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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP)...

2

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of residual enriched uranium in facility components for safeguards and nuclear criticality safety purposes. Current practices used to perform NDA measurements frequently have poorly defined uncertainties due to multiple factors. Working reference material (WRM) standards and container-specific surrogates are required to verify and validate NDA methods used to support characterization of gaseous diffusion equipment within the D&D project. Because working reference

3

Energy Department Selects Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

LEXINGTON, Ky. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a Task Order under the Nationwide Environmental Management ID/IQ Unrestricted Contract to Fluor Federal Services, Inc. for deactivation activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, which is currently leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC).

4

Independent Oversight Inspection, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2006 Independent Oversight Inspection, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2006 November 2006 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, conducted an inspection of the emergency management program at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in August and September 2006. The coordination of emergency plans and procedures among USEC and DOE contractor organizations has successfully integrated the emergency management programs into a single cohesive program for the PORTS site. Other strengths include accurate hazards surveys that identify applicable

5

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Gaseous Diffusion Plant. March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, INC - March 26, 2010 Issued to Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors,...

6

Enforcement Documents - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gaseous Diffusion Plant March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, INC - March 26, 2010 Issued to Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors,...

7

Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2011 August 2011 Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant HIAR-PORTS-2011-08-03 This Independent Activity Report documents an operational awareness...

8

Replacement of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) at the DOE gaseous diffusion plants: An assessment of global impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) formerly operated two gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) for enriching uranium and maintained a third shutdown GDP. These plants maintain a large inventory of dichlorotetrafluorethane (CFC-114), a cholorofluorocarbon (CFC), as a coolant. The paper evaluates the global impacts of four alternatives to modify GDP coolant system operations for a three-year period beginning in 1996. Interim modification of GDP coolant system operations has the potential to reduce stratospheric ozone depletion from GDP coolant releases while a permanent solution is studied.

Socolof, M.L.; Saylor, R.E.; McCold, L.N.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2013 November 5, 2013 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the preparedness of the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, contractors at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and selected non-leased facilities to respond to a severe natural phenomena event (NPE). The review was conducted in July and August 2013 by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, which is within the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations performed this

10

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant - TN 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (TN.02 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site...

11

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - KY 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (KY.01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site...

12

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant – November 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

13

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- January 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution

14

Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant [HIAR-PAD-2011-07-27] The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission support responsibilities. Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August 2011 Independent Activity Report, Argonne National Laboratory - August 2011

15

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- April 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of the Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

16

Gaseous Diffusion Plant Production Workers Needs Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Gaseous Diffusion Plants Department of Energy Gaseous Diffusion Plants Phase I: Needs Assessment Robert Wages Oil, Chemical and Atomic Inte national Union Steven Markowitz Mount Sinai School of Medicine Sylvia Kieding Oil, Chemical and Atomic International Union Mark Griffon University of Massachusetts Lowell Elizabeth Averill Samaras Alice Hamilton College October 1, 1997 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Number Executive Summary 1 J: OVERVIEW 1. Introduction 2-3 2. Methods 3-8 3. Principal Findings 9-16 4. Need for Medical Surveillance and Risk Communication 16-17 PART II: METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS 4. Exposure Assessment Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C 5. Focus Group Results Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C 6. Epidemiology and Other Health Studies EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Purpose We report the results and analysis of a one year needs assessment study evaluating

17

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building The K-25 plant, located on the southwestern end of the Oak Ridge reservation, used the gaseous diffusion method to separate uranium-235 from uranium-238. Based on the well-known principle that molecules of a lighter isotope would pass through a porous barrier more readily than molecules of a heavier one, gaseous diffusion produced through myriads of repetitions a gas increasingly rich in uranium-235 as the heavier uranium-238 was separated out in a system of cascades. Although producing minute amounts of final product measured in grams, gaseous diffusion required a massive

18

Enforcement Documents - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Enforcement Documents - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Intennech, Inc. - March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Intermech, Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Anchor Bolts and Pipe Supports at the DUF6 Conversion Buildings at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, INC - March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Penetration Fire Seals at the DUF6 Conversion Building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant March 26, 2010 Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 Consent Order issued to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC related to

19

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission support responsibilities. Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August

20

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - 026 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (026 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is located in south central Ohio, approximately 20 miles north of Portsmouth, Ohio and 70 miles south of Columbus, Ohio. Construction of the PGDP began in late 1952 to expand the Federal Government¿s gaseous diffusion program already in place at Oak Ridge, Tennessee and Paducah, Kentucky. The facility was built to increase the production of enriched uranium at rates substantially above the other

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Demolition of K-31 gaseous diffusion building begins  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

OREM begins demolition of the K-31 Building at Oak Ridge’s East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), marking the removal of the fourth of five gaseous diffusion buildings at the former uranium enrichment site.

22

Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition December 19, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis K-25 Demolition - Oak Ridge 2013 K-25 Demolition - Oak Ridge 2013 Media Contacts Ben Williams, DOE, (865) 574-4912 Wayne McKinney, UCOR, (865) 576-6284 Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Today, the Department of Energy announced that its contractor URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC, or UCOR, has completed demolition of the K-25 gaseous diffusion building, the largest facility in the DOE complex. UCOR took over the project in 2011 and has maintained a strong safety record while completing the demolition over one year ahead of its current schedule and approximately $300 million under the current budget. All debris removal is expected to be completed in spring 2014.

23

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- Quadrant I Groundwater Investigative (5-Unit) Area Plume  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Groundwater Database Report - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Quadrant I Groundwater Investigative (5-Unit) Area Plume

24

New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup August 18, 2010 - 10:47am Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, we took a closer look at the dismantling of the final W62 warhead, a major milestone in the nation's efforts to reduce the amount of nuclear weapons in its stockpile. But after five decades of nuclear weapons production, the Cold War didn't just create a stockpile -- it left 1.5 million cubic meters of solid waste and 88 million gallons of liquid waste. This waste requires treatment and permanent safe storage in gaseous diffusion plants, like the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in south-central Ohio. This week, the Department of Energy accelerated Portsmouth GDP cleanup

25

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - April  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 2013 April 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - April 2013 April 2013 Review of the Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO). The objective of the Independent Oversight review was to evaluate PPPO's conduct of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase I verification review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The contractor at PORTS is Fluor-Babcock & Wilcox Portsmouth (FBP). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations

26

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Paducah Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 464-0009 Local Outreach Office: Joe Hudson 1930 North 13th Street Paducah, KY 42001 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

27

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Portsmouth Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: Jeanne Cisco 2288 Wakefield Mound Road Piketon, OH 45661 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the Unitedsteel Workers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and

28

Privatization of the gaseous diffusion plants and impacts on nuclear criticality safety administration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 created the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) on July 1, 1993. The USEC is a government-owned business that leases those Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) facilities at the Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, sites from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that are required for enriching uranium. Lockheed Martin Utility Services is the operating contractor for the USEC-leased facilities. The DOE has retained use of, and regulation over, some facilities and areas at the Portsmouth and Paducah sites for managing legacy wastes and environmental restoration activities. The USEC is regulated by the DOE, but is currently changing to regulation under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The USEC is also preparing for privatization of the uranium enrichment enterprise. These changes have significantly affected the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) programs at the sites.

D`Aquila, D.M.; Holliday, R.T. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Dean, J.C. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PORTS-2011-08-03 PORTS-2011-08-03 Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 08/01/2011 - 08/03/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Portsmouth Site Office (PORTS) and the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky, from August 1-3, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's

30

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PAD-2011-07-27 PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 07/25/2011 - 07/27/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission

31

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PAD-2011-07-27 PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 07/25/2011 - 07/27/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission

32

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PORTS-2011-08-03 PORTS-2011-08-03 Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 08/01/2011 - 08/03/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Portsmouth Site Office (PORTS) and the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky, from August 1-3, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's

33

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report for 1992, is published annually. It reflects the results of an environmental monitoring program designed to quantify potential increases in the concentration of contaminants and potential doses to the resident human population. The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP`s neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, reduce the generation of waste, and minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

Horak, C.M. [ed.] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant State Kentucky Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/RCRA Scope Summary Ensure that the environmental impacts of activities at the Site are investigated and appropriate response actions are taken. Parties U.S. DOE; Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet; U.S. EPA Date 2/01/1998 SCOPE * Ensure all releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants are addressed to achieve comprehensive remediation of the site. * Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring response actions in accordance with CERCLA, RCRA, and Kentucky Law. * Facilitate cooperation, exchange of information, and participation of the Parties and

35

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support Contract Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant- March 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether the Infrastructure Support Contract Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

36

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support Contract Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant- May 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether Infrastructure Support Contract Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

37

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Production Workers Screening Production Workers Screening Projects Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Paducah Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: James Harbison 2525 Cairo Road Paducah, KY 42001 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing test, and an educational workshop. This program also offers CT

38

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Plant Former Workers, Construction Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Portsmouth Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPh, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 464-0009 Local Outreach Office: Ron Bush 1236 Gallia Street Portsmouth, OH 45662 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

39

Gaseous diffusion plant transition from DOE to external regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After many years of operation as government-owned/contractor-operated facilities, large portions of the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, were leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). These facilities are now certified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and subject to oversight by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The transition from DOE to NRC regulation was more difficult than expected. The original commitment was to achieve NRC certification in October 1995; however, considerably more time was required and transition-related costs escalated. The Oak Ridge Operations Office originally estimated the cost of transition at $60 million; $240 million has been spent to date. The DOE`s experience in transitioning the GDPs to USEC operation with NRC oversight provides valuable lessons (both positive and negative) that could be applied to future transitions.

Dann, R.K.; Crites, T.R.; Rahm-Crites, L.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Northwest Plume interceptor system evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) recently installed an interceptor system consisting of four wells, evenly divided between two well fields, to contain the Northwest Plume. As stated in the Northwest Plume Record of Decision (ROD), groundwater will be pumped at a rate to reduce further contamination and initiate control of the northwest contaminant plume. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the optimum (minimal) well field pumping rates required for plume hotspot containment. Plume hotspot, as defined in the Northwest Plume ROD and throughout this report, is that portion of the plume with trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations greater than 1,000 {micro}g/L. An existing 3-dimensional groundwater model was modified and used to perform capture zone analyses of the north and south interceptor system well fields. Model results suggest that the plume hotspot is not contained at the system design pumping rate of 100 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well field. Rather, the modeling determined that north and south well field pumping rates of 400 and 150 gal/min, respectively, are necessary for plume hotspot containment. The difference between the design and optimal pumping rates required for containment can be attributed to the discovery of a highly transmissive zone in the vicinity of the two well fields.

Laase, A.D.; Clausen, J.L.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DOE Issues Final Request for Proposal for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Support Services  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cincinnati -- The U.S. Department of Energy today issued a Final Request for Proposal (RFP), for the continued performance of infrastructure support services at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio.

42

DOE Issues Final Request for Proposal for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Support Services  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cincinnati -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Final Request for Proposal (RFP), for the performance of infrastructure support services at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky.

43

EA-1856: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Piketon, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of conveyance of land and facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, in Piketon, Ohio, for economic development purposes.

44

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 BEFORE THE OHIO ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY In the Matter Of: United States Department of Energy : Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant : Findings and Orders P.O. Box 700 : Piketon, Ohio 45661-0700 : Respondent It is hereby agreed by and among the parties hereto as follows: Table of Contents I. Jurisdiction II. Parties Bound III. Definitions IV. Findings of Fact V. Orders VI. Limitations of Director's Approval VII. Notice VIII. Project Managers IX. Dispute Resolution X. Funding XI. Other Applicable Laws XII. Reservation of Rights XIII. Modification XIV. Termination XV. Other Claims XVI. Signatories XVII. Waiver I. Jurisdiction These Director's Final Findings and Orders ("Orders") are issued to the United States

45

Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: K-25 Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: Bruce Lawson 133 Raleigh Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Local Medical Clinics: ParkMed 110 S. Illinois Avenue Oak Ridge, TN 37380 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge,

46

Linking drainage front morphology with gaseous diffusion in unsaturated porous media: A lattice Boltzmann study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

porous media is analyzed using the lattice Boltzmann method LBM . Flow regimes for immiscible in a physical experiment such as a micromodel. In this study, we use the lattice Boltzmann method LBMLinking drainage front morphology with gaseous diffusion in unsaturated porous media: A lattice

Shor, Leslie McCabe

47

DOE Seeks Small Businesses for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Infrastructure Support Services  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cincinnati -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Draft Request for Proposal (RFP) seeking eligible small businesses under North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 561210, Facilities Support Services, for the performance of infrastructure support services at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP).

48

DOE Seeks Small Businesses for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Infrastructure Support Services  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cincinnati -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Draft Request for Proposal (RFP) seeking eligible small businesses under North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 561210, Facilities Support Services, for the performance of infrastructure support services at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Portsmouth, Ohio.

49

Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OH OH EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: February 2008 ETR-12 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) is proposed for long-term containment of contaminated materials from the planned Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Acceptable performance of the proposed OSWDF will depend on interactions between engineered landfill features and operations methods that recognize the unique characteristics of the waste stream and site-

50

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 State Ohio Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Agreement between the Ohio EPA and DOE approving the STP and setting waste treatment milestones Parties DOE; Ohio Department of Environmental Protection Date 10/4/1995 SCOPE * Approve the Compliance Plan Volume of the amended PSTP submitted to Ohio EPA on October 2, 1995, hereafter referred to as "approved STP." * Set forth guidelines for storage and treatment of mixed wastes at the Facility which are not being stored in accordance with the LDR requirements of OAC rule 3745-59- 50. * Establish milestones and target dates for approved STP. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES

51

Summary - Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Paducah, KY Paducah, KY EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: August 2008 ETR-16 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility(OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is an active uranium enrichment facility that was placed on the National Priorities List. DOE is required to remediate the PGDP in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is evaluating alternatives to dispose of waste generated from the remedial activities at the PGDP. One option is to construct an on-site disposal facility (OSDF) meeting the CERCLA requirements.

52

Nuclear safety procedure upgrade project at USEC/MMUS gaseous diffusion plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Martin Marietta Utility Services has embarked on a program to upgrade procedures at both of its Gaseous Diffusion Plant sites. The transition from a U.S. Department of Energy government-operated facility to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated has necessitated a complete upgrade of plant operating procedures and practices incorporating human factors as well as a philosophy change in their use. This program is designed to meet the requirements of the newly written 10CFR76, {open_quotes}The Certification of Gaseous Diffusion Plants,{close_quotes} and aid in progression toward NRC certification. A procedures upgrade will help ensure increased nuclear safety, enhance plant operation, and eliminate personnel procedure errors/occurrences.

Kocsis, F.J. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of Spray Booth Operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for Spray Booth Operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current procedures and related hardware/equipment is presented. Control parameters relevant to nuclear criticality safety are explained, and a consolidated listing of administrative controls and safety systems is developed. Based on compliance with DOE Orders and MMES practices, the overall operation is evaluated, and recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested.

Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review, April 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology......................................................................................................................................... 1

55

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review, April 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology......................................................................................................................................... 1

56

Type B Accident Investigation of the July 12, 2007, Forklift and Pedestrian Accident at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On July 12, 2007, an employee at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) was walking alone during her scheduled lunch period.

57

Development of NF3 Deposit Removal Technology for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the Battelle, Stoller, and WASTREN (BSW) team's efforts, to date, in support of the United States Department of Energy's plans to remove uranium and technetium deposits before decommissioning the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The BSW team investigated nitrogen trifluoride (NF{sub 3}) as a safer yet effective alternative gaseous treatment to the chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3})-elemental fluorine (F{sub 2}) treatment currently used to remove uranium and technetium deposits from the uranium enrichment cascade. Both ClF{sub 3} and F{sub 2} are highly reactive, toxic, and hazardous gases, while NF{sub 3}, although toxic [1], is no more harmful than moth balls [2]. BSW's laboratory thermo-analytical and laboratory-scale prototype studies with NF{sub 3} established that thermal NF{sub 3} can effectively remove likely and potential uranium (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and UF{sub 4}) and technetium deposits (a surrogate deposit material, TcO{sub 2}, and pertechnetates) by conversion to volatile compounds. Our engineering evaluations suggest that NF{sub 3}'s effectiveness could be enhanced by combining with a lesser concentration of ClF{sub 3}. BSW's and other's studies indicate compatibility with Portsmouth materials of construction (aluminum, copper, and nickel). (authors)

Scheele, R.D.; McNamara, B.K.; Rapko, B.M.; Edwards, M.K.; Kozelisky, A.E.; Daniel, R.C. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Division, PO Box 999, Battelle Blvd, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); McSweeney, T.I.; Maharas, S.J.; Weaver, P.J.; Iwamasa, K.J. [Battelle Columbus Operations, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43201 (United States); Kefgen, R.B. [WASTREN, Inc., 1864 Shyville Road, Piketon, Ohio 45661 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

i i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 1 - Future Uses of the Subtitle D Landfill 2 3. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 2 - OSDF Siting in a Brownfield Area 3 4. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 3 - Seismic Issues 4 5. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 4 - Post-Closure Public Use of the OSDF 5 6. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 5 - Public Communication Plan 7 7. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 6 - Baseline Schedule 8 8. RECOMMENDATIONS 8 9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 10 10. REFERENCES 10 APPENDIX 11 1 1. INTRODUCTION The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is an active uranium enrichment facility that is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Uranium enrichment facilities at PGDP are leased to and operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. In 1994, PGDP was placed

59

Study of technetium uptake in vegetation in the vicinity of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technetium-99 was measured in vegetation and soil collected on and near the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to obtain an estimate of the soil-to-vegetation concentration factors. The concentration factors appear to be lognormally distributed with a geometric mean of 3.4 (Bq/kg dry wt. tissue per Bq/kg dry wt. soil) and a geometric standard deviation of 4.7. A dose commitment was calculated using a hypothetical 3.7 x 10/sup 10/ Bq Tc-99/year release and the actual CY-1981 concentration release of Tc-99. The radiological significance of Tc-99 in the terrestial food chain is substantially less than previously believed.

Acox, T.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A probabilistic safety analysis of UF{sub 6} handling at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A probabilistic safety study of UF{sub 6} handling activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has recently been completed. The analysis provides a unique perspective on the safety of UF{sub 6} handling activities. The estimated release frequencies provide an understanding of current risks, and the examination of individual contributors yields a ranking of important plant features and operations. Aside from the probabilistic results, however, there is an even more important benefit derived from a systematic modeling of all operations. The integrated approach employed in the analysis allows the interrelationships among the equipment and the required operations to be explored in depth. This paper summarizes the methods used in the study and provides an overview of some of the technical insights that were obtained. Specific areas of possible improvement in operations are described.

Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Summitt, R.L. [Safety and Reliability Optimization Services (SAROS), Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution, January 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Review of the Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1

62

EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Paducah, Kentucky  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE’s Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office is preparing an EA for a proposal to convey DOE land and facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant to the Paducah Area Community Reuse Organization and potentially other parties in furtherance of reindustrialization and reuse for economic development purposes.

63

Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; currently the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) was prepared in December 1986, as required by the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit that was issued on September 11, 1986. The effluent discharges to Mitchell Branch are complex, consisting of trace elements, organic chemicals, and radionuclides in addition to various conventional pollutants. Moreover, the composition of these effluent streams will be changing over time as various pollution abatement measures are implemented over the next several years. Although contaminant inputs to the stream originate primarily as point sources from existing plant operations, area sources, such as the classified burial grounds and the K-1407-C holding pond, can not be eliminated as potential sources of contaminants. The proposed BMAP consists of four tasks. These tasks include (1) ambient toxicity testing, (2) bioaccumulation studies, (3) biological indicator studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities. BMAP will determine whether the effluent limits established for ORGDP protect the designated use of the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch) for growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life. Another objective of the program is to document the ecological effects resulting from various pollution abatement projects, such as the Central Neutralization Facility.

Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Kszos, L.A.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Determination of operating limits for radionuclides for a proposed landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operating limits for radionuclides in sanitary and industrial wastes were determined for a proposed landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Kentucky. These limits, which may be very small but nonzero, are not mandated by law or regulation but are needed for rational operation. The approach was based on analyses of the potential contamination of groundwater at the plant boundary and the potential exposure to radioactivity of an intruder at the landfill after closure. The groundwater analysis includes (1) a source model describing the disposal of waste and the release of radionuclides from waste to the groundwater, (2) site-specific groundwater flow and contaminant transport calculations, and (3) calculations of operating limits from the dose limit and conversion factors. The intruder analysis includes pathways through ingestion of contaminated vegetables and soil, external exposure to contaminated soil, and inhalation of suspended activity from contaminated soil particles. In both analyses, a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) was adopted. The intended application of the results is to refine the radiological monitoring standards employed by the PGDP Health Physics personnel to determine what constitutes radioactive wastes, with concurrence of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Kocher, D.C.

1994-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

65

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant proposed pilot pump-and-treat project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 23, 1992, R.C. Sleeman of the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office requested that a Groundwater Corrective Actions Team be assembled to evaluate the technical merit of and the need to implement a proposed groundwater pump-and-treat demonstration project for the Northwest contaminant plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. In addition to other suggestions, the Team recommended that further characterization data be obtained for the plume. In the Fall of 1993 additional, temporary well points were installed so that groundwater samples from the shallow groundwater system and the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA) could be obtained to provide a three-dimensional view of groundwater contamination in the region of the plume. The results indicate that pure-phase DNAPL (trichloroethylene [TCE]) probably are present in the source area of the plume and extend in depth to the base of the RGA. Because the DNAPL likely will represent a source of a dissolved phase plume for decades it is essential that source containment take place. The Team recommends that although effective hydraulic containment can be achieved, other alternatives should be considered. For example, recent advances in emplacing low permeability barrier walls to depths of 100 to 150 ft make it possible to consider encirclement of the source of the Northwest plume.

Bodenstein, G.W.; Bonczek, R.R.; Early, T.O.; Huff, D.D.; Jones, K.S.; Nickelson, M.D.; Rightmire, C.T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Operating limit study for the proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) would accept wastes generated during normal operations that are identified as non-radioactive. These wastes may include small amounts of radioactive material from incidental contamination during plant operations. A site-specific analysis of the new solid waste landfill is presented to determine a proposed operating limit that will allow for waste disposal operations to occur such that protection of public health and the environment from the presence of incidentally contaminated waste materials can be assured. Performance objectives for disposal were defined from existing regulatory guidance to establish reasonable dose limits for protection of public health and the environment. Waste concentration limits were determined consistent with these performance objectives for the protection of off-site individuals and inadvertent intruders who might be directly exposed to disposed wastes. Exposures of off-site individuals were estimated using a conservative, site-specific model of the groundwater transport of contamination from the wastes. Direct intrusion was analyzed using an agricultural homesteader scenario. The most limiting concentrations from direct intrusion or groundwater transport were used to establish the concentration limits for radionuclides likely to be present in PGDP wastes.

Lee, D.W.; Wang, J.C.; Kocher, D.C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution, January 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1

68

Independent Oversight Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, November 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant May 2011 November 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology ....................................................................................................................................... 2

69

Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio, is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Uranium hexafluoride enriched uranium than 1.0 wt percent {sup 235}U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 (Reference 1) and 178 (Reference 2), or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF{sub 6} cylinders/overpacks. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF{sub 6} packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the is documented in Reference 4.

Becker, D.L.; Green, D.J.; Lindquist, M.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Hydraulic Containment of TCE Contaminated Groundwater at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will describe the progress of a groundwater remedial action at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. The X-749 southern boundary hydraulic containment system, combining a four-well extraction system with a previously constructed subsurface barrier wall, has been employed at PORTS. The hydraulic containment project has been implemented as part of containment and remediation of the X-749/X-120 area trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminant. The X-749/X-120 groundwater contaminant plume is located in the south central section (Quadrant I) of the PORTS facility. The plume is associated with the former X-120 Goodyear Training Facility and a landfill known as the X-749 Contaminated Materials Disposal Facility. The principal contaminants of concern are chlorinated solvents (primarily TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99). A subsurface barrier wall (X-749 South Barrier Wall) was completed in 1994 at the PORTS southern reservation boundary as an interim remedial measure to slow the advancement of the leading edge of the contaminated groundwater plume or to prevent the plume from migrating off DOE property. Remedial measures identified by Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) included installation of a barrier wall around the eastern and southern portions of the X-749 landfill to provide source control and installation of a phyto-remediation system to help contain groundwater flow and remove volatile organic compounds. Previous remedial measures that were implemented as elements of 'closures' on the X-749 landfill included a multimedia cap, barrier walls, and a groundwater collection system. Despite these measures, the X-749/X-120 groundwater plume has migrated beyond the southern DOE property boundary. Current TCE concentrations in off-site groundwater monitoring wells are below the preliminary remediation goal and drinking water maximum contaminant level for TCE of 5 {mu}g/kg, but continue to increase. Hydraulic containment was selected as the method for controlling the plume at the southern DOE property boundary. Recent borings and pumping tests indicate that approximately a 400-foot section of the existing subsurface barrier wall near the DOE property boundary may been improperly keyed into the Sunbury Shale bedrock which underlies the unconsolidated uppermost Gallia sand and gravel aquifer (Gallia). This gap is reported to be as much as 4 vertical feet. In addition, the X-749 groundwater plume is migrating around the western end of the X-749 South Barrier Wall. Four groundwater extraction wells were installed at the DOE property boundary to provide hydraulic control of the plume currently flowing under and around the existing subsurface barrier wall. Placement of the new extraction wells was based on groundwater modeling and data collected from pumping tests in the area. The extracted groundwater is being sent to the on-site X-622 Groundwater Treatment Facility via subsurface piping. The hydraulic containment system began operation in June 2007. The preliminary water elevations from monitoring wells in the vicinity of two of the four extraction wells demonstrate a significant decrease in groundwater potentiometric head in the southern boundary area. The current extraction rates should be adequate to contain the leading edge of the contaminant plume. Monitoring wells in the area will continue to be sampled on a quarterly basis. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Rieske, D.P.G.; Baird, D.R.P.E. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Gamma radiological surveys of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, 1990-1993, and overview of data processing and analysis by the Environmental Restoration Remote Sensing Program, Fiscal Year 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three gamma radiological surveys have been conducted under auspices of the ER Remote Sensing Program: (1) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (1992), (2) Clinch River (1992), and (3) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) (1993). In addition, the Remote Sensing Program has acquired the results of earlier surveys at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) (1990) and PORTS (1990). These radiological surveys provide data for characterization and long-term monitoring of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contamination areas since many of the radioactive materials processed or handled on the ORR, PGDP, and PORTS are direct gamma radiation emitters or have gamma emitting daughter radionuclides. High resolution airborne gamma radiation surveys require a helicopter outfitted with one or two detector pods, a computer-based data acquisition system, and an accurate navigational positioning system for relating collected data to ground location. Sensors measure the ground-level gamma energy spectrum in the 38 to 3,026 KeV range. Analysis can provide gamma emission strength in counts per second for either gross or total man-made gamma emissions. Gross count gamma radiation includes natural background radiation from terrestrial sources (radionuclides present in small amounts in the earth`s soil and bedrock), from radon gas, and from cosmic rays from outer space as well as radiation from man-made radionuclides. Man-made count gamma data include only the portion of the gross count that can be directly attributed to gamma rays from man-made radionuclides. Interpretation of the gamma energy spectra can make possible the determination of which specific radioisotopes contribute to the observed man-made gamma radiation, either as direct or as indirect (i.e., daughter) gamma energy from specific radionuclides (e.g., cesium-137, cobalt-60, uranium-238).

Smyre, J.L.; Moll, B.W.; King, A.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Type B Accident Investigation of the August 22, 2000, Injury Resulting From Violent Exothermic Chemical Reaction at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, X-701B Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On August 22, 2000, an accident occurred at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) located in Piketon, Ohio. An employee of the IT Corporation (IT) working on an Environmental Management (EM) Technology Deployment Project received serious burns from a violent chemical reaction.

73

Modification and expansion of X-7725A Waste Accountability Facility for storage of polychlorinated biphenyl wastes at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) must manage wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in accordance with Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requirements and as prescribed in a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) between DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). PCB-containing wastes are currently stored in the PORTS process buildings where they are generated. DOE proposes to modify and expand the Waste Accountability facility (X-7725A) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio, to provide a central storage location for these wastes. The proposed action is needed to eliminate the fire and safety hazards presented by the wastes. In this EA, DOE considers four alternatives: (1) no action, which requires storing wastes in limited storage areas in existing facilities; (2) modifying and expanding the X-7725A waste accountability facility; (3) constructing a new PCB waste storage building; and (4) shipping PCB wastes to the K-25 TSCA incinerator. If no action is taken, PCB-contaminated would continue to be stored in Bldgs X-326, X-330, and X-333. As TSCA cleanup activities continue, the quantity of stored waste would increase, which would subsequently cause congestion in the three process buildings and increase fire and safety hazards. The preferred alternative is to modify and expand Bldg. X-7725A to store wastes generated by TSCA compliance activities. Construction, which could begin as early as April 1996, would last approximately five to seven months, with a total peak work force of 70.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Thermal Discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Outfalls: Impacts on Stream Temperatures and Fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

Roy, W.K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Review of the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Oversight of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Criticality Safety Program, May 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Oversight of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Criticality Safety Program May 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

76

DOE Issues Final Request for Proposal for Portsmouth Gaseous...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

The U.S. Department of Energy today issued a Final Request for Proposal (RFP), for the continued performance of infrastructure support services at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion...

77

Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil guidelines as inputs into the code was also performed to determine the maximum (peak) dose for all receptors. This report contains the technical basis in support of the DOE?s derivation of ALs for the 'Property.' A complete description of the methodology, including an assessment of the input parameters, model inputs, and results is provided in this report. This report also provides initial recommendations on applying the derived soil guidelines.

Boerner, A. J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Maldonado, D. G. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Process for producing enriched uranium having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a {sup 235}U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower {sup 235}U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF{sub 6} tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a {sup 235} U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % {sup 235} U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF{sub 6}; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF{sub 6} in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} having a {sup 235}U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6}; and converting this low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. 4 figs.

Horton, J.A.; Hayden, H.W. Jr.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Process for producing enriched uranium having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a .sup.235 U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower .sup.235 U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF.sub.6 tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a .sup.235 U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % .sup.235 U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF.sub.6 ; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF.sub.6 in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 having a .sup.235 U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 ; and converting this low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process.

Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Transportation Impact Assessment for Shipment of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF<sub>6</sub>) Cylinders from the East Tennessee Technology Park to the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 Transportation Impact Assessment for Shipment of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF 6 ) Cylinders from the East Tennessee Technology Park to the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory, with facilities in the states of Illinois and Idaho, is owned by the United States Government and operated by The University of Chicago under the provisions of a contract with the Department of Energy. This technical memorandum is a product of Argonne's Environmental Assessment Division (EAD). For information on the division's scientific and engineering

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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81

Binding Facility Agreement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Lease Pursuant to the Lease Agreement Between the United States Department of Energy...

82

Binding Facility Agreement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Lease Pursuant to the Lease Agreement Between the United States Department oEnergy...

83

EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Paducah Gaseous...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Paducah, Kentucky EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at...

84

Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant More Documents & Publications Briefing: DOE EM ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop...

85

Electricity demand, GDP and employment: evidence from Italy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper applies time series methodologies to examine the causal relationship among electricity demand, real per capita GDP and total labor force for Italy from 1970 to 2009. After a brief introduction, a su...

Cosimo Magazzino

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The link between energy and GDP in developing countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Historical studies of the energy-demand patterns of the industrial countries show increasing energy intensity followed by decreasing intensity. To explore the energy intensity patterns of developing countries, a data base was assembled for 38 developing countries. The data base contains estimates of per capita energy demand and GDP for 1950, 1960, 1970 and 1980. If the GDP is measured using the purchasing power parity method, analysis of the data base demonstrates an increase in energy intensity as countries develop.

David B. Reister

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Refurbishment of uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yards C-745-K, L, M, N, and P and construction of a new uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yard (C-745-T) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is a uranium enrichment facility owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). A residual of the uranium enrichment process is depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). Depleted UF6, a solid at ambient temperature, is stored in 32,200 steel cylinders that hold a maximum of 14 tons each. Storage conditions are suboptimal and have resulted in accelerated corrosion of cylinders, increasing the potential for a release of hazardous substances. Consequently, the DOE is proposing refurbishment of certain existing yards and construction of a new storage yard. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the impacts of the proposed action and no action and considers alternate sites for the proposed new storage yard. The proposed action includes (1) renovating five existing cylinder yards; (2) constructing a new UF6 storage yard; handling and onsite transport of cylinders among existing yards to accommodate construction; and (4) after refurbishment and construction, restacking of cylinders to meet spacing and inspection requirements. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, DOE is issuing a Finding of No Significant Impact. Additionally, it is reported in this EA that the loss of less than one acre of wetlands at the proposed project site would not be a significant adverse impact.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Oversight Reports - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Paducah Project Office - May 2012 Assessment of the PortsmouthPaducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants...

90

Gaseous Diffusion Plant Production Workers Needs Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

about a variety of issues, including exposures, perceptions of risk, health concerns, health care, and receptivity to a health screening program The overall design recruitment...

91

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) PortsmouthPaducah Project Office (PPPO). The objective of the Independent...

92

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Security (HSS), conducted a shadowing oversight activity of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) PortsmouthPaducah Project Office (PPPO) oversight of selected aspects of the...

93

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or reduce the likelihood of hydrogen embrittlement Test existing high strength steel alloys for use in largeGaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7 compression. Safety, integrity, reliability: Metal embrittlement, no H2 odorant, low ignition energy

94

Potential Hazards Relating to Pyrolysis of c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}O, n-C{sub 4}F{sub 10}, and c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} in Selected Gaseous Diffusion Plant Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a program intended to replace the present evaporative coolant at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) with a non-ozone-depleting alternate, a series of investigations of the suitability of candidate substitutes is under way. This report summarizes studies directed at estimating the chemical and thermal stability of three candidate coolants, c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, n-C{sub 4}F{sub 10}, and c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}O, in a few specific environments to be found in gaseous diffusion plant operations. One issue concerning the new coolants is the possibility that they might produce the highly toxic compound perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in high-temperature environments. Two specific high-temperature thermal environments are examined, namely the use of a flame test for the presence of coolant vapors and welding in the presence of coolant vapors. A second issue relates to the thermal or chemical decomposition of the coolants in the gaseous diffusion process environment. The primary purpose of the study was to develop and evaluate available data to provide information that will allow the technical and industrial hygiene staff at the GDPs to perform appropriate safety evaluations and to determine the need for field testing or experimental work. The scope of this study included a literature search and an evaluation of the information developed therefrom. Part of that evaluation consists of chemical kinetics modeling of coolant decomposition in the two operational environments. The general conclusions are that PFIB formation is unlikely in either situation but that it cannot be ruled out completely under extreme conditions. The presence of oxygen, moisture, and combustion products will tend to lead to the formation of CF{sub 4} and oxidation products (COF{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and HF) rather than PFIB.

Trowbridge, L.D.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

95

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout - Strategic Directions for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop...

96

The effects of energy policies in China on energy consumption and GDP1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of energy policies in China on energy consumption and GDP1 Ming-Jie Lu, C.-Y. Cynthia consumption and GDP for several industries. We not only analyze the effects of multiple types of energy impact different kinds of energy consumption and the GDP of different kinds of industries using

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

97

Viscosity Measurements on Gaseous Ethane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viscosity Measurements on Gaseous Ethane ... Only the pressures, densities, and viscosities are given in the table with regard to the large number of experimental points. ...

Jörg Wilhelm; Daniel Seibt; Eckhard Vogel; Daniel Buttig; Egon Hassel

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

98

EMEF DMC EFS-95-004 GDP TURNOVER CONTINGENCY PLANNING POWER CONTRACTIN...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

111111111111111111111111 EMEF DMC EFS-95-004 GDP TURNOVER CONTINGENCY PLANNING POWER CONTRACTING OPTIONS This document is approved f()i puolic release per review by: er "-...

99

Viscosity Measurements on Gaseous Propane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viscosity Measurements on Gaseous Propane ... However, in that case, the viscosities will have to be re-evaluated too, which also requires the parameters of the wire oscillation, the logarithmic decrement and the frequency. ...

Jörg Wilhelm; Eckhard Vogel

2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

100

MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN GDP SHELLS USED AS CRYOGENIC DIRECT DRIVE TARGETS AT OMEGA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Thin glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells are currently used as the targets for cryogenic direct drive laser fusion experiments. These shells need to be filled with nearly 1000 atm of D{sub 2} and cooled to cryogenic temperatures without failing due to buckling and bursting pressures they experience in this process. Therefore, the mechanical and permeation properties of these shells are of utmost importance in successful and rapid filling with D{sub 2}. In this paper, they present an overview of buckle and burst pressures of several different types of GDP shells. These include those made using traditional GDP deposition parameters (standard GDP) using a high deposition pressure and using modified parameters (strong GDP) of low deposition pressure that leads to more robust shells.

NIKROO,A; CZECHOWICZ,D; CHEN,K.C; DICKEN,M; MORRIS,C; ANDREWS,R; GREENWOOD,A.L; CASTILLO,E

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EMEF DMC EFS-95-003 GDP TuRNOVER CONTINGENCY PLANNING POWER CONTRACT...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 11111111 EMEF DMC EFS-95-003 GDP TuRNOVER CONTINGENCY PLANNING POWER CONTRACT TERMINATION PROVISIONS AND CONSEQUENCES I JULY 1995 B. J. Kirby Power Systems Technology Program...

102

Technical Fact Sheets | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Workshop Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Sustainability Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with...

103

Causal relationship between energy consumption and GDP in Tunisia: aggregated and disaggregated analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the causality between energy consumption and GDP in Tunisia for the 1980 to 2009 period at both aggregated and disaggregated levels as oil, natural gas, and electricity. To determine the Granger causality in the presence of cointegration between variables, a vector error correction model (VECM) is used instead of an autoregressive model (VAR). In the short-run, the neutrality hypothesis is supported between total energy consumption and GDP. This is also true between GDP and oil consumption in one hand and the gas consumption in other hand. Whereas a unidirectional is detected from electricity to the GDP is found (growth hypothesis). In the long-run, total energy consumption, in aggregate and disaggregated forms (gas and electricity) causes GDP (growth hypothesis). For against GDP causes oil consumption (conservation hypothesis). Consequently, the policy makers in Tunisia should place priority an increased commitment to aggregated and disaggregated energy consumption will stabilise the country's inefficient spending and allow it to have a stable income stream in the short-term to raise capital for its long-term investments.

Mehdi Abid; Rafaa Mraihi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Generation of gaseous tritium standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The determination of aqueous and non-aqueous tritium in gaseous samples is one type of determination often requested of radioanalytical laboratories. This determination can be made by introducing the sample as a gas into a sampling train containing two silica gel beds separated by.a catalytic oxidizer bed. The first bed traps tritiated water. The sample then passes into and through the oxidizer bed where non-aqueous tritium containing species are oxidized to water and other products of combustion. The second silica gel bed then traps the newly formed tritiated water. Subsequently, silica gel is removed to plastic bottles, deionized water is added, and the mixture is permitted to equilibrate. The tritium content of the equilibrium mixture is then determined by conventional liquid scintillation counting (LSC). For many years, the moisture content of inert, gaseous samples has been determined using monitors which quantitatively electrolyze the moisture present after that moisture has been absorbed by phosphorous pentoxide or other absorbents. The electrochemical reaction is quantitative and definitive, and the energy consumed during electrolysis forms the basis of the continuous display of the moisture present. This report discusses the experimental evaluation of such a monitor as the basis for a technique for conversion of small quantities of SRMs of tritiated water ({sup 3}HOH) into gaseous tritium standards ({sup 3}HH).

Hohorst, F.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Viscosity of Gaseous HFC245fa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viscosity of Gaseous HFC245fa ... The uncertainty of the reported viscosities was estimated to be within ± 2.0 % with a coverage factor of k = 2. ...

Xiaopo Wang; Jiangtao Wu; Zhigang Liu

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Muon Capture in Gaseous Deuterium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the results of an experiment performed to measure the muon nuclear capture rate by free deuterons. The muons were slowed down in ultrapure gaseous hydrogen at 7.6 atm and 293 °K, containing 5% of deuterium. A special target was used, in which a system of gas proportional counters, working with the (H2 + D2) gaseous mixture itself, was operating. Neutrons from the capture reactions were detected using liquid scintillation counters, and the ?-ray background was eliminated by pulse-shape discrimination. The experimental result is ?exp=(445±60) sec-1, which is consistent with muon-electron universality and with the assumption that the nuclear capture proceeds from the doublet spin state of the ?d muonic atoms. Combining the present experimental value with a previous result obtained with a liquid-hydrogen deuterated target, one obtains a ratio between the axial-vector and vector coupling constants given by gA,?gV,?=-1.35±0.1.

A. Bertin; A. Vitale; A. Placci; E. Zavattini

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Energy-GDP decoupling in a second best world -A case study on India Cline Guivarcha,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

too optimistic views on spontaneous energy-GDP decoupling of emerging countries economies projections from MERGE for China with recent trends, the World Energy Outlook 2007 (IEA, 2007 the specificities of the developing countries' energy systems. In particular, it appears that most models neglect

Boyer, Edmond

109

GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AGO HGO HFO RG LPG R95 R100 RG LPG CN CGO RG Refinery Operation and Management - J.P. Favennec Crude1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning (Performance Analysis. Grossmann #12;2 Motivation · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

110

GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RG LPG R95 R100 RG LPG CN CGO RG Refinery Operation and Management - J.P. Favennec Crude Distillation1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning Department of Chemical · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies on the accuracy of the CDU

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

111

FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT FOR THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Plan or NCP) and RCRA and its implementing regulations, as they may be amended, shall control the meaning of the terms used in this Agreement unless such terms are otherwise...

112

EM Begins Demolishing K-31 Gaseous Diffusion Building | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

by conducting asbestos abatement and removing the facility's exterior transite paneling. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - EM's demolition of the K-31 Building at Oak Ridge's East Tennessee...

113

Breached cylinder incident at the Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 16, 1990, during an inspection of valves on partially depleted product storage cylinders, a 14-ton partially depleted product cylinder was discovered breached. The cylinder had been placed in long-term storage in 1977 on the top row of Portsmouth`s (two rows high) storage area. The breach was observed when an inspector noticed a pile of green material along side of the cylinder. The breach was estimated to be approximately 8- inches wide and 16-inches long, and ran under the first stiffening ring of the cylinder. During the continuing inspection of the storage area, a second 14-ton product cylinder was discovered breached. This cylinder was stacked on the bottom row in the storage area in 1986. This breach was also located adjacent to a stiffening ring. This paper will discuss the contributing factors of the breaching of the cylinders, the immediate response, subsequent actions in support of the investigation, and corrective actions.

Boelens, R.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Deactivation Project Begins at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

three-year contract to accept the deleased facilities formerly operated by USEC and conduct deactivation activities to optimize the site's utilities and infrastructure to...

115

Swift and Staley Team - Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, May...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the radiation training and refresher courses, respiratory protection training, and lockout-tag out (LOTO) training. The American Red Cross provided first-aid training this...

116

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Quadrant I Groundwater Investigat...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Controlled Area of Plume (acres): 38 Plume Status: Plume static or shrinking is size Remedial Approach Remedy Name Status Start Date End Date Treatment Status Pump and treat...

117

DOE Seeks Quotes for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Media Contact Bill Taylor Bill.Taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Cincinnati- The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for an Environmental Technical...

118

DOE Seeks Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Task Proposal (RTP) for deactivation activities at...

119

DOE Issues Final Request for Proposal for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and placed in containers so that the debris could be placed in the site's industrial landfill. Cost-Efficient Work Rids Paducah Site of Old Facilities Energy Department Selects...

120

Status and perspectives of gaseous photon detectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article aims at reviewing the state of the art of gaseous photon detectors for RICH applications. Emphasis will be put on THGEM based devices which represent the most advanced development among the various micro-pattern gaseous photon sensors proposed for Cherenkov imaging in very high rate environments.

Antonio Di Mauro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Investigating the impact of nuclear energy consumption on GDP growth and CO2 emission: A panel data analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigates the influence of nuclear energy consumption on GDP growth and CO2 emission in 30 major nuclear energy consuming countries. The panel mode was used taking the period 1990–2010. The results of the study indicated that nuclear energy consumption has a positive long run effect on GDP growth while it has no long run effect on CO2 emission. The Granger causality test results also revealed that nuclear energy consumption has a positive short run causal relationship with GDP growth while it has a negative short run causal relationship with CO2 emission. Based on the results of this study, nuclear energy consumption has an important role in increasing GDP growth in the investigated countries with no effect on CO2 emission. Consequently, unlike fossil fuels which also increase GDP growth, nuclear energy consumption causes less damage to the environment. From the results of the study, a number of recommendations were provided for the investigated countries.

Usama Al-mulali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

U.S. Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007 Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007 Danilo J. Santini, Ph. D. Senior Economist Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Phone: 630 252 3758 Fax: 630 252 3443 E-mail: dsantini@anl.gov David A Poyer, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Economics Morehouse College 830 Westview Dr. SW Atlanta, GA 30314 Phone: 404 681 2800, ext. 2553 E-mail: dpoyer@morehouse.edu THE 66th INTERNATIONAL ATLANTIC ECONOMIC CONFERENCE Montreal, Canada 9-12 October 2008 BUSINESS FLUCTUATIONS AND CYCLES 12 October 2008 Sunday 11:15 AM - 1:15 PM The submitted manuscript has been created by UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne"). Argonne, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. . The U.S. Government

123

Combination free electron and gaseous laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduction in energy consumption per unit of GDP from 2006 toEnergy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Achieving China’s goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of GDP)

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Muon Capture in Gaseous Hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experiment to measure the muon nuclear capture rate in ultrapure gaseous hydrogen (8 atm, 293°K) has been performed using a special target in which a system of gas proportional counters, working with the pure hydrogen of the target itself, were operating. Neutrons from the capture reactions were detected using a scintillation-counter technique, and the ?-ray background was eliminated by pulse-shape discrimination. The working conditions ensured that the captures were taking place in ?p atomic systems in a singlet total-spin state. The experimental result is ?expt=651±57 sec-1, which has to be compared with the theoretical rate ?s, theor=626±26 sec-1. From the experimental capture rate, and within the framework of the currently accepted theory, we have obtained for the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant gp=(-7.3±3.7)gV. The results of the present experiment are analyzed, together with results obtained from stopping negative muons in liquid hydrogen.

A. Alberigi Quaranta; A. Bertin; G. Matone; F. Palmonari; G. Torelli; P. Dalpiaz; A. Placci; E. Zavattini

1969-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

126

Pulse Combustion Characteristics of Various Gaseous Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pulse combustion performance of fuels with low and high heating values is also compared. ... Selected gaseous fuels such as low molecular weight hydrocarbons, high molecular weight hydrocarbons, biofuels, and mixed fuels are tested for pulse combustion, and their operational properties are presented and compared. ... Heat transfer data for several exptl. ...

Wu Zhonghua; Arun S. Mujumdar

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

127

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout- Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Targets, barriers and research and development priorities for gaseous delivery of hydrogen through hydrogen and natural gas pipelines.

128

The Long-Run Relationship between Money, Nominal GDP, and the Price Level in Venezuela: 1950 to 1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that structural breaks may be important. Since the economy depends heavily on oil revenue, oil price shocks haveThe Long-Run Relationship between Money, Nominal GDP, and the Price Level in Venezuela: 1950 and the price level in the Venezuelan economy. We apply time-series econometric techniques to annual data

Ahmad, Sajjad

129

Interactions between Rho \\{GTPases\\} and Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (Rho-GDI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Rho-GDP dissociation inhibitor (Rho-GDI) was used as bait in a two-hybrid screen of a human leucocyte cDNA library. Most of the isolated cDNAs encoded \\{GTPases\\} of the Rho subfamily: RhoA, B, C, Rac1, 2, CDC42 and RhoG. The newly discovered RhoH interacted very poorly with Rho-GDI. Another protein partner shared a homology with RhoA that points to Asp67RhoA-Arg68RhoA-Leu69RhoA as critical for interaction with Rho-GDI. A second screen with RhoA as bait led to the isolation of GDI only. In order to investigate the relative role of protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions between Rho \\{GTPases\\} and Rho-GDI, CAAX box mutants of RhoA were produced. They were found to interact with Rho-GDI as efficiently as wild type RhoA, indicating that protein-protein interactions alone lead to strong binding of the two proteins. The C-terminal polybasic region of RhoA was also shown to be a site of protein-protein interaction with Rho-GDI.

Julien Fauré; Marie-Claire Dagher

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Viscosity of gaseous ethyl fluoride (HFC-161)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper describes an improved Maxwell type oscillating-disk viscometer. The experimental system was calibrated by argon, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, hydrogen and verified by nitrogen. The viscosities of gaseous HFC-161 were measured from 293 K to 369 K at pressures from 0.1 MPa up to the saturated vapor pressure. An empirical viscosity equation is proposed to interpolate the present experimental data as a function of density and temperature. The uncertainty of the reported viscosity was estimated to be within 1%.

Shaohua Lv; Xiaoming Zhao; Chuanqi Yao; Wei Wang; Zhikai Guo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments using molecular dynamics simulations. It is reported that the thermal conductivity of perfect graphene nanoribbons decreases with the gaseous pressure. The decreasing is more obvious for the noble gas with large atomic number. However, the gaseous pressure cannot change the thermal conductivity of defective graphene nanoribbons apparently. The phonon spectra of graphene nanoribbons are also provided to give corresponding supports.

Zhong, Wei-Rong, E-mail: wrzhong@hotmail.com; Xu, Zhi-Cheng; Zheng, Dong-Qin [Department of Physics and Siyuan Laboratory, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ai, Bao-Quan, E-mail: aibq@scnu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Quantum Information Technology, ICMP and SPTE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

Pressure Relief Devices for High-Pressure Gaseous Storage Systems...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pressure Relief Devices for High-Pressure Gaseous Storage Systems: Applicability to Hydrogen Technology A. Kostival, C. Rivkin, W. Buttner, and R. Burgess National Renewable Energy...

133

Helix Dipole Movement and Conformational Variability Contribute to Allosteric GDP Release in G[alpha] Subunits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterotrimeric G proteins (Galphabetagamma) transmit signals from activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to downstream effectors through a guanine nucleotide signaling cycle. Numerous studies indicate that the carboxy-terminal alpha5 helix of Galpha subunits participates in Galpha-receptor binding, and previous EPR studies suggest this receptor-mediated interaction induces a rotation and translation of the alpha5 helix of the Galpha subunit [Oldham, W. M., et al. (2006) Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 13, 772-777]. On the basis of this result, an engineered disulfide bond was designed to constrain the alpha5 helix of Galpha(i1) into its EPR-measured receptor-associated conformation through the introduction of cysteines at position 56 in the alpha1 helix and position 333 in the alpha5 helix (I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1)). A functional mimetic of the EPR-measured alpha5 helix dipole movement upon receptor association was additionally created by introduction of a positive charge at the amino terminus of this helix, D328R Galpha(i1). Both proteins exhibit a dramatically elevated level of basal nucleotide exchange. The 2.9 A resolution crystal structure of I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1) in complex with GDP-AlF(4)(-) reveals the shift of the alpha5 helix toward the guanine nucleotide binding site that is anticipated by EPR measurements. The structure of the I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1) subunit further revealed altered positions for the switch regions and throughout the Galpha(i1) subunit, accompanied by significantly elevated crystallographic temperature factors. Combined with previous evidence in the literature, the structural analysis supports the critical role of electrostatics of the alpha5 helix dipole and overall conformational variability during nucleotide release.

Preininger, Anita M.; Funk, Michael A.; Oldham, William M.; Meier, Scott M.; Johnston, Christopher A.; Adhikary, Suraj; Kimple, Adam J.; Siderovski, David P.; Hamm, Heidi E.; Iverson, Tina M.; (Vanderbilt); (UNC)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Gas mixture for diffuse-discharge switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Gaseous medium in a diffuse-discharge switch of a high-energy pulse generator is formed of argon combined with a compound selected from the group consisting of CF/sub 4/, C/sub 2/F/sub 6/, C/sub 3/F/sub 8/, n-C/sub 4/F/sub 10/, WF/sub 6/, (CF/sub 3/)/sub 2/S and (CF/sub 3/)/sub 2/O.

Christophorou, L.G.; Carter, J.G.; Hunter, S.R.

1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Gaseous Detonation-Driven Fracture of Tubes Tong Wa Chao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gaseous Detonation-Driven Fracture of Tubes Thesis by Tong Wa Chao In Partial Fulfillment An experimental investigation of fracture response of aluminum 6061-T6 tubes under internal gaseous detonation on the detonation velocity, strain history, blast pressure from the crack opening, and crack speeds. The curved

136

Gaseous-fuel safety assessment. Status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory, in support of studies sponsored by the Office of Vehicle and Engine Research and Development in the US Department of Energy, has undertaken a safety assessment of selected gaseous fuels for use in light automotive transportation. The purpose is to put into perspective the hazards of these fuels relative to present day fuels and delineated criteria for their safe handling. Fuels include compressed and liquified natural gas (CNG and LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and for reference gasoline and diesel. This paper is a program status report. To date, physicochemical property data and general petroleum and transportation information were compiled; basic hazards defined; alternative fuels were safety-ranked based on technical properties alone; safety data and vehicle accident statistics reviewed; and accident scenarios selected for further analysis. Methodology for such analysis is presently under consideration.

Krupka, M.C.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Bartlit, J.R.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Simulating the Gaseous Halos of Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of local X-ray absorbers, high-velocity clouds, and distant quasar absorption line systems suggest that a significant fraction of baryons may reside in multi-phase, low-density, extended, ~100 kpc, gaseous halos around normal galaxies. We present a pair of high-resolution SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) simulations that explore the nature of cool gas infall into galaxies, and the physical conditions necessary to support the type of gaseous halos that seem to be required by observations. The two simulations are identical other than their initial gas density distributions: one is initialized with a standard hot gas halo that traces the cuspy profile of the dark matter, and the other is initialized with a cored hot halo with a high central entropy, as might be expected in models with early pre-heating feedback. Galaxy formation proceeds in dramatically different fashions in these two cases. While the standard cuspy halo cools rapidly, primarily from the central region, the cored halo is quasi-stable for ~4 Gyr and eventually cools via the fragmentation and infall of clouds from ~100 kpc distances. After 10 Gyr of cooling, the standard halo's X-ray luminosity is ~100 times current limits and the resultant disk galaxy is twice as massive as the Milky Way. In contrast, the cored halo has an X-ray luminosity that is in line with observations, an extended cloud population reminiscent of the high-velocity cloud population of the Milky Way, and a disk galaxy with half the mass and ~50% more specific angular momentum than the disk formed in the low-entropy simulation. These results suggest that the distribution and character of halo gas provides an important testing ground for galaxy formation models and may be used to constrain the physics of galaxy formation.

Tobias Kaufmann; James S. Bullock; Ari Maller; Taotao Fang

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

138

Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Peak Geothermal Systems, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Peak Geothermal Systems, Nevada Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Gaseous emissions from the landscape can be used to explore for geothermal systems, characterize their lateral extent, or map the trends of concealed geologic structures that may provide important reservoir permeability at depth. Gaseous geochemical signatures vary from system to system and utilization of a multi-gas analytical approach to exploration or characterization should enhance the survey's clarity. This paper describes

139

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration Property Type Quantity Description The estimated potential energy generation from gaseous biopower for a particular place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_of_energy It's possible types are Watt hours - 1000 Wh, Watt hour, Watthour Kilowatt hours - 1 kWh, Kilowatt hour, Kilowatthour Megawatt hours - 0.001 MWh, Megawatt hour, Megawatthour Gigawatt hours - 0.000001 GWh, Gigawatt hour, Gigawatthour Joules - 3600000 J, Joules, joules Pages using the property "PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25)

140

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass Property Type Quantity Description The potential mass of gaseous biopower material for a place. Use this type to express a quantity of magnitude, or an object's resistance to acceleration. The default unit is the kilogram (kg). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilogram Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Kilograms - 1 kg, kilo, kilogram, kilograms, Kilogram, kilogramme, kilos Grams - 1000 g, gram, gramme, grams Tonnes - 0.001 tonnes, metric tons, Tonnes, Metric Tonnes Pounds - 2.205 lbs, pounds, pound, Pounds, Lbs Stone - 0.1575 stones, st, stone Ounces - 35.27 ounces, oz, Ounces, ounce BDT - 0.001 BDT, Bone Dry Tonnes, bdt Pages using the property "PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of GDP)to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. Thecommitted to reduce its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Nitric Oxide and Oxygen Radical Attack on GDP-Dissociation Inhibitor 2 (GDI-2) in Spinal Cord Injury of the Rat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitric Oxide and Oxygen Radical Attack on GDP-Dissociation Inhibitor 2 (GDI-2) in Spinal Cord Injury of the Rat ... Herein, mass spectrometry unambiguously identified GDP-dissociation inhibitor-2 (GDI-2) in SCI with post-translational modifications of 3-aminotyrosine (8 h post-injury) and an acrolein adduct of GDI-2 (72 h post-injury). ... Protein profiling in SCI of the rat revealed that, at 8 h following the traumatic lesion, levels of a signalling protein, GDP-dissociation inhibitor-2 protein (GDI-2) (synonym:? Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta), were increased about 3-fold, and we therefore decided to use this potentially important signalling structure to study the presence of oxidation- and nitration-induced PTMs in SCI. ...

Julius Paul Pradeep John; Oliver Pintsov; Alexander Petter-Puchner; Heinz Redl; Arnold Pollak; Wei-Qiang Chen; Gert Lubec

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

143

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from gaseous biopower for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

144

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formation of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) can be an important pathway for mercury removal from an aquatic environment. DGM evasional fluxes from an aquatic system can account for up to 95% of atmospheric Hg and its deposition pathways. While...

Landin, Charles Melchor

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Collision-Induced Light Scattering in Gaseous Ar and Kr  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light scattering attributable to a change in polarizability produced in colliding pairs of atoms is observed in gaseous Ar and Kr. The experimental results are qualitatively accounted for by relations between the integrated intensity and the collision-induced polarizability.

J. P. McTague and George Birnbaum

1968-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

146

ON THE PROPAGATION OF ENERGY IN A STRATIFIED GASEOUS MEDIUM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MEDIUM Steven Rosencrans MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ON...STRATIFIED GASEOUS MEDIUM. | MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY...MEDIUM* BY STEVEN ROSENCRANS MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Communicated...responsible for the heating of the solar corona.6 (The top of our...

Steven Rosencrans

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's NA - No Data...

148

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 121 116 93 1970's 79 55 70 71 75 68 61 45 64 49 1980's 41 29 40 55 61 145 234 318 272 254 1990's 300 395 604 513 513 582 603 734 732 879 2000's 586 691 566 647 634 700 794 859 1,008 1,295 2010's 4,578 8,931 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Processing

149

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISSOLVED GASEOUS MERCURY BEHAVIOR IN SHALLOW WATER ESTUARIES A Thesis by CHARLES MELCHOR LANDIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Oceanography DISSOLVED GASEOUS MERCURY BEHAVIOR IN SHALLOW WATER ESTUARIES A Thesis by CHARLES MELCHOR LANDIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

Landin, Charles Melchor

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

150

Microbial production of energy: gaseous fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although several gaseous fuels could be derived by microbial fermentation, in the near term it will be economical to produce biomethane by anaerobic digestion of readily available heterogeneous feeds that may be obtained free or at low cost. Various wastes and biomass species grown in polluted waters are attractive feeds for commercial methane production. Biomethane could meet significant portions of the energy requirements of a number of countries. The conventional digestion-process configurations used for sewage sludge digestion were developed to ensure fail-safe maximized sludge stabilization, and are not necessarily suitable for maximized energy production. Commercial biomethane energy plants must be designed to optimize the net methane income production rate. Separate process designs are needed to effect optimized conversion of soluble, semisolid and solid feeds. Several approaches to improved process designs may be considered. The approaches include development of innovative fermentation modes, application of novel reactor designs, development of cost-effective pre/post-treatment techniques for feeds and unconverted residues, use of biostimulants, and development of new microbial strains. The last two approaches may not be feasible in the near future. In the near term, the objective of economical biomethane production at short HRT's and high loadings may be realized by applying new fermentation modes, such as two-phase digestion, and by utilizing new reactor designs, such as upflow digesters, the packed-bed reactors, plug-flow digesters, biodisc reactors, and others. The two-phase process has exhibited the highest reported methane yields from several soluble and particulate feeds and holos considerable commercialization potential. A number of new biomethanation processes have been proven feasible within the last decade by pilot- and commercial-scale application. 95 references, 14 figures, 12 tables.

Ghosh, S.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Diffuse Scattering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diffuse Scattering Diffuse Scattering * Anticipatory (trick) question: If you have an x-ray or neutron detector looking at a small sample volume, which will scatter more x- rays or neutrons into the detector 1 atom 100 atoms or 1000 atoms? X-ray or neutron beam Answer: Depends! Diffuse Scattering Gene E. Ice Materials Science and Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering ORNL/SNS June 2011 Presentation concentrates year graduate-level course into 1 hour * Skip mathematical complexities * Expose to range of applications * Develop intuition for length scales * Talk like x-ray/neutron scattering guru - Reciprocal space - Debye Temperature - Laue monotonic - Krivoglaz defects of 1st/2nd kinds! Great for cocktail parties or impressing attractive strangers-

152

Dry deposition of gaseous elemental iodine on water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRy DEPOSITION OF GASEOUS ELEMENTAL IODINE ON WATER A Thesis by MICHAEL DANA ALLEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 19/4 Ma...Jor SubJect: Nuclear Engineering (Health Physics) DRY DEPOSITION OF GASEOUS ELEMENTAL IODINE ON WATER A Thesis MICHAEL DANA ALLEN Approved as to style and content by: irman of C ttee) ( a of Department) (Member) (Member) August 1974 3. 1. 595') 6...

Allen, Michael Dana

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Lattice-Boltzmann Method for Simulating Gaseous Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lattice-Boltzmann Method for Simulating Gaseous Phenomena Xiaoming Wei, Student Member, IEEE animation. We introduce the Lattice Boltzmann Model (LBM), which simulates the microscopic movement of fluid in real-time, while still maintaining highly plausible visual details. Index Terms--Lattice Boltzmann

Mueller, Klaus

154

MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1 , L. Loyon2 , F. Guiziou2 , P to measure emissions factors of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O) methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from stored pig slurry and measured the variations of the emissions in time and space. In 2006, dynamic

Boyer, Edmond

155

THE POSSIBILITY OF PRODUCING THERMONUCLEAR REACTIONS IN A GASEOUS DISCHARGE*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE POSSIBILITY OF PRODUCING THERMONUCLEAR REACTIONS IN A GASEOUS DISCHARGE* I.V. Kurchatov of the energy of thermonuclear reactions. Physicists the world over are attracted by the extraordinarily interest- ing and very difficult task of controlling thermonuclear reactiom. Investigations in this field

156

Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,127 971 1,334 1970's 1,270 1,217 1,058 878 679 567 520 367 485 1,146 1980's 553 830 831 633 618 458 463 437 811 380 1990's 445 511 416 395 425 377 340 300 495 5,462 2000's 11,377 15,454 16,477 11,430 13,697 14,308 14,662 13,097 10,846 18,354 2010's 18,405 11,221 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

157

Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,499 3,667 3,475 1970's 3,235 2,563 1,197 1,118 952 899 823 674 883 1,308 1980's 1,351 1,327 1,287 1,258 1,200 1,141 1,318 1,275 1,061 849 1990's 800 290 413 507 553 488 479 554 451 431 2000's 377 408 395 320 254 231 212 162 139 168 2010's 213 268 424 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

158

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, March 18, 1999 Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Units) Integrated Units) State Ohio Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) Ohio EPA Scope Summary Integrating the PORTS on-site closure work required by various sources in order to avoid duplication of effort, and efficiently perform sitewide ground water monitoring and surveillance and maintenance activities Parties DOE; Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC; State of Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Date 3/18/1999 SCOPE * Integrate the on-site closure work required for specific units to avoid duplication of effort, and efficiently perform sitewide ground water monitoring and surveillance and maintenance activities at PORTS. * Recognize that a substantial portion of the tasks required under existing approved closure plans have been completed and incorporate the remaining tasks into the

159

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, February 24, 1998 Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DUF DUF 6 and LiOH) State Ohio Agreement Type Director's Final Findings and Orders Legal Driver(s) RCRA Scope Summary Establish Compliance Orders and schedules regarding the LiOH Storage Plan/LiOH removal, and the DUF 6 Management Plan. Parties DOE; Ohio Environmental Protection Agency; Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. Date 2/24/1998 SCOPE * Establish Compliance Orders and schedules regarding the LiOH Storage Plan/LiOH removal, and the DUF 6 Management Plan. * Exempt Respondents from 1) the requirement to evaluate the LiOH, according to OAC rule 3745-52-11, and 2) evaluate the DUF 6 that is both generated and stored at the facility, according to OAC rule 3745-52-11. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES * DOE shall submit to Ohio EPA on or before 31 December of each year until DOE's

160

Development of a Field Design for In Situ Gaseous Treatment of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Design for In Situ Gaseous Treatment of Sediment Based on Laboratory Column Test Data. Development of a Field Design for In Situ Gaseous Treatment of Sediment Based on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Using ethanol for preparation of nanosized TiO2 by gaseous detonation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method of preparing nanosized titanium dioxide by gaseous detonation by using ethanol, hydrogen, and oxygen as an explosion...

H. H. Yan; X. C. Huang; S. X. Xi

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Structural Studies of the Nudix GDP-mannose Hydrolase from E. coli Reveals a New Motif for Mannose Recognition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nudix hydrolase superfamily, characterized by the presence of the signature sequence GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where U is I, L, or V), is a well-studied family in which relations have been established between primary sequence and substrate specificity for many members. For example, enzymes that hydrolyze the diphosphate linkage of ADP-ribose are characterized by having a proline 15 amino acids C-terminal of the Nudix signature sequence. GDPMK is a Nudix enzyme that conserves this characteristic proline but uses GDP-mannose as the preferred substrate. By investigating the structure of the GDPMK alone, bound to magnesium, and bound to substrate, the structural basis for this divergent substrate specificity and a new rule was identified by which ADP-ribose pyrophosphatases can be distinguished from purine-DP-mannose pyrophosphatases from primary sequence alone. Kinetic and mutagenesis studies showed that GDPMK hydrolysis does not rely on a single glutamate as the catalytic base. Instead, catalysis is dependent on residues that coordinate the magnesium ions and residues that position the substrate properly for catalysis. GDPMK was thought to play a role in biofilm formation because of its upregulation in response to RcsC signaling; however, GDPMK knockout strains show no defect in their capacity of forming biofilms.

A Boto; W Xu; J Jakoncic; A Pannuri; T Romeo; M Bessman; S Gabelli; L Amzel

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Phyto remediation groundwater trends at the DOE portsmouth gaseous  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the progress of a phyto-remediation action being performed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) X-740 Waste Oil Handling Facility to remediate contaminated groundwater under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure action. This action was effected by an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) decision to use phyto-remediation as the preferred remedy for the X-740 groundwater contamination. This remedy was recognized as a cost-effective, low-maintenance, and promising method to remediate groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE). During 1999, prior to the tree installation at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in the area were collected from 10 monitoring wells completed in the Gallia Formation. The Gallia is the uppermost water-bearing zone and contains most of the groundwater contamination at PORTS. During the tree installation which took place during the summer of 1999, four new Gallia monitoring wells were installed at the X-740 Area in addition to the 10 Gallia wells which had been installed in the same area during the early 1990's. Manual water level measurements were collected quarterly from these 14 Gallia monitoring wells between 1998 and 2001. These manual water level measurements were collected to monitor the combined impact of the trees on the groundwater prior to root development. Beginning in 2001, water level measurements were collected monthly during the growing season (April-September) and quarterly during the dormant season (October-March). A total of eight water level measurements were collected annually to monitor the phyto-remediation system's effect on the groundwater in the X- 740 Area. The primary function of the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area is to hydraulically prevent further spreading of the TCE plume. This process utilizes deep-rooted plants, such as poplar trees, to extract large quantities of water from the saturated zone. The focus of any phyto-remediation system is to develop a cone of depression under the entire plantation area. This cone of depression can halt migration of the contaminant plume and can create a hydraulic barrier, thereby maintaining plume capture. While a cone of depression is not yet evident at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in 2004 and 2005 differed from measurements taken in previous years, indicating that the now mature trees are influencing groundwater flow direction and gradient at the site. Water level measurements taken from 2003 through 2005 indicate a trend whereby groundwater elevations steadily decreased in the X-740 Phyto-remediation System. During this time, an average groundwater table drop of 0.30 feet was observed. Although the time for the phyto-remediation system to mature had been estimated at two to three years, these monitoring data indicate a period of four to five years for the trees to reach maturity. Although, these trends are not apparent from analysis of the potentiometric surface contours, it does appear that the head gradient across the site is higher during the spring and lower during the fall. It is not clear, however, whether this trend was initiated by the installation of the phyto-remediation system. This paper will present the groundwater data collected to date to illustrate the effects of the trees on the groundwater table. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gaseous Hydrogen Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7-8, 2003 Crystal City, Virginia Breakout Session Name Targets/Objectives More work is needed to better define delivery target metrics Assumptions about targets for costs and energy efficiency need to be qualified Technology improvements likely to lower costs, but may not have major impact on total cost A significant impact on cost would come through permitting policy changes, e.g., use of public land Breakout Session Name Priority Barriers System Issues: need to assess delivery options in context of total system Materials: corrosion, H2 permeability Construction: welding, joining Maintenance and Operation: leak detection Pipeline Safety: odorants, flame visibility

165

A Numerical Study on Gaseous Reactions in Silane Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple gaseous reaction model involving 11 elementary reactions for 10 chemical species is proposed for silane and disilane pyrolyses at 550–750 K; its appropriateness is examined by a calculation based on an one-dimensional nonsteady condition which includes gaseous reactions, diffusional transport and radical adsorptions. The calculated results show that the model can successfully explain the experimental behavior of a gas composition concerning the time lag of hydrogen molecule production as well as the temperature and pressure dependences of the saturated higher silane concentrations. The reaction model is applied to a SiH4–H2–N2 system; it predicts that dilution with hydrogen or the premixing of c.a. 4% of disilane is useful for obtaining a spatially uniform deposition rate in a flow-type CVD reactor.

Akimasa Yuuki; Yasuji Matsui; Kunihide Tachibana

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Method of producing gaseous products using a downflow reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reactor systems and methods are provided for the catalytic conversion of liquid feedstocks to synthesis gases and other noncondensable gaseous products. The reactor systems include a heat exchange reactor configured to allow the liquid feedstock and gas product to flow concurrently in a downflow direction. The reactor systems and methods are particularly useful for producing hydrogen and light hydrocarbons from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons using aqueous phase reforming. The generated gases may find used as a fuel source for energy generation via PEM fuel cells, solid-oxide fuel cells, internal combustion engines, or gas turbine gensets, or used in other chemical processes to produce additional products. The gaseous products may also be collected for later use or distribution.

Cortright, Randy D; Rozmiarek, Robert T; Hornemann, Charles C

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

Assignment of the human GDI.D4 gene, a GDP/GTP-exchange regulator to chromosome 12, band 12p12.3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ras superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins performs a wide spectrum of critical cellular functions. Their biochemical activities are dependent on finely controlled cycles of GDP/GTP exchange. Regulators of this exchange are consequently molecules of pivotal importance, indicated by the increasing evidence for their involvement in oncogenic transformation and human diseases. GDP-dissociation inhibitors (GDIs) inhibit the activation of GTP-binding proteins by inhibiting the exchange of GDPs and GTPs and may therefore function as tumor-suppressors. We have cloned the cDNA for a novel GDI named GDI-D4, characterized by its high level of expression preferentially in hematopoietic cells. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have now localized the human gene to chromosome 12p12.3, a region deleted in a high frequency of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia.

Adra, C.N.; Lim, B. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Kobayashi, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Isotropic collision-induced light scattering by gaseous CF4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The binary isotropic collision-induced scattering spectra of the gaseous tetrafluoromethane has been measured in absolute units in the 50–150 cm-1 frequency range. Corresponding theoretical intensities taking into account multipolar polarizabilities have been calculated in a semiclassical way. From a comparison with experiment, the independent components of dipole-quadrupole and dipole-octupole polarizability tensors have been estimated. They have been compared with those previously deduced from depolarized spectrum and with recent theoretical ab initio calculations.

A. Elliasmine; J.-L. Godet; Y. Le Duff; T. Bancewicz

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Origin of gaseous hydrocarbons in east-central Texas groundwaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

increases. Calculations suggest addition of isotopically heavy carbon dioxide (as high as +10'%%do), COs probably coproduced with CH4 by acetate dissimilation. The isotopic difference in 5 C of Queen City-Sparta and Yegua-Cook Mountain gaseous.... Thermocatalytic gases form from the alteration of organic matter at an optimum temperature of about 12?C (Philippi, 1965). In general they have a 8' C values greater than -50'%%do and contain appreciable amounts of Cz+ (ethane, propane, butane, etc...

Coffman, Bryan Keith

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 115,177 140,290 179,117 1970's 193,209 195,072 197,967 206,833 194,329 189,541 172,584 166,392 161,511 165,515 1980's 142,171 142,423 128,858 124,193 132,501 117,736 115,604 124,890 120,092 121,425 1990's 119,405 129,154 132,656 130,336 128,583 146,048 139,841 150,008 144,609 164,794 2000's 164,908 152,862 152,724 124,955 133,434 103,381 105,236 110,745 94,785 95,359 2010's 102,448 95,630 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

171

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,351 3,244 2,705 1970's 2,330 2,013 1,912 1,581 1,921 2,879 6,665 11,494 14,641 15,686 1980's 15,933 14,540 14,182 13,537 12,829 11,129 11,644 10,876 10,483 9,886 1990's 8,317 8,103 8,093 7,012 6,371 6,328 6,399 6,147 5,938 5,945 2000's 5,322 4,502 4,230 3,838 4,199 3,708 3,277 3,094 3,921 2,334 2010's 2,943 2,465 2,480 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013

172

California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 34,803 32,639 30,334 1970's 29,901 27,585 24,156 17,498 17,201 15,221 14,125 13,567 13,288 10,720 1980's 8,583 7,278 14,113 14,943 15,442 16,973 16,203 15,002 14,892 13,376 1990's 12,424 11,786 12,385 12,053 11,250 11,509 12,169 11,600 10,242 10,762 2000's 11,063 11,060 12,982 13,971 14,061 13,748 14,056 13,521 13,972 13,722 2010's 13,244 12,095 12,755 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

173

Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 11,500 8,573 8,579 1970's 6,574 6,133 6,063 5,441 5,557 5,454 5,231 4,764 6,192 3,923 1980's 6,845 5,638 6,854 6,213 6,516 6,334 4,466 2,003 2,142 1,444 1990's 1,899 2,181 2,342 2,252 2,024 2,303 2,385 2,404 2,263 2,287 2000's 1,416 1,558 1,836 1,463 2,413 1,716 2,252 1,957 2,401 3,270 2010's 4,576 4,684 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014

174

New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 46,149 48,635 50,484 1970's 52,647 53,810 54,157 55,782 54,986 56,109 61,778 72,484 77,653 62,107 1980's 59,457 60,544 56,857 56,304 58,580 53,953 51,295 65,156 63,355 61,594 1990's 66,626 70,463 75,520 83,193 86,607 85,668 108,341 109,046 106,665 107,850 2000's 110,411 108,958 110,036 111,292 105,412 101,064 99,971 96,250 92,579 94,840 2010's 91,963 90,291 84,562 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

175

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 4,126 4,546 4,058 1970's 3,405 4,152 4,114 4,674 6,210 9,620 11,944 13,507 13,094 12,606 1980's 12,651 13,427 12,962 11,314 10,771 11,913 10,441 10,195 11,589 13,340 1990's 13,178 15,822 18,149 18,658 19,612 25,225 23,362 28,851 24,365 26,423 2000's 29,105 29,195 31,952 33,650 35,821 34,782 36,317 38,180 53,590 67,607 2010's 82,637 90,801 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

176

Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 236 1970's 225 281 243 199 501 694 661 933 1,967 4,845 1980's 4,371 4,484 4,727 4,709 5,123 5,236 4,836 4,887 4,774 5,022 1990's 4,939 4,997 5,490 5,589 5,647 5,273 5,361 4,637 4,263 18,079 2000's 24,086 13,754 14,826 11,293 15,133 13,759 21,065 19,831 17,222 17,232 2010's 19,059 17,271 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages:

177

North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,150 5,428 4,707 1970's 4,490 3,592 3,199 2,969 2,571 2,404 2,421 2,257 2,394 2,986 1980's 3,677 5,008 5,602 7,171 7,860 8,420 6,956 7,859 6,945 6,133 1990's 6,444 6,342 6,055 5,924 5,671 5,327 4,937 5,076 5,481 5,804 2000's 6,021 6,168 5,996 5,818 6,233 6,858 7,254 7,438 7,878 10,140 2010's 11,381 14,182 26,156 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014

178

Onsite Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plant UF6 Cylinder Destructive Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IAEA safeguards approach for gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) includes measurements of gross, partial, and bias defects in a statistical sampling plan. These safeguard methods consist principally of mass and enrichment nondestructive assay (NDA) verification. Destructive assay (DA) samples are collected from a limited number of cylinders for high precision offsite mass spectrometer analysis. DA is typically used to quantify bias defects in the GCEP material balance. Under current safeguards measures, the operator collects a DA sample from a sample tap following homogenization. The sample is collected in a small UF6 sample bottle, then sealed and shipped under IAEA chain of custody to an offsite analytical laboratory. Current practice is expensive and resource intensive. We propose a new and novel approach for performing onsite gaseous UF6 DA analysis that provides rapid and accurate assessment of enrichment bias defects. DA samples are collected using a custom sampling device attached to a conventional sample tap. A few micrograms of gaseous UF6 is chemically adsorbed onto a sampling coupon in a matter of minutes. The collected DA sample is then analyzed onsite using Laser Ablation Absorption Ratio Spectrometry-Destructive Assay (LAARS-DA). DA results are determined in a matter of minutes at sufficient accuracy to support reliable bias defect conclusions, while greatly reducing DA sample volume, analysis time, and cost.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Carter, Jennifer C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Phillips, Jon R.; Curtis, Michael M.

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

179

Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 433,684 457,117 447,325 1970's 466,016 448,288 470,105 466,143 448,993 435,571 428,635 421,110 393,819 352,650 1980's 350,312 345,262 356,406 375,849 393,873 383,719 384,693 364,477 357,756 343,233 1990's 342,186 353,737 374,126 385,063 381,020 381,712 398,442 391,174 388,011 372,566 2000's 380,535 355,860 360,535 332,405 360,110 355,589 373,350 387,349 401,503 424,042 2010's 433,622 481,308 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

180

GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-Galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor. 30 figs.

Lowe, J.B.; Lennon, G.; Rouquier, S.; Giorgi, D.; Kelly, R.J.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GDP-L-fucose: .beta.-D-galactoside 2-.alpha.-L-fucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: .beta.-D-Galactoside 2-.alpha.-L-fucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor.

Lowe, John B. (3125 Bolgos Cir., Ann Arbor, MI 48105); Lennon, Gregory (8309 Norris Canyon, Castro Valley, CA 94552); Rouquier, Sylvie (5, rue du Cannau, 34000 Montpellier, FR); Giorgi, Dominique (5, rue du Cannau, 34000 Montpellier, FR); Kelly, Robert J. (3164 Concord, Trenton, MI 48183)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Purification and characterization from rat liver cytosol of a GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) for liver 24K G, a ras p21-like GTP-binding protein, with properties similar to those of smg p25A GDI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purification and characterization from rat liver cytosol of a GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) for liver 24K G, a ras p21-like GTP-binding protein, with properties similar to those of smg p25A GDI ...

Takashi Ueda; Yoshifumi Takeyama; Toshihiko Ohmori; Harumasa Ohyanagi; Yoichi Saitoh; Yoshimi Takai

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Analysis of gaseous-phase stable and radioactive isotopes in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project of the US Department of Energy provides that agency with data for evaluating volcanic tuff beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine its suitability for a potential repository of high-level radioactive waste. Thickness of the unsaturated zone, which consists of fractured, welded and nonwelded tuff, is about 1640 to 2460 feet (500 to 750 meters). One question to be resolved is an estimate of minimum ground-water traveltime from the disturbed zone of the potentail repository to the accessible environment. Another issue is the potential for diffusive or convective gaseous transport of radionuclides from an underground facility in the unsaturated zone to the accessible environment. Gas samples were collected at intervals to a depth of 1200 feet from the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for major atmospheric gases; carbon dioxide in the samples was analyzed for carbon-14 activity and for {delta}2!{sup 3}C; water vapor in the samples was analyzed for deuterium and oxygen-18. These data could provide insight into the nature of unsaturated zone transport processes. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Yang, I.C.; Haas, H.H.; Weeks, E.P.; Thorstenson, D.C.

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Modified gaseous atmospheres for storage of beef, lamb and pork  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODIFIED G'~. ' . . OUS ATMOSPHERI. S FOR STORAGE OI REEF, I. PMB AND PORK A Thesis by GEORGE THEODORE DAVIS I II Submitted to thc. graduate college of Texas AsM University in partial fulfillment of the rec, u. 'rement fox the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December ' 1979 Major Subject: Animal "" ience MODIF1ED GASEOUS ATMOSPHERES FOR STORAGE OF BEEFi LAMB AND PORK A Thesis GEORGE THEODORE DAVIS III Approved as to style and content. by (Co Chairman of ommittee) (Member) (Member...

Davis, George Theodore

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope $\\alpha$-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

J. Renner; V. M. Gehman; A. Goldschmidt; H. S. Matis; T. Miller; Y. Nakajima; D. Nygren; C. A. B. Oliveira; D. Shuman; V. Álvarez; F. I. G. Borges; S. Cárcel; J. Castel; S. Cebrián; A. Cervera; C. A. N. Conde; T. Dafni; T. H. V. T. Dias; J. Díaz; R. Esteve; P. Evtoukhovitch; L. M. P. Fernandes; P. Ferrario; A. L. Ferreira; E. D. C. Freitas; A. Gil; H. Gómez; J. J. Gómez-Cadenas; D. González-Díaz; R. M. Gutiérrez; J. Hauptman; J. A. Hernando Morata; D. C. Herrera; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; M. A. Jinete; L. Labarga; A. Laing; I. Liubarsky; J. A. M. Lopes; D. Lorca; M. Losada; G. Luzón; A. Marí; J. Martín-Albo; A. Martínez; A. Moiseenko; F. Monrabal; M. Monserrate; C. M. B. Monteiro; F. J. Mora; L. M. Moutinho; J. Muñoz Vidal; H. Natal da Luz; G. Navarro; M. Nebot-Guinot; R. Palma; J. Pérez; J. L. Pérez Aparicio; L. Ripoll; A. Rodríguez; J. Rodríguez; F. P. Santos; J. M. F. dos Santos; L. Seguí; L. Serra; A. Simón; C. Sofka; M. Sorel; J. F. Toledo; A. Tomás; J. Torrent; Z. Tsamalaidze; J. F. C. A. Veloso; J. A. Villar; R. C. Webb; J. White; N. Yahlali

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

186

Low energy consumption method for separating gaseous mixtures and in particular for medium purity oxygen production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the separation of gaseous mixtures such as air and for producing medium purity oxygen, comprising compressing the gaseous mixture in a first compressor to about 3.9-4.1 atmospheres pressure, passing said compressed gaseous mixture in heat exchange relationship with sub-ambient temperature gaseous nitrogen, dividing the cooled, pressurized gaseous mixture into first and second streams, introducing the first stream into the high pressure chamber of a double rectification column, separating the gaseous mixture in the rectification column into a liquid oxygen-enriched stream and a gaseous nitrogen stream and supplying the gaseous nitrogen stream for cooling the compressed gaseous mixture, removing the liquid oxygen-enriched stream from the low pressure chamber of the rectification column and pumping the liquid, oxygen-enriched steam to a predetermined pressure, cooling the second stream, condensing the cooled second stream and evaporating the oxygen-enriched stream in an evaporator-condenser, delivering the condensed second stream to the high pressure chamber of the rectification column, and heating the oxygen-enriched stream and blending the oxygen-enriched stream with a compressed blend-air stream to the desired oxygen concentration.

Jujasz, Albert J. (North Olmsted, OH); Burkhart, James A. (Olmsted Falls, OH); Greenberg, Ralph (New York, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A new technology for producing synthetic liquid hydrocarbons from gaseous hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conventional technologies of synthetic liquid fuels (SLF) production from gaseous hydrocarbons by producing synthesis ... liquid hydrocarbons are examined. A high-efficiency SLF production technology that allows ...

D. L. Astanovskii; L. Z. Astanovskii; A. L. Lapidus

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Liquid and gaseous waste operations section. Annual operating report CY 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents information on the liquid and gaseous wastes operations section for calendar year 1997. Operating activities, upgrade activities, and maintenance activities are described.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - absorbing gaseous medium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Elperin, Tov - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University Collection: Engineering 3 Extending the Photon Mapping Method for Realistic Rendering of Hot Gaseous...

190

Mevva ion source operated in purely gaseous mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have operated a vacuum arc ion source in such a way as to form beams of purely gaseous ions. The vacuum arc configuration that is conventionally used to produce intense beams of metal ions was altered so as to form gaseous ion beams, with only minimal changes to the external circuitry and no changes at all internally to the ion source. In our experiments we formed beams from oxygen (O{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +}), nitrogen (N{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +}), argon (Ar{sup +}) and carbon dioxide (C{sup +}, CO{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +}) at extraction voltage of 2 to 50 kV. We used a pulsed mode of operation, with beam pulses approximately 50 milliseconds long and repetition rate 10 pulses per second, for a duty cycle of about 50%. Downstream ion beam current as measured by a 5 cm diameter Faraday cup was typically 0.5 mA pulse or about 250 {micro}A time averaged. This time averaged beam current is very similar to that obtained for metal ions when the source is operated in the usual vacuum arc mode. Here we describe the modifications made to the source and the results of our investigations.

Yushkov, G.Y.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I. G.

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

Gridless, very low energy, high-current, gaseous ion source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have made and tested a very low energy gaseous ion source in which the plasma is established by a gaseous discharge with electron injection in an axially diverging magnetic field. A constricted arc with hidden cathode spot is used as the electron emitter (first stage of the discharge). The electron flux so formed is filtered by a judiciously shaped electrode to remove macroparticles (cathode debris from the cathode spot) from the cathode material as well as atoms and ions. The anode of the emitter discharge is a mesh, which also serves as cathode of the second stage of the discharge, providing a high electron current that is injected into the magnetic field region where the operating gas is efficiently ionized. In this discharge configuration, an electric field is formed in the ion generation region, accelerating gas ions to energy of several eV in a direction away from the source, without the use of a gridded acceleration system. Our measurements indicate that an argon ion beam is formed with an energy of several eV and current up to 2.5 A. The discharge voltage is kept at less than 20 V, to keep below ion sputtering threshold for cathode material, a feature which along with filtering of the injected electron flow, results in extremely low contamination of the generated ion flow.

Vizir, A. V.; Oks, E. M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Shandrikov, M. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu. [High Current Electronics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Recent gaseous divertor experiments in DIII-D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The expected heat loads at the divertor plates for next generation tokamaks raise concern from the standpoints of both mechanical integrity and erosion rate. The peak heat flux anticipated for the present International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) design are predicted to be as high as {approximately}20 MW/m{sup 2}. High peak heat fluxes can be reduced to more manageable levels by increasing the radiated power in the divertor, which has the additional benefit of reducing divertor plasma temperature and sheath potential, thereby lowering the ion impact energy. Neutral deuterium gas injection into or near the divertor has been suggested as one means of reducing heat flux via radiation and/or momentum transfer and ionization collisions with the neutral gas; this method is often referred to as the gaseous divertor.'' In this paper we report on experiments in which the gaseous divertor approach was used to reduce the heat flux on the divertor tiles of the DIII-D tokamak during ELMing H-mode discharges. 7 refs., 4 figs.

Petrie, T.W.; Lippmann, S.; Mahdavi, M.A. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (USA)); Hill, D.N.; Futch, A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Buchenauer, D. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA)); Klepper, C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The R6A-1 peptide binds to switch II of G{alpha}{sub i1} but is not a GDP-dissociation inhibitor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches that convert signals from membrane receptors into changes in intracellular physiology. Recently, several peptides that bind heterotrimeric G-protein {alpha} subunits have been isolated including the novel G{alpha}{sub i1} . GDP binding peptides R6A and KB-752. The R6A peptide and its minimized derivative R6A-1 interact with G{alpha}{sub i1} . GDP. Based on spectroscopic analysis of BODIPYFL-GTP{gamma}S binding to G{alpha}{sub i1}, it has been reported that R6A-1 has guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) activity against G{alpha}{sub i1} [W.W. Ja, R.W. Roberts, Biochemistry 43 (28) (2004) 9265-9275]. Using radioligand binding, we show that R6A-1 is not a GDI for G{alpha}{sub i1} subunits. Furthermore, we demonstrate that R6A-1 reduces the fluorescence quantum yield of the G{alpha}{sub i1}-BODIPYFL-GTP{gamma}S complex, thus explaining the previously reported GDI activity as a fluorescence artifact. We further show that R6A-1 has significant sequence similarity to the guanine nucleotide exchange factor peptide KB-752 that binds to switch II of G{alpha}{sub i1}. We use competitive binding analysis to show that R6A-1 also binds to switch II of G{alpha} subunits.

Willard, Francis S. [Department of Pharmacology, CB 7365, 1106 Mary Ellen Jones Building, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7365 (United States)]. E-mail: fwillard@med.unc.edu; Siderovski, David P. [Department of Pharmacology, CB 7365, 1106 Mary Ellen Jones Building, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7365 (United States)

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

194

Spectral modeling of gaseous metal disks around DAZ white dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on our attempt for the first non-LTE modeling of gaseous metal disks around single DAZ white dwarfs recently discovered by Gaensicke et al. and thought to originate from a disrupted asteroid. We assume a Keplerian rotating viscous disk ring composed of calcium and hydrogen and compute the detailed vertical structure and emergent spectrum. We find that the observed infrared CaII emission triplet can be modeled with a hydrogen-deficient gas ring located at R=1.2 R_sun, inside of the tidal disruption radius, with Teff about 6000 K and a low surface mass density of about 0.3 g/cm**2. A disk having this density and reaching from the central white dwarf out to R=1.2 R_sun would have a total mass of 7 10**21 g, corresponding to an asteroid with about 160 km diameter.

K. Werner; T. Nagel; T. Rauch

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Stephen W. Webb  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Stephen W. Webb Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87 185 ABSTRACT Two models are commonly used to analyze gas- phase diffusion in porous media in the presence of advection, the Advective-Dispersive Model (ADM) and the Dusty-gas Model (DGM). The ADM, which is used in TOUGH2, is based on a simple linear addition of advection calculated by Darcy's law and ordinary diffusion using Fick's law with a porosity- tortuosity-gas saturation multiplier to account for the porous medium. Another approach for gas-phase transport in porous media is the Dusty-Gas Model. This model applies the kinetic theory of gases to the gaseous components and the porous media (or "dust") to combine transport due to diffusion and

196

Handbook on atmospheric diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Basic meteorological concepts are covered as well as plume rise, source effects, and diffusion models. Chapters are included on cooling tower plumes and urban diffusion. Suggestions are given for calculating diffusion in special situations, such as for instantaneous releases over complex terrain, over long distances, and during times when chemical reactions or dry or wet deposition are important. (PSB)

Hanna, S.R.; Briggs, G.A.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

,"Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_smt_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_smt_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

198

,"Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

199

,"Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sal_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sal_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

200

,"California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

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201

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sok_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sok_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

202

,"Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_soh_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_soh_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

203

,"Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sut_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sut_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

204

,"Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sak_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sak_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

205

,"Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sin_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sin_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

206

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

207

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sne_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sne_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

208

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_spa_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_spa_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

209

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

210

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_swy_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_swy_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

211

,"Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_smi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_smi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

212

,"Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

213

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sms_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sms_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

214

,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_stx_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_stx_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

215

Radiation Tests for a Single-GEM Loaded Gaseous Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the systematic study of a single-gas-electron-multiplication (GEM) loaded gaseous detector developed for precision measurements of high-energy particle beams and dose-verification measurements. In the present study, a 256-channel prototype detector with an active area of 16$\\times$16 cm$^{2}$, operated in a continuous current-integration-mode signal-processing method, was manufactured and tested with x rays emitted from a 70-kV x-ray generator and 43-MeV protons provided by the MC50 proton cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS). The amplified detector response was measured for the x rays with an intensity of about 5$\\times$10$^{6}$ Hz cm$^{-2}$. The linearity of the detector response to the particle flux was examined and validated by using 43-MeV proton beams. The non-uniform development of the amplification for the gas electrons in space was corrected by applying proper calibration to the channel responses of the measured beam-profile data. We concluded fro...

Lee, Kyong Sei; Kim, Sang Yeol; Park, Sung Keun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effect of gaseous inhibitors on PCDD/F formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) from municipal waste incineration are currently a subject of considerable public concern because of their extreme toxicity. PCDD/F formation in incineration processes is being studied widely, but studies on inhibition are quite sparse, especially in a pilot-plant scale. In this work, the effect of four gaseous inhibitors (sulfur dioxide, ammonia, dimethylamine, and methyl mercaptan) on PCDD/PCDF formation in the combustion of liquid fuel was studied using a pilot-scale plant. The inhibitors were injected into the flue gas stream after the first economizer at a temperature of 670 C and just before the second economizer at 410 C. Both the chlorophenol and PCDD and PCDF concentrations decreased when inhibitors were added. Particle-phase PCDD/F concentrations in particular decreased by up to 98%. The results suggest that the formation of PCDD/Fs is hindered in the particle phase at the early stages of the PCDD/F formation chain, probably even before precursors such as chlorophenols have been formed.

Ruokojaervi, P.H.; Halonen, I.A.; Tuppurainen, K.A.; Tarhanen, J.; Ruuskanen, J. [Univ. of Kuopio (Finland)] [Univ. of Kuopio (Finland)

1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Hybrid Multi Micropattern Gaseous Photomultiplier for detection of liquid-xenon scintillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gaseous PhotoMultipliers (GPM) are a very promising alternative of vacuum PMTs especially for large-size noble-liquid detectors in the field of Functional Nuclear Medical Imaging and Direct Dark Matter Detection. We present recent characterization results of a Hybrid-GPM made of three Micropattern Gaseous Structures; a Thick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM), a Parallel Ionization Multiplier (PIM) and a MICROMesh GAseous Structure (MICROMEGAS),operating in Ne/CF4 (90:10). Gain values close to 10^7 were recorded in this mixture, with 5.9keV x-rays at 1100 mbar, both at room temperature and at that of liquid xenon (T = 171K). The results are discussed in term of scintillation detection. While the present multiplier was investigated without photocathode, complementary results of photoextraction from CsI UV photocathodes are presented in Ne/CH4 (95:5) and CH4 in cryogenic conditions.

Samuel Duval; Lior Arazi; Amos Breskin; Ranny Budnik; Wan-Ting Chen; Hervé Carduner; A. E. C. Coimbra; Marco Cortesi; Roy Kaner; Jean-Pierre Cussonneau; Jérôme Donnard; Jacob Lamblin; Olivier Lemaire; Patrick Le Ray; J. A. M. Lopes; Abdul-Fattah Mohamad Hadi; Eric Morteau; Tugdual Oger; J. M. F. dos Santos; Luca Scotto Lavina; Jean-Sébastien Stutzmann; Dominique Thers

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

219

Effects of Gaseous Sulphuric Acid on Diesel Exhaust Nanoparticle Formation and Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effects of Gaseous Sulphuric Acid on Diesel Exhaust Nanoparticle Formation and Characteristics ... Diesel exhaust gaseous sulphuric acid (GSA) concentrations and particle size distributions, concentrations, and volatility were studied at four driving conditions with a heavy duty diesel engine equipped with oxidative exhaust after-treatment. ... The submicrometer diesel exhaust particles are typically divided into two separate groups, which are frequently seen in exhaust particle number size distribution as separate modes, usually called as an accumulation or a soot mode and a nucleation mode. ...

Topi Rönkkö; Tero Lähde; Juha Heikkilä; Liisa Pirjola; Ulrike Bauschke; Frank Arnold; Hans Schlager; Dieter Rothe; Jaakko Yli-Ojanperä; Jorma Keskinen

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

220

Collection of gaseous primary amines and analysis by fluorimetric derivativization using fluorescamine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLLECTION OF GASEOUS PRIMARY AMINES AND ANALYSIS 8Y FLUORIMETRIC DER IVATIV IZATION USING FLUORESCAMINE A Thesis by Mark Kennett Mitchell Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene COLLECTION OF GASEOUS PRIMARY AMINES AND ANALYSIS BY FLUORIMETRIC DERIVATI V IZATION USING FLUORESCAMINE A Thesis by Mark Kennett Mitchell Approved as to style...

Mitchell, Mark Kennett

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The determination of compressibility factors of gaseous butane-nitrogen mixtures in the gas phase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DETERMINATION OF COMPRESSIBILITY FACTORS OF GASEOUS BUTANE-NITROGEN MIXTURES IN THE GAS PHASE A D issertation By Robert Buckner Evans, III Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of^ 'ent Advisor) June 1955... ?-; i'i i ; A R y ? 'A 'Gi- Or- T EX AS THE DETERMINATION OF COMHIESSIBILITI FACTORS OF GASEOUS BUTANE-NITROGEN MIXTURES IN THE GAS PHASE A D issertation By ROBERT BUCKNER EVANS, III Submitted' to the Graduate School of the Agricultural...

Evans, Robert Buckner

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Analysis of the proposed relocation of the neutron criticality clusters in the process buildings for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation levels in Buildings X-326, X-330 and X-333 have been determined for the ANSI minimum accident of concern at both the current and the proposed locations of the criticality alum system neutron detectors. This was performed in order to evaluate whether or not the detectors could be lowered from their current positions and still respond to the minimum accident of concern. Relocating the detectors could reduce the potential for worker in injury when the approximately 90-pound alarms need to be removed for periodic maintenance. It could also decrease the incidence of battery failure from elevated temperatures which can exceed 160 degrees F. At the proposed 1-meter elevation the detectors would be surrounded by the cells containing the cascade equipment; therefore, the detectors would be less responsive to a criticality event. The results of this analysis indicate that the detectors could be lowered from their current height of 5 meters to a height of 1 meter and still respond to the minimum accident of concern. This analysis was performed using the MCNP monte carlo code with a source corresponding to a critical system of uranyl fluoride solutions of 1.2, 3.0, and 4.95 weight percent U-235 enrichment. The neutron dose rates were evaluated at positions of 69 meters and 100 meters radially outward from the source at 5 meter and 1 meter heights. All neutron detectors located in the three process buildings are located within 100 meters from any potential criticality. This report details the methodology used for this study, background on the data employed, and a comparison to a similar analysis performed in 1983.

Negron, S.B.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Environmental assessment for the construction and operation of waste storage facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE is proposing to construct and operate 3 waste storage facilities (one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for RCRA waste, one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for toxic waste (TSCA), and one 200,000 ft{sup 2} mixed (hazardous/radioactive) waste storage facility) at Paducah. This environmental assessment compares impacts of this proposed action with those of continuing present practices aof of using alternative locations. It is found that the construction, operation, and ultimate closure of the proposed waste storage facilities would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Process for recovering uranium from waste hydrocarbon oils containing the same. [Uranium contaminated lubricating oils from gaseous diffusion compressors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for the recovery of uranium from uranium-bearing hydrocarbon oils containing carboxylic acid as a degradation product. In one aspect, the invention comprises providing an emulsion of water and the oil, heating the same to a temperature effecting conversion of the emulsion to an organic phase and to an acidic aqueous phase containing uranium carboxylate, and recovering the uranium from the aqueous phase. The process is effective, simple and comparatively inexpensive. It avoids the use of toxic reagents and the formation of undesirable intermediates.

Conrad, M.C.; Getz, P.A.; Hickman, J.E.; Payne, L.D.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

225

Structure of a GDP:AlF4 Complex of the SRP \\{GTPases\\} Ffh and FtsY, and Identification of a Peripheral Nucleotide Interaction Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The signal recognition particle (SRP) \\{GTPases\\} Ffh and FtsY play a central role in co-translational targeting of proteins, assembling in a GTP-dependent manner to generate the SRP targeting complex at the membrane. A suite of residues in FtsY have been identified that are essential for the hydrolysis of GTP that accompanies disengagement. We have argued previously on structural grounds that this region mediates interactions that serve to activate the complex for disengagement and term it the activation region. We report here the structure of a complex of the SRP \\{GTPases\\} formed in the presence of GDP:AlF4. This complex accommodates the putative transition-state analog without undergoing significant change from the structure of the ground-state complex formed in the presence of the GTP analog GMPPCP. However, small shifts that do occur within the shared catalytic chamber may be functionally important. Remarkably, an external nucleotide interaction site was identified at the activation region, revealed by an unexpected contaminating GMP molecule bound adjacent to the catalytic chamber. This site exhibits conserved sequence and structural features that suggest a direct interaction with RNA plays a role in regulating the activity of the SRP targeting complex.

Pamela J. Focia; Joseph Gawronski-Salerno; John S. Coon V; Douglas M. Freymann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Microhotplate for Low Power and Ultra Dense Gaseous Sensor Arrays using Recessed Silica Aerogel for Heat Insulation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In the operation of an air pitted gaseous sensors, the microhotplate (µHP) consumes almost all the power used by the sensor. The required area… (more)

Kumar, Sanjay

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Technology Diffusion and Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter discusses the technology diffusion and development that play a key role in climate change mitigation. Most of the authors are engineers with long business experience in this field. In Sect. 9.1, t...

Teruo Okazaki; Mitsutsune Yamaguchi; Hiroyuki Watanabe…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn Department;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Collaborators Ronald Coifman (Yale University) Roy Lederman (Yale University) #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data How to compare images across sensors? Figure: Sokolov Mine

Hirn, Matthew

229

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn Department of Mathematics Yale University July 26, 2012 Bell Labs #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Collaborators Joint work with Ronald Coifman and Roy Lederman. #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Overview 1 High

Hirn, Matthew

230

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn Department of Mathematics Yale University November 29, 2012 Kansas State University Colloquium #12;Diffusion Maps;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data How to compare images across sensors? Figure: Sokolov Mine in 2009 and 2010

Hirn, Matthew

231

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn Department in Honor of the 70th Birthday of David R. Larson #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Collaborators Joint work with Ronald Coifman and Roy Lederman. #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data High Dimensional Data

Hirn, Matthew

232

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn September 3, 2013 #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Collaborators Simon Adar, Tel Aviv University Eyal Ben Dor, Tel, Clarkson University Yoel Shkolnisky, Tel Aviv University #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Heat equation

Hirn, Matthew

233

Detonation and deflagration characteristics of p-Xylene/gaseous hydrocarbon fuels/air mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract p-Xylene is an important intermediate for the production of polyethylene terephthalate, it has growing chemical industrial demand based on the statistics in the last few decades. In the process of producing p-Xylene, gaseous hydrocarbon fuels (e.g., H2, C1–C3) are usually involved, which renders p-Xylene highly possible mix with those gaseous hydrocarbon fuels as leaking occurs, this presents fire or explosion/detonation hazard at some specific conditions. To date, very limited data regarding its detonation and deflagration characteristics are available in previous literatures. In this study, experiments of measuring the overpressure and velocity of p-Xylene/gaseous hydrocarbon fuels (i.e., H2, C2H4, C3H8, CO)/air mixtures are carried out in a vertical detonation tube with an inner diameter of 200 mm and a length of 6.5 m to explore the detonation and deflagration characteristics of p-Xylene. The experimental results indicate that under the same initiation energy of 0.189 MJ m?2, pure p-Xylene/air and p-Xylene/CO/air cannot achieve detonation, only deflagrations are observed. However, under this same initiation energy, detonations occur in p-Xylene/H2/air, p-Xylene/C2H4/air and p-Xylene/C3H8/air mixtures. By comparing the combinatorial compositions of p-Xylene along with gaseous hydrocarbon fuels that within which detonation observed, the detonation sensitive of the mixtures in increasing order are obtained as following: p-Xylene/H2/air, p-Xylene/C3H8/air and p-Xylene/C2H4/air. The results also indicate the relative ease that p-Xylene/gaseous hydrocarbon fuel/air can be detonated mainly depends on the detonation sensitive of the gaseous fuel, which is supported by the critical energy of direct detonation initiation and chemical kinetic analysis.

Bo Zhang; Guangli Xiu; Jian Chen; Shaopeng Yang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The determination of compressibility factors of gaseous propane-nitrogen mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBRARY A A N O'iLLEOE OF 1EXAS THE DETERMINATION OF COMPRESSIBILITY FACTORS OF GASEOUS PROPANE-NITROGEIN MIXTURES A Thesis Cecil Herman Dickson Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of' Texas in partial... f'ulf'illment of the requirements for the de~ree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Ma]or GubjectI Chemistry May I&55 THE DETERMINATION OF COMPRESSIBILITY FACTORS OF GASEOUS PROPANE-NITROGEN MIXTURES A Thesis Cecil Herman Dickson Approved as to style...

Dickson, Cecil Herman

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

235

The determination of compressibility factors of gaseous propane-nitrogen mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of thc Beg;voc cf kBSTBACT The propane-nitrogen system has been investigated in the gaseous phase at a temperature of 300 F. and at pressures up to 4/0 atmospheres. Compressibility curves for three mixtures of this system have been determined. A... the pressure corresponding to the "n " expansion ? th? the partial pressure of nitrogen the partial pressure oi' propane the total pressure of a gaseous system the universal gas constant (0. 08206 liter-atmosphere/ gram mole - oK) the absolute...

Hodges, Don

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

236

Nonnegative Diffusion Orientation Distribution Function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of the well-known limitations of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in regions of low anisotropy and multiple fiber crossing, high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) and Q-Ball Imaging (QBI) are used to estimate the probability density ... Keywords: High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), Higher order diffusion tensor, Nonnegativity, Orientation distribution function (ODF), Principal direction

Liqun Qi; Gaohang Yu; Yi Xu

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Development of a Recyclable Remediation System for Gaseous BTEX: Combination of Iron Oxides Nanoparticles Adsorbents and Electrochemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We designed a two-step green technique to remove and recycle selected gaseous air pollutants. The first step includes the assessment of adsorption efficiencies of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) on magnetite, hematite, and their ...Naturally occurring iron oxides nanoparticles are efficient adsorption interfaces for the removal of gaseous BTEX pollutants and can be effectively regenerated by electrochemistry.

Zhenzhong Hu; Maximilien Beuret; Hassan Khan; Parisa A. Ariya

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

238

Oxygen diffusion in titanite: Lattice diffusion and fast-path diffusion in single crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen diffusion in titanite: Lattice diffusion and fast-path diffusion in single crystals X June 2006 Editor: P. Deines Abstract Oxygen diffusion in natural and synthetic single-crystal titanite was characterized under both dry and water-present conditions. For the dry experiments, pre-polished titanite

Watson, E. Bruce

239

Non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq Effects in Gaseous Rayleigh-Benard Convection Guenter Ahlers,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq Effects in Gaseous Rayleigh-Be´nard Convection Guenter Ahlers,1 Francisco December 2006; published 29 January 2007) Non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq (NOB) effects are measured experimentally where the material properties strongly depend on the temperature. Relative to the Oberbeck-Boussinesq

Ahlers, Guenter

240

Changes in seal capacity of fractured claystone caprocks induced by dissolved and gaseous CO2 seepage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes in seal capacity of fractured claystone caprocks induced by dissolved and gaseous CO2; accepted 17 June 2008; published 31 July 2008. [1] Claystone caprocks are often the ultimate seal for CO2 underground storage when residual CO2 gas reaches the reservoir top due to buoyancy. Permeability changes

Luquot, Linda

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Emission and Long-Range Transport of Gaseous Mercury from a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emission and Long-Range Transport of Gaseous Mercury from a Large-Scale Canadian Boreal Forest FireQuebec.Thesemeasurementsindicated significant and highly correlated increases in Hg and CO during the plume event. The Hg:CO emissions ratio emissions and biomass burned to determine a mean area-based Hg emission flux density for boreal forest fires

Lee, Xuhui

242

Method for measuring the effectiveness of gaseous-contaminant removal filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a brief review of the gas-adsorption kinetics theory applicable to adsorption of gaseous contaminants by filter media, and an algorithm for assessing the effectiveness of filtering devices with flow bypass. It briefly describes the selected testing technique for measuring the effectiveness of filter media, and presents experimental data for adsorption of n-butane, toluene, and carbon monoxide.

Mahajan, B.M.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The ebullition of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, carbon dioxide and total gaseous mercury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of gaseous species depends of their solubility in the water. Since CH4 is relatively insoluble, ebullition-product of the respiration and is highly soluble in the water, leading ofte h- 1 . Measurements of H2, CO, CH4 and CO2 trapped gas concentrations and fluxes were used

O'Driscoll, Nelson

244

Fracture response of externally flawed aluminum cylindrical shells under internal gaseous detonation loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fracture response of externally flawed aluminum cylindrical shells under internal gaseous. Experiments were performed to observe the fracture behavior of thin- wall and initially-flawed aluminum tubes to different fracture events are analyzed. Keywords: tube fracture, detonation, crack branching, crack curving

Barr, Al

245

Alignment of molecules in gaseous transport: Alkali dimers in supersonic nozzle beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alignment of molecules in gaseous transport: Alkali dimers in supersonic nozzle beams M. P. SinhaO) + a.P lcosO), where 0 is the angle between the angular momentum vector J of the molecule and the beam direction. This method is applied to determine the alignment of Na2 molecules in a supersonic nozzle beam

Zare, Richard N.

246

Probing the extended gaseous regions of M31 with quasar absorption lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......gaseous regions of M31 with quasar absorption lines Sandhya M. Rao 1 Gendith Sardane 1 David...from high-resolution 21-cm emission-line maps of M31's disc and extended regions...detect both low- and high-ion absorption lines associated with it. The impact parameters......

Sandhya M. Rao; Gendith Sardane; David A. Turnshek; David Thilker; Rene Walterbos; Daniel Vanden Berk; Donald G. York

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Combustion regimes of particle-laden gaseous flames: influences of radiation, molecular transports, kinetic-quenching, stoichiometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study flat flames propagating steadily in a reactive gaseous premixture which is seeded with an inert solid suspension. Our main assumptions are: (i) the two-reactant, one-step overall reaction we choose as the combustion process has a rate which vanishes at and below a prescribed temperature (Tc) and resumes the Arrhenius form at higher temperatures; (ii) both phases are considered as continua and have the same local speed and temperature; (iii) radiation among the particles follows the Eddington approximation specialized to a grey medium and the attenuation length markedly exceeds the conduction - convection length in the gas; (iv) the activation energy is large. The first regimes we consider comprise a thin flame front (dominated by molecular transports, convection and chemistry) embedded in much thicker radiation - convection zones. Jump conditions across the former are derived analytically and then used as targets in a shooting method to analyse the thickest zones and compute the burning speed (U). Such regimes only exist for equivalence ratios () above a load-dependent critical value which corresponds to a turning point of the U() curve. This turning point is due to radiative heat losses from the thin flame front to the cooler adjacent zones, which lead to extinction. Over restricted, well defined ranges of composition other regimes may also exist, which have monotonic temperature profiles culminating slightly above Tc. When they are too thick to be affected by molecular transports and are thus similar to coal-dust -air flames, their structure, domain of existence and speed are investigated analytically and numerically. The corresponding U() curve exhibits an upper limit equivalence ratio * characterized by an end-point, beyond which such regimes cannot exist. The influence of molecular diffusion is then accounted for and shown to modify the results only slightly.

Rodolphe Blouquin; Guy Joulin; Younès Merhari

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC URANIUM DIOXIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Division OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC11905 -DISCLAIMER - OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRICc o n e e n i g woroxygen self-diffusion coefficient

Kim, Kee Chul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Risk assessment of gaseous emissions from municipal solid waste landfill: case study Rafah landfill, Palestine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes the risk assessment of gaseous emissions from the municipal solid waste at Rafah landfill, Palestine. In this study, Gas-Sim model was used to quantify the gaseous emissions from the landfill and the Land-Gem model was used to verify the results. Risk assessment of both carcinogens and non-carcinogens were performed. Two scenarios were conducted namely with plant uptake and without plant uptake. The scenario with plant uptake revealed that the risk to residents is acceptable for non-carcinogens (risk value 0.45 > 1.0), while the risk to residents is not acceptable for carcinogens (risk value 2.69 × 10?6 risk to residents is acceptable for non-carcinogens (risk value 0.42 > 1.0), while the risk to residents is acceptable for carcinogens (risk value 2.855 × 10?7 > 10?6).

Ahmad A. Foul; Mazen Abualtayef; Basel Qrenawi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Particle diffusion in a spheromak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The local carbon particle diffusion coefficient was measured in the Proto S-1/C spheromak with use of a test-particle injection scheme. When the plasma was not in a force-free Taylor state, and when there were pressure gradients in the plasma, the particle diffusion was 5 times that predicted by Bohm and was consistent with collisional drift-wave diffusion. The diffusion appears to be driven by correlations of the fluctuating electric field and density. During the decay of the discharge when the plasma was in the Taylor state, the diffusion coefficient of the carbon was classical.

D. D. Meyerhofer; F. M. Levinton; M. Yamada

1988-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

251

Computational and theoretical analysis of weak and strong transverse-wave structures in gaseous detonations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-dimensional simulation results are presented that capture at great detail the temporal evolution of Mach reflection triple point sub-structures intrinsic to gaseous detonation waves. The observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis for realistic, thermally perfect but nonreactive gases. A diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed and found to be in good agreement with the computational results.

Deiterding, Ralf [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Microemulsion-Assisted Synthesis of Mesoporous Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Nanoflakes for Efficient Removal of Gaseous Formaldehyde  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microemulsion-Assisted Synthesis of Mesoporous Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Nanoflakes for Efficient Removal of Gaseous Formaldehyde ... Add to ACS ChemWorx ... (33) Often, aluminum oxyhydroxide was prepared via hydrothermal or solvothermal processes under high pressure in a sealed autoclave at relatively high temperatures (above 100 °C), in which different additives such as sodium tartrate, sodium amide, and trisodium citrate were used to control its morphology. ...

Zhihua Xu; Jiaguo Yu; Jingxiang Low; Mietek Jaroniec

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

253

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon, zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high parity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber.

Ghate, Madhav R. (Morgantown, WV); Yang, Ralph T. (Williamsville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high purity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Ghate, M.R.; Yang, R.T.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

255

On the influence of low initial pressure and detonation stochastic nature on Mach reflection of gaseous detonation waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The two-dimensional, time-dependent and reactive Navier–Stokes equations were solved to obtain an insight into Mach reflection of gaseous detonation in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture diluted ... argon. ...

C. J. Wang; C. M. Guo

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

Wijmans Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTY PERFORMANCE OF COMMERCIAL GRADE API PIPELINE STEELS IN HIGH PRESSURE GASEOUS HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continued growth of the world s developing countries has placed an ever increasing demand on traditional fossil fuel energy sources. This development has lead to increasing research and development of alternative energy sources. Hydrogen gas is one of the potential alternative energy sources under development. Currently the most economical method of transporting large quantities of hydrogen gas is through steel pipelines. It is well known that hydrogen embrittlement has the potential to degrade steel s mechanical properties when hydrogen migrates into the steel matrix. Consequently, the current pipeline infrastructure used in hydrogen transport is typically operated in a conservative fashion. This operational practice is not conducive to economical movement of significant volumes of hydrogen gas as an alternative to fossil fuels. The degradation of the mechanical properties of steels in hydrogen service is known to depend on the microstructure of the steel. Understanding the levels of mechanical property degradation of a given microstructure when exposed to hydrogen gas under pressure can be used to evaluate the suitability of the existing pipeline infrastructure for hydrogen service and guide alloy and microstructure design for new hydrogen pipeline infrastructure. To this end, the 2 Copyright 2010 by ASME microstructures of relevant steels and their mechanical properties in relevant gaseous hydrogen environments must be fully characterized to establish suitability for transporting hydrogen. A project to evaluate four commercially available pipeline steels alloy/microstructure performance in the presences of gaseous hydrogen has been funded by the US Department of Energy along with the private sector. The microstructures of four pipeline steels were characterized and then tensile testing was conducted in gaseous hydrogen and helium at pressures of 800, 1600 and 3000 psi. Based on measurements of reduction of area, two of the four steels that performed the best across the pressure range were selected for evaluation of fracture and fatigue performance in gaseous hydrogen at 800 and 3000 psi. This paper will describe the work performed on four commercially available pipeline steels in the presence of gaseous hydrogen at pressures relevant for transport in pipelines. Microstructures and mechanical property performances will be compared. In addition, recommendations for future work related to gaining a better understanding of steel pipeline performance in hydrogen service will be discussed.

Stalheim, Mr. Douglas [DGS Metallurgical Solutions Inc; Boggess, Todd [Secat; San Marchi, Chris [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Jansto, Steven [Reference Metals Company; Somerday, Dr. B [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Sofronis, Prof. Petros [University of Illinois

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Light diffusing fiber optic chamber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

Maitland, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Enthalpy Diffusion in Multicomponent Flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conclusions of this paper are: (1) Enthalpy diffusion preserves the second law. (2) Euler solvers will not produce correct temperatures in mixing regions. (3) Navier-Stokes solvers will only produce correct temperatures if q{sub d} is included. (4) Errors from neglecting enthalpy diffusion are most severe when differences in molecular weights are large. (5) In addition to temperature, enthalpy diffusion affects density, dilatation and other fields in subtle ways. (6) Reacting flow simulations that neglect the term are a dubious proposition. (7) Turbulence models for RANS and LES closures should preserve consistency between energy and species diffusion.

Cook, A W

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

260

Turing instability in reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Turing instability is studied in two-component reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion terms, and the regions in parametric space where Turing patterns can form are determined. The boundaries between super- and subcritical bifurcations are found. Calculations are performed for one-dimensional brusselator and oregonator models.

Zemskov, E. P., E-mail: zemskov@ccas.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Dorodnicyn Computing Center (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Interchangeability of gaseous fuels - The importance of the Wobbe-index  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wobbe-index is introduced as an important gas quality criterion when interchanging gaseous fuels for engines. Changes in fuel gas composition appear not to induce noticeable changes in air to fuel ratio and combustion velocity when the Wobbe-index remains the same. This implies that no re-adjustment of ignition timing and air to fuel ratio settings is required, then. The volumetric energy content, the explosion limits and the knock resistance of a mixture can vary to a moderate extent when the Wobbe-index is constant and the gas composition varies.

Klimstra, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL); Jalan, Vinod M. (Concord, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur-containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorbtion capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

264

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Vibration?Rotation Emission Spectrum of Gaseous HZnCl  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Vibration?Rotation Emission Spectrum of Gaseous HZnCl ... A least-squares fit was performed separately for each of the five observed bands and the lines were fitted using the simple energy level expression15 where G(v1, v2, v3) is the vibrational energy of the (v1, v2, v3) state relative to the zero point energy (ZPE), G(0, 0, 0). ... (16)?Wilson, E. B.; Decius, J. C., Jr.; Cross, P. C. Molecular Vibrations; McGraw-Hill:? New York, 1955. ...

Shanshan Yu; Alireza Shayesteh; Dejian Fu; Peter F. Bernath

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

266

BDP: BrainSuite Diffusion Pipeline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BDP: BrainSuite Diffusion Pipeline Chitresh Bhushan #12; Quantify microstructural tissue ROI Connectivity ROI Statistics MPRAGE Diffusion #12;Diffusion Pipeline Dicom to NIfTI Co ROIs Custom ROIs #12;Diffusion Pipeline Dicom to NIfTI Co-registration Diffusion Modeling Tractography

Leahy, Richard M.

267

Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth-Paducah Program Office Ohio Kentucky Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Challenge The decommissioning of GDP facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of residual enriched uranium in facility components for safeguards and nuclear criticality safety purposes. Current practices used to perform NDA measurements frequently have poorly defined uncertainties due to several factors, including; lack of available Working Reference Material (WRM) standards and surrogate container matrices to test performance and less than adequate programmatic requirements defined by end users. As a result, measurement uncertainties (typically ± 50 to 100 percent of measured values) are

268

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for Environment has responsibility for identifying, characterizing, and ameliorating the environmental, health, and safety issues and public concerns associated with commercial operation of specific energy systems. The need for developing a safety and environmental control assessment for liquefied gaseous fuels was identified by the Environmental and Safety Engineering Division as a result of discussions with various governmental, industry, and academic persons having expertise with respect to the particular materials involved: liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, and anhydrous ammonia. This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in Fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 1 (Executive Summary) describes the background, purpose and organization of the LGF Program and contains summaries of the 25 reports presented in Volumes 2 and 3. Annotated bibliographies on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety and Environmental Control Research and on Fire Safety and Hazards of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) are included in Volume 1.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Using large environmental chamber technique for gaseous contaminant removal equipment test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) has set a voluntary standard for testing the initial dust-removal capacity of portable air cleaners. In the authors` test of portable air cleaners for the local consumer council, the AHAM method was extended to test the initial removal capacity for gaseous phase pollutants. Also, carbon filters` efficiency change over time in toluene removal on a number of air cleaners was tested. In using a large chamber to carry out these tests, the chamber wall adsorption and re-emission effects were experimentally quantified. These tests indicated that a large chamber, with its wall surface adsorption controlled, is simple and robust to use to quantify the initial cleaning capacity for gaseous phase pollutants. Based on these test results, a large chamber method is proposed to test the performance lifetimes of portable air cleaners. The system advantages of the method over the in-duct performance life test methods are that no continuous air-cleaning system is required and that the chamber`s humidity and temperature can be maintained at the desired values more easily with the combination of a unitary dehumidifier and a bubbler system. This paper will present the trial results with portable air cleaner tests and discuss the large environmental chamber techniques.

Niu, J.; Tung, T.C.W.; Chui, V.W.Y. [Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ. (Hong Kong). Dept. of Building Services Engineering

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Molecular imaging of water binding state and diffusion in breast cancer using diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffusion weighted MRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular imaging of water binding state and diffusion inChung et al. , “In vivo water state measurements in breastby measuring tis- sue water state using diffuse optical

Chung, So Hyun; Yu, Hon; Su, Min-Ying; Cerussi, Albert E.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Laboratory scale studies on gaseous emissions generated by the incineration of an artificial automotive shredder residue presenting a critical composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Car manufacturers must eliminate automotive shredder residues (ASR). Two ways of incineration are of interest: at 850°C in municipal waste incinerators or at higher temperatures, above 1100°C in cement plants. These processes reduce the mass and the volume of waste to be disposed of in landfills and energy recovery might be possible. Regulations govern the emission of gaseous effluents to control environmental risk. To determine gaseous effluents from a pilot sacle or an industrial incineration plant, an artificial ASR was made by mixing three representative organic polymers present in the real ASR, namely polyvinylchloride, polyurethane and rubber. This mixture was incinerated at 850 and 1100°C in laboratory experiments and the analyses of the principal gaseous effluents such as carbon oxides, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, hydrochloric and hydrocyanic acids and sulphur compounds are presented and discussed. Lastly, in order to simulate artificial ASR behaviour, the composition of the combustion gases at equilibrium was calculated using a Gibbs energy minimisation code.

D. Lanoir; G. Trouvé; L. Delfosse

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Method and system for low-NO.sub.x dual-fuel combustion of liquid and/or gaseous fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for combustion in which a pressurized preheated liquid fuel is atomized and a portion thereof flash vaporized, creating a mixture of fuel vapor and liquid droplets. The mixture is mixed with primary combustion oxidant, producing a fuel/primary oxidant mixture which is then injected into a primary combustion chamber in which the fuel/primary oxidant mixture is partially combusted, producing a secondary gaseous fuel containing hydrogen and carbon oxides. The secondary gaseous fuel is mixed with a secondary combustion oxidant and injected into the second combustion chamber wherein complete combustion of the secondary gaseous fuel is carried out. The resulting second stage flue gas containing very low amounts of NO.sub.x is then vented from the second combustion chamber.

Gard, Vincent; Chojnacki, Dennis A; Rabovitser, Ioseph K

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

273

Portsmouth and Paducah Construction Workers Needs Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Needs Assessment for Needs Assessment for Medical Screening of Construction Workers at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants Introduction In 1993 the U.S. Congress enacted Section 3162 of the Defense Authorization Act, which directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to initiate programs to evaluate the health of former DOE defense nuclear facility workers. Consistent with the mandate to DOE from Congress, this project implements a notification, health evaluation (including medical screening) and intervention program for former building and construction trades workers at the DOE Oak Ridge, TN site and the Gaseous Diffusion Plants (GDP) at Portsmouth, OH and Paducah, KY, who may have been exposed to health hazards as a result of work at these sites. Based on congressional language, current workers at GDP's may request

274

Active Diffusion of Motor Particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The movement of motor particles consisting of one or several molecular motors bound to a cargo particle is studied theoretically. The particles move on patterns of immobilized filaments. Several patterns are described for which the motor particles undergo nondirected but enhanced diffusion. Depending on the walking distance of the particles and the mesh size of the patterns, the active diffusion coefficient exhibits three different regimes. For micrometer-sized motor particles in water, e.g., this diffusion coefficient can be enhanced by 2 orders of magnitude.

Stefan Klumpp and Reinhard Lipowsky

2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

275

Theory of Grain Boundary Diffusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The previously proposed dependence of the structure of grain boundaries upon the angle of disorientation of the two grains is used as a basis of a quantitative consideration of diffusion along grain boundaries and in particular of the apparent activation energies. At small angles in the dislocation range the diffusion is controlled by volume diffusion mechanism. At high angles near 45° the model of a uniform grain boundary is applicable. In the intermediate range an array of rod-like areas of distorted lattice leads to low or even negative apparent activation energies. The theory is in good agreement with experiment.

R. Smoluchowski

1952-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Prediction of Room Air Diffusion for Reduced Diffuser Flow Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling at the air supply device (ASHRAE Research Project RP -1009, ?Simplified Diffuser Boundary Conditions for Numerical Room Airflow Models, 2001) 2.2.4 Box model Nielsen (1989, 1992) proposed the box method with an imaginary box near.... Nielsen (1989, 13 1992). Results obtained from the box method are in good agreement with the measured data. Figure 5 Methods for momentum modeling in front of an air supply device (ASHRAE RP -1009, ?Simplified Diffuser Boundary Conditions...

Gangisetti, Kavita

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hot carrier diffusion in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report an optical study of charge transport in graphene. Diffusion of hot carriers in epitaxial graphene and reduced graphene oxide samples are studied using an ultrafast pump-probe technique with a high spatial resolution. Spatiotemporal...

Ruzicka, Brian Andrew; Wang, Shuai; Werake, Lalani Kumari; Weintrub, Ben; Loh, Kian Ping; Zhao, Hui

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Accelerating and Retarding Anomalous Diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper Gaussian models of retarded and accelerated anomalous diffusion are considered. Stochastic differential equations of fractional order driven by single or multiple fractional Gaussian noise terms are introduced to describe retarding and accelerating subdiffusion and superdiffusion. Short and long time asymptotic limits of the mean squared displacement of the stochastic processes associated with the solutions of these equations are studied. Specific cases of these equations are shown to provide possible descriptions of retarding or accelerating anomalous diffusion.

Chai Hok Eab; S. C. Lim

2012-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Lessons Learned from Practical Field Experience with High Pressure Gaseous Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5/2010 5/2010 www.cleanvehicle.org 1 Lessons Learned from Practical Field Experience with High Pressure Gaseous Fuels DOE - DOT CNG - H 2 Workshop December 10, 2009 Douglas Horne, PE - CVEF President Rob Adams, P.Eng. - Marathon Technical Services The Facts  NGVs have been used in North America for over 30 years  Codes and Standards (C&S) provide opportunity for safe reliable operation of NGVs  C&S evolve with new technology and field experience  People make mistakes, continuous training is critical for safe operations  Cylinders have a limited life -track your cylinders! 2/25/2010 www.cleanvehicle.org 2 Incidents in North America  Since 1984 CVEF has recorded 97 incidents of which 67 involved CNG vehicles - 37 incidents involve either a CNG leak (15) or a

280

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 consists of 19 reports describing technical effort performed by Government Contractors in the area of LNG Safety and Environmental Control. Report topics are: simulation of LNG vapor spread and dispersion by finite element methods; modeling of negatively buoyant vapor cloud dispersion; effect of humidity on the energy budget of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vapor cloud; LNG fire and explosion phenomena research evaluation; modeling of laminar flames in mixtures of vaporized liquefied natural gas (LNG) and air; chemical kinetics in LNG detonations; effects of cellular structure on the behavior of gaseous detonation waves under transient conditions; computer simulation of combustion and fluid dynamics in two and three dimensions; LNG release prevention and control; the feasibility of methods and systems for reducing LNG tanker fire hazards; safety assessment of gelled LNG; and a four band differential radiometer for monitoring LNG vapors.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Liquefied gaseous fuels safety and environmental control assessment program: third status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Status Report contains contributions from all contractors currently participating in the DOE Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LG) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program and is presented in two principal sections. Section I is an Executive Summary of work done by all program participants. Section II is a presentation of fourteen individual reports (A through N) on specific LGF Program activities. The emphasis of Section II is on research conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Reports A through M). Report N, an annotated bibliography of literature related to LNG safety and environmental control, was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of its LGF Safety Studies Project. Other organizations who contributed to this Status Report are Aerojet Energy Conversion Company; Applied Technology Corporation; Arthur D. Little, Incorporated; C/sub v/ International, Incorporated; Institute of Gas Technology; and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for Reports A through N for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

Heffel, James W. (Lake Matthews, CA); Scott, Paul B. (Northridge, CA); Park, Chan Seung (Yorba Linda, CA)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Gusty, gaseous flows of FIRE: galactic winds in cosmological simulations with explicit stellar feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of the galaxy-scale gaseous outflows from the FIRE (Feedback in Realistic Environments) simulations. This suite of hydrodynamic cosmological zoom simulations provides a sample of halos where star-forming giant molecular clouds are resolved to z=0, and features an explicit stellar feedback model on small scales. In this work, we focus on quantifying the gas mass ejected out of galaxies in winds and how this material travels through the halo. We correlate these quantities to star formation in galaxies throughout cosmic history. Our simulations reveal that a significant portion of every galaxy's evolution, particularly at high redshift, is dominated by bursts of star formation, which are followed by powerful gusts of galactic outflow that sweep up a large fraction of gas in the interstellar medium and send it through the circumgalactic medium. The dynamical effect of these outflows can significantly limit the amount of star formation within the affected galaxy. At low redshift, however, su...

Muratov, Alexander L; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Hopkins, Philip F; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Purex Plant gaseous iodine-129 control capability and process development requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the ability of the Purex Plant to effectively control iodine-129 emissions. Based on historical evidence, the current Purex Plant iodine control system appears capable of meeting the goal of limiting gaseous iodine-129 emissions at the point of discharge to levels stipulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) for an uncontrolled area. Expected decontamination factors (DF`s) with the current system will average about 100 and will be above the calculated DF`s of 2.2 and 87 required to meet DOE yearly average concentration limits for controlled and uncontrolled areas respectively, but below the calculated DF of 352 required for meeting the proposed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mass emission limit. Chemical costs for maintaining compliance with the DOE limits will be approximately $166 per metric ton of fuel processed (based on a silver nitrate price of $12.38/oz). Costs will increase in proportion to increases in silver prices.

Evoniuk, C.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Constraints on the microwave opacity of gaseous methane and water vapor in the Jovian atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gaseous NH/sub 3/'s microwave absorption in the Jovian atmosphere appears too great to be due to a solar abundance of this gas. The additional capacity of microwave absorption is presently sought in measurements of the microwave absorption of CH/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O under simulated Jovian conditions at 2.25 GHz, 8.5 GHz, 21.7 GHz; due to large error bars, measurements represent upper limits on the microwave opacity generated by H/sub 2/O and CH/sub 4/. The results obtained are consistent with theoretical expressions for microwave opacity in a Jovian atmosphere at the specified frequencies. The presence of an NH/sub 3/ abundance exceeding the solar level by a factor of 1.5 is indicated by test results. 16 references.

Jenkins, J.M.; Steffes, P.G.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The performance and the gaseous emissions of two small marine craft diesel engines fuelled with biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental investigation of the application of biodiesel (recycled cooking fat and vegetable oil) on small marine craft diesel engines was completed. The tests were performed on Perkins 404C-22 (Marinised) in Boat No. 1 (Fair Countess) and on Nanni Diesel 3.100HE in Boat No. 2 (Aimee 2). The tests were designed and carried out in accordance with the standardised test procedure described in ISO 8178-4 Test Cycle E5. The performance and gaseous emissions of the tested engines were compared and analysed. The test results show that the power output for both trial engines operating with biodiesel were comparable to that fuelled with fossil diesel, but with an increase in fuel consumptions. The \\{NOx\\} emissions were found to be reduced when fuelled with biodiesel. The CO emissions were found to be lower when the engines operated at higher loads using biodiesel.

A.P. Roskilly; S.K. Nanda; Y.D. Wang; J. Chirkowski

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Development of a cold-neutron imaging detector based on thick gaseous electron multiplier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of our recent studies on a cold-neutron imaging detector prototype based on THick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM). The detector consists of a thin Boron layer, for neutron-to-charged particle conversion, coupled to two THGEM electrodes in cascade for charge amplification and a position-sensitive charge-readout anode. The detector operates in Ne/(5%)CF{sub 4}, at atmospheric pressure, in a stable condition at a gain of around 10{sup 4}. Due to the geometrical structure of the detector elements (THGEM geometry and charge read-out anode), the image of detector active area shows a large inhomogeneity, corrected using a dedicated flat-filed correction algorithm. The prototype provides a detection efficiency of 5% and an effective spatial resolution of the order of 1.3 mm.

Cortesi, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen PSI CH-5234 (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Zurich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Zboray, R.; Kaestner, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen PSI CH-5234 (Switzerland); Prasser, H.-M. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Zurich CH-8092 (Switzerland)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Composition, apparatus, and process, for sorption of gaseous compounds of group II-VII elements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Scavenger compositions are disclosed, which have utility for effecting the sorptive removal of hazardous gases containing Group II-VII elements of the Periodic Table, such as are widely encountered in the manufacture of semiconducting materials and semiconductor devices. Gas sorption processes including the contacting of Group II-VII gaseous compounds with such scavenger compositions are likewise disclosed, together with critical space velocity contacting conditions pertaining thereto. Further described are gas contacting apparatus, including mesh structures which may be deployed in gas contacting vessels containing such scavenger compositions, to prevent solids from being introduced to or discharged from the contacting vessel in the gas stream undergoing treatment. A reticulate heat transfer structure also is disclosed, for dampening localized exothermic reaction fronts when gas mixtures comprising Group II-VII constituents are contacted with the scavenger compositions in bulk sorption contacting vessels according to the invention.

Tom, Glenn M. (New Milford, CT); McManus, James V. (Danbury, CT); Luxon, Bruce A. (Stamford, CT)

1991-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

289

Apparatus for recovering gaseous hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Santa Fe, NM); Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11 - 26720 of 29,416 results. 11 - 26720 of 29,416 results. Article New EM Technology: Spray Lights up Contamination Hot Spots OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers have developed a new technology to determine the extent of contamination in Cold War facilities that could replace costly and time-consuming traditional survey methods used by EM. http://energy.gov/em/articles/new-em-technology-spray-lights-contamination-hot-spots Article DOE Seeks Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Task Proposal (RTP) for deactivation activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. http://energy.gov/em/articles/doe-seeks-deactivation-contractor-paducah-gaseous-diffusion-plant

291

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81 - 26690 of 28,904 results. 81 - 26690 of 28,904 results. Article New EM Technology: Spray Lights up Contamination Hot Spots OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers have developed a new technology to determine the extent of contamination in Cold War facilities that could replace costly and time-consuming traditional survey methods used by EM. http://energy.gov/em/articles/new-em-technology-spray-lights-contamination-hot-spots Article DOE Seeks Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Task Proposal (RTP) for deactivation activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. http://energy.gov/em/articles/doe-seeks-deactivation-contractor-paducah-gaseous-diffusion-plant

292

Shaping of fuel delivery characteristics for solenoid operated diesel engine gaseous injectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solenoid operated gaseous injectors, when compared to conventional liquid fuel diesel injectors, differ in the way the fuel dose and its discharge rate are controlled. While in conventional diesel systems, the fuel dose and its injection rate depends on the fuel injection pump effective stroke and on the plunger diameter and velocity, the solenoid injectors operate in an on-off manner which limits the ability to control the gas discharge rate, resulting in its profile to be basically rectangular in shape. To reduce the gas injection rate at the beginning of the injection process in order to suppress the diesel-knock phenomenon, similar procedures as used in diesel engines could be implemented. One such approach is to use a throttling type pintle nozzle, and another method is to use a double-spring injector with a hole nozzle. The rationale for using such nozzle configurations is that gaseous fuels do not require atomization, and therefore, can be injected at lower discharge velocities than with liquid fuels. The gas delivery characteristics from a solenoid injector has been computer-simulated in order to assess the impact of the investigated three modes of fuel discharge rate control strategies. The simulation results confirmed that the gas dose and its discharge rate can be shaped as required. An experimental set-up is described to measure the gas discharge rate using a special gas injection mass flow rate indicator with a strain-gage sensor installed at the entry to a long tube, similar to that proposed by Bosch for liquid fuel volumetric flow rate measurements.

Hong, H.; Krepec, T.; Kekedjian, H.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Inverted end-Hall-type low-energy high-current gaseous ion source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel approach to low-energy, high-current, gaseous ion beam generation was explored and an ion source based on this technique has been developed. The source utilizes a dc high-current (up to 20 A) gaseous discharge with electron injection into the region of ion generation. Compared to the conventional end-Hall ion source, the locations of the discharge anode and cathode are inverted: the cathode is placed inside the source and the anode outside, and correspondingly, the discharge current is in the opposite direction. The discharge operates in a diverging axial magnetic field, similar to the end-Hall source. Electron generation and injection is accomplished by using an additional arc discharge with a ''cold'' (filamentless) hollow cathode. Low plasma contamination is achieved by using a low discharge voltage (avoidance of sputtering), as well as by a special geometric configuration of the emitter discharge electrodes, thereby filtering (removing) the erosion products stemming from the emitter cathode. The device produces a dc ion flow with energy below 20 eV and current up to 2.5 A onto a collector of 500 cm{sup 2} at 25 cm from the source edge, at a pressure {>=}0.02 Pa and gas flow rate {>=}14 SCCM. The ion energy spread is 2 to 3 eV (rms). The source is characterized by high reliability, low maintenance, and long lifetime. The beam contains less than 0.1% of metallic ions. The specific electric energy consumption is 400 eV per ion registered at the collector. The source operates with noble gases, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrocarbons. Utilizing biasing, it can be used for plasma sputtering, etching, and other ion technologies.

Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Shandrikov, M. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Grishin, D. M.; Anders, A.; Baldwin, D. A. [High Current Electronics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); 4Wave, Inc., Sterling, Virginia 20166 (United States)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Reduction of particulate matter and gaseous emission from marine diesel engines using a catalyzed particulate filter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel engines are used widely as the power sources of coastal ships and international vessels primarily due to their high thermal efficiency, high fuel economy and durable performance. However, the gaseous and solid substances exhausted from diesel engines during the combustion process cause air pollution, in particular around harbor regions. In order to effectively reduce particulate matter and gaseous pollution emissions, a catalyzed particulate filter was equipped in the tail pipe of a marine diesel engine. The engine's performance and emission characteristics under various engine speeds and torques were measured using a computerized engine data control and acquisition system accompanied with an engine dynamometer. The effectiveness of installing a catalyzed particulate filter on the reduction of pollutant emissions was examined. The experimental results show that the exhaust gas temperature, carbon monoxide and smoke opacity were reduced significantly upon installation of the particulate filter. In particular, larger conversion of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide — and thus larger CO2 and lower CO emissions — were observed for the marine diesel engine equipped with a catalyzed particulate filter and operated at higher engine speeds. This is presumably due to enhancement of the catalytic oxidation reaction that results from an exhaust gas with stronger stirring motion passing through the filter. The absorption of partial heating energy from the exhaust gas by the physical structure of the particulate filter resulted in a reduction in the exhaust gas temperature. The particulate matter could be burnt to a greater extent due to the effect of the catalyst coated on the surface of the particulate filter. Moreover, the fuel consumption rate was increased slightly while the excess oxygen emission was somewhat decreased with the particulate filter.

Cherng-Yuan Lin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Selective Gaseous Extraction: Research, Development and Training for Isotope Production, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General Atomics and the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) completed research and development of selective gaseous extraction of fission products from irradiated fuel, which included training and education of MURR students. The process used porous fuel and after irradiation flowed product gases through the fuel to selectively removed desired fission products with the primary goal of demonstrating the removal of rhodium 105. High removal rates for the ruthenium/rhodium (Ru/Rh), tellurium/iodine (Te/I) and molybdenum/technetium (Mo/Tc) series were demonstrated. The success of this research provides for the reuse of the target for further production, significantly reducing the production of actinide wastes relative to processes that dissolve the target. This effort was conducted under DOE funding (DE-SC0007772). General Atomics objective of the project was to conduct R&D on alternative methods to produce a number of radioactive isotopes currently needed for medical and industry applications to include rhodium-105 and other useful isotopes. Selective gaseous extraction was shown to be effective at removing radioisotopes of the ruthenium/rhodium, tellurium/iodine and molybdenum/technetium decay chains while having trace to no quantities of other fission products or actinides. This adds a new, credible method to the area of certain commercial isotope production beyond current techniques, while providing significant potential reduction of process wastes. Waste reduction, along with reduced processing time/cost provides for superior economic feasibility which may allow domestic production under full cost recovery practices. This provides the potential for improved access to domestically produced isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment at reduced cost, providing for the public good.

Bertch, Timothy C, [General Atomics

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

New C-H Stretching Vibrational Spectral Features in the Raman Spectra of Gaseous and Liquid Ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New C-H Stretching Vibrational Spectral Features in the Raman Spectra of Gaseous and Liquid Ethanol Traditionally, the Raman spectrum of ethanol in the C-H vibrational stretching region between 2800 cm-1 and 3100, and the -CH3 antisymmetric stretching. In this report, new Raman spectral features were observed for ethanol

Liu, Shilin

297

The Gaseous Electronics Conference radio-frequency reference cell: A defined parallel-plate radio-frequency system for experimental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Gaseous Electronics Conference radio-frequency reference cell: A defined parallel-plate radio-frequency publication 3 September1993) A "referencecell" for generatingradio-frequency(rf) glow dischargesin gasesat a frequencyof 13.56MHz is described.The referencecell provides an experimental platform for comparing plasma

Kushner, Mark

298

Two-dimensional position-sensitive gaseous detectors for high-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two-dimensional position-sensitive gaseous detectors have been developed at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility (GeNF) for high-resolution...2, 3He/CF4 and Xe/CO2, respectively. One neutron detector is used at the AR...

M. Marmotti; M. Haese-Seiller; R. Kampmann

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Chapter 1 - Introduction to Diffusion MR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstracts Developments in the last century have led to a better understanding of diffusion—the perpetual mixing of molecules caused by thermal motion. In this chapter, the basic principles governing the diffusion phenomenon and its measurement using magnetic resonance (MR) are reviewed. The concepts of the apparent diffusion coefficient and of the diffusion propagator as well as their MR measurements are introduced from basic principles. Finally, the influence of neural tissue microstructure on the diffusion-weighted MR signal is briefly discussed.

Peter J. Basser; Evren Özarslan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Delafosse, D. 2012. "Chapter 9 -Hydrogen Effects on the Plasticity of Face Centred Cubic (fcc) Crystals." In Gaseous Hydrogen Embrittlement of Materials in Energy Technologies, edited by Richard P Gangloff and B P Somerday,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Crystals." In Gaseous Hydrogen Embrittlement of Materials in Energy Technologies, edited by Richard P-11May2014 Author manuscript, published in "Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of materials in energy) Crystals." In Gaseous Hydrogen Embrittlement of Materials in Energy Technologies, edited by Richard P

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Assessment Addendum for Disposition of Additional Waste at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE/EA-1339A) (April 30, 2003)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

117 117 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 83 / Wednesday, April 30, 2003 / Notices Corp., Club Affiliation, Disability, Hobbies, Military Affiliation, National Merit, Athletics, Union Affiliation, Misc., Career Objective, or Programs of Study)) * ParentVeteran? (Is either parent a Veteran) * ParentDisabledInMilitary? * ParentKilledInMilitary? * HouseholdIncome (Annual) Financial Aid Wizard For each School tracked in the user's EDpack * Tuition * RoomBoard * Fees * Books * OtherExpense Used in the EFC calculation * StOfResidence * Veteran? * SchoolsOfAttendance * ChildSupport? * OtherDependants? * Orphan? * PeopleInHousehold * CollegeStudentIn House * CompletedTaxReturn? * 1040EZ Able to file 1040A or 1040EZ) * AGI (Adjusted Gross Income) * IncomeTax * Exemptions * YouWages * SpouseWages

302

DOE Announces Transfer of Depleted Uranium to Advance the U.S. National Security Interests, Extend Operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transfer to deliver important national security benefits, while keeping Kentucky plant operating for the next year

303

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 15, 1997, Drum Explosion at Building C-746-Q, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board (Board) appointed by James C. Hall, Manager, Oak Ridge Operations.

304

Hot carrier diffusion in graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report an optical study of charge transport in graphene. Diffusion of hot carriers in epitaxial graphene and reduced graphene-oxide samples are studied using an ultrafast pump-probe technique with a high spatial resolution. Spatiotemporal dynamics of hot carriers after a pointlike excitation are monitored. Carrier-diffusion coefficients of 11?000 and 5500?cm2?s?1 are measured in epitaxial graphene and reduced graphene-oxide samples, respectively, with a carrier temperature on the order of 3600 K. The demonstrated optical techniques can be used for noncontact and noninvasive in situ detection of transport properties of graphene.

Brian A. Ruzicka; Shuai Wang; Lalani K. Werake; Ben Weintrub; Kian Ping Loh; Hui Zhao

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

305

Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

306

Decay Energies of Gaseous Fission Products and their Daughters for A=88 to 93  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic study of ?-decay energies has been made for mass-separated activities of Kr gaseous fission products and their daughters at the TRISTAN on-line separator facility at the Ames Laboratory research reactor. A well-type plastic scintillator was used in coincidence with a Ge(Li) ? detector to determine ?-group end-point energies and deduce Q values. The following ?-decay energies have been determined: Kr88, 2.93 ± 0.03 MeV; Rb88, 5.30 ± 0.06 MeV; Kr89, 4.93 ± 0.06 MeV; Kr90, 4.35 ± 0.05 MeV; Rb90, 6.32 ± 0.07 MeV; Kr91, 6.12 ± 0.07 MeV; Rb91, 5.68 ± 0.04 MeV; Kr92, 5.97 ± 0.08 MeV; Rb92, 7.58 ± 0.15 MeV; Sr92, 1.93 ± 0.03 MeV; Kr93, 8.3 ± 0.5 MeV; and Rb93, 7.23 ± 0.10 MeV. The decay energies are compared with previous measurements, systematics predictions, and two currently accepted mass relations. The energies are used to predict the ?-decay energies for 13 additional nuclei by means of systematics.

J. R. Clifford; W. L. Talbert; Jr.; F. K. Wohn; J. P. Adams; J. R. McConnell

1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids, producing a small atomic uranium vapor plume. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. LAARS has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for U-235. The sample is scanned and assayed point-by-point at rates reaching 1 million measurements/hour, enabling LAARS to detect and analyze uranium in trace samples. The spectrometer is assembled using primarily commercially available components and features a compact design and automated analysis.Two specific gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) applications of the spectrometer are currently under development: 1) LAARS-Environmental Sampling (ES), which collects and analyzes aerosol particles for GCEP misuse detection and 2) LAARS-Destructive Assay (DA), which enables onsite enrichment DA sample collection and analysis for protracted diversion detection. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in GCEP safeguards verification.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Munley, John T.; Nelson, Danny A.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Phillips, Jon R.

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

308

Modeling of temporal behavior of isotopic exchange between gaseous hydrogen and palladium hydride power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A parametric rate-equation model is described which depicts the time dependent behavior of the isotopic exchange process occurring between the solid and gas phases in gaseous hydrogen (deuterium) flows through packed-powder palladium deuteride (hydride) beds. The exchange mechanism is assumed to be rate-limited by processes taking place on the surface of the powder. The fundamental kinetic parameter of the model is the isotopic exchange probability, p, which is the probability that an isotopic exchange event occurs during a collision of a gas phase atom with the surface. Isotope effects between the gas and solid phases are explicitly included in terms of the isotope separation factor, ..cap alpha... Results of the model are compared with recent experimental measurements of isotope exchange in the ..beta..-phase hydrogen/palladium system and, using a literature value of ..cap alpha.. = 2.4, a good description of the experimental data is obtained for p approx. 10/sup -7/. In view of the importance of the isotope effects in the hydrogen/palladium system and the range of ..cap alpha.. values reported for the ..beta..-phase in the literature, the sensitivity of the model results to a variation in the value of ..cap alpha.. is examined.

Melius, C F; Foltz, G W

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Gravitational drag on a point mass in hypersonic motion through a gaseous medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore a ballistic orbit model to infer the gravitational drag force on an accreting point mass M, such as a black hole, moving at a hypersonic velocity v_{0} through a gaseous environment of density \\rho_{0}. The streamlines blend in the flow past the body and transfer momentum to it. The total drag force acting on the body, including the nonlinear contribution of those streamlines with small impact parameter that bend significantly and pass through a shock, can be calculated by imposing conservation of momentum. In this fully analytic approach, the ambiguity in the definition of the lower cut-off distance $r_{\\rm min}$ in calculations of the effect of dynamical friction is removed. It turns out that $r_{\\rm min}=\\sqrt{e}GM/2v_{0}^{2}$. Using spherical surfaces of control of different sizes, we carry out a successful comparison between the predicted drag force and the one obtained from a high resolution, axisymmetric, isothermal flow simulation. We demonstrate that ballistic models are reasonably success...

Canto, J; Esquivel, A; Sanchez-Salcedo, F J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

DYNAMICAL FRICTION IN A GASEOUS MEDIUM WITH A LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamical friction force experienced by a massive gravitating body moving through a gaseous medium is modified by sufficiently strong large-scale magnetic fields. Using linear perturbation theory, we calculate the structure of the wake generated by, and the gravitational drag force on, a body traveling in a straight-line trajectory in a uniformly magnetized medium. The functional form of the drag force as a function of the Mach number ({identical_to} V{sub 0}/c{sub s} , where V{sub 0} is the velocity of the body and c{sub s} is the sound speed) depends on the strength of the magnetic field and on the angle between the velocity of the perturber and the direction of the magnetic field. In particular, the peak value of the drag force is not near Mach number {approx}1 for a perturber moving in a sufficiently magnetized medium. As a rule of thumb, we may state that for supersonic motion, magnetic fields act to suppress dynamical friction; for subsonic motion, they tend to enhance dynamical friction. For perturbers moving along the magnetic field lines, the drag force at some subsonic Mach numbers may be stronger than at supersonic velocities. We also mention the relevance of our findings to black hole coalescence in galactic nuclei.

Sanchez-Salcedo, F. J., E-mail: jsanchez@astroscu.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico City (Mexico)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

308 nm photochemical reaction of gaseous HNO3 and benzene on ?-Fe2O3 surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The 308 nm photochemical reactions of nitric acid (HNO3) and benzene in the gas phase and on ?-Fe2O3 surface at 298 K was investigated by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The concentration and yield of HONO and p-nitrophenol (p-NP) had been examined as a function of reaction time, benzene initial concentration and relative humidity on photochemical reaction. The results showed that gaseous HNO3 did not directly react with benzene in the dark, and p-NP was formed irradiation under 308 nm UV light. When HNO3 initial concentration was 400 Pa and benzene was 300 Pa, the illumination time was 100 min, the concentration of p-NP produced from the photochemical reaction of HNO3 and benzene on ?-Fe2O3 surface was about 3.08 times higher than that in the gas phase. In the meantime, while reaction time was 40 min and relative humidity was 70%, the concentration of HONO and p-NP formed on ?-Fe2O3 surface were about 3.55 and 2.51 times higher than those in the gas phase, and the yield of p-NP was 3.74% and 2.99%, respectively. Surfaces effect played a leading role in photochemical reaction of HNO3 and benzene on ?-Fe2O3 surface.

Jun Zhao; Chengzhu Zhu; Jun Lu; Jiaji Zou; Shuchuan Peng; Tianhu Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Variable Emission from a Gaseous Disc around a Metal-Polluted White Dwarf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the discovery of strongly variable emission lines from a gaseous disc around the DA white dwarf SDSS J1617+1620, a star previously found to have an infrared excess indicative of a dusty debris disc formed by the tidal disruption of a rocky planetary body. Time-series spectroscopy obtained during the period 2006-2014 has shown the appearance of strong double-peaked Ca II emission lines in 2008. The lines were weak, at best, during earlier observations, and monotonically faded through the remainder of our monitoring. Our observations represent unambiguous evidence for short-term variability in the debris environment of evolved planetary systems. Possible explanations for this extraordinary variability include the impact onto the dusty disc of either a single small rocky planetesimal, or of material from a highly eccentric debris tail. The increase in flux from the emission lines is sufficient that similar events could be detected in the broadband photometry of ongoing and future large-area time domai...

Wilson, David J; Koester, Detlev; Raddi, Roberto; Breedt, Elmé; Southworth, John; Parsons, Steven G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A DUSTY COMPONENT TO THE GASEOUS DEBRIS DISK AROUND THE WHITE DWARF SDSS J1228+1040  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) spectroscopy and ISAAC, UKIDSS, and Spitzer Space Telescope broadband photometry of SDSS J1228+1040-a white dwarf for which evidence of a gaseous metal-rich circumstellar disk has previously been found from optical emission lines. The data show a clear excess in the near- and mid-infrared (IR), providing compelling evidence for the presence of dust in addition to the previously identified gaseous debris disk around the star. The IR excess can be modeled in terms of an optically thick but geometrically thin disk. We find that the inner disk temperatures must be relatively high ({approx}1700 K) in order to fit the spectral energy distribution in the near-IR. These data provide the first evidence for the coexistence of both gas and dust in a disk around a white dwarf, and show that their presence is possible even around moderately hot ({approx}22,000 K) stars.

Brinkworth, C. S.; Hoard, D. W. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gaensicke, B. T.; Marsh, T. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Warwick, Warwick CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Tappert, C. [Dpto de AstronomIa y AstrofIsica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

314

Influence of continuous and discontinuous supplemental lighting on the daily variation in gaseous exchange in greenhouse cucumber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stomatal conductance, transpiration, net photosynthesis and internal CO2 concentration were measured on the fifth leaf of 36- to 43-day-old cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants. Three series of measurements followed the variations during a diurnal period in gaseous exchange of plants under three light regimes. One group of plants received supplemental lighting split into two periods (04:00–08:00 and 16:00–22:00) for a continuous 18-h photoperiod. A second group was illuminated between 19:00 and 05:00 for a discontinuous 18-h photoperiod. The last group received only natural light (control). Supplemental lighting increased the stomatal conductance and transpiration. Extending the photoperiod with supplemental lighting increased the net photosynthesis rate and extended the period of CO2 assimilation. The internal CO2 concentration varied inversely with the CO2 assimilation rate. The continuity or discontinuity of the photoperiod did not affect gaseous exchange.

Gilles Turcotte; André Gosselin

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

An evaluation of gaseous sterilants under various conditions and their effect upon the heat resistance of Salmonella  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gaseous Sterilant Exposure Chamber Environment for Gas Exposure Tests with Formaldehyde Preparation for Heat Treatment Heat Treatment Test with Beta-propiolactone Test with Penn Gas 10 10 10 10 12 IV. RESULTS Test wi. th Formaldehyde Test... with BPL Test with Penn Gas 14 14 17 19 V DISCUSSION 23 iv Chapter VI. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS LITERATURE CITED . . . , ~ ~ ~ . 26 47 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Effect of formaldehyde (conc. 0. 005 ml/L) with subsequent heat treatment (50 C...

Ali, Md. Razzak

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Impact of Alternative Fuels on Emissions Characteristics of a Gas Turbine Engine – Part 1: Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact of Alternative Fuels on Emissions Characteristics of a Gas Turbine Engine – Part 1: Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions ... † Center of Excellence for Aerospace Particulate Emissions Reduction Research, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409, United States ... Growing concern over emissions from increased airport operations has resulted in a need to assess the impact of aviation related activities on local air quality in and around airports, and to develop strategies to mitigate these effects. ...

Prem Lobo; Lucas Rye; Paul I. Williams; Simon Christie; Ilona Uryga-Bugajska; Christopher W. Wilson; Donald E. Hagen; Philip D. Whitefield; Simon Blakey; Hugh Coe; David Raper; Mohamed Pourkashanian

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hierarchical 3D diffusion wavelet shape priors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we propose a novel representation of prior knowledge for image segmentation, using diffusion wavelets that can reflect arbitrary continuous interdependencies in shape data. The application of diffusion ...

Langs, Georg

318

Efficient Stochastic Galerkin Methods For Random Diffusion ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss in this paper simulations of diffusion problems ... With PC/gPC serving as a complete basis to represent random processes, a stochastic Galerkin ... coupled diffusion equations, which can be readily written in a vector/

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

319

MICROFLUIDIC CONTROL OF STEM CELL DIFFUSIBLE SIGNALING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICROFLUIDIC CONTROL OF STEM CELL DIFFUSIBLE SIGNALING Katarina Blagovi, Lily Y. Kim, Alison M cell differentiation. KEYWORDS: Embryonic stem cells, microfluidic perfusion, diffusible signaling; they secrete molecules to which they respond. Microfluidics offers a potential solution to this challenge

Voldman, Joel

320

Diffusion stability of bubbles in a cluster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The diffusion stability of gas bubbles in one-fraction and two-fraction clusters ... gas concentrations in the liquid at which the bubble tends to one of two equilibrium states because of diffusion processes betw...

É. Sh. Nasibullaeva; I. Sh. Akhatov

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN UO2-x  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ K.C. K:i.m, "Oxygen Diffusion in Hypostoichiometricsystem for enriching uo 2 in oxygen-18 or for stoichiometry+nal of Nuclear Materials OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN U0 2 _:x K.C.

Kim, K.C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

PAndAS IN THE MIST: THE STELLAR AND GASEOUS MASS WITHIN THE HALOS OF M31 AND M33  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale surveys of the prominent members of the Local Group have provided compelling evidence for the hierarchical formation of massive galaxies, revealing a wealth of substructure that is thought to be the debris from ancient and ongoing accretion events. In this paper, we compare two extant surveys of the M31-M33 subgroup of galaxies: the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey of the stellar structure, and a combination of observations of the H I gaseous content, detected at 21 cm. Our key finding is a marked lack of spatial correlation between these two components on all scales, with only a few potential overlaps between stars and gas. The paucity of spatial correlation significantly restricts the analysis of kinematic correlations, although there does appear to be H I kinematically associated with the Giant Stellar Stream where it passes the disk of M31. These results demonstrate that different processes must significantly influence the dynamical evolution of the stellar and H I components of substructures, such as ram pressure driving gas away from a purely gravitational path. Detailed modeling of the offset between the stellar and gaseous substructures will provide a determination of the properties of the gaseous halos of M31 and M33.

Lewis, Geraint F. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)] [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Braun, Robert [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); McConnachie, Alan W. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)] [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Irwin, Michael J.; Chapman, Scott C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Martin, Nicolas F. [Observatoire de Strasbourg, 11, rue de l'Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France)] [Observatoire de Strasbourg, 11, rue de l'Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Fardal, Mark [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Dubinski, John [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George Street, University of Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George Street, University of Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Widrow, Larry [Department of Physics, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Mackey, A. Dougal [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)] [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Babul, Arif [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Tanvir, Nial R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Rich, Michael, E-mail: geraint.lewis@sydney.edu.au [Division of Astronomy, University of California, 8979 Math Sciences, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)] [Division of Astronomy, University of California, 8979 Math Sciences, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

323

Summary and Outlook of the International Workshop on Aging Phenomena in Gaseous Detectors (DESY, Hamburg, October, 2001)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Energy Physics experiments are currently entering a new era which requires the operation of gaseous particle detectors at unprecedented high rates and integrated particle fluxes. Full functionality of such detectors over the lifetime of an experiment in a harsh radiation environment is of prime concern to the involved experimenters. New classes of gaseous detectors such as large-scale straw-type detectors, Micro-pattern Gas Detectors and related detector types with their own specific aging effects have evolved since the first workshop on wire chamber aging was held at LBL, Berkeley in 1986. In light of these developments and as detector aging is a notoriously complex field, the goal of the workshop was to provide a forum for interested experimentalists to review the progress in understanding of aging effects and to exchange recent experiences. A brief summary of the main results and experiences reported at the 2001 workshop is presented, with the goal of providing a systematic review of aging effects in state-of-the-art and future gaseous detectors.

M. Titov; M. Hohlmann; C. Padilla; N. Tesch

2002-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

324

Levels of the Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) are altered in the prenatal restrain stress mouse model of schizophrenia and are differentially regulated by the mGlu2/3 receptor agonists, LY379268 and LY354740  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract LY379268 and LY354740, two agonists of mGlu2/3 metabotropic glutamate receptors, display different potencies in mouse models of schizophrenia. This differential effect of the two drugs remains unexplained. We performed a proteomic analysis in cultured cortical neurons challenged with either LY379268 or LY354740. Among the few proteins that were differentially influenced by the two drugs, Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor-? (Rab GDI?) was down-regulated by LY379268 and showed a trend to an up-regulation in response to LY354740. In cultured hippocampal neurons, LY379268 selectively down-regulated the ? isoform of Rab GDI. Rab GDI inhibits the activity of the synaptic vesicle-associated protein, Rab3A, and is reduced in the brain of schizophrenic patients. We examined the expression of Rab GDI in mice exposed to prenatal stress (“PRS mice”), which have been described as a putative model of schizophrenia. Rab GDI? protein levels were increased in the hippocampus of PRS mice at postnatal days (PND)1 and 21, but not at PND60. At PND21, PRS mice also showed a reduced depolarization-evoked [3H]d-aspartate release in hippocampal synaptosomes. The increase in Rab GDI? levels in the hippocampus of PRS mice was reversed by a 7-days treatment with LY379268 (1 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.), but not by treatment with equal doses of LY354740. These data strengthen the validity of PRS mice as a model of schizophrenia, and show for the first time a pharmacodynamic difference between LY379268 and LY354740 which might be taken into account in an attempt to explain the differential effect of the two drugs across mouse models.

Rosamaria Orlando; Marina Borro; Marta Motolese; Gemma Molinaro; Sergio Scaccianoce; Alessandra Caruso; Luigi di Nuzzo; Filippo Caraci; Francesco Matrisciano; Anna Pittaluga; Jerome Mairesse; Maurizio Simmaco; Robert Nisticò; James A. Monn; Ferdinando Nicoletti

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Heat Hyperbolic Diffusion in Planck Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we investigate the diffusion of the thermal pulse in Planck Gas. We show that the Fourier diffusion equation gives the speed of diffusion, v > c and breaks the causality of the thermal processes in Planck gas .For hyperbolic heat transport v

Miroslaw Kozlowski; Janina Marciak-Kozlowska

2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

326

Gravitational waves, diffusion and decoherence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quite different behaviors exhibited by microscopic and macroscopic systems with respect to quantum interferences suggest that there may exist a naturally frontier between quantum and classical worlds. The value of the Planck mass (22$\\mu$g) may lead to the idea of a connection between this borderline and intrinsic fluctuations of spacetime. We show that it is possible to obtain quantitative answers to these questions by studying the diffusion and decoherence mechanisms induced on quantum systems by gravitational waves generated at the galactic or cosmic scales. We prove that this universal fluctuating environment strongly affects quantum interferences on macroscopic systems, while leaving essentially untouched those on microscopic systems. We obtain the relevant parameters which, besides the ratio of the system's mass to Planck mass, characterize the diffusion constant and decoherence time. We discuss the feasibility of experiments aiming at observing these effects in the context of ongoing progress towar...

Reynaud, Serge; Jaekel, Marc-Thierry

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Nanoparticle Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations show that nanoparticle (NP) diffusivity in weakly interacting mixtures of NPs and polymer melts has two very different classes of behavior depending on their size. NP relaxation times and their diffusivities are completely described by the local, Rouse dynamics of the polymer chains for NPs smaller than the polymer entanglement mesh size. The motion of larger NPs, which are comparable to the entanglement mesh size, is significantly slowed by chain entanglements, and is not describable by the Stokes-Einstein relationship. Our results are in essentially quantitative agreement with a force-level generalized Langevin equation theory for all the NP sizes and chain lengths explored, and imply that for these lightly entangled systems, activated NP hopping is not important.

Jagannathan T. Kalathi; Umi Yamamoto; Kenneth S. Schweizer; Gary S. Grest; Sanat K. Kumar

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

328

Determination of effective water vapor diffusion coefficient in pemfc gas diffusion layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

route from the cathode catalyst layer to the cathode flow channels. Water can be removed from the cellDetermination of effective water vapor diffusion coefficient in pemfc gas diffusion layers Jacob M: Water vapor diffusion PEMFC Water management GDL Diffusivity MPL a b s t r a c t The primary removal

Kandlikar, Satish

329

Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays from Centaurus A: Jet Interaction with Gaseous Shells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), with energies above ~6 x 10^19 eV, seem to show a weak correlation with the distribution of matter relatively near to us in the universe. It has earlier been proposed that UHECRs could be accelerated in either the nucleus or the outer lobes of the nearby radio galaxy Cen A. We show that UHECR production at a spatially intermediate location about 15 kpc northeast from the nucleus, where the jet emerging from the nucleus is observed to strike a large star-forming shell of gas, is a plausible alternative. A relativistic jet is capable of accelerating lower-energy heavy seed cosmic rays (CRs) to UHECRs on timescales comparable to the time it takes the jet to pierce the large gaseous cloud. In this model many CRs arising from a starburst, with a composition enhanced in heavy elements near the knee region around PeV, are boosted to ultra-high energies by the relativistic shock of a newly oriented jet. This model matches the overall spectrum shown by the Auger data and also makes a prediction for the chemical composition as a function of particle energy. We thus predict an observable anisotropy in the composition at high energy in the sense that lighter nuclei should preferentially be seen toward the general direction of Cen A. Taking into consideration the magnetic field models for the Galactic disk and a Galactic magnetic wind, this scenario may resolve the discrepancy between HiRes and Auger results concerning the chemical composition of UHECRs.

Gopal-Krishna; Peter L. Biermann; Vitor de Souza; Paul J. Wiita

2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

330

Modifying woody plants for efficient conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Short Rotation Woody Crop Program (SRWCP), Department of Energy, is developing woody plant species as sources of renewable energy. Much progress has been made in identifying useful species, and testing site adaptability, stand densities, coppicing abilities, rotation lengths, and harvesting systems. Conventional plant breeding and intensive cultural practices have been used to increase above-ground biomass yields. Given these and foreseeable accomplishments, program leaders are now shifting attention to prospects for altering biomass physical and chemical characteristics, and to ways for improving the efficiency with which biomass can be converted to gaseous and liquid fuels. This report provides a review and synthesis of literature concerning the quantity and quality of such characteristics and constituents, and opportunities for manipulating them via conventional selection and breeding and/or molecular biology. Species now used by SRWCP are emphasized, with supporting information drawn from others as needed. Little information was found on silver maple (Acer saccharinum), but general comparisons (Isenberg 1981) suggest composition and behavior similar to those of the other species. Where possible, conclusions concerning means for and feasibility of manipulation are given, along with expected impacts on conversion efficiency. Information is also provided on relationships to other traits, genotype X environment interactions, and potential trade-offs or limitations. Biomass productivity per se is not addressed, except in terms of effects that may by caused by changes in constituent quality and/or quantity. Such effects are noted to the extent they are known or can be estimated. Likely impacts of changes, however effected, on suitability or other uses, e.g., pulp and paper manufacture, are notes. 311 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Dinus, R.J.; Dimmel, D.R.; Feirer, R.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Malcolm, E.W. (Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

An asixymmetric diffusion experiment for the determination of diffusion and sorption coefficients of rock samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffusion anisotropy is a critical property in predicting migration of substances in sedimentary formations with very low permeability. The diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks has been evaluated mainly from laboratory diffusion experiments, in which the directional diffusivities are separately estimated by through-diffusion experiments using different rock samples, or concurrently by in-diffusion experiments in which only the tracer profile in a rock block is measured. To estimate the diffusion anisotropy from a single rock sample, this study proposes an axisymmetric diffusion test, in which tracer diffuses between a cylindrical rock sample and a surrounding solution reservoir. The tracer diffusion between the sample and reservoir can be monitored from the reservoir tracer concentrations, and the tracer profile could also be obtained after dismantling the sample. Semi-analytical solutions are derived for tracer concentrations in both the reservoir and sample, accounting for an anisotropic diffusion tensor of rank two as well as the dilution effects from sampling and replacement of reservoir solution. The transient and steady-state analyses were examined experimentally and numerically for different experimental configurations, but without the need for tracer profiling. These experimental configurations are tested for in- and out-diffusion experiments using Koetoi and Wakkanai mudstones and Shirahama sandstone, and are scrutinized by a numerical approach to identify favorable conditions for parameter estimation. The analysis reveals the difficulty in estimating diffusion anisotropy; test configurations are proposed for enhanced identifiability of diffusion anisotropy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the axisymmetric diffusion test is efficient in obtaining the sorption parameter from both steady-state and transient data, and in determining the effective diffusion coefficient if isotropic diffusion is assumed. Moreover, measuring reservoir concentrations in an axisymmetric diffusion experiment coupled with tracer profiling may be a promising approach to estimate of diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks.

Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.; Finsterle, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Gaseous fission product management for molten salt reactors and vented fuel systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fission gas disposal is one of the unresolved difficulties for Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs) and advanced reactors with vented fuel systems. As these systems operate, they produce many radioactive isotopes of xenon and krypton (e.g. {sup 135}Xe t{sub 1/2} = 9.14 hours and {sup 85}Kr t{sub 1/2}= 10.73 years). Removing these gases proves vital to the success of such reactor designs for two reasons. First, the gases act as large neutron sinks which decrease reactivity and must be counterbalanced by increasing fuel loading. Second, for MSRs, inert fission product gases naturally separate quickly from high temperature salts, thus creating high vapor pressure which poses safety concerns. For advanced reactors with solid vented fuel, the gases are allowed to escape into an off-gas system and thus must be managed. Because of time delays in transport of fission product gases in vented fuel systems, some of the shorter-lived radionuclides will decay away thereby reducing the fission gas source term relative to an MSR. To calculate the fission gas source term of a typical molten salt reactor, we modeled a 1000 MWe graphite moderated thorium MSR similar to that detailed in Mathieu et al. [1]. The fuel salt used in these calculations was LiF (78 mole percent) - (HN)F 4 (22 mole percent) with a heavy nuclide composition of 3.86% {sup 233}U and 96.14% {sup 232}Th by mass. Before we can remove the fission product gases produced by this reactor configuration, we must first develop an appropriate storage mechanism. The gases could be stored in pressurized containers but then one must be concerned about bottle failure. Methods to trap noble gases in matrices are expensive and complex. Alternatively, there are direct storage/disposal options: direct injection into the Earth or injecting a grout-based product into the Earth. Advances in drilling technologies, hydro fracture technologies, and methods for the sequestration of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel plants are creating new options for disposal of fission gas wastes. In each option, lithostatic pressure, a kilometer or more underground, eliminates the pressure driving force for noble gas release and dissolves any untrapped gas in deep groundwater or into incorporated solid waste forms. The options, challenges, and potential for these methods to dispose of gaseous fission products are described. With this research, we hope to help both MSRs and other advanced reactors come one step closer to commercialization. (authors)

Messenger, S. J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 54-1717, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 24-207, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Massie, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., NW12-230, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to obtain results from a given sample collection. The destructive assay instrument, LAARS-destructive assay (DA), uses a simple purpose-built fixture with a sampling planchet to collect adsorbed UF6 gas from a cylinder valve or from a process line tap or pigtail. A portable LAARS-DA instrument scans the microgram quantity of uranium collected on the planchet and the assay of the uranium is measured to ~0.15% relative precision. Currently, destructive assay samples for bias defect measurements are collected in small sample cylinders for offsite mass spectrometry measurement.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Phillips, Jon R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Binary black hole mergers in gaseous environments: 'Binary Bondi' and 'binary Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton' accretion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Merging supermassive black hole-black hole binaries produced in galaxy mergers are promising sources of detectable gravitational waves. If such a merger takes place in a gaseous environment, there is a possibility of a simultaneous detection of electromagnetic and gravitational radiation, as the stirring, shock heating, and accretion of the gas may produce variability and enhancements in the electromagnetic flux. Such a simultaneous detection can provide a wealth of opportunities to study gravitational physics, accretion physics, and cosmology. We investigate this scenario by performing fully general-relativistic, hydrodynamic simulations of merging, equal-mass, nonspinning black hole-black hole binaries embedded in gas clouds. We evolve the metric using the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura formulation with standard moving puncture gauge conditions and handle the hydrodynamics via a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme. We consider both 'binary Bondi accretion' in which the binary is at rest relative to the ambient gas cloud, as well as 'binary Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion' in which the binary moves relative to the gas cloud. The gas cloud is assumed to be homogeneous far from the binary and governed by a {Gamma}-law equation of state. We vary {Gamma} between 4/3 and 5/3. For each simulation, we compute the gas flow and accretion rate and estimate the electromagnetic luminosity due to bremsstrahlung and synchrotron emission. We find evidence for significant enhancements in both the accretion rate and luminosity over values for a single black hole of the same mass as the binary. We estimate that this luminosity enhancement should be detectable by the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope for a 10{sup 6}M{sub {center_dot}}binary in a hot gas cloud of density n{approx}10 cm{sup -3} and temperature T{approx}10{sup 6} K at z=1, reaching a maximum of L{approx}3x10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, with the emission peaking in the visible band, and lasting for {approx}1 hour.

Farris, Brian D.; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Design of an Unattended Environmental Aerosol Sampling and Analysis System for Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The resources of the IAEA continue to be challenged by the rapid, worldwide expansion of nuclear energy production. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) represent an especially formidable dilemma to the application of safeguard measures, as the size and enrichment capacity of GCEPs continue to escalate. During the early part of the 1990's, the IAEA began to lay the foundation to strengthen and make cost-effective its future safeguard regime. Measures under Part II of 'Programme 93+2' specifically sanctioned access to nuclear fuel production facilities and environmental sampling by IAEA inspectors. Today, the Additional Protocol grants inspection and environmental sample collection authority to IAEA inspectors at GCEPs during announced and low frequency unannounced (LFUA) inspections. During inspections, IAEA inspectors collect environmental swipe samples that are then shipped offsite to an analytical laboratory for enrichment assay. This approach has proven to be an effective deterrence to GCEP misuse, but this method has never achieved the timeliness of detection goals set forth by IAEA. Furthermore it is questionable whether the IAEA will have the resources to even maintain pace with the expansive production capacity of the modern GCEP, let alone improve the timeliness in reaching current safeguards conclusions. New safeguards propositions, outside of familiar mainstream safeguard measures, may therefore be required that counteract the changing landscape of nuclear energy fuel production. A new concept is proposed that offers rapid, cost effective GCEP misuse detection, without increasing LFUA inspection access or introducing intrusive access demands on GCEP operations. Our approach is based on continuous onsite aerosol collection and laser enrichment analysis. This approach mitigates many of the constraints imposed by the LFUA protocol, reduces the demand for onsite sample collection and offsite analysis, and overcomes current limitations associated with the in-facility misuse detection devices. Onsite environmental sample collection offers the ability to collect fleeting uranium hexafluoride emissions before they are lost to the ventilation system or before they disperse throughout the facility, to become deposited onto surfaces that are contaminated with background and historical production material. Onsite aerosol sample collection, combined with enrichment analysis, provides the unique ability to quickly detect stepwise enrichment level changes within the facility, leading to a significant strengthening of facility misuse deterence. We report in this paper our study of several GCEP environmental sample release scenarios and simulation results of a newly designed aerosol collection and particle capture system that is fully integrated with the Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) uranium particle enrichment analysis instrument that was developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Anheier, Norman C.; Munley, John T.; Alexander, M. L.

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

336

Method of preparing and utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a method of utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream with a mitigation of carbon accumulation. The system is comprised of a catalytically active phase deposited onto an oxygen conducting phase, with or without supplemental support. The catalytically active phase has a specified crystal structure where at least one catalytically active metal is a cation within the crystal structure and coordinated with oxygen atoms within the crystal structure. The catalyst system employs an optimum coverage ratio for a given set of oxidation conditions, based on a specified hydrocarbon conversion and a carbon deposition limit. Specific embodiments of the catalyst system are disclosed.

Berry, David A; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Smith, Mark; Haynes, Daniel

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

Copper diffusion in single-crystal ?-Zr  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tracer diffusion of Cu64 in ?-Zr single crystals has been measured in the temperature range (615-860)°C. The temperature dependences of the Cu64 diffusion coefficients in directions parallel to and perpendicular to the c axis are given by D?=0.40e-1.54 eVkT and D?=0.25e-1.60 eVkT cm2/sec, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of an interstitial diffusion mechanism.

G. M. Hood and R. J. Schultz

1975-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Characterizing unsaturated diffusion in porous tuff gravel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of solute diffusion in unsaturated porous gravel is very important for investigations of contaminant transport and remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (for example, the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). For a porous aggregate medium such as granular tuff, the total water content is comprised of surface water and interior water. The surface water component (water film around grains and pendular water between the grain contacts) could serve as a predominant diffusion pathway. To investigate the extent to which surface water films and contact points affect solute diffusion in unsaturated gravel, we examined the configuration of water using x-ray computed tomography in partially saturated gravel, and made quantitative measurements of diffusion at multiple water contents using two different techniques. In the first, diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride in 2-4 mm granular tuff at multiple water contents were calculated from electrical conductivity measurements using the Nernst-Einstein equation. In the second, we used laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to perform micro-scale mapping, allowing the measurement of diffusion coefficients for a mixture of chemical tracers for tuff cubes and tetrahedrons having two contact geometries (cube-cube and cube-tetrahedron). The x-ray computed tomography images show limited contact between grains, and this could hinder the pathways for diffusive transport. Experimental results show the critical role of surface water in controlling transport pathways and hence the magnitude of diffusion. Even with a bulk volumetric water content of 1.5%, the measured solute diffusion coefficient is as low as 1.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s for tuff gravel. Currently used diffusion models relating diffusion coefficients to total volumetric water content inadequately describe unsaturated diffusion behavior in porous gravel at very low water contents.

Hu, Qinhong; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Wang, Joseph, S.Y.

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

339

Diffusion in Porous Catalysts and Adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diffusion in Porous Catalysts and Adsorbents ... Single industrial adsorbent pellets of zeolites 5A and 13X were mounted with a polymer capable of withstanding high temperatures. ...

Jan Hoogschagen

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Self-Similar Modes of Coherent Diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-similar solutions of the coherent diffusion equation are derived and measured. The set of real similarity solutions is generalized by the introduction of a nonuniform phase surface, based on the elegant Gaussian modes of optical diffraction. In an experiment of light storage in a gas of diffusing atoms, a complex initial condition is imprinted, and its diffusion dynamics is monitored. The self-similarity of both the amplitude and the phase pattern is demonstrated, and an algebraic decay associated with the mode order is measured. Notably, as opposed to a regular diffusion spreading, a self-similar contraction of a special subset of the solutions is predicted and observed.

O. Firstenberg; P. London; D. Yankelev; R. Pugatch; M. Shuker; N. Davidson

2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Pipe diffusion at dislocations in UO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the fuel grain. Dislo- cations may also provide pathways for enhanced diffusion of fis- sion products, in particular, dislocations pinned to fission product precipitates may...

342

The Diffusion of GIS in Journalism.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purposes of this study were to determine the likelihood of reporters to adopt Geographical Information Systems and to predict the future of the diffusion… (more)

Wasike, Ben S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Diffuse Irradiance Study Planned for October  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

installed at the SGP CART site near Lamont, Oklahoma. The instruments measuring diffuse solar radiation have black sphere-shaped shades to keep direct sunlight from reaching the...

344

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband diffuse downwelling...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

: Shortwave narrowband diffuse downwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 mum, that has been...

345

Fully nonlinear equations for nonlocal diffusions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in collaboration with Luis Silvestre, we developed the parallel theory in the case of discontinuous (Levy type) diffusion. I plan to present the main steps.

2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

346

3D MHD Modeling of the Gaseous Structure of the Galaxy: Synthetic Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We generated synthetic observations from the four-arm model presented in Gomez & Cox (2004) for the Galactic ISM in the presence of a spiral gravitational perturbation. We found that velocity crowding and diffusion have a strong effect in the l-v diagram. The v-b diagram presents structures at the expected spiral arm velocities, that can be explained by the off-the-plane structure of the arms presented in previous papers of this series. Such structures are observed in the Leiden/Dwingeloo HI survey. The rotation curve, as measured from the inside of the modeled galaxy, shows similarities with the observed one for the Milky Way Galaxy, although it has large deviations from the smooth circular rotation corresponding to the background potential. The magnetic field inferred from a synthetic synchrotron map shows a largely circular structure, but with interesting deviations in the midplane due to distortion of the field from circularity in the interarm regions.

Gómez, G C; Gomez, Gilberto C.; Cox, Donald P.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

3D MHD Modeling of the Gaseous Structure of the Galaxy: Synthetic Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We generated synthetic observations from the four-arm model presented in Gomez & Cox (2004) for the Galactic ISM in the presence of a spiral gravitational perturbation. We found that velocity crowding and diffusion have a strong effect in the l-v diagram. The v-b diagram presents structures at the expected spiral arm velocities, that can be explained by the off-the-plane structure of the arms presented in previous papers of this series. Such structures are observed in the Leiden/Dwingeloo HI survey. The rotation curve, as measured from the inside of the modeled galaxy, shows similarities with the observed one for the Milky Way Galaxy, although it has large deviations from the smooth circular rotation corresponding to the background potential. The magnetic field inferred from a synthetic synchrotron map shows a largely circular structure, but with interesting deviations in the midplane due to distortion of the field from circularity in the interarm regions.

Gilberto C. Gomez; Donald P. Cox

2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) apparatus for nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D. A.; Velsko, C. A.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Yeamans, C. B.; Moody, K. J.; Tereshatov, E.; Stoeffl, W.; Riddle, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-236, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Performance of a low-cost iron ore as an oxygen carrier for Chemical Looping Combustion of gaseous fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work evaluates the performance of an iron ore, mainly composed of Fe2O3, as an oxygen carrier (OC) for Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) with gaseous fuels. The OC was characterized by TGA and evaluated in a continuous 500 Wth CLC unit, using CH4, syngas and a PSA off-gas as fuels. The OC was able to fully convert syngas at 880 °C. However, lower conversion rates were observed with methane-containing fuels. The addition of a Ni-based OC was evaluated in order to increase the reactivity of the OC with methane. In spite of this, an absence of catalytic effect was observed for the Ni-based OC. A deep analysis was carried out into the reasons for the absence of catalytic effect of the Ni-based OC. The performance of the iron ore with regard to attrition and fluidization behaviour was satisfactory throughout 50 h of hot operation in the continuous CLC plant. Thus, this low cost material is a suitable OC for gaseous fuels mainly composed of H2 and CO.

Miguel A. Pans; Pilar Gayán; Luis F. de Diego; Francisco García-Labiano; Alberto Abad; Juan Adánez.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Detection of the primary scintillation light from dense Ar, Kr and Xe with novel photosensitive gaseous detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection of primary scintillation light in combination with the charge or secondary scintillation signals is an efficient technique to determine the events t=0 as well as particle / photon separation in large mass TPC detectors filled with noble gases and/or condensed noble gases. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that costly photo-multipliers could be replaced by cheap novel photosensitive gaseous detectors: wire counters, GEMs or glass capillary tubes coupled with CsI photocathodes. We have performed systematic measurements with Ar, Kr and Xe gas at pressures in the range of 1-50 atm as well as some preliminary measurements with liquid Xe and liquid Ar. With the gaseous detectors we succeeded in detecting scintillation light produced by 22 keV X-rays with an efficiency of close to 100%. We also detected the scintillation light produced by bs (5 keV deposit energy) with an efficiency close to 25%. Successful detection of scintillation from 22 keV gammas open new experimental possibilities not only ...

Periale, L; Carlson, P J; Francke, T; Pavlopoulos, P; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Modelling international wind energy diffusion: Are the patterns of induced diffusion `S'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling international wind energy diffusion: Are the patterns of induced diffusion `S' shaped datasets, the paper explores the patterns of international wind energy diffusion in OECD countries. The model employed in the paper predicted that wind energy, as a complex and expensive innovation, would

Feigon, Brooke

352

Neoclassical diffusion in a turbulent plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work describes a new approach to plasma transport where the toroidal drift motion is considered as a perturbation to the fluctuating velocity. Percolation theory is used to determine the scaling of the diffusion coefficient. Several neoclassical phenomena should persist even when diffusion is enhanced from neoclassical predictions. Numerical simulation results support the theoretical scaling arguments.

Yushmanov, P. [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol`zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow (USSR). Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii]|[Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

ANISOTROPIC DIFFUSION USING POWER WATERSHEDS Camille Couprie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimal methods such as graph cuts have received a lot of attention. However not all problems in com are able to optimize this energy quickly and effectively. This study paves the way for using the power and the diffusion time. Practical usage of anisotropic diffusion requires a choice between long compu- tation times

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

354

Diffusive limit for the random Lorentz gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some recent results concerning the derivation of the diffusion equation and the validation of Fick's law for the microscopic model given by the random Lorentz Gas. These results are achieved by using a linear kinetic equation as an intermediate level of description between our original mechanical system and the diffusion equation.

Alessia Nota

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

355

Nuclear diffuseness as a degree of freedom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The response of the nuclear energy to changes in neutron and proton surface diffusenesses is investigated using the Thomas-Fermi model. Algebraic expressions are provided for the energy cost of changing the two diffusenesses away from their equilibrium values. This will make it possible to generalize the macroscopic-microscopic calculations of nuclear masses and deformation energies by the inclusion of the neutron and proton diffusenesses as degrees of freedom (to be varied along with the shape degrees of freedom). One result, which is suggested by the relatively low cost in macroscopic energy of increasing the diffuseness of a heavy nucleus by 10% (about 4 MeV), is that superheavy nuclei near Z=126,?N=184 may have a fair chance of becoming stabilized by shell effects. An appendix introduces an improved measure of surface diffuseness, with certain advantages over the conventional Süssmann width b.

W. D. Myers and W. J. ?wia?tecki

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Laser utilizing a gaseous lasing medium and method for operating the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to an improvement in gas lasers and a method of operating the same. In one aspect, the invention is an improved method for operating a high-power gas laser. The improvement comprises introducing the gas lasing medium tangentially to the laser tube at a pressure establishing a forced vortex in the tube. The vortex defines an axially extending core region characterized by a low pressure and temperature relative to the gas inlet and the exterior of the vortex. An electrical discharge is established in the core region to initiate lasing of the gas. The gas discharge from the tube is passed through a diffuser. As in conventional gas lasers, firing results in a very abrupt increase in gas temperature and in severe disruption of the gas. However, the gas vortex almost immediately restores the gas to its pre-firing condition. That is, almost all of the waste heat is transferred radially to the laser wall, and the original gas-flow pattern is restored. As a result, the power output of the laser is increased significantly, and the laser firing repetition rate is markedly increased.

Zerr, Bruce A. (Harriman, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Optoelectronic switches based on diffusive conduction Hilmi Volkan Demira  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optoelectronic switches based on diffusive conduction Hilmi Volkan Demira and Fatih Hakan Koklu the process of diffusive conduction that we use in our optoelectronic switches to achieve rapid optical. We demonstrate the feasibility of using such diffusive conductive optoelectronic switches

Miller, David A. B.

358

On the Combustion of Hydrogen-Rich Gaseous Fuels with Low Calorific Value in a Porous Burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It was also observed that, for the Wobbe Index varying from 5 to 44 MJ/Nm3, it is possible to burn stably at ?260 kW/m2, which reveals the fuel interchangeability potential of the present burner design. ... A range of low calorific value gaseous fuel mixtures containing CH4, H2, CO2, CO, and N2 have been burned in a porous radiant burner to analyze the effects of the fuel composition on flame stability and pollutant emissions. ... There are, however, gaps in the fundamental understanding of syngas combustion and emissions, as most previous research has focused on flames burning individual fuel components such as H2 and CH4, rather than syngas mixts. ...

R. W. Francisco, Jr.; F. Rua; M. Costa; R. C. Catapan; A. A. M. Oliveira

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

Gaseous Mean Opacities for Giant Planet and Ultracool Dwarf Atmospheres over a Range of Metallicities and Temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new calculations of Rosseland and Planck gaseous mean opacities relevant to the atmospheres of giant planets and ultracool dwarfs. Such calculations are used in modeling the atmospheres, interiors, formation, and evolution of these objects. Our calculations are an expansion of those presented in Freedman et al. (2008) to include lower pressures, finer temperature resolution, and also the higher metallicities most relevant for giant planet atmospheres. Calculations span 1 microbar to 300 bar, and 75 K to 4000 K, in a nearly square grid. Opacities at metallicities from solar to 50 times solar abundances are calculated. We also provide an analytic fit to the Rosseland mean opacities over the grid in pressure, temperature, and metallicity. In addition to computing mean opacities at these local temperatures, we also calculate them with weighting functions up to 7000 K, to simulate the mean opacities for incident stellar intensities, rather than locally thermally emitted intensities. The chemical equilib...

Freedman, Richard S; Fortney, Jonathan J; Lupu, Roxana E; Marley, Mark S; Lodders, Katharina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Heavy quark diffusion from the lattice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the diffusion of heavy quarks in the quark gluon plasma using the Langevin equations of motion and estimate the contribution of the transport peak to the Euclidean current-current correlator. We show that the Euclidean correlator is remarkably insensitive to the heavy quark diffusion coefficient and give a physical interpretation of this result using the free streaming Boltzmann equation. However if the diffusion coefficient is smaller than {approx}1/({pi}T), as favored by RHIC phenomenology, the transport contribution should be visible in the Euclidean correlator. We outline a procedure to isolate this contribution.

Petreczky, Peter; Teaney, Derek [Nuclear Theory Group, Department of Physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11764 (United States)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Determinants of intranet diffusion and infusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercial interest in Internet technology has grown tremendously in the last decade. Until now, little research has been devoted to examining the internal deployment of Internet technology. The present study focuses on the implementation process of intranets by examining factors associated with its diffusion and infusion in organizations. Findings suggest that earliness of adoption, top management support, and organizational size are positively associated with intranet diffusion. Intranet infusion is positively associated with earliness of adoption, top management support, and IT infrastructure flexibility, and these effects are mediated by intranet diffusion. Implications for management and suggestions for further research are discussed.

Lauren B. Eder; Magid Igbaria

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Diffusive Accumulation of Methane Bubbles in Seabed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider seabed bearing methane bubbles. In the absence of fractures the bubbles are immovably trapped in a porous matrix by surface tension forces; therefore the dominant mechanism of transfer of gas mass becomes the diffusion of gas molecules through the liquid. The adequate description of this process requires accounting "other-than-normal" (non-Fickian) diffusion effects, thermodiffusion and gravity action. We evaluate the diffusive flux of aqueous methane and predict the possibility of existence of bubble mass accumulation zones (which can appear independently from the presence/absence of hydrate stability zone) and effect of non-Fickian drift on the capacity of shallow and deep methane-hydrate deposits.

Goldobin, D S; Levesley, J; Lovell, M A; Rochelle, C A; Jackson, P; Haywood, A; Hunter, S; Rees, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Detection of illicit HEU production in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants using neutron counting techniques on product cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Innovative and novel safeguards approaches are needed for nuclear energy to meet global energy needs without the threat of nuclear weapons proliferation. Part of these efforts will include creating verification techniques that can monitor uranium enrichment facilities for illicit production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU). Passive nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques will be critical in preventing illicit HEU production because NDA offers the possibility of continuous and unattended monitoring capabilities with limited impact on facility operations. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) are commonly used to produce low-enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel. In a GCEP, gaseous UF{sub 6} spins at high velocities in centrifuges to separate the molecules containing {sup 238}U from those containing the lighter {sup 235}U. Unfortunately, the process for creating LEU is inherently the same as HEU, creating a proliferation concern. Insuring that GCEPs are producing declared enrichments poses many difficult challenges. In a GCEP, large cascade halls operating thousands of centrifuges work together to enrich the uranium which makes effective monitoring of the cascade hall economically prohibitive and invasive to plant operations. However, the enriched uranium exiting the cascade hall fills product cylinders where the UF{sub 6} gas sublimes and condenses for easier storage and transportation. These product cylinders hold large quantities of enriched uranium, offering a strong signal for NDA measurement. Neutrons have a large penetrability through materials making their use advantageous compared to gamma techniques where the signal is easily attenuated. One proposed technique for detecting HEU production in a GCEP is using neutron coincidence counting at the product cylinder take off stations. This paper discusses findings from Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code simulations that examine the feasibility of such a detector.

Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid solutions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid solutions of methanol and ethanol at temperatures near the glass Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid...

365

Hydrogen diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate. Hydrogen diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate. Abstract: Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning,...

366

Oxygen Diffusion (OD) Dramatically Improves Wear-Resistance of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Oxygen Diffusion (OD) Dramatically Improves Wear-Resistance of Titanium Oxygen Diffusion (OD) Dramatically Improves Wear-Resistance of Titanium 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency &...

367

Using Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the Glass Transition Temperature. Using Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the Glass Transition Temperature....

368

HILO: Quasi Diffusion Accelerated Monte Carlo on Hybrid Architectures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HILO: Quasi Diffusion Accelerated Monte Carlo on Hybrid Architectures HILO: Quasi Diffusion Accelerated Monte Carlo on Hybrid Architectures The Boltzmann transport equation...

369

International Symposium on Gaseous and Odour Emissions from Animal Production Facilities, Horsens, Jutland, Denmark 1-4 June, 2003 AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM LAYER HOUSES IN IOWA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Symposium on Gaseous and Odour Emissions from Animal Production Facilities, Horsens), hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Among the air contaminants produced in poultry buildings al. (2003). MATERIALS AND METHODS Housing Description and Management Two types of laying hen houses

Kentucky, University of

370

International Symposium on Gaseous and Odour Emissions from Animal Production Facilities, Horsens, Jutland, Denmark 1-4 June, 2003 Ammonia Emissions from Broiler Houses in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Symposium on Gaseous and Odour Emissions from Animal Production Facilities, Horsens, Jutland, Denmark 1-4 June, 2003 1 Ammonia Emissions from Broiler Houses in Pennsylvania During Cold of reducing ammonia (NH3) emissions are under study. Ammonia emissions during cold weather conditions from

Kentucky, University of

371

Annual book of ASTM Standards 2008. Section Five. Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels. Volume 05.06. Gaseous fuels; coal and coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first part covers standards for gaseous fuels. The second part covers standards on coal and coke including the classification of coals, determination of major elements in coal ash and trace elements in coal, metallurgical properties of coal and coke, methods of analysis of coal and coke, petrogrpahic analysis of coal and coke, physical characteristics of coal, quality assurance and sampling.

NONE

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Annual book of ASTM Standards 2005. Section Five. Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels. Volume 05.06. Gaseous fuels; coal and coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first part covers standards for gaseous fuels. The standard part covers standards on coal and coke including the classification of coals, determination of major elements in coal ash and trace elements in coal, metallurgical properties of coal and coke, methods of analysis of coal and coke, petrographic analysis of coal and coke, physical characteristics of coal, quality assurance and sampling.

NONE

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride National Center for Physics, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest, Romania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L-493 Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride I. Ursu National Center provide a method to determine the presence of 23 5U in liquid uranium hexafluoride. The first proposed on physical properties of uranium hexa- fluoride molecule in the gas phase it is possible to predict [9

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

374

ARM - Field Campaign - Diffuse Shortwave IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsDiffuse Shortwave IOP govCampaignsDiffuse Shortwave IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Diffuse Shortwave IOP 2001.09.24 - 2001.10.22 Lead Scientist : Joseph Michalsky Data Availability Data will not be available for public viewing until April 8, 2002. All data will be archived at the diffuse IOP web site by that date. For data sets, see below. Summary Almost 4 weeks of data were acquired under mostly sunny skies. Ninety-two percent of the daylight hours had measureable direct beam radiation. Much of the sunny data included completely cloud free conditions. The trackers functioned perfectly. Clear-sky data included low to moderate aerosol cases with no high aerosol conditions sampled. Data recovery from the

375

Diffuser Augmented Wind Turbine Analysis Code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, it is necessary to develop innovative wind capturing devices that can produce energy in the locations where large conventional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) are too impractical to install and operate. A diffuser augmented wind turbine (DAWT) is one...

Carroll, Jonathan

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Diffusion of Innovations over Multiplex Social Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ways in which an innovation (e.g., new behaviour, idea, technology, product) diffuses among people can determine its success or failure. In this paper, we address the problem of diffusion of innovations over multiplex social networks where the neighbours of a person belong to one or multiple networks (or layers) such as friends, families, or colleagues. To this end, we generalise one of the basic game-theoretic diffusion models, called networked coordination game, for multiplex networks. We present analytical results for this extended model and validate them through a simulation study, finding among other properties a lower bound for the success of an innovation.While simple and leading to intuitively understandable results, to the best of our knowledge this is the first extension of a game-theoretic innovation diffusion model for multiplex networks and as such it provides a basic framework to study more sophisticated innovation dynamics.

Ramezanian, Rasoul; Magnani, Matteo; Montesi, Danilo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Diffusion of innovations in social networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While social networks do affect diffusion of innovations, the exact nature of these effects are far from clear, and, in many cases, there exist conflicting hypotheses among researchers. In this paper, we focus on the linear ...

Acemoglu, Daron

378

Diffusion of carbon dioxide (1); propane (2)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document is part of Subvolume A ‘Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures’ of Volume 15 ‘Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes’ of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV ‘Physical Chemistry’. It is part of the ...

J. Winkelmann

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Diffusion of hydrogen (1); propane (2)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document is part of Subvolume A ‘Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures’ of Volume 15 ‘Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes’ of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV ‘Physical Chemistry’. It is part of the ...

J. Winkelmann

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Diffusion Preconditioner for Discontinuous Galerkin Transport Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limits; however, it degrades for high-aspect ratio cells. These properties are typical for partially consistent diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) schemes, and in particular they are exactly the properties of the method that was previously developed...

Barbu, Anthony Petru

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Diffusion Databases for ICME | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ICME Diffusion Databases for ICME 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation lm036warren2011o.pdf More...

382

Time-space fabric underlying anomalous diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study unveils the time-space transforms underlying anomalous diffusion process. Based on this finding, we present the two hypotheses concerning the effect of fractal time-space fabric on physical behaviors and accordingly derive fractional quantum relationships between energy and frequency, momentum and wavenumber which further give rise to fractional Schrodinger equation. As an alternative modeling approach to the standard fractional derivatives, we introduce the concept of the Hausdorff derivative underlying the Hausdorff dimensions of metric spacetime. And in terms of the proposed hypotheses, the Hausdorff derivative is used to derive a linear anomalous transport-diffusion equation underlying anomalous diffusion process. Its Green's function solution turns out to be a new type of stretched Gaussian distribution and is compared with that from the Richardson's diffusion equation.

W Chen

2005-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

383

Electrospray emitters For diffusion vacuum pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Following similar principles as regular diffusion vacuum pumps, an electrospray emitter is set to produce a jet of charged particles that will drag air molecules out of a volume. To be a feasible concept, the emitted ...

Diaz Gómez Maqueo, Pablo (Pablo Ly)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Ising Model of Diffusion in Molecular Sieves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a new analytical theory for activated diffusion in zeolites at finite loadings, including the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. Excellent qualitative agreement is obtained comparing our new theory to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We have applied this theory to benzene diffusion in faujasite, to help resolve discrepancies among different experiments. Our results are in qualitative agreement with pulsed field gradient NMR, and in qualitative disagreement with tracer zero-length column data.

Chandra Saravanan; Fabien Jousse; Scott M. Auerbach

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

385

Diffusive shielding stabilizes bulk nanobubble clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using molecular dynamics, we study the nucleation and stability of bulk nanobubble clusters. We study the formation, growth, and final size of bulk nanobubbles. We find that, as long as the bubble-bubble interspacing is small enough, bulk nanobubbles are stable against dissolution. Simple diffusion calculations provide an excellent match with the simulation results, giving insight into the reason for the stability: nanobubbles in a cluster of bulk nanobubbles "protect" each other from diffusion by a shielding effect.

Weijs, Joost H; Lohse, D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Site Characterization Report ORGDP Diffusion Facilities Permanent Shutdown K-700 Power House and K-27 Switch Yard/Switch House  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K-700 Power House area, initially built to supply power to the K-25 gaseous diffusion plant was shutdown and disassembled in the 1960s. This shutdown was initiated by TVA supplying economical power to the diffusion plant complex. As a result of world wide over production of enriched, reactor grade U{sup 235}, the K-27 switch yard and switch house area was placed in standby in 1985. Subsequently, as the future production requirements decreased, the cost of production increased and the separation technologies for other processes improved, the facility was permanently shutdown in December, 1987. This Site Characterization Report is a part of the FY-88 engineering Feasibility Study for placing ORGDP Gaseous Diffusion Process facilities in 'Permanent Shutdown'. It is sponsored by the Department of Energy through Virgil Lowery of Headquarters--Enrichment and through Don Cox of ORO--Enrichment Operations. The primary purpose of these building or site characterization reports is to document, quantify, and map the following potential problems: Asbestos; PCB containing fluids; Oils, coolants, and chemicals; and External contamination. With the documented quantification of the concerns (problems) the Engineering Feasibility Study will then proceed with examining the potential solutions. For this study, permanent shutdown is defined as the securing and/or conditioning of each facility to provide 20 years of safe service with minimal expenditures and, where feasible, also serving DOE's needs for long-term warehousing or other such low-risk use. The K-700 power house series of buildings were either masonry construction or a mix of masonry and wood. The power generating equipment was removed and sold as salvage in the mid 1960s but the buildings and auxiliary equipment were left intact. The nine ancillary buildings in the power house area use early in the Manhattan Project for special research projects, were left intact minus the original special equipment. During the late 1960s and 1970s, some of the abandoned buildings were used for offices, special projects, and storage. Some of the remaining electrical transformers contain PCBs in concentrations less than 500 ppm. Many of the steam and hot water pipes in the buildings are insulated with asbestos insulation, but none of the equipment or buildings have high counts of surface radioactive contamination. The general conditions of the buildings are from fair to poor. Many should be boarded-up to prevent personnel entry and in some cases demolitions would be the safer alternative.

Thomas R.J., Blanchard R.D.

1988-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

387

The diffusion of mobile telephones: An empirical analysis for Peru  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper models the diffusion of mobile telephone subscriptions in Peru. Peru's mobile telephone diffusion has occurred in a concentrated market with relatively high prices and as such it features consumer behaviors such as call management, multiple ... Keywords: Diffusion forecasting, Gompertz curve, Mobile telephones, Peru, Technology diffusion

Peter Yamakawa; Gareth H. Rees; José Manuel Salas; Nikolai Alva

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

would take place at DOE owned facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky....

389

Determination of oxygen self-diffusion in akermanite, anorthite, diopside, and spinel: Implications for oxygen isotopic anomalies and the thermal histories of Ca-Al-rich inclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen self-diffusion coefficients have been measured for three natural diopsidic clinopyroxenes, a natural anorthite, a synthetic magnesium aluminate spinel, and a synthetic akermanite for oxygen fugacities ranging from the NNO to IW buffers. The oxygen diffusion data are used to evaluate the effects of three different types of thermal histories upon the oxygen isotopic compositions of minerals found in Type B Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIBs) in carbonaceous chondrites: (1) gas-solid exchange during isothermal heating, (2) gas-solid exchange as a function of cooling rate subsequent to instantaneous heating, and (3) isotopic exchange with a gaseous reservoir during partial melting and recrystallization. With the assumptions that the mineral compositions within a CAIB were uniformly enriched in [sup 16]O prior to any thermal processing, that effective diffusion dimensions may be estimated from observed grain sizes, and that diffusion in diopside is similar to that in fassaitic clinopyroxene, none of the above scenarios can reproduce the relative oxygen isotopic anomalies observed in CAIBs without improbably long or unrealistically intense thermal histories relative to current theoretical models of nebular evolution. The failure of these simple models, coupled with recent observations of disturbed magnesium isotopic abundances and correlated petrographic features in anorthite and melilite indicative of alteration and recrystallization, suggests that the oxygen isotopic compositions of these phases may have also been modified by alteration and recrystallization possibly interspersed with multiple melting events. Because the modal abundance of spinel remains relatively constant for plausible melting scenarios, and its relatively sluggish diffusion kinetics prevent substantial equilibration, Mg-Al spinel is the most reliable indicator of the oxygen isotopic composition of precursor material which formed Type B CAIs.

Ryerson, F.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); McKeegan, K.D. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral diffuse downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

diffuse downwelling irradiance diffuse downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave spectral diffuse downwelling irradiance The rate at which spectrally resolved radiant energy at wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, that has been scattered in the atmosphere at least once, passes through a horizontal unit area in a downward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments RSS : Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer

391

Anomalous diffusion modifies solar neutrino fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density and temperature conditions in the solar core suggest that the microscopic diffusion of electrons and ions could be nonstandard: diffusion and friction coefficients are energy dependent, collisions are not two-body processes and retain memory beyond the single scattering event. A direct consequence of nonstandard diffusion is that the equilibrium energy distribution of particles departs from the Maxwellian one (tails goes to zero more slowly or faster than exponentially) modifying the reaction rates. This effect is qualitatively different from temperature and/or composition modification: small changes in the number of particles in the distribution tails can strongly modify the rates without affecting bulk properties, such as the sound speed or hydrostatic equilibrium, which depend on the mean values from the distribution. This mechanism can considerably increase the range of predictions for the neutrino fluxes allowed by the current experimental values (cross sections and solar properties) and can be u...

Kaniadakis, G; Lissia, M; Quarati, P

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

ASYMMETRIC DIFFUSION OF MAGNETIC FIELD LINES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stochasticity of magnetic field lines is important for particle transport properties. Magnetic field lines separate faster than diffusively in turbulent plasma, which is called superdiffusion. We discovered that this superdiffusion is pronouncedly asymmetric, so that the separation of field lines along the magnetic field direction is different from the separation in the opposite direction. While the symmetry of the flow is broken by the so-called imbalance or cross-helicity, the difference between forward and backward diffusion is not directly due to imbalance, but a non-trivial consequence of both imbalance and non-reversibility of turbulence. The asymmetric diffusion perpendicular to the mean magnetic field entails a variety of new physical phenomena, such as the production of parallel particle streaming in the presence of perpendicular particle gradients. Such streaming and associated instabilities could be significant for particle transport in laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasmas.

Beresnyak, Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

Magnetoplasticity and diffusion in silicon single crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of static magnetic fields on the dynamics of surface dislocation segments, as well as the diffusion mobility of a dopant in silicon single crystals, has been analyzed. It has been experimentally found that the preliminary treatment of p-type silicon plates (the dopant is boron with a concentration of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) in the static magnetic field (B = 1 T, a treatment time of 30 min) leads to an increase in the mobility of surface dislocation segments. The characteristic times of observed changes (about 80 h) and the threshold dopant concentration (10{sub 15} cm{sup -3}) below which the magneto-optical effect in silicon is not fixed have been determined. It has been found that diffusion processes in dislocation-free silicon are magnetically sensitive: the phosphorus diffusion depth in p-type silicon that is preliminarily aged in the static magnetic field increases (by approximately 20%) compared to the reference samples.

Skvortsov, A. A., E-mail: SkvortsovAA2009@yandex.ru; Karizin, A. V. [Moscow State Technical University 'MAMI' (Russian Federation)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Single molecule tracking of heterogeneous diffusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mean square displacement of heterogeneous diffusion obeys the Einstein relation, thereby showing no sign of heterogeneities in the ensemble measurement of the diffusion constant. The signature of spatial heterogeneities appears in the time evolution of the non-Gaussian distribution and in the cross correlation between the square displacements at different times, both available from single molecule diffusional trajectories. As a quantitative measure, the non-Gaussian indicator g(t) decays asymptotically to zero according to 1/t for finite time correlation, but saturates at a plateau value for power-law correlation. In addition, the joint moment correlation function f(t,?) provides a direct probe of the memory effect of the fluctuating rate constant. A two-state diffusion model and a stochastic Gaussian model are constructed to evaluate these quantities and are shown to yield the same result within the second cumulant expansion.

Jianshu Cao

2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband diffuse downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

diffuse downwelling irradiance diffuse downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband diffuse downwelling irradiance All of the solar radiation, across the wavelength range of 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, coming directly from the sky except for solar radiation coming directly from the sun and the circumsolar irradiance within approximately three degrees of the sun. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments

396

Hexapartite safeguards project team 3: material accounting and control questionnaire  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information provided in this report reflects the current design and operating procedures for the GCEP. However, since the installation is currently under construction, facility design and operating procedures discussed in this report are subject to change. Where applicable, the responses are based on material control and accounting practices of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's (GDP) operating contractor (Goodyear Atomic Corporation). These practices meet US Department of Energy (DOE) standards and are assumed to be the reference practices for the GCEP. This report covers data collection and record keeping actions of the operator.

Swindle, D.W. Jr.

1981-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

Background Fact Sheet Transfer of Depleted Uranium and Subsequent Transactions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Background Fact Sheet Background Fact Sheet Transfer of Depleted Uranium and Subsequent Transactions At the direction of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, over many months, the Energy Department (DOE) has been working closely with Energy Northwest (ENW), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and USEC Inc. (USEC) to develop a plan to address the challenges at USEC's Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) that advances America's national security interests, protects taxpayers, and provides benefits for TVA and the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) electric ratepayers and business operations. BPA is ENW's sole customer, purchasing 100 percent of ENW's Columbia Generating Station's electric power as part of BPA's overall

398

Comparison of Diffuse Shortwave Irradiance Measurements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diffuse Shortwave Diffuse Shortwave Irradiance Measurements J. J. Michalsky and J. Schlemmer Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York B. C. Bush, S. Leitner, D. Marsden, and F. P. J. Valero Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California R. Dolce and A. Los Kipp & Zonen, Inc. Bohemia, New York and Delft The Netherlands E. G. Dutton Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado M. P. Haeffelin Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Blackburg, Virginia G. Major Budapest University of Economic Sciences and Public Administration Budapest, Hungry J. Hickey The Eppley Laboratory, Inc. Newport, Rhode Island

399

Ambipolar Diffusion in a Magnetic Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diffusion of ions in a plasma across a magnetic field is shown to be not ambipolar in character in most arc experiments. Owing to the highly anisotropic conductivity of the medium, the ions diffuse across the field at their own intrinsic rate. Space-charge neutralization is maintained by slight adjustments of the currents in the direction of the magnetic field lines. The discrepancy between theory and experiment noted by Bohm is thus resolved and no additional mechanisms, such as plasma oscillations, need be postulated.

Albert Simon

1955-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Self- and zinc diffusion in gallium antimonide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technological age has in large part been driven by the applications of semiconductors, and most notably by silicon. Our lives have been thoroughly changed by devices using the broad range of semiconductor technology developed over the past forty years. Much of the technological development has its foundation in research carried out on the different semiconductors whose properties can be exploited to make transistors, lasers, and many other devices. While the technological focus has largely been on silicon, many other semiconductor systems have applications in industry and offer formidable academic challenges. Diffusion studies belong to the most basic studies in semiconductors, important from both an application as well as research standpoint. Diffusion processes govern the junctions formed for device applications. As the device dimensions are decreased and the dopant concentrations increased, keeping pace with Moore's Law, a deeper understanding of diffusion is necessary to establish and maintain the sharp dopant profiles engineered for optimal device performance. From an academic viewpoint, diffusion in semiconductors allows for the study of point defects. Very few techniques exist which allow for the extraction of as much information of their properties. This study focuses on diffusion in the semiconductor gallium antimonide (GaSb). As will become clear, this compound semiconductor proves to be a powerful one for investigating both self- and foreign atom diffusion. While the results have direct applications for work on GaSb devices, the results should also be taken in the broader context of III-V semiconductors. Results here can be compared and contrasted to results in systems such as GaAs and even GaN, indicating trends within this common group of semiconductors. The results also have direct importance for ternary and quaternary semiconductor systems used in devices such as high speed InP/GaAsSb/InP double heterojunction bipolar transistors (DHBT) [Dvorak, (2001)]. Many of the findings which will be reported here were previously published in three journal articles. Hartmut Bracht was the lead author on two articles on self-diffusion studies in GaSb [Bracht, (2001), (2000)], while this report's author was the lead author on Zn diffusion results [Nicols, (2001)]. Much of the information contained herein can be found in those articles, but a more detailed treatment is presented here.

Nicols, Samuel Piers

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Investigation of high temperature gaseous species by Knudsen cell mass spectrometry above the condensed systems Au-Ge-Cu and Au-Si / by Joseph Edward Kingcade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0), in kJ mol for the Gaseous Molecules AuSi, Ie 24 27 3l 34 TABLE 12. 13. 14. 15. 1 6. 17a 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. Au2Si, AuSi2, CuGe and CuGe2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Summary of Enthalpy Changes: for the Molecule Au..., (HT-H ), in kJ mol for the Gaseous T o Molecules Au2Ge2, AuGe3 and AuGe4 MOLECULE AND STRUCTURE 298 1200 1400 1600 TEMPERATURE ( K) 1800 2000 2200 hu2 Ge2 (Linear) Au2 Gep (Square Planar) FEF HCF FEF HCF 297. 7 18. 69 317. 1 18. 83...

Kingcade, Joseph Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Zero-flux planes, flux reversals and diffusion paths in ternary and quaternary diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During isothermal multicomponent diffusion, interdiffusion fluxes of individual components can go to zero at zero-flux planes (ZFP) and exhibit flux reversals from one side to the other of such planes. Interdiffusion fluxes as well as the locations and compositions of ZFPs for components are determined directly from the concentration profiles of diffusion couples without the need for prior knowledge of interdiffusion coefficients. The development and identification of ZFPs is reviewed with the aid of single phase and two-phase diffusion couples investigated in the Cu-Ni-Zn system at 775/sup 0/C. ZFP locations in the diffusion zone nearly correspond to sections where the activity of a component is the same as its activity in either of the terminal alloys of a couple. Path slopes at ZFPs are uniquely dictated by the atomic mobility and thermodynamic data for the components. Discontinuous flux reversals for the components can also occur at interfaces in multiphase couples. Identification of ZFPs is also presented for diffusion in the Cu-Ni-Zn-Mn quaternary system. Analytical representation of diffusion paths for both ternary and quaternary diffusion couples is presented with the aid of characteristic path parameters.

Dayananda, M.A.

1986-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

403

Open Source Software: Management, Diffusion and Competition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and competitive environment such as the ICT market. 1 Introduction OSS is an alternative model of software has introduced an innovative model of software development, based on self-organized communitiesOpen Source Software: Management, Diffusion and Competition Spyridoula Lakkaé National

Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

404

Correcting the diffusion approximation at the boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2011 The diffusion approximation to the radiative transport equation applies for light that has solutions of the radiative transport equation to evaluate each of their accuracy. Nonetheless, nearly all transport equation · I þ aI þ sLI ¼ 0; ð1:1� governs continuous light propagation in tissues [1

Kim, Arnold D.

405

Original article Mannitol enhances intracellular calcium diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentration-dependent increase in the amount of calcium absor- bed in 1 h from 8 cm long ileal loops prepared-enhanced movement of calcium out of the loop cannot have utilized the paracellular pathway, inasmuch as the luminalOriginal article Mannitol enhances intracellular calcium diffusion in the rat ileum ­ a hypothesis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

406

Diffusive Acceleration of Ions at Interplanetary Shocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heliospheric shocks are excellent systems for testing theories of particle acceleration in their environs. These generally fall into two classes: (1) interplanetary shocks that are linear in their ion acceleration characteristics with the non?thermal ions serving as test particles and (2) non?linear systems such as the Earth’s bow shock and the solar wind termination shock where the accelerated ions strongly influence the magnetohydrodynamic structure of the shock. This paper explores the modelling of diffusive acceleration at a particular interplanetary shock with an emphasis on explaining in situ measurements of ion distribution functions. The observational data for this event was acquired on day 292 of 1991 by the Ulysses mission. The modeling is performed using a well?known kinetic Monte Carlo simulation which has yielded good agreement with observations at several heliospheric shocks as have other theoretical techniques namely hybrid plasma simulations and numerical solution of the diffusion?convection equation. In this theory/data comparison it is demonstrated that diffusive acceleration theory can to first order successfully account for both the proton distribution data near the shock and the observation of energetic protons farther upstream of this interplanetary shock than lower energy pick?up protons using a single turbulence parameter. The principal conclusion is that diffusive acceleration of inflowing upstream ions can model this pick?up ion?rich event without the invoking any seed pre?acceleration mechanism though this investigation does not rule out the action of such pre?acceleration.

Matthew G. Baring; Errol J. Summerlin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Diffusive Acceleration of Ions at Interplanetary Shocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heliospheric shocks are excellent systems for testing theories of particle acceleration in their environs. These generally fall into two classes: (1) interplanetary shocks that are linear in their ion acceleration characteristics, with the non-thermal ions serving as test particles, and (2) non-linear systems such as the Earth's bow shock and the solar wind termination shock, where the accelerated ions strongly influence the magnetohydrodynamic structure of the shock. This paper explores the modelling of diffusive acceleration at a particular interplanetary shock, with an emphasis on explaining in situ measurements of ion distribution functions. The observational data for this event was acquired on day 292 of 1991 by the Ulysses mission. The modeling is performed using a well-known kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, which has yielded good agreement with observations at several heliospheric shocks, as have other theoretical techniques, namely hybrid plasma simulations, and numerical solution of the diffusion-convection equation. In this theory/data comparison, it is demonstrated that diffusive acceleration theory can, to first order, successfully account for both the proton distribution data near the shock, and the observation of energetic protons farther upstream of this interplanetary shock than lower energy pick-up protons, using a single turbulence parameter. The principal conclusion is that diffusive acceleration of inflowing upstream ions can model this pick-up ion-rich event without the invoking any seed pre-acceleration mechanism, though this investigation does not rule out the action of such pre-acceleration.

Matthew G. Baring; Errol J. Summerlin

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

408

Unattended Monitoring of HEU Production in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants using Automated Aerosol Collection and Laser-based Enrichment Assay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward low carbon energy production. Pivotal to the global nuclear power renaissance is the development and deployment of robust safeguards instrumentation that allows the limited resources of the IAEA to keep pace with the expansion of the nuclear fuel cycle. Undeclared production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains a primary proliferation concern for modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), due to their massive separative work unit (SWU) processing power and comparably short cascade equilibrium timescale. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an unattended safeguards instrument, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely detection of HEU production within a GCEP. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulates, followed by laser spectroscopy to characterize the uranium enrichment level. Our prior investigation demonstrated single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and relative isotope ratio uncertainty better than 10% using gadolinium as a surrogate for uranium. In this paper we present measurement results on standard samples containing traces of depleted, natural, and low enriched uranium, as well as measurements on aerodynamic size uranium particles mixed in background materials (e.g., dust, minerals, soils). Improvements and optimizations in the detection electronics, signal timing, calibration, and laser alignment have lead to significant improvements in detection sensitivity and enrichment accuracy, contributing to an overall reduction in the false alarm probability. The sample substrate media was also found to play a significant role in facilitating laser-induced vaporization and the production of energetic plasma conditions, resulting in ablation optimization and further improvements in the isotope abundance sensitivity.

Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

409

Comments on Diffusion of Kr Isotopes in Solid Ar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, the isotope effect for Kr diffusion in Ar was found to be f?K?0. 48. The results are consistent with a divacancy diffusion mechanism with ?K?1.

J. J. Burton

1970-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Quantitative analysis of cerebral white matter anatomy from diffusion MRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis we develop algorithms for quantitative analysis of white matter fiber tracts from diffusion MRI. The presented methods enable us to look at the variation of a diffusion measure along a fiber tract in a single ...

Maddah, Mahnaz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Pattern formation in reaction diffusion systems: a Galerkin model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reaction diffusion systems are extremely useful for studying pattern formation in biological systems. We carry out a Lorenz like few mode truncation of a reaction diffusion system and show that it not only giv...

A. Bhattacharyay; J.K. Bhattacharjee

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A Multiscale Framework for Markov Decision Processes using Diffusion Wavelets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Multiscale Framework for Markov Decision Processes using Diffusion Wavelets Mauro Maggioni Program in Applied Mathematics Department of Mathematics Yale University New Haven, CT 06511 mauro Diffusion Wavelets Mauro Maggioni mauro.maggioni@yale.edu Program in Applied Mathematics Department

Mahadevan, Sridhar

413

On the Principle of Smooth Fit for Killed Diffusions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Principle of Smooth Fit for Killed Diffusions Farman Samee To appear in Electron. Commun of Smooth Fit for Killed Diffusions Farman Samee Research Report No. 16, 2006, Probab. Statist. Group

Sidorov, Nikita

414

CODED SPECTROSCOPY FOR ETHANOL DETECTION IN DIFFUSE, FLUORESCENT MEDIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT CODED SPECTROSCOPY FOR ETHANOL DETECTION IN DIFFUSE, FLUORESCENT MEDIA by Scott Thomas Mc FOR ETHANOL DETECTION IN DIFFUSE, FLUORESCENT MEDIA by Scott Thomas McCain Department of Electrical

415

Sensitivity of climate change to diapycnal diffusivity in the ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The diapycnal diffusivity of the ocean is one of the least known parameters in cur- rent climate models. Measurements of this diffusivity are sparse and insufficient for compiling a global map. Inferences from inverse ...

Dalan, Fabio, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona,...

417

Shell Model for Atomistic Simulation of Lithium Diffusion in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shell Model for Atomistic Simulation of Lithium Diffusion in Mixed MnTi Oxides. Shell Model for Atomistic Simulation of Lithium Diffusion in Mixed MnTi Oxides. Abstract: Mixed...

418

Moisture Diffusion in Asphalt Binders and Fine Aggregate Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost in highway maintenance and vehicle operations. One key mechanism of how moisture reaches the asphalt-aggregate interface is by its permeation or diffusion through the asphalt binder or mastic. Different techniques are available for diffusion...

Vasconcelos, Kamilla L.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

419

A piecewise linear finite element discretization of the diffusion equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it discretizes the diffusion equation on an arbitrary polyhedral mesh. We implemented our method in the KULL software package being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This code previously utilized Palmer's method as its diffusion solver, which...

Bailey, Teresa S

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

Solar Energy Evolution and Diffusion Studies | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evolution and Diffusion Studies Solar Energy Evolution and Diffusion Studies Graphic of a map with pinpoints and a photo of a house with solar panels on the roof. Through the Solar...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Imaging Intrinsic Diffusion of Bridge-Bonded Oxygen Vacancies...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intrinsic Diffusion of Bridge-Bonded Oxygen Vacancies on TiO2(110). Imaging Intrinsic Diffusion of Bridge-Bonded Oxygen Vacancies on TiO2(110). Abstract: Since oxygen atom...

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - altered water diffusivity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emory University Collection: Materials Science ; Physics 47 Oxygen diffusion in titanite: Lattice diffusion and fast-path diffusion in single crystals Summary: , with little...

423

Nonlinear analysis of a reaction-diffusion system: Amplitude equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reaction-diffusion system with a nonlinear diffusion term is considered. Based on nonlinear analysis, the amplitude equations are obtained in the cases of the Hopf and Turing instabilities in the system. Turing pattern-forming regions in the parameter space are determined for supercritical and subcritical instabilities in a two-component reaction-diffusion system.

Zemskov, E. P., E-mail: zemskov@ccas.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Dorodnicyn Computing Center (Russian Federation)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

ORIGINAL PAPER Assimilation and diffusion during xenolith-magma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(responsible for the linear mixing trends) and (2) diffusion-controlled redistribution of elements between bothORIGINAL PAPER Assimilation and diffusion during xenolith-magma interaction: a case study the assimilation of granitic melt. Linear mixing trends on Harker diagrams for most network-forming and mainly slow-diffusing

Podladchikov, Yuri

425

Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

426

Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

Weil, Kenneth Scott (Richland, WA); Hardy, John S. (Richland, WA); Kim, Jin Yong (Richland, WA); Choi, Jung-Pyung (Richland, WA)

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

427

Diffusive Acceleration of Ions at Interplanetary Shocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heliospheric shocks are excellent systems for testing theories of particle acceleration in their environs. These generally fall into two classes: (1) interplanetary shocks that are linear in their ion acceleration characteristics, with the non-thermal ions serving as test particles, and (2) non-linear systems such as the Earth's bow shock and the solar wind termination shock, where the accelerated ions strongly influence the magnetohydrodynamic structure of the shock. This paper explores the modelling of diffusive acceleration at a particular interplanetary shock, with an emphasis on explaining in situ measurements of ion distribution functions. The observational data for this event was acquired on day 292 of 1991 by the Ulysses mission. The modeling is performed using a well-known kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, which has yielded good agreement with observations at several heliospheric shocks, as have other theoretical techniques, namely hybrid plasma simulations, and numerical solution of the diffusion-conv...

Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Summerlin, Errol J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Waste acid recycling via diffusion dialysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic acids are commonly used for surface cleaning and finishing of metals. The acids become unuseable due to contamination with metals or diluted and weakened. Diffusion dialysis has become a way to recover the useable acid and allow separation of the metals for recovery and sale to refineries. This technique is made possible by the use of membranes that are strong enough to withstand low ph and have long service life.

Steffani, C.

1995-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

429

Diffuse-dynamic multiparameter diffractometry: A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results reported at the Conference on Application of X-Rays, Synchrotron Radiation, Neutrons, and Electrons in Nano-, Bio-, Information-, and Cognitive Technologies (RSNE-NBIC 2009) are briefly reviewed. This review is based on a cycle of studies [1-6] where a new method for studying the structure of real crystals-diffuse-dynamic multiparameter diffractometry (DDMD)-was proposed and substantiated.

Molodkin, V. B., E-mail: molodkn@imp.kiev.ua; Shpak, A. P. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Metal Physics (Ukraine); Kovalchuk, M. V.; Nosik, V. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Machulin, V. F. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed generation (DG) technologies, such as gas-fired reciprocating engines and microturbines, have been found to be economically beneficial in meeting commercial-sector electrical, heating, and cooling loads. Even though the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that offered by traditional central stations, combined heat and power (CHP) applications using recovered heat can make the overall system energy efficiency of distributed energy resources (DER) greater. From a policy perspective, however, it would be useful to have good estimates of penetration rates of DER under various economic and regulatory scenarios. In order to examine the extent to which DER systems may be adopted at a national level, we model the diffusion of DER in the US commercial building sector under different technical research and technology outreach scenarios. In this context, technology market diffusion is assumed to depend on the system's economic attractiveness and the developer's knowledge about the technology. The latter can be spread both by word-of-mouth and by public outreach programs. To account for regional differences in energy markets and climates, as well as the economic potential for different building types, optimal DER systems are found for several building types and regions. Technology diffusion is then predicted via two scenarios: a baseline scenario and a program scenario, in which more research improves DER performance and stronger technology outreach programs increase DER knowledge. The results depict a large and diverse market where both optimal installed capacity and profitability vary significantly across regions and building types. According to the technology diffusion model, the West region will take the lead in DER installations mainly due to high electricity prices, followed by a later adoption in the Northeast and Midwest regions. Since the DER market is in an early stage, both technology research and outreach programs have the potential to increase DER adoption, and thus, shift building energy consumption to a more efficient alternative.

Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui,Afzal S.

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

Interactive Volume Rendering of Diffusion Tensor Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As 3D volumetric images of the human body become an increasingly crucial source of information for the diagnosis and treatment of a broad variety of medical conditions, advanced techniques that allow clinicians to efficiently and clearly visualize volumetric images become increasingly important. Interaction has proven to be a key concept in analysis of medical images because static images of 3D data are prone to artifacts and misunderstanding of depth. Furthermore, fading out clinically irrelevant aspects of the image while preserving contextual anatomical landmarks helps medical doctors to focus on important parts of the images without becoming disoriented. Our goal was to develop a tool that unifies interactive manipulation and context preserving visualization of medical images with a special focus on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. At each image voxel, DTI provides a 3 x 3 tensor whose entries represent the 3D statistical properties of water diffusion locally. Water motion that is preferential to specific spatial directions suggests structural organization of the underlying biological tissue; in particular, in the human brain, the naturally occuring diffusion of water in the axon portion of neurons is predominantly anisotropic along the longitudinal direction of the elongated, fiber-like axons [MMM+02]. This property has made DTI an emerging source of information about the structural integrity of axons and axonal connectivity between brain regions, both of which are thought to be disrupted in a broad range of medical disorders including multiple sclerosis, cerebrovascular disease, and autism [Mos02, FCI+01, JLH+99, BGKM+04, BJB+03].

Hlawitschka, Mario; Weber, Gunther; Anwander, Alfred; Carmichael, Owen; Hamann, Bernd; Scheuermann, Gerik

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Anomalous diffusion modifies solar neutrino fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density and temperature conditions in the solar core suggest that the microscopic diffusion of electrons and ions could be nonstandard: Diffusion and friction coefficients are energy dependent, collisions are not two-body processes and retain memory beyond the single scattering event. A direct consequence of nonstandard diffusion is that the equilibrium energy distribution of particles departs from the Maxwellian one (tails goes to zero more slowly or faster than exponentially) modifying the reaction rates. This effect is qualitatively different from temperature and/or composition modification: Small changes in the number of particles in the distribution tails can strongly modify the rates without affecting bulk properties, such as the sound speed or hydrostatic equilibrium, which depend on the mean values from the distribution. This mechanism can considerably increase the range of predictions for the neutrino fluxes allowed by the current experimental values (cross sections and solar properties) and can be used to reduce the discrepancy between these predictions and the solar neutrino experiments.

G. Kaniadakis; A. Lavagno; M. Lissia; P. Quarati

1997-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

433

Diffuse-Charge Dynamics in Electrochemical Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The response of a model micro-electrochemical system to a time-dependent applied voltage is analyzed. The article begins with a fresh historical review including electrochemistry, colloidal science, and microfluidics. The model problem consists of a symmetric binary electrolyte between parallel-plate, blocking electrodes which suddenly apply a voltage. Compact Stern layers on the electrodes are also taken into account. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson equations are first linearized and solved by Laplace transforms for small voltages, and numerical solutions are obtained for large voltages. The ``weakly nonlinear'' limit of thin double layers is then analyzed by matched asymptotic expansions in the small parameter $\\epsilon = \\lambda_D/L$, where $\\lambda_D$ is the screening length and $L$ the electrode separation. At leading order, the system initially behaves like an RC circuit with a response time of $\\lambda_D L / D$ (not $\\lambda_D^2/D$), where $D$ is the ionic diffusivity, but nonlinearity violates this common picture and introduce multiple time scales. The charging process slows down, and neutral-salt adsorption by the diffuse part of the double layer couples to bulk diffusion at the time scale, $L^2/D$. In the ``strongly nonlinear'' regime (controlled by a dimensionless parameter resembling the Dukhin number), this effect produces bulk concentration gradients, and, at very large voltages, transient space charge. The article concludes with an overview of more general situations involving surface conduction, multi-component electrolytes, and Faradaic processes.

Martin Z. Bazant; Katsuyo Thornton; Armand Ajdari

2004-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

434

A diffuse interface model with immiscibility preservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new, simple, and computationally efficient interface capturing scheme based on a diffuse interface approach is presented for simulation of compressible multiphase flows. Multi-fluid interfaces are represented using field variables (interface functions) with associated transport equations that are augmented, with respect to an established formulation, to enforce a selected interface thickness. The resulting interface region can be set just thick enough to be resolved by the underlying mesh and numerical method, yet thin enough to provide an efficient model for dynamics of well-resolved scales. A key advance in the present method is that the interface regularization is asymptotically compatible with the thermodynamic mixture laws of the mixture model upon which it is constructed. It incorporates first-order pressure and velocity non-equilibrium effects while preserving interface conditions for equilibrium flows, even within the thin diffused mixture region. We first quantify the improved convergence of this formulation in some widely used one-dimensional configurations, then show that it enables fundamentally better simulations of bubble dynamics. Demonstrations include both a spherical-bubble collapse, which is shown to maintain excellent symmetry despite the Cartesian mesh, and a jetting bubble collapse adjacent a wall. Comparisons show that without the new formulation the jet is suppressed by numerical diffusion leading to qualitatively incorrect results.

Tiwari, Arpit, E-mail: atiwari2@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Freund, Jonathan B., E-mail: jbfreund@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Pantano, Carlos [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Multicomponent Gas Diffusion in Porous Electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multicomponent gas transport is investigated with unprecedented precision by AC impedance analysis of porous YSZ anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells. A fuel gas mixture of H2-H2O-N2 is fed to the anode, and impedance data are measured across the range of hydrogen partial pressure (10-100%) for open circuit conditions at three temperatures (800C, 850C and 900C) and for 300mA applied current at 800C. For the first time, analytical formulae for the diffusion resistance (Rb) of three standard models of multicomponent gas transport (Fick, Stefan-Maxwell, and Dusty Gas) are derived and tested against the impedance data. The tortuosity is the only fitting parameter since all the diffusion coefficients are known. Only the Dusty Gas model leads to a remarkable data collapse for over twenty experimental conditions, using a constant tortuosity consistent with permeability measurements and the Bruggeman relation. These results establish the accuracy of the Dusty Gas model for multicomponent gas diffusion in porous med...

Fu, Yeqing; Dutta, Abhijit; Mohanram, Aravind; Pietras, John D; Bazant, Martin Z

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 930,320 953,451 1,024,082 1,066,366 1,134,473 1,250,340 1930-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2011 Alabama 19,831 17,222 17,232 19,059 17,271 1969-2011 Alaska 26,332 24,337 22,925 20,835 21,554 21,470 1969-2012 Arkansas 162 139 168 213 268 424 1967-2012 California 13,521 13,972 13,722 13,244 12,095 12,755 1967-2012 Colorado 38,180 53,590 67,607 82,637 90,801 1967-2011 Florida 132 22 0 0 0 0 1968-2012 Illinois 48 42 31 345 1,043 0 1967-2012 Indiana 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2012

437

Improved gaseous leak detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

Juravic, F.E. Jr.

1983-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fiber Bulk Gaseous Carriers  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

CONSUMERS RETAIL CNG REFUELLING CNG VEHICLES ON SITE COMPRESSION AND CONDITIONING MOTHER STATION Modification of "Figure NG-7. Natural Gas for Transportation Supply Chain" to...

439

Lattice Boltzmann modeling of multicomponent diffusion in narrow channels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate lattice Boltzmann (LB) modeling of multicomponent diffusion for finite Knudsen numbers. Analytic solutions for binary diffusion in narrow channels, where both molecular and Knudsen diffusion are of importance, are obtained for the standard and higher-order LB methods and validated against the results from the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The LB methods are shown to reproduce the diffusion slip phenomena. In the DSMC method, while fluid particles are diffusely reflected on a wall, significant component slip and a kinetic boundary layer are observed. It is shown that a higher-order LB method accurately captures the characteristics observed in the DSMC method.

Seung Hyun Kim; Heinz Pitsch; Iain D. Boyd

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

440

Mutual diffusion in binary Ar-Kr mixtures and empirical diffusion models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations of four binary Ar-Kr mixtures are used to compute self- and mutual-diffusion coefficients. Results using mean squared displacements and using velocity correlation functions are presented. The diffusivity coefficients are also presented in the time and frequency domains where a comparatively low frequency structure is evident in some simulations. The computed diffusivities are dependent on the maximum time over which the velocity correlation functions are integrated and the time at which the Einstein relationships are evaluated. This dependence explains in part the small systematic differences between our results (20–80 ps) and earlier molecular dynamics results (<4 ps) in the system Ar-Kr. We compare the computed mutual diffusion coefficients to two empirical models, Darken’s model and the common force model. Darken’s model is consistent with our results over the entire frequency range we resolve. At frequencies lower than about 5 ps-1 Darken’s model and the common force model converge and we cannot discriminate between them. At higher frequencies the common force model prediction is significantly different from the computed mutual diffusion coefficient. Assumptions regarding the contribution of cross correlations that are implicit in the empirical models are discussed and tested against our simulation results. The net contribution of velocity cross correlations is found to be negligible, as is often assumed in deriving Darken’s model, but the individual cross-correlation terms are substantial and negative—a finding contrary to common assumptions. © 1996 The American Physical Society.

Yanhua Zhou and Gregory H. Miller

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Diffusion in single crystals of melilite: 2. Cations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffusion coefficients of divalent cations, Ni, Co, Fe, Mn, Ca, Sr, and Ba, in synthetic akermanite were determined by tracer-diffusion experiments. Diffusion coefficients of cation paris, Al + Al-Mg + Si, Al + Al-Co + Si, and Mg-Co in melilite solid-solution systems, were determined by coupled annealing of synthetic melilites of endmember compositions. Cobalt tracer diffuses slower along the c-crystallographic axis than along the a-axis by a factor of about three, possibly due to the anisotropic sheet-like arrangement of oxygen ions parallel to the (001) plane which is perpendicular to the c-axis in the crystal structure of melilite. In the coupled diffusion experiments, the cation pairs interdiffuse complementary, as expected for conservation of material and ionic charge balance in the substitution. The observed trend in the inter-diffusion coefficient vs. melting temperature relations is similar to those observed for alloys and consistent with an empirical rule for self-diffusion coefficient-melting temperature relation. In the diffusion coefficient vs. ionic radius diagram for divalent cation diffusion in akermanite, smooth curves were observed as in the case of olivine systems. However, the shapes of the curves were significantly different from those observed in olivine systems. The observed trend of diffusion coefficients with ionic radius can be explained on the basis of crystal structure-controlled diffusion in akermanite.

Morioka, Masana (Univ. of Tokyo Yayoi (Japan)); Nagasawa, Hiroshi (Gakushiun Univ. Mejiro, Tokyo (Japan))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

System and process for capture of H.sub.2S from gaseous process streams and process for regeneration of the capture agent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and process are disclosed for selective removal and recovery of H.sub.2S from a gaseous volume, e.g., from natural gas. Anhydrous organic, sorbents chemically capture H.sub.2S gas to form hydrosulfide salts. Regeneration of the capture solvent involves addition of an anti-solvent that releases the captured H.sub.2S gas from the capture sorbent. The capture sorbent and anti-solvent are reactivated for reuse, e.g., by simple distillation.

Heldenbrant, David J; Koech, Phillip K; Rainbolt, James E; Bearden, Mark D; Zheng, Feng

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

443

Optical properties of hierarchical-nanostructured TiO{sub 2} and its time-dependent photo-degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TiO{sub 2} hierarchical nanostructures (HNs) composed of rutile TiO{sub 2} nanowires on anatase TiO{sub 2} nanofibers had higher photocatalytic activities of 62% and 48% than the commercial TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (?21 nm diameter) in the continuous flow mode and closed-circulation mode, respectively, leading to an efficient degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde under UV-light irradiation. This behavior may be attributed to the effective TiO{sub 2} HNs with specific surface area of 85.1 m{sup 2}/g and lower radiative recombination of self-trapped excitons, enabling an effective electron-hole separation.

Ahn, Kyun; Jeong, Se-Young; Cho, Chae-Ryong [College of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)] [College of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Soon-Hyun; Hyun Kim, Jae [Division of Nano and Bio Technology, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu 711-873 (Korea, Republic of)] [Division of Nano and Bio Technology, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu 711-873 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Pil; Sung Jin, Jong [Division of High Technology Materials Research, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 618-230 (Korea, Republic of)] [Division of High Technology Materials Research, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 618-230 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

444

The Impact of Thermal Conductivity and Diffusion Rates on Water Vapor Transport through Gas Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water management in a hydrogen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is critical for performance. The impact of thermal conductivity and water vapor diffusion coefficients in a gas diffusion layer (GDL) has been studied by a mathematical model. The fraction of product water that is removed in the vapour phase through the GDL as a function of GDL properties and operating conditions has been calculated and discussed. Furthermore, the current model enables identification of conditions when condensation occurs in each GDL component and calculation of temperature gradient across the interface between different layers, providing insight into the overall mechanism of water transport in a given cell design. Water transport mode and condensation conditions in the GDL components depend on the combination of water vapor diffusion coefficients and thermal conductivities of the GDL components. Different types of GDL and water removal scenarios have been identified and related to experimentally-determined GDL proper...

Burlatsky, S F; Gummallaa, M; Condita, D; Liua, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

EA-0767: Final Environmental Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

446

Direct Sampling Method for Diffusive Optical Tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we are concerned with the diffusive optical tomography (DOT) problem in the case when only one or two pairs of Cauchy data is available. We propose a simple and efficient direct sampling method (DSM) to locate inhomogeneities inside a homogeneous background and solve the DOT problem in both full and limited aperture cases. This new method is easy to implement and less expensive computationally. Numerical experiments demonstrate its effectiveness and robustness against noise in the data. This provides a new promising numerical strategy for the DOT problem.

Yat Tin Chow; Kazufumi Ito; Keji Liu; Jun Zou

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

447

Theory of correlated hops in surface diffusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scanning tunneling microscopy observations of long hops in the diffusion of Pb atoms on Ge surfaces are explained by the model of a Brownian particle in a periodic potential. The classical turnover theory for barrier crossing predicts a large correlated hopping probability in the underdamped limit, consistent with experiment and in agreement with simulations. The corresponding quantum theory predicts that in the underdamped limit the rate is dominated by tunneling. This causes the quantum correlated hopping probability to vanish in this limit and may be thought of as a new form of quantum localization.

Eli Pollak, Joel Bader, B. J. Berne, and Peter Talkner

1993-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

448

Diffusion for an ensemble of Hamiltonians  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two ensembles of standard maps are studied analytically and numerically. In particular the diffusion coefficient is calculated. For one type of ensemble the chaotic parameter is chosen at random from a Gaussian distribution and is then kept fixed, while for the other type it varies from step to step. The effect of averaging out the details is evaluated and in particular it is found to be much more effective in the process of the second type. The work may shed light on the possible properties of different ensembles of mixed systems.

Or Alus; Shmuel Fishman

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

449

Carbon Diffusion Across Dissimilar Steel Welds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of recrystallised ferrite. The major consequence of carbon diffusion is a loss of strength in the carbon depleted region and an increase in hardness in the carburised region. These zones are immediately adjacent to one another and provide a significant change... , tungsten and niobium, a sequence of alloy carbides may be formed, giving rise to the more complex M23C6 and M6C carbides at higher tempering temperatures. In this notation "M" indicates a mixture of metal atoms. Nutting (1969) summarises the sequence...

Race, Julia Margaret

1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

450

Diffusion in single crystals of melilite: I. Oxygen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffusion profiles of {sup 18}O tracer in single crystals of gehlenite and akermanite following annealing at 1,000{degree}-1,300{degree}C have been determined by a depth-profiling technique using secondary ion mass spectrometry. From the {sup 18}O depth profiling the lattice diffusion coefficients for oxygen along the crystallographic axes in gehlenite and akermanite, D{sup 1}{sub geh}//c, D{sup 1}{sub ak}//{alpha} and D{sup 1}{sub ak}//c, respectively, are given by three different equations. Present results are two to four orders of magnitude lower than those previously reported for melilite solid solutions. These high diffusion rates in melilite solid solutions and the heterogeneous distribution of O isotopes in the Allende Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) have been examined considering the contribution of fast diffusion along dislocations and possible changes in diffusion rate with gehlenite-akermanite ratios in melilite. For this purpose, diffusion coefficients of O along dislocations were calculated by analyzing tailing of the O-diffusion profiles. From the effective diffusion rate in melilite solid solution obtained by lattice and dislocation diffusion rates, it is unlikely that the O-isotope differences in the Allende CAI minerals are the result of diffusion processes during a postcrystallization thermal event.

Yurimoto, Hisayoshi (Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Morioka, Masana (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)); Nagasawa, Hiroshi (Gakushuin Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Chemical oxygen diffusion coefficient measurement by conductivity relaxation--correlation between tracer diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical oxygen diffusion coefficient measurement by conductivity relaxation--correlation between J. P., Grenier J. C., Loup J. P. ABSTRACT Chemical oxygen diusion coecient ¯(D)was measured the oxygen partial pressure in the surrounding atmosphere of the sample. The consequent evolution

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

452

Overview of SIMS-Based Experimental Studies of Tracer Diffusion in Solids and Application to Mg Self-Diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tracer diffusivities provide the most fundamental information on diffusion in materials and are the foundation of robust diffusion databases. Compared to traditional radiotracer techniques that utilize radioactive isotopes, the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based thin-film technique for tracer diffusion is based on the use of enriched stable isotopes that can be accurately profiled using SIMS. Experimental procedures & techniques that are utilized for the measurement of tracer diffusion coefficients are presented for pure magnesium, which presents some unique challenges due to the ease of oxidation. The development of a modified Shewmon-Rhines diffusion capsule for annealing Mg and an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system for sputter deposition of Mg isotopes are discussed. Optimized conditions for accurate SIMS depth profiling in polycrystalline Mg are provided. An automated procedure for the correction of heat-up and cool-down times during tracer diffusion annealing is discussed. The non-linear fitting of a SIMS depth profile data using the thin film Gaussian solution to obtain the tracer diffusivity along with the background tracer concentration and tracer film thickness is discussed. An Arrhenius fit of the Mg self-diffusion data obtained using the low-temperature SIMS measurements from this study and the high-temperature radiotracer measurements of Shewmon and Rhines (1954) was found to be a good representation of both types of diffusion data that cover a broad range of temperatures between 250 - 627 C (523 900 K).

Kulkarni, Nagraj S [ORNL; Warmack, Robert J Bruce [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL; HunterJr., Jerry [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Sohn, Yong Ho [University of Central Florida; Coffey, Kevin [University of Central Florida; Murch, Prof. Graeme [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Belova, Irina [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Reaction and diffusion in turbulent combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for this project is the need to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the technologically-important phenomenon of turbulent combustion. In nearly all applications in which fuel is burned-for example, fossil-fuel power plants, furnaces, gas-turbines and internal-combustion engines-the combustion takes place in a turbulent flow. Designers continually demand more quantitative information about this phenomenon-in the form of turbulent combustion models-so that they can design equipment with increased efficiency and decreased environmental impact. For some time the PI has been developing a class of turbulent combustion models known as PDF methods. These methods have the important virtue that both convection and reaction can be treated without turbulence-modelling assumptions. However, a mixing model is required to account for the effects of molecular diffusion. Currently, the available mixing models are known to have some significant defects. The major motivation of the project is to seek a better understanding of molecular diffusion in turbulent reactive flows, and hence to develop a better mixing model.

Pope, S.B. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ithaca, NY (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Diffusive processes in a stochastic magnetic field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The statistical representation of a fluctuating (stochastic) magnetic field configuration is studied in detail. The Eulerian correlation functions of the magnetic field are determined, taking into account all geometrical constraints: these objects form a nondiagonal matrix. The Lagrangian correlations, within the reasonable Corrsin approximation, are reduced to a single scalar function, determined by an integral equation. The mean square perpendicular deviation of a geometrical point moving along a perturbed field line is determined by a nonlinear second-order differential equation. The separation of neighboring field lines in a stochastic magnetic field is studied. We find exponentiation lengths of both signs describing, in particular, a decay (on the average) of any initial anisotropy. The vanishing sum of these exponentiation lengths ensures the existence of an invariant which was overlooked in previous works. Next, the separation of a particle’s trajectory from the magnetic field line to which it was initially attached is studied by a similar method. Here too an initial phase of exponential separation appears. Assuming the existence of a final diffusive phase, anomalous diffusion coefficients are found for both weakly and strongly collisional limits. The latter is identical to the well known Rechester-Rosenbluth coefficient, which is obtained here by a more quantitative (though not entirely deductive) treatment than in earlier works.

Hai-Da Wang; M. Vlad; E. Vanden Eijnden; F. Spineanu; J. H. Misguich; R. Balescu

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Commercial Building Partnerships Replication and Diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents findings from survey and interview data investigating replication efforts of Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) partners that worked directly with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL partnered directly with 12 organizations on new and retrofit construction projects, which represented approximately 28 percent of the entire U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CBP program. Through a feedback survey mechanism, along with personal interviews, PNNL gathered quantitative and qualitative data relating to replication efforts by each organization. These data were analyzed to provide insight into two primary research areas: 1) CBP partners’ replication efforts of technologies and approaches used in the CBP project to the rest of the organization’s building portfolio (including replication verification), and, 2) the market potential for technology diffusion into the total U.S. commercial building stock, as a direct result of the CBP program. The first area of this research focused specifically on replication efforts underway or planned by each CBP program participant. Factors that impact replication include motivation, organizational structure and objectives firms have for implementation of energy efficient technologies. Comparing these factors between different CBP partners revealed patterns in motivation for constructing energy efficient buildings, along with better insight into market trends for green building practices. The second area of this research develops a diffusion of innovations model to analyze potential broad market impacts of the CBP program on the commercial building industry in the United States.

Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Dillon, Heather E.; Baechler, Michael C.

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

457

Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

Rooney, Stephen J. (East Berne, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Optical waveguides in SBN by zinc vapor diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at 600'C for a 12. 5 i1m Wide 1000'C Zinc Vapor Diffused SBN:60 Waveguide Measured at X = 0. 81 pm. IV. SBN:60 Amplitude Modulator Results . . . . . V. SBN:60 Mach-Zehnder Interferometer Results. . . . VI. Voltage-Length Product Comparison...: (a) extraordinary (TM), (b) 1. 5 x ordinary (TE). 12. Surface damage on SBN:60 diffused at 1000'C with an SiOz diffusion mask. 13. Zinc in-diffusion in SBN:60 25 . . . . . 26 . . . . . 27 . . . . . 28 29 14. Barium out-diffuison in SBN:60...

Quinn, Jeffrey Dale

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo Benchmarks and Validation of van der Waals Density Functional Methods P. Ganesh,* , Jeongnim Kim, Changwon...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A study of diffusion in binary solutions using spin echoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acetone 21 ~ 25 26 27 5 The Concentration Dependence of the Diffusion Coefficient of' Benzene in C6H6-CC1~ Solution Intrinsic 29 The Concentration Dependence of the Diffusion Coefficient of Benzene in C6H6-CS2 Solution Intrinsic a 30 ~ ~ 32... The Concentration Dependence of the Intrinsic Diffusion Coefficient of Cyclohexane in a C6H12 CC1~ Solution The Concentration Dependence of the Intrinsic Diffusion Coefficient of Cyclohexane in a C6H12-CS2 Solution LIST C1" TABLES Table Page Comparison...

Rousseau, Cecil Clyde

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

Improved diffusion coefficients generated from Monte Carlo codes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monte Carlo codes are becoming more widely used for reactor analysis. Some of these applications involve the generation of diffusion theory parameters including macroscopic cross sections and diffusion coefficients. Two approximations used to generate diffusion coefficients are assessed using the Monte Carlo code MC21. The first is the method of homogenization; whether to weight either fine-group transport cross sections or fine-group diffusion coefficients when collapsing to few-group diffusion coefficients. The second is a fundamental approximation made to the energy-dependent P1 equations to derive the energy-dependent diffusion equations. Standard Monte Carlo codes usually generate a flux-weighted transport cross section with no correction to the diffusion approximation. Results indicate that this causes noticeable tilting in reconstructed pin powers in simple test lattices with L2 norm error of 3.6%. This error is reduced significantly to 0.27% when weighting fine-group diffusion coefficients by the flux and applying a correction to the diffusion approximation. Noticeable tilting in reconstructed fluxes and pin powers was reduced when applying these corrections. (authors)

Herman, B. R.; Forget, B.; Smith, K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Aviles, B. N. [Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, P.O. Box 1072, Schenectady, NY 12301-1072 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Big Data Projects on Solar Technology Evolution and Diffusion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Projects on Solar Technology Evolution and Diffusion: Kickoff Meeting Graphic showing a web of people with energy bolts connecting them. Through the SEEDS program, seven projects...

464

Permeation and Diffusion of Hydrogen Through Pd Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen diffusion through Pd membranes has been measured under non-UHV conditions, i.e., the membranes are evacuated under non-UHV conditions. Despite this, the results indicate that bulk diffusion is the slow step and the diffusion constants agree with earlier workers results where UHV conditions obtained. The activation energy for H2 permeation in the dilute phase was determined from an Arrhenius plot over a series of temperatures from 423 to 503 K. The solubilities of H2 were determined over the same temperature range and from these data, the diffusion constants were determined.

Shanahan, K.L.

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

465

18.366 Random Walks and Diffusion, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrete and continuum modeling of diffusion processes in physics, chemistry, and economics. Topics include central limit theorems, continuous-time random walks, Levy flights, correlations, extreme events, mixing, ...

Bazant, Martin Z.

466

Optical processing furnace with quartz muffle and diffuser plate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical furnace for annealing a process wafer comprising a source of optical energy, a quartz muffle having a door to hold the wafer for processing, and a quartz diffuser plate to diffuse the light impinging on the quartz muffle; a feedback system with a light sensor located in the door or wall of the muffle is also provided for controlling the source of optical energy. The quartz for the diffuser plate is surface etched (to give the quartz diffusive qualities) in the furnace during a high intensity burn-in process.

Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Modeling Intragranular Diffusion in Low-Connectivity Granular...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

can produce diffusive behavior that appears as if the solute had undergone slow sorption, even in the absence of any sorption process. This mechanism may help explain some...

468

Reduction in Fabrication Costs of Gas Diffusion Layers | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Layers Reduction in Fabrication Costs of Gas Diffusion Layers 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

469

Diffusion Databases for Mg-ICME | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mg-ICME Diffusion Databases for Mg-ICME 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

470

X-ray Diffuse Scattering Measurements of Nucleation Dynamics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-ray Diffuse Scattering Measurements of Nucleation Dynamics at Femtosecond Resolution Real-time measurement and control of the non-equilibrium properties of materials represents...

471

Energy Transport by Classical Waves through Multilayers of Diffusing Slabs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the effect of interfaces on classical wave propagation through diffusing layered media. A series resistor model for wave energy transport is introduced and we derive a...

Gerritsen, Sijmen; Bauer, Gerrit E

472

Oil price fluctuations and Its effect on GDP growth.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? During the year of 2008, the world has experienced historically high oil prices reaching an all time high of 147 USD per barrel in… (more)

Gonzalez , Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

GDP Jobs Direct Structure of Australian economy, employment and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

last page for the data) #12;Australian 2020 carbon abatement cost curve Cost of abatement A$/t CO2e -50 Conservation tillage Agriculture, livestock Afforestation, pasture Reforestation Forest management Energy Geothermal On-shore wind Afforestation, cropland Coal-to-gas shift Agriculture, waste Coal CCS retrofit

Pezzey, Jack

474

Anomalous diffusion of field lines and charged particles in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress force-free magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cosmic magnetic fields in regions of low plasma pressure and large currents, such as in interstellar space and gaseous nebulae, are force-free in the sense that the Lorentz force vanishes. The three-dimensional Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) field is an example of a force-free, helical magnetic field. In fluid dynamics, ABC flows are steady state solutions of the Euler equation. The ABC magnetic field lines exhibit a complex and varied structure that is a mix of regular and chaotic trajectories in phase space. The characteristic features of field line trajectories are illustrated through the phase space distribution of finite-distance and asymptotic-distance Lyapunov exponents. In regions of chaotic trajectories, an ensemble-averaged variance of the distance between field lines reveals anomalous diffusion—in fact, superdiffusion—of the field lines. The motion of charged particles in the force-free ABC magnetic fields is different from the flow of passive scalars in ABC flows. The particles do not necessarily follow the field lines and display a variety of dynamical behavior depending on their energy, and their initial pitch-angle. There is an overlap, in space, of the regions in which the field lines and the particle orbits are chaotic. The time evolution of an ensemble of particles, in such regions, can be divided into three categories. For short times, the motion of the particles is essentially ballistic; the ensemble-averaged, mean square displacement is approximately proportional to t{sup 2}, where t is the time of evolution. The intermediate time region is defined by a decay of the velocity autocorrelation function—this being a measure of the time after which the collective dynamics is independent of the initial conditions. For longer times, the particles undergo superdiffusion—the mean square displacement is proportional to t{sup ?}, where ??>?1, and is weakly dependent on the energy of the particles. These super-diffusive characteristics, both of magnetic field lines and of particles moving in these fields, strongly suggest that theories of transport in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields need a shift from the usual paradigm of quasilinear diffusion.

Ram, Abhay K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Dasgupta, Brahmananda [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35805 (United States); Krishnamurthy, V. [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States); Mitra, Dhrubaditya [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband diffuse upwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

upwelling irradiance upwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband diffuse upwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, that has been scattered in the atmosphere at least once, passes through a horizontal unit area in an upward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MFR : Multifilter Radiometer

476

Diffusion of Kr Isotopes in Solid Ar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The diffusion coefficient D=D0e-Q0RT and isotope effect for Kr78 and Kr86 in solid Ar have been measured using a tracer technique. The activation energy QKr0 depends on the interchange parameter w, but is estimated to lie in the range 3500-3900 cal mole-1, with the most reliable w giving the lower value. Thus, the two calculated QKr0 (3853 and 4050 cal mole-1) for the vacancy mechanism using a two-body (12, 6) potential appear somewhat high, but in reasonable agreement with experiment. The isotope effect gives f?K?(D78D86-1)[(8678)12-1]=0.48±0.25 which, since QKr0?QAr0, suggests that ?K?0.6 for a single-vacancy mechanism. {Here f is the correlation factor and ?K?(?278?286-1)[(8678)12-1], where ?2 is the tracer jump rate.}

E. H. C. PARKER; B. L. SMITH; H. R. GLYDE

1969-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Turbulent diffusion with rotation or magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The turbulent diffusion tensor describing the evolution of the mean concentration of a passive scalar is investigated for forced turbulence either in the presence of rotation or a magnetic field. With rotation the Coriolis force causes a sideways deflection of the flux of mean concentration. Within the magnetohydrodynamics approximation there is no analogous effect from the magnetic field because the effects on the flow do not depend on the sign of the field. Both rotation and magnetic fields tend to suppress turbulent transport, but this suppression is weaker in the direction along the magnetic field. Turbulent transport along the rotation axis is not strongly affected by rotation, except on shorter length scales, i.e. when the scale of the variation of the mean field becomes comparable with the scale of the energy-carrying eddied.

Brandenburg, Axel; Vasil, Geoffrey M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Isothermally heatsunk diffusion cloud chamber refrigerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a diffusion cloud chamber isothermally heatsunk refrigerator which comprises: a heatsink consisting of two phases of a saturated substance existing in thermodynamic equilibrium at constant pressure and therefore at constant temperature, contained in a reservoir; a means of pressure damping to maintain constant pressure, as the ratio of the two phases present changes and introduces volumetric changes in the substance; a cooling member which transfer heat from vapor in contact with the cooling member surface to the ''cold side'' of a Peltier thermoelectric element with which the cooling member is in thermal contact; a Peltier thermoelectric element which removes the heat supplied by the cooling member from its ''cold side'' and pumps it to the ''hot side'' when driven by an electric current; and a means of transferring heat from the ''hot side'' of the Peltier thermoelectric element to the two-phase isothermal substance in the reservoir.

Menocal, S.G.

1987-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

479

Diffusion of irreversible energy technologies under uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a model of technology diffusion is consistent with characteristics of participants in most energy markets. Whereas the models used most widely for empirical research are based on the assumption that the extended delays in adoption of cost-saving innovations are the result of either lack of knowledge about the new processes or heterogeneity across potential adopters, the model presented in this paper is based on the strategic behavior by firms. The strategic interdependence of the firms` decisions is rooted in spillover effects associated with an inability to exclude others from the learning-by-doing acquired when a firm implements a new technology. The model makes extensive use of recent developments in investment theory as it relates irreversible investments under uncertainty.

Cacallo, J.D.; Sutherland, R.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Thermal diffusivity measurement system applied to polymers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the search for cleaner energy sources the improvement of the efficiency of the actual ones appears as a primary objective. In this way thermoelectric materials which are able to convert wasted heat into electricity are reveal as an interesting way to improve efficiency of car engines for example. Cost-effective energy harvesting from thermoelectric devices requires materials with high electrical conductivities and Seebeck coefficient but low thermal conductivity. Conductive polymers can fulfil these conditions if they are doped appropriately. One of the most promising polymers is Polyaniline. In this work the thermal conductivity of the polyaniline and mixtures of polyaniline with nanoclays has been studied using a new experimental set-up developed in the lab. The novel system is based on the steady-state method and it is used to obtain the thermal diffusivity of the polymers and the nanocomposites.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Uniformly Accurate Diffusive Relaxation Schemes for Multiscale Transport Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, radiative transfer, and transport equations for waves in random media, have a diffusive scaling that leads #12; 1. Introduction Many transport equations, such as the neutron transport [CZ], radiative transferUniformly Accurate Diffusive Relaxation Schemes for Multiscale Transport Equations Shi JIN y

482

Diffusion MRI of Complex Tissue Structure David Solomon Tuch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion MRI of Complex Tissue Structure by David Solomon Tuch B.A., Physics, University Solomon Tuch Submitted to the Division of Health Sciences and Technology on January 11, 2002, in partial to be beyond the scope of diffusion imaging methodology. Thesis Supervisor: Van Jay Wedeen Title: Associate

Duncan, James S.

483

DIFFUSION MECHANISMS FOR MULTIMEDIA BROADCASTING IN MOBILE AD HOC NETWORKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIFFUSION MECHANISMS FOR MULTIMEDIA BROADCASTING IN MOBILE AD HOC NETWORKS E. Baccelli Hitachi HSAL: Philippe.Jacquet@inria.fr ABSTRACT Scarce bandwidth and interferences in mobile ad-hoc networks yield in view to gain enough performance and allow applications such as multimedia diffusion in an ad hoc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

484

Comment on "Optimal Reaction Time for Surface-Mediated Diffusion"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent letter [Phys. Rev. Lett {\\bf 105}, 150606 (2010)], the surface-mediated diffusion problem is theoretically discussed, and interesting results have been obtained. However, for more general cases, the ansatz of solutions of the diffusion equation, which is the starting point of their analysis, might not be appropriate. In this comment, suggested ansatz and corresponding methods will be presented.

Yunxin Zhang

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

485

Experimental and numerical investigation of microscale hydrogen diffusion flames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are properly modeled. However, the code does not properly predict the air entrainment and pre-heating enhanced thermal-diffusive effects. Therefore, thermal diffusion for light species and different combustion models of time of operation. Generally, the energy density of typical hydrocarbon fuels is about 100 times higher

Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

486

Optical processing furnace with quartz muffle and diffuser plate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical furnace for annealing a process wafer comprising a source of optical energy, a quartz muffle having a door to hold the wafer for processing, and a quartz diffuser plate to diffuse the light impinging on the quartz muffle; a feedback system with a light sensor located in the wall of the muffle is also provided for controlling the source of optical energy.

Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Interactive visual simulation of dynamic ink diffusion effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an effective method that simulates the ink diffusion process with visual plausible effects and real-time performance. Our algorithm updates the dynamic ink volume with a hybrid grid-particle representation: the fluid velocity field ... Keywords: industrial animation, ink diffusion, interaction, motion blur

Shibiao Xu; Xing Mei; Weiming Dong; Zhiyi Zhang; Xiaopeng Zhang

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Experimental determination of the boundary condition for diffuse photons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a turbid medium, the light transport is described by the diffusion approxima- tion of the radiative of a turbid medium within a few transport mean free paths, the diffusion equation is no longer satisfied light transport through a turbid (i.e., highly scatter- ing) medium and in imaging objects

Zhu, Xiangdong

489

Diffusion in Nanoporous Phases:? Size Dependence and Levitation Effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diffusion of guests, xenon and argon, in two zeolites with different bottleneck diameters show a surprising dependence of self-diffusivity on the guest diameter. ... Note oscillation in ??(k)/2Dk2 near k = 0.5 Å-1 for the guest from LR. ... The oscillations are not large on the ordinate suggesting that the slow down in motion is not significant. ...

S. Yashonath; Pradip Kr. Ghorai

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

490

1st workshop on diffusion networks and cascade analytics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diffusion and cascades have been studied for many years in sociology, and different theoretical models have been developed. However, experimental validation has been always carried out in relatively small datasets. In recent years, with the availability ... Keywords: cascade modeling, diffusion networks

Peng Cui; Fei Wang; Hanghang Tong; Manuel Gomez Rodriguez

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Photonic bandgaps of periodic multilayers with diffuse interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the locations and widths of the forbidden bandgaps is standard [1­3]. However, generally the interfaces betweenPhotonic bandgaps of periodic multilayers with diffuse interfaces Jean-Michel André* , Philippe-michel.andre1@upmc.fr The photonic bandgap of periodic multilayers with diffuse interface is calculated

Boyer, Edmond

492

Peer Effects in the Diffusion of Solar Photovoltaic Panels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Social interaction (peer) effects are recognized as a potentially important factor in the diffusion of new products. In the case of environmentally friendly goods or technologies, both marketers and policy makers are interested in the presence of causal ... Keywords: diffusion models, empirical IO methods, endogeneity, probability models, social contagion, word of mouth

Bryan Bollinger; Kenneth Gillingham

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Peer Effects in the Diffusion of Solar Photovoltaic Panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peer Effects in the Diffusion of Solar Photovoltaic Panels Bryan Bollinger NYU Stern School base of consumers in the reference group. We study the diffusion of solar photovoltaic panels of an environmentally beneficial technology, solar photovoltaic (PV) panels. Policymakers are particularly interested

Lee, Daeyeol

494

Vacancy mediated substitutional diffusion in binary crystalline solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vacancy mediated substitutional diffusion in binary crystalline solids Anton Van der Ven a,*, Hui coefficients of substi- tutional alloys from first principles. The focus is restricted to vacancy mediated and grain boundaries that can act as vacancy sources) and diffusion in a solid containing a continuous

Ceder, Gerbrand