on requiring federal securities oversight, as well as an estimate of market potential for U.S. shared solar deployment.

  9. New DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of Potential CO2 Storage Impacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In another step forward toward improved scientific understanding of potential geologic carbon dioxide storage impacts, a new U.S. Department of Energy sponsored study has confirmed earlier research showing that proper site selection and monitoring is essential for helping anticipate and mitigate possible risks.

  10. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Southeast Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-07-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Southeast (defined here as Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia).

  11. Acting Globally: Potential Carbon Emissions Mitigation Impacts from an International Standards and Labelling Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A; Letschert, Virginie E.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Egan, Christine

    2009-05-29

    This paper presents an analysis of the potential impacts of an international initiative designed to support and promote the development and implementation of appliances standards and labelling programs throughout the world. As part of previous research efforts, LBNL developed the Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), an analysis framework that estimates impact potentials of energy efficiency policies on a global scale. In this paper, we apply this framework to an initiative that would result in the successful implementation of programs focused on high priority regions and product types, thus evaluating the potential impacts of such an initiative in terms of electricity savings and carbon mitigation in 2030. In order to model the likely parameters of such a program, we limit impacts to a five year period starting in 2009, but assume that the first 5 years of a program will result in implementation of 'best practice' minimum efficiency performance standards by 2014. The 'high priority' regions considered are: Brazil, China, the European Union,India, Mexico and the United States. The products considered are: refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting (both fluorescent and incandescent), standby power (for consumer electronics) and televisions in the residential sector, and air conditioning and lighting in commercial buildings. In 2020, these regions and enduses account for about 37percent of global residential electricity and 29percent of electricity in commercial buildings. We find that 850Mt of CO2 could be saved in buildings by 2030 compared to the baseline forecast.

  12. The need for health impact assessment in China: Potential benefits for public health and steps forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Liming; Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia

    2011-07-15

    Health impact assessment (HIA) is a useful tool to predict and estimate the potential health impact associated with programs, projects, and policies by comprehensively identifying relevant health determinants and their consequences. China is undergoing massive and rapid socio-economic changes leading to environment and population health challenges such as a large increase in non-communicable diseases, the emergence and re-emergence of infectious diseases, new health risks associated with environmental pollutants and escalating health inequality. These health issues are affected by multiple determinants which can be influenced by planned policies, programs, and projects. This paper discusses the needs for health impact assessment in China in order to minimize the negative health consequences from projects, programs and policies associated with rapid social and economic development. It first describes the scope of China's current impact assessment system and points out its inadequacy in meeting the requirements of population health protection and promotion. It then analyses the potential use of HIA and why China needs to develop and apply HIA as a tool to identify potential health impacts of proposed programs, projects and policies so as to influence decision-making early in the planning process. Thus, the paper recommends the development of HIA as a useful tool in China to enhance decision-making for the protection and promotion of population health. For this to happen, the paper outlines steps necessary for the establishment and successful implementation of HIA in China: beginning with the establishment of a HIA framework, followed by workforce capacity building, methodology design, and intersectoral collaboration and stakeholder engagement.

  13. Modeling In-stream Tidal Energy Extraction and Its Potential Environmental Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-09-30

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in harnessing in-stream tidal energy in response to concerns of increasing energy demand and to mitigate climate change impacts. While many studies have been conducted to assess and map tidal energy resources, efforts for quantifying the associated potential environmental impacts have been limited. This paper presents the development of a tidal turbine module within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid coastal ocean model and its application for assessing the potential environmental impacts associated with tidal energy extraction. The model is used to investigate in-stream tidal energy extraction and associated impacts on estuarine hydrodynamic and biological processes in a tidally dominant estuary. A series of numerical experiments with varying numbers and configurations of turbines installed in an idealized estuary were carried out to assess the changes in the hydrodynamics and biological processes due to tidal energy extraction. Model results indicated that a large number of turbines are required to extract the maximum tidal energy and cause significant reduction of the volume flux. Preliminary model results also indicate that extraction of tidal energy increases vertical mixing and decreases flushing rate in a stratified estuary. The tidal turbine model was applied to simulate tidal energy extraction in Puget Sound, a large fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast.

  14. Quantifying the Potential Impacts of Flexibility Reserve on Power System Operations: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantifying the Potential Impacts of Flexibility Reserve on Power System Operations Preprint I. Krad and E. Ibanez National Renewable Energy Laboratory E. Ela Electric Power Research Institute Presented at the IEEE 2015 Annual Green Technology Conference New Orleans, Louisiana April 15-17, 2015 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5D00-63402 April 2015 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government

  15. A Rac1--GDP trimer complex binds zinc with tetrahedral and octahedral coordination, displacing magnesium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prehna, G.; Stebbins, C

    2007-01-01

    The Rho family of small GTPases represent well characterized signaling molecules that regulate many cellular functions such as actin cytoskeletal arrangement and the cell cycle by acting as molecular switches. A Rac1-GDP-Zn complex has been crystallized in space group P3221 and its crystal structure has been solved at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. These trigonal crystals reveal the unexpected ability of Rac1 to coordinate Zn atoms in a tetrahedral fashion by use of its biologically relevant switch I and switch II regions. Upon coordination of zinc, the switch I region is stabilized in the GDP-bound conformation and contributes to a Rac1 trimer in the asymmetric unit. Zinc coordination causes switch II to adopt a novel conformation with a symmetry-related molecule. Additionally, zinc was found to displace magnesium from its octahedral coordination at switch I, although GDP binding remained stable. This structure represents the first reported Rac1-GDP-Zn complex, which further underscores the conformational flexibility and versatility of the small GTPase switch regions.

  16. A Rac1-GDP Trimer Complex Binds Zinc with Tetrahedral and Octahedral Coordination, Displacing Magnesium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prehna,G.; Stebbins, E.

    2007-01-01

    The Rho family of small GTPases represent well characterized signaling molecules that regulate many cellular functions such as actin cytoskeletal arrangement and the cell cycle by acting as molecular switches. A Rac1-GDP-Zn complex has been crystallized in space group P3{sub 2}21 and its crystal structure has been solved at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. These trigonal crystals reveal the unexpected ability of Rac1 to coordinate Zn atoms in a tetrahedral fashion by use of its biologically relevant switch I and switch II regions. Upon coordination of zinc, the switch I region is stabilized in the GDP-bound conformation and contributes to a Rac1 trimer in the asymmetric unit. Zinc coordination causes switch II to adopt a novel conformation with a symmetry-related molecule. Additionally, zinc was found to displace magnesium from its octahedral coordination at switch I, although GDP binding remained stable. This structure represents the first reported Rac1-GDP-Zn complex, which further underscores the conformational flexibility and versatility of the small GTPase switch regions.

  17. Analysis of the environmental impact of China based on STIRPAT model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin Shoufu; Zhao Dingtao; Marinova, Dora

    2009-11-15

    Assuming that energy consumption is the main source of GHG emissions in China, this paper analyses the effect of population, urbanisation level, GDP per capita, industrialisation level and energy intensity on the country's environmental impact using the STIRPAT model with data for 1978-2006. The analysis shows that population has the largest potential effect on environmental impact, followed by urbanisation level, industrialisation level, GDP per capita and energy intensity. Hence, China's One Child Policy, which restrains rapid population growth, has been an effective way of reducing the country's environmental impact. However, due to the difference in growth rates, GDP per capita had a higher effect on the environmental impact, contributing to 38% of its increase (while population's contribution was at 32%). The rapid decrease in energy intensity was the main factor restraining the increase in China's environmental impact but recently it has also been rising. Against this background, the future of the country looks bleak unless a change in human behaviour towards more ecologically sensitive economic choices occurs.

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-10

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies, as summarized herein. The contract also required cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and two recipients of awards (Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision) in a sub-topic area to develop a protocol to identify streamlined, best-siting practices. Over the period of this contract, PCCI and our sub-consultants, David Basco, Ph.D., and Neil Rondorf of Science Applications International Corporation, met with USCG headquarters personnel, with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters and regional personnel, with U.S. Navy regional personnel and other ocean users in order to develop an understanding of existing practices for the identification of navigational impacts that might occur during construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. At these same meetings, “standard” and potential mitigation measures were discussed so that guidance could be prepared for project developers. Concurrently, PCCI reviewed navigation guidance published by the USCG and international community. This report summarizes the results of this effort, provides guidance in the form of a checklist for assessing the navigational impacts of potential marine and hydrokinetic projects, and provides guidance for improving the existing navigational guidance promulgated by the USCG in Navigation Vessel Inspection Circular 02 07. At the request of the USCG, our checklist and mitigation guidance was written in a generic nature so that it could be equally applied to offshore wind projects. PCCI teleconferenced on a monthly basis with DOE, Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision in order to share information and review work products. Although the focus of our effort was on marine and hydrokinetic technologies, as defined above, this effort drew upon earlier work by the USCG on offshore wind renewable energy installations. The guidance provided herein can be applied equally to marine and hydrokinetic technologies and to offshore wind, which are collectively referred to by the USCG as Renewable Energy Installations.

  19. Cloning, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the Bacillus subtilis GTPase YphCGDP complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Ling; Muench, Stephen P.; Roujeinikova, Anna; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E.; Rice, David W.

    2006-05-01

    Crystals of a selenomethionine-incorporated YphCGDP complex have been grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and polyethylene glycol as a precipitating agent. The Bacillus subtilis YphC gene encodes an essential GTPase thought to be involved in ribosome binding and whose protein product may represent a target for the development of a novel antibacterial agent. Sequence analysis reveals that YphC belongs to the EngA family of GTPases, which uniquely contain two adjacent GTP-binding domains. Crystals of a selenomethionine-incorporated YphCGDP complex have been grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and polyethylene glycol as a precipitating agent. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.71, b = 65.05, c = 110.61 , and have one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Data sets at three different wavelengths were collected on a single crystal to 2.5 resolution at the Daresbury SRS in order to solve the structure by MAD. Ultimately, analysis of YphC in complex with GDP may allow a greater understanding of the EngA family of essential GTPases.

  20. Characterization of a Ras Mutant with Identical GDP- and GTP-Bound Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, B.; Boykevisch, S; Zhao, C; Kunzelmann, S; Bar-Sagi, D; Herrmann, C; Nassar, N

    2009-01-01

    We previously characterized the G60A mutant of Ras and showed that the switch regions of the GTP-bound but not the GDP-bound form of this mutant adopt an 'open conformation' similar to that seen in nucleotide-free Ras. Here, we mutate Lys147 of the conserved {sup 145}SAK{sup 147} motif in the G60A background and characterize the resulting double mutant (DM). We show that RasDM is the first structure of a Ras protein with identical GDP- and GTP-bound structures. Both structures adopt the open conformation of the active form of RasG60A. The increase in the accessible surface area of the nucleotide is consistent with a 4-fold increase in its dissociation rate. Stopped-flow experiments show no major difference in the two-step kinetics of association of GDP or GTP with the wild type, G60A, or RasDM. Addition of Sos fails to accelerate nucleotide exchange. Overexpression of the G60A or double mutant of Ras in COS-1 cells fails to activate Erk and shows a strong dominant negative effect. Our data suggest that flexibility at position 60 is required for proper Sos-catalyzed nucleotide exchange and that structural information is somehow shared among the switch regions and the different nucleotide binding motifs.

  1. Sources of biomass feedstock variability and the potential impact on biofuels production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C. Luke; Westover, Tyler L.; Emerson, Rachel M.; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Li, Chenlin

    2015-11-23

    In this study, terrestrial lignocellulosic biomass has the potential to be a carbon neutral and domestic source of fuels and chemicals. However, the innate variability of biomass resources, such as herbaceous and woody materials, and the inconsistency within a single resource due to disparate growth and harvesting conditions, presents challenges for downstream processes which often require materials that are physically and chemically consistent. Intrinsic biomass characteristics, including moisture content, carbohydrate and ash compositions, bulk density, and particle size/shape distributions are highly variable and can impact the economics of transforming biomass into value-added products. For instance, ash content increases by an order of magnitude between woody and herbaceous feedstocks (from ~0.5 to 5 %, respectively) while lignin content drops by a factor of two (from ~30 to 15 %, respectively). This increase in ash and reduction in lignin leads to biofuel conversion consequences, such as reduced pyrolysis oil yields for herbaceous products as compared to woody material. In this review, the sources of variability for key biomass characteristics are presented for multiple types of biomass. Additionally, this review investigates the major impacts of the variability in biomass composition on four conversion processes: fermentation, hydrothermal liquefaction, pyrolysis, and direct combustion. Finally, future research processes aimed at reducing the detrimental impacts of biomass variability on conversion to fuels and chemicals are proposed.

  2. Sources of biomass feedstock variability and the potential impact on biofuels production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Williams, C. Luke; Westover, Tyler L.; Emerson, Rachel M.; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Li, Chenlin

    2015-11-23

    In this study, terrestrial lignocellulosic biomass has the potential to be a carbon neutral and domestic source of fuels and chemicals. However, the innate variability of biomass resources, such as herbaceous and woody materials, and the inconsistency within a single resource due to disparate growth and harvesting conditions, presents challenges for downstream processes which often require materials that are physically and chemically consistent. Intrinsic biomass characteristics, including moisture content, carbohydrate and ash compositions, bulk density, and particle size/shape distributions are highly variable and can impact the economics of transforming biomass into value-added products. For instance, ash content increases by anmore » order of magnitude between woody and herbaceous feedstocks (from ~0.5 to 5 %, respectively) while lignin content drops by a factor of two (from ~30 to 15 %, respectively). This increase in ash and reduction in lignin leads to biofuel conversion consequences, such as reduced pyrolysis oil yields for herbaceous products as compared to woody material. In this review, the sources of variability for key biomass characteristics are presented for multiple types of biomass. Additionally, this review investigates the major impacts of the variability in biomass composition on four conversion processes: fermentation, hydrothermal liquefaction, pyrolysis, and direct combustion. Finally, future research processes aimed at reducing the detrimental impacts of biomass variability on conversion to fuels and chemicals are proposed.« less

  3. FEMA Asteroid Impact Tabletop Exercise Simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boslough, Mark; Jennings, Barbara; Carvey, Brad; Fogleman, William

    2015-05-19

    We describe the computational simulations and damage assessments that we provided in support of a tabletop exercise (TTX) at the request of NASA's Near-Earth Objects Program Office. The overall purpose of the exercise was to assess leadership reactions, information requirements, and emergency management responses to a hypothetical asteroid impact with Earth. The scripted exercise consisted of discovery, tracking, and characterization of a hypothetical asteroid; inclusive of mission planning, mitigation, response, impact to population, infrastructure and GDP, and explicit quantification of uncertainty. Participants at the meeting included representatives of NASA, Department of Defense, Department of State, Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergencymore » Management Agency (FEMA), and the White House. The exercise took place at FEMA headquarters. Sandia's role was to assist the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in developing the impact scenario, to predict the physical effects of the impact, and to forecast the infrastructure and economic losses. We ran simulations using Sandia's CTH hydrocode to estimate physical effects on the ground, and to produce contour maps indicating damage assessments that could be used as input for the infrastructure and economic models. We used the FASTMap tool to provide estimates of infrastructure damage over the affected area, and the REAcct tool to estimate the potential economic severity expressed as changes to GDP (by nation, region, or sector) due to damage and short-term business interruptions.« less

  4. FEMA Asteroid Impact Tabletop Exercise Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boslough, Mark; Jennings, Barbara; Carvey, Brad; Fogleman, William

    2015-05-19

    We describe the computational simulations and damage assessments that we provided in support of a tabletop exercise (TTX) at the request of NASA's Near-Earth Objects Program Office. The overall purpose of the exercise was to assess leadership reactions, information requirements, and emergency management responses to a hypothetical asteroid impact with Earth. The scripted exercise consisted of discovery, tracking, and characterization of a hypothetical asteroid; inclusive of mission planning, mitigation, response, impact to population, infrastructure and GDP, and explicit quantification of uncertainty. Participants at the meeting included representatives of NASA, Department of Defense, Department of State, Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and the White House. The exercise took place at FEMA headquarters. Sandia's role was to assist the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in developing the impact scenario, to predict the physical effects of the impact, and to forecast the infrastructure and economic losses. We ran simulations using Sandia's CTH hydrocode to estimate physical effects on the ground, and to produce contour maps indicating damage assessments that could be used as input for the infrastructure and economic models. We used the FASTMap tool to provide estimates of infrastructure damage over the affected area, and the REAcct tool to estimate the potential economic severity expressed as changes to GDP (by nation, region, or sector) due to damage and short-term business interruptions.

  5. Global Economic Effects of USA Biofuel Policy and the Potential Contribution from Advanced Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gbadebo Oladosu; Keith Kline; Paul Leiby; Rocio Uria-Martinez; Maggie Davis; Mark Downing; Laurence Eaton

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the global economic effects of the USA renewable fuel standards (RFS2), and the potential contribution from advanced biofuels. Our simulation results imply that these mandates lead to an increase of 0.21 percent in the global gross domestic product (GDP) in 2022, including an increase of 0.8 percent in the USA and 0.02 percent in the rest of the world (ROW); relative to our baseline, no-RFS scenario. The incremental contributions to GDP from advanced biofuels in 2022 are estimated at 0.41 percent and 0.04 percent in the USA and ROW, respectively. Although production costs of advanced biofuels are higher than for conventional biofuels in our model, their economic benefits result from reductions in oil use, and their smaller impacts on food markets compared with conventional biofuels. Thus, the USA advanced biofuels targets are expected to have positive economic benefits.

  6. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Potential Impact Categories for Radiological Air Emission Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. M.

    2012-06-05

    In 2002, the EPA amended 40 CFR 61 Subpart H and 40 CFR 61 Appendix B Method 114 to include requirements from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities for major emission points. Additionally, the WDOH amended the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 Radiation protection-air emissions to include ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 requirements for major and minor emission points when new permitting actions are approved. A result of the amended regulations is the requirement to prepare a written technical basis for the radiological air emission sampling and monitoring program. A key component of the technical basis is the Potential Impact Category (PIC) assigned to an emission point. This paper discusses the PIC assignments for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Integrated Laboratory emission units; this revision includes five PIC categories.

  7. Potential

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential and Frictional Drag on a Floating Sphere in a Flowing Plasma I. H. Hutchinson Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA...

  8. Potential Impact of Atmospheric Releases at Russian Far East Nuclear Submarine Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, F.; Mahura, A.; Compton, K.; Brown, K.; Takano, M.; Novikov, V.; Soerensen, J. H.; Baklanov, A.

    2003-02-25

    An ''Assessment of the Impact of Russian Nuclear Fleet Operations on Far Eastern Coastal Regions'' is being performed as part of the Radiation Safety of the Biosphere Project (RAD) of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) of Laxenburg, Austria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive unclassified analysis of the potential impact of accidents at the Russian Far East nuclear submarine sites near Vladivostok and Petropavlovsk. We have defined the situation there based upon available information and studies commissioned by RAD in collaboration with Russian research institutes including Russian Research Center-''Kurchatov Institute'', Institute of Northern Environmental Problems and Lazurit Central Design Bureau. Further, in our original work, some in collaboration with the staff of the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) and members of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, we have calculated the nuclide trajectories from these sites in the atmospheric boundary layer, less than 1.5 kilometers high, and determined their probability of crossing any of the nearby countries as well as Asiatic Russia. We have further determined the concentrations in each of these crossings as well as the total, dry and wet depositions of nuclides on these areas. Finally, we have calculated the doses to the Japanese Island population from typical winter airflow patterns (those most likely to cross the Islands in the minimum times), strong north winds, weak north winds and cyclonic winds for conditions similar to the Chazhma Bay criticality accident (fresh fuel) and for a criticality accident for the same type of reactor with fuel being withdrawn (spent fuel). The maximum individual committed dosages were less than 2 x 10-7 and 2 x 10-3 mSv, respectively. The long-term external doses by radionuclides deposited on the ground and the internal doses by consumption of foods were not evaluated as it is believed that such doses can be avoided by social controls. In other calculations taking these longer term doses into account and determining the sum of the maximum individual committed dosages (SMICD), we found for each of the surrounding countries to be less than 1 mSv. In that part of Russia the (SMICD) is less than 6 mSv. For releases from the Petropavlovsk sites the (SMICD) for each of the surrounding countries is less than 0.3 mSv. In that part of Russia the (SMICD) is less than 6 mSv.

  9. Potential Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A

    2008-01-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed around the world, with much work aiming to optimize engine and battery for efficient operation, both during discharge and when grid electricity is available for recharging. However, the general expectation has been that the grid will not be greatly affected by the use of PHEVs because the recharging will occur during off-peak hours, or the number of vehicles will grow slowly enough so that capacity planning will respond adequately. This expectation does not consider that drivers will control the timing of recharging, and their inclination will be to plug in when convenient, rather than when utilities would prefer. It is important to understand the ramifications of adding load from PHEVs onto the grid. Depending on when and where the vehicles are plugged in, they could cause local or regional constraints on the grid. They could require the addition of new electric capacity and increase the utilization of existing capacity. Usage patterns of local distribution grids will change, and some lines or substations may become overloaded sooner than expected. Furthermore, the type of generation used to meet the demand for recharging PHEVs will depend on the region of the country and the timing of recharging. This paper analyzes the potential impacts of PHEVs on electricity demand, supply, generation structure, prices, and associated emission levels in 2020 and 2030 in 13 regions specified by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), and on which the data and analysis in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 are based (Figure ES-1). The estimates of power plant supplies and regional hourly electricity demand come from publicly available sources from EIA and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Electricity requirements for PHEVs are based on analysis from the Electric Power Research Institute, with an optimistic projection of 25% market penetration by 2020, involving a mixture of sedans and sport utility vehicles. The calculations were done using the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model, a model developed over the past 12 years to evaluate a wide variety of critical electricity sector issues. Seven scenarios were run for each region for 2020 and 2030, for a total of 182 scenarios. In addition to a base scenario of no PHEVs, the authors modeled scenarios assuming that vehicles were either plugged in starting at 5:00 p.m. (evening) or at 10:00 p.m.(night) and left until fully charged. Three charging rates were examined: 120V/15A (1.4 kW), 120V/20A (2 kW), and 220V/30A (6 kW). Most regions will need to build additional capacity or utilize demand response to meet the added demand from PHEVs in the evening charging scenarios, especially by 2030 when PHEVs have a larger share of the installed vehicle base and make a larger demand on the system. The added demands of evening charging, especially at high power levels, can impact the overall demand peaks and reduce the reserve margins for a region's system. Night recharging has little potential to influence peak loads, but will still influence the amount and type of generation.

  10. The Potential Economic Impact of Electricity Restructuring in the State of Oklahoma: Phase II Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2001-10-30

    Because of the recent experiences of several states undergoing restructuring (e.g., higher prices, greater volatility, lower reliability), concerns have been raised in states currently considering restructuring as to whether their systems are equally vulnerable. Factors such as local generation costs, transmission constraints, market concentration, and market design can all play a role in the success or failure of the market. These factors along with the mix of generation capacity supplying the state will influence the relative prices paid by consumers. The purpose of this project is to provide a model and process to evaluate the potential price and economic impacts of restructuring the Oklahoma electric industry. The Phase I report concentrated on providing an analysis of the Oklahoma system in the near-term, using only present generation resources and customer demands. This Phase II study analyzed the Oklahoma power market in 2010, incorporating the potential of new generation resources and customer responses. Five key findings of this Phase II were made: (1) Projected expansion in generating capacity exceeds by over 3,000 MW the demands within the state plus the amount that could be exported with the current transmission system. (2) Even with reduced new plant construction, most new plants could lose money (although residential consumers would see lower rates) unless they have sufficient market power to raise their prices without losing significant market share (Figure S-1). (3) If new plants can raise prices to stay profitable, existing low-cost coal and hydro plants will have very high profits. Average prices to customers could be 5% to 25% higher than regulated rates (Figure S-1). If the coal and hydro plants are priced at cost-based rates (through long-term contracts or continued regulation) while all other plants use market-based rates then prices are lower. (4) Customer response to real-time prices can lower the peak capacity requirements by around 9%, lowering the need for new capacity and reduce prices during the peak demand. (5) Changes to electric prices on the order of 5% to 20% will have only a modest effect on overall economic activity within the state.

  11. 2014 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Resources International (ERI), Inc conducted this independent market impact analysis on DOE planned uranium sales and transfers during the period 2014 to 2033, based on ...

  12. Structural basis of GDP release and gating in G protein coupled Fe[superscript 2+] transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilfoyle, Amy; Maher, Megan J.; Rapp, Mikaela; Clarke, Ronald; Harrop, Stephen; Jormakka, Mika

    2009-09-29

    G proteins are key molecular switches in the regulation of membrane protein function and signal transduction. The prokaryotic membrane protein FeoB is involved in G protein coupled Fe{sup 2+} transport, and is unique in that the G protein is directly tethered to the membrane domain. Here, we report the structure of the soluble domain of FeoB, including the G protein domain, and its assembly into an unexpected trimer. Comparisons between nucleotide free and liganded structures reveal the closed and open state of a central cytoplasmic pore, respectively. In addition, these data provide the first observation of a conformational switch in the nucleotide-binding G5 motif, defining the structural basis for GDP release. From these results, structural parallels are drawn to eukaryotic G protein coupled membrane processes.

  13. Shared Solar: Current Landscape, Market Potential, and the Impact of Federal Securities Regulation; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-27

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the current U.S. shared solar landscape, the impact that a given shared solar program's structure has on requiring federal securities oversight, as well as an estimate of market potential for U.S. shared solar deployment.

  14. Potential Environmental Impacts of Hydrogen-based Transportation and Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grieb, Thomas M.; Mills, W. B.; Jacobson, Mark Z.; Summers, Karen V.; Crossan, A. Brook

    2010-12-31

    Hydrogen (H2) offers advantages as an energy carrier: minimal discharge of pollutants, production from multiple sources, increased thermodynamic efficiencies compared to fossil fuels, and reduced dependence on foreign oil. However, potential impacts from the H2 generation processes, transport and distribution of H2, and releases of H2 into the atmosphere have been proposed. The goal of this project was to analyze the effects of emissions of hydrogen, the six criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases on climate, human health, materials and structures. This project was part of a larger effort by DOE to assess the life-cycle costs and benefits and environmental impacts to inform decisions regarding future hydrogen research. Technical Approach: A modeling approach was developed and used to evaluate the potential environmental effects associated with the conversion of the on-road vehicle fleet from fossil-fuel vehicles to hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. GATOR-GCMOM was the primary tool used to predict atmospheric concentrations of gases and aerosols for selected scenarios. This model accounts for all feedbacks among major atmospheric processes based on first principles. The future scenarios and the emission rates selected for this analysis of hydrogen environmental effects are based on the scenarios developed by IPCC. The scenarios selected for the model simulations are a 2000 and 2050 A1B base cases, and a 2050 A1B case with hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs). The hydrogen fuel cell scenario assumed conversion of 90% of fossil-fuel on-road vehicles (FFOV) in developed countries and 45% of FFOVs vehicles in other countries to HFCVs, with the H2 produced by steam-reforming of natural gas (SHFCVs). Simulations were conducted to examine the effect of converting the world’s FFOVs to HFCVs, where the H2 is produced by wind-powered electrolysis (WHFCVs). In all scenarios a 3% leakage of H2 consumed was assumed. Two new models were developed that provide the ability to evaluate a wider range of conditions and address some of the uncertainties that exist in the evaluation of hydrogen emissions. A simplified global hydrogen cycle model that simulates hydrogen dynamics in the troposphere and stratosphere was developed. A Monte Carlo framework was developed to address hydrogen uptake variability for different types of ecosystems. Findings 1.Converting vehicles worldwide in 2050 to SHFCVs at 90% penetration in developed countries and 45% penetration in other countries is expected to reduce NOx, CO, CO2, CH4, some other organic gases, ozone, PAN, black carbon, and other particle components in the troposphere, but may increase some other organic gases, depending on emissions. Conversion to SHFCVs is also expected to cool the troposphere and warm the stratosphere, but to a lesser extent than WHFCVs. Finally, SHFCVs are expected to increase UTLS ozone while decreasing upper stratospheric ozone, but to a lesser extent than WHFCVs. 2.The predicted criteria pollutant concentrations from the GATOR-GCMOM simulations indicated that near-surface annual mean concentrations in the US are likely to increase from the 2000 base case to the 2050 A1B base case for CO2 and ozone due to the increased economic activity, but to decrease for CO, NO2, SO2, and PM10 due to improved pollution control equipment and energy efficiencies. The shift to SHFCVs in 2050 was predicted to result in decreased concentrations for all the criteria pollutants, except for SO2 and PM10. The higher predicted concentrations for SO2 and PM10 were attributed to increased emissions using the steam-reforming method to generate H2. If renewable methods such as wind-based electrolysis were used to generate H2, the emissions of SO2 and PM10 would be lower. 3.The effects on air quality, human health, ecosystem, and building structures were quantified by comparing the GATOR-GCMOM model output and accepted health and ecosystem effects levels and ambient air quality criteria. Shifting to HFCVs is expected to result in improved air quality and benefits to human health. Shifting to HFCVs is unlikely to result in damage to buildings. 4.Results are thought to be robust for larger leakage rates of H2 and for greater penetrations of HFCVs, since the controlling factor for stratospheric ozone impacts is the reduction in fossil-fuel greenhouse gases and the resulting surface cooling, which reduces water vapor emissions and stratospheric warming, which increases tropopause stability reducing water vapor transport to the stratosphere. 5.The supplemental modeling results were generally supportive of the results from the GATOR-GCMOM simulations, and recommendations for additional analyses were made. Extending the duration of the simulation to coincide with the time required for hydrogen mixing ratios to attain a steady state condition was recommended. Further evaluation of algorithms to describe hydrogen uptake in the model was also recommended.

  15. SUMMARY REPORT ON POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Johnson, F.

    2011-04-27

    This report summarizes a large amount of experimental work completed to identify the potential impacts of material from Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) on glass formulation at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The results show no significant issues with the predicted values of chemical durability and viscosity using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models when the SCIX components are added to projected DWPF glass compositions. No modifications to the viscosity and durability models appear to be necessary at this time in order to incorporate the SCIX streams at DWPF. It is recommended that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) continue to verify the durability and viscosity models as the projected compositions for DWPF processing evolve. It is also recommended that the data generated thus far be reviewed and a determination be made as to how best to extend the validation ranges of the durability and viscosity models. The liquidus temperatures for the experimental glasses are also reported and discussed in this report. The results show that the measured or estimated (based on measured data) liquidus temperature values for the glasses with SCIX components added are consistently higher than those predicted by the current model. Therefore, the PCCS liquidus temperature model will need to be modified in order to incorporate the SCIX streams at DWPF. It is recommended that SRNL carry out full measurements of the liquidus temperatures for those KT-series glasses where estimates have been made. These data should then be used to support an evaluation of whether a refitting of the liquidus temperature model coefficients will be sufficient to correctly predict the liquidus temperature of glasses containing the SCIX components (particularly higher TiO{sub 2} concentrations), or whether additional modifications to the model are required. While there are prediction issues with the current liquidus temperature model, they are not at this time expected to hamper the incorporation of SCIX streams at DWPF. The estimated liquidus temperatures, while higher than the model predicted values, remain below the current DWPF limit of 1050 C for most of the study glasses. Note that the properties and performance of the glasses in this study are highly dependent on glass composition. Therefore, should significant changes be made to the projected compositions or processing rates for SCIX or DWPF, many of the assessments and experiments may have to be revisited.

  16. The Potential Economic Impact of Electricity Restructuring in the State of Oklahoma: Phase I Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2001-03-27

    Because of the recent experiences of several states undergoing restructuring (e.g., higher prices, greater volatility, lower reliability), concerns have been raised in states currently considering restructuring as to whether their systems are equally vulnerable. Factors such as local generation costs, transmission constraints, market concentration, and market design can all play a role in the success or failure of the market. These factors along with the mix of generation capacity supplying the state will influence the relative prices paid by consumers. The purpose of this project is to provide a model and process to evaluate the potential price and economic impacts of restructuring the Oklahoma electric industry. This Phase I report concentrates on providing an analysis of the Oklahoma system in the near-term, using only present generation resources and customer demands. In Phase II, a longer-term analysis will be conducted, incorporating the potential of new generation resources and customer responses. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model to evaluate marginal-cost-based and regulated prices for the state. The model dispatches the state's power plants to meet the demands from all customers based on the marginal cost of production. Consequent market-clearing prices for each hour of the year are applied to customers' demands to determine the average prices paid. The revenues from the sales are paid to each plant for their generation, resulting in a net profit or loss depending on the plant's costs and prices when it operates. Separately, the model calculates the total cost of generation, including fixed costs such as depreciation, interest and required return on equity. These costs are allocated among the customer classes to establish regulated prices for each class. These prices can be compared to the average market-based prices to see if prices increase or decrease with restructuring. An unchanging transmission and distribution (T&D) component is added to both types of generation prices to determine the overall price of power to each customer class. A base case was established for the state as a whole, using the set of plants and customer demands from 1999 based on data from various industry and government sources. Energy demands from the different customer classes were defined, including wholesale sales outside the state. Plant ownership by specific utilities, whether investor-owned, government, or cooperatives, was not used as a factor in the analysis, except in the generic cost of capital for the different types of utilities. The results showed an average price increase of roughly one cent per kilowatt-hour under a restructured market. This is because in a regulated market each plant will earn just enough to pay all costs and earn a reasonable return on equity. In a restructured market, where prices are based on marginal costs of the most expensive plant operating at any given time, some plants may earn little or nothing over the year while others earn more than the regulated rate of return.

  17. Potential social, institutional, and environmental impacts of selected energy-conservation measures in two Washington communities. [Seattle and Yakima

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelson, E.; Olsen, M.

    1980-03-01

    The likely environmental, social, and institutional impacts of selected energy-conservation measures in two communities in Washington state are reported. The five conservation measures investigated in this study were: (1) retrofitting existing buildings; (2) district heating and Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES); (3) small automobiles and vehicle redesign; (4) land-use and housing modifications; and (5) electric-utility rate reform. Twenty potential impact areas were selected for analysis. These areas were divided into five categories of environmental impacts, economic impacts, community impacts, personal impacts, and overall quality of life in the community. The research was conducted in Seattle and Yakima, Washington. In each location, about two dozen public officials and business, labor, and community leaders were interviewed. Their diverse views are summarized. The Seattle respondents saw energy conservation as a highly desirable policy with a number of temporary, transitional problems arising as energy-conservation measures were implemented. Yakima respondents, in contrast, did not expect to encounter many serious energy problems in the foreseeable future and consequently viewed energy conservation as a relatively minor community concern. Moreover, they anticipated that many conservation measures, if implemented by the government, would encounter either apathy or resistance in their community. Two broad generalizations can bedrawn from these interviews: (1) energy conservation will basically be beneficial for the natural environment and our society; and (2) if energy conservation does become a dominant thrust in our society, it could stimulate and reinforce a much broader process of fundamental social change. (LCL)

  18. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-I-003-2016_Key Factors for Assessing Potential Groundwater Impacts.20160128.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Factors for Assessing Potential Groundwater Impacts Due to Leakage from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Reservoirs 28 January 2016 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-I-003-2016 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness,

  19. Evaluation of the Potential Environmental Impacts from Large-Scale Use and Production of Hydrogen in Energy and Transportation Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Dubey, M.K., Edmonds, J.; Layzell, D.; Olsen, S.; Rahn, T.; Rocket, A.; Wang, D.; Jia, W.

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this project is to systematically identify and examine possible near and long-term ecological and environmental effects from the production of hydrogen from various energy sources based on the DOE hydrogen production strategy and the use of that hydrogen in transportation applications. This project uses state-of-the-art numerical modeling tools of the environment and energy system emissions in combination with relevant new and prior measurements and other analyses to assess the understanding of the potential ecological and environmental impacts from hydrogen market penetration. H2 technology options and market penetration scenarios will be evaluated using energy-technology-economics models as well as atmospheric trace gas projections based on the IPCC SRES scenarios including the decline in halocarbons due to the Montreal Protocol. Specifically we investigate the impact of hydrogen releases on the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, the long-term stability of the ozone layer due to changes in hydrogen emissions, the impact of hydrogen emissions and resulting concentrations on climate, the impact on microbial ecosystems involved in hydrogen uptake, and criteria pollutants emitted from distributed and centralized hydrogen production pathways and their impacts on human health, air quality, ecosystems, and structures under different penetration scenarios

  20. Identification, definition and evaluation of potential impacts facing the US electric utility industry over the next decade. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grainger, J.J.; Lee, S.S.H.

    1993-11-26

    There are numerous conditions of the generation system that may ultimately develop into system states affecting system reliability and security. Such generation system conditions should also be considered when evaluating the potential impacts on system operations. The following five issues have been identified to impact system reliability and security to the greatest extent: transmission access/retail wheeling; non-utility generators and independent power producers; integration of dispersed storage and generation into utility distribution systems; EMF and right-of-way limitations; Clean Air Act Amendments. Strictly speaking, some issues are interrelated and one issue cannot be completely dissociated from the others. However, this report addresses individual issues separately in order to determine all major aspects of bulk power system operations affected by each issue. The impacts of the five issues on power system reliability and security are summarized. This report examines the five critical issues that the US electric utility industry will be facing over the next decade. The investigation of their impacts on utility industry will be facing over the next decade. The investigation of their impacts on utility system reliability and security is limited to the system operation viewpoint. Those five issues will undoubtedly influence various planning aspects of the bulk transmission system. However, those subjects are beyond the scope of this report. While the issues will also influence the restructure and business of the utility industry politically, sociologically, environmentally, and economically, all discussion included in the report are focused only on technical ramifications.

  1. Mutational, Structural, and Kinetic Evidence for a Dissociative Mechanism in the GDP-mannose Mannosyl Hydrolase Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia,Z.; Azurmendi, H.; lairson, L.; Withers, S.; Gabelli, S.; Bianchet, M.; Amzel, L.; Mildvan, A.

    2005-01-01

    GDP-mannose hydrolase (GDPMH) catalyzes the hydrolysis of GDP-{alpha}-D-sugars by nucleophilic substitution with inversion at the anomeric C1 atom of the sugar, with general base catalysis by H124. Three lines of evidence indicate a mechanism with dissociative character. First, in the 1.3 Angstrom X-ray structure of the GDPMH-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP{center_dot}Tris{sup +} complex, the GDP leaving group interacts with five catalytic components: R37, Y103, R52, R65, and the essential Mg{sup 2+}. As determined by the effects of site-specific mutants on k{sub cat}, these components contribute factors of 24-, 100-, 309-, 24-, and {ge}10{sup 5}-fold, respectively, to catalysis. Both R37 and Y103 bind the {beta}-phosphate of GDP and are only 5.0 Angstroms apart. Accordingly, the R37Q/Y103F double mutant exhibits partially additive effects of the two single mutants on k{sub cat}, indicating cooperativity of R37 and Y103 in promoting catalysis, and antagonistic effects on K{sub m}. Second, the conserved residue, D22, is positioned to accept a hydrogen bond from the C2-OH group of the sugar undergoing substitution at C1, as was shown by modeling an {alpha}-D-mannosyl group into the sugar binding site. The D22A and D22N mutations decreased k{sub cat} by factors of 10{sup 2.1} and 10{sup 2.6}, respectively, for the hydrolysis of GDP-{alpha}-D-mannose, and showed smaller effects on K{sub m}, suggesting that the D22 anion stabilizes a cationic oxocarbenium transition state. Third, the fluorinated substrate, GDP-2F-{alpha}-D-mannose, for which a cationic oxocarbenium transition state would be destabilized by electron withdrawal, exhibited a 16-fold decrease in k{sub cat} and a smaller, 2.5-fold increase in K{sub m}. The D22A and D22N mutations further decreased the k{sub cat} with GDP-2F-{alpha}-D-mannose to values similar to those found with GDP-{alpha}-D-mannose, and decreased the K{sub m} of the fluorinated substrate. The choice of histidine as the general base over glutamate, the preferred base in other Nudix enzymes, is not due to the greater basicity of histidine, since the pK{sub a} of E124 in the active complex (7.7) exceeded that of H124 (6.7), and the H124E mutation showed a 10{sup 2.2}-fold decrease in k{sub cat}and a 4.0-fold increase in K{sub m} at pH 9.3. Similarly, the catalytic triad detected in the X-ray structure (H124---Y127---P120) is unnecessary for orienting H124, since the Y127F mutation had only 2-fold effects on k{sub cat} and K{sub m} with either H124 or E124 as the general base. Hence, a neutral histidine rather than an anionic glutamate may be necessary to preserve electroneutrality in the active complex.

  2. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose.

  3. A modeling study of the potential water quality impacts from in-stream tidal energy extraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-11-09

    To assess the effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality in a simplified estuarine system, which consists of a tidal bay connected to the coastal ocean through a narrow channel where energy is extracted using in-stream tidal turbines, a three-dimensional coastal ocean model with built-in tidal turbine and water quality modules was applied. The effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality were examined for two energy extraction scenarios as compared with the baseline condition. It was found, in general, that the environmental impacts associated with energy extraction depend highly on the amount of power extracted from the system.more » Model results indicate that, as a result of energy extraction from the channel, the competition between decreased flushing rates in the bay and increased vertical mixing in the channel directly affects water quality responses in the bay. The decreased flushing rates tend to cause a stronger but negative impact on water quality. On the other hand, the increase of vertical mixing could lead to higher bottom dissolved oxygen at times. As the first modeling effort directly aimed at examining the impacts of tidal energy extraction on estuarine water quality, this study demonstrates that numerical models can serve as a very useful tool for this purpose. Furthermore, more careful efforts are warranted to address system-specific environmental issues in real-world, complex estuarine systems.« less

  4. Helix Dipole Movement and Conformational Variability Contribute to Allosteric GDP Release in G[alpha] Subunits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preininger, Anita M.; Funk, Michael A.; Oldham, William M.; Meier, Scott M.; Johnston, Christopher A.; Adhikary, Suraj; Kimple, Adam J.; Siderovski, David P.; Hamm, Heidi E.; Iverson, Tina M.

    2009-06-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins (Galphabetagamma) transmit signals from activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to downstream effectors through a guanine nucleotide signaling cycle. Numerous studies indicate that the carboxy-terminal alpha5 helix of Galpha subunits participates in Galpha-receptor binding, and previous EPR studies suggest this receptor-mediated interaction induces a rotation and translation of the alpha5 helix of the Galpha subunit [Oldham, W. M., et al. (2006) Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 13, 772-777]. On the basis of this result, an engineered disulfide bond was designed to constrain the alpha5 helix of Galpha(i1) into its EPR-measured receptor-associated conformation through the introduction of cysteines at position 56 in the alpha1 helix and position 333 in the alpha5 helix (I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1)). A functional mimetic of the EPR-measured alpha5 helix dipole movement upon receptor association was additionally created by introduction of a positive charge at the amino terminus of this helix, D328R Galpha(i1). Both proteins exhibit a dramatically elevated level of basal nucleotide exchange. The 2.9 A resolution crystal structure of I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1) in complex with GDP-AlF(4)(-) reveals the shift of the alpha5 helix toward the guanine nucleotide binding site that is anticipated by EPR measurements. The structure of the I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1) subunit further revealed altered positions for the switch regions and throughout the Galpha(i1) subunit, accompanied by significantly elevated crystallographic temperature factors. Combined with previous evidence in the literature, the structural analysis supports the critical role of electrostatics of the alpha5 helix dipole and overall conformational variability during nucleotide release.

  5. The potential impact of externalities considerations on the market for biomass power technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swezey, B.G.; Porter, K.L.; Feher, J.S.

    1994-02-01

    This study assesses the current status of externalities considerations--nonmarket costs and benefits--in state and utility electricity resource planning processes and determines how externalities considerations might help or hinder the development of biomass power plants. It provides an overview of biomass resources and technologies, including their market status and environmental impacts; reviews the current treatment of externalities in the states; and documents the perspectives of key utility, regulatory, and industry representatives concerning externalities considerations. The authors make the following recommendations to the biomass industry: (1) the wood and agricultural waste industries should work toward having states and utilities recognize that wood and agricultural waste are greenhouse gas neutral resources because of carbon sequestration during growth; (2) the biomass industry should emphasize nonenvironmental benefits such as economic development and job creation; and (3) the biomass industry should pursue and support efforts to establish renewable energy set-asides or ``green`` requests for proposals.

  6. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    This project had three major objectives. The first objective was to develop a fossil fuel combustion source inventory (NO/sub x/, SO/sub x/, and hydrocarbon emissions) that would be relatively easy to use and update for analyzing the impact of combustion emissions on acid deposition in the eastern United States. The second objective of the project was to use the inventory data as a basis for selection of a number of areas that, by virtue of their importance in the acid rain issue, could be further studied to assess the impact of local and intraregional combustion sources. The third objective was to conduct an analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in the areas under study, along with pertinent physical characteristics, meteorological conditions, and emission patterns of these areas, to investigate probable relationships between local and intraregional combustion sources and the deposition of acidic material. The combustion source emissions inventory has been developed for the eastern United States. It characterizes all important area sources and point sources on a county-by-county basis. Its design provides flexibility and simplicity and makes it uniquely useful in overall analysis of emission patterns in the eastern United States. Three regions with basically different emission patterns have been identified and characterized. The statistical analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in conjunction with emission patterns, wind direction, and topography has produced consistent results for each study area and has demonstrated that the wet deposition in each area reflects the characteristics of the localized area around the monitoring sites (typically 50 to 150 miles). 8 references, 28 figures, 39 tables.

  7. Potential energy savings with exterior shades in large office buildings and the impact of discomfort glare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, Sabine; Lee, Eleanor

    2015-04-01

    Exterior shades are highly efficient for reducing solar load in commercial buildings. Their impact on net energy use depends on the annual energy balance of heating, cooling, fan and lighting energy. This paper discusses the overall energy use intensity of various external shading systems for a prototypical large office building split into the different types of energy use and for different orientations and window sizes. Lighting energy was calculated for a constant lighting power as well as for dimmed lighting fixtures (daylighting control). In Section 3, slat angles and solar cut-off angles were varied for fixed exterior slat shading systems. While the most light-blocking shades performed best for the case without daylighting controls, the optimum cut-off angle with daylighting controls was found to be 30 deg for the office building prototype used in Chicago and Houston. For large window-to-wall (WWR) ratios, window related annual energy use could be reduced by at least 70 % without daylighting control and by a minimum of 86 % with daylighting control in average over all orientations. The occurrence of discomfort glare was is considered in Section 4 of the paper, which looks at the performance of commercially available exterior shading systems when an interior shade is used in addition to the exterior shade during hours when occupants would experience discomfort glare. Glare control impacts overall energy use intensity significantly for exterior shades with high transmittance, especially when daylighting controls are used. In these cases, exterior shades are only beneficial for window-to-wall areas ≥ 45% in the hot Houston climate. For smaller windows and in a heating/cooling climate like Chicago, exterior shades can increase energy consumption

  8. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonetti, Angelita; Fabbretti, Attilio; Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue.

  9. An Evaluation of the Environmental Impact of Different Commercial Supermarket Refrigeration Systems Using Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beshr, Mohamed; Aute, Vikrant; Abdelaziz, Omar; Fricke, Brian A; Radermacher, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Commercial refrigeration systems consumed 1.21 Quads of primary energy in 2010 and are known to be a major source for refrigerant charge leakage into the environment. Thus, it is important to study the environmental impact of commercial supermarket refrigeration systems and improve their design to minimize any adverse impacts. The system s Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) was presented as a comprehensive metric with the aim of calculating the equivalent mass of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere throughout its lifetime, from construction to operation and destruction. In this paper, an open source tool for the evaluation of the LCCP of different air-conditioning and refrigeration systems is presented and used to compare the environmental impact of a typical multiplex direct expansion (DX) supermarket refrigeration systems based on three different refrigerants as follows: two hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants (R-404A, and R-407F), and a low global warming potential (GWP) refrigerant (N-40). The comparison is performed in 8 US cities representing different climates. The hourly energy consumption of the refrigeration system, required for the calculation of the indirect emissions, is calculated using a widely used building energy modeling tool (EnergyPlus). A sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the impact of system charge and power plant emission factor on the LCCP results. Finally, we performed an uncertainty analysis to determine the uncertainty in total emissions for both R-404A and N-40 operated systems. We found that using low GWP refrigerants causes a considerable drop in the impact of uncertainty in the inputs related to direct emissions on the uncertainty of the total emissions of the system.

  10. Assessment of Potential Flood Events and Impacts at INL's Proposed Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter

    2010-09-01

    Rates, depths, erosion potential, increased subsurface transport rates, and annual exceedance probability for potential flooding scenarios have been evaluated for the on-site alternatives of Idaho National Laboratorys proposed remote handled low-level waste disposal facility. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of flood impacts are required to meet the Department of Energys Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE-O 435.1), its natural phenomena hazards assessment criteria (DOE-STD-1023-95), and the Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1) guidance in addition to being required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental assessment (EA). Potential sources of water evaluated include those arising from (1) local precipitation events, (2) precipitation events occurring off of the INL (off-site precipitation), and (3) increased flows in the Big Lost River in the event of a Mackay Dam failure. On-site precipitation events include potential snow-melt and rainfall. Extreme rainfall events were evaluated for the potential to create local erosion, particularly of the barrier placed over the disposal facility. Off-site precipitation carried onto the INL by the Big Lost River channel was evaluated for overland migration of water away from the river channel. Off-site precipitation sources evaluated were those occurring in the drainage basin above Mackay Reservoir. In the worst-case scenarios, precipitation occurring above Mackay Dam could exceed the dams capacity, leading to overtopping, and eventually complete dam failure. Mackay Dam could also fail during a seismic event or as a result of mechanical piping. Some of the water released during dam failure, and contributing precipitation, has the potential of being carried onto the INL in the Big Lost River channel. Resulting overland flows from these flood sources were evaluated for their erosion potential, ability to overflow the proposed disposal facility, and for their ability to increase migration of contaminants from the facility. The assessment of available literature suggests that the likelihood of detrimental flood water impacting the proposed RH-LLW facility is extremely low. The annual exceedance probability associated with uncontrolled flows in the Big Lost River impacting either of the proposed sites is 1x10-5, with return interval (RI) of 10,000yrs. The most probable dam failure scenario has an annual exceedance probability of 6.3x10-6 (1.6x105 yr RI). In any of the scenarios generating possible on-site water, the duration is expected to be quite short, water depths are not expected to exceed 0.5 m, and the erosion potential can easily be mitigated by emplacement of a berm (operational period), and an engineered cover (post closure period). Subsurface mobilization of radionuclides was evaluated for a very conservative flooding scenario resulting in 50 cm deep, 30.5 day on-site water. The annual exceedance probability for which is much smaller than 3.6x10-7 (2.8x106 yr RI). For the purposes of illustration, the facility was assumed to flood every 500 years. The periodically recurring flood waters were predicted to marginally increase peak radionuclide fluxes into the aquifer by at most by a factor of three for non-sorbing radionuclides, and to have limited impact on peak radionuclide fluxes into the aquifer for contaminants that do sorb.

  11. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Čada, Glenn F.

    2007-04-01

    A new generation of hydropower technologies, the kinetic hydro and wave energy conversion devices, offers the possibility of generating electricity from the movements of water, without the need for dams and diversions. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 encouraged the development of these sources of renewable energy in the United States, and there is growing interest in deploying them globally. The technologies that would extract electricity from free-flowing streams, estuaries, and oceans have not been widely tested. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy convened a workshop to (1) identify the varieties of hydrokinetic energy and wave energy conversion devices and their stages of development, (2) identify where these technologies can best operate, (3) identify the potential environmental issues associated with these technologies and possible mitigation measures, and (4) develop a list of research needs and/or practical solutions to address unresolved environmental issues. The article reviews the results of that workshop, focusing on potential effects on freshwater, estuarine, and marine ecosystems, and we describe recent national and international developments.

  12. LUNAR DUST GRAIN CHARGING BY ELECTRON IMPACT: DEPENDENCE OF THE SURFACE POTENTIAL ON THE GRAIN SIZE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemecek, Z.; Pavlu, J.; Safrankova, J.; Beranek, M.; Richterova, I.; Vaverka, J.; Mann, I.

    2011-09-01

    The secondary electron emission is believed to play an important role for the dust charging at and close to the lunar surface. However, our knowledge of emission properties of the dust results from model calculations and rather rare laboratory investigations. The present paper reports laboratory measurements of the surface potential on Lunar Highlands Type regolith simulants with sizes between 0.3 and 3 {mu}m in an electron beam with energy below 700 eV. This investigation is focused on a low-energy part, i.e., {<=}100 eV. We found that the equilibrium surface potential of this simulant does not depend on the grain size in our ranges of grain dimensions and the beam energies, however, it is a function of the primary electron beam energy. The measurements are confirmed by the results of the simulation model of the secondary emission from the spherical samples. Finally, we compare our results with those obtained in laboratory experiments as well as those inferred from in situ observations.

  13. Urban leakage of liquefied petroleum gas and its potential impact of Mexico City air quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, D.R.; Rowland, F.S.

    1995-12-01

    Seventy eight whole air samples were collected at various park locations throughout Mexico City and later assayed for methane, carbon monoxide, 20 halocarbons and 40 C{sub 2}-C{sub 10} hydrocarbons. Propane had the highest median mixing ratio value of all assayed non-methane hydrocarbon compounds (NMHCs) with a concentration as high as 0.1 ppmv. The concentration of n-butane, i-butane, n-pentane and i-pentane were all notably elevated as well. The only significant identified source of propane in Mexico City is liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), which also has a strong component of C{sub 4} and C{sub 5} alkanes. All of these alkanes were present at concentrations well above those observed in other cities where LPG is not the main domestic fuel. Data strongly suggest that as much as 50% of total Mexico City NMHCs is a result of losses associated with the transfer, storage and delivery of LPG. Additionally, using median concentrations and laboratory determined hydroxyl reaction rate constants, LPG emissions account for about 20% of initial reactivities. This suggests that LPG losses may significantly impact photochemical oxidant levels in Mexico City.

  14. Comparison of caprock pore networks which potentially will be impacted by carbon sequestration projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCray, John; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis; Mouzakis, Katherine; Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rother, Gernot

    2010-12-01

    Injection of CO2 into underground rock formations can reduce atmospheric CO2 emissions. Caprocks present above potential storage formations are the main structural trap inhibiting CO2 from leaking into overlying aquifers or back to the Earth's surface. Dissolution and precipitation of caprock minerals resulting from reaction with CO2 may alter the pore network where many pores are of the micrometer to nanometer scale, thus altering the structural trapping potential of the caprock. However, the distribution, geometry and volume of pores at these scales are poorly characterized. In order to evaluate the overall risk of leakage of CO2 from storage formations, a first critical step is understanding the distribution and shape of pores in a variety of different caprocks. As the caprock is often comprised of mudstones, we analyzed samples from several mudstone formations with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging to compare the pore networks. Mudstones were chosen from current or potential sites for carbon sequestration projects including the Marine Tuscaloosa Group, the Lower Tuscaloosa Group, the upper and lower shale members of the Kirtland Formation, and the Pennsylvanian Gothic shale. Expandable clay contents ranged from 10% to approximately 40% in the Gothic shale and Kirtland Formation, respectively. During SANS, neutrons effectively scatter from interfaces between materials with differing scattering length density (i.e., minerals and pores). The intensity of scattered neutrons, I(Q), where Q is the scattering vector, gives information about the volume and arrangement of pores in the sample. The slope of the scattering data when plotted as log I(Q) vs. log Q provides information about the fractality or geometry of the pore network. On such plots slopes from -2 to -3 represent mass fractals while slopes from -3 to -4 represent surface fractals. Scattering data showed surface fractal dimensions for the Kirtland formation and one sample from the Tuscaloosa formation close to 3, indicating very rough surfaces. In contrast, scattering data for the Gothic shale formation exhibited mass fractal behavior. In one sample of the Tuscaloosa formation the data are described by a surface fractal at low Q (larger pores) and a mass fractal at high Q (smaller pores), indicating two pore populations contributing to the scattering behavior. These small angle neutron scattering results, combined with high-resolution TEM imaging, provided a means for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of the differences in pore networks between these various mudstones.

  15. The development and application of the chemical mixture methodology in analysis of potential health impacts from airborne release in emergencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Petrocchi, Achille J.; Craig, Douglas K.; Glantz, Clifford S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ciolek, John T.; Lu, Po-Yung; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Tuccinardi, Thomas E.; Bouslaugh, Philip R.

    2010-07-15

    The Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) is used for emergency response and safety planning by the U.S. Department of Energy, its contractors, and other private and public sector organizations. The CMM estimates potential health impacts on individuals and their ability to take protective actions as a result of exposure to airborne chemical mixtures. They are based on the concentration of each chemical in the mixture at a designated receptor location, the protective action criteria (PAC) providing chemical-specific exposure limit values, and the health code numbers (HCNs) that identify the target organ groupings that may be impacted by exposure to each chemical in a mixture. The CMM has been significantly improved since its introduction more than 10 years ago. Major enhancements involve the expansion of the number of HCNs from 44 to 60 and inclusion of updated PAC values based on an improved development methodology and updates in the data used to derive the PAC values. Comparisons between the 1999 and 2009 versions of the CMM show potentially substantial changes in the assessment results for selected sets of chemical mixtures. In particular, the toxic mode hazard indices (HIs) and target organ HIs are based on more refined acute HCNs, thereby improving the quality of chemical consequence assessment, emergency planning, and emergency response decision making. Seven hypothetical chemical storage and processing scenarios are used to demonstrate how the CMM is applied in emergency planning and hazard assessment.

  16. Potential impact of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) on fisheries. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, E.P.; Hoss, D.E.; Matsumoto, W.M.; Peters, D.S.; Seki, M.P.

    1986-06-01

    The commercial development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) operations will involve some environmental perturbations for which there is no precedent experience. The pumping of very large volumes of warm surface water and cold deep water and its subsequent discharge will result in the impingement, entrainment, and redistribution of biota. Additional stresses to biota will be caused by biocide usage and temperature depressions. However, the artificial upwelling of nutrients associated with the pumping of cold deep water, and the artificial reef created by an OTEC plant may have positive effects on the local environment. Although more detailed information is needed to assess the net effect of an OTEC operation on fisheries, certain assumptions and calculations are made, supporting the conclusion that the potential risk to fisheries is not signnificant enough to deter the early development of OTEC. It will be necessary to monitor a commercial-scale plant in order to remove many of the remaining uncertainties.

  17. The ORSphere Benchmark Evaluation and Its Potential Impact on Nuclear Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; J. Blair Briggs

    2013-10-01

    In the early 1970’s, critical experiments using an unreflected metal sphere of highly enriched uranium (HEU) were performed with the focus to provide a “very accurate description…as an ideal benchmark for calculational methods and cross-section data files.” Two near-critical configurations of the Oak Ridge Sphere (ORSphere) were evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook). The results from those benchmark experiments were then compared with additional unmoderated and unreflected HEU metal benchmark experiment configurations currently found in the ICSBEP Handbook. For basic geometries (spheres, cylinders, and slabs) the eigenvalues calculated using MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 were within 3 of their respective benchmark values. There appears to be generally a good agreement between calculated and benchmark values for spherical and slab geometry systems. Cylindrical geometry configurations tended to calculate low, including more complex bare HEU metal systems containing cylinders. The ORSphere experiments do not calculate within their 1s uncertainty and there is a possibility that the effect of the measured uncertainties for the GODIVA I benchmark may need reevaluated. There is significant scatter in the calculations for the highly-correlated ORCEF cylinder experiments, which are constructed from close-fitting HEU discs and annuli. Selection of a nuclear data library can have a larger impact on calculated eigenvalue results than the variation found within calculations of a given experimental series, such as the ORCEF cylinders, using a single nuclear data set.

  18. Capital requirements and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of potential PNGV fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, L.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Wang, M.

    1999-03-11

    Our study reveals that supplying gasoline-equivalent demand for the low-market-share scenario requires a capital investment of less than $40 billion for all fuels except H{sub 2}, which will require a total cumulative investment of $150 billion. By contrast, cumulative capital investments under the high-market-share scenario are $50 billion for LNG, $90 billion for ethanol, $100 billion for methanol, $160 billion for CNG and DME, and $560 billion for H{sub 2}. Although these substantial capital requirements are spread over many years, their magnitude could pose a challenge to the widespread introduction of 3X vehicles. Fossil fuel use by US light-duty vehicles declines significantly with introduction of 3X vehicles because of fuel-efficiency improvements for 3X vehicles and because of fuel substitution (which applies to the nonpetroleum-fueled alternatives). Petroleum use for light-duty vehicles in 2030 is reduced by as much as 45% relative to the reference scenario. GHG emissions follow a similar pattern. Total GHG emissions decline by 25-30% with most of the propulsion system/fuel alternatives. For those using renewable fuels (i.e., ethanol and H{sub 2} from solar energy), GHG emissions drop by 33% (H{sub 2}) and 45% (ethanol). Among urban air pollutants, urban NOX emissions decline slightly for 3X vehicles using CIDI and SIDI engines and drop substantially for fuel-cell vehicles. Urban CO emissions decline for CIDI and FCV alternatives, while VOC emissions drop significantly for all alternatives except RFG-, methanol-, and ethanol-fueled SIDI engines. With the exception of CIDI engines fueled by RFD, FT50, or B20 (which increase urban PM{sub 10} emissions by over 30%), all propulsion system/fuel alternatives reduce urban PM{sub 10} emissions. Reductions are approximately 15-20% for fuel cells and for methanol-, ethanol-, CNG-, or LPG-fueled SIDI engines. Table 3 qualitatively summarizes impacts of the 13 alternatives on capital requirements and on energy use and emissions relative to the reference scenario. The table clearly shows the trade-off between costs and benefits. For example, while H{sub 2} FCVs have the greatest incremental capital needs, they offer the largest energy and emissions benefits. On the basis of the cost and benefit changes shown, methanol and gasoline FCVs appear to have particularly promising benefits-to-costs ratios.

  19. Measuring the Costs and Economic, Social, and Environmental Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat Pump Deployment and The Potential Employment, Energy, and Environmental Impacts of Direct Use Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: To measure the costs and economic; social; and environmental benefits of nationwide geothermal heat pump (GHP) deployment; and To survey selected states as to their potential employment; energy use and savings; and environmental impact for direct use applications.

  20. The Potential Impacts of OTEC Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, HI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oney, Stephen K.; Hogan, Timothy; Steinbeck, John

    2013-08-31

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a marine renewable energy technology with the potential to contribute significantly to the baseload power needs of tropical island communities and remote U.S. military installations. As with other renewable energy technologies, however, there are potential challenges to its commercialization: technological, financial, social, and environmental. Given the large volumes of seawater required to drive the electricity-producing cycle, there is potential for the intakes to negatively impact the marine resources of the source waterbody through the impingement and entrainment of marine organisms. The goal of this project was to identify feasible warm water intake designs for a land-based OTEC facility proposed for development in Port Allen, Kauai and to characterize the populations of ichthyoplankton near the proposed warm water intake location that could be at risk of entrainment. The specific objectives of this project were to: • Complete a site-specific assessment of available and feasible warm water intake technologies to determine the best intake designs for minimizing impacts to aquatic organisms at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. • Complete a field sampling program to collect biological data to characterize the baseline populations of ichthyoplankton near the sites being considered for the warm water intake at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. Various intake design options are presented with the focus on providing adequate environmental protection to the local ichthyoplankton population while providing an economically viable intake option to the OTEC developer. Further definition by NOAA and other environmental regulators is required to further refine the designs presented to meet all US regulations for future OTEC development.

  1. POTENTIAL IMPACT OF BLENDING RESIDUAL SOLIDS FROM TANKS 18/19 MOUNDS WITH TANK 7 OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eibling, R; Erich Hansen, E; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2007-03-29

    High level waste tanks 18F and 19F have residual mounds of waste which may require removal before the tanks can be closed. Conventional slurry pump technology, previously used for waste removal and tank cleaning, has been incapable of removing theses mounds from tanks 18F and 19F. A mechanical cleaning method has been identified that is potentially capable of removing and transferring the mound material to tank 7F for incorporation in a sludge batch for eventual disposal in high level waste glass by the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The Savannah River National Laboratory has been requested to evaluate whether the material transferred from tanks 18F/19F by the mechanical cleaning technology can later be suspended in Tank 7F by conventional slurry pumps after mixing with high level waste sludge. The proposed mechanical cleaning process for removing the waste mounds from tanks 18 and 19 may utilize a high pressure water jet-eductor that creates a vacuum to mobilize solids. The high pressure jet is also used to transport the suspended solids. The jet-eductor system will be mounted on a mechanical crawler for movement around the bottom of tanks 18 and 19. Based on physical chemical property testing of the jet-eductor system processed IE-95 zeolite and size-reduced IE-95 zeolite, the following conclusions were made: (1) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite has a mean and median particle size (volume basis) of 115.4 and 43.3 microns in water. Preferential settling of these large particles is likely. (2) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite rapidly generates settled solid yield stresses in excess of 11,000 Pascals in caustic supernates and will not be easily retrieved from Tank 7 with the existing slurry pump technology. (3) Settled size-reduced IE-95 zeolite (less than 38 microns) in caustic supernate does not generate yield stresses in excess of 600 Pascals in less than 30 days. (4) Preferential settling of size-reduced zeolite is a function of the amount of sludge and the level of dilution for the mixture. (5) Blending the size-reduced zeolite into larger quantities of sludge can reduce the amount of preferential settling. (6) Periodic dilution or resuspension due to sludge washing or other mixing requirements will increase the chances of preferential settling of the zeolite solids. (7) Mixtures of Purex sludge and size-reduced zeolite did not produce yield stresses greater than 200 Pascals for settling times less than thirty days. Most of the sludge-zeolite blends did not exceed 50 Pascals. These mixtures should be removable by current pump technology if sufficient velocities can be obtained. (8) The settling rate of the sludge-zeolite mixtures is a function of the ionic strength (or supernate density) and the zeolite- sludge mixing ratio. (9) Simulant tests indicate that leaching of Si may be an issue for the processed Tank 19 mound material. (10) Floating zeolite fines observed in water for the jet-eductor system and size-reduced zeolite were not observed when the size-reduced zeolite was blended with caustic solutions, indicating that the caustic solutions cause the fines to agglomerate. Based on the test programs described in this report, the potential for successfully removing Tank 18/19 mound material from Tank 7 with the current slurry pump technology requires the reduction of the particle size of the Tank 18/19 mound material.

  2. X-ray, NMR, and Mutational Studies of the Catalytic Cycle of the GDP-Mannose Mannosyl Hydrolase Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabelli,S.; Azurmendi, H.; Bianchet, M.; Amzel, L.; Mildva, A.

    2006-01-01

    GDP-mannose hydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis with inversion of GDP-{alpha}-D-hexose to GDP and {beta}-D-hexose by nucleophilic substitution by water at C1 of the sugar. Two new crystal structures (free enzyme and enzyme-substrate complex), NMR, and site-directed mutagenesis data, combined with the structure of the enzyme-product complex reported earlier, suggest a four-stage catalytic cycle. An important loop (L6, residues 119-125) contains a ligand to the essential Mg{sup 2+} (Gln-123), the catalytic base (His-124), and three anionic residues. This loop is not ordered in the X-ray structure of the free enzyme due to dynamic disorder, as indicated by the two-dimensional 1H-15N HMQC spectrum, which shows selective exchange broadening of the imidazole nitrogen resonances of His-124 (k{sub ex} = 6.6 x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}). The structure of the enzyme-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP-mannose substrate complex of the less active Y103F mutant shows loop L6 in an open conformation, while the structure of the enzyme-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP product complex showed loop L6 in a closed, 'active' conformation. 1H-15N HMQC spectra show the imidazole N of His-124 to be unprotonated, appropriate for general base catalysis. Substituting Mg{sup 2+} with the more electrophilic metal ions Mn{sup 2+} or Co{sup 2+} decreases the pK{sub a} in the pH versus k{sub cat} rate profiles, showing that deprotonation of a metal-bound water is partially rate-limiting. The H124Q mutation, which decreases k{sub cat} 103.4-fold and largely abolishes its pH dependence, is rescued by the Y103F mutation, which increases k{sub cat} 23-fold and restores its pH dependence. The structural basis of the rescue is the fact that the Y103F mutation shifts the conformational equilibrium to the open form moving loop L6 out of the active site, thus permitting direct access of the specific base hydroxide from the solvent. In the proposed dissociative transition state, which occurs in the closed, active conformation of the enzyme, the partial negative charge of the GDP leaving group is compensated by the Mg2+, and by the closing of loop L2 that brings Arg-37 closer to the -phosphate. The development of a positive charge at mannosyl C1, as the oxocarbenium-like transition state is approached, is compensated by closing the anionic loop, L6, onto the active site, further stabilizing the transition state.

  3. Non-Targeted Effects Induced by Ionizing Radiation: Mechanisms and Potential Impact on Radiation Induced Health Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-01-01

    Not-targeted effects represent a paradigm shift from the "DNA centric" view that ionizing radiation only elicits biological effects and subsequent health consequences as a result of an energy deposition event in the cell nucleus. While this is likely true at higher radiation doses (> 1Gy), at low doses (< 100mGy) non-targeted effects associated with radiation exposure might play a significant role. Here definitions of non-targeted effects are presented, the potential mechanisms for the communication of signals and signaling networks from irradiated cells/tissues are proposed, and the various effects of this intra- and intercellular signaling are described. We conclude with speculation on how these observations might lead to and impact long-term human health outcomes.

  4. Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

    2010-05-03

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar magnitude.

  5. Preliminary Scoping and Assessment Study of the Potential Impacts of Community-wide Radiological Events and Subsequent Decontamination Activities on Drinking Water and Wastewater Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; Tomasko, D.; Chen, S.Y.; Hais, A.; MacKinney, J.; Janke, R.

    2006-07-01

    Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, there has been a great deal of concern about further attacks within the United States, particularly attacks using weapons of mass destruction (WMD) or other unconventional weapons, such as a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or 'dirty bomb', which is a type of RDD. During all phases of an RDD event, secondary impacts on drinking water and wastewater systems would be possible. Secondary impacts refer to those impacts that would occur when the water systems were not the direct or intended target of the specific event. Secondary impacts would include (1) fallout from an event occurring elsewhere on water supply reservoirs and (2) runoff into storm water and sewer systems during precipitation events or as a result of cleanup and decontamination activities. To help address potential secondary impacts, a scoping and assessment study was conducted for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Homeland Security Research Center to support its water security program. The study addresses the potential impacts on water resources and infrastructure that could result from the use of an RDD, including potential impacts from the initial attack as well as from subsequent cleanup efforts. Eight radionuclides are considered in the assessment: Am-241, Cf-252, Cs-137, Co-60, Ir-192, Pu-238, Ra-226, and Sr-90. (authors)

  6. Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact of Modeling Approach on Flutter Predictions for Very Large Wind Turbine Blade Designs Brian C. Owens bcowens@sandia.gov Graduate Student Intern Wind Energy Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories ∗ Albuquerque, New Mexico, U.S.A. D. Todd Griffith dgriffi@sandia.gov Principal Member of Technical Staff Wind Energy Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories ∗ Albuquerque, New Mexico, U.S.A. Brian R. Resor brresor@sandia.gov Senior Member of Technical Staff Wind

  7. The Structure of the MUR1 GDP-mannose 4,67-deydratase from A. thaliana: Implications for Ligand Binding Specificity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulichak, A.M.; Bonin, C.P.; Reiter, W.-D.; Garavito, R.M.

    2010-03-08

    GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of GDP-L-fucose, the activated form of L-fucose, which is a component of glycoconjugates in plants known to be important to the development and strength of stem tissues. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the MUR1 dehydratase isoform from Arabidopsis thaliana complexed with its NADPH cofactor as well as with the ligands GDP and GDP-D-rhamnose. MUR1 is a member of the nucleoside-diphosphosugar modifying subclass of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase enzyme family, having homologous structures and a conserved catalytic triad of Lys, Tyr, and Ser/Thr residues. MUR1 is the first member of this subfamily to be observed as a tetramer, the interface of which reveals a close and intimate overlap of neighboring NADP{sup +}-binding sites. The GDP moiety of the substrate also binds in an unusual syn conformation. The protein-ligand interactions around the hexose moiety of the substrate support the importance of the conserved triad residues and an additional Glu side chain serving as a general base for catalysis. Phe and Arg side chains close to the hexose ring may serve to confer substrate specificity at the O2 position. In the MUR1/GDP-D-rhamnose complex, a single unique monomer within the protein tetramer that has an unoccupied substrate site highlights the conformational changes that accompany substrate binding and may suggest the existence of negative cooperativity in MUR1 function.

  8. Trading places - an innovative SO{sub 2} trading program to mitigate potential adverse impacts on Class I areas: part I. impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis Militana; Cindy Huber; Christopher Colbert; Chris Arrington; Don Shepherd

    2005-07-01

    Published in two parts, this article describes a new emissions cap-and-trade program to reduce acid deposition and visibility impacts in four Class I areas (e.g. wildernesses and national parks) from the proposed Longview Power coal-fired power plant to be located in Maidsville, WV. Part I discusses the air quality impacts of the proposed project. 5 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. EIS-0083: Final Northeast Regional Environmental Impact Statement; The Potential Conversion of Forty-Two Powerplants From Oil to Coal or Alternate Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Economic Regulatory Administration statement assesses the potential for cumulative and interactive environmental impacts resulting from conversion of up to 42 northeastern power plants from oil to coal and from an alternative “Voluntary Conversion” scenario for 27 power plants.

  10. Novel protein and Mg[superscript 2+] configurations in the Mg[superscript 2+] GDP Complex of the SRP GTPase ffh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Focia, Pamela J.; Alam, Hena; Lu, Thanh; Ramirez, Ursula D.; Freymann, Douglas M.

    2010-03-05

    Ffh is the signal sequence recognition and targeting subunit of the prokaryotic signal recognition particle (SRP). Previous structural studies of the NG GTPase domain of Ffh demonstrated magnesium-dependent and magnesium-independent binding conformations for GDP and GMPPNP that are believed to reflect novel mechanisms for exchange and activation in this member of the GTPase superfamily. The current study of the NG GTPase bound to Mg{sup 2+} GDP reveals two new binding conformations - in the first the magnesium interactions are similar to those seen previously, however, the protein undergoes a conformational change that brings a conserved aspartate into its second coordination sphere. In the second, the protein conformation is similar to that seen previously, but the magnesium coordination sphere is disrupted so that only five oxygen ligands are present. The loss of the coordinating water molecule, at the position that would be occupied by the oxygen of the {gamma}-phosphate of GTP, is consistent with that position being privileged for exchange during phosphate release. The available structures of the GDP-bound protein provide a series of structural snapshots that illuminate steps along the pathway of GDP release following GTP hydrolysis.

  11. A survey of endangered waterbirds on Maui and Oahu and assessment of potential impacts to waterbirds from the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission corridor. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, K.; Woodside, D.; Bruegmann, M.

    1994-08-01

    A survey of endangered waterbirds on Maui and Oahu was conducted during August and September 1993 to identify potential waterbird habitats within the general area of the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission corridor and to assess the potential impacts to endangered waterbird of installing and operating a high voltage transmission line from the Island of Hawaii to the islands of Oahu and Maui. Annual waterbird survey information and other literature containing information on specific wetland sites were summarized. Literature describing impacts of overhead transmission lines on birds was used to evaluate potential impacts of the proposed project on endangered waterbirds, resident wading birds, and migratory shorebirds and waterfowl. On Oahu, five wetland habitats supporting endangered Hawaiian waterbirds were identified within 2.5 miles of the proposed transmission line corridor. On Maui, three wetland habitats supporting endangered Hawaiian waterbirds were identified within the general area of the proposed transmission line corridor. Several of the wetlands identified on Oahu and Maui also supported resident wading birds and migratory shorebirds and waterfowl. Endangered waterbirds, resident wading birds, and migratory birds may collide with the proposed transmission lines wires. The frequency and numbers of bird collisions is expected to be greater on Oahu than on Maui because more wetland habitat exists and greater numbers of birds occur in the project area on Oahu. In addition, the endangered Hawaiian goose and the endangered Hawaiian petrel may be impacted by the proposed segment of the Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission line on Maui.

  12. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides detailed analyses of the following policies to determine the impact they may have on ratepayers, businesses, and the state in terms of energy saved, clean energy generated, and the financial costs and benefits.

  13. Structural Studies of the Nudix GDP-mannose Hydrolase from E. coli Reveals a New Motif for Mannose Recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Boto; W Xu; J Jakoncic; A Pannuri; T Romeo; M Bessman; S Gabelli; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    The Nudix hydrolase superfamily, characterized by the presence of the signature sequence GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where U is I, L, or V), is a well-studied family in which relations have been established between primary sequence and substrate specificity for many members. For example, enzymes that hydrolyze the diphosphate linkage of ADP-ribose are characterized by having a proline 15 amino acids C-terminal of the Nudix signature sequence. GDPMK is a Nudix enzyme that conserves this characteristic proline but uses GDP-mannose as the preferred substrate. By investigating the structure of the GDPMK alone, bound to magnesium, and bound to substrate, the structural basis for this divergent substrate specificity and a new rule was identified by which ADP-ribose pyrophosphatases can be distinguished from purine-DP-mannose pyrophosphatases from primary sequence alone. Kinetic and mutagenesis studies showed that GDPMK hydrolysis does not rely on a single glutamate as the catalytic base. Instead, catalysis is dependent on residues that coordinate the magnesium ions and residues that position the substrate properly for catalysis. GDPMK was thought to play a role in biofilm formation because of its upregulation in response to RcsC signaling; however, GDPMK knockout strains show no defect in their capacity of forming biofilms.

  14. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busche, S.; Doris, E.; Braccio, R.; Lippert, D.; Finch, P.; O'Toole, D.; Fetter, J.

    2010-04-01

    This report provides detailed analyses of 21 clean energy policy options considered by the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative working groups for recommendation to the 2010 Hawaii State Legislature. The report considers the impact each policy may have on ratepayers, businesses, and the state in terms of energy saved, clean energy generated, and the financial costs and benefits. The analyses provide insight into the possible impacts, both qualitative and quantitative, that these policies may have in Hawaii based on the experience with these policies elsewhere. As much as possible, the analyses incorporate Hawaii-specific context to reflect the many unique aspects of energy use in the State of Hawaii.

  15. Report to Congress on Assessment of Potential Impact of Concentrating Solar Power for Electriicty Generation (EPACT 2005--Section 934(c))

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, F.

    2007-02-01

    Summary of DOE's assessment of issues regarding EPAct 2005, which requires the Secretary of Energy to assess conflicting guidance on the economic potential of concentrating solar power for electricity production.

  16. Operating Experience Level 3, Laboratory Tests Indicate Conditions that Could Potentially Impact Certain Type of HEPA Filter Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE-3: 2013-02 This Operating Experience Summary provides new information on a potential performance issue associated with certain axial flow high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters that do not contain separators in the folded media (separatorless).

  17. Input-output model for MACCS nuclear accident impacts estimation¹

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Outkin, Alexander V.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Vargas, Vanessa N

    2015-01-27

    Since the original economic model for MACCS was developed, better quality economic data (as well as the tools to gather and process it) and better computational capabilities have become available. The update of the economic impacts component of the MACCS legacy model will provide improved estimates of business disruptions through the use of Input-Output based economic impact estimation. This paper presents an updated MACCS model, bases on Input-Output methodology, in which economic impacts are calculated using the Regional Economic Accounting analysis tool (REAcct) created at Sandia National Laboratories. This new GDP-based model allows quick and consistent estimation of gross domestic product (GDP) losses due to nuclear power plant accidents. This paper outlines the steps taken to combine the REAcct Input-Output-based model with the MACCS code, describes the GDP loss calculation, and discusses the parameters and modeling assumptions necessary for the estimation of long-term effects of nuclear power plant accidents.

  18. Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie E.; Bojda, Nicholas; Ke, Jing; McNeil, Michael A.

    2012-07-01

    This study analyzes the financial impacts on consumers of minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) for appliances that could be implemented in 13 major economies around the world. We use the Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), to analyze various appliance efficiency target levels to estimate the net present value (NPV) of policies designed to provide maximum energy savings while not penalizing consumers financially. These policies constitute what we call the cost-effective potential (CEP) scenario. The CEP scenario is designed to answer the question: How high can we raise the efficiency bar in mandatory programs while still saving consumers money?

  19. Chemical Species in the Vapor Phase of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks: Potential Impacts on Waste Tank Corrosion Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Boomer, Kayle D.

    2010-09-22

    The presence of corrosive and inhibiting chemicals on the tank walls in the vapor space, arising from the waste supernatant, dictate the type and degree of corrosion that occurs there. An understanding of how waste chemicals are transported to the walls and the affect on vapor species from changing supernatant chemistry (e.g., pH, etc.), are basic to the evaluation of risks and impacts of waste changes on vapor space corrosion (VSC). In order to address these issues the expert panel workshop on double-shell tank (DST) vapor space corrosion testing (RPP-RPT-31129) participants made several recommendations on the future data and modeling needs in the area of DST corrosion. In particular, the drying of vapor phase condensates or supernatants can form salt or other deposits at the carbon steel interface resulting in a chemical composition at the near surface substantially different from that observed directly in the condensates or the supernatants. As a result, over the past three years chemical modeling and experimental studies have been performed on DST supernatants and condensates to predict the changes in chemical composition that might occur as condensates or supernatants equilibrate with the vapor space species and dry at the carbon steel surface. The experimental studies included research on both the chemical changes that occurred as the supernatants dried as well as research on how these chemical changes impact the corrosion of tank steels. The chemical modeling and associated experimental studies were performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the research on tank steel corrosion at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This report presents a summary of the research conducted at PNNL with special emphasis on the most recent studies conducted in FY10. An overall summary of the project results as well as their broader implications for vapor space corrosion of the DSTs is given at the end of this report.

  20. GDP-L-fucose: .beta.-D-galactoside 2-.alpha.-L-fucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowe, John B.; Lennon, Gregory; Rouquier, Sylvie; Giorgi, Dominique; Kelly, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: .beta.-D-Galactoside 2-.alpha.-L-fucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor.

  1. GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowe, J.B.; Lennon, G.; Rouquier, S.; Giorgi, D.; Kelly, R.J.

    1998-09-15

    The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-Galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor. 30 figs.

  2. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2007-03-09

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investigate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a qualitative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represent initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simulation period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are current contaminants of concern (COCs) in the Central Plateau and include tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as initial conditions for steady-state flow runs, simulations were executed to investigate the relative effects on contaminant transport from the increased upland fluxes. Contaminant plumes were analyzed for 1) peak concentrations and arrival times at downstream points of compliance, 2) the area of the aquifer contaminated at or above the drinking water standard (DWS), and 3) the total activity remaining in the domain at the end of the simulation. In addition to this analysis, unit source release simulations from a hypothetical tracer were executed to determine relative travel times from the Central Plateau. The results of this study showed that increases in the upland boundary fluxes 1) had little impact on regional flow directions and 2) accelerated contaminant transport. Although contaminant concentrations have initially increased for the more mobile contaminants (tritium, technetium-99, and iodine-129), the accelerated transport caused dilution and a more rapid decline in concentrations relative to the Base Case (no additional flux). For the low-mobility uranium-238, higher upland fluxes caused increases in concentration, but these concentrations never exceeded the DWS. No significant effects on contaminant concentrations were identified at the Core Zone, Columbia River, or buffer zone area separating these two compliance boundaries. When lateral recharge at the upland boundaries was increased, more mass was transported out of the aquifer and discharged into the Columbia River. These concentrations, however, were diluted with respect to the Base Case, where no potential leakage from the proposed reservoir was considered.

  3. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS OF SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION FACILITIES FOR NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROWE,M.D.; KLEIN,R.C.; JONES,K.W.

    1999-07-31

    Sediment is accumulating in New York/New Jersey Harbor, and shipping channels are rapidly becoming too shallow for large ships. The Port Authority of New York/New Jersey has determined that dredging of the ship channels is essential to keep them navigable. About five million cubic yards of sediment must be removed per year to keep the channels open. Without dredging, the channels will soon become unusable, and the shoreside shipping and warehousing businesses that depend on them will fade away. The economic loss to the area would be devastating. But the deeper layers of sediment in the Harbor contain a broad range of pollutants that are hazardous to humans and the environment-a legacy of past discharges that are no longer permitted. These include heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins. As a result, there are several million cubic yards of sediments to be dredged per year that do not meet applicable criteria for ocean disposal and must be dealt with in some other way. A possible solution to the problem is to treat the dredged material to immobilize or destroy the contaminants and make the treated sediments suitable for disposal in the ocean or on land at acceptable cost. A variety of technologies can be used to achieve this goal. The simplest approach is to make manufactured soil from untreated sediment. The most complex approaches involve high-temperature destruction of organic contaminants and immobilization of inorganic contaminants. When any of these technologies are used, there is potential for risks to human health from process wastes and from the treated materials themselves. Also, disposal or beneficial use of treated materials may generate other risks to human health or the environment. A description of some of the technologies considered is given in Table 1. Success in removing or immobilizing the contaminants, which varies significantly among technologies, is reported elsewhere. This report provides a preliminary evaluation, or ``screening assessment,'' of potential occupational, public, and environmental health risks from dredging, transporting, and treating contaminated harbor sediments with thermal treatment methods to render them suitable for disposal or beneficial use. The assessment was done in stages as the project advanced and data became available from other tasks on characteristics of sediments and treatment processes.

  4. Evaluating the potential impact of transmission constraints on the operation of a competitive electricity market in Illinois.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cirillo, R.; Thimmapuram, P.; Veselka, T.; Koritarov, V.; Conzelmann, G.; Macal, C.; Boyd, G.; North, M.; Overbye, T.; Cheng, X.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Illinois

    2006-04-30

    Despite the current adequacy of the generation and transmission system in Illinois, there is concern that the uncertainties of electricity restructuring warrant a more detailed analysis to determine if there might be pitfalls that have not been identified under current conditions. The problems experienced elsewhere in the country emphasize the need for an evaluation of how Illinois might fare under a restructured electricity market. The Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) commissioned this study to be undertaken as a joint effort by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the Illinois situation in the 2007 period when restructuring is scheduled to be fully implemented in the State. The purpose of this study is to make an initial determination if the transmission system in Illinois and the surrounding region would be able to support a competitive electricity market, would allow for effective competition to keep prices in check, and would allow for new market participants to effectively compete for market share. The study seeks to identify conditions that could reasonably be expected to occur that would enable a company to exercise market power in one or more portions of the State and thereby create undue pressure on the prices charged to customers and/or inhibit new market participants from entering the market. The term 'market power' has many different definitions, and there is no universal agreement on how to measure it. For the purposes of this study, the term is defined as the ability to raise prices and increase profitability by unilateral action. A more complete definition is provided later. With this definition, the central question of this analysis becomes: 'Can a company, acting on its own, raise electricity prices and increase its profits?' It should be noted that the intent of the study is not to predict whether or not such market power would be exercised by any company. Rather, it is designed to determine if a set of reasonably expected conditions could allow any company to do so. It should also be emphasized that this study is not intended to be a comprehensive evaluation of the electric power system in the State. Rather, it is intended to identify some issues that may impact the effective functioning of a competitive market.

  5. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2008-01-30

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investigate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a qualitative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represents initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simulation period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as initial conditions for steady-state flow runs, simulations were executed to investigate the relative effects on contaminant transport from the increased upland fluxes. Contaminant plumes were analyzed for 1) peak concentrations and arrival times at downstream points of compliance, 2) the area of the aquifer contaminated at or above the drinking water standard (DWS), and 3) the total activity remaining in the domain at the end of the simulation. In addition to this analysis, unit source release simulations from a hypothetical tracer were executed to determine relative travel times from the Central Plateau. The results of this study showed that increases in the lateral recharge had limited impact on regional flow directions but accelerated contaminant transport. Although contaminant concentrations may have initially increased for the more mobile contaminants (tritium, technetium-99, and iodine-129), the accelerated transport caused dilution and a more rapid decline in concentrations relative to the Base Case (no additional flux). For the low-mobility uranium-238, higher lateral recharge caused increases in concentration, but these concentrations never approached the DWS. In this preliminary investigation, contaminant concentrations did not exceed the DWS study metric. With the increases in upland fluxes, more mass was transported out of the aquifer, and concentrations were diluted with respect to the base case where no additional flux was considered.

  6. An assessment of potential environmental impacts of cement kiln dust produced in kilns co-fired with hazardous waste fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goad, P.T.; Millner, G.C.; Nye, A.C.

    1998-12-31

    The Keystone Cement Company (Keystone), located in Bath, Pennsylvania, produces cement in two kilns that are co-fired with hazardous waste-derived fuels. Beginning in the late 1970`s Keystone began storing cement kiln dust (CKD) in an aboveground storage pile located on company property adjacent to the cement kilns. Storm water runoff from the CKD pile is channeled into a storm water settling pond which in turn discharges into Monocacy Creek, a stream running along the eastern property boundary. Monocacy Creek sustains a thriving trout fishery and is routinely fished during the open recreational fishing season in pennsylvania. The CKD pile has a surface area of approximately 12 acres, with an average height of approximately 35 feet. The southern edge of the pile is contiguous with an adjacent company-owned field in which field corn is grown for cattle feed. Some of the corn on the edges of the field is actually grown in direct contact with CKD that comprises the edge of the storage pile. The CKD pile is located approximately 150 yards to the west of Monocacy Creek. In 1995--1996 water, sediment and fish (trout) samples were obtained from Monocacy Creek sampling stations upstream and downstream of the point of discharge of storm water runoff from the CKD pile. In addition, corn samples were obtained from the field contiguous with the CKD pile and from a control field located distant to the site. The sediment, water, fish, and corn samples were analyzed for various chemicals previously identified as chemicals of potential concern in CKD. These data indicate that chemical constituents of CKD are not contaminating surface water or sediment in the stream, and that bioaccumulation of organic chemicals and/or metals has not occurred in field corn grown in direct contact with undiluted CKD, or in fish living in the waters that receive CKD pile runoff.

  7. Economic impacts of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic : a cross-sectional analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Braeton J.; Shaneyfelt, Calvin R.

    2010-06-01

    A NISAC study on the economic effects of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic was done in order to assess the differential impacts at the state and industry levels given changes in absenteeism, mortality, and consumer spending rates. Part of the analysis was to determine if there were any direct relationships between pandemic impacts and gross domestic product (GDP) losses. Multiple regression analysis was used because it shows very clearly which predictors are significant in their impact on GDP. GDP impact data taken from the REMI PI+ (Regional Economic Models, Inc., Policy Insight +) model was used to serve as the response variable. NISAC economists selected the average absenteeism rate, mortality rate, and consumer spending categories as the predictor variables. Two outliers were found in the data: Nevada and Washington, DC. The analysis was done twice, with the outliers removed for the second analysis. The second set of regressions yielded a cleaner model, but for the purposes of this study, the analysts deemed it not as useful because particular interest was placed on determining the differential impacts to states. Hospitals and accommodation were found to be the most important predictors of percentage change in GDP among the consumer spending variables.

  8. The R6A-1 peptide binds to switch II of G{alpha}{sub i1} but is not a GDP-dissociation inhibitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willard, Francis S. . E-mail: fwillard@med.unc.edu; Siderovski, David P.

    2006-01-27

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches that convert signals from membrane receptors into changes in intracellular physiology. Recently, several peptides that bind heterotrimeric G-protein {alpha} subunits have been isolated including the novel G{alpha}{sub i1} . GDP binding peptides R6A and KB-752. The R6A peptide and its minimized derivative R6A-1 interact with G{alpha}{sub i1} . GDP. Based on spectroscopic analysis of BODIPYFL-GTP{gamma}S binding to G{alpha}{sub i1}, it has been reported that R6A-1 has guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) activity against G{alpha}{sub i1} [W.W. Ja, R.W. Roberts, Biochemistry 43 (28) (2004) 9265-9275]. Using radioligand binding, we show that R6A-1 is not a GDI for G{alpha}{sub i1} subunits. Furthermore, we demonstrate that R6A-1 reduces the fluorescence quantum yield of the G{alpha}{sub i1}-BODIPYFL-GTP{gamma}S complex, thus explaining the previously reported GDI activity as a fluorescence artifact. We further show that R6A-1 has significant sequence similarity to the guanine nucleotide exchange factor peptide KB-752 that binds to switch II of G{alpha}{sub i1}. We use competitive binding analysis to show that R6A-1 also binds to switch II of G{alpha} subunits.

  9. Source Term Modeling for Evaluating the Potential Impacts to Groundwater of Fluids Escaping from a Depleted Oil Reservoir Used for Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-06-13

    In recent years depleted oil reservoirs have received special interest as carbon storage reservoirs because of their potential to offset costs through collaboration with enhanced oil recovery projects. Modeling is currently being conducted to evaluate potential risks to groundwater associated with leakage of fluids from depleted oil reservoirs used for storage of CO2. Modeling results reported here focused on understanding how toxic organic compounds found in oil will distribute between the various phases within a storage reservoir after introduction of CO2, understanding the migration potential of these compounds, and assessing potential groundwater impacts should leakage occur. Two model scenarios were conducted to evaluate how organic components in oil will distribute among the phases of interest (oil, CO2, and brine). The first case consisted of 50 wt.% oil and 50 wt.% water; the second case was 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil. Several key organic compounds were selected for special attention in this study based upon their occurrence in oil at significant concentrations, relative toxicity, or because they can serve as surrogate compounds for other more highly toxic compounds for which required input data are not available. The organic contaminants of interest (COI) selected for this study were benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene. Partitioning of organic compounds between crude oil and supercritical CO2 was modeled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state over temperature and pressure conditions that represent the entire subsurface system (from those relevant to deep geologic carbon storage environments to near surface conditions). Results indicate that for a typical set of oil reservoir conditions (75°C, and 21,520 kPa) negligible amounts of the COI dissolve into the aqueous phase. When CO2 is introduced into the reservoir such that the final composition of the reservoir is 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil, a significant fraction of the oil dissolves into the vapor phase. As the vapor phase moves up through the stratigraphic column, pressures and temperatures decrease, resulting in significant condensation of oil components. The heaviest organic components condense early in this process (at higher pressures and temperatures), while the lighter components tend to remain in the vapor phase until much lower pressures and temperatures are reached. Based on the model assumptions, the final concentrations of COI to reach an aquifer at 1,520 kPa and 25°C were quite significant for benzene and toluene, whereas the concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons that reach the aquifer were very small. This work demonstrates a methodology that can provide COI source term concentrations in CO2 leaking from a reservoir and entering an overlying aquifer for use in risk assessments.

  10. HTGR technology economic/ business analysis and trade studies impacts. Impacts of HTGR commericialization on the U.S. economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silady, Fred

    2013-12-07

    The approach to this task was to initially review the 2012 Business Plan and supporting analyses for the above impacts. With that understanding as a base, the Business Plan impacts are updated in terms of the GDP and job creation as a result of additional studies and inputs such as the revised market assessment from Task 1.1. For the impacts on U.S. competitiveness, the NGNP Industry Alliance team members have been utilized to provide inputs on supplier infrastructure development and on vendor capability.

  11. 40-MW(e) OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) plant at Kahe Point, Oahu, Hawaii: a case study of potential biological impacts. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, J.T.

    1987-02-01

    Construction and operation of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) facility will affect marine, terrestrial, and atmospheric environments. The nature and degree of OTEC environmental impacts have been subjects of numerous studies and reports. The proposed 40-MWe OTEC plant at Kahe Point, Oahu, Hawaii has been the focus of much of the work. The first section provides a summary of pertinent design features of the proposed plant, including standard operating parameters. Next, salient elements of the biological oceanography in the region of the proposed development are summarized. The following sections discuss expected impacts of construction and operation of the plant, and finally, significant aspects of modeling studies conducted in support of the Kahe OTEC plant development are presented.

  12. Trading places - an innovative SO{sub 2} trading program to mitigate potential adverse impacts on class I areas: part II. Mitigation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis Militana; Cindy Huber; Christopher Colbert; Chris Arrington; Don Shepherd

    2005-08-01

    This is the second of two articles describing a plan that was developed to mitigate the effects of acid deposition and visibility impairment in four Class I areas from the proposed Longview Power Project. Part I (published in July 2005) discussed the air quality impacts of the proposed coal-fired power plant. Part II discusses the mitigation plan. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-10-01

    A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

  14. List of currently classified documents relative to Hanford Operations and of potential use in the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment, January 1, 1973--June 20, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, T.B.; Huesties, L.R.

    1995-02-01

    The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) Project seeks to estimate the current risk from the Columbia River resulting from past and present Hanford activities. To resolve the question of the current risk, it is necessary for the CRCIA Project to have access to any classified information that may be relevant to this study. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the search for relevant classified information. There are two classified matter control centers operated by two prime contractors at the Hanford Site. One is operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the other is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Only the WHC collection contained information relevant to a study of the Columbia River in the time frame of interest: January 1, 1973 through June 20, 1994. A list of the classified documents in the WHC collection is maintained in the WHC Classified Document Control database. The WHC Classified Document Control database was searched. The search criteria were the dates of interest and the basic keywords used for the CRCIA Project`s data compendium (Eslinger et al. 1994). All Hanford-generated, Hanford-related entries that were applicable to the CRCIA Project and the dates of interest were provided. The resulting list of 477 titles comprises the Appendix of this report. The information give for each title is exactly as it appears in the database. Any inconsistencies are the result of duplicating the database.

  15. EIS-0319: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0319: Draft Environmental Impact Statement This EIS evaluates the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental impacts...

  16. Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SWEIS Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement We analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with Laboratory operations and facilities. Contact Environmental...

  17. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FIGURE S-7 Areas of Potential Impact Evaluated for Each ... This EIS assesses the potential environmental impacts from ... activities consistent with current plans and procedures. ...

  18. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FIGURE S-6 Areas of Potential Impact Evaluated for Each ... This EIS assesses the potential environmental impacts from ... activities consistent with current plans and procedures. ...

  19. Replacement of chlorofluorocarbons at the DOE gaseous diffusion plants: An assessment of global impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Socolof, M.L.; McCold, L.N.; Saylor, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Three gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) for enriching uranium maintain a large inventory of chlorofluorocarbon-114 (CFC-114) as a coolant. To address the continued use of CFC-114, an ozone-depleting substance, the US Department of Energy (DOE) considered introducing perfluorocarbons (PFCs) by the end of 1995. These PFCs would not contribute to stratospheric ozone depletion but would be larger contributors to global warming than would CFC-114. The paper reports the results of an assessment of the global impacts of four alternatives for modifying GDP coolant system operations over a three-year period beginning in 1996. The overall contribution of GDP coolant releases to impacts on ozone depletion and global warming were quantified by parameters referred to as ozone-depletion impact and global-warming impact. The analysis showed that these parameters could be used as surrogates for predicting global impacts to all resources and could provide a framework for assessing environmental impacts of a permanent coolant replacement, eliminating the need for subsequent resource-specific analyses.

  20. Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Normandeau Associates is developing a tool to check the risk of wind turbine collisions for bird and bat species.

  1. Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Associates of Bedford, New Hampshire, developed a tool that characterizes the risk for bird and bat species that may be susceptible to collisions with wind turbines. This tool...

  2. The potential role of a carbon tax in U.S. fiscal reform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKibbin, Warwick; Morris, Adele; Wilcoxen, Peter; Cai, Yiyong

    2012-07-24

    This paper examines fiscal reform options in the United States with an intertemporal computable general equilibrium model of the world economy called G-Cubed. Six policy scenarios explore two overarching issues: (1) the effects of a carbon tax under alternative assumptions about the use of the resulting revenue, and (2) the effects of alternative measures that could be used to reduce the budget deficit. We examine a simple excise tax on the carbon content of fossil fuels in the U.S. energy sector starting immediately at $15 per metric ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) and rising at 4 percent above inflation each year through 2050. We investigate policies that allow the revenue from the illustrative carbon tax to reduce the long run federal budget deficit or the marginal tax rates on labor and capital income. We also compare the carbon tax to other means of reducing the deficit by the same amount. We find that the carbon tax will raise considerable revenue: $80 billion at the outset, rising to $170 billion in 2030 and $310 billion by 2050. It also significantly reduces U.S. CO2 emissions by an amount that is largely independent of the use of the revenue. By 2050, annual CO2 emissions fall by 2.5 billion metric tons (BMT), or 34 percent, relative to baseline, and cumulative emissions fall by 40 BMT through 2050. The use of the revenue affects both broad economic impacts and the composition of GDP across consumption, investment and net exports. In most scenarios, the carbon tax lowers GDP slightly, reduces investment and exports, and increases imports. The effect on consumption varies across policies and can be positive if households receive the revenue as a lump sum transfer. Using the revenue for a capital tax cut, however, is significantly different than the other policies. In that case, investment booms, employment rises, consumption declines slightly, imports increase, and overall GDP rises significantly relative to baseline through about 2040. Thus, a tax reform that uses a carbon tax to reduce capital taxes would achieve two goals: reducing CO2 emissions significantly and expanding short-run employment and the economy. We examine three ways to reduce the deficit by an equal amount. We find that raising marginal tax rates on labor income has advantages over raising tax rates on capital income or establishing a carbon tax. A labor tax increase leaves GDP close to its baseline, reduces consumption very slightly and expands net exports slightly. Investment remains essentially unchanged. In contrast, a capital tax increase causes a significant and persistent drop in investment and much larger reductions in GDP. A carbon tax falls between the two: it lowers GDP more than a labor tax increase because it reduces investment. However, its effects on investment and GDP are more moderate than the capital tax increase, and it also significantly reduces CO2 emissions. A carbon tax thus offers a way to help reduce the deficit and improve the environment, and do so with minimal disturbance to overall economic activity.

  3. EIS-0283: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with alternatives for the disposition of surplus plutonium.

  4. Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the ocean's impact on tropical cyclones Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamic Potential Intensity: An ...

  5. Environmental impact report (draft)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The three projects as proposed by Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the environmental analysis of the projects are discussed. Sections on the natural and social environments of the proposed projects and their surrounding areas consist of descriptions of the setting, discussions of the adverse and beneficial consequences of the project, and potential mitigation measures to reduce the effects of adverse impacts. The Environmental Impact Report includes discussions of unavoidable adverse effects, irreversible changes, long-term and cumulative impacts, growth-inducing effects, and feasible alternatives to the project. (MHR)

  6. EIS-0377: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0377: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project This EIS evaluates the potential environmental...

  7. EIS-0344: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coulee - Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) discloses the potential impacts associated with construction and operation of the proposed...

  8. EA-1777: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Significant Impact EA-1777: Finding of No Significant Impact Lincoln Electric's Wind Energy Project in Euclid, OH DOE prepared an environmental assessment analyzing the potential...

  9. EIS-0460: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Impact Statement FutureGen 2.0 Project, Morgan County, Illinois This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of DOE's proposed action to provide approximately 1...

  10. Impact of Ethanol Blending on U.S. Gasoline Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-11-01

    This study assesses the impact of ethanol blending on gasoline prices in the US today and the potential impact of ethanol on gasoline prices at higher blending concentrations.

  11. EIS-0323: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Statement EIS-0323: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Sacramento Area Voltage Support This Draft EIS evaluates the potential environmental effects of physical...

  12. EIS-0290: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0290: Final Environmental Impact Statement Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) The AMWTP Final EIS assesses the potential ...

  13. EIS-0503: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0503: Final Environmental Impact Statement New England Clean Power Link, Vermont DOE prepared this Final EIS to evaluate the potential ...

  14. The differential impact of low-carbon technologies on climate change mitigation cost under a range of socioeconomic and climate policy scenarios.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barron, Robert W.; McJeon, Haewon C.

    2015-05-01

    This paper considers the effect of several key parameters of low carbon energy technologies on the cost of abatement. A methodology for determining the minimum level of performance required for a parameter to have a statistically significant impact on CO2 abatement cost is developed and used to evaluate the impact of eight key parameters of low carbon energy supply technologies on the cost of CO2 abatement. The capital cost of nuclear technology is found to have the greatest impact of the parameters studied. The cost of biomass and CCS technologies also have impacts, while their efficiencies have little, if any. Sensitivity analysis of the results with respect to population, GDP, and CO2 emission constraint show that the minimum performance level and impact of nuclear technologies is consistent across the socioeconomic scenarios studied, while the other technology parameters show different performance under higher population, lower GDP scenarios. Solar technology was found to have a small impact, and then only at very low costs. These results indicate that the cost of nuclear is the single most important driver of abatement cost, and that trading efficiency for cost may make biomass and CCS technologies more competitive.

  15. Ocean energy resources: the impact of OTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ditmars, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The status of OTEC technological development is summarized with emphasis on the potential impacts of OTEC power production on the ocean environment, including implications for impacts to climate. (MHR)

  16. Reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake- induced settlements at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykora, D.W.; Yule, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    This report documents a reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake-induced settlements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located southwest of Paducah, KY. The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was authorized to conduct this study from FY91 to FY94 by the DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), Oak Ridge, TN, through Inter- Agency Agreement (IAG) No. DE-AI05-91OR21971. The study was conducted under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report (GDP SAR) Program.

  17. Impact Statements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Room / Final Environment Impact Statements Record of Decision on Bonneville Power Administration’s Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project (DOE/EIS-3790, November 2008). February 2009.

  18. EIS-0083: Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final Northeast Regional Environmental Impact Statement; The Potential Conversion of Forty-Two Powerplants From Oil to Coal or Alternate Fuels

  19. Connecticut's Health Impact Study Rapidly Increasing Weatherization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and reducing potential negative impacts on health when working toward its energy goals. ... develop the HIA. As a result of this collaborative effort, the state association and ...

  20. RANGELAND SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Spangler; George F. Vance; Gerald E. Schuman; Justin D. Derner

    2012-03-31

    Rangelands occupy approximately half of the world's land area and store greater than 10% of the terrestrial biomass carbon and up to 30% of the global soil organic carbon. Although soil carbon sequestration rates are generally low on rangelands in comparison to croplands, increases in terrestrial carbon in rangelands resulting from management can account for significant carbon sequestration given the magnitude of this land resource. Despite the significance rangelands can play in carbon sequestration, our understanding remains limited. Researchers conducted a literature review to identify sustainably management practices that conserve existing rangeland carbon pools, as well as increase or restore carbon sequestration potentials for this type of ecosystem. The research team also reviewed the impact of grazing management on rangeland carbon dynamics, which are not well understood due to heterogeneity in grassland types. The literature review on the impact of grazing showed a wide variation of results, ranging from positive to negative to no response. On further review, the intensity of grazing appears to be a major factor in controlling rangeland soil organic carbon dynamics. In 2003, researchers conducted field sampling to assess the effect of several drought years during the period 1993-2002. Results suggested that drought can significantly impact rangeland soil organic carbon (SOC) levels, and therefore, carbon sequestration. Resampling was conducted in 2006; results again suggested that climatic conditions may have overridden management effects on SOC due to the ecological lag of the severe drought of 2002. Analysis of grazing practices during this research effort suggested that there are beneficial effects of light grazing compared to heavy grazing and non-grazing with respect to increased SOC and nitrogen contents. In general, carbon storage in rangelands also increases with increased precipitation, although researchers identified threshold levels of precipitation where sequestration begins to decrease.

  1. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the U.S. transportation sector. Technical report fourteen: Market potential and impacts of alternative fuel use in light-duty vehicles -- A 2000/2010 analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    In this report, estimates are provided of the potential, by 2010, to displace conventional light-duty vehicle motor fuels with alternative fuels--compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), methanol from natural gas, ethanol from grain and from cellulosic feedstocks, and electricity--and with replacement fuels such as oxygenates added to gasoline. The 2010 estimates include the motor fuel displacement resulting both from government programs (including the Clean Air Act and EPACT) and from potential market forces. This report also provides an estimate of motor fuel displacement by replacement and alterative fuels in the year 2000. However, in contrast to the 2010 estimates, the year 2000 estimate is restricted to an accounting of the effects of existing programs and regulations. 27 figs., 108 tabs.

  2. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This report focuses on potential impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e., rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological ...

  3. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This report focuses on potential impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e. rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological ...

  4. DEISCODES. For Environmental Impact Statements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widmayer, D.A. [U.S. NRC, Office of Material Safety and Safegaurds, Washington, D.C., (United States)

    1983-01-01

    DEISCODES, the Draft Environmental Impact Statement CODES are five separate FORTRAN codes used to perform the analysis in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement written to support 10 CFR 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste. The five codes are named OPTIONS, GRWATER, INTRUDE, INVERSW, and INVERSI. These codes calculate impact measures associated with the management of Low-Level radioactive Waste (LLW). Three phases of waste management are considered: waste processing, transportation, and disposal, utilizing (1) information on waste characteristics, (2) data and assumptions on disposal technologies and (3) impact calculational methodologies presented in NUREG/CR-1759 and NUREG-0782. The INTRUDE code determines the radiological impacts resulting from potential inadvertent human intrusion into a selected disposal facility containing processed waste as a function of time after disposal. GRWATER calculates the individual exposures resulting from use of contaminated water drawn from various human access locations such as a well that may become contaminated as a result of potential groundwater migration or radionuclides. The OPTIONS code calculates the waste volume-averaged inadvertent intruder impacts, impacts resulting from exposed waste scenarios, as well as those resulting from operational accidents, and those associated with short term consideration such as waste processing and transportation impacts, disposal costs, energy use, land use, etc. INVERSI, calculates the limiting concentrations in waste to meet a specific dose criterion for a disposal facility. INVERSW, calculates disposal facility radionuclide concentrations and inventories to meet specific allowable dose criteria for groundwater migration for the facility design and regionally representative environmental characteristics.

  5. Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SWEIS Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement We analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with Laboratory operations and facilities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement forms the backbone of the National Environmental Policy Act documentation for LANL's continued facility operations. Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement The Site-wide

  6. Identify Potential HITs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Impact Technology Catalyst » Identify Potential HITs Identify Potential HITs Identify Potential HITs HIT prioritization is conducted each year based on quantitative, foundational criteria developed through a transparent, collaborative and consistent methodology designed to drive technologies through a step-by-step evaluation. The HIT prioritization methodology helps prioritize technologies for deployment focus and also ensures the open, consistent, two-way transfer of information and

  7. DOE/EA-1976 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR PROPOSED CNG...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with...

  8. Scientific Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Impact Since its inception over twenty years ago, CAMS has achieved noteworthy scientific progress by developing new capabilities and by combining state-of-the-art tools and expertise to address important scientific challenges. Scientific Leadership CAMS scientists are recognized as scientific leaders in the field of AMS and the disciplines that it supports. Many CAMS staff participate on federal agency (NIH, NSF, NOAA and DOE) scientific review panels as well as giving a multitude

  9. ECONOMIC IMPACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ECONOMIC IMPACT 2015 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES National Security Sandia's primary mission is ensuring the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure, and reliable, and can fully support our nation's deterrence policy. NUCLEAR WEAPONS DEFENSE SYSTEMS & ASSESSMENTS We provide technical solutions for global security by engineering and integrating advanced science and technology to help defend and protect the United States. Jill Hruby President and Laboratories Director "Qualified, diverse

  10. Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the ocean's

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    impact on tropical cyclones (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the ocean's impact on tropical cyclones Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the ocean's impact on tropical cyclones To incorporate the effects of tropical cyclone (TC)-induced upper ocean mixing and sea surface temperature (SST) cooling on TC intensification, a vertical average of

  11. Utility Potential Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Potential Studies in the Northwest V1.0 Utility Potential Calculator V1.0 for Excel 2007 Utility Potential Calculator V1.0 for Excel 2003 Note: BPA developed the Utility...

  12. Economic Impact | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic Impact Jefferson Lab generates many economic benefits. For the nation, Jefferson Lab generates $679.1 million in economic output and 4,422 jobs. The economic output and related jobs represent the potential loss of gross output and employment that would be felt by the country if the lab suddenly were to vanish. For the Commonwealth of Virginia, Jefferson Lab generates $271.1 million in economic output and 2,200 jobs. For the Hampton Roads area, the lab creates an economic benefit in the

  13. EIS-0473: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EIS-0473: Draft Environmental Impact Statement W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Fort Bend County, Texas This EIS evaluates the potential impacts ...

  14. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... as having any special scientific ... are feasible. 3 This report is available at no cost ... Methodology All cost and emissions abatement scenarios in this study are ...

  15. The potential impact of ZT=4 thermoelectric materials on solar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    engines taking into account specific mass, volume and cost as well as system reliability. ... CONVERSION; INDUCTION; PERFORMANCE; RELIABILITY; STIRLING ENGINES; THERMOELECTRIC ...

  16. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a national energy coordinator at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, DC. Hall ... degradation of fish passage, water quality, and aquatic and terrestrial habitats. ...

  17. Impact of Electric Industry Structure on High Wind Penetration Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Gramlich, R.; Goggin, M.

    2009-07-01

    This paper attempts to evaluate which balancing area (BA) characteristics best accommodate wind energy.

  18. Preliminary study assesses potential impact of seismic event...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a variety of nuclear materials research and development programs. LANL is committed to continuous improvement. Reevaluation of site hazards is part of our continuous cycle of...

  19. Laboratory Tests Indicate Conditions that Could Potentially Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    may be exposed while in use. The HEPA filters tested were 24" x 24" x 11 .5" DYN E2 media HEPA filters (model number 0-007-U-42-03-NU-11-13-GG- FU5). The tests showed that...

  20. Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Introduction of the Enrichment Services Component of DOE Low Enriched Uranium Inventory ... Markets of Introduction of the Enrichment Services Component of DOE Low Enriched ...

  1. Impact of Codes on Potential PVC Duct System Solution

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 26, 2012, and addressed the question "Do codes and standards get in the way of high performance?"

  2. PNNL: About: EMS Control of Potential Environmental Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and hence are most deserving of attention and control through our Environmental Management System. The aspects identified are shown below along with the controls the EMS uses...

  3. Potential Health and Environmental Impact from Emerging Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuels: A report from the Health Effects Insitute Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September ...

  4. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon 47891.pdf More Documents & Publications Hawai'i's Evolution: Hawai'i Powered. Technology Driven. HCEI Road Map: 2011 Edition (Brochure) Hawai'i Establishes Goal of ...

  5. Potential Release Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRS Potential Release Sites Legacy sites where hazardous materials are found to be above acceptable levels are collectively called potential release sites. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Less than 10 percent of the total number of potential release sites need to go through the full corrective action process. What are potential release sites? Potential release sites are areas around the Laboratory and

  6. EA-1746: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is adopting an environmental assessment completed by the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management in December 2007 that analyzed the potential environmental impacts...

  7. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AGREEMENT FOR PART 2 OF THE MESQUITE SOLAR ENERGY PROJECT IN MARICOPA COUNTY, ARIZONA ... (EA) (DOEEA-1796) to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with ...

  8. EIS-0319: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    TA-18 Relocation EIS evaluates the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental impacts associated with this proposed action at the following DOE sites: (1) a different...

  9. EIS-0280: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    potential environmental and human health impacts of a proposed project under the Clean Coal Technology Program that would integrate the production of molten iron for steelmaking...

  10. EIS-0509: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    its intent to prepare an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal facilities in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. ...

  11. EIS-0349: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    areas; access roads; and wetland mitigation areas.This Draft EIS assesses the existing natural and built environment, evaluates the potential environmental impacts and economic...

  12. EIS-0485: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed Grande Prairie Wind Farm (Holt County, Nebraska) to Western Area Power Administration's power...

  13. EIS-0383: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    social and economic resources, waste management, human health and safety, and noise. The EIS also evaluates potential impacts on these resource areas for a scenario...

  14. Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios Effects Of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment ...

  15. EIS-0509: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal facilities in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. DOE, Office of Fossil...

  16. EIS-0506: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    agency - that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to improve fish habitat by restoring stream and floodplain functions, restoring instream fish habitat...

  17. EIS-0492: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    an an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of proposals (1) to add liquefaction and export capability to a proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in...

  18. EIS-0393: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Montana Department of Environmental Quality to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposed copper and silver underground mine about 18 miles south of Libby, Montana. ...

  19. EIS-0393: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Quality issued a Final EIS that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposed copper and silver underground mine about 18 miles south of Libby, Montana. ...

  20. EA-2003: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an EA that assessed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed removal of a dam from the east channel of the Sandy River. DOE's Bonneville Power Administration, a...

  1. EIS-0496: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed interconnection of certain San Luis Unit facilities to Western's Central Valley Project Transmission System. For the...

  2. EIS-0503: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New England Clean Power Link, Vermont DOE announces its intent to prepare an EIS to assess the potential environmental impacts of granting a Presidential permit to construct,...

  3. EA-1696: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-1696: Finding of No Significant Impact Pantex Renewable Energy Project, Amarillo, Texas The NNSA has prepared an Environmental Assessment to analyze the potential...

  4. EA-1606: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, SC DOE prepared an environmental assessment to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed use of Savannah ...

  5. EIS-0321: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Condon Wind Project This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of executing one or more power purchase and transmission services agreements to acquire and transmit up...

  6. EIS-0445: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Potential Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement, EIS-0445 (June 2010) (75 FR 32171) More Documents & Publications...

  7. EIS-0423-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0423-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury This SEIS supplements the January 2011 Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury. It analyzes the potential environmental impact for a facility at and in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad,

  8. EIS-0525: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0525: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Eastern United States The First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) in the U.S. Department of Commerce, with DOE as a cooperating agency, has prepared a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to

  9. Accelerated Depletion: Assessing Its Impacts on Domestic Oil and Natural Gas Prices and Production

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of the potential impacts of accelerated depletion on domestic oil and natural gas prices and production.

  10. Regional Economic Accounting (REAcct). A software tool for rapidly approximating economic impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Vargas, Vanessa N.; Loose, Verne William; Starks, Shirley J.; Ellebracht, Lory A.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the Regional Economic Accounting (REAcct) analysis tool that has been in use for the last 5 years to rapidly estimate approximate economic impacts for disruptions due to natural or manmade events. It is based on and derived from the well-known and extensively documented input-output modeling technique initially presented by Leontief and more recently further developed by numerous contributors. REAcct provides county-level economic impact estimates in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and employment for any area in the United States. The process for using REAcct incorporates geospatial computational tools and site-specific economic data, permitting the identification of geographic impact zones that allow differential magnitude and duration estimates to be specified for regions affected by a simulated or actual event. Using these data as input to REAcct, the number of employees for 39 directly affected economic sectors (including 37 industry production sectors and 2 government sectors) are calculated and aggregated to provide direct impact estimates. Indirect estimates are then calculated using Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS II) multipliers. The interdependent relationships between critical infrastructures, industries, and markets are captured by the relationships embedded in the inputoutput modeling structure.

  11. Renewable Energy Economic Potential

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, is defined in this report as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity.

  12. Field matric potential sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2001-01-01

    A method of determining matric potential of a sample, the method comprising placing the sample in a container, the container having an opening; and contacting the sample with a tensiometer via the opening. An apparatus for determining matric potential of a sample, the apparatus comprising a housing configured to receive a sample; a portable matric potential sensing device extending into the housing and having a porous member; and a wall closing the housing to insulate the sample and at least a portion of the matric potential sensing device including the porous member.

  13. EIS-0474: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement | Department of Energy EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0474: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement Southline Transmission Line Project; Arizona and New Mexico The Bureau of Land Management and Western Area Power Administration announced the availability of a final EIS that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Southline Transmission Project and addresses associated potential land use plan

  14. EIS-0474: Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement | Department of Energy EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0474: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement Southline Transmission Line Project; Arizona and New Mexico The Bureau of Land Management and Western Area Power Administration announced the availability of a final EIS that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Southline Transmission Project and addresses associated potential land use plan

  15. U.S. Biomass Potential: An Update to the 2005 and 2011 Assessments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... (>1 million dry tonsyear) Volume 2 * Environmental sustainability analysis of potential delivered supply with metrics reported for: - GHG emissions - Air quality impacts - ...

  16. Potential Vulnerability of US Petroleum Refineries to Increasing Water Temperature and/or Reduced Water Availability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report discusses potential impacts of increased water temperature and reductions in water availability on petroleum refining and presents case studies related to refinery water use. Report...

  17. EA-1795: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1795: Finding of No Significant Impact Loan Guarantee to Diamond Green Diesel for Construction of the Diamond Green Diesel Facility in Norco, Louisiana The Department of Energy conducted an environmental assessment that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a biomass-based diesel facility adjacent to the existing Valero St. Charles Refinery in Norco, Louisiana. PDF icon Finding of No Significant Impact

  18. EIS-0463: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement | Department of Energy EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0463: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement Northern Pass Transmission Line Project, New Hampshire EPA announced the availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (Draft EIS) for the Northern Pass Transmission Line Project. The Draft EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to grant a Presidential permit to Northern Pass

  19. EIS-0499: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement | Department of Energy EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0499: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement Great Northern Transmission Line Project, Minnesota EPA announced the availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Great Northern Transmission Line Project. The Final EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to grant a Presidential permit to Minnesota Power to construct,

  20. EIS-0444: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0444: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Texas Clean Energy Project, Ector County, Texas This draft environmental impact statement (EIS) provides information about the potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) proposal to provide limited financial assistance (approximately $450 million), through a cooperative agreement, to Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC (Summit) for the proposed Texas Clean Energy Project

  1. EIS-0444: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0444: Final Environmental Impact Statement Texas Clean Energy Project, Ector County, Texas This final environmental impact statement (EIS) provides information about the potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) proposal to provide limited financial assistance (approximately $450 million), through a cooperative agreement, to Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC (Summit) for the proposed Texas Clean Energy Project

  2. Original Impact Calculations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  3. Preliminary Impact Evaluation BBNP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Preliminary Impact Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, 2013.

  4. WINDExchange: Potential Wind Capacity

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Potential Wind Capacity Potential wind capacity maps are provided for a 2014 industry standard wind turbine installed on a 110-m tower, which represents plausible current technology options, and a wind turbine on a 140-m tower, which represents near-future technology options. Enlarge image This map shows the wind potential at a 110-m height for the United States. Download a printable map. Click on a state to view the wind map for that state. * Grid Granularity = 400 sq km* 35% Gross Capacity

  5. Economic Energy Savings Potential in Federal Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Hunt, Diane M.

    2000-09-04

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate the current life-cycle cost-effective (i.e., economic) energy savings potential in Federal buildings and the corresponding capital investment required to achieve these savings, with Federal financing. Estimates were developed for major categories of energy efficiency measures such as building envelope, heating system, cooling system, and lighting. The analysis was based on conditions (building stock and characteristics, retrofit technologies, interest rates, energy prices, etc.) existing in the late 1990s. The potential impact of changes to any of these factors in the future was not considered.

  6. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Azevedo, Ines Lima

    2009-09-01

    In this analysis, the authors projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions to 2050. Their analysis of various scenarios indicated that Japan's CO{sub 2} emissions in 2050 could be potentially reduced by 26-58% from the current level (FY 2005). These results suggest that Japan could set a CO{sub 2} emission reduction target for 2050 at between 30% and 60%. In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050 from the present level, Japan will have to strongly promote energy conservation at the same pace as an annual rate of 1.9% after the oil crises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP (TPES/GDP) in 2050 by 60% from 2005) and expand the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primary energy supply in 2050 to 50% (to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions per primary energy demand (CO{sub 2}/TPES) in 2050 by 40% from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclear power will account for 60%, solar and other renewable energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-fired generation for 10%, indicating substantial shift away from fossil fuel in electric power supply. Among the mitigation measures in the case of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050, energy conservation will make the greatest contribution to the emission reduction, being followed by solar power, nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. In order to realize this massive CO{sub 2} abatement, however, Japan will have to overcome technological and economic challenges including the large-scale deployment of nuclear power and renewable technologies.

  7. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery Warren; Zevenbergen, Gary Allen

    2012-07-17

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and a voltage attenuator. The first electrode and the second electrode are both electrically connected to the voltage attenuator. A means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential is connected to the voltage attenuator. The device and method further comprises a means for enabling one or more alarms upon the detection of the dangerous ground potential. Preferably, a first transmitter/receiver is connected to the means for enabling one or more alarms. Preferably, a second transmitter/receiver, comprising a button, is electromagnetically connected to the first transmitter/receiver. Preferably, the means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential comprises a means for determining the true RMS voltage at the output of the voltage attenuator, a transient detector connected to the output of the voltage attenuator, or a combination thereof.

  8. Wind Energy Impacts: Slides

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    help to alleviate common misconceptions about wind energy. Wind Energy Impacts Photo from Invenergy LLC, NREL 14371 Wildlife impacts vary by location,* and new developments have helped to reduce these effects. Photo from LuRay Parker, NREL 17429 Wind Energy Impacts Pre- and post-development studies, educated siting, and curtailment during high-activity periods have decreased wildlife impacts.** Additional strategies are being researched to better understand and further decrease impacts.

  9. Electronic dispersion in two overlapping graphene sheets: Impacts of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    long-range atomic ordering and periodic potentials. (Conference) | SciTech Connect dispersion in two overlapping graphene sheets: Impacts of long-range atomic ordering and periodic potentials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic dispersion in two overlapping graphene sheets: Impacts of long-range atomic ordering and periodic potentials. Abstract not provided. Authors: Ohta, Taisuke Publication Date: 2013-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1121282 Report Number(s): SAND2013-10156C

  10. Economic Impact Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Impact Tools Economic Impact Tools Photo of a well drilling rig. A man stands on the platform while another is climbing the rig. Technology Feasibility and Cost Analysis is performed to determine the potential economic viability of geothermal energy production and helps to identify which technologies have the greatest likelihood of economic success. Results from technology feasibility analysis efforts provide input to the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) research, development, and

  11. Documentation of cumulative impacts in environmental impact statements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, T.A.; Canter, L.W.

    1997-11-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations in the United States require federal agencies to apply an environmental impact assessment (EIA) in decision-making related to their actions. One aspect requires an examination of direct, indirect and cumulative impacts (CIs). Historically, cumulative impact assessment (CIA) has been given limited attention in EIA and resultant environmental impact statements (EISs), not because of its lack of importance, but owing to limitations in methodologies and procedures, including documentation consistency. The objectives of this study were to identify deficiencies in the documentation of CIs and CIA in EISs and to formulate appropriate recommendations (potential solutions) related to such deficiencies. The study involved the systematic review of 33 EISs. The results indicate that improvements have been made in documentation practices since 1990; however, inconsistencies and inadequacies still exist. Therefore, the following recommendations were developed: (1) CIs should be reported in a separate part of the Environmental Consequences section, and they should be addressed for each pertinent environmental resource; (2) a summary of CIs should be included; (3) any CIs considered not significant should be mentioned plus the reason(s) for their non-significance; (4) spatial and temporal boundaries addressed within the CIA process should be defined for pertinent environmental resources; and (5) utilized guidelines and methodologies should be described.

  12. Motor vehicle output and GDP, 1968-2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D. J.; Poyer, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we assess the performance of the BEA series 'value of motor vehicle output' as an indicator of the business cycle over the period 1968-2007. We statistically assess the causal relationship between real motor vehicle output (RMVO) and real gross domestic product (RGDP). This is accomplished by standard estimation and statistical methods used to assess vector autoregressive models. This assessment represents the initial results of a more encompassing research project, the intent of which is to determine the dynamic interaction of the transport sector with the overall economy. It's a start to a more comprehensive assessment of how transport and economic activity interrelate.

  13. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented.

  14. The Impact of Weatherization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weatherization Assistance Program under the Recovery Act is making a serious impact in savings this summer.

  15. National Lab Impact Initiative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lab Impact Initiative Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy EERE National Lab Impact Summit Driving American Energy Innovation and Competitiveness May 4, 2016 | 7:30 am-7:00 pm National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado EERE National Lab Impact Summit // i ` http://www.cyclotronroad.org/home TABLE OF CONTENTS Department of Energy National Lab Abbreviations .........................................................................................................ii Welcome Letter

  16. Environmental impacts of increased hydroelectric development at existing dams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Railsback, S. F.; Cada, G. F.; Petrich, C. H.; Sale, M. J.; Shaakir-Ali, J. A.; Watts, J. A.; Webb, J. W.

    1991-04-01

    This report describes the environmental impacts of a proposed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiative to promote the development of hydropower resources at existing dams. Hydropower development at existing dams has, in general, fewer impacts than development of additional fossil-fueled resources or hydropower at new dams, although potential cumulative impacts of developing multiple hydropower projects have not been explicitly addressed. Environmental review of project impacts and mitigation needs can ensure that additional hydropower development at existing dams can provide a renewable resource with fewer impacts than alternative resources.

  17. Status and Impacts of State MTBE Bans

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes legislation passed in 16 states banning or restricting the use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in gasoline. Analysis of the status and impact of these state MTBE bans is provided concerning the supply and potential price changes of gasoline.

  18. EPA Launches New Online Mapping Tool for Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on any state for a list of EISs, including information about the potential environmental, social and economic impacts of these projects. Users can click on a state in the map and...

  19. EIS-0283-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Statement This Final SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for disposition of 13.1 metric tons (14.4 tons) of surplus plutonium for which a disposition...

  20. EIS-0507: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    re initiated scoping for an EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct a new 500-kV transmission line from northeast Oregon to southwest Idaho. ...

  1. EIS-0507: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    their intent to prepare an EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct a new 500-kV transmission line from northeast Oregon to southwest Idaho. ...

  2. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q-1 APPENDIX Q LONG-TERM HUMAN HEALTH DOSE AND RISK ANALYSIS This appendix presents methods and results for assessment of potential human health impacts due to releases of ...

  3. EIS-0507: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Due to changes in the proposed route, the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service re initiated scoping for an EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a...

  4. EIS-0507: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service announced their intent to prepare an EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct a new...

  5. Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource Use and Availability May ... 15, 2012 Biofuel Is a Key Component in Water-Energy Nexus 1 2 Potential Cellulosic ...

  6. EIS-0303: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Closure, Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, SC This EIS evalutes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to close the high-level waste tanks at the Savannah River ...

  7. EIS-0460: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Potential Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement for the FutureGen 2.0 Program, EIS-0460 (May 2011) (76 FR 29728) More...

  8. EIS-0287: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    : Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0287: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of managing two waste types at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, namely, high-level waste in a calcine form and liquid mixed transuranic waste (historically know as sodium bearing waste and newly generated liquid waste). It also analyzes the disposition of existing and proposed

  9. EIS-0418: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0408: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as joint lead agencies, issued the Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Final Programmatic EIS, which evaluates issues and potential environmental impacts associated with wind energy development within Western's Upper Great Plains Customer Service

  10. EIS-0447: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0447: Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE prepared this Draft EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to grant a Presidential permit to Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc., to construct, operate, maintain, and connect a new 1000-megawatt (MW) electric transmission system across the U.S.-Canada border near Champlain, New York, to New York City. PDF icon EIS-0447-DEIS- Volume 1 PDF icon EIS-0447-DEIS- Volume 2 - Appendix

  11. EIS-0453: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0453: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Recapitalization of Infrastructure Supporting Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Handling at the Idaho National Laboratory DOE prepared this Draft EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with recapitalizing the infrastructure needed to ensure the long-term capability of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (NNPP) and to support naval spent nuclear fuel handling capabilities provided by the Expended

  12. EIS-0474: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement | Department of Energy EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0474: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement Southline Transmission Line Project; Arizona and New Mexico EPA announces the availability of the Southline Transmission Project, (Arizona and New Mexico), draft EIS that was issued by the Bureau of Land Management and Western Area Power Administration to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed

  13. EIS-0486: DOE Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement | Department of Energy DOE Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0486: DOE Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project DOE announces the availability of a draft EIS that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of DOE participating with Clean Line Energy Partners LLC (Clean Line) in the proposed Plains & Eastern Project. The proposed project would include an overhead ± 600

  14. EIS-0491: FERC Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement | Department of Energy FERC Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0491: FERC Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Liquefaction Project, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana Federal Energy Regulatory Commission issued a notice of availability of a Draft EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate the Lake Charles Liquefaction Project. For more information on this project,

  15. EIS-0493: FERC Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0493: Draft Environmental Impact Statement The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), with DOE as a cooperating agency, issued a Draft EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas export and import terminal on the north shore of Corpus Christi Bay in Nueces and San Patricio Counties, Texas; a marine berth connecting the terminal to the adjacent La Quinta Channel; and an

  16. EIS-0503: DOE Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement | Department of Energy DOE Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0503: DOE Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement New England Clean Power Link Project, Vermont DOE announced the availability of the Draft EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to grant a Presidential permit to Transmission Developers, Inc.-New England, to construct, operate, maintain, and connect a new 1000-megawatt electric

  17. EIS-0503: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement | Department of Energy EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0503: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement New England Clean Power Link Project, Vermont EPA announced the availability of the Draft EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to grant a Presidential permit to Transmission Developers, Inc.-New England, to construct, operate, maintain, and connect a new 1000-megawatt electric

  18. EA-1995: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    95: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1995: Finding of No Significant Impact Trestle Bay Ecosystem Restoration Project, Clatsop County, Oregon The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers prepared a Feasibility Study and EA that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to improve estuary habitat in Trestle Bay, located at the mouth of the Columbia River and the Pacific Ocean. DOE's Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a cooperating agency, proposes to partially fund the project. BPA

  19. EA-2036: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-2036: Finding of No Significant Impact Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project (design optimization); Cameron Parish, Louisiana In January 2014, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with an application to amend FERC's April 2012 authorization of the Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project in order to optimize its design and operation. In April 2015, Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC, and Sabine

  20. EIS-0393: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement | Department of Energy EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0393: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement Montanore Project; Montana EPA announced the availability of a Final EIS prepared by USDA Forest Service (Kootenai National Forest) and the Montana Department of Environmental Quality to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposed copper and silver underground mine about 18 miles south of Libby,

  1. EIS-0486: DOE Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement | Department of Energy Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0486: DOE Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project DOE announces the availability of a final EIS that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of DOE participating with Clean Line Energy Partners LLC (Clean Line) in the proposed Plains & Eastern Project. The proposed Project would include an overhead ± 600-kilovolt

  2. EIS-0486: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement | Department of Energy Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0486: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project EPA announces the availability of a final EIS that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of DOE participating with Clean Line Energy Partners LLC (Clean Line) in the proposed Plains & Eastern Project. The proposed Project would include an overhead ± 600-kilovolt

  3. EIS-0501: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement | Department of Energy EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0501: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement Golden Pass LNG Export Project; Texas and Louisiana EPA announced the availability of a Draft EIS, prepared by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate natural gas liquefaction and export facilities at the existing Golden Pass

  4. EA-1793: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1793: Finding of No Significant Impact Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA), for the Replacement Capability for the Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site to evaluate potential environmental impacts related to replacement capability options. Based on the

  5. EIS-0236-S2: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0226: Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center This EIS has been prepared in accordance with NEPA and SEQR to examine the potential environmental impacts of the range of reasonable alternatives to decommission and/or maintain long-term stewardship at WNYNSC. The alternatives analyzed in this Draft EIS

  6. EIS-0503: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement | Department of Energy EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0503: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement New England Clean Power Link, Vermont DOE prepared this Final EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to grant a Presidential permit to Transmission Developers, Inc.-New England, to construct, operate, maintain, and connect a new 1000-megawatt electric transmission system across the

  7. EIS-0509: Supplemental Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement | Department of Energy 09: Supplemental Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0509: Supplemental Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement Mississippi River LNG Project; Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued a supplemental notice of intent (NOI) to prepare an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal facilities in Plaquemines

  8. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As

  9. Impact of Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Corrections on ARM IOP Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Impact of Teaming Arrangements on Small Business Status Impact of Teaming Arrangements on Small Business Status Impact of Teaming Arrangements on Small Business Status The Department of Energy is planning to set aside for small businesses a number of acquisitions of a very complex nature, requiring a myriad of capabilities on the part of offerors, which might result in teaming arrangements or joint ventures being formed. Given this, the Department believes that potential offerors

  10. Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is developing a science-based toolset for the analysis of potential impacts to groundwater

  11. EIS-0433-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 3-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0433-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Keystone XL Project This EIS analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a revised proposal for the Keystone XL pipeline and related facilities. The proposed facilities would transport crude oil from the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin and the Williston Basin to existing pipeline facilities near Steele City, Nebraska, for onward transport to markets in the

  12. DOE Issues Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment on Road Project U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO, 83403 News Media Contact: Tim Jackson (208) 526-8484 For Immediate Release Thursday August 12, 2010 DOE Issues Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment on Road Project The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Finding of No Significant Impact stemming from an environmental assessment it performed to examine the potential environmental impacts of building an internal road to safely ship

  13. Impact of Teaming Arrangements on Small Business Status | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Impact of Teaming Arrangements on Small Business Status Impact of Teaming Arrangements on Small Business Status Impact of Teaming Arrangements on Small Business Status The Department of Energy is planning to set aside for small businesses a number of acquisitions of a very complex nature, requiring a myriad of capabilities on the part of offerors, which might result in teaming arrangements or joint ventures being formed. Given this, the Department believes that potential offerors

  14. Community impact documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community impact documents Community impact documents Fact sheets, program summaries, and other documents provide insight into the Laboratory's community efforts and impact in Northern New Mexico. Contacts Kathy Keith Community Relations & Partnerships (505) 665-4400 Email Making a difference in Northern New Mexico Fact sheets by county Los Alamos (pdf) Rio Arriba (pdf) San Miguel and Mora (pdf) Santa Fe (pdf) Taos (pdf) General Community Commitment Plan (pdf) | Archive Community Leaders

  15. Sage-Grouse and Wind Energy: Biology, Habits, and Potential Effects from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development | Department of Energy Sage-Grouse and Wind Energy: Biology, Habits, and Potential Effects from Development Sage-Grouse and Wind Energy: Biology, Habits, and Potential Effects from Development Sage-Grouse and Wind Energy: Biology, Habits, and Potential Effects from Development PDF icon PNNL-18567.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1772: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1772: Finding of No Significant Impact EIS-0521: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact

  16. Adaptation strategies for health impacts of climate change in Western Australia: Application of a Health Impact Assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery T.; Brown, Helen L.; Katscherian, Dianne

    2011-04-15

    Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing the globe and there is substantial evidence that this will result in a number of health impacts, regardless of the level of greenhouse gas mitigation. It is therefore apparent that a combined approach of mitigation and adaptation will be required to protect public health. While the importance of mitigation is recognised, this project focused on the role of adaptation strategies in addressing the potential health impacts of climate change. The nature and magnitude of these health impacts will be determined by a number of parameters that are dependent upon the location. Firstly, climate change will vary between regions. Secondly, the characteristics of each region in terms of population and the ability to adapt to changes will greatly influence the extent of the health impacts that are experienced now and into the future. Effective adaptation measures therefore need to be developed with these differences in mind. A Health Impact Assessment (HIA) framework was used to consider the implications of climate change on the health of the population of Western Australia (WA) and to develop a range of adaptive responses suited to WA. A broad range of stakeholders participated in the HIA process, providing informed input into developing an understanding of the potential health impacts and potential adaptation strategies from a diverse sector perspective. Potential health impacts were identified in relation to climate change predictions in WA in the year 2030. The risk associated with each of these impacts was assessed using a qualitative process that considered the consequences and the likelihood of the health impact occurring. Adaptations were then developed which could be used to mitigate the identified health impacts and provide responses which could be used by Government for future decision making. The periodic application of a HIA framework is seen as an ideal tool to develop appropriate adaptation strategies to address the potential health impacts of climate change.

  17. Environmental Impact Statement Explained

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires Federal agencies to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for all major Federal actions that may significantly affect the quality of...

  18. National Laboratory Impact Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Laboratory Impact Initiative supports the relationship between the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy and the national laboratory enterprise.  The national laboratories...

  19. CBI Technology Impact Framework

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CBI Technology Impact Framework 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, ...

  20. Infrastructure Impacts | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    content top National Population, Economic, and Infrastructure Impacts of Pandemic Influenza with Strategic Recommendations Posted by Admin on Mar 2, 2012 in | Comments 0...

  1. Combining Balancing Areas' Variability: Impacts on Wind Integration in the Western Interconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Beuning, S.

    2010-07-01

    This paper investigates the potential impact of balancing area cooperation on a large-scale in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC).

  2. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery W. (Mandan, ND); Zevenbergen, Gary A. (Arvada, CO)

    2012-04-03

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  3. Predicting window condensation potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, A.

    1995-07-01

    Although a substantial amount of effort has been expended to develop numerical methods for determining window U-factors, there has been little work to date on using numerical methods to predict condensation potential. It is, perhaps, of direct interest to most ASHRAE members to determine heat loss and solar gains through windows as a preliminary step to sizing heating and cooling equipment, but condensation has long been recognized as an extremely important issue for consumers (and, consequently, for window manufacturers). Moreover, building scientists recognize the link between condensation and increased energy consumption (due to latent loads), reduced occupant comfort and inferior indoor air quality (from the presence of bacteria and mold), and structural damage (where accumulated condensation is absorbed by the building materials, thus reducing their structural stability). The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is developing a rating method for condensation potential in fenestration products, as part of its mandate from the Department of Energy. A rating method would benefit from the use of simulation as a supplement to physical condensation resistance testing, to reduce the cost and time required for implementation and increase the flexibility of the rating method. This article outlines the necessary components in the application of numerical methods for evaluating condensation in fenestration products, and describes the status of the development of these methods. The theoretical approach and its practical application are discussed, as well as some comparisons between numerical prediction and physical test results for a sample of products. Much of the technical discussion in this article can be found in ASHRAE Transactions.

  4. Potential for cogeneration in Maryland. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Cogeneration is a name given to energy systems that produce both electric power and useful thermal energy such as steam. While cogeneration markets have flourished in California, Texas, and some states, those in Maryland have not. A primary reason is that the industries that have been targeted in other states--e.g., oil refining, pulp and paper, chemicals, food processing--are not major elements of Maryland's industrial base. The study estimates the potential for future cogeneration in Maryland, both large units and small packaged systems, and assesses the potential impact of cogeneration systems on Maryland's energy needs between now and 2005. The study is presented in three volumes. Because of significant differences between large- and small-scale cogeneration, the analysis of these two systems was performed separately. This volume is a summary document presenting the findings from both studies.

  5. Static tetraquark and pentaquark potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandrou, C.; Koutsou, G.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluate the static qqqq and qqqqq potentials in the quenched theory at {beta}=5.8 and {beta}=6.0 on a lattice of size 16{sup 3}x32. We compare the static potentials to the sum of two meson potentials for the tetraquark system and to the sum of the baryonic and mesonic potentials for the pentaquark state, as well as, with the confining potential obtained in the strong coupling expansion.

  6. A qualitative method proposal to improve environmental impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toro, Javier; Requena, Ignacio; Duarte, Oscar; Zamorano, Montserrat

    2013-11-15

    In environmental impact assessment, qualitative methods are used because they are versatile and easy to apply. This methodology is based on the evaluation of the strength of the impact by grading a series of qualitative attributes that can be manipulated by the evaluator. The results thus obtained are not objective, and all too often impacts are eliminated that should be mitigated with corrective measures. However, qualitative methodology can be improved if the calculation of Impact Importance is based on the characteristics of environmental factors and project activities instead on indicators assessed by evaluators. In this sense, this paper proposes the inclusion of the vulnerability of environmental factors and the potential environmental impact of project activities. For this purpose, the study described in this paper defined Total Impact Importance and specified a quantification procedure. The results obtained in the case study of oil drilling in Colombia reflect greater objectivity in the evaluation of impacts as well as a positive correlation between impact values, the environmental characteristics at and near the project location, and the technical characteristics of project activities. -- Highlights: Concept of vulnerability has been used to calculate the importance impact assessment. This paper defined Total Impact Importance and specified a quantification procedure. The method includes the characteristics of environmental and project activities. The application has shown greater objectivity in the evaluation of impacts. Better correlation between impact values, environment and the project has been shown.

  7. Impact-GMI Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-03-22

    IMPACT-GMI is an atmospheric chemical transport model designed to run on massively parallel computers. It is designed to model trace pollutants in the atmosphere. It includes models for emission, chemistry and deposition of pollutants. It can be used to assess air quality and its impact on future climate change.

  8. Colorado Potential Geothermal Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado PRS Cool Fairways Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the weakened basement rocks. Isostatic gravity was utilized to identify structural basin areas, characterized by gravity low values reflecting weakened basement rocks. Together interpreted regional fault zones and basin outlines define geothermal "exploration fairways", where the potential exists for deep, superheated fluid flow in the absence of Pliocene or younger volcanic units Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4544698.569273 m Left: 144918.141004 m Right: 763728.391299 m Bottom: 4094070.397932 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  9. Environmental impacts during geothermal development: Some examples from Central America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, S.; Goff, F.

    1997-04-01

    The impacts of geothermal development projects are usually positive. However, without appropriate monitoring plans and mitigation actions firmly incorporated into the project planning process, there exists the potential for significant negative environmental impacts. The authors present five examples from Central America of environmental impacts associated with geothermal development activities. These brief case studies describe landslide hazards, waste brine disposal, hydrothermal explosions, and air quality issues. Improved Environmental Impact Assessments are needed to assist the developing nations of the region to judiciously address the environmental consequences associated with geothermal development.

  10. DOE Issues Final Environmental Impact Statement for Disposal of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Greater-Than-Class C Waste | Department of Energy Environmental Impact Statement for Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Waste DOE Issues Final Environmental Impact Statement for Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Waste February 25, 2016 - 3:30pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed development, operation, and long-term management of

  11. Innovation Impact Publications | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Impact Publications NREL has a rich history of scientific innovation and partnering with industry in research and development across our primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: analysis, bioenergy, buildings, manufacturing, solar, transportation, and wind technologies. Learn more about NREL's Innovation Impact by viewing the fact sheets below on our key breakthrough results. Analysis NREL Case Study Leads to International Partnership In 2012, NREL analysts

  12. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Information Resources - FOIAXpress Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY

  13. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextineword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE

  14. Small Particles, Big Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Particles, Big Impact Small Particles, Big Impact Small-scale effects of Aerosols Add up Over Time August 24, 2011 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 High-resolution simulation for Mexico City (top), shows a more detailed and accurate picture of aerosol pollution compared to representations of a global climate model (bottom). The deep red to light green colors represent concentrations of aerosol pollution with red being highest, light green lowest. Using systems at the National Energy

  15. OTEC power system development and environmental impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, N.F.

    1980-02-20

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) is a proven solar energy technology with enormous potential as a supplier of electric power. However, before this potential can be realized there must be significant reductions in OTEC plant investment costs estimated for state-of-the-art designs. A comprehensive survey of the opportunities for reducing costs of the heat exchangers and other components of the power system of closed-cycle OTEC plants is given. These cost-reducing inventives are strongly dependent on the extent to which the environmental impacts of OTEC plants will have to be controlled. The environmental concerns associated with the deployment of OTEC plants are reviewed, and approaches to alleviating these concerns are described. Finally, the key roles of the OTEC-1 component test facility and the OTEC pilot plant planned for a 1984 start up in providing information about the critical power system development and environmental impact problems are summarized.

  16. DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: Texas Site Is Preferred for Long-Term Mercury Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON – The Department of Energy has prepared a Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement to analyze the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven locations

  17. Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Processing | National Nuclear Security Administration Environmental Assessment for Gap Material Plutonium - Transport, Receipt, and Processing The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), has prepared this Environmental Assessment for Gap Material Plutonium - Transport, Receipt, and Processing to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with transporting plutonium from foreign nations to the United States, storing the plutonium at

  18. Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Ground Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Ground Water Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Ground Water Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Ground ...

  19. EIS-0459: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0459: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Hawaii Clean Energy Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOE ...

  20. Commercial Building Toplighting: Energy Saving Potential and Potential Paths Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, Tyson; Roth, Kurt W.

    2008-06-01

    This report documents the energy-saving potential of toplighting, a form of daylighting that combines skylights and electric lighting controls.

  1. EA-1927: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Potential Land and Facilities Transfers; McCracken County, Kentucky

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of the proposed transfer of land and facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant from DOE to other entities for economic development.

  2. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report focuses on potential impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e. rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological relationships, and other marine and freshwater aquatic resources.

  3. Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This report is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) initial effort to provide information and analysis on the potential impacts on petroleum product markets from reductions in Northeast petroleum refining activity.

  4. A framework for combining social impact assessment and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmoudi, Hossein; Environmental Sciences Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. ; Renn, Ortwin; Vanclay, Frank; Hoffmann, Volker; Karami, Ezatollah

    2013-11-15

    An increasing focus on integrative approaches is one of the current trends in impact assessment. There is potential to combine impact assessment with various other forms of assessment, such as risk assessment, to make impact assessment and the management of social risks more effective. We identify the common features of social impact assessment (SIA) and social risk assessment (SRA), and discuss the merits of a combined approach. A hybrid model combining SIA and SRA to form a new approach called, ‘risk and social impact assessment’ (RSIA) is introduced. RSIA expands the capacity of SIA to evaluate and manage the social impacts of risky projects such as nuclear energy as well as natural hazards and disasters such as droughts and floods. We outline the three stages of RSIA, namely: impact identification, impact assessment, and impact management. -- Highlights: • A hybrid model to combine SIA and SRA namely RSIA is proposed. • RSIA can provide the proper mechanism to assess social impacts of natural hazards. • RSIA can play the role of ex-post as well as ex-ante assessment. • For some complicated and sensitive cases like nuclear energy, conducting a RSIA is necessary.

  5. Assessment of potential and existing problems concerning interface between electric utilities and cogenerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    The potential and existing problems concerning the interface between US electric utilities and cogenerators are considered by region. Also considered are regulatory barriers, rates and contracts, economic feasibility, and impact on system planning. Finally, the impact of the National Energy Act on the marketability potential of cogeneration is reviewed. The three appendixes summarize the utility meetings on cogeneration held in Washington, DC, Los Angeles, and Chicago.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Potential Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Partners Potential Partners Sandia and one or more partners outside the federal government collaborate and share the results of a jointly conducted research and development project. Partners can be domestic or foreign and generally come from industry, nonprofit organizations or academia. Becoming a Partner SAM Registration The System for Award Management (SAM) is a government portal that enables secure registration as a potential CRADA Partner with Sandia National Laboratories.

  7. Cogeneration development and market potential in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, F.; Levine, M.D.; Naeb, J.; Xin, D.

    1996-05-01

    China`s energy production is largely dependent on coal. China currently ranks third in global CO{sub 2} emissions, and rapid economic expansion is expected to raise emission levels even further in the coming decades. Cogeneration provides a cost-effective way of both utilizing limited energy resources and minimizing the environmental impacts from use of fossil fuels. However, in the last 10 years state investments for cogeneration projects in China have dropped by a factor of 4. This has prompted this study. Along with this in-depth analysis of China`s cogeneration policies and investment allocation is the speculation that advanced US technology and capital can assist in the continued growth of the cogeneration industry. This study provides the most current information available on cogeneration development and market potential in China.

  8. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APPENDIX S WASTE INVENTORIES FOR CUMULATIVE IMPACT ANALYSES Integral to development of the inventory data set for the cumulative impact analyses presented in this Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington was identification of those waste sites potentially contributing to cumulative impacts on groundwater. Their identification involved two semi-independent, convergent processes: a Waste Information Data System screen and a

  9. EIS-0447: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0444: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Texas Clean Energy Project, Ector County, Texas This draft environmental impact statement (EIS) provides information about the potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) proposal to provide limited financial assistance (approximately $450 million), through a cooperative agreement, to Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC (Summit) for the proposed Texas Clean Energy Project

  10. EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement | Department of Energy 1: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement This EIS will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to implement one or more programs to catalyze the deployment of engineered high energy crops (EHECs). A main component of the proposed EHEC

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Potential Sponsors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Sponsors Potential Partners Sandia has worked with a wide variety of Sponsors, including large companies and small businesses based in New Mexico. Projects involve a broad range of technologies including materials and materials processing, advanced manufacturing and precision engineering, microelectronics and photonics, advanced computing and information technologies, modeling and simulation, nanotechnologies, vulnerability analysis, robotics and intelligent systems, failure analysis

  12. High Impact Technology Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The High Impact Technology Hub is a one stop shop for information associated with technology demonstrations in occupied, operational buildings. Resources posted to Hub should accelerate the selection and evaluation of technology demonstration projects and enable transparency into DOEs market stimulation and tech to market activities.

  13. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conventional Hydro Model Conventional Hydro Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Conventional Hydro model was developed to demonstrate the economic benefits associated with conventional hydro power plants in the United States. The primary goal in developing the state level model was to provide a tool for developers, renewable energy advocates, government officials, decision makers and other potential users, to easily identify the local economic impacts associated with

  14. EIS-0244: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0243: Final Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to certain NEPA documents on this website due to the potential security sensitivity of some information in these documents. DOE regrets any inconvenience caused by this decision, which reflects an awareness of the need to protect the public. For information on how to request a copy of a secure DOE NEPA document visit the Secure NEPA Documents page. More

  15. EIS-0286: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0249: Final Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to certain NEPA documents on this website due to the potential security sensitivity of some information in these documents. DOE regrets any inconvenience caused by this decision, which reflects an awareness of the need to protect the public. For information on how to request a copy of a secure DOE NEPA document visit the Secure NEPA Documents page. More

  16. NREL analysis finds tax credit extensions can impact renewable energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deployment and electric sector CO2 emissions - News Releases | NREL analysis finds tax credit extensions can impact renewable energy deployment and electric sector CO2 emissions February 22, 2016 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) today released new analysis exploring the potential impact of recently extended federal tax credits on the deployment of renewable generation technologies and related U.S. electric sector carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The report,

  17. EIS-0410: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    297: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0297: Final Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to certain NEPA documents on this website due to the potential security sensitivity of some information in these documents. DOE regrets any inconvenience caused by this decision, which reflects an awareness of the need to protect the public. For information on how to request a copy of a secure DOE NEPA document visit the Secure NEPA Documents page. More

  18. Economic Impact Analysis for EGS | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Project objective: To conduct an economic impact study for EGS and to develop a Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC) tool to quantify (in economic terms) the potential job, energy and environmental impacts associated with electric power production from geothermal resources. PDF icon analysis_low_t_resources_peer2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Canby Cascaded Geothermal Project Phase 1 Feasibility Novel Energy Conversion

  19. Completeness for sparse potential scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Zhongwei

    2014-01-15

    The present paper is devoted to the scattering theory of a class of continuum Schrdinger operators with deterministic sparse potentials. We first establish the limiting absorption principle for both modified free resolvents and modified perturbed resolvents. This actually is a weak form of the classical limiting absorption principle. We then prove the existence and completeness of local wave operators, which, in particular, imply the existence of wave operators. Under additional assumptions on the sparse potential, we prove the completeness of wave operators. In the context of continuum Schrdinger operators with sparse potentials, this paper gives the first proof of the completeness of wave operators.

  20. Assessing the impacts of climate change on natural resource systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, K.D.; Rosenberg, N.J. [eds.

    1994-11-30

    This volume is a collection of papers addressing the theme of potential impacts of climatic change. Papers are entitled Integrated Assessments of the Impacts of Climatic Change on Natural Resources: An Introductory Editorial; Framework for Integrated Assessments of Global Warming Impacts; Modeling Land Use and Cover as Part of Global Environmental Change; Assessing Impacts of Climatic Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling; Integrating Climatic Change and Forests: Economic and Ecological Assessments; Environmental Change in Grasslands: Assessment using Models; Assessing the Socio-economic Impacts of Climatic Change on Grazinglands; Modeling the Effects of Climatic Change on Water Resources- A Review; Assessing the Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change on Water Resources; and Conclusions, Remaining Issues, and Next Steps.

  1. Identifying Event Impacts by Monitoring the News Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    Assessing the potential property and social impacts of an event, such as tornado or wildfire, continues to be a challenging research area. From financial markets to disaster management to epidemiology, the importance of understanding the impacts that events create cannot be understated. Our work describes an approach to fuse information from multiple sources, then to analyze the information cycles to identify prior temporal patterns related to the impact of an event. This approach is then applied to the analysis of news reports from multiple news sources pertaining to several different natural disasters. Results show that our approach can project the severity of the impacts of certain natural disasters, such as heat waves on droughts and wild fires. In addition, results show that specific types of disaster consistently produce similar impacts when each time they occur.

  2. Gross national happiness as a framework for health impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennock, Michael; Ura, Karma

    2011-01-15

    The incorporation of population health concepts and health determinants into Health Impact Assessments has created a number of challenges. The need for intersectoral collaboration has increased; the meaning of 'health' has become less clear; and the distinctions between health impacts, environmental impacts, social impacts and economic impacts have become increasingly blurred. The Bhutanese concept of Gross National Happiness may address these issues by providing an over-arching evidence-based framework which incorporates health, social, environmental and economic contributors as well as a number of other key contributors to wellbeing such as culture and governance. It has the potential to foster intersectoral collaboration by incorporating a more limited definition of health which places the health sector as one of a number of contributors to wellbeing. It also allows for the examination of the opportunity costs of health investments on wellbeing, is consistent with whole-of-government approaches to public policy and emerging models of social progress.

  3. EIS-0447: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0447: Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE prepared this Final EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to grant a Presidential permit to Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc., to construct, operate, maintain, and connect a new 1000-megawatt (MW) electric transmission system across the U.S.-Canada border near Champlain, New York, to New York City. PDF icon EIS-0447-FEIS-Summary-2014.pdf PDF icon EIS-0447-FEIS-Vol_I-2014.pdf

  4. Possible global environmental impacts of solid waste practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.M.; Holter, G.M.; DeForest, T.J.; Stapp, D.C.; Dibari, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Pollutants resulting from the management of solid waste have been shown to affect the air, land, oceans, and waterways. In addition, solid wastes have other, more indirect impacts such as reduction in feedstocks of natural resources, because useful materials are disposed of rather than recycled. The objective of this study is to evaluate solid waste management practices that have negative implications on the global environment and develop recommendations for reducing such impacts. Recommendations identifying needed changes are identified that will reduce global impacts of solid waste practices in the future. The scope of this study includes the range of non-hazardous solid wastes produced within our society, including municipal solid waste (MSW) and industrial solid waste (ISW), as well as industry-specific wastes from activities such as construction, demolition, and landclearing. Most solid waste management decisions continue to be made and implemented at very local levels, predominantly with a short-term focus to respond to relatively immediate pressures of landfill shortages, funding problems, political considerations, and the like. In this rush to address immediate local problems, little consideration is being given to potential impacts, either short- or long-term, at the national or global level resulting from solid waste management practices. More and more, the cumulative impacts from local decisions concerning solid waste management are beginning to manifest themselves in broader, longer-term impacts than are being addressed by the decision-makers or, at the very least, are presenting a greater and greater potential for such impacts.

  5. Powertrain Trends and Future Potential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Powertrain Trends and Future Potential * Global Trends - Fighting Global Warming * Clean Diesel - Neglected in the U.S. for Too Long Agenda DSNE-NA | August 4, 2009 | Robert ...

  6. Estimates of Green potentials. Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danchenko, V I

    2003-02-28

    Optimal Cartan-type covers by hyperbolic discs of carriers of Green {alpha}-potentials are obtained in a simply connected domain in the complex plane and estimates of the potentials outside the carriers are presented. These results are applied to problems on the separation of singularities of analytic and harmonic functions. For instance, uniform and integral estimates in terms of Green capacities of components of meromorphic functions are obtained.

  7. Report: Strategic Planning Impacts

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strategic Planning Impacts September 30, 2009 Submitted by the EMAB ARRA Implementation and Oversight Subcommittee Background: EM plans to use the influx of stimulus funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to fulfill compliance agreements, complete construction projects, and address the program's lower-tier activities such as decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) and soil and groundwater remediation. Using the ARRA funds to reduce the physical size of the EM

  8. Potential environmental effects of energy conservation measures in northwest industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M C; Gygi, K F; Hendrickson, P L

    1992-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has identified 101 plants in the Pacific Northwest that account for 80% of the region's industrial electricity consumption. These plants offer a precise target for a conservation program. PNL determined that most of these 101 plants were represented by 11 major industries. We then reviewed 36 major conservation technologies used in these 11 industrial settings to determine their potential environmental impacts. Energy efficiency technologies designed for industrial use may result in direct or indirect environmental impacts. Effects may result from the production of the conservation measure technology, changes in the working environment due to different energy and material requirements, or changes to waste streams. Industry type, work-place conditions, worker training, and environmental conditions inside and outside the plant are all key variables that may affect environmental outcomes. To address these issues this report has three objectives: Describe potential conservation measures that Bonneville may employ in industrial programs and discuss potential primary impacts. Characterize industrial systems and processes where the measure may be employed and describe general environmental issues associated with each industry type. Review environmental permitting, licensing, and other regulatory actions required for industries and summarize the type of information available from these sources for further analysis.

  9. Technology's Impact on Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

    2009-06-30

    As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

  10. Calculating Impacts of Energy Standards on Energy Demand in U.S. Buildings under Uncertainty with an Integrated Assessment Model: Technical Background Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Daly, Don S.; Hathaway, John E.; Lansing, Carina S.; Liu, Ying; McJeon, Haewon C.; Moss, Richard H.; Patel, Pralit L.; Peterson, Marty J.; Rice, Jennie S.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-12-06

    This report presents data and assumptions employed in an application of PNNL’s Global Change Assessment Model with a newly-developed Monte Carlo analysis capability. The model is used to analyze the impacts of more aggressive U.S. residential and commercial building-energy codes and equipment standards on energy consumption and energy service costs at the state level, explicitly recognizing uncertainty in technology effectiveness and cost, socioeconomics, presence or absence of carbon prices, and climate impacts on energy demand. The report provides a summary of how residential and commercial buildings are modeled, together with assumptions made for the distributions of state–level population, Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per worker, efficiency and cost of residential and commercial energy equipment by end use, and efficiency and cost of residential and commercial building shells. The cost and performance of equipment and of building shells are reported separately for current building and equipment efficiency standards and for more aggressive standards. The report also details assumptions concerning future improvements brought about by projected trends in technology.

  11. Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact 2 June 2001 This page intentionally left blank. U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact 12 June 2001 This page intentionally left blank.

  12. Renewable Energy Technical Potential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Technical Potential Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Renewable Energy Technical Potential: Renewable energy technical potential represents the achievable...

  13. NREL: Innovation Impact Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy Bioenergy Buildings Buildings Transportation Transportation Manufacturing Manufacturing Energy Systems Integration Energy Systems Integration Innovation Impact NREL...

  14. Environmental Impact of Smart Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Environmental Impact Statements are detailed written statements that are required by section 102(2)(C) of NEPA for a proposed major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact AskNEPA@hq.doe.gov for assistance. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 6, 2016 EIS-0525: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

  15. Combined Heat and Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels, August 2004

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels, August 2004 Combined Heat and Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels, August 2004 The purpose of this 2004 report was to determine the best opportunity fuel(s) for distributed energy resources and combined heat and power (DER/CHP) applications, examine the DER/CHP technologies that can use them, and assess the potential market impacts of opportunity fueled DER/CHP applications. PDF icon chp_opportunityfuels.pdf More

  16. Khler potentials for Planck inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roest, Diederik; Scalisi, Marco; Zavala, Ivonne E-mail: m.scalisi@rug.nl

    2013-11-01

    We assess which Khler potentials in supergravity lead to viable single-field inflationary models that are consistent with Planck. We highlight the role of symmetries, such as shift, Heisenberg and supersymmetry, in these constructions. Also the connections to string theory are pointed out. Finally, we discuss a supergravity model for arbitrary inflationary potentials that is suitable for open string inflation and generalise it to the case of closed string inflation. Our model includes the recently discussed supergravity reformulation of the Starobinsky model of inflation as well as an interesting alternative with comparable predictions.

  17. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Reutzel, Edward W.

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  18. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

    1998-08-18

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

  19. Impact assisted segmented cutterhead

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrell, Roger J.; Larson, David A.; Ruzzi, Peter L.

    1992-01-01

    An impact assisted segmented cutterhead device is provided for cutting various surfaces from coal to granite. The device comprises a plurality of cutting bit segments deployed in side by side relationship to form a continuous cutting face and a plurality of impactors individually associated with respective cutting bit segments. An impactor rod of each impactor connects that impactor to the corresponding cutting bit segment. A plurality of shock mounts dampening the vibration from the associated impactor. Mounting brackets are used in mounting the cutterhead to a base machine.

  20. Impact-Z

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-03-18

    IMPACT-Z is a parallel particle-in-cell code whose primary purpose is to model the dynamics of charged particle beams in linear accelerators. The code includes the effects of externally applied fields from magnets and accelerating cavities as well as the effect of self-fields (space charge fields). Mathematically, the code solves the Vlasov/Poisson equations using a particle-based technique. The code, which is written in Fortran90 with MPI, runs on both single-processor and multi-processor systems.

  1. Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance (EPA, 2012) Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance (EPA, 2012) Amended Environmental Impact ...

  2. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Environmental Impact Statements are detailed written statements that are required by section 102(2)(C) ...

  3. Charleston Wise Impact Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Describes how the program conducted community outreach to educate residents on the value of energy efficiency; gathered data on the condition of homes, best practices for efficiency improvements, and the real potential for energy savings; and grew the capacity of the local workforce to provide quality service and good customer experience.

  4. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

    2009-02-09

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  5. LHC Physics Potential versus Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    Parton luminosities are convenient for estimating how the physics potential of Large Hadron Collider experiments depends on the energy of the proton beams. I present parton luminosities, ratios of parton luminosities, and contours of fixed parton luminosity for gg, u{bar d}, and qq interactions over the energy range relevant to the Large Hadron Collider, along with example analyses for specific processes.

  6. Modeling Momentum Transfer from Kinetic Impacts: Implications for Redirecting Asteroids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stickle, A. M.; Atchison, J. A.; Barnouin, O. S.; Cheng, A. F.; Crawford, D. A.; Ernst, C. M.; Fletcher, Z.; Rivkin, A. S.

    2015-05-19

    Kinetic impactors are one way to deflect a potentially hazardous object headed for Earth. The Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission is designed to test the effectiveness of this approach and is a joint effort between NASA and ESA. The NASA-led portion is the Double Asteroid Redirect Test (DART) and is composed of a ~300-kg spacecraft designed to impact the moon of the binary system 65803 Didymos. The deflection of the moon will be measured by the ESA-led Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) (which will characterize the moon) and from ground-based observations. Because the material properties and internal structure of the target are poorly constrained, however, analytical models and numerical simulations must be used to understand the range of potential outcomes. Here, we describe a modeling effort combining analytical models and CTH simulations to determine possible outcomes of the DART impact. We examine a wide parameter space and provide predictions for crater size, ejecta mass, and momentum transfer following the impact into the moon of the Didymos system. For impacts into “realistic” asteroid types, these models produce craters with diameters on the order of 10 m, an imparted Δv of 0.5–2 mm/s and a momentum enhancement of 1.07 to 5 for a highly porous aggregate to a fully dense rock.

  7. Modeling Momentum Transfer from Kinetic Impacts: Implications for Redirecting Asteroids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stickle, A. M.; Atchison, J. A.; Barnouin, O. S.; Cheng, A. F.; Crawford, D. A.; Ernst, C. M.; Fletcher, Z.; Rivkin, A. S.

    2015-05-19

    Kinetic impactors are one way to deflect a potentially hazardous object headed for Earth. The Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission is designed to test the effectiveness of this approach and is a joint effort between NASA and ESA. The NASA-led portion is the Double Asteroid Redirect Test (DART) and is composed of a ~300-kg spacecraft designed to impact the moon of the binary system 65803 Didymos. The deflection of the moon will be measured by the ESA-led Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) (which will characterize the moon) and from ground-based observations. Because the material properties and internal structure ofmore » the target are poorly constrained, however, analytical models and numerical simulations must be used to understand the range of potential outcomes. Here, we describe a modeling effort combining analytical models and CTH simulations to determine possible outcomes of the DART impact. We examine a wide parameter space and provide predictions for crater size, ejecta mass, and momentum transfer following the impact into the moon of the Didymos system. For impacts into “realistic” asteroid types, these models produce craters with diameters on the order of 10 m, an imparted Δv of 0.5–2 mm/s and a momentum enhancement of 1.07 to 5 for a highly porous aggregate to a fully dense rock.« less

  8. EIS-0459: Hawaii Clean Energy Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE prepared a programmatic EIS that examines the potential environmental impacts of energy efficiency activities and renewable energy technologies that could assist the State of Hawaii in meeting the goal established under the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative to meet 70% of the State’s energy needs by 2030 through energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  9. Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

    2012-06-20

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  10. EIS-0283-S1: Supplement to the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Supplement evaluates the potential environmental impacts of using MOX fuel in these six specific reactors named in the DCS proposal as well as other program changes made since the SPD Draft EIS...

  11. EIS-0283-S2: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Supplemental EIS (SEIS) analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with changes to the surplus plutonium disposition program, including changes to the inventory of surplus plutonium and proposed new alternatives.

  12. Impact of information and communications technologies on residental customer energy services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Kempton, W.; Eide, A.; Iyer, M.

    1996-10-01

    This study analyzes the potential impact of information and communications technologies on utility delivery of residential customer energy services. Many utilities are conducting trials which test energy-related and non-energy services using advanced communications systems.

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - KCD Proj's Impact Fed Power_SWPA Conf...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    any operational changes to determine potential adverse impacts. BUILDING STRONG p Harry S. Truman Stilli B i R i Stilling Basin Repair S h d l Schedule 3 Jun -2 Jul: Contract...

  14. Nanobiocatalysis and Its Potential Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jungbae; Grate, Jay W.; Wang, Ping

    2008-11-01

    Nanobiocatalysis with enzymes incorporated into nanostructured materials have emerged as a rapidly growing area. Structures including nanoporous media, nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, and nanoparticles have been found to be efficient in manipulating the nanoscale environment of the enzyme and thus promising exciting advances in many areas of enzyme technology. This review will describe these recent developments in nanobiocatalysis and their potential applications in various fields such as trypsin digestion in proteomic analysis, antifouling, biofuel cells, and biosensors.

  15. High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies The Energy Department released the High Impact Technology Catalyst: ...

  16. EIS-0481: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Engineered High Energy Crop (EHEC) Programs Draft Programmatic...

  17. Bioenergy Impact Posters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Posters Bioenergy Impact Posters On October 1, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Technologies Office kicked off Energy Action Month by displaying bioenergy impacts posters in the DOE Forrestal Building in Washington, D.C. PDF icon impact_posters_billion_dry_tons.pdf PDF icon impact_posters_bioproducts.pdf PDF icon impact_posters_biorefineries.pdf PDF icon impact_posters_cellulosic_ethanol.pdf PDF icon impact_posters_green_jobs.pdf PDF icon

  18. Impact Evaluation Framework for Technology Deployment Programs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Framework for Technology Deployment Programs 2007 Impact Evaluation Framework for Technology Deployment Programs 2007 Impact Evaluation Framework for Technology Deployment ...

  19. EIS-0481: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental ...

  20. Usefulness of programmatic environmental impact statements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinkney, F.C.; Downey, K.M. )

    1993-01-01

    Programmatic environmental impact statements (EISs) are comprehensive documents that integrate environmental considerations into planning and operational decisions at the concept level, avoiding the need for repetitive environmental documentation of specific actions. Procedures developed in the programmatic EIS provide a process for incorporating environmental considerations into the planning phase of future actions and assist in determining the type of environmental considerations into the planning phase of future actions and assist in determining the type of environmental documentation necessary. The programmatic EIS project area is divided into recognizable geographic zones. These zones are mapped and an evaluation zone summary sheet is developed for each area that contains an inventory of pertinent information for analysis of environmental issues. On each map and summary sheet, sensitive zones that are adversely affected and/or require mitigation for implementation of proposed actions are easily recognizable. Accompanying narrative provides both insight for mitigating potential impacts within the sensitive areas and how such impacts should be addressed. Additional assistance in evaluating the effects of planned actions is provided by identifying thresholds of significance at which the effect of a proposed action may prompt the need for environmental documentation.

  1. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APPENDIX F DIRECT AND INDIRECT IMPACTS: ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY This appendix briefly describes the methods used to assess the potential direct and indirect effects of the alternatives in this Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Included in this appendix are discussions of general impact assessment methodologies for land resources, infrastructure, noise and vibration, air quality, geology and soils, water resources,

  2. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summary-1996.HTM[6/27/2011 11:21:59 AM] The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires Federal agencies to analyze the potential environmental impacts of their proposed actions to assist them in making informed decisions. A similar Washington State law, the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), requires State agencies, including the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), to analyze environmental impacts before making decisions that could impact the environment. A major

  3. Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proposal for Standard Market Design | Department of Energy Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Proposal for Standard Market Design Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Proposal for Standard Market Design A report on an independent study to assess various potential impacts of the proposed rulemaking by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), "Remedying Undue Discrimination through Open Access Transmission

  4. EIS-0450: EPA Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement | Department of Energy EPA Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0450: EPA Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement TransWest Express Transmission Project; Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada EPA announced the availability of a final EIS, prepared by Western Area Power Administration and the Bureau of Land Management as joint lead agencies, that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of granting a right-of-way for the

  5. EIS-0459: Amended Notice of Intent for a Programmatic Environmental Impact

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement | Department of Energy Amended Notice of Intent for a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0459: Amended Notice of Intent for a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOE announced a broadening of the scope of the previously announced Hawai'i Interisland Renewable Energy Program: Wind Programmatic EIS and its renaming as the Hawaii Clean Energy PEIS. The PEIS examines the potential environmental impacts of 31 energy efficiency activities and renewable energy

  6. EA-1605: Revised Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Revised Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1605: Revised Finding of No Significant Impact The Department of Energy prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1605) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of new biomass cogeneration and heating facilities located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A FONSI was issued in August 2008. In this revised FONSI, DOE proposes to design an construct a new heating plant to be located adjacent to the

  7. EIS-0510: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 10: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0510: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement Calcasieu Pass Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) announced its intent to prepare an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the Calcasieu Pass Project, a proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. DOE is a cooperating agency in

  8. EIS-0521: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0521: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Incorporating Gunnison Sage-Grouse Conservation Measures into Resource Management Plans; Colorado and Utah Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announced its intent to prepare an EIS that will analyze the potential environmental impacts of proposed Resource Management Plan amendments that would incorporate conservation measures for the

  9. DOE/EA-1976 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR PROPOSED CNG PROJECT REGARDING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE/EA-1976 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR PROPOSED CNG PROJECT REGARDING EMERA CNG, LLC APPLICATION SEEKING DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation

  10. The Impact of Ethanol Blending on U.S. Gasoline Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-11-01

    This study assesses the impact of ethanol blending on gasoline prices in the United States today and the potential impact of ethanol on gasoline prices at higher blending concentrations (10%, 15% and 20% of the total U.S. gasoline consumption).

  11. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's antitrust review process: an analysis of the impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) antitrust process is reviewed and its impacts to small systems and applicant systems are studied. This process takes the form of a description of the NRC's antitrust review process as implemented, a generic categorization of potential impacts and individual case-by-case studies of four different utilities.

  12. EIS-0236-S4: Final Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (SPEIS) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives to continue transformation of the nuclear weapons complex to be smaller, and more responsive, efficient, and secure in order to meet national security requirements.

  13. Cumulative Impacts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cumulative Impacts Cumulative Impacts Selected documents on the topic of Cumulative Impacts and NEPA. June 24, 2005 Guidance on the Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects Analysis (CEQ, 2005) In this Memorandum, the Council on Environmental Quality provides guidance on the extent to which agencies of the Federal government are required to analyze the environmental effects of past actions when they describe the cumulative environmental effect of a proposed action. May 1, 1999

  14. EERE's National Lab Impact Initiative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory Consortium (NRELPNNL) * Manufacturing Demonstration Facilities - 3D Printing ... and many more New Lab-Industry Consortium Models Lab Impact: Innovation Ecosystem (>1%) A ...

  15. Bioenergy Impact on Wisconsin's Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Troy Runge, Wisconsin Bioenergy Initiative, presents on bioenergy's impact on Wisconsin's workforce development for the Biomass/Clean Cities States webinar.

  16. Environmental Impact of Smart Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pollutants * Evaluate impact from Smart Grid on reducing pollutants through: - Demand Response - Electric Vehicles - Demand Side Management - Renewables and Distributed Energy ...

  17. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The riparian buffer zone could mitigate any impact of stormwater runoff to local surface waters. A Stormwater Management Plan, as required by King George County, would be prepared ...

  18. High Impact Technology Hub- Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Highlights, outcomes and activities to support the adoption of High Impact Technologies. Technology Highlights preview early results from current technology demonstrations. Case Studies overview...

  19. High Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, Alliance Laundry Systems, NREL Commercial ...

  20. Thin film mixed potential sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2007-09-04

    A mixed potential sensor for oxidizable or reducible gases and a method of making. A substrate is provided and two electrodes are formed on a first surface of the substrate, each electrode being formed of a different catalytic material selected to produce a differential voltage between the electrodes from electrochemical reactions of the gases catalyzed by the electrode materials. An electrolytic layer of an electrolyte is formed over the electrodes to cover a first portion of the electrodes from direct exposure to the gases with a second portion of the electrodes uncovered for direct exposure to the gases.

  1. Dirac solutions for quaternionic potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Leo, Stefano Giardino, Sergio

    2014-02-15

    The Dirac equation is solved for quaternionic potentials, i?V{sub 0} + j?W{sub 0} (V{sub 0}?R , W{sub 0}?C). The study shows two different solutions. The first one contains particle and anti-particle solutions and leads to the diffusion, tunneling, and Klein energy zones. The standard solution is recovered taking the complex limit of this solution. The second solution, which does not have a complex counterpart, can be seen as a V{sub 0}-antiparticle or |W{sub 0}|-particle solution.

  2. Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 72 58 25 89 2000's 107 141 234 257 0 1,796 0 152 140 402 2010's 424 265 257 241 200 206 Feet)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA NA 2000's NA NA 1 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 123 0

    Feet)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 553,073 548,022 556,215 790,427 2000's 784,583 648,400 768,533 699,288

  3. Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: Market Issues and Potential Energy and Emissions Impacts

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Jeff Sessions for an analysis of the environmental and energy efficiency attributes of light-duty diesel vehicles. Specifically, the inquiry asked for a comparison of the characteristics of diesel-fueled vehicles with those of similar gasoline-fueled, E85-fueled, and hybrid vehicles, as well as a discussion of any technical, economic, regulatory, or other obstacles to increasing the use of diesel-fueled vehicles in the United States.

  4. Potential Impacts on Air Quality of the Use of Ethanol as as Alternative Fuel

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

  5. Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

    1991-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA's Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

  6. Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

    1991-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA`s Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

  7. ERI-2142 07-1001 DOE - Potential Market Impact CY2011,12,13 December...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    11 2.2.5. Future Market Price for Conversion Services 13 2.3. Enrichment Services 13 2.3.1. Enrichment Market Price Activity 13 2.3.2. Enrichment Services Requirements 14 ...

  8. Projected Impact of Federal Policies on U.S. Wind Market Potential...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WinDS to calculate transmission distances, as well as the benefits of dispersed wind farms supplying power to a demand region. 1 Short, Walter; et al., May 2003, "Modeling the...

  9. Assessment of Future ICE and Fuel-Cell Powered Vehicles and Their Potential Impacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  10. Measuring Coastal Boating Noise to Assess Potential Impacts on Marine Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzner, Shari; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-07-01

    Article requested for submission in Sea Technology Magazine describing the Underwater Noise From Small Boats. An Overlooked Component of the Acoustic Environment in Coastal Areas. Underwater noise and its effects on marine life deserve attention as human activity in the marine environment increases. Noise can affect fish and marine mammals in ways that are physiological, as in auditory threshold shifts, and behavioral, as in changes in foraging habits. One anthropogenic source of underwater noise that has received little attention to date is recreational boating. Coastal areas and archipelago regions, which play a crucial role in the marine ecosystem, are often subject to high levels of boat traffic. In order to better understand the noise produced by a small powerboat, a test was conducted in Sequim Bay, Washington, using an instrumented research vessel and multiple acoustic sensors. The broadband noise and narrowband peak levels were observed from two different locations while the boat was operated under various conditions. The results, combined with background noise levels, sound propagation and local boat traffic patterns, can provide a picture of the total boating noise to which marine life may be subjected.

  11. Power system impacts of potential changes in Glen Canyon power plant operations. Phase 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    The Phase III report reflects several changes in assumptions and methodologies which augment the Phase II approach. The most significant changes from the Phase II, October 1993 report include the following: Inclusion of SO2 costs; Modeling of the Salt River Project transmission curtailment deterministically rather than probabilistically; Changes were made to the Combined Cycle and Combustion Turbine characteristics and costs; Inclusion of emissions for all interconnected systems. Inclusion of emissions for purchased power contracts; Only the winter/summer marketable capacity for the No Action and Modified Low Fluctuating Flow Dam Alternatives were modeled; Common fuel escalation rates were used in the extension periods; Corrections were made to the modeling of DSM programs and the market penetration of these programs was reevaluated; Two new sensitivity cases are included; 1995 as the Base Year and full replacement cost of capacity lost at Glen Canyon Dam.

  12. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn

    2009-12-01

    This report focuses on potential impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e. rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological relationships, and other marine and freshwater aquatic resources. The report does not address impacts to terrestrial ecosystems and organisms that are common to other electricity-generating technologies (e.g., construction and maintenance of transmission lines) or possible effects on the human environment, including: human use conflicts, aesthetics, viewsheds, noise in the terrestrial environment, light, recreation, transportation, navigation, cultural resources, socioeconomic impacts.

  13. THE IMPACT OF THERMAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH ON GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelan, Patrick; Abdelaziz, Omar; Otanicar, Todd; Phelan, Bernadette; Prasher, Ravi; Taylor, Robert; Tyagi, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    Global climate change is recognized by many people around the world as being one of the most pressing issues facing our society today. The thermal engineering research community clearly plays an important role in addressing this critical issue, but what kind of thermal engineering research is, or will be, most impactful? In other words, in what directions should thermal engineering research be targeted in order to derive the greatest benefit with respect to global climate change? To answer this question we consider the potential reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, coupled with potential economic impacts, resulting from thermal engineering research. Here a new model framework is introduced that allows a technological, sector-by-sector analysis of GHG emissions avoidance. For each sector, we consider the maximum reduction in CO2 emissions due to such research, and the cost effectiveness of the new efficient technologies. The results are normalized on a country-by-country basis, where we consider the USA, the European Union, China, India, and Australia as representative countries or regions. Among energy supply-side technologies, improvements in coal-burning power generation are seen as having the most beneficial CO2 and economic impacts. The one demand-side technology considered, residential space cooling, offers positive but limited impacts. The proposed framework can be extended to include additional technologies and impacts, such as water consumption.

  14. Adventures on the C3H5O potential energy surface: OH+propyne, OH+allene and related reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zádor, Judit; Miller, James A.

    2014-06-25

    We mapped out the stationary points and the corresponding conformational space on the C3H5O potential energy surface relevant for the OH + allene and OH + propyne reactions systematically and automatically using the KinBot software at the UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVQZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. We used RRKM-based 1-D master equations to calculate pressure- and temperature-dependent, channel-specific phenomenological rate coefficients for the bimolecular reactions propyne + OH and allene + OH, and for the unimolecular decomposition of the CH3CCHOH, CH3C(OH)CH, CH2CCH2OH, CH2C(OH)CH2 primary adducts, and also for the related acetonyl, propionyl, 2-methylvinoxy, and 3-oxo-1-propyl radicals. The major channel of the bimolecular reactions at highmore »temperatures is the formation propargyl + H2O, which makes the title reactions important players in soot formation at high temperatures. However, below ~1000 K the chemistry is more complex, involving the competition of stabilization, isomerization and dissociation processes. We found that the OH addition to the central carbon of allene has a particularly interesting and complex pressure dependence, caused by the low-lying exit channel to form ketene + CH3 bimolecular products. In this study, we compared our results to a wide range of experimental data and assessed possible uncertainties arising from certain aspects of the theoretical framework.« less

  15. Adventures on the C3H5O potential energy surface: OH+propyne, OH+allene and related reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zádor, Judit; Miller, James A.

    2014-06-25

    We mapped out the stationary points and the corresponding conformational space on the C3H5O potential energy surface relevant for the OH + allene and OH + propyne reactions systematically and automatically using the KinBot software at the UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVQZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. We used RRKM-based 1-D master equations to calculate pressure- and temperature-dependent, channel-specific phenomenological rate coefficients for the bimolecular reactions propyne + OH and allene + OH, and for the unimolecular decomposition of the CH3CCHOH, CH3C(OH)CH, CH2CCH2OH, CH2C(OH)CH2 primary adducts, and also for the related acetonyl, propionyl, 2-methylvinoxy, and 3-oxo-1-propyl radicals. The major channel of the bimolecular reactions at highmore » temperatures is the formation propargyl + H2O, which makes the title reactions important players in soot formation at high temperatures. However, below ~1000 K the chemistry is more complex, involving the competition of stabilization, isomerization and dissociation processes. We found that the OH addition to the central carbon of allene has a particularly interesting and complex pressure dependence, caused by the low-lying exit channel to form ketene + CH3 bimolecular products. In this study, we compared our results to a wide range of experimental data and assessed possible uncertainties arising from certain aspects of the theoretical framework.« less

  16. Category:Self Potential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    page. S Self Potential Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:SelfPotential&oldid794082" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  17. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is...

  18. Ancillary Service Revenue Potential for Geothermal Generators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ancillary Service Revenue Potential for Geothermal Generators in California Ancillary Service Revenue Potential for Geothermal Generators in California PDF icon Ancillary Service...

  19. Potential Hydroelectric Development at Existing Federal Facilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Potential Hydroelectric Development at Existing Federal Facilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Potential Hydroelectric Development at...

  20. Research highlights potential for improved solar cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential for improved solar cells Research highlights potential for improved solar cells Research has shown that carrier multiplication is a real phenomenon in tiny semiconductor ...

  1. Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment September 24, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov ...

  2. Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with Sugarcane for Energycane Production Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with Sugarcane for Energycane ...

  3. Pollution prevention cost savings potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celeste, J.

    1994-12-01

    The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

  4. Assessing human rights impacts in corporate development projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salcito, Kendyl; University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel; NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202; NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 ; Utzinger, Jrg; University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel ; Weiss, Mitchell G.; Mnch, Anna K.; Singer, Burton H.; Krieger, Gary R.; Wielga, Mark; NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202

    2013-09-15

    Human rights impact assessment (HRIA) is a process for systematically identifying, predicting and responding to the potential impact on human rights of a business operation, capital project, government policy or trade agreement. Traditionally, it has been conducted as a desktop exercise to predict the effects of trade agreements and government policies on individuals and communities. In line with a growing call for multinational corporations to ensure they do not violate human rights in their activities, HRIA is increasingly incorporated into the standard suite of corporate development project impact assessments. In this context, the policy world's non-structured, desk-based approaches to HRIA are insufficient. Although a number of corporations have commissioned and conducted HRIA, no broadly accepted and validated assessment tool is currently available. The lack of standardisation has complicated efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of HRIA as a risk mitigation tool, and has caused confusion in the corporate world regarding company duties. Hence, clarification is needed. The objectives of this paper are (i) to describe an HRIA methodology, (ii) to provide a rationale for its components and design, and (iii) to illustrate implementation of HRIA using the methodology in two selected corporate development projectsa uranium mine in Malawi and a tree farm in Tanzania. We found that as a prognostic tool, HRIA could examine potential positive and negative human rights impacts and provide effective recommendations for mitigation. However, longer-term monitoring revealed that recommendations were unevenly implemented, dependent on market conditions and personnel movements. This instability in the approach to human rights suggests a need for on-going monitoring and surveillance. -- Highlights: We developed a novel methodology for corporate human rights impact assessment. We piloted the methodology on two corporate projectsa mine and a plantation. Human rights impact assessment exposed impacts not foreseen in ESIA. Corporations adopted the majority of findings, but not necessarily immediately. Methodological advancements are expected for monitoring processes.

  5. Calculate and Plot Complex Potential

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-05

    SOLUPLOT is a program designed to calculate and plot complex potential, pH diagrams and log oxygen activity, pH diagrams for aqueous chemical syatems, considering speciation of ligands, from free energy and thermodynamic activity data. These diagrams, commonly referred to as Eh-pH and ao2-pH diagrams, respectively, define areas of predominance in Eh-pH diagrams or ao2-pH space for chemical species of a chemical system at equilibrium. Over an area of predominance, one predominant species is at greatermore » activity than the other species of the system considered. The diagram axes, pH (a measure of hydrogen ion activity) and either Eh or log ao2 (measures of a tendency toward either oxidation or reduction) , are paremeters commonly applied in describing the chemistry of aqueous systems.« less

  6. Managing the analysis of air quality impacts under NEPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Y.B.; Leslie, A.C.D.

    1995-12-31

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) mandates the analysis and evaluation of potential impacts of major Federal actions having the potential to affect the environment. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify an array of new air quality issues appropriate for analysis in compliance with NEPA. An example is emissions of the 189 hazardous air pollutants identified in Title III. The utility industry estimates that more than 2.4 billion pounds of toxic pollutants were emitted to the atmosphere in 1988, with the potential for resultant adverse health impacts such as cancer, reproductive effects, birth defects, and respiratory illness. The US Department of Energy (DOE) provides Federal funds for projects that utilize coal as the primary fuel, including the approximately 45 projects funded over the past ten years under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Provision of Federal funds brings these projects under NEPA review. While electric steam generating units greater than 25 MW are currently excluded from regulatory review for the 189 air toxics listed in Title III, they are not, due to their potential impacts, excluded from NEPA review when Federally funded, in whole or in part. The authors will discuss their experiences drawn from NEPA evaluations of coal-fired power projects, the differences between regulatory requirements and NEPA requirements, source categories, major and area sources, conformity, maximum achievable control technology, mandatory licensing, radionuclides, visibility, toxics found to be emitted from coal combustion, public involvement, citizen suits, the bounty system, and how NEPA review can result in beneficial changes to proposed projects through mitigation measures to avoid or minimize potentially adverse environmental impacts.

  7. Estimate of Technical Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Ke, Jing; McNeil, Michael

    2012-07-01

    As part of the ongoing effort to estimate the foreseeable impacts of aggressive minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) programs in the worlds major economies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a scenario to analyze the technical potential of MEPS in 13 major economies around the world1 . The best available technology (BAT) scenario seeks to determine the maximum potential savings that would result from diffusion of the most efficient available technologies in these major economies.

  8. Decontamination impacts on solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Davis, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The increased occupational exposure resulting from the accumulation of activated corrosion products in the primary system of LWRs has led to the development of chemical methods to remove the contamination. In the past, the problem of enhanced migration of radionuclides away from trenches used to dispose of low-level radioactive waste, has been linked to the presence, at the disposal unit, of chelating or complexing agents such as those used in decontamination processes. These agents have further been found to reduce the normal sorptive capacity of soils for radionuclides. The degree to which these agents inhibit the normal sorptive processes is dependent on the type of complexing agent, the radionuclide of concern, the soil properties and whether the nuclide is present as a complex or is already sorbed to the soil. Since the quantity of reagent employed in a full system decontamination is large (200 to 25,000 kg), the potential for enhanced migration of radionuclides from a site used to dispose of the decontamination wastes should be addressed and guidelines established for the safe disposal of these wastes.

  9. Biofuel impacts on water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien

    2011-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors Global Energy Systems team conducted a joint biofuels systems analysis project from March to November 2008. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, implications, limitations, and enablers of large-scale production of biofuels. 90 billion gallons of ethanol (the energy equivalent of approximately 60 billion gallons of gasoline) per year by 2030 was chosen as the book-end target to understand an aggressive deployment. Since previous studies have addressed the potential of biomass but not the supply chain rollout needed to achieve large production targets, the focus of this study was on a comprehensive systems understanding the evolution of the full supply chain and key interdependencies over time. The supply chain components examined in this study included agricultural land use changes, production of biomass feedstocks, storage and transportation of these feedstocks, construction of conversion plants, conversion of feedstocks to ethanol at these plants, transportation of ethanol and blending with gasoline, and distribution to retail outlets. To support this analysis, we developed a 'Seed to Station' system dynamics model (Biofuels Deployment Model - BDM) to explore the feasibility of meeting specified ethanol production targets. The focus of this report is water and its linkage to broad scale biofuel deployment.

  10. The potential of renewable energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    On June 27 and 28, 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories were convened to discuss plans for the development of a National Energy Strategy (NES) and, in particular, the analytic needs in support of NES that could be addressed by the laboratories. As a result of that meeting, interlaboratory teams were formed to produce analytic white papers on key topics, and a lead laboratory was designated for each core laboratory team. The broad-ranging renewables assignment is summarized by the following issue statement from the Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis: to what extent can renewable energy technologies contribute to diversifying sources of energy supply What are the major barriers to greater renewable energy use and what is the potential timing of widespread commercialization for various categories of applications This report presents the results of the intensive activity initiated by the June 1989 meeting to produce a white paper on renewable energy. Scores of scientists, analysts, and engineers in the five core laboratories gave generously of their time over the past eight months to produce this document. Their generous, constructive efforts are hereby gratefully acknowledged. 126 refs., 44 figs., 32 tabs.

  11. Energy conservation potential of surface modification technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le, H.K.; Horne, D.M.; Silberglitt, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    This report assesses the energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries. The energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries is assessed by estimating their friction and wear tribological sinks and the subsequent reduction in these sinks when surface modified tools are used. Ion implantation, coatings, and laser and electron beam surface modifications are considered.

  12. Energy Policy Socioeconomic Impact Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-05-13

    Econometric model simulates consumer demand response to residential demand-side management programs and two-part tariff electricity rate designs and assesses their economic impact on various population groups.

  13. Impact Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Assessments Impact Assessments american-flag-802087_960_720.jpg DOE F 206.1 PIA Template (MS Word) Management and Administration (MA) Open Gov User Voice System (3WP) (pdf) DOE Open Government Plan Comment Box (pdf) Energy Contractor Registration System (EnCoRe) (pdf) Hiring Management Enterprise Solutions (HMES) (pdf) Foreign Travel Management System (FTMS) (pdf) FOIAXpress (pdf) Electronic Document Online Correspondence and Concurrence (eDOCS) (pdf) DOE Jobs Online (Hiring Management)

  14. Environmental Impacts of Smart Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research & Development » Environmental Impacts and Siting of Wind Projects Environmental Impacts and Siting of Wind Projects A trained falcon, equipped with a GPS and a VHF tracker, gathers radar data that is helping scientists improve bird detection technologies at wind facilities. A trained falcon, equipped with a GPS and a VHF tracker, gathers radar data that is helping scientists improve bird detection technologies at wind facilities. The Wind Program works to remove barriers to wind

  15. SRS Economic Impact Study - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SRS Economic Impact Study The operations at Savannah River Site (SRS) create jobs, generate income, and contribute to the tax revenues across both South Carolina and Georgia. When economic multipliers are factored in, the economic ripple effect is enormous. Despite its significance in recent years, there has been little understanding beyond qualitative observations about the value of SRS's contributions to the region and what that impact means in quantifiable terms. Consequently, the SRSCRO

  16. High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2006-04-20

    This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

  17. Kazakhstan's potential provides Western opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darnell, R. )

    1993-01-01

    While crude oil production continues to drop in the Russian Federation at a rate of 15% to 20% per year, Kazakhstan's output rose from 440,000 bopd in 1991 to 446,000 bopd, as of November 1992. Much of this increase was exported to the Russian Federation to supplement the latter's declining production. while Kazakhstan received needed Russian goods in exchange for this oil, it isn't getting the hard currency that will be required to upgrade its petroleum industry. This is a serious problem for Kazakh officials, since they are counting on revenues from petroleum exports to invigorate their overall plan for economic growth in this newly independent country. In order to convert Kazakhstan's hydrocarbon potential into economic reality, two critical issues must be addressed immediately. First, Kazakhstan must develop a tax and minerals law that gives multinational petroleum companies an incentive to invest in opening a dedicated crude oil export route through Russia, and at least one alternate export route to the Caspian Sea or Persian Gulf. At present, even the most successful petroleum venture inside Kazakhstan would have to weave its way through the Russian bureaucracy to utilize that existing and inadequate export pipeline system. This quandary, of course, has recently become the undoing of several Western petroleum operations that have managed to actually produce exportable oil inside the Russian Federation itself, but they can't get it out. In addition, three other variables should be considered by any party that is evaluating Kazakhstan as a future area (see map for current fields) of interest for petroleum operations. These are political stability, field operating conditions, and the country's natural gas crisis. Each of these factors, though not as critical as the legal regime and export access, can radically affect how an operator might approach negotiating the terms of its particular project.

  18. Use of tamarisk as a potential feedstock for biofuel production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Norman, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses the energy and water use of saltcedar (or tamarisk) as biomass for biofuel production in a hypothetical sub-region in New Mexico. The baseline scenario consists of a rural stretch of the Middle Rio Grande River with 25% coverage of mature saltcedar that is removed and converted to biofuels. A manufacturing system life cycle consisting of harvesting, transportation, pyrolysis, and purification is constructed for calculating energy and water balances. On a dry short ton woody biomass basis, the total energy input is approximately 8.21 mmBTU/st. There is potential for 18.82 mmBTU/st of energy output from the baseline system. Of the extractable energy, approximately 61.1% consists of bio-oil, 20.3% bio-char, and 18.6% biogas. Water consumptive use by removal of tamarisk will not impact the existing rate of evapotranspiration. However, approximately 195 gal of water is needed per short ton of woody biomass for the conversion of biomass to biocrude, three-quarters of which is cooling water that can be recovered and recycled. The impact of salt presence is briefly assessed. Not accounted for in the baseline are high concentrations of Calcium, Sodium, and Sulfur ions in saltcedar woody biomass that can potentially shift the relative quantities of bio-char and bio-oil. This can be alleviated by a pre-wash step prior to the conversion step. More study is needed to account for the impact of salt presence on the overall energy and water balance.

  19. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE New England Clean Power Link Project: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 165, August 26, 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to assess the potential environmental impacts from its proposed federal action of granting a...

  20. The people problems of NEPA: Social impact assessment and the role of public involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, S.A.

    1989-12-31

    This Chapter of the book `` The Scientific Challenges of NEPA`` discusses the people problems of NEPA and social impact assessment and the role of public involvement in NEPA. When Congress passed the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in 1969, there was little guidance on the preparation of environmental impact statements (EIS) and the role of the public in the NEPA process. Excepting the statutory language of NEPA, which referred to impacts on the human environment, nowhere was this more evident than with respect to people. Questions such as what impacts on people should be assessed, how impacts on people should be assessed, and how people, including but not limited to those persons potentially impacted, should be involved in the assessment itself as well as NEPA`s associated administrative processes, were simply not addressed.

  1. EIS-0403: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0403: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Abstract: The BLM...

  2. EIS-0161: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    61: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0161: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to certain ...

  3. EIS-0377: Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Statement EIS-0377: Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project In May 2006, Western Area Power...

  4. Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. ...

  5. Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System Configurations of the Mirant Potomac River Plant Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System Configurations ...

  6. Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability...

  7. Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) ...

  8. Environmental Impact Statement Summary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary Environmental Impact Statement Summary This DOE guidance is intended to help EIS preparers draft the EIS summary. PDF icon Environmental Impact Statement Summary More...

  9. Employment Impacts of Geothermal Electric Projects (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Employment Impacts of Geothermal Electric Projects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Employment Impacts of Geothermal Electric Projects You are accessing a document...

  10. EIS-0386: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0386: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact ... would continue under current agency procedures for granting rights-of-way. ...

  11. Analysis of Environmental Impacts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Selected documents on the Analysis of Environmental Impacts under NEPA. October 3, 1984 Policy and Procedures for the Review of Federal Actions Impacting the Environment This...

  12. Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA309 Reviewers Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA309 Reviewers The ...

  13. Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies and the NYC Example Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies and the NYC Example ...

  14. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 1, 2003 EIS-0337: Draft Environmental Impact Statement West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management April 1, 2003 EIS-0312: Final Environmental Impact Statement Fish...

  15. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 1, 2012 EIS-0457: Final Environmental Impact Statement Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR February 8, 2012 EIS-0476: Final Environmental Impact...

  16. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 1, 1999 EIS-0222: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Revised Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and Comprehensive Land-Use Plan April 1, 1999...

  17. Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development at Existing Dams Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development at Existing Dams This report describes the ...

  18. Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. You are accessing a ...

  19. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Statement Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah September 3, 2004 EIS-0346: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Salmon...

  20. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PRIME Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by ...

  1. ERDA-1537: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ERDA-1537: Final Environmental Impact Statement ERDA-1537: Final Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to certain NEPA documents on ...

  2. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 22, 2006 EIS-0374: Final Environmental Impact Statement Klondike IIIBiglow Canyon Wind Integration Project August 1, 2006 EIS-0383: Draft Environmental Impact Statement...

  3. Preliminary Energy Savings Impact Evaluation: Better Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4, 2013. PDF icon Preliminary Energy Savings Impact Evaluation More Documents & Publications Savings and Economic Impacts of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final ...

  4. Induced Seismicity Impact | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismicity Impact Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleInducedSeismicityImpact&oldid612409" Feedback Contact needs updating...

  5. Environmental Impact Statements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compliance Environmental Impact Statements Environmental Impact Statements The documents included on the Environmental Compliance Division webpages have been posted to comply ...

  6. EIS-0310: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0310: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, ...

  7. EIS-0396: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0396: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Global Nuclear Energy Partnership The proposed Global Nuclear ...

  8. EIS-0515: Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5: Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0515: Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement Bay Delta Conservation Plan; Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, ...

  9. EIS-0229: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0229: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to certain ...

  10. EIS-0269: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    69: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0269: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to certain ...

  11. EIS-0472: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0472: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties, ...

  12. Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart The Status Chart provides the ...

  13. Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Fish from Mining-impacted Reservoirs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Fish from Mining-impacted Reservoirs Mercury toxicity generates environmental concerns in diverse aquatic systems because methylmercury enters the water column in diverse ways then biomagnifies through food webs. At the apex of many freshwater food webs, piscivorous fish can then extend that trophic transfer and potential for neurotoxicity to wildlife and humans. Mining activities, particularly those associated with the San Francisco Bay region, can generate

  14. EA-1929: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3: Preliminary Environmental Assessment EA-1913: Preliminary Environmental Assessment Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal by BPA to fund the modification of an existing IDFG trout hatchery near Springfield, Idaho, to provide a facility that would be capable of rearing up to 1 million Snake River sockeye salmon juveniles. Modifications would include demolishing several existing structures,

  15. Global Potential of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A; McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2008-06-15

    This report estimates the global potential reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 for energy efficiency improvements associated with equipment (appliances, lighting, and HVAC) in buildings by means of energy efficiency standards and labels (EES&L). A consensus has emerged among the world's scientists and many corporate and political leaders regarding the need to address the threat of climate change through emissions mitigation and adaptation. A further consensus has emerged that a central component of these strategies must be focused around energy, which is the primary generator of greenhouse gas emissions. Two important questions result from this consensus: 'what kinds of policies encourage the appropriate transformation to energy efficiency' and 'how much impact can these policies have'? This report aims to contribute to the dialogue surrounding these issues by considering the potential impacts of a single policy type, applied on a global scale. The policy addressed in this report is Energy Efficient Standards and Labeling (EES&L) for energy-consuming equipment, which has now been implemented in over 60 countries. Mandatory energy performance standards are important because they contribute positively to a nation's economy and provide relative certainty about the outcome (both timing and magnitudes). Labels also contribute positively to a nation's economy and importantly increase the awareness of the energy-consuming public. Other policies not analyzed here (utility incentives, tax credits) are complimentary to standards and labels and also contribute in significant ways to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. We believe the analysis reported here to be the first systematic attempt to evaluate the potential of savings from EES&L for all countries and for such a large set of products. The goal of the analysis is to provide an assessment that is sufficiently well-quantified and accurate to allow comparison and integration with other strategies under consideration.

  16. JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 High

  17. JC3 Low Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 Low

  18. JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 Medium

  19. Potential for Biofuels from Algae (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pienkos, P. T.

    2007-11-15

    Presentation on the potential for biofuels from algae presented at the 2007 Algae Biomass Summit in San Francisco, CA.

  20. ARM Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Availability: ORNL Language: English Subject: 54 Environmental Sciences ARMBE, Soundings; Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE); ...

  1. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 1, 2015 | Palo Alto, CA by Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Improvements in energy intensity largely offset impact of growth in GDP leading to slow growth in energy...

  2. Estimated Energy Savings and Financial Impacts of Nanomaterials by Design on Selected Applications in the Chemical Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thayer, Gary R.; Roach, J. Fred; Dauelsberg, Lori

    2006-03-01

    This study provides a preliminary analysis of the potential impact that nanotechnology could have on energy efficiency, economic competitiveness, waste reduction, and productivity, in the chemical and related industries.

  3. EIS-0288: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor

  4. EIS-0222: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Revised Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and Comprehensive Land-Use Plan

  5. Supply Impacts of an MTBE Ban

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyzes the supply impacts of removing methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline.

  6. Analysis of some potential social effects of four coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, C.A.; Gould, L.C.

    1980-09-01

    This is an analysis of the potential social impacts of four coal technologies: conventional combustion, fluidized-bed combustion, liquifaction, and gasification. Because of their flexibility, and the abundance and relatively low costs of coal, the potential benefits of these technologies would seem to outweigh their potential social costs, both in the intermediate and long term. Nevertheless, the social costs of a coal industry are far more obscure and hard to quantify than the benefits. In general, however, it maybe expected that those technologies that can be deployed most quickly, that provide fuels that can substitute most easily for oil and natural gas, that are the cheapest, and that are the most thermally efficient will minimize social costs most in the intermediate term, while technologies that can guide energy infrastructure changes to become the most compatable with the fuels that will be most easily derived from inexhaustible sources (electricity and hydrogen) will minimize social costs most in the long run. An industry structured to favor eastern over western coal and plant sites in moderate sized communities, which could easily adapt to inexhaustible energy technologies (nuclear or solar) in the future, would be favored in either time period.

  7. Health impact assessment in Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Eunjeong; Lee, Youngsoo; Harris, Patrick; Koh, Kwangwook; Kim, Keonyeop

    2011-07-15

    Recently, Health Impact Assessment has gained great attention in Korea. First, the Ministry of Environment introduced HIA within existing Environment Impact Assessment. Second, the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs began an HIA program in 2008 in alliance with Healthy Cities. In this short report, these two different efforts are introduced and their opportunities and challenges discussed. We believe these two approaches complement each other and both need to be strengthened. We also believe that both can contribute to the development of health in policy and project development and ultimately to improvements in the Korean population's health.

  8. Impact Pilots | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Pilots Impact Pilots Dr. David Danielson announces that NREL will be the leading lab of a newly funded Lab-Corps Pilot program Dr. David Danielson announces that NREL will be the leading lab of a newly funded Lab-Corps Pilot program Dr. David Danielson, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy announces that NREL will be the Leading lab of a newly funded Lab Core Pilot program, at a keynote speech at the 27th Industry Growth Forum in

  9. EIS-0423-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This SEIS supplements the January 2011 Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury. It will analyze the potential environmental impact for a facility at and in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico.

  10. EIS-0523: Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Non-Contiguous United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) in the U.S. Department of Commerce is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that will analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to design, deploy and operate the Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network. This PEIS covers the non-contiguous United States.

  11. High Impact Technology HQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Technology Catalyst » High Impact Technology HQ High Impact Technology HQ High Impact Technology HQ Home Resources for Evaluators -- Site Evaluation Checklists, General M&V Plans, General Templates Host a Site -- Current Opportunities for Owners and Operators Provide Information About Technologies -- Open Opportunities, Upcoming Events, Prioritization Tool Input Form Results -- Technology Highlights, Case Studies, Final Technical Reports, Market Stimulation Activities The High Impact

  12. WINDExchange: Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Regional Resource Centers Economic Development Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Resources & Tools Siting Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Fact Sheet PDF The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels. Based on

  13. Environmental Impact Statement | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact Statements DOE/EIS-0473 - W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project Notice of Intent (November 2011) Draft Environmental Impact Statement (September 2012) Final Environmental Impact Statement (February 2013) Record of Decision (May 2013) Mitigation Action Plan (June 2013) DOE/EIS-0464 - Lake Charles CCS Project Notice of Intent (April 2011) Draft Environmental Impact Statement (April 2013) Final Environmental Impact Statement (November 2013) Record of Decision

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-01

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies. A technical report addressing our findings is available on this Science and Technology Information site under the Product Title, "Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures". This product is a brochure, primarily for project developers, that summarizes important issues in that more comprehensive report, identifies locations where that report can be downloaded, and identifies points of contact for more information.

  15. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation PDF icon Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents & ...

  16. Ultrasonic-impact grinder system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Calkins, N.C.

    1982-09-30

    The disclosure relates to an ultrasonic impact grinding apparatus utilizing a counterweight to set an unloaded friction free condition. An added weight is used to optimize feed rate in accordance with the material to be cut, tool size and the like.

  17. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-06-01

    The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

  18. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P-1 APPENDIX P ECOLOGICAL RESOURCES AND RISK ANALYSIS This appendix presents the ecological resources (see Section P.1) at the Hanford Site and lists the plants and animals evaluated in this Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Potential impacts of both airborne releases during operations and groundwater discharges under the various alternatives are evaluated in this appendix. The purpose of the risk analysis is to compare

  19. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q-1 APPENDIX Q LONG-TERM HUMAN HEALTH DOSE AND RISK ANALYSIS This appendix presents methods and results for assessment of potential human health impacts due to releases of radionuclides and chemicals from the high-level radioactive waste tanks, Fast Flux Test Facility decommissioning, and waste management activities over long periods of time following stabilization or closure. Q.1 INTRODUCTION Adverse impacts on human health and the environment may occur over long periods of time following

  20. Occidental Geothermal, Inc. , Oxy Geothermal Power Plant No. 1: draft environmental impact report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The following aspects of the proposed geothermal power plant are discussed: the project description; the environment in the vicinity of project as it exists before the project begins, from both a local and regional perspective; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the growth inducing impacts. (MHR)

  1. NNSA lab explores options to save Earth from asteroid impact | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration lab explores options to save Earth from asteroid impact Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 3:08pm The threat of potential earth impacts from space objects has been on scientists' and policymakers' radar for decades. Now, technologies enabled and driven by the nuclear security enterprise are making improvements to the analysis of possible solutions. New research at NNSA's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) shows that by crashing space vehicles into large

  2. EIS-0517: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement (FR) | Department of Energy Statement (FR) EIS-0517: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (FR) Port Arthur Liquefaction Project and Port Arthur Pipeline Project; Jefferson and Orange Counties, Texas, and Cameron Parish, Louisiana The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued a notice of intent to prepare an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas marine terminal along

  3. EIS-0517: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement | Department of Energy Statement EIS-0517: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Port Arthur Liquefaction Project and Port Arthur Pipeline Project; Jefferson and Orange Counties, Texas, and Cameron Parish, Louisiana The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued a notice of intent to prepare an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas marine terminal along the

  4. Autonomous Vehicles Have a Wide Range of Possible Energy Impacts (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, A.; Repac, B.; Gonder, J.

    2013-07-01

    This poster presents initial estimates of the net energy impacts of automated vehicles (AVs). Automated vehicle technologies are increasingly recognized as having potential to decrease carbon dioxide emissions and petroleum consumption through mechanisms such as improved efficiency, better routing, lower traffic congestion, and by enabling advanced technologies. However, some effects of AVs could conceivably increase fuel consumption through possible effects such as longer distances traveled, increased use of transportation by underserved groups, and increased travel speeds. The net effect on petroleum use and climate change is still uncertain. To make an aggregate system estimate, we first collect best estimates for the energy impacts of approximately ten effects of AVs. We then use a modified Kaya Identity approach to estimate the range of aggregate effects and avoid double counting. We find that depending on numerous factors, there is a wide range of potential energy impacts. Adoption of automated personal or shared vehicles can lead to significant fuel savings but has potential for backfire.

  5. Pumped Storage and Potential Hydropower from Conduits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENERGY United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Message from the Secretary Th is Congressional Report, Pumped Storage Hydropower and Potential Hydropower from Conduits, addresses the technical flexibility that existing pumped storage facilities can provide to support intermittent renewable energy generation . This study considered potential upgrades or retrofit of these facilities, the technical potential of existing and new pumped storage facilities to provide grid reliability

  6. Pumped Storage and Potential Hydropower from Conduits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-02-25

    Th is Congressional Report, Pumped Storage Hydropower and Potential Hydropower from Conduits, addresses the technical flexibility that existing pumped storage facilities can provide to support intermittent renewable energy generation. This study considered potential upgrades or retrofit of these facilities, the technical potential of existing and new pumped storage facilities to provide grid reliability benefits, and the range of conduit hydropower opportunities available in the United States.

  7. Environmental impacts of residual Municipal Solid Waste incineration: A comparison of 110 French incinerators using a life cycle approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beylot, Antoine Villeneuve, Jacques

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: 110 French incinerators are compared with LCA based on plant-specific data. Environmental impacts vary as a function of plants energy recovery and NO{sub x} emissions. E.g. climate change impact ranges from ?58 to 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne of residual MSW. Implications for LCA of waste management in a decision-making process are detailed. - Abstract: Incineration is the main option for residual Municipal Solid Waste treatment in France. This study compares the environmental performances of 110 French incinerators (i.e. 85% of the total number of plants currently in activity in France) in a Life Cycle Assessment perspective, considering 5 non-toxic impact categories: climate change, photochemical oxidant formation, particulate matter formation, terrestrial acidification and marine eutrophication. Mean, median and lower/upper impact potentials are determined considering the incineration of 1 tonne of French residual Municipal Solid Waste. The results highlight the relatively large variability of the impact potentials as a function of the plant technical performances. In particular, the climate change impact potential of the incineration of 1 tonne of waste ranges from a benefit of ?58 kg CO{sub 2}-eq to a relatively large burden of 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq, with 294 kg CO{sub 2}-eq as the average impact. Two main plant-specific parameters drive the impact potentials regarding the 5 non-toxic impact categories under study: the energy recovery and delivery rate and the NO{sub x} process-specific emissions. The variability of the impact potentials as a function of incinerator characteristics therefore calls for the use of site-specific data when required by the LCA goal and scope definition phase, in particular when the study focuses on a specific incinerator or on a local waste management plan, and when these data are available.

  8. Aftertreatment Modeling Status, Futur Potential, and Application...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DaimlerChrysler NAFTA Truck Business Unit PDF icon 2004deerzhang.pdf More Documents & Publications SCR Potential and Issues for Heavy-Duty Applications in the United ...

  9. Potential for Data Center Efficiency Improvements | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Data Center Efficiency Improvements Potential for Data Center Efficiency Improvements Document offers an overview of the Federal Energy Management Program's data center activities. ...

  10. Shape invariant potentials in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandhya, R.; Sree Ranjani, S.; Kapoor, A.K.

    2015-08-15

    In this paper we investigate the shape invariance property of a potential in one dimension. We show that a simple ansatz allows us to reconstruct all the known shape invariant potentials in one dimension. This ansatz can be easily extended to arrive at a large class of new shape invariant potentials in arbitrary dimensions. A reformulation of the shape invariance property and possible generalizations are proposed. These may lead to an important extension of the shape invariance property to Hamiltonians that are related to standard potential problems via space time transformations, which are found useful in path integral formulation of quantum mechanics.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Working with Sandia: Potential...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Suppliers Man with Computer Becoming a Supplier to Sandia Sandia spends about 1 billion each year on purchases of quality products and services to meet its national...

  12. Global Renewable Resource Potential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Quality of Renewable Energy Potential 3 Representation of Challenges 4 Generation of New Climate Change Mitigation Scenarios 5 References Introduction A wind farm located in...

  13. Webinar: Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eastern Standard Time (EST). An analysis conducted by Sandia National Laboratories explored potential synergies that may be realized by integrating solar hydrogen production and ...

  14. Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office January ...

  15. Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Log Chemical Logging Density Log Gamma Log Image Logs Mud Logging Neutron Log Pressure Temperature Log Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Spontaneous Potential Well Log...

  16. NREL Research Identifies Increased Potential for Perovskites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Identifies Increased Potential for Perovskites as a Material for Solar Cells October 30, 2015 Scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory ...

  17. The Snell law for quaternionic potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Leo, Stefano; Ducati, Gisele C.

    2013-12-15

    By using the analogy between optics and quantum mechanics, we obtain the Snell law for the planar motion of quantum particles in the presence of quaternionic potentials.

  18. Alternative Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential for 'Novel' Financing Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Ways of Financing...

  19. Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2007-11-01

    Provides guidance on determining the efficiency potential in a utility footprint, state, or region; evaluating efficiency as a supply-side resource; and developing detailed efficiency program plans.

  20. A review and critique of the socioeconomic impact assessment for the Kahe Point Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, R; Gopalakrishnan, C; Samples, K

    1988-01-01

    This report addresses the adequacy of Ocean Thermal Corporation's socioeconomic impact assessment of its 40-MWe closed-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plant proposed for Kahe Point, Oahu, Hawaii. The socioeconomic impacts identified as relevant to the plant were assessed in detail, including potential economic-demographic, public-service and fiscal, ocean-use, aesthetic, cultural, and energy impacts. The economic-demographic impact assessment does not estimate the full extent of population and income changes or second-order effects associated with the plant. There is no subjective assessment of perceptions on the part of local communities concerning probable changes in land values, housing, and population. Anticipated public-service and fiscal impacts are found to be relatively unimportant; however, the measurement of the impact of the plant on tax revenues needs improvement. The assessment does not sufficiently consider the objective and subjective assessment of ocean-use, aesthetic, and cultural impacts, which are of major significance to the local communities. The quantification of physical impacts, perceptions of impacts, and potential mitigation measures is inadequate. The energy impacts need to be updated to reflect the recent declines in oil prices and price projections. An assessment of low-probability, high-risk occurrences may be necessary. 12 refs., 3 tabs.