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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive...

2

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of residual enriched uranium in facility components for safeguards and nuclear criticality safety purposes. Current practices used to perform NDA measurements frequently have poorly defined uncertainties due to multiple factors. Working reference material (WRM) standards and container-specific surrogates are required to verify and validate NDA methods used to support characterization of gaseous diffusion equipment within the D&D project. Because working reference

3

DOE Seeks Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnati – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Task Proposal (RTP) for deactivation activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in Paducah, Kentucky.

4

DOE Seeks Quotes for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Technical Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnati– The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for an Environmental Technical Services acquisition at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) for the Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO).

5

Independent Oversight Inspection, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2006 Independent Oversight Inspection, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2006 November 2006 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, conducted an inspection of the emergency management program at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in August and September 2006. The coordination of emergency plans and procedures among USEC and DOE contractor organizations has successfully integrated the emergency management programs into a single cohesive program for the PORTS site. Other strengths include accurate hazards surveys that identify applicable

6

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program...

7

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Penetration Fire Seals at the DUF6 Conversion Building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, March 26, 2010 Consent...

8

Replacement of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) at the DOE gaseous diffusion plants: An assessment of global impacts  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) formerly operated two gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) for enriching uranium and maintained a third shutdown GDP. These plants maintain a large inventory of dichlorotetrafluorethane (CFC-114), a cholorofluorocarbon (CFC), as a coolant. The paper evaluates the global impacts of four alternatives to modify GDP coolant system operations for a three-year period beginning in 1996. Interim modification of GDP coolant system operations has the potential to reduce stratospheric ozone depletion from GDP coolant releases while a permanent solution is studied.

Socolof, M.L.; Saylor, R.E.; McCold, L.N.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2013 November 5, 2013 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the preparedness of the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, contractors at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and selected non-leased facilities to respond to a severe natural phenomena event (NPE). The review was conducted in July and August 2013 by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, which is within the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations performed this

10

Production and Handling Slide 25: The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

11

Production and Handling Slide 24: The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Site Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Site Refer to...

12

Manhattan Project: K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 > Working K-25 into the Mix, Oak Ridge:...

13

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- January 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution

14

Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant [HIAR-PAD-2011-07-27] The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission support responsibilities. Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August 2011 Independent Activity Report, Argonne National Laboratory - August 2011

15

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- April 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

16

Gaseous Diffusion Plant Production Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Gaseous Diffusion Plants Department of Energy Gaseous Diffusion Plants Phase I: Needs Assessment Robert Wages Oil, Chemical and Atomic Inte national Union Steven Markowitz Mount Sinai School of Medicine Sylvia Kieding Oil, Chemical and Atomic International Union Mark Griffon University of Massachusetts Lowell Elizabeth Averill Samaras Alice Hamilton College October 1, 1997 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Number Executive Summary 1 J: OVERVIEW 1. Introduction 2-3 2. Methods 3-8 3. Principal Findings 9-16 4. Need for Medical Surveillance and Risk Communication 16-17 PART II: METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS 4. Exposure Assessment Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C 5. Focus Group Results Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C 6. Epidemiology and Other Health Studies EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Purpose We report the results and analysis of a one year needs assessment study evaluating

17

Band Formation during Gaseous Diffusion in Aerogels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study experimentally how gaseous HCl and NH_3 diffuse from opposite sides of and react in silica aerogel rods with porosity of 92 % and average pore size of about 50 nm. The reaction leads to solid NH_4Cl, which is deposited in thin sheet-like structures. We present a numerical study of the phenomenon. Due to the difference in boundary conditions between this system and those usually studied, we find the sheet-like structures in the aerogel to differ significantly from older studies. The influence of random nucleation centers and inhomogeneities in the aerogel is studied numerically.

M. A. Einarsrud; F. A. Maao; A. Hansen; M. Kirkedelen; J. Samseth

1997-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

18

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building The K-25 plant, located on the southwestern end of the Oak Ridge reservation, used the gaseous diffusion method to separate uranium-235 from uranium-238. Based on the well-known principle that molecules of a lighter isotope would pass through a porous barrier more readily than molecules of a heavier one, gaseous diffusion produced through myriads of repetitions a gas increasingly rich in uranium-235 as the heavier uranium-238 was separated out in a system of cascades. Although producing minute amounts of final product measured in grams, gaseous diffusion required a massive

19

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the...

20

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - 026 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (026 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is located in south central Ohio, approximately 20 miles north of Portsmouth, Ohio and 70 miles south of Columbus, Ohio. Construction of the PGDP began in late 1952 to expand the Federal Government¿s gaseous diffusion program already in place at Oak Ridge, Tennessee and Paducah, Kentucky. The facility was built to increase the production of enriched uranium at rates substantially above the other

22

Enforcement Documents - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Enforcement Documents - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Intennech, Inc. - March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Intermech, Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Anchor Bolts and Pipe Supports at the DUF6 Conversion Buildings at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, INC - March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Penetration Fire Seals at the DUF6 Conversion Building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant March 26, 2010 Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 Consent Order issued to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC related to

23

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission support responsibilities. Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August

24

Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition December 19, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis K-25 Demolition - Oak Ridge 2013 K-25 Demolition - Oak Ridge 2013 Media Contacts Ben Williams, DOE, (865) 574-4912 Wayne McKinney, UCOR, (865) 576-6284 Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Today, the Department of Energy announced that its contractor URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC, or UCOR, has completed demolition of the K-25 gaseous diffusion building, the largest facility in the DOE complex. UCOR took over the project in 2011 and has maintained a strong safety record while completing the demolition over one year ahead of its current schedule and approximately $300 million under the current budget. All debris removal is expected to be completed in spring 2014.

25

Feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion equipment  

SciTech Connect

The five buildings at the K-25 Site formerly involved in the gaseous diffusion process contain 5000 gaseous diffusion stages as well as support facilities that are internally contaminated with uranium deposits. The gaseous diffusion facilities located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant also contain similar equipment and will eventually close. The decontamination of these facilities will require the most cost-effective technology consistent with the criticality, health physics, industrial hygiene, and environmental concerns; the technology must keep exposures to hazardous substances to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report documents recent laboratory experiments that were conducted to determine the feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of the internal surfaces of the gaseous diffusion equipment that is contaminated with uranium deposits. A gaseous fluorinating agent is used to fluorinate the solid uranium deposits to gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The lab results regarding the feasibility of the gas-phase process are encouraging. These results especially showed promise for a novel decontamination approach called the long-term, low-temperature (LTLT) process. In the LTLT process: The equipment is rendered leak tight, evacuated, leak tested, and pretreated, charged with chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) to subatmospheric pressure, left for an extended period, possibly > 4 months, while processing other items. Then the UF{sub 6} and other gases are evacuated. The UF{sub 6} is recovered by chemical trapping. The lab results demonstrated that ClF{sub 3} gas at subatmospheric pressure and at {approx} 75{degree}F is capable of volatilizing heavy deposits of uranyl fluoride from copper metal surfaces sufficiently that the remaining radioactive emissions are below limits.

Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - April  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 2013 April 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - April 2013 April 2013 Review of the Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO). The objective of the Independent Oversight review was to evaluate PPPO's conduct of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase I verification review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The contractor at PORTS is Fluor-Babcock & Wilcox Portsmouth (FBP). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations

27

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Paducah Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 464-0009 Local Outreach Office: Joe Hudson 1930 North 13th Street Paducah, KY 42001 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

28

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Portsmouth Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: Jeanne Cisco 2288 Wakefield Mound Road Piketon, OH 45661 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the Unitedsteel Workers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and

29

New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup August 18, 2010 - 10:47am Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, we took a closer look at the dismantling of the final W62 warhead, a major milestone in the nation's efforts to reduce the amount of nuclear weapons in its stockpile. But after five decades of nuclear weapons production, the Cold War didn't just create a stockpile -- it left 1.5 million cubic meters of solid waste and 88 million gallons of liquid waste. This waste requires treatment and permanent safe storage in gaseous diffusion plants, like the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in south-central Ohio. This week, the Department of Energy accelerated Portsmouth GDP cleanup

30

Privatization of the gaseous diffusion plants and impacts on nuclear criticality safety administration  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 created the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) on July 1, 1993. The USEC is a government-owned business that leases those Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) facilities at the Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, sites from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that are required for enriching uranium. Lockheed Martin Utility Services is the operating contractor for the USEC-leased facilities. The DOE has retained use of, and regulation over, some facilities and areas at the Portsmouth and Paducah sites for managing legacy wastes and environmental restoration activities. The USEC is regulated by the DOE, but is currently changing to regulation under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The USEC is also preparing for privatization of the uranium enrichment enterprise. These changes have significantly affected the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) programs at the sites.

D`Aquila, D.M.; Holliday, R.T. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Dean, J.C. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PORTS-2011-08-03 PORTS-2011-08-03 Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 08/01/2011 - 08/03/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Portsmouth Site Office (PORTS) and the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky, from August 1-3, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's

32

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PAD-2011-07-27 PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 07/25/2011 - 07/27/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission

33

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAD-2011-07-27 PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 07/25/2011 - 07/27/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission

34

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PORTS-2011-08-03 PORTS-2011-08-03 Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 08/01/2011 - 08/03/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Portsmouth Site Office (PORTS) and the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky, from August 1-3, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's

35

Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant State Kentucky Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/RCRA Scope Summary Ensure that the environmental impacts of activities at the Site are investigated and appropriate response actions are taken. Parties U.S. DOE; Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet; U.S. EPA Date 2/01/1998 SCOPE * Ensure all releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants are addressed to achieve comprehensive remediation of the site. * Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring response actions in accordance with CERCLA, RCRA, and Kentucky Law. * Facilitate cooperation, exchange of information, and participation of the Parties and

36

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This calendar year 1990 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the summary, discussion, and conclusions (Part 1) and the data presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are as follows: report 1990 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (when appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance.

Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Greenhouse warming potential of candidate gaseous diffusion plant coolants  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary estimate has been made of the greenhouse warming potential (GWP) of coolants under consideration as substitutes for CFC-114 in the gaseous diffusion plants. Coolants are not at present regulated on the basis of GWP, but may well be in the future. Use of c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} or n-C{sub 4}F{sub 10} is estimated to have three to four times the greenhouse impact of an equivalent use of CFC-114. Neither of the substitutes, of course, would cause any ozone depletion. HCFC-124 (a probable commercial substitute for CFC-114, but not presently under serious consideration due to its relatively high UF{sub 6} reactivity) would have much less greenhouse and ozone depletion impact than CFC-114. The GWP estimates derive from a simple model that approximately reproduces literature values for similar compounds. The major uncertainty in these estimates lies in the atmospheric lifetime, especially of the perfluorocarbon compounds, for which little reliable information exists. In addition to GWP estimates for coolants, the overall greenhouse impact of the gaseous diffusion plants is calculated, including indirect power-related CO{sub 2} emissions. This result is used to compare greenhouse impacts of nuclear- and coal-produced electricity. 11 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

DOE Seeks Proposals for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Technical Services Contract  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnati - The Department of Energy today issued a Draft Request for Proposals (RFP) for an Environmental Technical Services acquisition at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Piketon, Ohio.

40

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Production Workers Screening Projects Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Paducah Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: James Harbison 2525 Cairo Road Paducah, KY 42001 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing test, and an educational workshop. This program also offers CT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant Former Workers, Construction Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Portsmouth Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPh, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 464-0009 Local Outreach Office: Ron Bush 1236 Gallia Street Portsmouth, OH 45662 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

42

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program.

Horak, C.M. [ed.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Gaseous diffusion plant transition from DOE to external regulation  

SciTech Connect

After many years of operation as government-owned/contractor-operated facilities, large portions of the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, were leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). These facilities are now certified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and subject to oversight by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The transition from DOE to NRC regulation was more difficult than expected. The original commitment was to achieve NRC certification in October 1995; however, considerably more time was required and transition-related costs escalated. The Oak Ridge Operations Office originally estimated the cost of transition at $60 million; $240 million has been spent to date. The DOE`s experience in transitioning the GDPs to USEC operation with NRC oversight provides valuable lessons (both positive and negative) that could be applied to future transitions.

Dann, R.K.; Crites, T.R.; Rahm-Crites, L.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This calendar year 1989 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the Summary, Discussion, and Conclusions (Part 1) and the Data Presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are the following: report 1989 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance. Routine monitoring and sampling for radiation, radioactive materials, and chemical substances on and off the DOE site are used to document compliance with appropriate standards, to identify trends, to provide information for the public, and to contribute to general environmental knowledge. The surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of protecting the public, employees, and environment from harm that could be caused by its activities and reducing negative environmental impacts to the greatest degree practicable. Environmental-monitoring information complements data on specific releases, trends, and summaries. 26 refs.

Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 BEFORE THE OHIO ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY In the Matter Of: United States Department of Energy : Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant : Findings and Orders P.O. Box 700 : Piketon, Ohio 45661-0700 : Respondent It is hereby agreed by and among the parties hereto as follows: Table of Contents I. Jurisdiction II. Parties Bound III. Definitions IV. Findings of Fact V. Orders VI. Limitations of Director's Approval VII. Notice VIII. Project Managers IX. Dispute Resolution X. Funding XI. Other Applicable Laws XII. Reservation of Rights XIII. Modification XIV. Termination XV. Other Claims XVI. Signatories XVII. Waiver I. Jurisdiction These Director's Final Findings and Orders ("Orders") are issued to the United States

46

Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: K-25 Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: Bruce Lawson 133 Raleigh Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Local Medical Clinics: ParkMed 110 S. Illinois Avenue Oak Ridge, TN 37380 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge,

47

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Long-range global warming impact of gaseous diffusion plant operation  

SciTech Connect

The DOE gaseous diffusion plant complex makes extensive use of CFC-114 as a primary coolant. As this material is on the Montreal Protocol list of materials scheduled for production curtailment, a substitute must be found. In addition to physical cooling properties, the gaseous diffusion application imposes the unique requirement of chemical inertness to fluorinating agents. This has narrowed the selection of a near-term substitute to two fully fluorinated material, FC-318 and FC-3110, which are likely to be strong, long-lived greenhouse gases. In this document, calculations are presented showing, for a number of plausible scenarios of diffusion plant operation and coolant replacement strategy, the future course of coolant use, greenhouse gas emissions (including coolant and power-related indirect CO{sub 2} emissions), and the consequent global temperature impacts of these scenarios.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OH OH EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: February 2008 ETR-12 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) is proposed for long-term containment of contaminated materials from the planned Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Acceptable performance of the proposed OSWDF will depend on interactions between engineered landfill features and operations methods that recognize the unique characteristics of the waste stream and site-

50

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 State Ohio Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Agreement between the Ohio EPA and DOE approving the STP and setting waste treatment milestones Parties DOE; Ohio Department of Environmental Protection Date 10/4/1995 SCOPE * Approve the Compliance Plan Volume of the amended PSTP submitted to Ohio EPA on October 2, 1995, hereafter referred to as "approved STP." * Set forth guidelines for storage and treatment of mixed wastes at the Facility which are not being stored in accordance with the LDR requirements of OAC rule 3745-59- 50. * Establish milestones and target dates for approved STP. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES

51

Summary - Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah, KY Paducah, KY EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: August 2008 ETR-16 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility(OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is an active uranium enrichment facility that was placed on the National Priorities List. DOE is required to remediate the PGDP in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is evaluating alternatives to dispose of waste generated from the remedial activities at the PGDP. One option is to construct an on-site disposal facility (OSDF) meeting the CERCLA requirements.

52

Nuclear safety procedure upgrade project at USEC/MMUS gaseous diffusion plants  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Utility Services has embarked on a program to upgrade procedures at both of its Gaseous Diffusion Plant sites. The transition from a U.S. Department of Energy government-operated facility to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated has necessitated a complete upgrade of plant operating procedures and practices incorporating human factors as well as a philosophy change in their use. This program is designed to meet the requirements of the newly written 10CFR76, {open_quotes}The Certification of Gaseous Diffusion Plants,{close_quotes} and aid in progression toward NRC certification. A procedures upgrade will help ensure increased nuclear safety, enhance plant operation, and eliminate personnel procedure errors/occurrences.

Kocsis, F.J. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

D&D of the French High Enrichment Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the D&D program that is being implemented at France's High Enrichment Gaseous Diffusion Plant, which was designed to supply France's Military with Highly Enriched Uranium. This plant was definitively shut down in June 1996, following French President Jacques Chirac's decision to end production of Highly Enriched Uranium and dismantle the corresponding facilities.

BEHAR, Christophe; GUIBERTEAU, Philippe; DUPERRET, Bernard; TAUZIN, Claude

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

54

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the major Environmental Restoration (ER) concerns at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The identified solid waste management units at PGDP are listed. In the Department of Energy (DOE) Five Year Plan development process, one or more waste management units are addressed in a series of activity data sheets (ADSs) which identify planned scope, schedule, and cost objectives that are representative of the current state of planned technical development for individual or multiple sites.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review, April 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology......................................................................................................................................... 1

56

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review, April 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology......................................................................................................................................... 1

57

Environmental effects of the construction and operation of a gaseous diffusion plant  

SciTech Connect

The impacts upon the environment resulting from construction, stert-up, and operation of a gaseous dfffusion plant are described. Some of the impacts are typical regardless of location of the plant. Others are atypical and depend upon location; those are presented, by way of example, as they occur at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The various environmental contaminants that may be produced in the operating plant are described. The concentrations of those contaminants are stated; and the adverse biological effects of pertinent conteminants are elucidated. UF/sup 6/ may be enriched in the Portsmouth Gaseous Wffusion Plant to almost any /sup 235/U concentration desired. The environmental impact of the plant varies somewhat according to /sup 235/U concentrations. However, commercial plants are not expected to enrich /sup 235/U in concentrations greater than 4%. for this reason, environmental effects due to Portsmouth operations within that range are emphasized. The study revealed that present discharges from the plants generally have no detrimental effects upon the environment. (auth)

1973-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

58

Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 1 - Future Uses of the Subtitle D Landfill 2 3. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 2 - OSDF Siting in a Brownfield Area 3 4. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 3 - Seismic Issues 4 5. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 4 - Post-Closure Public Use of the OSDF 5 6. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 5 - Public Communication Plan 7 7. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 6 - Baseline Schedule 8 8. RECOMMENDATIONS 8 9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 10 10. REFERENCES 10 APPENDIX 11 1 1. INTRODUCTION The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is an active uranium enrichment facility that is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Uranium enrichment facilities at PGDP are leased to and operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. In 1994, PGDP was placed

60

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1990 to November 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 23, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, guiding plans for remediation, and protecting human health. In September 1992, a renewed permit was issued which requires toxicity monitoring of continuous and intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities. This report includes ESD/ORNL activities occurring from December 1990 to November 1992.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1992--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The goals of BMP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, characterize potential health and environmental impacts, document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, bioaccumulation studies, and ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1992 to December 1993, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A.; Hinzman, R.L.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution, January 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of the Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1

63

Infrared absorption strengths of potential gaseous diffusion plant coolants and related reaction products  

SciTech Connect

The DOE gaseous diffusion plant complex makes extensive use of CFC-114 as a primary coolant. As this material is scheduled for production curtailment within the next few years, a search for substitutes is underway, and apparently workable alternatives have been found and are under testing. The presently favored substitutes, FC-c3l8 and FC-3110, satisfy ozone depletion and operational chemical compatibility concerns, but will be long-lived greenhouse gases, and thus may be regulated on that basis in the future. A further search is therefore underway for compounds with shorter atmospheric lifetimes which could otherwise satisfy operational physical and chemical requirements. A number of such candidates are in the process of being screened for chemical compatibility in a fluorinating environment. This document presents infrared spectral data developed and used in that study for candidates recently examined, and also for many of their fluorination reaction products. The data include gas-phase infrared spectra, quantitative peak intensities as a function of partial pressure, and integrated absorbance strength in the IR-transparent atmospheric window of interest to global warming modeling. Combining this last property with literature or estimated atmospheric lifetimes, rough estimates of global warming potential for these compounds are also presented.

Trowbridge, L.D.; Angel, E.C.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) conducted March 14 through 25, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental risk associated with ORGDP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORGDP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during is on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the ORGDP Survey findings for in inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 120 refs., 41 figs., 74 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1993 to December 1994  

SciTech Connect

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was implemented in 1987 by the University of Kentucky. Research staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as reviewers and advisers to the University of Kentucky. Beginning in fall 1991, ESD added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and (4) recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. In September 1992, a renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit was issued to PGDP. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1993 to December 1994, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was conducted by the University of Kentucky Between 1987 and 1992 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from January 1996 to December 1996, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.; Konetsky, B.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Petrie, R.B.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

IAEA Verification Experiment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Report on the Cascade Header Enrichment Monitor  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe the Cascade Header Enrichment Monitor (CHEM) for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant at Piketon, Ohio, and present the calibration and measurement results. The US government has offered excess fissile material that is no longer needed for defense purposes for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspection. Measurement results provided by the CHEM were used by the IAEA in a verification experiment to provide confidence that the US successfully blended excess highly enriched uranium (HEU) down to low enriched uranium (LEU). The CHEM measured the uranium enrichment in two cascade header pipes, a 20.32-cm HEU pipe and a 7.62-cm product LEU pipe. The CHEM determines the amount of {sup 235}U from the 185.7-keV gamma-ray photopeak and the amount of total uranium by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) of the 98.4-keV x-ray from uranium with a {sup 57}Co XRF source. The ratio yields the enrichment. The CHEM consists of a collimator assembly, an electromechanically cooled germanium detector, and a rack-mounted personal computer running commercial and custom software. The CHEM was installed in December 1997 and was used by the IAEA inspectors for announced and unannounced inspections on the HEU and LEU header pipes through October 1998. The equipment was sealed with tamper-indicating enclosures when the inspectors were not present.

P. L. Kerr; D. A. Close; W. S. Johnson; R. M. Kandarian; C. E. Moss; C. D. Romero

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and Surrounding Area, Portsmouth, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the 16 square-mile (~41 square-kilometer) area surrounding the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The survey was performed in August 2007 utilizing a large array of helicopter mounted sodium iodide detectors. The purpose of the survey was to update the previous radiological survey levels of the environment and surrounding areas of the plant. A search for a missing radium-226 source was also performed. Implied exposure rates, man-made activity, and excess bismuth-214 activity, as calculated from the aerial data are presented in the form of isopleth maps superimposed on imagery of the surveyed area. Ground level and implied aerial exposure rates for nine specific locations are compared. Detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with those expected from normal background emitters. At specific plant locations described in the report, man-made activity was consistent with the operational histories of the location. There was no spectral activity that would indicate the presence of the lost source.

Namdoo Moon

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Independent Oversight Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, November 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant May 2011 November 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology ....................................................................................................................................... 2

70

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution, January 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1

71

Prioritizing and scheduling Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant safeguards upgrades. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Site Safeguards and Security Plan (SSSP), facilities are required to develop a Resource Plan (RP). The Resource Plan provides documentation and justification for the facility`s planned upgrades, including the schedule, priority, and cost estimates for the safeguards and security upgrades. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) management has identified and obtained funding approval for a number of safeguards and security upgrades, including line-item construction projects. These upgrade projects were selected to address a variety of concerns identified in the PORTS vulnerability assessments and other reviews performed in support of the SSSP process. However, budgeting and scheduling constraints do not make it possible to simultaneously begin implementation of all of the upgrade projects. A formal methodology and analysis are needed to explicitly address the trade-offs between competing safeguards objectives, and to prioritize and schedule the upgrade projects to ensure that the maximum benefit can be realized in the shortest possible time frame. The purpose of this report is to describe the methodology developed to support these upgrade project scheduling decisions. The report also presents the results obtained from applying the methodology to a set of the upgrade projects selected by PORTS S&S management. Data for the analysis are based on discussions with personnel familiar with the PORTS safeguards and security needs, the requirements for implementing these upgrades, and upgrade funding limitations. The analysis results presented here assume continued highly enriched uranium (HEU) operations at PORTS. However, the methodology developed is readily adaptable for the evaluation of other operational scenarios and other resource allocation issues relevant to PORTS.

Edmunds, T.; Saleh, R.; Zevanove, S.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio, is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Uranium hexafluoride enriched uranium than 1.0 wt percent {sup 235}U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 (Reference 1) and 178 (Reference 2), or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF{sub 6} cylinders/overpacks. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF{sub 6} packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the is documented in Reference 4.

Becker, D.L.; Green, D.J.; Lindquist, M.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The Mailbox Computer System for the IAEA verification experiment on HEU downlending at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

IN APRIL 1996, THE UNITED STATES (US) ADDED THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT TO THE LIST OF FACILITIES ELIGIBLE FOR THE APPLICATION OF INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA) SAFEGUARDS. AT THAT TIME, THE US PROPOSED THAT THE IAEA CARRY OUT A ''VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT'' AT THE PLANT WITH RESPECT TO DOOWNBLENDING OF ABOUT 13 METRIC TONS OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) IN THE FORM OF URANIUM HEXAFLUROIDE (UF6). DURING THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1997 THROUGH JULY 1998, THE IAEA CARRIED OUT THE REQUESTED VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT. THE VERIFICATION APPROACH USED FOR THIS EXPERIMENT INCLUDED, AMONG OTHER MEASURES, THE ENTRY OF PROCESS-OPERATIONAL DATA BY THE FACILITY OPERATOR ON A NEAR-REAL-TIME BASIS INTO A ''MAILBOX'' COMPUTER LOCATED WITHIN A TAMPER-INDICATING ENCLOSURE SEALED BY THE IAEA.

Aronson, A.L.; Gordon, D.M.

2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Prediction of external corrosion for steel cylinders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Application of an empirical method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer of 1995, ultrasonic wall thickness data were collected for 100 steel cylinders containing depleted uranium (DU) hexafluoride located at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The cylinders were selected for measurement to assess the condition of the more vulnerable portion of the cylinder inventory at PGDP. The purpose of this report is to apply the method used in Lyon to estimate the effects of corrosion for larger unsampled populations as a function of time. The scope of this report is limited and is not intended to represent the final analyses of available data. Future efforts will include continuing analyses of available data to investigate defensible deviations from the conservative assumptions made to date. For each cylinder population considered, two basic types of analyses were conducted: (1) estimates were made of the number of cylinders as a function of time that will have a minimum wall thickness of either 0 mils (1 mil = 0.00 1 in.) or 250 mils and (2) the current minimum wall thickness distributions across cylinders were estimated for each cylinder population considered. Additional analyses were also performed investigating comparisons of the results for F and G yards with the results presented in Lyon (1995).

Lyon, B.F.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Nuclear criticality safety controls for uranium deposits during D and D at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management has issued a challenge to complete DOE environmental cleanup within a decade. The response for Oak Ridge facilities is in accordance with the DOE ten-year plan which calls for completion of > 95% of environmental management work by the year 2006. This will result in a 99% risk reduction and in a significant savings in base line costs in waste management (legacy waste); remedial action (groundwater, soil, etc.); and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). It is assumed that there will be long-term institutional control of cascade equipment, i.e., there will be no walk away from sites, and that there will be firm radioactivity release limits by 1999 for recycle metals. An integral part of these plants is the removal of uranium deposits which pose nuclear criticality safety concerns in the shut down of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. DOE has initiated the Nuclear Criticality Stabilization Program to improve nuclear criticality safety by removing the larger uranium deposits from unfavorable geometry equipment. Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements have identified the location of these deposits. The objective of the K-25 Site Nuclear Criticality Stabilization Program is to remove and place uranium deposits into safe geometry storage containers to meet the double contingency principle. Each step of the removal process results in safer conditions where multiple controls are present. Upon completion of the Program, nuclear criticality risks will be greatly reduced.

Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Jollay, L.J. III; Dahl, T.L. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Investigation of Auxiliary Power Substation 95A4 fault and fire, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, March 24, 1982  

SciTech Connect

On March 24, 1982, an electrical fault and resultant fire in the 480 volt Auxiliary Power Substation 95A4 at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant destroyed that substation. There were no personal injuries, the overall loss was limited to the Substation, and the cost of replacing the Substation with repaired and new components has been estimated at $184,000. At the time of the incident, Goodyear was involved in a project to replace the obsolete 480 volt circuit breaker of the Auxiliary Power System. This project involved the disassembly, refurishing, and reassembly of 480 volt circuit breaker carriages by Goodyear personnel. The fault occurred in a circuit breaker upgraded under this project. The investigation of this accident is reported. The evidence suggests the fault resulted from the improper assembly of an upgraded 480 volt circuit breaker. Compounding the problem and leading to the extensive damage was the failure of the transformer secondary breaker to trip open as designed and interrupt the flow of power to the substation. It is surmised that inadequate testing during preventive maintenance contributed to this condition. Additional factors which may have contributed to the accident included: no requirements for assuring the competence of the electricians who installed the circuit breakers, no specific assembly instructions to the electricians, inadequate procedure instructions, and an inadequate procedure governing operational or load testing of the breaker. (LCL)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

"Projected Real GDP Growth Trend"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

69465655,0.02391459409,0.01807394932 " * These are historical annual growth rates in real GDP (2005 chained dollars). The annual changes are compounded and averaged in the table...

78

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

implement Cold Shutdown requirements; disposition of depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinders; and perform Decontamination and Decommissioning. Portsmouth D&D Project Portsmouth...

79

Rate of Contamination Removal of Two Phyto-remediation Sites at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes applications of phyto-remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. Phyto-remediation has been implemented to assist in the removal of TCE (trichloroethylene) in the groundwater at two locations at the PORTS facility: the X-740 area and the X-749/X-120 area. Phyto-remediation technology is based on the ability of certain plants species (in this case hybrid poplar trees) and their associated rhizo-spheric microorganisms to remove, degrade, or contain chemical contaminants located in the soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, and possibly even the atmosphere. Phyto-remediation technology is a promising clean-up solution for a wide variety of pollutants and sites. Mature trees, such as the hybrid poplar, can consume up to 3,000 gallons of groundwater per acre per day. Organic compounds are captured in the trees' root systems. These organic compounds are degraded by ultraviolet light as they are transpired along with the water vapor through the leaves of the trees. The phyto-remediation system at the X-740 area encompasses 766 one-year old hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x nigra, Populus nigra x maximowiczii, and Populus deltoides x nigra) that were planted 10 feet apart in rows 10 feet to 20 feet apart, over an area of 2.6 acres. The system was installed to manage the VOC contaminant plume. At the X749/X-120 area, a phyto-remediation system of 2,640 hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x maximowiczii) was planted in seven areas/zones to manage the VOC contaminant plume. The objectives of these systems are to remove contamination from the groundwater and to prevent further migration of contaminants. The goal of these remediation procedures is to achieve completely mature and functional phyto-remediation systems within two years of the initial planting of the hybrid poplar trees at each planting location. There is a direct relationship between plant transpiration, soil moisture, and groundwater flow in a phyto-remediation system. The existing monitoring program was expanded in 2004 in order to evaluate the interactions among these processes. The purpose of this monitoring program was to determine the rate of contaminant removal and to more accurately predict the amount of time needed to remediate the contaminated groundwater. Initial planting occurred in 1999 at the X-740 area, with additional replanting in 2001 and 2002. In 2003, coring of selected trees and chemical analyses illustrated the presence of TCE; however, little impact was observed in groundwater levels, analytical monitoring, and periodic tree diameter monitoring at the X-740 area. To provide better understanding of how these phyto-remediation systems work, a portable weather station was installed at the X-740 area to provide data for estimating transpiration and two different systems for measuring sap flow and sap velocity were outfitted to numerous trees. After evaluating and refining the groundwater flow and contaminant transport models, the data gathered by these two inventive methods can be used to establish a rate of contaminant removal and to better predict the time required in order to meet remediation goals for the phyto-remediation systems located at the PORTS site. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM Federal Services, P.O. Box 789, Piketon, OH 45661 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING VARIABILITY IN MW66 AND NEARBY WELLS, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of disposal records, soil data, and spatial/temporal groundwater data from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 7 indicate that the peak contaminant concentrations measured in monitoring well (MW) 66 result from the influence of the regional PGDP NW Plume, and does not support the presence of significant vertical transport from local contaminant sources in SWMU 7. This updated evaluation supports the 2006 conceptualization which suggested the high and low concentrations in MW66 represent different flow conditions (i.e., local versus regional influences). Incorporation of the additional lines of evidence from data collected since 2006 provide the basis to link high contaminant concentrations in MW66 (peaks) to the regional 'Northwest Plume' and to the upgradient source, specifically, the C400 Building Area. The conceptual model was further refined to demonstrate that groundwater and the various contaminant plumes respond to complex site conditions in predictable ways. This type of conceptualization bounds the expected system behavior and supports development of environmental cleanup strategies, providing a basis to support decisions even if it is not feasible to completely characterize all of the 'complexities' present in the system. We recommend that the site carefully consider the potential impacts to groundwater and contaminant plume migration as they plan and implement onsite production operations, remediation efforts, and reconfiguration activities. For example, this conceptual model suggests that rerouting drainage water, constructing ponds or basin, reconfiguring cooling water systems, capping sites, decommissioning buildings, fixing (or not fixing) water leaks, and other similar actions will potentially have a 'direct' impact on the groundwater contaminant plumes. Our conclusion that the peak concentrations in MW66 are linked to the regional PGDP NW Plume does not imply that there TCE is not present in SWMU 7. The available soil and groundwater data indicate that the some of the waste disposed in this facility contacted and/or were contaminated by TCE. In our assessment, the relatively small amount of TCE associated with SWMU 7 is not contributing detectable TCE to the groundwater and does not represent a significant threat to the environment, particularly in an area where remediation and/or management of TCE in the NW plume will be required for an extended timeframe. If determined to be necessary by the PGDP team and regulators, additional TCE characterization or cleanup activities could be performed. Consistent with the limited quantity of TCE in SWMU 7, we identify a range of low cost approaches for such activities (e.g., soil gas surveys for characterization or SVE for remediation). We hope that this information is useful to the Paducah team and to their regulators and stakeholders to develop a robust environmental management path to address the groundwater and soil contamination associated with the burial ground areas.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Thermal discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant outfalls: Impacts on stream temperatures and fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks  

SciTech Connect

The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7 C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

Roy, W.K.; Ryon, M.G.; Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Div.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Potential Hazards Relating to Pyrolysis of c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} in Selected Gaseous Diffusion Plant Operations  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program intended to replace the present evaporative coolant at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) with a non-ozone-depleting alternate, a series of investigations of the suitability of candidate substitutes in under way. One issue concerning a primary candidate, c-C4F8, is the possibility that it might produce the highly toxic perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in high temperature environments. This study was commissioned to determine the likelihood and severity of decomposition under two specific high temperature thermal environments, namely the use of a flame test for the presence of coolant vapors and welding in the presence of coolant vapors. The purpose of the study was to develop and evaluate available data to provide information that will allow the technical and industrial hygiene staff at the GDPs to perform appropriate safety evaluations and to determine the need for field testing or experimental work. The scope of this study included a literature search and an evaluation of the information developed therefrom. Part of that evaluation consists of chemical kinetics modeling of coolant decomposition in the two operational environments. The general conclusions are that PFIB formation is unlikely in either situation but that it cannot be ruled out completely under extreme conditions. The presence of oxygen, moisture, and combustion products will tend to lead to formation of oxidation products (COF2, CO, CO2, and HF) rather than PFIB.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Verification experiment on the downblending of high enriched uranium (HEU) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Digital video surveillance of the HEU feed stations  

SciTech Connect

As part of a Safeguards Agreement between the US and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio, was added to the list of facilities eligible for the application of IAEA safeguards. Currently, the facility is in the process of downblending excess inventory of HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) from US defense related programs for commercial use. An agreement was reached between the US and the IAEA that would allow the IAEA to conduct an independent verification experiment at the Portsmouth facility, resulting in the confirmation that the HEU was in fact downblended. The experiment provided an opportunity for the DOE laboratories to recommend solutions/measures for new IAEA safeguards applications. One of the measures recommended by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and selected by the IAEA, was a digital video surveillance system for monitoring activity at the HEU feed stations. This paper describes the SNL implementation of the digital video system and its integration with the Load Cell Based Weighing System (LCBWS) from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The implementation was based on commercially available technology that also satisfied IAEA criteria for tamper protection and data authentication. The core of the Portsmouth digital video surveillance system was based on two Digital Camera Modules (DMC-14) from Neumann Consultants, Germany.

Martinez, R.L.; Tolk, K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whiting, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Castleberry, K.; Lenarduzzi, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms applicable'' and relevant and appropriate'' is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed.

Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms ``applicable`` and ``relevant and appropriate`` is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed.

Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Thermal Discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Outfalls: Impacts on Stream Temperatures and Fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks  

SciTech Connect

The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

Roy, W.K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Review of the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Oversight of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Criticality Safety Program, May 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Oversight of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Criticality Safety Program May 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

88

ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the multiple lines of evidence support the occurrence of cometabolism and the potential for the process to contribute to temporal and spatial attenuation of TCE in PGDP groundwater, then a follow-up enzyme probe microcosm study to better estimate biological degradation rate(s) is warranted.

Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

Fissible Deposit Characterization at the Former Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant by {sup 252}CF-Source-Driven Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deposit Removal Project was undertaken with the support of the U. S. Department of Energy at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The project team performed the safe removal of the hydrated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) deposits from the K-29 Building of the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The deposits had developed as a result of air leakage into UF{sub 6} gas process pipes; UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} became hydrated by moisture from the air and deposited inside the pipes. The mass, its distribution, and the hydrogen content [that is, the ratio of H to U (H/U)], were the key parameters that controlled the nuclear criticality safety of the deposits. Earlier gamma-ray spectrometry measurements in K-29 had identified the largest deposits in the building. The first and third largest deposits in the building were measured in this program. The first deposit, found in the Unit 2, Cell 7, B-Line Outlet process pipe (called the ''Hockey Stick'') was about 1,300 kg ({+-} 50% uncertainty) at 3.34 wt% {sup 235}U enrichment ({+-}50% uncertainty) and according to the gamma-ray spectroscopy was uniformly distributed. The second deposit (the third-largest deposit in the building), found in the Unit 2, Cell 6, A-Line Outlet process pipe (called the ''Tee-Pipe''), had a uranium deposit estimated to be about 240 kg ({+-} 50% uncertainty) at 3.4 wt % {sup 235}U enrichment ({+-} 20% uncertainty). Before deposit removal activities began, the Deposit Removal Project team needed to survey the inside of the pipes intrusively to assess the nuclear criticality safety of the deposits. Therefore, the spatial distribution of the deposits, the total uranium deposit mass, and the moderation level resulting from hydration of the deposits, all of which affect nuclear criticality safety were required. To perform the task safely and effectively, the Deposit Removal Project team requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) characterize the two largest deposits with the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven transmission (CFSDT) technique, an active neutron interrogation method developed for use at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to identify nuclear weapons components in containers. The active CFSDT measurement technique uses CFSDT time-of-flight measurements of prompt neutrons and gamma rays from an externally introduced {sup 252}Cf source.

Hannon, T.F.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Uckan, T.; Valentine, T.E.; Wyatt, M.S.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE CURRENT WATER POLICY BOUNDARY AT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1988, groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99) was identified in samples collected from residential water wells withdrawing groundwater from the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA) north of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) facility. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided temporary drinking water supplies to approximately 100 potentially affected residents by initially supplying bottled water, water tanks, and water-treatment systems, and then by extending municipal water lines, all at no cost, to those persons whose wells could be affected by contaminated groundwater. The Water Policy boundary was established in 1993. In the Policy, DOE agreed to pay the reasonable monthly cost of water for homes and businesses and, in exchange, many of the land owners signed license agreements committing to cease using the groundwater via rural water wells. In 2012, DOE requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), managing contractor of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), provide an independent assessment of the quality and quantity of the existing groundwater monitoring data and determine if there is sufficient information to support a modification to the boundary of the current Water Policy. As a result of the assessment, ORAU concludes that sufficient groundwater monitoring data exists to determine that a shrinkage and/or shift of the plume(s) responsible for the initial development of this policy has occurred. Specifically, there is compelling evidence that the TCE plume is undergoing shrinkage due to natural attenuation and associated degradation. The plume shrinkage (and migration) has also been augmented in local areas where large volumes of groundwater were recovered by pump-and treat remedial systems along the eastern and western boundaries of the Northwest Plume, and in other areas where pump-and-treat systems have been deployed by DOE to remove source contaminants. The available evidence supports adjusting the western and northwestern Water Policy boundary. Based on the historical and modeled hydrogeological data reflecting past flow and plume attenuation, along with associated plume migration toward the northeast, the establishment of a new boundary along the westernmost margin of the earliest indication of the TCE plume is proposed and justified on hydrogeological grounds. Approximately 30% of the original area would remain within the adjusted Water Policy area west and northwest of the PGDP facility. This modification would release about 70% of the area, although individual properties would overlap the new boundary.

None

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

91

Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil guidelines as inputs into the code was also performed to determine the maximum (peak) dose for all receptors. This report contains the technical basis in support of the DOE?s derivation of ALs for the 'Property.' A complete description of the methodology, including an assessment of the input parameters, model inputs, and results is provided in this report. This report also provides initial recommendations on applying the derived soil guidelines.

Boerner, A. J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Maldonado, D. G. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Process for producing enriched uranium having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a {sup 235}U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower {sup 235}U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF{sub 6} tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a {sup 235} U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % {sup 235} U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF{sub 6}; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF{sub 6} in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} having a {sup 235}U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6}; and converting this low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. 4 figs.

Horton, J.A.; Hayden, H.W. Jr.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Process for producing enriched uranium having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a .sup.235 U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower .sup.235 U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF.sub.6 tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a .sup.235 U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % .sup.235 U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF.sub.6 ; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF.sub.6 in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 having a .sup.235 U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 ; and converting this low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process.

Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Transportation Impact Assessment for Shipment of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF<sub>6</sub>) Cylinders from the East Tennessee Technology Park to the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Transportation Impact Assessment for Shipment of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF 6 ) Cylinders from the East Tennessee Technology Park to the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory, with facilities in the states of Illinois and Idaho, is owned by the United States Government and operated by The University of Chicago under the provisions of a contract with the Department of Energy. This technical memorandum is a product of Argonne's Environmental Assessment Division (EAD). For information on the division's scientific and engineering

95

North Dakota sees increases in real GDP per capita following ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In recent years, North Dakota has seen significant gains in real gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, coinciding with development of the Bakken shale play.

96

NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By:...

97

Refurbishment of uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yards C-745-K, L, M, N, and P and construction of a new uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yard (C-745-T) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is a uranium enrichment facility owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). A residual of the uranium enrichment process is depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). Depleted UF6, a solid at ambient temperature, is stored in 32,200 steel cylinders that hold a maximum of 14 tons each. Storage conditions are suboptimal and have resulted in accelerated corrosion of cylinders, increasing the potential for a release of hazardous substances. Consequently, the DOE is proposing refurbishment of certain existing yards and construction of a new storage yard. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the impacts of the proposed action and no action and considers alternate sites for the proposed new storage yard. The proposed action includes (1) renovating five existing cylinder yards; (2) constructing a new UF6 storage yard; handling and onsite transport of cylinders among existing yards to accommodate construction; and (4) after refurbishment and construction, restacking of cylinders to meet spacing and inspection requirements. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, DOE is issuing a Finding of No Significant Impact. Additionally, it is reported in this EA that the loss of less than one acre of wetlands at the proposed project site would not be a significant adverse impact.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Argonne National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Challenge The decommissioning of GDP facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of...

99

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs.

Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Gaseous Diffusion Plant Production Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

been identified at Oak Ridge. The risk mapping sessions highlighted the instrument mechanics as a job classification with significant mercury exposure. Solvents Solvent...

102

Independent Oversight Inspection, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in August and September 2006. The coordination of emergency plans and procedures among USEC and DOE contractor organizations has successfully integrated the emergency management...

103

FLAME STRUCTURE MEASUREMENT OF POLYMER DIFFUSION FLAMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diffusion flame of gaseous propane and methane provide aCurrent study Tsuji and Yamoaka (propane fuel, -f Oxidizeris air and propane flow rate is constant Nozzle velocity

Pitz, W. J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Potential Hazards Relating to Pyrolysis of c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}O, n-C{sub 4}F{sub 10}, and c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} in Selected Gaseous Diffusion Plant Operations  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program intended to replace the present evaporative coolant at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) with a non-ozone-depleting alternate, a series of investigations of the suitability of candidate substitutes is under way. This report summarizes studies directed at estimating the chemical and thermal stability of three candidate coolants, c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, n-C{sub 4}F{sub 10}, and c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}O, in a few specific environments to be found in gaseous diffusion plant operations. One issue concerning the new coolants is the possibility that they might produce the highly toxic compound perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in high-temperature environments. Two specific high-temperature thermal environments are examined, namely the use of a flame test for the presence of coolant vapors and welding in the presence of coolant vapors. A second issue relates to the thermal or chemical decomposition of the coolants in the gaseous diffusion process environment. The primary purpose of the study was to develop and evaluate available data to provide information that will allow the technical and industrial hygiene staff at the GDPs to perform appropriate safety evaluations and to determine the need for field testing or experimental work. The scope of this study included a literature search and an evaluation of the information developed therefrom. Part of that evaluation consists of chemical kinetics modeling of coolant decomposition in the two operational environments. The general conclusions are that PFIB formation is unlikely in either situation but that it cannot be ruled out completely under extreme conditions. The presence of oxygen, moisture, and combustion products will tend to lead to the formation of CF{sub 4} and oxidation products (COF{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and HF) rather than PFIB.

Trowbridge, L.D.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

Gaseous Arginine Conformers and Their Unique Intramolecular Interactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive ab initio calculations were employed to characterize stable conformers of gaseous arginine, both canonical and zwitterionic tautomers. Step-by-step geometry optimizations of possible single-bond rotamers at the B3LYP/6-31G(d), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels yield numerous structures that are more stable than any known ones. The final electronic energies of the conformers were determined at the CCSD/6-31++G(d,p) level. The lowest energies of the canonical and zwitterionic structures are lower than the existing ones by 2.0 and 2.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The relative energies, rotational constants, dipole moments and harmonic frequencies of the stable conformers were given for future experimental verifications. The conformational distributions at various temperatures, estimated based upon the thermodynamic principles, consist almost exclusively of the newly found structures. One striking feature is the occurrence of the blue-shifting hydrogen bonds in all the six most stable conformers. A unique feature of important conformations is the coexistence of dihydrogen, blue- and red-shifting hydrogen bonds. In addition to the hydrogen bonds, the stereoelectronic effects were also found to be important stabilization factors. The calculated and measured proton affinities agree within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties, affirming high quality of our conformational search. The theoretical gas phase basicity of 245.9 kcal/mol is also in good agreement with the experimental value of 240.6 kcal/mol. The extensive searches establish firmly that gaseous arginine exists primarily in the canonical and not the zwitterionic form. Computing resources were available through a Computational Grand Challenge Application grant from the Molecular Sciences Computing Facility in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830.

Ling, Sanliang; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Zhijian; Lin, Zijing; Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

106

Gaseous Arginine Conformers and Their Unique Intramolecular Interactions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive ab initio calculations were employed to characterize stable conformers of gaseous arginine, both the canonical and zwitterionic tautomers. Step-by-step geometry optimizations of possible single-bond rotamers at the B3LYP/6-31G(d), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p), and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels yield numerous structures that are more stable than any known ones. The final electronic energies of the conformers were determined at the CCSD/6-31++G(d,p) level. The lowest energies of the canonical and zwitterionic structures are lower than the existing values by 2.0 and 2.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The relative energies, rotational constants, dipole moments, and harmonic frequencies of the stable conformers remain for future experimental verification. The conformational distributions at various temperatures, estimated according to thermodynamic principles, consist almost exclusively of the newly found structures. One striking feature is the occurrence of blueshifting hydrogen bonds in all six of the most stable conformers. A unique feature of important conformations is the coexistence of dihydrogen and blue- and red-shifting hydrogen bonds. In addition to the hydrogen bonds, the stereoelectronic effects were also found to be important stabilization factors. The calculated and measured proton affinities agree within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties, affirming the high quality of our conformational search. The theoretical gas-phase basicity of 245.9 kcal/mol is also in good agreement with the experimental value of 240.6 kcal/mol. The extensive searches establish firmly that gaseous arginine exists primarily in the canonical and not the zwitterionic form.

Ling, Sanliang; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Zhijian; Lin, Zijing; Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

107

GDP Jobs Direct Structure of Australian economy, employment and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% GDP Jobs Direct emissions Inclusive emissions Structure Biomass Solar PV 3020 Abatement below businss as usual Mt CO2e Industry Buildings Forestry Power Transport Employment intensity Jobs / $m valu-add 13 2 10 4 14 10 11 Gross value added ABS Australian Nat'l Accounts

Pezzey, Jack

108

Gaseous Fuel Injection Modeling using a Gaseous Sphere Injection Methodology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growing interest in gaseous fuels (hydrogen and natural gas) for internal combustion engines calls for the development of computer models for simulation of gaseous fuel injection, air entrainment and the ensuing combustion. This paper introduces a new method for modeling the injection and air entrainment processes for gaseous fuels. The model uses a gaseous sphere injection methodology, similar to liquid droplet in injection techniques used for liquid fuel injection. In this paper, the model concept is introduced and model results are compared with correctly- and under-expanded experimental data.

Hessel, R P; Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

109

GASEOUS SCINTILLATION COUNTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gaseous excitation counter for detecting the presence amd measuring the energy of subatomic particles and electromagnetic radiation is described. The counter includes a gas-tight chamber filled with an elemental gas capable of producing ultra-violet excitation quanta when irradiated with subatomic particles and electromagnetic radiation. The gas has less than one in a thousand parts ultra-violet absorbing contamination. When nuclear radiation ps present the ultra-violet light produced by the gas strikes a fluorescent material within the counter, responsive to produce visible excitation quanta, and photo-sensitive counting means detect the visible emission.

Eggler, C.; Huddleston, C.M.

1959-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

U.S. Primary Energy Use and GDP, 1970-1998 (chart)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Figure 2. U.S. primary energy use and GDP [Trends in Building-Related Energy and ...

111

Gaseous electrode development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the present study is to optimize the gaseous electrode for use in an MHD generator and to test this optimum configuration in an operating MHD channel. The arc gaseous electrode concept is based on the use of an arc source in the body of the MHD channel electrode, wherein the arc follows a helical path and generates a plasma which flows out of a long, thin slot cut parallel to the cylindrical annulus, to provide a low impedance path for the MHD current through the boundary layer so that electrode erosion due to arcing can be reduced. Bench-scale tests on the arc plasma source were conducted. The effect of the parameters such as magnetic field, yaw angle with respect to the magnetic field, electrode geometry, and arc cathode materials were studied. Based on these studies, an optimum design was selected for testing in the MHD channel. Tests were conducted with the arc gaseous electrode in the cathode wall of a diagonal conducting wall MHD generator at magnetic fields up to 3.83 Tesla, with a supersonic flow of combustion products seeded with 1.0 w/o of potassium. The measured MHD plasma conductivity varied between 12 and 22 S/m. Results are presented and discussed in detail. (WHK)

Jones, M.S. Jr.; Scannell, E.P.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Thiagarajan, V.; Mallavarpu, R.; Armstrong, A.J.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Detector for flow abnormalities in gaseous diffusion plant compressors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector detects a flow abnormality in a plant compressor which outputs a motor current signal. The detector includes a demodulator/lowpass filter demodulating and filtering the motor current signal producing a demodulated signal, and first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters connected to the demodulator/lowpass filter, and filtering the demodulated signal in accordance with first, second, third and fourth bandpass frequencies generating first, second, third and fourth filtered signals having first, second, third and fourth amplitudes. The detector also includes first, second, third and fourth amplitude detectors connected to the first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters respectively, and detecting the first, second, third and fourth amplitudes, and first and second adders connected to the first and fourth amplitude detectors and the second and third amplitude detectors respectively, and adding the first and fourth amplitudes and the second and third amplitudes respectively generating first and second added signals. Finally, the detector includes a comparator, connected to the first and second adders, and comparing the first and second added signals and detecting the abnormal condition in the plant compressor when the second added signal exceeds the first added signal by a predetermined value.

Smith, Stephen F. (Loudon, TN); Castleberry, Kim N. (Harriman, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UF 6 Sampling Building, X-345 Special Nuclear Material Storage Facility, X-744G Bulk Non-Uranium Enrichment Service Activity (UESA) Storage Building and Associated Outside...

115

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Service Activity (UESA) Storage Building and Associated Outside Storage, and the DUF6 Conversion Facility. The tours gave the site lead the opportunity to interact with...

116

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Low-Level Waste Storage Facility (HC-2), C- 410 D&D Project Complex (HC-2), and DUF6 Conversion Project (HC-3). The tours gave the site lead the opportunity to interact...

117

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Plant Historical documents may contain links which are no longer valid or to outside sources. LM can not attest to the accuracy of information provided by these links. Please see...

118

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: James Harbison 2525 Cairo Road Paducah, KY 42001 Website:...

119

Detector for flow abnormalities in gaseous diffusion plant compressors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector detects a flow abnormality in a plant compressor which outputs a motor current signal. The detector includes a demodulator/lowpass filter demodulating and filtering the motor current signal producing a demodulated signal, and first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters connected to the demodulator/lowpass filter, and filtering the demodulated signal in accordance with first, second, third and fourth bandpass frequencies generating first, second, third and fourth filtered signals having first, second, third and fourth amplitudes. The detector also includes first, second, third and fourth amplitude detectors connected to the first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters respectively, and detecting the first, second, third and fourth amplitudes, and first and second adders connected to the first and fourth amplitude detectors and the second and third amplitude detectors respectively, and adding the first and fourth amplitudes and the second and third amplitudes respectively generating first and second added signals. Finally, the detector includes a comparator, connected to the first and second adders, and comparing the first and second added signals and detecting the abnormal condition in the plant compressor when the second added signal exceeds the first added signal by a predetermined value. 6 figs.

Smith, S.F.; Castleberry, K.N.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

120

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criteria, Review and Approach Document DNFSB Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board DOE U.S. Department of Energy ESH&Q Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality FBP...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT FOR THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conservation and Recovery Act, 42 U.S.C. 6901, et seq., as amended. 98-616. II. RCRA closure and post-closure care shall mean closure and post-closure care of hazardous...

122

Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

Hindin, Saul G. (Mendham, NJ); Roberts, George W. (Westfield, NJ)

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

123

Illinois Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

124

Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

125

Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

126

Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

127

Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

128

Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

129

Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

130

Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

131

Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

132

Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

133

Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

134

West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

135

Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

136

Combination free electron and gaseous laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Empirical Analysis on the Cities' GDP and the Main Economic Indicators of High-Tech Industrial Parks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the national 54 high-tech industrial parks' main economic indicators and their cities' GDP are analyzed respectively with clustering analysis. It is found that there is a certain degree of correlation between them. To reveal the inner ... Keywords: Cities' GDP, High-tech industrial parks' economic, Correlation Analysis, Clustering Analysis

Yu-Chen Song; Sha Zhen

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

U.S. Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007 Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007 Danilo J. Santini, Ph. D. Senior Economist Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Phone: 630 252 3758 Fax: 630 252 3443 E-mail: dsantini@anl.gov David A Poyer, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Economics Morehouse College 830 Westview Dr. SW Atlanta, GA 30314 Phone: 404 681 2800, ext. 2553 E-mail: dpoyer@morehouse.edu THE 66th INTERNATIONAL ATLANTIC ECONOMIC CONFERENCE Montreal, Canada 9-12 October 2008 BUSINESS FLUCTUATIONS AND CYCLES 12 October 2008 Sunday 11:15 AM - 1:15 PM The submitted manuscript has been created by UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne"). Argonne, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. . The U.S. Government

139

Analytical risk-based model of gaseous and liquid-phase radon transport in landfills with radium sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical model of gaseous and liquid-phase radon transport through soils is derived for environmental modeling of landfills containing uranium mill tailings or Ra-226 sources. Processes include radon diffusion in both the gas and liquid phases, ... Keywords: Landfill, Multiphase, Performance assessment, Probabilistic modeling, Radium, Radon, Transport

Clifford K. Ho

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Gaseous insulators for high voltage electrical equipment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gaseous insulators comprise compounds having high attachment cross sections for electrons having energies in the 0-1.3 electron volt range. Multi-component gaseous insulators comprise compounds and mixtures having overall high electron attachment cross sections in the 0-1.3 electron volt range and moderating gases having high cross sections for inelastic interactions with electrons of energies 1-4 electron volts. Suitable electron attachment components include hexafluorobutyne, perfluorobutene-2, perfluorocyclobutane, perfluorodimethylcyclobutane, perfluorocyclohexene, perfluoromethylcyclohexane, hexafluorobutadiene, perfluoroheptene-1 and hexafluoroazomethane. Suitable moderating gases include N.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The gaseous insulating mixture can also contain SF.sub.6, perfluoropropane and perfluorobenzene.

Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); James, David R. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Pai, Robert Y. (Concord, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gaseous insulators for high voltage electrical equipment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gaseous insulators comprise compounds having high attachment cross sections for electrons having energies in the 0-1.3 electron volt range. Multi-component gaseous insulators comprise compounds and mixtures having overall high electron attachment cross sections in the 0-1.3 electron volt range and moderating gases having high cross sections for inelastic interactions with electrons of energies 1-4 electron volts. Suitable electron attachment components include hexafluorobutyne, perfluorobutene-2, perfluorocyclobutane, perfluorodimethylcyclobutane, perfluorocyclohexene, perfluoromethylcyclohexane, hexafluorobutadiene, perfluoroheptene-1 and hexafluoroazomethane. Suitable moderating gases include N.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The gaseous insulating mixture can also contain SF.sub.6, perfluoropropane and perfluorobenzene.

Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); James, David R. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Pai, Robert Y. (Concord, TN)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Gas fixation solar cell using gas diffusion semiconductor electrode  

SciTech Connect

A gas diffusion semiconductor electrode and solar cell and a process for gaseous fixation, such as nitrogen photoreduction, CO/sub 2/ photoreduction and fuel gas photo-oxidation are described. The gas diffusion photosensitive electrode has a central electrolyte porous matrix with an activated semiconductor material on one side adapted to be in contact with an electrolyte and a hydrophobic gas diffusion region on the opposite side adapted to be in contact with a supply of molecular gas.

Ang, P.G.; Sammells, A.F.

1980-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

143

Gaseous modification of MCrAlY coatings  

SciTech Connect

The present invention generally describes methods for modifying MCrAlY coatings by using gaseous carburization, gaseous nitriding or gaseous carbonitriding. The modified MCrAlY coatings are useful in thermal barrier coating systems, which may be used in gas turbine engines.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Alternative gaseous-fuels safety assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A relative safety assessment of alternative gaseous and reference liquid fuels utilized for light automotive transportation in the public sector was completed. The specific fuels considered were compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and the liquid fuels, gasoline and diesel. The assessment methodology describes and develops the relative hazards of these fuels from an integrated generic physicochemical property and accident scenario point of view. A technique involving a method of eliciting expert judgment combined with a comparative scoring methodology was applied in establishing fuel relative safety rankings. Limitations of this type of assessment are discussed. Selected accident scenarios included fuel leakage in both residential and public garages; fueling line rupture at a refueling station in the presence of user vehicles or delivery vehicles; and vehicle collisions under rural, urban, and vehicular tunnel conditions. Overall, the results obtained demonstrate dependency upon the specific application or scenario. Gaseous fuels have increased relative risks in certain situations and are relatively safe in others. The results suggest that alternative gaseous fuels are not disqualified for public usage. The assessment also provides rationale for the development of selected safe handling criteria and recommendations.

Krupka, M.C.; Peaslee, A.T. Jr.; Laquer, H.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Carbon Emission Outlook to 2050. ” Berkeley, CA:of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings2 Sectoral Outlook and

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

147

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012...

148

,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Bcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release...

149

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

150

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

151

,"Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

152

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

153

,"West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

154

The Thermodynamics of Gaseous, Cuprous Chloride Monomer and Trimer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No.W-7405-eng~48B TIiE THERMODYNAMICS OF GASEOUS" CUPROUSCu(s) + HCl::= I Thermodynamics of Vaporization to Monomeric

Brewer, Leo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Virtual Screening of Materials for Gaseous Fuel Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Virtual Screening of Materials for Gaseous Fuel Storage .... Numerical Study on Behavior of Top-Blown Supersonic Jets and Their Interaction  ...

156

Diffusion Coefficients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... Challenges in Constructing Diffusion Mobility Databases for Industrial Alloys: ... Implementation of new initiatives such as the Materials Genome ...

157

Mutational, Structural, and Kinetic Evidence for a Dissociative Mechanism in the GDP-mannose Mannosyl Hydrolase Reaction  

SciTech Connect

GDP-mannose hydrolase (GDPMH) catalyzes the hydrolysis of GDP-{alpha}-D-sugars by nucleophilic substitution with inversion at the anomeric C1 atom of the sugar, with general base catalysis by H124. Three lines of evidence indicate a mechanism with dissociative character. First, in the 1.3 Angstrom X-ray structure of the GDPMH-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP{center_dot}Tris{sup +} complex, the GDP leaving group interacts with five catalytic components: R37, Y103, R52, R65, and the essential Mg{sup 2+}. As determined by the effects of site-specific mutants on k{sub cat}, these components contribute factors of 24-, 100-, 309-, 24-, and {ge}10{sup 5}-fold, respectively, to catalysis. Both R37 and Y103 bind the {beta}-phosphate of GDP and are only 5.0 Angstroms apart. Accordingly, the R37Q/Y103F double mutant exhibits partially additive effects of the two single mutants on k{sub cat}, indicating cooperativity of R37 and Y103 in promoting catalysis, and antagonistic effects on K{sub m}. Second, the conserved residue, D22, is positioned to accept a hydrogen bond from the C2-OH group of the sugar undergoing substitution at C1, as was shown by modeling an {alpha}-D-mannosyl group into the sugar binding site. The D22A and D22N mutations decreased k{sub cat} by factors of 10{sup 2.1} and 10{sup 2.6}, respectively, for the hydrolysis of GDP-{alpha}-D-mannose, and showed smaller effects on K{sub m}, suggesting that the D22 anion stabilizes a cationic oxocarbenium transition state. Third, the fluorinated substrate, GDP-2F-{alpha}-D-mannose, for which a cationic oxocarbenium transition state would be destabilized by electron withdrawal, exhibited a 16-fold decrease in k{sub cat} and a smaller, 2.5-fold increase in K{sub m}. The D22A and D22N mutations further decreased the k{sub cat} with GDP-2F-{alpha}-D-mannose to values similar to those found with GDP-{alpha}-D-mannose, and decreased the K{sub m} of the fluorinated substrate. The choice of histidine as the general base over glutamate, the preferred base in other Nudix enzymes, is not due to the greater basicity of histidine, since the pK{sub a} of E124 in the active complex (7.7) exceeded that of H124 (6.7), and the H124E mutation showed a 10{sup 2.2}-fold decrease in k{sub cat}and a 4.0-fold increase in K{sub m} at pH 9.3. Similarly, the catalytic triad detected in the X-ray structure (H124---Y127---P120) is unnecessary for orienting H124, since the Y127F mutation had only 2-fold effects on k{sub cat} and K{sub m} with either H124 or E124 as the general base. Hence, a neutral histidine rather than an anionic glutamate may be necessary to preserve electroneutrality in the active complex.

Xia,Z.; Azurmendi, H.; lairson, L.; Withers, S.; Gabelli, S.; Bianchet, M.; Amzel, L.; Mildvan, A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

2011 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The conference will cover theory and experiments, and systems ranging from molecular to biological to clusters to materials. The meeting goal continues to be bringing together scientists interested in fundamentals, with those applying fundamental phenomena to a wide range of practical problems. Each of the ten conference sessions will focus on a topic within this spectrum, and there will also be poster sessions for contributed papers, with sufficient space and time to allow all participants to present their latest results. To encourage active participation by young investigators, about ten of the poster abstracts will be selected for 15 minute 'hot topic' talks during the conference sessions. Hot topic selection will be done about a month before the meeting. Funds should be available to offset the participation cost for young investigators.

Scott Anderson

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

159

2011 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE  

SciTech Connect

The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The conference will cover theory and experiments, and systems ranging from molecular to biological to clusters to materials. The meeting goal continues to be bringing together scientists interested in fundamentals, with those applying fundamental phenomena to a wide range of practical problems. Each of the ten conference sessions will focus on a topic within this spectrum, and there will also be poster sessions for contributed papers, with sufficient space and time to allow all participants to present their latest results. To encourage active participation by young investigators, about ten of the poster abstracts will be selected for 15 minute 'hot topic' talks during the conference sessions. Hot topic selection will be done about a month before the meeting. Funds should be available to offset the participation cost for young investigators.

Scott Anderson

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

160

Gaseous-fuel safety assessment. Status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory, in support of studies sponsored by the Office of Vehicle and Engine Research and Development in the US Department of Energy, has undertaken a safety assessment of selected gaseous fuels for use in light automotive transportation. The purpose is to put into perspective the hazards of these fuels relative to present day fuels and delineated criteria for their safe handling. Fuels include compressed and liquified natural gas (CNG and LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and for reference gasoline and diesel. This paper is a program status report. To date, physicochemical property data and general petroleum and transportation information were compiled; basic hazards defined; alternative fuels were safety-ranked based on technical properties alone; safety data and vehicle accident statistics reviewed; and accident scenarios selected for further analysis. Methodology for such analysis is presently under consideration.

Krupka, M.C.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Bartlit, J.R.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration Property Type Quantity Description The estimated potential energy generation from gaseous biopower for a particular place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_of_energy It's possible types are Watt hours - 1000 Wh, Watt hour, Watthour Kilowatt hours - 1 kWh, Kilowatt hour, Kilowatthour Megawatt hours - 0.001 MWh, Megawatt hour, Megawatthour Gigawatt hours - 0.000001 GWh, Gigawatt hour, Gigawatthour Joules - 3600000 J, Joules, joules Pages using the property "PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25)

162

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass Property Type Quantity Description The potential mass of gaseous biopower material for a place. Use this type to express a quantity of magnitude, or an object's resistance to acceleration. The default unit is the kilogram (kg). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilogram Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Kilograms - 1 kg, kilo, kilogram, kilograms, Kilogram, kilogramme, kilos Grams - 1000 g, gram, gramme, grams Tonnes - 0.001 tonnes, metric tons, Tonnes, Metric Tonnes Pounds - 2.205 lbs, pounds, pound, Pounds, Lbs Stone - 0.1575 stones, st, stone Ounces - 35.27 ounces, oz, Ounces, ounce BDT - 0.001 BDT, Bone Dry Tonnes, bdt Pages using the property "PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass"

163

Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Peak Geothermal Systems, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Peak Geothermal Systems, Nevada Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Gaseous emissions from the landscape can be used to explore for geothermal systems, characterize their lateral extent, or map the trends of concealed geologic structures that may provide important reservoir permeability at depth. Gaseous geochemical signatures vary from system to system and utilization of a multi-gas analytical approach to exploration or characterization should enhance the survey's clarity. This paper describes

164

Gaseous Detectors: recent developments and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multiwire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volume with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photo-lithography and micro-processing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high energy physics, MPGD applications has expanded to nuclear physics, UV and visible photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection and medical physics.

Maxim Titov

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

165

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 121 116 93 1970's 79 55 70 71 75 68 61 45 64 49 1980's 41 29 40 55 61 145 234 318 272 254 1990's 300 395 604 513 513 582 603 734 732 879 2000's 586 691 566 647 634 700 794 859 1,008 1,295 2010's 4,578 8,931 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Processing

166

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from gaseous biopower for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

167

Diffuse Scattering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diffuse Scattering Diffuse Scattering * Anticipatory (trick) question: If you have an x-ray or neutron detector looking at a small sample volume, which will scatter more x- rays or neutrons into the detector 1 atom 100 atoms or 1000 atoms? X-ray or neutron beam Answer: Depends! Diffuse Scattering Gene E. Ice Materials Science and Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering ORNL/SNS June 2011 Presentation concentrates year graduate-level course into 1 hour * Skip mathematical complexities * Expose to range of applications * Develop intuition for length scales * Talk like x-ray/neutron scattering guru - Reciprocal space - Debye Temperature - Laue monotonic - Krivoglaz defects of 1st/2nd kinds! Great for cocktail parties or impressing attractive strangers-

168

Relativistic diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a relativistic diffusion in the proper time in an approach of Schay and Dudley. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates.We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form.We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution.We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution.The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Juettner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

Z. Haba

2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

169

Anisotropic gaseous models of tidally limited star clusters -- comparison with other methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new models of the evolution and dissolution of star clusters evolving under the combined influence of internal relaxation and external tidal fields, using the anisotropic gaseous model based on the Fokker-Planck approximation, and a new escaper loss cone model. This model borrows ideas from loss cones of stellar distributions near massive black holes, and describes physical processes related to escaping stars by a simple model based on two timescales and a diffusion process. We compare our results with those of direct $N$-body models and of direct numerical solutions of the orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck equation. For this comparative study we limit ourselves to idealized single point mass star clusters, in order to present a detailed study of the physical processes determining the rate of mass loss, core collapse and other features of the system's evolution. With the positive results of our study the path is now open in the future to use the computationally efficient gaseous models for future studies with more realism (mass spectrum, stellar evolution).

R. Spurzem; M. Giersz; K. Takahashi; A. Ernst

2004-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

Diffusion bonding  

SciTech Connect

1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

Anderson, Robert C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

171

GROW1: a crop growth model for assessing impacts of gaseous pollutants from geothermal technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary model of photosynthesis and growth of field crops was developed to assess the effects of gaseous pollutants, particularly airborne sulfur compounds, resulting from energy production from geothermal resources. The model simulates photosynthesis as a function of such variables as irradiance, CO/sub 2/ diffusion resistances, and internal biochemical processes. The model allocates the products of photosynthesis to structural (leaf, stem, root, and fruit) and storage compartments of the plant. The simulations encompass the entire growing season from germination to senescence. The model is described conceptually and mathematically and examples of model output are provided for various levels of pollutant stress. Also, future developments that would improve this preliminary model are outlined and its applications are discussed.

Kercher, J.R.

1977-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

172

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, March 18, 1999 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Units) Integrated Units) State Ohio Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) Ohio EPA Scope Summary Integrating the PORTS on-site closure work required by various sources in order to avoid duplication of effort, and efficiently perform sitewide ground water monitoring and surveillance and maintenance activities Parties DOE; Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC; State of Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Date 3/18/1999 SCOPE * Integrate the on-site closure work required for specific units to avoid duplication of effort, and efficiently perform sitewide ground water monitoring and surveillance and maintenance activities at PORTS. * Recognize that a substantial portion of the tasks required under existing approved closure plans have been completed and incorporate the remaining tasks into the

173

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, February 24, 1998 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DUF DUF 6 and LiOH) State Ohio Agreement Type Director's Final Findings and Orders Legal Driver(s) RCRA Scope Summary Establish Compliance Orders and schedules regarding the LiOH Storage Plan/LiOH removal, and the DUF 6 Management Plan. Parties DOE; Ohio Environmental Protection Agency; Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. Date 2/24/1998 SCOPE * Establish Compliance Orders and schedules regarding the LiOH Storage Plan/LiOH removal, and the DUF 6 Management Plan. * Exempt Respondents from 1) the requirement to evaluate the LiOH, according to OAC rule 3745-52-11, and 2) evaluate the DUF 6 that is both generated and stored at the facility, according to OAC rule 3745-52-11. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES * DOE shall submit to Ohio EPA on or before 31 December of each year until DOE's

174

ESTIMATING HISTORICAL TRICHLOROETHYLENE EXPOSURE IN A URANIUM ENRICHMENT, GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Previous studies at two uranium enrichment plants have looked at radiation exposures, but not an extensive list of chemical exposures, limiting evaluation of potential interactions.… (more)

MOSER, ADRIANE

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Final environmental impact assessment of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

This document considers: the need for uranium enrichment facilities; site location; plant description; and describes the power generating facilities in light of its existing environment. The impacts from continuing operations are compared with alternatives of shutdown, relocation, and alternative power systems. (PSB)

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (benthic macroinvertebrates, fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from Jan. 1995 to Dec. 1995, although activities conducted outside this period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Method and apparatus for rapid adjustment of process gas inventory in gaseous diffusion cascades  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved method and system for making relatively large and rapid adjustments in the process gas

Dyer, Robert H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fowler, Andrew H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Vanstrum, Paul R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Electrochemical cell apparatus having an integrated reformer-mixer nozzle-mixer diffuser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical apparatus is made having a generator section containing electrochemical cells, a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet, a gaseous feed oxidant inlet, and at least one hot gaseous spent fuel recirculation channel, where the spent fuel recirculation channel, passes from the generator chamber to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet to form a reformable mixture, where a reforming chamber contains an outer portion containing reforming material, an inner portion preferably containing a mixer nozzle and a mixer-diffuser, and a middle portion for receiving spent fuel, where the mixer nozzle and mixer-diffuser are preferably both within the reforming chamber and substantially exterior to the main portion of the apparatus, where the reformable mixture flows up and then backward before contacting the reforming material, and the mixer nozzle can operate below 400 C. 1 figure.

Shockling, L.A.

1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Artificial neural network in gaseous emissions prediction with bioreactor usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The artificial neural network is used more and more often for prediction of processes related with the biowaste management. In this area, composting is one of the most important process of biowaste recycling. However, the gaseous emissions from the composted ... Keywords: composting, data acquisition, emissions, multilayer perceptron, neural modeling, prediction

Piotr Boniecki; Jacek Dach; Krzysztof Pilarski; Aleksander J?dru?; Krzysztof Nowakowski; Hanna Piekarska-Boniecka; Jacek Przyby?

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,127 971 1,334 1970's 1,270 1,217 1,058 878 679 567 520 367 485 1,146 1980's 553 830 831 633 618 458 463 437 811 380 1990's 445 511 416 395 425 377 340 300 495 5,462 2000's 11,377 15,454 16,477 11,430 13,697 14,308 14,662 13,097 10,846 18,354 2010's 18,405 11,221 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,499 3,667 3,475 1970's 3,235 2,563 1,197 1,118 952 899 823 674 883 1,308 1980's 1,351 1,327 1,287 1,258 1,200 1,141 1,318 1,275 1,061 849 1990's 800 290 413 507 553 488 479 554 451 431 2000's 377 408 395 320 254 231 212 162 139 168 2010's 213 268 424 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

182

Methods for deacidizing gaseous mixtures by phase enhanced absorption  

SciTech Connect

An improved process for deacidizing a gaseous mixture using phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption is described. The process utilizes a multiphasic absorbent that absorbs an acid gas at increased rate and leads to reduced overall energy costs for the deacidizing operation.

Hu, Liang

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

183

The real air quality benefits of gaseous-fueled vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a justification for prominent inclusion of currently available gaseous-fueled vehicles (i.e., vehicles powered by propane, sometimes called liquefied petroleum gas [LPG], or natural gas--chiefly, methane--stored onboard the vehicle in gaseous or liquid state but combusted as a gas) in the mix of strategies to (a) reduce public exposure to toxic and fine particulate emissions in the urbanized areas of the developing world and (b) achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality. It also presents estimates of associated emission reduction credits into the future. Important considerations discussed are the location of fine particle and toxic emissions in congested urban areas, and the location and timing of ozone precursor emissions, with emphasis on how gaseous-fueled vehicles' role in the relationship among and magnitude of these variables differs from that of their conventionally-fueled counterparts. Efforts to enhance the measurement and quantification of gaseous-fuel benefits are also described.

Saricks, C. L.

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

184

Adaptive high-resolution simulation of realistic gaseous detonation waves  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The numerical approximation of detonation waves in gaseous combustible mixtures is extremely demanding since a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. A dynamically adaptive high-resolution finite volume method is described that has enabled accurately resolved computational investigations of the transient behavior of regularly oscillating detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in realistic two-dimensional geometry.

Deiterding, Ralf [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Recent Advances in Laser-based Diagnostics for Gaseous Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-based diagnostic techniques offer unique capabilities for experimentation on gaseous flows. In this paper, we overview recent progress of two concepts: spectrally resolved absorption and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. The absorption ... Keywords: PLIF, absorption spectroscopy, acetone, combustion control, diode laser, hypersonic, supersonic

R. Hanson; D. Baer; C. Morris; M. Thurber; E. Furlong; S. Wehe

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Estimation of Carbon-14 in Nuclear Power Plant Gaseous Effluents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants report the amount of radioactivity released through permitted effluent pathways in their plant annual reports. This report provides users with a method for calculating the amount of carbon-14 (14C) generated in a light water reactor (LWR) core and released through plant gaseous effluent pathways.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

187

Phyto remediation groundwater trends at the DOE portsmouth gaseous  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the progress of a phyto-remediation action being performed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) X-740 Waste Oil Handling Facility to remediate contaminated groundwater under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure action. This action was effected by an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) decision to use phyto-remediation as the preferred remedy for the X-740 groundwater contamination. This remedy was recognized as a cost-effective, low-maintenance, and promising method to remediate groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE). During 1999, prior to the tree installation at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in the area were collected from 10 monitoring wells completed in the Gallia Formation. The Gallia is the uppermost water-bearing zone and contains most of the groundwater contamination at PORTS. During the tree installation which took place during the summer of 1999, four new Gallia monitoring wells were installed at the X-740 Area in addition to the 10 Gallia wells which had been installed in the same area during the early 1990's. Manual water level measurements were collected quarterly from these 14 Gallia monitoring wells between 1998 and 2001. These manual water level measurements were collected to monitor the combined impact of the trees on the groundwater prior to root development. Beginning in 2001, water level measurements were collected monthly during the growing season (April-September) and quarterly during the dormant season (October-March). A total of eight water level measurements were collected annually to monitor the phyto-remediation system's effect on the groundwater in the X- 740 Area. The primary function of the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area is to hydraulically prevent further spreading of the TCE plume. This process utilizes deep-rooted plants, such as poplar trees, to extract large quantities of water from the saturated zone. The focus of any phyto-remediation system is to develop a cone of depression under the entire plantation area. This cone of depression can halt migration of the contaminant plume and can create a hydraulic barrier, thereby maintaining plume capture. While a cone of depression is not yet evident at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in 2004 and 2005 differed from measurements taken in previous years, indicating that the now mature trees are influencing groundwater flow direction and gradient at the site. Water level measurements taken from 2003 through 2005 indicate a trend whereby groundwater elevations steadily decreased in the X-740 Phyto-remediation System. During this time, an average groundwater table drop of 0.30 feet was observed. Although the time for the phyto-remediation system to mature had been estimated at two to three years, these monitoring data indicate a period of four to five years for the trees to reach maturity. Although, these trends are not apparent from analysis of the potentiometric surface contours, it does appear that the head gradient across the site is higher during the spring and lower during the fall. It is not clear, however, whether this trend was initiated by the installation of the phyto-remediation system. This paper will present the groundwater data collected to date to illustrate the effects of the trees on the groundwater table. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, Hsu-Chi (Albuquerque, NM); Cheng, Yung-Sung (Albuquerque, NM)

1984-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

2012 Diffusion Workshop Presentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Diffusion Studies in Mg-Al-Zn (N. Kulkarni, B. Warmack, J. Mundy, ORNL); Thermodynamics and Correlation Effects on Diffusion in Al-Ni Melts. ...

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

191

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gaseous Hydrogen Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7-8, 2003 Crystal City, Virginia Breakout Session Name Targets/Objectives More work is needed to better define delivery target metrics Assumptions about targets for costs and energy efficiency need to be qualified Technology improvements likely to lower costs, but may not have major impact on total cost A significant impact on cost would come through permitting policy changes, e.g., use of public land Breakout Session Name Priority Barriers System Issues: need to assess delivery options in context of total system Materials: corrosion, H2 permeability Construction: welding, joining Maintenance and Operation: leak detection Pipeline Safety: odorants, flame visibility

192

Method for diverting a gaseous sand-consolidating fluid  

SciTech Connect

An unconsolidated gas-producing sand in which the permeability is layered and the productivity can be impaired by liquid blocking can be consolidated by wetting the rock surfaces with a limited amount of water, injecting a smoke which selectively reduces the permeability of the most permeable layers by depositing on their faces unconsolidated masses of substantially inert solid particles and injecting a gaseous silicon polyhalide to convert a significant proportion of the rock surface-wettingwater to a grain bonding silica gel.

Davies, D. R.; Richardson, E. A.

1980-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Method and apparatus for analyzing particle-containing gaseous suspensions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method and apparatus permit analyses, by optical means, of properties of gaseous suspensions of particles, by measuring radiation that is emitted, transmitted or scattered by the particles. Determinations of composition, size, temperature and spectral emittance can be performed either in-situ or by sampling, and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometric techniques are most effectively used. Apparatus specifically adapted for performing radiation scattering analyses, and for collecting radiation from different sources, are provided. 51 figs.

Solomon, P.R.; Carangelo, R.M.; Best, P.E.

1987-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

194

North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,150 5,428 4,707 1970's 4,490 3,592 3,199 2,969 2,571 2,404 2,421 2,257 2,394 2,986 1980's 3,677 5,008 5,602 7,171 7,860 8,420 6,956 7,859 6,945 6,133 1990's 6,444 6,342 6,055 5,924 5,671 5,327 4,937 5,076 5,481 5,804 2000's 6,021 6,168 5,996 5,818 6,233 6,858 7,254 7,438 7,878 10,140 2010's 11,381 14,182 26,156 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014

195

Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 433,684 457,117 447,325 1970's 466,016 448,288 470,105 466,143 448,993 435,571 428,635 421,110 393,819 352,650 1980's 350,312 345,262 356,406 375,849 393,873 383,719 384,693 364,477 357,756 343,233 1990's 342,186 353,737 374,126 385,063 381,020 381,712 398,442 391,174 388,011 372,566 2000's 380,535 355,860 360,535 332,405 360,110 355,589 373,350 387,349 401,503 424,042 2010's 433,622 481,308 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

196

Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 115,177 140,290 179,117 1970's 193,209 195,072 197,967 206,833 194,329 189,541 172,584 166,392 161,511 165,515 1980's 142,171 142,423 128,858 124,193 132,501 117,736 115,604 124,890 120,092 121,425 1990's 119,405 129,154 132,656 130,336 128,583 146,048 139,841 150,008 144,609 164,794 2000's 164,908 152,862 152,724 124,955 133,434 103,381 105,236 110,745 94,785 95,359 2010's 102,448 95,630 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

197

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,351 3,244 2,705 1970's 2,330 2,013 1,912 1,581 1,921 2,879 6,665 11,494 14,641 15,686 1980's 15,933 14,540 14,182 13,537 12,829 11,129 11,644 10,876 10,483 9,886 1990's 8,317 8,103 8,093 7,012 6,371 6,328 6,399 6,147 5,938 5,945 2000's 5,322 4,502 4,230 3,838 4,199 3,708 3,277 3,094 3,921 2,334 2010's 2,943 2,465 2,480 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013

198

California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 34,803 32,639 30,334 1970's 29,901 27,585 24,156 17,498 17,201 15,221 14,125 13,567 13,288 10,720 1980's 8,583 7,278 14,113 14,943 15,442 16,973 16,203 15,002 14,892 13,376 1990's 12,424 11,786 12,385 12,053 11,250 11,509 12,169 11,600 10,242 10,762 2000's 11,063 11,060 12,982 13,971 14,061 13,748 14,056 13,521 13,972 13,722 2010's 13,244 12,095 12,755 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

199

Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 11,500 8,573 8,579 1970's 6,574 6,133 6,063 5,441 5,557 5,454 5,231 4,764 6,192 3,923 1980's 6,845 5,638 6,854 6,213 6,516 6,334 4,466 2,003 2,142 1,444 1990's 1,899 2,181 2,342 2,252 2,024 2,303 2,385 2,404 2,263 2,287 2000's 1,416 1,558 1,836 1,463 2,413 1,716 2,252 1,957 2,401 3,270 2010's 4,576 4,684 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014

200

New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 46,149 48,635 50,484 1970's 52,647 53,810 54,157 55,782 54,986 56,109 61,778 72,484 77,653 62,107 1980's 59,457 60,544 56,857 56,304 58,580 53,953 51,295 65,156 63,355 61,594 1990's 66,626 70,463 75,520 83,193 86,607 85,668 108,341 109,046 106,665 107,850 2000's 110,411 108,958 110,036 111,292 105,412 101,064 99,971 96,250 92,579 94,840 2010's 91,963 90,291 84,562 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 4,126 4,546 4,058 1970's 3,405 4,152 4,114 4,674 6,210 9,620 11,944 13,507 13,094 12,606 1980's 12,651 13,427 12,962 11,314 10,771 11,913 10,441 10,195 11,589 13,340 1990's 13,178 15,822 18,149 18,658 19,612 25,225 23,362 28,851 24,365 26,423 2000's 29,105 29,195 31,952 33,650 35,821 34,782 36,317 38,180 53,590 67,607 2010's 82,637 90,801 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

202

Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 236 1970's 225 281 243 199 501 694 661 933 1,967 4,845 1980's 4,371 4,484 4,727 4,709 5,123 5,236 4,836 4,887 4,774 5,022 1990's 4,939 4,997 5,490 5,589 5,647 5,273 5,361 4,637 4,263 18,079 2000's 24,086 13,754 14,826 11,293 15,133 13,759 21,065 19,831 17,222 17,232 2010's 19,059 17,271 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages:

203

Gaseous divertor simulation in an arc-jet device  

SciTech Connect

The first experimental simulation of the gaseous tokamak divertor is presented. Significant results are: (1) neutral gas at a pressure of a few mTorr is sufficient to absorb the entire localized flux of plasma thermal energy and reidstribute it over a wide area; (2) elastic ion-neutral collisions constitute the main energy absorbing process (at T/sub e,i/ less than or equal to 5 eV), and (3) a large pressure difference between divertor and main plasma chamber is maintained by plasma pumping in the connecting channel.

Hsu, W.L.; Yamada, M.; Barrett, P.J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Removing gaseous contaminants in {sup 3}He by cryogenic stripping  

SciTech Connect

The Tritium Operations Group at LLNL, Tritium Facility has recently developed a {sup 3}He recovery system to remove argon, xenon, neon, hydrogen, and all other contaminants from the {sup 3}He stream in an Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) experimental apparatus. In this paper the authors will describe in detail the background information, technical requirements, the design approach, and the results of their experimental tests. The authors believe this gas purification system may have other applications as it provides at a reasonable cost an efficient method for purification of gaseous helium.

Benapfl, M.; Biltoft, P.; Coombs, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Tritium Operations Group

1995-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

205

Microfabricated diffusion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Low energy consumption method for separating gaseous mixtures and in particular for medium purity oxygen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the separation of gaseous mixtures such as air and for producing medium purity oxygen, comprising compressing the gaseous mixture in a first compressor to about 3.9-4.1 atmospheres pressure, passing said compressed gaseous mixture in heat exchange relationship with sub-ambient temperature gaseous nitrogen, dividing the cooled, pressurized gaseous mixture into first and second streams, introducing the first stream into the high pressure chamber of a double rectification column, separating the gaseous mixture in the rectification column into a liquid oxygen-enriched stream and a gaseous nitrogen stream and supplying the gaseous nitrogen stream for cooling the compressed gaseous mixture, removing the liquid oxygen-enriched stream from the low pressure chamber of the rectification column and pumping the liquid, oxygen-enriched steam to a predetermined pressure, cooling the second stream, condensing the cooled second stream and evaporating the oxygen-enriched stream in an evaporator-condenser, delivering the condensed second stream to the high pressure chamber of the rectification column, and heating the oxygen-enriched stream and blending the oxygen-enriched stream with a compressed blend-air stream to the desired oxygen concentration.

Jujasz, Albert J. (North Olmsted, OH); Burkhart, James A. (Olmsted Falls, OH); Greenberg, Ralph (New York, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility: Overview of STF capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (STF) constructed at the Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site is a basic research tool for studying the dynamics of accidental releases of various hazardous liquids. This Facility is designed to (1) discharge, at a controlled rate, a measured volume of hazardous test liquid on a prepared surface of a dry lake bed (Frenchman Lake); (2) monitor and record process operating data, close-in and downwind meteorological data, and downwind gaseous concentration levels; and (3) provide a means to control and monitor these functions from a remote location. The STF will accommodate large and small-scale testing of hazardous test fluid release rates up to 28,000 gallons per minute. Spill volumes up to 52,800 gallons are achievable. Generic categories of fluids that can be tested are cryogenics, isothermals, aerosol-forming materials, and chemically reactive. The phenomena that can be studied include source definition, dispersion, and pool fire/vapor burning. Other capabilities available at the STF include large-scale wind tunnel testing, a small test cell for exposing personnel protective clothing, and an area for developing mitigation techniques.

Gray, H.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Updating Applied Diffusion Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most diffusion models currently used in air quality applications are substantially out of date with understanding of turbulence and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer. Under a Cooperative Agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency, ...

J. C. Weil

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Design for Krypton-85 Enrichment by Thermal Diffusion  

SciTech Connect

Substantial quantities of krypton having a krypton-85 concentration of less than 10% will become available if nuclear fuel-processing plants are required to collect the gaseous fission products rather than releasing them into the atmosphere. A modular thermal diffusion unit was designed for the enrichment of the krypton-85 to useful concentrations of greater than 45%. The design emphasizes reliability and integrity by incorporating no moving parts within the unit. The modular design also offers flexibility in the size of the enrichment facility that need be constructed at any time.

Schwind, Roger A.; Rutherford, William M.

1973-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

TREATMENT OF GASEOUS EFFLUENTS ISSUED FROM RECYCLING – A REVIEW OF THE CURRENT PRACTICES AND PROSPECTIVE IMPROVEMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of gaseous waste management for the recycling of nuclear used fuel is to reduce by best practical means (ALARA) and below regulatory limits, the quantity of activity discharged to the environment. The industrial PUREX process recovers the fissile material U(VI) and Pu(IV) to re-use them for the fabrication of new fuel elements e.g. recycling plutonium as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel or recycling uranium for new enrichment for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Meanwhile the separation of the waste (activation and fission product) is performed as a function of their pollution in order to store and avoid any potential danger and release towards the biosphere. Raffinate, that remains after the extraction step and which contains mostly all fission products and minor actinides is vitrified, the glass package being stored temporarily at the recycling plant site. Hulls and end pieces coming from PWR recycled fuel are compacted by means of a press leading to a volume reduced to 1/5th of initial volume. An organic waste treatment step will recycle the solvent, mainly tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) and some of its hydrolysis and radiolytic degradation products such as dibutyl phosphate (HDPB) and monobutyl phosphate (H2MBP). Although most scientific and technological development work focused on high level waste streams, a considerable effort is still under way in the area of intermediate and low level waste management. Current industrial practices for the treatment of gaseous effluents focusing essentially on Iodine-129 and Krypton-85 will be reviewed along with the development of novel technologies to extract, condition, and store these fission products. As an example, the current industrial practice is to discharge Kr-85, a radioactive gas, entirely to the atmosphere after dilution, but for the large recycling facilities envisioned in the near future, several techniques such as 1) cryogenic distillation and selective absorption in solvents, 2) adsorption on activated charcoal, 3) selective sorption on chemical modified zeolites, or 4) diffusion through membranes with selective permeability are potential technologies to retain the gas.

Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; William Kerlin; Steven Bakhtiar

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-Galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor. 30 figs.

Lowe, J.B.; Lennon, G.; Rouquier, S.; Giorgi, D.; Kelly, R.J.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Stephen W. Webb  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Stephen W. Webb Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87 185 ABSTRACT Two models are commonly used to analyze gas- phase diffusion in porous media in the presence of advection, the Advective-Dispersive Model (ADM) and the Dusty-gas Model (DGM). The ADM, which is used in TOUGH2, is based on a simple linear addition of advection calculated by Darcy's law and ordinary diffusion using Fick's law with a porosity- tortuosity-gas saturation multiplier to account for the porous medium. Another approach for gas-phase transport in porous media is the Dusty-Gas Model. This model applies the kinetic theory of gases to the gaseous components and the porous media (or "dust") to combine transport due to diffusion and

213

Online learning of a neural fuel control system for gaseous fueled si engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This dissertation presents a new type of fuel control algorithm for gaseous fuelled vehicles. Gaseous fuels such as hydrogen and natural gas have been shown to be less polluting than liquid fuels such as gasoline, both at the tailpipe and on a total ...

Travis Kent Wiens

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Extending the Photon Mapping Method for Realistic Rendering of Hot Gaseous Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluid dynamics have proved very successful. As a result, diverse physically based fluid animation fluids. In addition to the generation of ap- pealing motions of gaseous fluids, several inter- esting, they are gen- erated within the gaseous fluid, but an energy value is assigned to each one according to the to

Texas at Austin, University of

215

Hydrogen diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning, next-generation fuel for vehicle and stationary power. Unfortunately, hydrogen is also well known to have serious materials compatibility issues in metals, polymers, and ceramics. Piezoelectric actuator materials proposed for low-cost, high efficiency high-pressure hydrogen internal combustion engines (HICE) are known to degrade rapidly in hydrogen. This limits their potential use and poses challenges for HICE. Hydrogen-induced degradation of piezoelectrics is also an issue for low-pressure hydrogen passivation in ferroelectric random access memory. Currently, there is a lack of data in the literature on hydrogen species diffusion in piezoelectrics in the temperature range appropriate for the HICE as charged via a gaseous route. We present 1HNMR quantification of the local hydrogen species diffusion within lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate on samples charged by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen ?32?MPa. Results are discussed in context of theoretically predicted interstitial hydrogen lattice sites and aqueous charging experiments from existing literature.

Alvine, Kyle J.; Vijayakumar, M.; Bowden, Mark E.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Pitman, Stan G.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

Thermodynamics and Diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011 ... Hume-Rothery Symposium Thermodynamics and Diffusion Coupling ... be quite fundamental and often it cannot be distinguished from “basic” ...

217

Mulitcomponent Multiphase Diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 54 (2006) p 2431-2439. pdf file; "Hillert, Höglund, and Ågren, "Diffusion in interstitial compounds with thermal and stoichiometric defects," J. Appl. ...

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

218

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

219

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sne_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sne_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

220

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_spa_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_spa_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

222

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_swy_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_swy_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

223

,"Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_smi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_smi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

224

,"Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

225

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sms_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sms_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

226

,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_stx_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_stx_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

227

,"Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_smt_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_smt_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

228

,"Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

229

,"Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sal_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sal_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

230

,"California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

231

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sok_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sok_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

232

,"Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_soh_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_soh_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

233

,"Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sut_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sut_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

234

,"Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sak_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sak_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

235

,"Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sin_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sin_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

236

Application of Gaseous Sphere Injection Method for Modeling Under-expanded H2 Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology for modeling gaseous injection has been refined and applied to recent experimental data from the literature. This approach uses a discrete phase analogy to handle gaseous injection, allowing for addition of gaseous injection to a CFD grid without needing to resolve the injector nozzle. This paper focuses on model testing to provide the basis for simulation of hydrogen direct injected internal combustion engines. The model has been updated to be more applicable to full engine simulations, and shows good agreement with experiments for jet penetration and time-dependent axial mass fraction, while available radial mass fraction data is less well predicted.

Whitesides, R; Hessel, R P; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

237

Galactic Diffuse Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

238

Dispersing the Gaseous Protoplanetary Disc and Halting Type II Migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than 30 extra-solar Jupiter-like planets have shorter periods than the planet Mercury. It is generally accepted that they formed further out, past the ’snow line ’ (?1 AU), and migrated inwards. In order to be driven by tidal torques from the gaseous disc, the disc exterior to the planet had to contain about a planetary mass. The fact that the planets stopped migrating means that their outer disc was removed. We suggest, following the simulation by Bate et al. (2003), that the outer disc was accreted by the planet. This not only halts migration but removes the outer disc for planets interior to about 2 AU. The disc further out could have been removed by photoevaporation (Matsuyama et al. 2003). Furthermore, as also shown by Bate et al. (op cit) this process also provides an upper limit to planetary masses in agreement with the analysis of observed planetary masses by Zucker & Mazeh (2002). In this scenario, the endgame is a race. The central star is accreting the inner disc and the planet, while the planet is accreting the outer disc. The planet survives if it accretes its outer disc before being accreted by the star. The winner is determined solely by the ratio of the mass of the outer disc to the local surface density of the disc. Some planets are certainly eaten by the central star. Subject headings: extrasolar planets, Jupiter 1.

M. Lecar; D. D. Sasselov

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

GASEOUS CO ABUNDANCE-AN EVOLUTIONARY TRACER FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

Planck cold clumps are among the most promising objects to investigate the initial conditions of the evolution of molecular clouds. In this work, by combing the dust emission data from the survey of the Planck satellite with the molecular data of {sup 12}CO/{sup 13}CO/C{sup 18}O (1-0) lines from observations with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope, we investigate the CO abundance, CO depletion, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of 674 clumps in the early cold cores sample. The median and mean values of the CO abundance are 0.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 1.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, respectively. The mean and median of CO depletion factor are 1.7 and 0.9, respectively. The median value of X{sub CO-to-H{sub 2}} for the whole sample is 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} K{sup -1} km{sup -1} s. The CO abundance, CO depletion factor, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor are strongly (anti-)correlated to other physical parameters (e.g., dust temperature, dust emissivity spectral index, column density, volume density, and luminosity-to-mass ratio). To conclude, the gaseous CO abundance can be used as an evolutionary tracer for molecular clouds.

Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com, E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Early Morning Ventilation of a Gaseous Tracer from a Mountain Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important component of a joint Environmental Protection Agency–Department of Energy field experiment in Brush Creek Valley, Colorado in July–August 1982, was an aircraft sampling task to help verify the early morning ventilation of a gaseous ...

Montie M. Orgill

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Interpolation and Profile Correction (IPC) Method for Shortwave Radiative Transfer in Spectral Intervals of Gaseous Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new interpolation and profile correction (IPC) method for radiance/flux calculations in gaseous absorption bands is presented. The IPC method is designed to allow an arbitrary spectral resolution including monochromatic mode. It features a ...

Alexei I. Lyapustin

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Relaxed Eddy Accumulation System for Measuring Surface Fluxes of Total Gaseous Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system was designed to continuously measure total gaseous mercury (TGM) fluxes over a forest canopy. TGM concentration measurements were measured at 5-min intervals with a Tekran model 2537A mercury analyzer ...

Jesse O. Bash; David R. Miller

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department Annual Operating Report, CY 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of the waste management operations section of the liquid and gaseous waste operations department at ORNL for 1993. The process waste, liquid low-level waste, gaseous waste systems activities are reported, as well as the low-level waste solidification project. Upgrade activities is the various waste processing and treatment systems are summarized. A maintenance activity overview is provided, and program management, training, and other miscellaneous activities are covered.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Nonlinear Horizontal Diffusion for GCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixing-length-based parameterization of horizontal diffusion, which was originally proposed by Smagorinsky, is revisited. The complete tendencies of horizontal momentum diffusion, the associated frictional heating, and horizontal diffusion of ...

Erich Becker; Ulrike Burkhardt

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Infrared Spectroscopy of Atomic Lines in Gaseous Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectroscopy in the infrared provides a means to assess important properties of the plasma in gaseous nebulae. We present some of our own work that illustrates the need for interactions between the themes of this conference - astronomical data, atomic data, and plasma simulations. We undertook Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) observations with the intent of better understanding the effects of density variations in nebulae, particularly planetary nebulae (PNs), by determining average electron densities from the flux ratios of several fine-structure, IR emission lines. Instead, we are able to ascertain only minor density information because of several instances of the observed line flux ratios being out of range of the theoretical predictions using current atomic data. In these cases, the ISO data cannot presently be used to derive electron density, but rather provide direction for needed improvements in the atomic collision strengths. We have detected an unidentified (uid) strong emission line in an ISO/SWS spectrum of the Orion Nebula. The line has a rest wavelength 2.89350$\\pm$0.00003 $\\mu$m. A long-slit UKIRT observation confirms the presence of this line and shows that the emission is spatially extended and appears to be coincident with the brightest part of the ionized region. We do not detect the uid line in our SWS02 spectra of any of the several bright PNs which we observed for a comparable time. The need for basic atomic data, in this case wavelengths to aid species identification, is paramount for future progress. We look toward the future with a brief synopsis of upcoming or planned IR missions.

R. H. Rubin; R. J. Dufour; T. R. Geballe; S. W. J. Colgan; J. P. Harrington; S. D. Lord; A. L. Liao; D. A. Levine

2001-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

248

VISUALS: Diffusion couple animation - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 25, 2007 ... This Quicktime animation of a diffusion couple shows side-by-side views of two different atomic species - red and green - diffusing across a flat ...

249

Environmental assessment for the construction and operation of waste storage facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE is proposing to construct and operate 3 waste storage facilities (one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for RCRA waste, one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for toxic waste (TSCA), and one 200,000 ft{sup 2} mixed (hazardous/radioactive) waste storage facility) at Paducah. This environmental assessment compares impacts of this proposed action with those of continuing present practices aof of using alternative locations. It is found that the construction, operation, and ultimate closure of the proposed waste storage facilities would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

China's Pathways to Achieving 40% ~ 45% Reduction in CO{sub 2} Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

SciTech Connect

Achieving China’s goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO{sub 2} per unit of GDP) by 40% to 45% percent below 2005 levels by 2020 will require the strengthening and expansion of energy efficiency policies across the buildings, industries and transport sectors. This study uses a bottom-up, end-use model and two scenarios -- an enhanced energy efficiency (E3) scenario and an alternative maximum technically feasible energy efficiency improvement (Max Tech) scenario – to evaluate what policies and technical improvements are needed to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. The findings from this study show that a determined approach by China can lead to the achievement of its 2020 goal. In particular, with full success in deepening its energy efficiency policies and programs but following the same general approach used during the 11th Five Year Plan, it is possible to achieve 49% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions per unit of GDP (CO{sub 2} emissions intensity) in 2020 from 2005 levels (E3 case). Under the more optimistic but feasible assumptions of development and penetration of advanced energy efficiency technology (Max Tech case), China could achieve a 56% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions intensity in 2020 relative to 2005 with cumulative reduction of energy use by 2700 Mtce and of CO{sub 2} emissions of 8107 Mt CO{sub 2} between 2010 and 2020. Energy savings and CO{sub 2} mitigation potential varies by sector but most of the energy savings potential is found in energy-intensive industry. At the same time, electricity savings and the associated emissions reduction are magnified by increasing renewable generation and improving coal generation efficiency, underscoring the dual importance of end-use efficiency improvements and power sector decarbonization.

Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Ke, Jing

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream  

SciTech Connect

A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream is proposed, and the results of numerical simulation of the burnout dynamics of Kansk-Achinsk coals in the pulverized state at different treatment conditions and different model parameters are presented. The mathematical model describes the dynamics of thermochemical conversion of solid organic fuels with allowance for complex physicochemical phenomena of heat-and-mass exchange between coal particles and the gaseous environment.

E.A. Boiko; S.V. Pachkovskii [Polytechnic Institute, Federal University of Siberia, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) can be an important pathway for mercury removal from an aquatic environment. DGM evasional fluxes from an aquatic system can account for up to 95% of atmospheric Hg and its deposition pathways. While this makes DGM an important species of mercury to investigate, the difficulty of accurately analyzing DGM has prevented many from studying it. In this study, DGM was measured in two different types of estuarine environments and with two different methods, discrete and continuous analysis. The discrete technique works reasonably well and is reproducible, but it does not allow one to observe rapid changes in DGM concentration due to long analysis times (~2 hr per sample). When used in this study, the discrete sampling technique agreed well with the continuous technique for Offatts Bayou, Galveston, Texas, and Georgiana Slough in the California Bay-Delta region. The average DGM concentration during the March continuous study at Offatts Bayou was 25.3 ± 8.8 pg L-1. This is significantly higher than the average DGM concentration from Georgiana Slough during late March 2006 (9.6 ± 6.6 pg L-1). DGM seemed to correlate best with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) data in every study, suggesting that the primary control of its formation is solar irradiation. Stronger positive correlations with PAR were seen when DGM data was shifted back one hour, indicating that mercury photoreactions take time to complete. DGM also correlated positively with wind speed in most instances. However, increased wind speed should enhance air to water transfer of elemental mercury, thus one would expect a negative correlation. DGM co-varied negatively with salinity during the continuous studies, suggesting that the DGM pool is reduced in surface waters by chloride mediated oxidation. Three predictive flux models were used in the study to assess the potential for DGM water to air transfer. For both the Georgiana Slough and Offatts Bayou studies, the predicted flux dropped to or below zero after sunset. This study does contribute to the understanding of DGM cycling in aquatic environments as there are few studies that have made continuous DGM measurements in estuarine environments.

Landin, Charles Melchor

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) can be an important pathway for mercury removal from an aquatic environment. DGM evasional fluxes from an aquatic system can account for up to 95% of atmospheric Hg and its deposition pathways. While this makes DGM an important species of mercury to investigate, the difficulty of accurately analyzing DGM has prevented many from studying it. In this study, DGM was measured in two different types of estuarine environments and with two different methods, discrete and continuous analysis. The discrete technique works reasonably well and is reproducible, but it does not allow one to observe rapid changes in DGM concentration due to long analysis times (~2 hr per sample). When used in this study, the discrete sampling technique agreed well with the continuous technique for Offatts Bayou, Galveston, Texas, and Georgiana Slough in the California Bay-Delta region. The average DGM concentration during the March continuous study at Offatts Bayou was 25.3 + 8.8 pg L-1. This is significantly higher than the average DGM concentration from Georgiana Slough during late March 2006 (9.6 + 6.6 pg L-1). DGM seemed to correlate best with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) data in every study, suggesting that the primary control of its formation is solar irradiation. Stronger positive correlations with PAR were seen when DGM data was shifted back one hour, indicating that mercury photoreactions take time to complete. DGM also correlated positively with wind speed in most instances. However, increased wind speed should enhance air to water transfer of elemental mercury, thus one would expect a negative correlation. DGM co-varied negatively with salinity during the continuous studies, suggesting that the DGM pool is reduced in surface waters by chloride mediated oxidation. Three predictive flux models were used in the study to assess the potential for DGM water to air transfer. For both the Georgiana Slough and Offatts Bayou studies, the predicted flux dropped to or below zero after sunset. This study does contribute to the understanding of DGM cycling in aquatic environments as there are few studies that have made continuous DGM measurements in estuarine environments.

Landin, Charles Melchor

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Carburization of austenitic alloys by gaseous impurities in helium  

SciTech Connect

The carburization behavior of Alloy 800H, Inconel Alloy 617 and Hastelloy Alloy X in helium containing various amounts of H/sub 2/, CO, CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/ was studied. Corrosion tests were conducted in a temperature range from 649 to 1000/sup 0/C (1200 to 1832/sup 0/F) for exposure time up to 10,000 h. Four different helium environments, identified as A, B, C, and D, were investigated. Concentrations of gaseous impurities were 1500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 450 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and 50 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment A; 200 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 100 ..mu..atm CO, 20 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/, 50 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O and 5 ..mu..atm CO/sub 2/ for Environment B; 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and < 0.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment C; and 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and 1.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment D. Environments A and B were characteristic of high-oxygen potential, while C and D were characteristic of low-oxygen potential. The results showed that the carburization kinetics in low-oxygen potential environments (C and D) were significantly higher, approximately an order of magnitude higher at high temperatures, than those in high-oxygen potential environments (A and B) for all three alloys. Thermodynamic analyses indicated no significant differences in the thermodynamic carburization potential between low- and high-oxygen potential environments. It is thus believed that the enhanced carburization kinetics observed in the low-oxygen potential environments were related to kinetic effects. A qualitatively mechanistic model was proposed to explain the enhanced kinetics. The present results further suggest that controlling the oxygen potential of the service environment can be an effective means of reducing carburization of alloys.

Lai, G.Y.; Johnson, W.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Sampling Conditioned Hypoelliptic Diffusions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of recent articles introduced a method to construct stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) which are invariant with respect to the distribution of a given conditioned diffusion. These works are restricted to the case of elliptic diffusions where the drift has a gradient structure, and the resulting SPDE is of second order parabolic type. The present article extends this methodology to allow the construction of SPDEs which are invariant with respect to the distribution of a class of hypoelliptic diffusion processes, subject to a bridge conditioning. This allows the treatment of more realistic physical models, for example one can use the resulting SPDE to study transitions between meta-stable states in mechanical systems with friction and noise. In this situation the restriction of the drift being a gradient can also be lifted.

Hairer, Martin; Voss, Jochen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Simulation of VUV electroluminescence in micropattern gaseous detectors: the case of GEM and MHSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electroluminescence produced during avalanche development in gaseous avalanche detectors is an useful information for triggering, calorimetry and tracking in gaseous detectors. Noble gases present high electroluminescence yields, emitting mainly in the VUV region. The photons can provide signal readout if appropriate photosensors are used. Micropattern gaseous detectors are good candidates for signal amplification in high background and/or low rate experiments due to their high electroluminescence yields and radiopurity. In this work, the VUV light responses of the Gas Electron Multiplier and of the Micro-Hole Strip Plate, working with pure xenon, are simulated and studied in detail using a new and versatile C++ toolkit. It is shown that the solid angle subtended by a photosensor placed below the microstructures depends on the operating conditions. The obtained absolute EL yields, determined for different gas pressures and as functions of the applied voltage, are compared with those determined experimentally.

C. A. B. Oliveira; P. M. M. Correia; H. Schindler; A. L. Ferreira; C. M. B. Monteiro; J. M. F. dos Santos; S. Biagi; R. Veenhof; J. F. C. A. Veloso

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

258

Quasi-monoenergetic protons accelerated by laser radiation pressure and shocks in thin gaseous targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated effective CO{sub 2} laser acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic protons from thick gaseous hydrogen target (of thickness tens of laser wavelengths) via hole boring and shock accelerations. We present here an alternative novel acceleration scheme by combining laser radiation pressure acceleration with shock acceleration of protons in a thin gaseous target of thickness several laser wavelengths. The laser pushes the thin gaseous plasma forward while compressing it with protons trapped in it. We demonstrated the combined acceleration with two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and obtained quasi-monoenergetic protons {approx}44 MeV in a gas target of thickness twice of the laser wavelength irradiated by circularly polarized CO{sub 2} laser with normalized laser amplitude a{sub 0}=10.

He Minqing; Shao Xi; Liu Chuansheng; Liu Tungchang; Su Jaojang; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z. [East-West Space Science Center, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Sheng Zhengming [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Oak Ridge National Lebroatory Liquid&Gaseous Waste Treatment System Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

Excellence in Laboratory operations is one of the three key goals of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Agenda. That goal will be met through comprehensive upgrades of facilities and operational approaches over the next few years. Many of ORNL's physical facilities, including the liquid and gaseous waste collection and treatment systems, are quite old, and are reaching the end of their safe operating life. The condition of research facilities and supporting infrastructure, including the waste handling facilities, is a key environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concern. The existing infrastructure will add considerably to the overhead costs of research due to increased maintenance and operating costs as these facilities continue to age. The Liquid Gaseous Waste Treatment System (LGWTS) Reengineering Project is a UT-Battelle, LLC (UT-B) Operations Improvement Program (OIP) project that was undertaken to develop a plan for upgrading the ORNL liquid and gaseous waste systems to support ORNL's research mission.

Van Hoesen, S.D.

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

260

Diffusion and Numerical Filters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applications of low-pass filters or implicit diffusion are found to be extremely beneficial in a simple model problem that contains an oven-ordered advection scheme based on a symmetric stencil. In contrast, the effects are negative when either ...

William H. Raymond

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1996  

SciTech Connect

This annual report summarizes operating activities dealing with the process waste system, the liquid low-level waste system, and the gaseous waste system. It also describes upgrade activities dealing with the process and liquid low-level waste systems, the cathodic protection system, a stack ventilation system, and configuration control. Maintenance activities are described dealing with nonradiological wastewater treatment plant, process waste treatment plant and collection system, liquid low-level waste system, and gaseous waste system. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits/reviews/tours, and environmental restoration support.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Possible Anisotropy in Blackbody Radiation Viewed through Non-uniform Gaseous Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-local gauge symmetry of a complex scalar field, which can be trivially extended to spinor fields, was demonstrated in a recent paper (Mod.Phys.Lett. A13, 1265 (1998) ; hep-th/9902020). The corresponding covariant Lagrangian density yielded a new, non-local Quantum Electrodynamics. In this letter we show that as a consequence of this new QED, a blackbody radiation viewed through gaseous matter appears to show a slight deviation from the Planck formula, and propose an experimental test to check this effect. We also show that a non-uniformity in this gaseous matter distribution leads to an (apparent) spatial anisotropy in the blackbody radiation.

T K Rai Dastidar

1999-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

263

Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide layers prepared by magnetron sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and thermal growth has been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and diffusion coefficients have been extracted from simulations based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Erbium diffusion in magnetron sputtered silicon dioxide from buried erbium distributions has in particular been studied, and in this case a simple Arrhenius law can describe the diffusivity with an activation energy of 5.3{+-}0.1 eV. Within a factor of two, the erbium diffusion coefficients at a given temperature are identical for all investigated matrices.

Lu Yingwei; Julsgaard, B.; Petersen, M. Christian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Jensen, R. V. Skougaard [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, DK-9220 Aalborg O (Denmark); Pedersen, T. Garm; Pedersen, K. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, DK-9220 Aalborg O (Denmark); Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center-iNANO, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Larsen, A. Nylandsted [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center-iNANO, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

264

Diffusive Transport by Breaking Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple conceptual model of the relationship between advective transport by breaking waves and diffusive transport is derived. line model postulates that the displacement of fluid parcels by a breaking wave is analogous to molecular diffusion (...

Kenneth P. Bowman

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

On-Line Measurement of Heat of Combustion of Gaseous Hydrocarbon Fuel Mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for the on-line measurement of the heat of combustion of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel mixtures has been developed and tested. The method involves combustion of a test gas with a measured quantity of air to achieve a preset concentration of oxygen ...

Sprinkle Danny R.; Chaturvedi Sushil K.; Kheireddine Ali

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from net excess hydrogen in a catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons in the presence of hydrogen, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products. An improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from the net excess hydrogen is realized by chilling and contacting said hydrogen with a normally liquid hydrocarbon stream in a plural stage absorption zone at an elevated pressure.

Scheifele, C.A.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

267

Method of absorbing UF.sub.6 from gaseous mixtures in alkamine absorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering uranium hexafluoride from gaseous mixtures employing as an absorbent a liquid composition at least one of the components of which is chosen from the group consisting of ethanolamine, diethanolamine, and 3-methyl-3-amino-propane-diol-1,2.

Lafferty, Robert H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Smiley, Seymour H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Radimer, Kenneth J. (Little Falls, NJ)

1976-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

Sampling diffusive transition paths  

SciTech Connect

We address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with sampling infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with sampling the coarse features of long paths. The fine-features sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm (FSA), and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. We use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature.

F. Miller III, Thomas; Predescu, Cristian

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

269

METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF LIGHT ISOTOPE PRODUCT FROM LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION UNITS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for removing the lighter isotope of a gaseous-liquid product from a number of diffusion columns of a liquid thermal diffusion system in two stages by the use of freeze valves. The subject liquid flows from the diffusion columns into a heated sloping capsule where the liquid is vaporized by the action of steam in a heated jacket surrounding the capsule. When the capsule is filled the gas flows into a collector. Flow between the various stages is controlled by freeze valves which are opened and closed by the passage of gas and cool water respectively through coils surrounding portions of the pipes through which the process liquid is passed. The use of the dual stage remover-collector and the freeze valves is an improvement on the thermal diffusion separation process whereby the fraction containing the lighter isotope many be removed from the tops of the diffusion columns without intercolumn flow, or prior stage flow while the contents of the capsule is removed to the final receiver.

Hoffman, J.D.; Ballou, J.K.

1957-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

Light diffusing fiber optic chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

Maitland, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Process and system for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gaseous streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-stage UCSRP process and system for removal of sulfur from a gaseous stream in which the gaseous stream, which contains a first amount of H.sub.2S, is provided to a first stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess SO.sub.2 mode at a first amount of SO.sub.2, producing an effluent gas having a reduced amount of SO.sub.2, and in which the effluent gas is provided to a second stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess H.sub.2S mode, producing a product gas having an amount of H.sub.2S less than said first amount of H.sub.2S.

Basu, Arunabha (Aurora, IL); Meyer, Howard S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Lynn, Scott (Pleasant Hill, CA); Leppin, Dennis (Chicago, IL); Wangerow, James R. (Medinah, IL)

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

diffuse radiation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Wiki Apps Datasets Browse Upload data GDR Community Linked Data Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon diffuse radiation Dataset Summary...

273

Diffusion Flame Measurements: Notes B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Profiles in steady and flickering methane/air, ethylene/air, and propane/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure using an axisymmetric burner ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

274

Tracer Diffusion Databases for ICME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of a large repository of stable isotopes that can be utilized for tracer diffusion .... Lattice Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Lithium Battery Materials LiMPO4 ...

275

Lithium Diffusion in Graphitic Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volume 1 Start Page 1176 Issue 8 Pagination 1176-1180 Keywords anode, diffusion, graphene, lithium ion battery, transport Abstract Graphitic carbon is currently considered the...

276

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high purity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Ghate, M.R.; Yang, R.T.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

277

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon, zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high parity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber.

Ghate, Madhav R. (Morgantown, WV); Yang, Ralph T. (Williamsville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Oak Ridge National Lebroatory Liquid&Gaseous Waste Treatment System Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

Excellence in Laboratory operations is one of the three key goals of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Agenda. That goal will be met through comprehensive upgrades of facilities and operational approaches over the next few years. Many of ORNL's physical facilities, including the liquid and gaseous waste collection and treatment systems, are quite old, and are reaching the end of their safe operating life. The condition of research facilities and supporting infrastructure, including the waste handling facilities, is a key environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concern. The existing infrastructure will add considerably to the overhead costs of research due to increased maintenance and operating costs as these facilities continue to age. The Liquid Gaseous Waste Treatment System (LGWTS) Reengineering Project is a UT-Battelle, LLC (UT-B) Operations Improvement Program (OIP) project that was undertaken to develop a plan for upgrading the ORNL liquid and gaseous waste systems to support ORNL's research mission.

Van Hoesen, S.D.

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

279

The Use of New Parameterizations for Gaseous Absorption in the CLIRAD-SW Solar Radiation Code for Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new gaseous absorption parameterizations are incorporated in the CLIRAD-SW solar radiation code for models, openly distributed for the scientific community. In the new parameterizations, the magnitude of absorption coefficients in each ...

T. A. Tarasova; B. A. Fomin

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Joint Test Plan to Identify the Gaseous By-Products of CH3I Loading on AgZ  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this test plan is to describe research to determine the gaseous by-products of the adsorption of CH3I on hydrogen reduced silver exchanged mordenite (AgZ).

R. T. Jubin; N. R. Soelberg; D. M. Strachan; T. M. Nenoff; B. B. Spencer

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

Wijmans Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTY PERFORMANCE OF COMMERCIAL GRADE API PIPELINE STEELS IN HIGH PRESSURE GASEOUS HYDROGEN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continued growth of the world s developing countries has placed an ever increasing demand on traditional fossil fuel energy sources. This development has lead to increasing research and development of alternative energy sources. Hydrogen gas is one of the potential alternative energy sources under development. Currently the most economical method of transporting large quantities of hydrogen gas is through steel pipelines. It is well known that hydrogen embrittlement has the potential to degrade steel s mechanical properties when hydrogen migrates into the steel matrix. Consequently, the current pipeline infrastructure used in hydrogen transport is typically operated in a conservative fashion. This operational practice is not conducive to economical movement of significant volumes of hydrogen gas as an alternative to fossil fuels. The degradation of the mechanical properties of steels in hydrogen service is known to depend on the microstructure of the steel. Understanding the levels of mechanical property degradation of a given microstructure when exposed to hydrogen gas under pressure can be used to evaluate the suitability of the existing pipeline infrastructure for hydrogen service and guide alloy and microstructure design for new hydrogen pipeline infrastructure. To this end, the 2 Copyright 2010 by ASME microstructures of relevant steels and their mechanical properties in relevant gaseous hydrogen environments must be fully characterized to establish suitability for transporting hydrogen. A project to evaluate four commercially available pipeline steels alloy/microstructure performance in the presences of gaseous hydrogen has been funded by the US Department of Energy along with the private sector. The microstructures of four pipeline steels were characterized and then tensile testing was conducted in gaseous hydrogen and helium at pressures of 800, 1600 and 3000 psi. Based on measurements of reduction of area, two of the four steels that performed the best across the pressure range were selected for evaluation of fracture and fatigue performance in gaseous hydrogen at 800 and 3000 psi. This paper will describe the work performed on four commercially available pipeline steels in the presence of gaseous hydrogen at pressures relevant for transport in pipelines. Microstructures and mechanical property performances will be compared. In addition, recommendations for future work related to gaining a better understanding of steel pipeline performance in hydrogen service will be discussed.

Stalheim, Mr. Douglas [DGS Metallurgical Solutions Inc; Boggess, Todd [Secat; San Marchi, Chris [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Jansto, Steven [Reference Metals Company; Somerday, Dr. B [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Sofronis, Prof. Petros [University of Illinois

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

Foreman, Kenneth M. (North Bellmore, NY); Gilbert, Barry L. (Westbury, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Tidal Diffusivity: A Mechanism for Frontogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is hypothesized that tidal mixing may provide a “diffusivity” mechanism for frontogenesis. It stems from the fact that tidal diffusivity varies in the opposite sense from the water depth, so the vertically integrated diffusivity may exhibit a ...

Hsien-Wang Ou; Chang-Ming Dong; Dake Chen

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Modeling phosphorus diffusion in three dimensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional process simulator in which both the standard nonlinear diffusion model and a five-species kinetic model are implemented to model phosphorus diffusion in silicon is described. The reaction-diffusion equations are discretized using ...

W. B. Richardson; G. F. Carey; B. J. Mulvaney

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

BEAM DIFFUSION MEASUREMENTS AT RHIC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During a store, particles from the beam core continually diffuse outwards into the halo through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the diffusion rate as a function of particle amplitude can help discover which processes are important to halo growth. A collimator can be used to measure the amplitude growth rate as a function of the particle amplitude. In this paper we present results of diffusion measurements performed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with fully stripped gold ions, deuterons, and protons. We compare these results with measurements from previous years, and simulations, and discuss any factors that relate to beam growth in RHIC.

FLILLER,R.P.,IIIDREES,A.GASSNER,D.MCINTYRE,G.PEGGS,S.TRBOJEVIC,D.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

287

Model of leaf photosynthesis and the effects of simple gaseous sulfur compounds (H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A theoretical development is presented of a leaf model and the effects of simple sulfur compounds (H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}) on photosynthesis based upon biochemical mechanisms. The model is developed to interpret short-term fumigation experiments and to use with season-long fumigation experiments to assess the effects of these compounds on growth. The model is designed as a submodel in a growth-and-allocation model of the plant. Included in this development are an analysis of the diffusion of CO{sub 2} and sulfur compound into the leaf, enzymatic interactions of sulfur in dark and light reactions of photosynthesis, temperature dependence of the kinetics and denaturization of enzymes, metabolism of sulfur compounds, and a hypothesis for the long-term effects of sulfur compounds. Enhanced photosynthesis at low H{sub 2}S levels, depression of photosynthesis at high H/sub 2/S levels, threshold to effects of sulfur pollutants, and the nature of the temperature dependence of photosynthesis are explained. Parameters in the model for sugar beets from data in the literature and from experiments funded through LLL were used. The properties of the model were analyzed. Data and experiments still required, sensitivities of the model to parameters and variables, implications to assessments, and the setting of standards for gaseous pollutants, are discussed.

Kercher, J.R.

1978-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

FLAME STRUCTURE MEASUREMENT OF POLYMER DIFFUSION FLAMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of counterflow diffusion flames above condensed fuels:of counterflow diffusion flames in the forward stagnationCA, October 15-16, 1979 FLAME STRUCTURE MEASUREMENT OF

Pitz, W. J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Measuring the Effect of Fuel Chemical Structure on Particulate and Gaseous Emissions using Isotope Tracing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique initially developed for radiocarbon dating and recently applied to internal combustion engines, carbon atoms within specific fuel molecules can be labeled and followed in particulate or gaseous emissions. In addition to examining the effect of fuel chemical structure on emissions, the specific source of carbon for PM can be identified if an isotope label exists in the appropriate fuel source. Existing work has focused on diesel engines, but the samples (soot collected on quartz filters or combustion gases captured in bombs or bags) are readily collected from large industrial combustors as well.

Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Martin, G C; Upatnicks, A; Dibble, R W; Cheng, S

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

290

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

291

(2) Quantities and Prices of Animal Manure and Gaseous Fuels Generated:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this context, we are defining animal manure as the excrement of livestock reared in agricultural operations as well as straw, sawdust, and other residues used as animal bedding. Gaseous fuels may be derived from municipal and industrial landfills (landfill gas) or from animal manure and solid biomass such as crop silage or the organic fraction of MSW (biogas). Both landfill gas and biogas are generated via anaerobic digestion, a multi-stage process whereby bacteria convert carbohydrates, fats, and proteins to methane (Evans 2001). EPA does not consider these materials to be wastes in themselves, when used as fuel, but rather materials derived from wastes.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

SciTech Connect

This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 3 contains reports from 6 government contractors on LPG, anhydrous ammonia, and hydrogen energy systems. Report subjects include: simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water; LPG safety research; state-of-the-art of release prevention and control technology in the LPG industry; ammonia: an introductory assessment of safety and environmental control information; ammonia as a fuel, and hydrogen safety and environmental control assessment.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

2013 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, FEBRUARY 24 - MARCH 1, 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The long-standing goal of our community is to develop new strategies for capturing complex molecular architectures as gas phase ions where they can be isolated, characterized and manipulated with great sensitivity. Emergent areas of interest include catalytic mechanisms, cryogenic processing of ions extracted from solution, ion fragmentation mechanisms, and new methods for ion formation and structural characterization. The conference will cover theoretical and experimental advances on systems ranging from model studies at the molecular scale to preparation of nanomaterials and characterization of large biological molecules.

Williams, Evan

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Separation of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from a catalytic reforming effluent and recovery of purified hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for the catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products, is disclosed. Relatively impure hydrogen is separated from the reforming zone effluent, compressed, and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product to provide relatively pure hydrogen, a portion of which is recycled to the reforming zone. The balance is further compressed and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product to provide an improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons as well as an improved recovery of purified hydrogen at a pressure suitable for use in the relatively high pressure hydrotreating of sulfur-containing feedstocks.

Coste, A.C.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

295

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL); Jalan, Vinod M. (Concord, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Linking the gaseous and the condensed phases of matter: The slow electron and its interactions  

SciTech Connect

The interfacing of the gaseous and the condensed phases of matter as effected by interphase and cluster studies on the behavior of key reactions involving slow electrons either as reacting initial particles or as products of the reactions themselves is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the measurement of both the cross sections and the energetics involved, although most of the available information to date is on the latter. The discussion is selectively focussed on electron scattering (especially the role of negative ion states in gases, clusters, and dense matter), ionization, electron attachment and photodetachment. The dominant role of the electric polarization of the medium is emphasized.

Christophorou, L.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

New frontiers in diffusion modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last fifty years, diffusion researchers have sought to explain why the rate of adoption of an innovation varies over time. Some innovations are adopted quickly as compared to others, which take decades for adoption. ...

Ranganath, Naveen Chandra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Diffusion of Hydrogen in Titanium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 1994 ... TMS Member price: 10.00. Non-member price: 25.00. TMS Student Member price : 10.00. Product In Stock. Description The diffusion of ...

299

Programming reaction-diffusion processors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In reaction-diffusion (RD) processors, both the data and the results of the computation are encoded as concentration profiles of the reagents. The computation is performed via the spreading and interaction of wave fronts. Most prototypes of RD computers ...

Andrew Adamatzky

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Argonne National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth-Paducah Program Office Ohio Kentucky Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Challenge The decommissioning of GDP facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of residual enriched uranium in facility components for safeguards and nuclear criticality safety purposes. Current practices used to perform NDA measurements frequently have poorly defined uncertainties due to several factors, including; lack of available Working Reference Material (WRM) standards and surrogate container matrices to test performance and less than adequate programmatic requirements defined by end users. As a result, measurement uncertainties (typically ± 50 to 100 percent of measured values) are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Heat-pipe effect on the transport of gaseous radionuclides released from a nuclear waste container  

SciTech Connect

When an unsaturated porous medium is subjected to a temperature gradient and the temperature is sufficiently high, vadose water is heated and vaporizes. Vapor flows under its pressure gradient towards colder regions where it condenses. Vaporization and condensation produce a liquid saturation gradient, creating a capillary pressure gradient inside the porous medium. Condensate flows towards the hot end under the influence of a capillary pressure gradient. This is a heat pipe in an unsaturated porous medium. We study analytically the transport of gaseous species released from a spent-fuel waste package, as affected by a time-dependent heat pipe in an unsaturated rock. For parameter values typical of a potential repository in partially saturated fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, we found that a heat pipe develops shortly after waste is buried, and the heat-pipe`s spatial extent is time-dependent. Water vapor movements produced by the heat pipe can significantly affect the migration of gaseous radionuclides. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Zhou, W.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) Apparatus for Nuclear Diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The RAGS (Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility. Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D A; Velsko, C A; Jedlovec, D R; Yeamans, C B; Moody, K J; Tereshatov, E; Stoeffl, W; Riddle, A

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for Environment has responsibility for identifying, characterizing, and ameliorating the environmental, health, and safety issues and public concerns associated with commercial operation of specific energy systems. The need for developing a safety and environmental control assessment for liquefied gaseous fuels was identified by the Environmental and Safety Engineering Division as a result of discussions with various governmental, industry, and academic persons having expertise with respect to the particular materials involved: liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, and anhydrous ammonia. This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in Fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 1 (Executive Summary) describes the background, purpose and organization of the LGF Program and contains summaries of the 25 reports presented in Volumes 2 and 3. Annotated bibliographies on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety and Environmental Control Research and on Fire Safety and Hazards of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) are included in Volume 1.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Mixture of micronized coal powder with gaseous fuels for use in internal combustion engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved fuel mixture for use in internal combustion engines is described. This fuel is an intimate mixture of micronized coal, having an average particle size of less than 100 microns, with a gaseous fuel selected from natural gas and coal-derived. The coal can be present from more than 0 percent to less than 100 percent, with generally the lower percentages being preferred. The addition of the coal to the gaseous fuel improves engine efficiency and power rating, and also decreases peak engine pressure allowing for higher compression ratios. An increase in the amount of the coal increases the oxides of sulfur while reducing the oxides of nitrogen in the exhaust. An increase in the amount of gas, on the other hand, increases the oxides of nitrogen but lowers oxides of sulfur. Accordingly, a preferred mixture will depend upon a particular application for the coal/gas fuel and thereby increases user fuel flexibility considerations. Modeling of the fuel mixture for use in a diesel engine is described. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Carpenter, L.K.

1990-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

305

Portsmouth and Paducah Construction Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Needs Assessment for Needs Assessment for Medical Screening of Construction Workers at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants Introduction In 1993 the U.S. Congress enacted Section 3162 of the Defense Authorization Act, which directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to initiate programs to evaluate the health of former DOE defense nuclear facility workers. Consistent with the mandate to DOE from Congress, this project implements a notification, health evaluation (including medical screening) and intervention program for former building and construction trades workers at the DOE Oak Ridge, TN site and the Gaseous Diffusion Plants (GDP) at Portsmouth, OH and Paducah, KY, who may have been exposed to health hazards as a result of work at these sites. Based on congressional language, current workers at GDP's may request

306

Gas Phase Suppression of a Diffusion Flame formed over a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Solid fuels are often found in berthing space, laundry room, and other spaces on a ship and may respond differently from the gaseous or liquid fuels ...

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fractional reaction-diffusion equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a series of papers, Saxena, Mathai, and Haubold (2002, 2004a, 2004b) derived solutions of a number of fractional kinetic equations in terms of generalized Mittag-Leffler functions which provide the extension of the work of Haubold and Mathai (1995, 2000). The subject of the present paper is to investigate the solution of a fractional reaction-diffusion equation. The results derived are of general nature and include the results reported earlier by many authors, notably by Jespersen, Metzler, and Fogedby (1999) for anomalous diffusion and del-Castillo-Negrete, Carreras, and Lynch (2003) for reaction-diffusion systems with L\\'evy flights. The solution has been developed in terms of the H-function in a compact form with the help of Laplace and Fourier transforms. Most of the results obtained are in a form suitable for numerical computation.

R. K. Saxena; A. M. Mathai; H. J. Haubold

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride National Center for Physics, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest, Romania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-493 Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride I. Ursu National Center- vation of235 U NMR signal in liquid UF6 at B = 11.747 T has been recently reported [7]. The aim of this Letter is to investigate the effect of the 23 5U enrichment on the 19F NMR spectra in gaseous UF6. Using

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

309

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 26690 of 28,904 results. 81 - 26690 of 28,904 results. Article New EM Technology: Spray Lights up Contamination Hot Spots OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers have developed a new technology to determine the extent of contamination in Cold War facilities that could replace costly and time-consuming traditional survey methods used by EM. http://energy.gov/em/articles/new-em-technology-spray-lights-contamination-hot-spots Article DOE Seeks Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Task Proposal (RTP) for deactivation activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. http://energy.gov/em/articles/doe-seeks-deactivation-contractor-paducah-gaseous-diffusion-plant

310

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 26720 of 29,416 results. 11 - 26720 of 29,416 results. Article New EM Technology: Spray Lights up Contamination Hot Spots OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers have developed a new technology to determine the extent of contamination in Cold War facilities that could replace costly and time-consuming traditional survey methods used by EM. http://energy.gov/em/articles/new-em-technology-spray-lights-contamination-hot-spots Article DOE Seeks Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Task Proposal (RTP) for deactivation activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. http://energy.gov/em/articles/doe-seeks-deactivation-contractor-paducah-gaseous-diffusion-plant

311

Apparatus for recovering gaseous hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Santa Fe, NM); Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

Heffel, James W. (Lake Matthews, CA); Scott, Paul B. (Northridge, CA); Park, Chan Seung (Yorba Linda, CA)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Lessons Learned from Practical Field Experience with High Pressure Gaseous Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/2010 5/2010 www.cleanvehicle.org 1 Lessons Learned from Practical Field Experience with High Pressure Gaseous Fuels DOE - DOT CNG - H 2 Workshop December 10, 2009 Douglas Horne, PE - CVEF President Rob Adams, P.Eng. - Marathon Technical Services The Facts  NGVs have been used in North America for over 30 years  Codes and Standards (C&S) provide opportunity for safe reliable operation of NGVs  C&S evolve with new technology and field experience  People make mistakes, continuous training is critical for safe operations  Cylinders have a limited life -track your cylinders! 2/25/2010 www.cleanvehicle.org 2 Incidents in North America  Since 1984 CVEF has recorded 97 incidents of which 67 involved CNG vehicles - 37 incidents involve either a CNG leak (15) or a

314

Assessment of methods for analyzing gaseous mixtures of hydrogen isotopes and helium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mass spectrographic methods have served well in the past to analyze gaseous mixtures of the hydrogen isotopes. Alternate methods of analyses are reviewed which offer wider ranges and variety of isotopic determinations. This report describes possible improvements of the mass spectrographic determinations, gas chromatography, anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, microwave-induced optical emission spectroscopy, and methods of measuring tritium using radiation detection devices. Precision, accuracy, limitations, and costs are included for some of the methods mentioned. Costs range from $70,000 for the anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy equipment, which can determine hydrogen isotopes but not helium, to less than $10,000 for the gas chromatographic equipment, which can determine hydrogen isotopes and helium with precision and accuracy comparable to those of the mass spectrometer.

Attalla, A.; Bishop, C.T.; Bohl, D.R.; Buxton, T.L.; Sprague, R.E.; Warner, D.K.

1976-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

315

Preliminary assessment of the gaseous fuels aftermarket conversion industry. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the report is to provide information to be used in assessing the potential impacts of EPA's proposed Gaseous Fuels and Clean Fuel Fleet rulemakings on the aftermarket conversion industry. Therefore, the report will focus on issues germane to determining these impacts (such as financial profiles of companies involved, future trends in industry development and sales, and costs of complying with conversion requirements) rather than assessing the viability of current technologies or the emissions benefits of alternative fuels. Moreover, the report focuses on conversions to CNG and LPG as conversions to these fuels are most viable at this time, even though EPA's proposed conversion regulations could potentially apply to any fuel (e.g., liquid natural gas).

Not Available

1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

316

Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to "float" in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields.

Hobson, David O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Alexeff, Igor (Oak Ridge, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Clinton, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to ''float'' in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields. 6 figs.

Hobson, D.O.; Alexeff, I.; Sikka, V.K.

1987-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

Liquefied gaseous fuels safety and environmental control assessment program: third status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Status Report contains contributions from all contractors currently participating in the DOE Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LG) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program and is presented in two principal sections. Section I is an Executive Summary of work done by all program participants. Section II is a presentation of fourteen individual reports (A through N) on specific LGF Program activities. The emphasis of Section II is on research conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Reports A through M). Report N, an annotated bibliography of literature related to LNG safety and environmental control, was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of its LGF Safety Studies Project. Other organizations who contributed to this Status Report are Aerojet Energy Conversion Company; Applied Technology Corporation; Arthur D. Little, Incorporated; C/sub v/ International, Incorporated; Institute of Gas Technology; and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for Reports A through N for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Separation of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from a catalytic reforming effluent and recovery of purified hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for the catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products, is disclosed. Relatively impure hydrogen is separated from the reforming zone effluent, compressed, and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product to provide relatively pure hydrogen, a portion of which is recycled to the reforming zone. The balance is further compressed and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product in a plural stage absorption zone to provide an improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons as well as an improved recovery of purified hydrogen at a pressure suitable, for example, the relatively high pressure hydrotreating of sulfur-containing feedstocks.

O'brien, D.E.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

320

In vivo facilitated diffusion model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under dilute in vitro conditions transcription factors rapidly locate their target sequence on DNA by using the facilitated diffusion mechanism. However, whether this strategy of alternating between three-dimensional bulk diffusion and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA contour is still beneficial in the crowded interior of cells is highly disputed. Here we use a simple model for the bacterial genome inside the cell and present a semi-analytical model for the in vivo target search of transcription factors within the facilitated diffusion framework. Without having to resort to extensive simulations we determine the mean search time of a lac repressor in a living E. coli cell by including parameters deduced from experimental measurements. The results agree very well with experimental findings, and thus the facilitated diffusion picture emerges as a quantitative approach to gene regulation in living bacteria cells. Furthermore we see that the search time is not very sensitive to the parameters characterizing the DNA configuration and that the cell seems to operate very close to optimal conditions for target localization. Local searches as implied by the colocalization mechanism are only found to mildly accelerate the mean search time within our model.

Max Bauer; Ralf Metzler

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Tracer Diffusion Db- NIST09  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... DCu Cu-Zn, 780oC Atom Fraction Zinc (X Zn ) 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 Tra cer Diffusion Co ... Au-Ni, 900 o C Atom fraction nickel (X Ni ) 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

322

Int. J. Environment and Pollution, Vol. 8, Nos. 3-6, 1997 727 Gaseous pollutant dispersion around urban-canopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Meroney, 1983: Gas dispersion near a cubical model building. Part I. Mean concentration measurements. JInt. J. Environment and Pollution, Vol. 8, Nos. 3-6, 1997 727 Gaseous pollutant dispersion around numerical predictions of atmospheric dispersion in the urban environment on sub-meso scales. Wind

Fedorovich, Evgeni

323

Tests of Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors for Active1 Target Time Projection Chambers in nuclear physics2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests of Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors for Active1 Target Time Projection Chambers in nuclear the gas used as the detection medium10 is also a target for nuclear reactions, have been used for a wide variety of11 nuclear physics applications since the eighties. Improvements in MPGD (Mi-12 cro Pattern

Recanati, Catherine

324

Separation and recovery of hydrogen and normally gaseous hydrocarbons from net excess hydrogen from a catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons in the presence of hydrogen, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products. An improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from the net excess hydrogen is realized by chilling and contacting said hydrogen with a normally liquid hydrocarbon stream in a plural stage absorption zone at an elevated pressure.

Scheifele, C.A.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

325

Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Assessment Addendum for Disposition of Additional Waste at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE/EA-1339A) (April 30, 2003)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

117 117 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 83 / Wednesday, April 30, 2003 / Notices Corp., Club Affiliation, Disability, Hobbies, Military Affiliation, National Merit, Athletics, Union Affiliation, Misc., Career Objective, or Programs of Study)) * ParentVeteran? (Is either parent a Veteran) * ParentDisabledInMilitary? * ParentKilledInMilitary? * HouseholdIncome (Annual) Financial Aid Wizard For each School tracked in the user's EDpack * Tuition * RoomBoard * Fees * Books * OtherExpense Used in the EFC calculation * StOfResidence * Veteran? * SchoolsOfAttendance * ChildSupport? * OtherDependants? * Orphan? * PeopleInHousehold * CollegeStudentIn House * CompletedTaxReturn? * 1040EZ Able to file 1040A or 1040EZ) * AGI (Adjusted Gross Income) * IncomeTax * Exemptions * YouWages * SpouseWages

326

Investigation of the radiological safety concerns and medical history of the late Joseph T. Harding, former employee of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ex-employee's claims that inadequate enforcement of radiation safety regulations allowed excess radiation exposure thereby causing his deteriorating health was not substantiated by a thorough investigation.

Vallario, E J

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Analysis of criticality alarm system response to an accidental criticality outside the cascade process buildings at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

Neutron dose rates at detector positions within the X-326, X-330, and X-333 buildings were evaluated for an accidental criticality outside of each building. As fissile material bearing equipment and containers are moved to and from each building, the possibility exists for a criticality accident to occur. This analysis demonstrates that a criticality accident which occurs at any position on the access roads alongside a process building can be detected. The detectable area includes all points within the access road boundary along each face of each building. This analysis also demonstrates that the criticality alarm systems of the process buildings will respond to criticality events occurring within the tie lines connecting the process buildings. This analysis was performed using the MCNP Monte Carlo neutron-proton transport code. The radiation source is the neutron leakage spectrum of a critical solution of 4.95 percent enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at a power level corresponding to the ANSI ANS 8.3. Standard minimum accident of concern. The evaluated neutron fluxes were converted to neutron dose rates by use of the Henderson free-in-air response functions. Critical source positions correspond to the farthest source to detector distances on the access roads along each face of the three buildings, and the centerpoint of the building tie lines. This report contains the methodology used for this study, a background on the data used, and a section about the assumptions and limits to all conclusions.

Negron, S.B.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.; Dobelbower, M.C. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document for the Authorized Limits Request for the C-746-U Landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the technical basis in support of the DOE?s derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for the DOE Paducah C-746-U Landfill. A complete description of the methodology, including an assessment of the input parameters, model inputs, and results is provided in this report. This report also provides initial recommendations on applying the derived soil guidelines. The ORISE-derived soil guidelines are specifically applicable to the Landfill at the end of its operational life. A suggested 'upper bound' multiple of the derived soil guidelines for individual shipments is provided.

Boerner, A. J. [IEAVP, ORISE, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Maldonado, D. G. [IEAVP, ORISE, Oak Ridge, TN (United States; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers Thomasconditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of areaction of reactant gases (1). A number of strategies exist

Dursch, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Synergistic diffuser/heat-exchanger design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The theoretical and numerical evaluation of synergistic diffusing heat-exchanger design is presented. Motivation for this development is based on current diffuser and heat-exchange technologies in cogeneration plants, which ...

Lazzara, David S. (David Sergio), 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Diffusion Tubes for Ambient NO2 Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the field of diffusive sampling, and other stakeholders. The following (in alphabetical order) actively or vapour phase pollutant directly from the surrounding air by means of diffusion, without actively drawing

Short, Daniel

334

Hierarchical 3D diffusion wavelet shape priors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a novel representation of prior knowledge for image segmentation, using diffusion wavelets that can reflect arbitrary continuous interdependencies in shape data. The application of diffusion ...

Langs, Georg

335

Solar diffusion and public incentives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Institutional arrangements for the commercialization of solar technologies cover a variety of incentives. Although this book concentrates on one such incentive, a grant awarded to homeowners purchasing an approved solar hot water heater, the concluding discussion suggests alternative inducements. The empirical work is based on data collected in Connecticut, but attention is given to national- and state-level studies addressing various aspects of the solar-diffusion process. The authors begin by examining public acceptance and various social-science models for diffusion processes. They conclude that the importance of social and behavioral factors in accelerating the energy transition should not be underestimated. Eight appendices include survey and application forms, information releases, and information about the incentive program. 81 references, 4 figures, 33 tables.

Warkov, S.; Meyer, J.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

D-eigenvalues of diffusion kurtosis tensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a new model in medical engineering, where a diffusion kurtosis (DK) tensor is involved. A DK tensor is a fourth-order three-dimensional fully symmetric tensor. In this paper, we introduce D-eigenvalues for a DK tensor. ... Keywords: Computation, Diffusion kurtosis, Eigenvalues, Tensors

Liqun Qi; Yiju Wang; Ed X. Wu

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Heat Hyperbolic Diffusion in Planck Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the diffusion of the thermal pulse in Planck Gas. We show that the Fourier diffusion equation gives the speed of diffusion, v > c and breaks the causality of the thermal processes in Planck gas .For hyperbolic heat transport v

Miroslaw Kozlowski; Janina Marciak-Kozlowska

2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

338

THE DIFFUSION OF LITHIUM IN ALUMINUM  

SciTech Connect

The diffusion of lithium in aluminum was measured at various temperatures with diffusion couples of aluminum-LiAl. The activation energy, E, is 33.3 kcal/mol, and the diffusion factor, Do, is 4.5 cm{sup2}/sec. (auth)

Costas, L. P.

1963-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Technology Diffusion in Communication Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the rich and growing literature on diffusion and cascade effects in social networks, it is assumed that a node's actions are influenced only by its immediate neighbors in the social network. However, there are other contexts in which this highly-local view of influence is not applicable. The diffusion of technologies in communication networks is one important example; here, a node's actions should also be influenced by remote nodes that it can communicate with using the new technology. We propose a new model of technology diffusion inspired by the networking literature on this topic. Given the communication network $G(V,E)$, we assume that node $u$ activates (i.e. deploys the new technology) when it is adjacent to a connected component of active nodes in $G$ of size exceeding node $u$'s threshold $\\theta(u)$. We focus on an algorithmic problem that is well understood in the context of social networks, but thus far has only heuristic solutions in the context of communication networks: determining the smalle...

Goldberg, Sharon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Impact of nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation on gaseous releases from a landfill bioreactor cell  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the impact of nitrate injection on a full scale landfill bioreactor through the monitoring of gaseous releases and particularly N{sub 2}O emissions. During several weeks, we monitored gas concentrations in the landfill gas collection system as well as surface gas releases with a series of seven static chambers. These devices were directly connected to a gas chromatograph coupled to a flame ionisation detector and an electron capture detector (GC-FID/ECD) placed directly on the field. Measurements were performed before, during and after recirculation of raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate. Raw leachate recirculation did not have a significant effect on the biogas concentrations (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O) in the gas extraction network. However, nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation induced a marked increase of the N{sub 2}O concentrations in the gas collected from the recirculation trench (100-fold increase from 0.2 ppm to 23 ppm). In the common gas collection system however, this N{sub 2}O increase was no more detectable because of dilution by gas coming from other cells or ambient air intrusion. Surface releases through the temporary cover were characterized by a large spatial and temporal variability. One automated chamber gave limited standard errors over each experimental period for N{sub 2}O releases: 8.1 {+-} 0.16 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 384), 4.2 {+-} 0.14 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 132) and 1.9 {+-} 0.10 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 49), during, after raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation, respectively. No clear correlation between N{sub 2}O gaseous surface releases and recirculation events were evidenced. Estimated N{sub 2}O fluxes remained in the lower range of what is reported in the literature for landfill covers, even after nitrate injection.

Tallec, G.; Bureau, C. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France); Peu, P.; Benoist, J.C. [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Lemunier, M. [Suez-Environnement, CIRADE, 38 Av. Jean Jaures, 78440 Gargenville (France); Budka, A.; Presse, D. [SITA France, 132 Rue des 3 Fontanot, 92000 Nanterre Cedex (France); Bouchez, T. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France)], E-mail: theodore.bouchez@cemagref.fr

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWR-GALE Code). Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report revises the original issuance of NUREG-0017, ''Calculation of Releases of Radioactive Materials in Gaseous and Liquid Effluents from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR-GALE-Code)'' (April 1976), to incorporate more recent operating data now available as well as the results of a number of in-plant measurement programs at operating pressurized water reactors. The PWR-GALE Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the releases of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents (i.e., the gaseous and liquid source terms). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses the PWR-GALE Code to determine conformance with the requirements of Appendix I to 10 CFR Part 50.

Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Quasichemical Models of Multicomponent Nonlinear Diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffusion preserves the positivity of concentrations, therefore, multicomponent diffusion should be nonlinear if there exist non-diagonal terms. The vast variety of nonlinear multicomponent diffusion equations should be ordered and special tools are needed to provide the systematic construction of the nonlinear diffusion equations for multicomponent mixtures with significant interaction between components. We develop an approach to nonlinear multicomponent diffusion based on the idea of the reaction mechanism borrowed from chemical kinetics. Chemical kinetics gave rise to very seminal tools for the modeling of processes. This is the stoichiometric algebra supplemented by the simple kinetic law. The results of this invention are now applied in many areas of science, from particle physics to sociology. In our work we extend the area of applications onto nonlinear multicomponent diffusion. We demonstrate, how the mechanism based approach to multicomponent diffusion can be included into the general thermodynamic ...

Gorban, A N; Wahab, H A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

MODEL OF DIFFUSERS / PERMEATORS FOR HYDROGEN PROCESSING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Palladium-silver (Pd-Ag) diffusers are mainstays of hydrogen processing. Diffusers separate hydrogen from inert species such as nitrogen, argon or helium. The tubing becomes permeable to hydrogen when heated to more than 250 C and a differential pressure is created across the membrane. The hydrogen diffuses better at higher temperatures. Experimental or experiential results have been the basis for determining or predicting a diffuser's performance. However, the process can be mathematically modeled, and comparison to experimental or other operating data can be utilized to improve the fit of the model. A reliable model-based diffuser system design is the goal which will have impacts on tritium and hydrogen processing. A computer model has been developed to solve the differential equations for diffusion given the operating boundary conditions. The model was compared to operating data for a low pressure diffuser system. The modeling approach and the results are presented in this paper.

Hang, T; William Jacobs, W

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

344

Six-dimensional muon beam cooling in a continuous, homogeneous, gaseous hydrogen absorber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fast reduction of the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams is required for muon colliders and is also of great importance for neutrino factories based on accelerated muon beams. Ionization cooling, where all momentum components are degraded by an energy absorbing material and only the longitudinal momentum is restored by RF cavities, provides a means to quickly reduce transverse beam sizes. However, the beam momentum spread cannot be reduced by this method unless the longitudinal emittance can be transformed or exchanged into the transverse emittance. The best emittance exchange plans up to now have been accomplished by using magnets to disperse the beam along the face of a wedge-shaped absorber such that higher momentum particles pass through thicker parts of the absorber and thus suffer larger ionization energy loss. In the scheme advocated in this paper, it is noted that one can generate a magnetic channel filled with absorber where higher momentum corresponds to a longer path length and therefore larger ionization energy loss. Thus a homogeneous absorber, without any special edge shaping, can provide the desired emittance exchange. An attractive example of a cooling channel based on this principle involves the use of RF cavities filled with a continuous gaseous hydrogen absorber in a magnetic channel composed of a solenoidal field with superimposed helical transverse dipole, quadrupole, and octupole fields. The theory of this helical channel is described to support the analytical prediction of a million-fold reduction in phase space volume in a channel 150 m long.

Yaroslav Derbenev; Rolland P. Johnson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Corrosion behavior of stainless steel in solid oxide fuel cell simulated gaseous environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant progress in reducing the operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) from {approx}1000 C to {approx} 750 C may permit the replacement of currently used ceramic interconnects by metallic interconnects in planar SOFCs (PSOFC). The use of metallic interconnects will result in a substantial cost reduction of PSOFCs. The interconnects operate in severe gaseous environments, in which one side of the interconnect can be exposed to hydrogen and the other side to air or oxygen at temperatures up to 800 C. Similar environmental conditions can exist in devices used for separating hydrogen from CO after reforming methane and steam. Type 304 stainless steel was selected for this base line study aimed at understanding corrosion processes in dual gas environments. This paper discusses the oxidation resistance of 304 stainless steel exposed to a dual environment gas at 800 C. The dual environment consisted of air on one side of the specimen and 1% hydrogen in nitrogen on the other side. The surface characterization techniques used in this study were optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as various x-ray techniques.

Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Matthes, Steven A.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.; Wilson, Rick D.; Singh, P.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Gaseous Radiochemical Method for Registration of Ionizing Radiation and Its Possible Applications in Science and Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents a new possibility of registration of ionizing radiation by the flowing gaseous radiochemical method (FGRM). The specified method uses the property of some solid crystalline lattice materials for a free emission of radioactive isotopes of inert gas atoms formed as a result of nuclear reactions. Generated in an ampoule of the detector, the radioactive inert gases are transported by a gas-carrier into the proportional gas counter of the flowing type, where the decay rate of the radioactive gas species is measured. This quantity is unequivocally related to the flux of particles (neutrons, protons, light and heavy ions) at the location of the ampoule. The method was used to monitor the neutron flux of the pulsed neutron target "RADEX" driven by the linear proton accelerator of INR RAS. Further progress of the FGRM may give rise to possible applications in nuclear physics, astrophysics and medicine, in the nondestructive control of fissionable materials, diagnostics of thermonuclear plasma, monitoring of fluxes and measurement of spectra of bombarding particles.

S. G. Lebedev; V. E. Yants

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

347

Radioactivity discharged in gaseous wastes from separations facilities 200 Area stacks during 1970  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes by stack number the amount of radioactivity discharged from the facilities of Chemical Processing Division, Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company. Emission data for 231-Z Building and 2724-W, Laundry Building, which are operated by other AEC Contractors are not available for this report. Total beta, alpha and I{sup l3l} radioactive emissions from the stacks for 1970 were as follows: alpha (Pu, assumed) 1.59 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} C, alpha (U, assumed) 1.44 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} C, beta 1.93C, and I{sup 131} 4.92 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} C. Air samples taken continuously from gaseous release facilities were analyzed for total beta and alpha activity (and iodine activity, where applicable). Where sample data were not available, the total radioactive emission was adjusted by using the average emission rate prior to the subject period; or where activity was near constant, by using the daily average as a base. A gamma scan of the 291-S stack is included in the report.

Maxfield, H.L.

1971-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Design and reliability optimization of a MEMS micro-hotplate for combustion of gaseous fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report will detail the process by which the silicon carbide (SiC) microhotplate devices, manufactured by GE, were imaged using IR microscopy equipment available at Sandia. The images taken were used as inputs to a finite element modeling (FEM) process using the ANSYS software package. The primary goal of this effort was to determine a method to measure the temperature of the microhotplate. Prior attempts to monitor the device's temperature by measuring its resistance had proven to be unreliable due to the nonlinearity of the doped SiC's resistance with temperature. As a result of this thermal modeling and IR imaging, a number of design recommendations were made to facilitate this temperature measurement. The lower heating value (LHV) of gaseous fuels can be measured with a catalyst-coated microhotplate calorimeter. GE created a silicon carbide (SiC) based microhotplate to address high-temperature survivability requirements for the application. The primary goal of this effort was to determine a method to measure the temperature of the microhotplate. Prior attempts to monitor the device's temperature by measuring its resistance had proven to be unreliable due to the non-linearity of the doped SiC's resistance with temperature. In this work, thermal modeling and IR imaging were utilized to determine the operation temperature as a function of parameters such as operation voltage and device sheet resistance. A number of design recommendations were made according to this work.

Manginell, R. P.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Gaseous dry deposition of atmospheric mercury: A comparison of two surface resistance models for deposition to semiarid vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the United States, atmospheric mercury (Hg) deposition, from regional and international sources, is the largest contributor to increased Hg concentrations in bodies of water leading to bioaccumulation of methyl mercury in fish. In this work, modeled dry deposition velocities (vd) for gaseous Hg are calculated using two surface resistance parameterizations found in the literature. The flux is then estimated as the product of the species concentration and modeled vd. The calculations utilize speciated atmospheric mercury concentrations measured during an annual monitoring campaign in southern Idaho. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were monitored with Tekran models 2537A and 1130, respectively. Two anemometers collected meteorological data, including one fast-response three-dimensional sonic anemometer to measure turbulence parameters. For the flux calculation, three resistances are required to model the mechanisms that transport gaseous Hg from the atmosphere to the surface, with the surface resistance being the largest source of error. Results from two surface resistance models are presented. In particular, the downward flux is sensitive to the choice of model and input parameters such as seasonal category and mesophyll resistance. A comparison of annual GEM and RGM fluxes calculated using the two models shows good agreement for RGM (3.2% difference for annual deposition); however, for the low-solubility species of GEM, the models show a 64% difference in annual fluxes, with a range of 32% to 200% in seasonal fluxes. Results indicate the importance of understanding the diurnal variation of the physical processes modeled in the surface resistance parameterization for vd.

Heather A. Holmes; Eric R. Pardyjak; Kevin D. Perry; Michael L. Abbott

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Diffusion Welding of Alloys for Molten Salt Service - Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The present work is concerned with heat exchanger development for molten salt service, including the proposed molten salt reactor (MSR), a homogeneous reactor in which the fuel is dissolved in a circulating fluid of molten salt. It is an outgrowth of recent work done under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program; what the two reactor systems have in common is an inherently safe nuclear plant with a high outlet temperature that is useful for process heat as well as more conventional generation The NGNP program was tasked with investigating the application of a new generation of nuclear power plants to a variety of energy needs. One baseline reactor design for this program is a high temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which provides many options for energy use. These might include the conventional Rankine cycle (steam turbine) generation of electricity, but also other methods: for example, Brayton cycle (gas turbine) electrical generation, and the direct use of the high temperatures characteristic of HTGR output for process heat in the chemical industry. Such process heat is currently generated by burning fossil fuels, and is a major contributor to the carbon footprint of the chemical and petrochemical industries. The HTGR, based on graphite fuel elements, can produce very high output temperatures; ideally, temperatures of 900 C or even greater, which has significant energy advantages. Such temperatures are, of course, at the frontiers of materials limitations, at the upper end of the performance envelope of the metallic materials for which robust construction codes exist, and within the realm of ceramic materials, the fabrication and joining of which, on the scale of large energy systems, are at an earlier stage of development. A considerable amount of work was done in the diffusion welding of materials of interest for HTGR service with alloys such as 617 and 800H. The MSR output temperature is also materials limited, and is projected at about 700 C. (RR E) A different set of alloys, such as Alloy N and 242, are needed to handle molten salts at this temperature. The diffusion welding development work described here builds on techniques developed during the NGNP work, as applied to these alloys. There is also the matter of dissimilar metal welding, since alloys suitable for salt service are generally not suited for service in gaseous oxidizing environments, and vice versa, and welding is required for the Class I boundaries in these systems, as identified in the relevant ASME codes.

Denis Clark; Ronald Mizia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Diffusion Welding of Alloys for Molten Salt Service - Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work is concerned with heat exchanger development for molten salt service, including the proposed molten salt reactor (MSR), a homogeneous reactor in which the fuel is dissolved in a circulating fluid of molten salt. It is an outgrowth of recent work done under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program; what the two reactor systems have in common is an inherently safe nuclear plant with a high outlet temperature that is useful for process heat as well as more conventional generation The NGNP program was tasked with investigating the application of a new generation of nuclear power plants to a variety of energy needs. One baseline reactor design for this program is a high temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which provides many options for energy use. These might include the conventional Rankine cycle (steam turbine) generation of electricity, but also other methods: for example, Brayton cycle (gas turbine) electrical generation, and the direct use of the high temperatures characteristic of HTGR output for process heat in the chemical industry. Such process heat is currently generated by burning fossil fuels, and is a major contributor to the carbon footprint of the chemical and petrochemical industries. The HTGR, based on graphite fuel elements, can produce very high output temperatures; ideally, temperatures of 900 °C or even greater, which has significant energy advantages. Such temperatures are, of course, at the frontiers of materials limitations, at the upper end of the performance envelope of the metallic materials for which robust construction codes exist, and within the realm of ceramic materials, the fabrication and joining of which, on the scale of large energy systems, are at an earlier stage of development. A considerable amount of work was done in the diffusion welding of materials of interest for HTGR service with alloys such as 617 and 800H. The MSR output temperature is also materials limited, and is projected at about 700 °C. (RR E) A different set of alloys, such as Alloy N and 242, are needed to handle molten salts at this temperature. The diffusion welding development work described here builds on techniques developed during the NGNP work, as applied to these alloys. There is also the matter of dissimilar metal welding, since alloys suitable for salt service are generally not suited for service in gaseous oxidizing environments, and vice versa, and welding is required for the Class I boundaries in these systems, as identified in the relevant ASME codes.

Denis Clark; Ronald Mizia; Piyush Sabharwall

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

An asixymmetric diffusion experiment for the determination of diffusion and sorption coefficients of rock samples  

SciTech Connect

Diffusion anisotropy is a critical property in predicting migration of substances in sedimentary formations with very low permeability. The diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks has been evaluated mainly from laboratory diffusion experiments, in which the directional diffusivities are separately estimated by through-diffusion experiments using different rock samples, or concurrently by in-diffusion experiments in which only the tracer profile in a rock block is measured. To estimate the diffusion anisotropy from a single rock sample, this study proposes an axisymmetric diffusion test, in which tracer diffuses between a cylindrical rock sample and a surrounding solution reservoir. The tracer diffusion between the sample and reservoir can be monitored from the reservoir tracer concentrations, and the tracer profile could also be obtained after dismantling the sample. Semi-analytical solutions are derived for tracer concentrations in both the reservoir and sample, accounting for an anisotropic diffusion tensor of rank two as well as the dilution effects from sampling and replacement of reservoir solution. The transient and steady-state analyses were examined experimentally and numerically for different experimental configurations, but without the need for tracer profiling. These experimental configurations are tested for in- and out-diffusion experiments using Koetoi and Wakkanai mudstones and Shirahama sandstone, and are scrutinized by a numerical approach to identify favorable conditions for parameter estimation. The analysis reveals the difficulty in estimating diffusion anisotropy; test configurations are proposed for enhanced identifiability of diffusion anisotropy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the axisymmetric diffusion test is efficient in obtaining the sorption parameter from both steady-state and transient data, and in determining the effective diffusion coefficient if isotropic diffusion is assumed. Moreover, measuring reservoir concentrations in an axisymmetric diffusion experiment coupled with tracer profiling may be a promising approach to estimate of diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks.

Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.; Finsterle, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Homebased healthcare : issues and challenges; Supply chain challenges due to diffusion of medical devices in a home based healthcare environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Healthcare costs in United States are projected to rise to 20% of GDP by 2015. This is a cause of major concern and current political… (more)

Nagpure, Prashant

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Analysis of mercury diffusion pumps  

SciTech Connect

Several mercury diffusion pump stages in the Tritium Purification process at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have been removed from service for scheduled preventive maintenance. These stages have been examined to determine if failure has occurred. Evidence of fatigue around the flange portion of the pump has been seen. In addition, erosion and cavitation inside the throat of the venturi tube and corrosion on the other surface of the venturi tube has been observed. Several measures are being examined in an attempt to improve the performance of these pumps. These measures, as well as the noted observations, are described. 4 refs.

Dunn, K.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Analysis of mercury diffusion pumps  

SciTech Connect

Several mercury diffusion pump stages in the Tritium Purification process at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have been removed from service for scheduled preventive maintenance. These stages have been examined to determine if failure has occurred. Evidence of fatigue around the flange portion of the pump has been seen. In addition, erosion and cavitation inside the throat of the venturi tube and corrosion on the other surface of the venturi tube has been observed. Several measures are being examined in an attempt to improve the performance of these pumps. These measures, as well as the noted observations, are described. 4 refs.

Dunn, K.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

PAndAS IN THE MIST: THE STELLAR AND GASEOUS MASS WITHIN THE HALOS OF M31 AND M33  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale surveys of the prominent members of the Local Group have provided compelling evidence for the hierarchical formation of massive galaxies, revealing a wealth of substructure that is thought to be the debris from ancient and ongoing accretion events. In this paper, we compare two extant surveys of the M31-M33 subgroup of galaxies: the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey of the stellar structure, and a combination of observations of the H I gaseous content, detected at 21 cm. Our key finding is a marked lack of spatial correlation between these two components on all scales, with only a few potential overlaps between stars and gas. The paucity of spatial correlation significantly restricts the analysis of kinematic correlations, although there does appear to be H I kinematically associated with the Giant Stellar Stream where it passes the disk of M31. These results demonstrate that different processes must significantly influence the dynamical evolution of the stellar and H I components of substructures, such as ram pressure driving gas away from a purely gravitational path. Detailed modeling of the offset between the stellar and gaseous substructures will provide a determination of the properties of the gaseous halos of M31 and M33.

Lewis, Geraint F. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)] [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Braun, Robert [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); McConnachie, Alan W. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)] [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Irwin, Michael J.; Chapman, Scott C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Martin, Nicolas F. [Observatoire de Strasbourg, 11, rue de l'Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France)] [Observatoire de Strasbourg, 11, rue de l'Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Fardal, Mark [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Dubinski, John [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George Street, University of Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George Street, University of Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Widrow, Larry [Department of Physics, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Mackey, A. Dougal [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)] [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Babul, Arif [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Tanvir, Nial R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Rich, Michael, E-mail: geraint.lewis@sydney.edu.au [Division of Astronomy, University of California, 8979 Math Sciences, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)] [Division of Astronomy, University of California, 8979 Math Sciences, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Summary and Outlook of the International Workshop on Aging Phenomena in Gaseous Detectors (DESY, Hamburg, October, 2001)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Energy Physics experiments are currently entering a new era which requires the operation of gaseous particle detectors at unprecedented high rates and integrated particle fluxes. Full functionality of such detectors over the lifetime of an experiment in a harsh radiation environment is of prime concern to the involved experimenters. New classes of gaseous detectors such as large-scale straw-type detectors, Micro-pattern Gas Detectors and related detector types with their own specific aging effects have evolved since the first workshop on wire chamber aging was held at LBL, Berkeley in 1986. In light of these developments and as detector aging is a notoriously complex field, the goal of the workshop was to provide a forum for interested experimentalists to review the progress in understanding of aging effects and to exchange recent experiences. A brief summary of the main results and experiences reported at the 2001 workshop is presented, with the goal of providing a systematic review of aging effects in state-of-the-art and future gaseous detectors.

M. Titov; M. Hohlmann; C. Padilla; N. Tesch

2002-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

358

Method for selectively removing fluorine and fluorine-containing contaminants from gaseous UF/sub 6/. [ClF/sub 3/  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a method for effecting preferential removal and immobilization of certain gaseous contaminants from gaseous UF/sub 6/. The contaminants include fluorine and fluorides which are more reactive with CaCO/sub 3/ than is UF/sub 6/. The method comprises contacting the contaminant-carrying UF/sub 6/ with particulate CaCO/sub 3/ at a temperature effecting reaction of the contaminant and the CaCO/sub 3/.

Jones, R.L.; Otey, M.G.; Perkins, R.W.

1980-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Gaseous ISM Observations with the Wisconsin $H-\\alpha$ Mapper (WHAM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) is a new facility dedicated to the study of faint optical emission lines from diffuse interstellar gas. During its first 18 months of operation, WHAM carried out a survey of the interstellar H-alpha emission associated with the warm, ionized component of the interstellar medium. The observations consisted of 37,000 spectra obtained with a one degree diameter beam on a 0.98 X 0.85 degree grid (lxb), covering the sky above declination -30 degrees. This survey provides for the first time a detailed picture of the distribution and kinematics of the diffuse ionized hydrogen through the H-alpha line comparable to surveys of the neutral hydrogen obtained through the 21 cm line. Preliminary reduction of the data from selected portions of the sky reveal that the interstellar H II has a complex distribution, with long filaments and loop-like structures extending to high Galactic latitudes and superposed on a more diffuse background. Apart from the H-alpha sky survey, WHAM has also de...

Reynolds, R J; Tufte, S L

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fractional diffusion modeling of ion channel gating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An anomalous diffusion model for ion channel gating is put forward. This modeling scheme is able to describe the non-exponential, power-law like gating behavior of residence time intervals in several types of ion channels. Our scheme presents a generalization of the discrete diffusion model by Millhauser, Salpeter and Oswald [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85, 1503 (1988)] to the case of a continuous, anomalously slow conformational diffusion. The corresponding generalization is derived from a continuous time random walk composed of nearest neighbor jumps which in the scaling limit results in a fractional diffusion equation. The studied model contains three parameters only: the mean residence time, a characteristic time of conformational diffusion, and the index of subdiffusion. A tractable analytical expression for the characteristic function of the residence time distribution (RTD) is obtained. In the limiting case of normal diffusion a prior result of Goychuk and Hanggi [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 3552 (20...

Goychuk, I; Goychuk, Igor; Hanggi, Peter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Modifying woody plants for efficient conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Short Rotation Woody Crop Program (SRWCP), Department of Energy, is developing woody plant species as sources of renewable energy. Much progress has been made in identifying useful species, and testing site adaptability, stand densities, coppicing abilities, rotation lengths, and harvesting systems. Conventional plant breeding and intensive cultural practices have been used to increase above-ground biomass yields. Given these and foreseeable accomplishments, program leaders are now shifting attention to prospects for altering biomass physical and chemical characteristics, and to ways for improving the efficiency with which biomass can be converted to gaseous and liquid fuels. This report provides a review and synthesis of literature concerning the quantity and quality of such characteristics and constituents, and opportunities for manipulating them via conventional selection and breeding and/or molecular biology. Species now used by SRWCP are emphasized, with supporting information drawn from others as needed. Little information was found on silver maple (Acer saccharinum), but general comparisons (Isenberg 1981) suggest composition and behavior similar to those of the other species. Where possible, conclusions concerning means for and feasibility of manipulation are given, along with expected impacts on conversion efficiency. Information is also provided on relationships to other traits, genotype X environment interactions, and potential trade-offs or limitations. Biomass productivity per se is not addressed, except in terms of effects that may by caused by changes in constituent quality and/or quantity. Such effects are noted to the extent they are known or can be estimated. Likely impacts of changes, however effected, on suitability or other uses, e.g., pulp and paper manufacture, are notes. 311 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Dinus, R.J.; Dimmel, D.R.; Feirer, R.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Malcolm, E.W. (Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Characterizing unsaturated diffusion in porous tuff gravel  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of solute diffusion in unsaturated porous gravel is very important for investigations of contaminant transport and remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (for example, the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). For a porous aggregate medium such as granular tuff, the total water content is comprised of surface water and interior water. The surface water component (water film around grains and pendular water between the grain contacts) could serve as a predominant diffusion pathway. To investigate the extent to which surface water films and contact points affect solute diffusion in unsaturated gravel, we examined the configuration of water using x-ray computed tomography in partially saturated gravel, and made quantitative measurements of diffusion at multiple water contents using two different techniques. In the first, diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride in 2-4 mm granular tuff at multiple water contents were calculated from electrical conductivity measurements using the Nernst-Einstein equation. In the second, we used laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to perform micro-scale mapping, allowing the measurement of diffusion coefficients for a mixture of chemical tracers for tuff cubes and tetrahedrons having two contact geometries (cube-cube and cube-tetrahedron). The x-ray computed tomography images show limited contact between grains, and this could hinder the pathways for diffusive transport. Experimental results show the critical role of surface water in controlling transport pathways and hence the magnitude of diffusion. Even with a bulk volumetric water content of 1.5%, the measured solute diffusion coefficient is as low as 1.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s for tuff gravel. Currently used diffusion models relating diffusion coefficients to total volumetric water content inadequately describe unsaturated diffusion behavior in porous gravel at very low water contents.

Hu, Qinhong; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Wang, Joseph, S.Y.

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

Experience with Palladium Diffusers in Tritium Processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen isotopes are separated from other gases by permeation through palladium and palladium-silver alloy diffusers in the Tritium Facilities at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). Diffusers have provided effective service for almost forty years. This paper is an overview of the operational experience with the various diffuser types that have been employed at SRS. Alternative technologies being developed at SRS for purifying hydrogen isotopes are also discussed.

Motyka, T.; Clark, E.A.; Dauchess, D.A.; Heung, L.K.; Rabum, R.L.

1995-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

364

Diffusion bonding of Stratapax for drill bits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process has been developed for the diffusion bonding of General Electric's Stratapax drill blanks to support studs for cutter assemblies in drill bits. The diffusion bonding process is described and bond strength test data are provided for a variety of materials. The extensive process details, provided in the Appendices, should be sufficient to enable others to successfully build diffusion-bonded drill bit cutter assemblies.

Middleton, J.N.; Finger, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Reaction-Diffusion Texture Synthesis - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 12, 2000 ... page 9 : Meinhardt's Stripe-Generation System · stripes.png · page 10 : Multiple Reaction-Diffusion Systems · page 11 : Cheetah Spots

366

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation,...

367

Laser Extinction in Laminar Inverse Diffusion Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagnostics, Chapter 9: Laser-Induced Incandescence,Laser Extinction in Laminar Inverse Diffusion Flames WesternFoundation, Arlington, VA Laser Extinction in Laminar

Macko, Kevin; Mikofski, Mark A; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Blevins, Linda G; Davis, Ronald W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Diffusion Flame Measurements: Literature Citations C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Partial Equilibrium in the Reaction Zone of Methane-Air Diffusion Flames; and Combustion and Flame 37:227-244 (1980). ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Diffusion of GIS in Journalism.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purposes of this study were to determine the likelihood of reporters to adopt Geographical Information Systems and to predict the future of the diffusion… (more)

Wasike, Ben S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Diffusion instability in a thermonuclear burn  

SciTech Connect

Time-dependent, one-dimesional equations are solved to demonstrate the possibility of a superheating-diffusion instability in a steady-state fusion reactor.

Vasil' ev, N.N.; Lukash, V.E.; Nedospasov, A.V.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Diffusion in active magnetic colloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Properties of active colloids of circle swimmers are reviewed. As an particular example of active magnetic colloids the magnetotactic bacteria under the action of a rotating magnetic field is considered. The relation for a diffusion coefficient due to the random switching of the direction of rotation of their rotary motors is derived on the basis of the master equation. The obtained relation is confirmed by the direct numerical simulation of random trajectory of a magnetotactic bacterium under the action of the Poisson type internal noise due to the random switching of rotary motors. The results obtained are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with the available experimental results and allows one to determine the characteristic time between the switching events of a rotary motor of the bacterium.

Reinis Taukulis; Andrejs Cebers

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Gaseous ISM: Observations with the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper (WHAM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) is a new facility dedicated to the study of faint optical emission lines from diffuse interstellar gas. During its first 18 months of operation, WHAM carried out a survey of the interstellar H-alpha emission associated with the warm, ionized component of the interstellar medium. The observations consisted of 37,000 spectra obtained with a one degree diameter beam on a 0.98 X 0.85 degree grid (lxb), covering the sky above declination -30 degrees. This survey provides for the first time a detailed picture of the distribution and kinematics of the diffuse ionized hydrogen through the H-alpha line comparable to surveys of the neutral hydrogen obtained through the 21 cm line. Preliminary reduction of the data from selected portions of the sky reveal that the interstellar H II has a complex distribution, with long filaments and loop-like structures extending to high Galactic latitudes and superposed on a more diffuse background. Apart from the H-alpha sky survey, WHAM has also detected for the first time faint diagnostic emission lines in selected directions, [O I] 6300, [O III] 5007, and He I 5876, which provide information about the physical state of the gas and clues about the source of the ionization. Maps of [S II] 6716 and [N II] 6584 over limited regions of the sky are providing information about variations in the temperature and ionization conditions within the Galactic disk, and the detection of faint optical emission lines from high velocity clouds is probing conditions in the halo.

R. J. Reynolds; L. M. Haffner; S. L. Tufte

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

Modelling international wind energy diffusion: Are the patterns of induced diffusion `S'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling international wind energy diffusion: Are the patterns of induced diffusion `S' shaped datasets, the paper explores the patterns of international wind energy diffusion in OECD countries. The model employed in the paper predicted that wind energy, as a complex and expensive innovation, would

Feigon, Brooke

374

Properties of small molecular drug loading and diffusion in a fluorinated PEG hydrogel studied by 1H molecular diffusion NMR and 19F spin diffusion NMR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA NMR combined withspin diffusion NMR is useful in studying the drug loadingdiffusion . Spin diffusion . NMR Introduction R f -PEGs (

Mathias, Errol V.; Aponte, Julia; Kornfield, Julia A.; Ba, Yong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Diffusion coefficient of trona in water  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the diffusion coefficient of trona in water. The diffusion coefficient of trona from saturated solution in water was measured to be 1.167 *10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2//s with a standard devition of 6.2% at 25/degree/C.30 10/sup 9/ refs.

Mehta, G.D.; Jain, S.C.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

THE MULTIGROUP DIFFUSION EQUATIONS OF REACTOR PHYSICS  

SciTech Connect

The partial differential equations of the multigroup diffusion model of reactor physics are shown to have solutions both in the time-independent and timedependent problems, and the usually assumed behavior of these solutions is shown to be mathematically valid. The method of spectral representation is developed for the multigroup diffusion operator. (auth)

Habetler, G.J.; Martino, M.A.

1958-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

377

Surveying Diffusion in Complex Geometries. An Essay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surrounding world surprises us by the beauty and variety of complex shapes that emerge from nanometric to macroscopic scales. Natural or manufactured materials (sandstones, sedimentary rocks and cement), colloidal solutions (proteins and DNA), biological cells, tissues and organs (lungs, kidneys and placenta), they all present irregularly shaped "scenes" for a fundamental transport "performance", that is, diffusion. Here, the geometrical complexity, entangled with the stochastic character of diffusive motion, results in numerous fascinating and sometimes unexpected effects like diffusion screening or localization. These effects control many diffusion-mediated processes that play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis, biochemical mechanisms, electrochemistry, growth phenomena, oil recovery, or building industry. In spite of a long and rich history of academic and industrial research in this field, it is striking to see how little we know about diffusion in complex geometries, especially the one which occurs in three dimensions. We present our recent results on restricted diffusion. We look into the role of geometrical complexity at different levels, from boundary microroughness to hierarchical structure and connectivity of the whole diffusion-confining domain. We develop a new approach which consists in combining fast random walk algorithms with spectral tools. The main focus is on studying diffusion in model complex geometries (von Koch boundaries, Kitaoka acinus, etc.), as well as on developing and testing spectral methods. We aim at extending this knowledge and at applying the accomplished arsenal of theoretical and numerical tools to structures found in nature and industry.

Denis Grebenkov

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

378

Patents and the diffusion of technical information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Does the disclosure requirement of the patent system encourage the diffusion of inventions? This paper builds a simple model where firms choose between patents and trade secrecy to protect inventions. Diffusion is not necessarily more likely with a patent system nor is the “market for technology ” necessarily greater.

James Bessen; Thanks To Ashish Arora; Robert Barr; Nancy Gallini; Wendy Gordon; Mark Lemley; Mike Meurer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to obtain results from a given sample collection. The destructive assay instrument, LAARS-destructive assay (DA), uses a simple purpose-built fixture with a sampling planchet to collect adsorbed UF6 gas from a cylinder valve or from a process line tap or pigtail. A portable LAARS-DA instrument scans the microgram quantity of uranium collected on the planchet and the assay of the uranium is measured to ~0.15% relative precision. Currently, destructive assay samples for bias defect measurements are collected in small sample cylinders for offsite mass spectrometry measurement.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Phillips, Jon R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Design of an Unattended Environmental Aerosol Sampling and Analysis System for Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The resources of the IAEA continue to be challenged by the rapid, worldwide expansion of nuclear energy production. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) represent an especially formidable dilemma to the application of safeguard measures, as the size and enrichment capacity of GCEPs continue to escalate. During the early part of the 1990's, the IAEA began to lay the foundation to strengthen and make cost-effective its future safeguard regime. Measures under Part II of 'Programme 93+2' specifically sanctioned access to nuclear fuel production facilities and environmental sampling by IAEA inspectors. Today, the Additional Protocol grants inspection and environmental sample collection authority to IAEA inspectors at GCEPs during announced and low frequency unannounced (LFUA) inspections. During inspections, IAEA inspectors collect environmental swipe samples that are then shipped offsite to an analytical laboratory for enrichment assay. This approach has proven to be an effective deterrence to GCEP misuse, but this method has never achieved the timeliness of detection goals set forth by IAEA. Furthermore it is questionable whether the IAEA will have the resources to even maintain pace with the expansive production capacity of the modern GCEP, let alone improve the timeliness in reaching current safeguards conclusions. New safeguards propositions, outside of familiar mainstream safeguard measures, may therefore be required that counteract the changing landscape of nuclear energy fuel production. A new concept is proposed that offers rapid, cost effective GCEP misuse detection, without increasing LFUA inspection access or introducing intrusive access demands on GCEP operations. Our approach is based on continuous onsite aerosol collection and laser enrichment analysis. This approach mitigates many of the constraints imposed by the LFUA protocol, reduces the demand for onsite sample collection and offsite analysis, and overcomes current limitations associated with the in-facility misuse detection devices. Onsite environmental sample collection offers the ability to collect fleeting uranium hexafluoride emissions before they are lost to the ventilation system or before they disperse throughout the facility, to become deposited onto surfaces that are contaminated with background and historical production material. Onsite aerosol sample collection, combined with enrichment analysis, provides the unique ability to quickly detect stepwise enrichment level changes within the facility, leading to a significant strengthening of facility misuse deterence. We report in this paper our study of several GCEP environmental sample release scenarios and simulation results of a newly designed aerosol collection and particle capture system that is fully integrated with the Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) uranium particle enrichment analysis instrument that was developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Anheier, Norman C.; Munley, John T.; Alexander, M. L.

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Advanced Laser Diagnostics Development for the Characterization of Gaseous High Speed Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of high-speed flows represents a challenging problem in the fluid dynamics field due to the presence of chemical reactions and non-equilibrium effects. Hypersonic flights, where speeds reach Mach 5 and above, are particularly influenced by these effects, resulting in a direct impact on the flow and consequently on the aerodynamic performance of a vehicle traveling at these speeds. The study of hypersonic flow conditions requires the experimental capability of determining local temperatures, pressures and velocities using non-intrusive techniques. Furthermore, the simultaneous measurement of two or more variables in a complex flow boosts the amount of information that is obtained since valuable correlations can be established. This research includes the design, construction and characterization of a hypersonic flow apparatus explicitly intended as a tool for advanced laser diagnostics development. This apparatus is characterized by its pulsed operation mode that translates into a significant reduction in mass flow rates and can be operated for long periods at Mach numbers ranging from 2.8 to 6.2. The flow conditions during the uniform flow time interval of each pulse vary by less than 1%, generating a flow of sufficient quality for quantitative measurements. The development of a laser diagnostic technique, the VENOM technique, which is a non-intrusive method to provide simultaneous 2-D measurements of the mean and instantaneous fluctuations in two-component velocity and temperature is also presented. This technique represents the first single diagnostic capable of instantaneous two-component velocimetry and thermometry in a gaseous flow field by combining two Nitric Oxide Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence methods: two-component Molecular Tagging Velocimetry and two-line thermometry, employing the nascent NO(v"=1) arising from the NO2 photodissociation as a molecular tracer. The VENOM technique is expected to be not only applicable to cold high-speed flows, which is the focus of the present work, but also to combustion and other reactive or high-enthalpy flow fields.

Sanchez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Elucidating the solid, liquid and gaseous products from batch pyrolysis of cotton-gin trash.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cotton-gin trash (CGT) was pyrolyzed at different temperatures and reaction times using an externally-heated batch reactor. The average yields of output products (solid/char, liquid/bio-oil, and gaseous) were determined. The heating value (HV) of CGT was measured to be around 15-16 MJ kg- 1 (6500-7000 Btu lb-1). In the first set of tests, CGT was pyrolyzed at 600, 700, and 800°C and at 30, 45, and 60 min reaction period. The maximum char yield of 40% by weight (wt.%) was determined at 600°C and 30 min settings, however, the HV of char was low and almost similar to the HV of CGT. A maximum gas yield of 40 wt.% was measured at 800°C and 60 min and the highest liquid yield of 30 wt.% was determined at 800°C and 30 min. In the modified pyrolysis test, the effects of temperature (500, 600, 700, and 800°C) on the product yield and other properties were investigated. The experiment was performed using the same reactor purged with nitrogen at a rate of 1000 cm3 min-1. Gas yield increased as temperature was increased while the effect was opposite on char yield. The maximum char yield of 38 wt.% was determined at 500°C and 30 min. The char had the largest fraction in the energy output (70-83%) followed by gas (10-20%) and bio-oil (7- 9%). Maximum gas yield of 35 wt.% was determined at 800°C. The average yield of CO, H2 and total hydrocarbons (THC) generally increased with increased temperature but CO2 production decreased. Methane, ethane, and propane dominated the THC. The bio-oil yield at 600°C was the highest at about 30 wt.% among the temperature settings. The HV of bio-oil was low (2-5 MJ kg-1) due to minimal non-HC compounds and high moisture content (MC). A simple energy balance of the process was performed. The process was considered energy intensive due to the high amount of energy input (6100 kJ) while generating a maximum energy output of only 10%. After disregarding the energy used for preparation and pyrolysis, the energy losses ranged from 30-46% while the energy of the output represent between 55-70% of the input energy from CGT.

Aquino, Froilan Ludana

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

THE DIFFUSION OF HYDROGEN IN BETA ZIRCONIUM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diffusion coefficients for hydrogen in beta zirconium were determined from permeation rates in the range 650 to 850 deg C. Both the steady-state method, which is dependent upon the hydrogen concentration, and the time-lag method, which is independent of hydrogen concentration, were employed to obtain diffusion data. Zirconium disks, 0.03 to 0.1 cm thick and varying in hydrogen concentration from 9 to 33 at.%, were used to measure permeation rates. The diffusion coefficients determined by the steady-state and time-lag methods on samples of differing thickness were in agreement. It was concluded that the permeation process was diffusion controlled. The diffusion coefficients were found to be independent of concentration and can be expressed by D = 6.14 x 10/ sup 4/ exp (--45,900/RT). (auth)

Albrecht, W.M.; Goode, W.D. Jr.

1959-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

384

Surveying Diffusion in Complex Geometries. An Essay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surrounding world surprises us by the beauty and variety of complex shapes that emerge from nanometric to macroscopic scales. Natural or manufactured materials (sandstones, sedimentary rocks and cement), colloidal solutions (proteins and DNA), biological cells, tissues and organs (lungs, kidneys and placenta), they all present irregularly shaped "scenes" for a fundamental transport "performance", that is, diffusion. Here, the geometrical complexity, entangled with the stochastic character of diffusive motion, results in numerous fascinating and sometimes unexpected effects like diffusion screening or localization. These effects control many diffusion-mediated processes that play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis, biochemical mechanisms, electrochemistry, growth phenomena, oil recovery, or building industry. In spite of a long and rich history of academic and industrial research in this field, it is striking to see how little we know about diffusion in complex geometries, especially the one whic...

Grebenkov, Denis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Blue Chip Consensus US GDP Forecast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and metro area from Moody’s Economy.com Equivalent to US-level Gross Domestic Product ? The GMP forecasts have a large impact on the peak load forecasts Rule of thumb: 1 % growth in RTO GMP ? approx. 1,000 MW growth in forecast RTO peak load

James F. Wilson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Information Technology Diffusion with Influentials, Imitators, and Opponents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information technology (IT) innovations follow a diverse set of diffusion patterns. Early diffusion models explaining technology diffusion patterns assumed that there is a single homogeneous segment of potential adopters. It was later shown that a two-segment ... Keywords: Diffusion Of Innovation, Information Technology Diffusion, Technology Opposition

Hasan Cavusoglu; Nan Hu; Yingjiu Li; Dan Ma

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Evaluation of diffusion coefficients from nonlinear impurity profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At high concentrations, impurity diffusion in semiconductors is governed by nonlinear diffusion processes. Using similarity analysis, a general expression for evaluation of the diffusion coefficient from experimental impurity profiles derived for the case of redistributive diffusion of implanted impurities. This expression corresponds to the Boltzmann-Matano analysis for the case of diffusion with constant surface concentration.

Anderson, D.; Jeppson, K.O.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Spatial and Temporal Diffusion of House Prices in the UK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

world property markets to GDP which is correlated across countries. Herring and Wachter (1999) have pointed out that the 1997 Asian crisis was characterized by a collapse in real estate prices and a consequent weakening of the banking system before... exchange rates came under attack. The essential link was that the real estate collapse impacted very negatively on the balance sheets of banks. Herring and Wachter point to a strong correlation between real estate cycles and banking crisis across a wide...

Holly, Sean; Pesaran, M Hashem; Yamagata, Takashi

389

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) apparatus for nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited)  

SciTech Connect

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D. A.; Velsko, C. A.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Yeamans, C. B.; Moody, K. J.; Tereshatov, E.; Stoeffl, W.; Riddle, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-236, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Diffusive Accumulation of Methane Bubbles in Seabed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider seabed bearing methane bubbles. In the absence of fractures the bubbles are immovably trapped in a porous matrix by surface tension forces; therefore the dominant mechanism of transfer of gas mass becomes the diffusion of gas molecules through the liquid. The adequate description of this process requires accounting "other-than-normal" (non-Fickian) diffusion effects, thermodiffusion and gravity action. We evaluate the diffusive flux of aqueous methane and predict the possibility of existence of bubble mass accumulation zones (which can appear independently from the presence/absence of hydrate stability zone) and effect of non-Fickian drift on the capacity of shallow and deep methane-hydrate deposits.

Goldobin, D S; Levesley, J; Lovell, M A; Rochelle, C A; Jackson, P; Haywood, A; Hunter, S; Rees, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Reaction-diffusion systems and nonlinear waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors investigate the solution of a nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation connected with nonlinear waves. The equation discussed is more general than the one discussed recently by Manne, Hurd, and Kenkre (2000). The results are presented in a compact and elegant form in terms of Mittag-Leffler functions and generalized Mittag-Leffler functions, which are suitable for numerical computation. The importance of the derived results lies in the fact that numerous results on fractional reaction, fractional diffusion, anomalous diffusion problems, and fractional telegraph equations scattered in the literature can be derived, as special cases, of the results investigated in this article.

R. K. Saxena; A. M. Mathai; H. J. Haubold

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

392

Facilitated diffusion of proteins on chromatin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical model of facilitated diffusion of proteins in the cell nucleus. This model, which takes into account the successive binding/unbinding events of proteins to DNA, relies on a fractal description of the chromatin which has been recently evidenced experimentally. Facilitated diffusion is shown quantitatively to be favorable for a fast localization of a target locus by a transcription factor, and even to enable the minimization of the search time by tuning the affinity of the transcription factor with DNA. This study shows the robustness of the facilitated diffusion mechanism, invoked so far only for linear conformations of DNA.

O. Benichou; C. Chevalier; B. Meyer; R. Voituriez

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

393

Chloride Ion Diffusion in Cement-Based Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... into Hardened Cement Paste , Fly Ash, Silica Fume ... Diffusion Cell: Effects of Material and Test ... LJ, and Yu, SW, Diffusion in Cementitious Materials: II ...

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

394

ARM - Field Campaign - Diffuse Shortwave IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsDiffuse Shortwave IOP govCampaignsDiffuse Shortwave IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Diffuse Shortwave IOP 2001.09.24 - 2001.10.22 Lead Scientist : Joseph Michalsky Data Availability Data will not be available for public viewing until April 8, 2002. All data will be archived at the diffuse IOP web site by that date. For data sets, see below. Summary Almost 4 weeks of data were acquired under mostly sunny skies. Ninety-two percent of the daylight hours had measureable direct beam radiation. Much of the sunny data included completely cloud free conditions. The trackers functioned perfectly. Clear-sky data included low to moderate aerosol cases with no high aerosol conditions sampled. Data recovery from the

395

Diffuse solar radiation and associated meteorological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Solar diffuse radiation data including global radiation, shortwave and longwave balances, net radiation and sunshine hours have been extensively analyzed to study the variation of diffuse radiation with turbidity and cloud discharges appearing in the form of atmospherics over the tropics. Results of surface radiation measurements at Calcutta, Poona, Delhi and Madras are presented together with some meteorological parameters. The monthly values of diffuse radiation and the monthly ratios of diffuse to global solar radiation have been examined, with a special emphasis in relation to the noise level of atmospherics at Calcutta in the very low frequency band. The results exhibit some definite seasonal changes which appear to be in close agreement with one another. 1

unknown authors

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Wind and Diffusion Modeling for Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric transport and dispersion over complex terrain were investigated. Meteorological and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) concentration data were collected and used to evaluate the performance of a transport and diffusion model coupled with a ...

Robert M. Cox; John Sontowski; Richard N. Fry Jr.; Catherine M. Dougherty; Thomas J. Smith

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Pollutant Transport and Diffusion in Katabatic Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of pollutant transport and diffusion of a passive contaminant in a two-dimensional katabatic flow over a simple slope are examined using a primitive equation hydrodynamic model. It is shown that pollutants released above the ...

Carmen J. Nappo; K. Shankar Rao; Jerold A. Herwehe

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Turbulence Spectra and Eddy Diffusivity over Forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objectives of this observational study are to examine the stability dependence of velocity and air temperature spectra and to employ the spectral quantities to establish relations for eddy diffusivity over forests. The datasets chosen ...

Xuhui Lee

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Diffuse reflectance imaging with astronomical applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffuse objects generally tell us little about the surrounding lighting, since the radiance they reflect blurs together incident lighting from many directions. In this paper we discuss how occlusion geometry can help invert ...

Hasinoff, Samuel W.

400

Electrospray emitters For diffusion vacuum pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following similar principles as regular diffusion vacuum pumps, an electrospray emitter is set to produce a jet of charged particles that will drag air molecules out of a volume. To be a feasible concept, the emitted ...

Diaz Gómez Maqueo, Pablo (Pablo Ly)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Laser utilizing a gaseous lasing medium and method for operating the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to an improvement in gas lasers and a method of operating the same. In one aspect, the invention is an improved method for operating a high-power gas laser. The improvement comprises introducing the gas lasing medium tangentially to the laser tube at a pressure establishing a forced vortex in the tube. The vortex defines an axially extending core region characterized by a low pressure and temperature relative to the gas inlet and the exterior of the vortex. An electrical discharge is established in the core region to initiate lasing of the gas. The gas discharge from the tube is passed through a diffuser. As in conventional gas lasers, firing results in a very abrupt increase in gas temperature and in severe disruption of the gas. However, the gas vortex almost immediately restores the gas to its pre-firing condition. That is, almost all of the waste heat is transferred radially to the laser wall, and the original gas-flow pattern is restored. As a result, the power output of the laser is increased significantly, and the laser firing repetition rate is markedly increased.

Zerr, Bruce A. (Harriman, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Laser utilizing a gaseous lasing medium and method for operating the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to an improvement in gas lasers and a method of operating the same. In one aspect, the invention is an improved method for operating a high-power gas laser. The improvement comprises introducing the gas lasing medium tangentially to the laser tube at a pressure establishing a forced vortex in the tube. The vortex defines an axially extending core region characterized by a low pressure and temperature relative to the gas inlet and the exterior of the vortex. An electrical discharge is established in the core region to initiate lasing of the gas. The gas discharge from the tube is passed through a diffuser. As in conventional gas lasers, firing results in a very abrupt increase in gas temperature and in severe disruption of the gas. However, the gas vortex, almost immediately restores the gas to its prefiring condition. That is, almost all of the waste heat is transferred radially to the laser wall, and the original gas-flow pattern is restored. As a result, the power output of the laser is increased significantly, and the laser firing repetition rate is markedly increased.

Zerr, B.A.

1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

Determination of Matrix Diffusion Properties of Granite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rock-core column experiments were introduced to estimate the diffusion and sorption properties of Kuru Grey granite used in block-scale experiments. The objective was to examine the processes causing retention in solute transport through rock fractures, especially matrix diffusion. The objective was also to estimate the importance of retention processes during transport in different scales and flow conditions. Rock-core columns were constructed from cores drilled into the fracture and were placed inside tubes to form flow channels in the 0.5 mm gap between the cores and the tube walls. Tracer experiments were performed using uranin, HTO, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 131}I, {sup 22}Na and {sup 85}Sr at flow rates of 1-50 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. Rock matrix was characterized using {sup 14}C-PMMA method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray micro analysis (EDX) and the B.E.T. method. Solute mass flux through a column was modelled by applying the assumption of a linear velocity profile and molecular diffusion. Coupling of the advection and diffusion processes was based on the model of generalised Taylor dispersion in the linear velocity profile. Experiments could be modelled applying a consistent parameterization and transport processes. The results provide evidence that it is possible to investigate matrix diffusion at the laboratory scale. The effects of matrix diffusion were demonstrated on the slightly-sorbing tracer breakthrough curves. Based on scoping calculations matrix diffusion begins to be clearly observable for non-sorbing tracer when the flow rate is 0.1 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. The experimental results presented here cannot be transferred directly to the spatial and temporal scales that prevail in an underground repository. However, the knowledge and understanding of transport and retention processes gained from this study is transferable to different scales from laboratory to in-situ conditions. (authors)

Holtta, Pirkko; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Huittinen, Nina [Laboratory of Radiochemistry, P.O. Box 55, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 (Finland); Poteri, Antti [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1608, VTT, FI-02044 (Finland)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16. mu. m laser radiation using gaseous CF/sub 4/  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 ..mu..m laser radiation using gaseous CF/sub 4/. Laser radiation at 16 ..mu..m has been observed in a cooled static cell containing low pressure CF/sub 4/ optically pumped by an approximately 3 W output power c-w CO/sub 2/ laser. The laser cavity employed was a multiple-pass off-axis-path two spherical mirror ring resonator. Unidirectional CF/sub 4/ laser output power at 615 cm/sup -1/ exceeded 2 mW. Computer calculations indicate that for modest pump powers of about 40 W, approximately 1 W of emitted laser radiation at 16 ..mu..m might be obtained.

Telle, J.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 .mu.m laser radiation using gaseous CF.sub.4  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 .mu.m laser radiation using gaseous CF.sub.4. Laser radiation at 16 .mu.m has been observed in a cooled static cell containing low pressure CF.sub.4 optically pumped by an approximately 3 W output power cw CO.sub.2 laser. The laser cavity employed was a multiple-pass off-axis-path two spherical mirror ring resonator. Unidirectional CF.sub.4 laser output power at 615 cm.sup.-1 exceeded 2 mW. Computer calculations indicate that for modest pump powers of about 40 W, approximately 1 W of emitted laser radiation at 16 .mu.m might be obtained.

Telle, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Flow and diffusion distributed structures with noise at the inlet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow and diffusion distributed structures (FDS) are stationary spatially periodic patterns that can be observed in reaction-diffusion-advection systems. These structures arise when the flow rate exceeds a certain bifurcation point provided that concentrations ... Keywords: 47.54.-r, 82.40.Ck, Flow and diffusion distributed structures, Flow distributed oscillations, Noise, Pattern formation, Reaction-diffusion-advection system

Pavel V. Kuptsov; Razvan A. Satnoianu

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Phase Stability, Diffusion, Kinetics and their Applications (PSDK-VI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expedited Processing of CIGS Photovoltaic Absorber Materials · Experimental Uncertainty Propagation in Depth-Profiling Diffusion Experiments.

408

NMR Advanced methodologies to investigate water diffusion in materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NMR Advanced methodologies to investigate water diffusion in materials and biological systems Ph · Introduction: _Water Diffusion _Experimental technique: NMR · Diffusion NMR: applications to the study glasses · Diffusion NMR in the framework of multi-quantum coherences · Project outline #12;Outlook

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

409

Detection of illicit HEU production in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants using neutron counting techniques on product cylinders  

SciTech Connect

Innovative and novel safeguards approaches are needed for nuclear energy to meet global energy needs without the threat of nuclear weapons proliferation. Part of these efforts will include creating verification techniques that can monitor uranium enrichment facilities for illicit production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU). Passive nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques will be critical in preventing illicit HEU production because NDA offers the possibility of continuous and unattended monitoring capabilities with limited impact on facility operations. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) are commonly used to produce low-enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel. In a GCEP, gaseous UF{sub 6} spins at high velocities in centrifuges to separate the molecules containing {sup 238}U from those containing the lighter {sup 235}U. Unfortunately, the process for creating LEU is inherently the same as HEU, creating a proliferation concern. Insuring that GCEPs are producing declared enrichments poses many difficult challenges. In a GCEP, large cascade halls operating thousands of centrifuges work together to enrich the uranium which makes effective monitoring of the cascade hall economically prohibitive and invasive to plant operations. However, the enriched uranium exiting the cascade hall fills product cylinders where the UF{sub 6} gas sublimes and condenses for easier storage and transportation. These product cylinders hold large quantities of enriched uranium, offering a strong signal for NDA measurement. Neutrons have a large penetrability through materials making their use advantageous compared to gamma techniques where the signal is easily attenuated. One proposed technique for detecting HEU production in a GCEP is using neutron coincidence counting at the product cylinder take off stations. This paper discusses findings from Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code simulations that examine the feasibility of such a detector.

Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

High voltage research (breakdown strengths of gaseous and liquid insulators) and environmental effects of dielectric gases. Semiannual report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics covered include basic studies of gaseous dielectrics, direct current breakdown strengths of gases/mixtures, environmental effects studies and decomposition analyses, impulse studies, breakdown strengths of binary mixtures with concentric cylinder geometry, and a discussion of the experimental apparatus. (GHT)

Christophorou, L.G.; James, D.R.; Pai, R.Y.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The importance of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} for sulphation of gaseous KCl - An experimental investigation in a biomass fired CFB boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is based on results obtained during co-combustion of wood pellets and straw in a 12 MW circulating fluidised bed (CFB) boiler. Elemental sulphur (S) and ammonium sulphate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}) were used as additives to convert the alkali chlorides (mainly KCl) to less corrosive alkali sulphates. Their performance was then evaluated using several measurement tools including, IACM (on-line measurements of gaseous alkali chlorides), a low-pressure impactor (particle size distribution and chemical composition of extracted fly ash particles), and deposit probes (chemical composition in deposits collected). The importance of the presence of either SO{sub 2} or SO{sub 3} for gas phase sulphation of KCl is also discussed. Ammonium sulphate performed significantly better than elemental sulphur. A more efficient sulphation of gaseous KCl was achieved with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} even when the S/Cl molar ratio was less than half compared to sulphur. Thus the presence of gaseous SO{sub 3} is of greater importance than that of SO{sub 2} for the sulphation of gaseous KCl. (author)

Kassman, Haakan [Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Division of Energy Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Baefver, Linda [Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Energy Technology, Boraas (Sweden); Aamand, Lars-Erik [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Division of Energy Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Annual book of ASTM Standards 2008. Section Five. Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels. Volume 05.06. Gaseous fuels; coal and coke  

SciTech Connect

The first part covers standards for gaseous fuels. The second part covers standards on coal and coke including the classification of coals, determination of major elements in coal ash and trace elements in coal, metallurgical properties of coal and coke, methods of analysis of coal and coke, petrogrpahic analysis of coal and coke, physical characteristics of coal, quality assurance and sampling.

NONE

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Reaction-diffusion systems with constant diffusivities: conditional symmetries and form-preserving transformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Q-conditional symmetries (nonclassical symmetries) for a general class of two-component reaction-diffusion systems with constant diffusivities are studied. Using the recently introduced notion of Q-conditional symmetries of the first type (R. Cherniha J. Phys. A: Math. Theor., 2010. vol. 43., 405207), an exhaustive list of reaction-diffusion systems admitting such symmetry is derived. The form-preserving transformations for this class of systems are constructed and it is shown that this list contains only non-equivalent systems. The obtained symmetries permit to reduce the reaction-diffusion systems under study to two-dimensional systems of ordinary differential equations and to find exact solutions. As a non-trivial example, multiparameter families of exact solutions are explicitly constructed for two nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems. A possible interpretation to a biologically motivated model is presented.

Roman Cherniha; Vasyl' Davydovych

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

414

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband diffuse downwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diffuse downwelling irradiance diffuse downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband diffuse downwelling irradiance All of the solar radiation, across the wavelength range of 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, coming directly from the sky except for solar radiation coming directly from the sun and the circumsolar irradiance within approximately three degrees of the sun. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments

415

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral diffuse downwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diffuse downwelling irradiance diffuse downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave spectral diffuse downwelling irradiance The rate at which spectrally resolved radiant energy at wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, that has been scattered in the atmosphere at least once, passes through a horizontal unit area in a downward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments RSS : Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer

416

Diffusion of Radionuclides in Concrete and Soil  

SciTech Connect

One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Such concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and would act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The mobilized radionuclides may escape from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and move into the surrounding subsurface environment. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. The objective of our study was to measure the diffusivity of Re, Tc and I in concrete containment and the surrounding vadose zone soil. Effects of carbonation, presence of metallic iron, and fracturing of concrete and the varying moisture contents in soil on the diffusivities of Tc and I were evaluated.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Parker, Kent E.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

417

Comparison of Diffuse Shortwave Irradiance Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diffuse Shortwave Diffuse Shortwave Irradiance Measurements J. J. Michalsky and J. Schlemmer Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York B. C. Bush, S. Leitner, D. Marsden, and F. P. J. Valero Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California R. Dolce and A. Los Kipp & Zonen, Inc. Bohemia, New York and Delft The Netherlands E. G. Dutton Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado M. P. Haeffelin Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Blackburg, Virginia G. Major Budapest University of Economic Sciences and Public Administration Budapest, Hungry J. Hickey The Eppley Laboratory, Inc. Newport, Rhode Island

418

Quantum diffusion in the quasiperiodic kicked rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the mechanisms responsible for quantum diffusion in the quasiperiodic kicked rotor. We report experimental measurements of the diffusion constant on the atomic version of the system and develop a theoretical approach (based on the Floquet theorem) explaining the observations, especially the ``sub-Fourier'' character of the resonances observed in the vicinity of exact periodicity, i.e. the ability of the system to distinguish two neighboring driving frequencies in a time shorter than the inverse of the difference of the two frequencies.

Hans Lignier; Jean Claude Garreau; Pascal Szriftgiser; Dominique Delande

2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

419

Calculating the Diffuse Responsivity of Solar Pyranometers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyranometers are used to measure the global and diffuse components of solar irradiance. One of the methods to calculate the unshade (global) responsivity of a pyranometer is the standard shading method, described in the Annual Book of ASTM Standards, section 14, volume 14.02. In this paper, the standard method is used to calculate the shade (diffuse) responsivity of a pyranometer by accounting for the zenith and azimuth response of the pyranometer. A discussion of the effect of pyranometer offset on the calculated responsivity is also presented.

Reda, I.; Myers, D.

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

Separation of Hydrogen Isotopes by Thermal Diffusion  

SciTech Connect

At high hot wall temperatures the gas phase thermal diffusion column acts as an atomic rather than a molecular separator. A modified theory was developed to describe the process. Equivalent transport equations were derived for the two nuclides in a binary atomic mixture. The equations are identical in form to those normally encountered in thermal diffusion column theory. Experiments to test the theory were carried out with two 3-meter columns. Experimental results with deuterium-tritium mixtures were found to be in satisfactory agreement with theory, and it was concluded that the theory was sufficiently accurate for design purposes.

Rutherford, W. M.; Lindsay, C. N.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Zero-flux planes, flux reversals and diffusion paths in ternary and quaternary diffusion  

SciTech Connect

During isothermal multicomponent diffusion, interdiffusion fluxes of individual components can go to zero at zero-flux planes (ZFP) and exhibit flux reversals from one side to the other of such planes. Interdiffusion fluxes as well as the locations and compositions of ZFPs for components are determined directly from the concentration profiles of diffusion couples without the need for prior knowledge of interdiffusion coefficients. The development and identification of ZFPs is reviewed with the aid of single phase and two-phase diffusion couples investigated in the Cu-Ni-Zn system at 775/sup 0/C. ZFP locations in the diffusion zone nearly correspond to sections where the activity of a component is the same as its activity in either of the terminal alloys of a couple. Path slopes at ZFPs are uniquely dictated by the atomic mobility and thermodynamic data for the components. Discontinuous flux reversals for the components can also occur at interfaces in multiphase couples. Identification of ZFPs is also presented for diffusion in the Cu-Ni-Zn-Mn quaternary system. Analytical representation of diffusion paths for both ternary and quaternary diffusion couples is presented with the aid of characteristic path parameters.

Dayananda, M.A.

1986-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

422

Aircraft Observations of Transport and Diffusion in Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gaseous tracer, sulfur hexafluoride, was used to follow the path of two different AgI cloud seeding aerosols in cumulus clouds. The materials were released at cloud base or midlevels. Plumes sampled at midlevels were found to be relatively ...

Jeffrey L. Stith; Don A. Griffith; R. Lynn Rose; John A. Flueck; James R. Miller Jr.; Paul L. Smith

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

ICT diffusion in the Republic of Armenia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Republic of Armenia, a high literacy and high poverty country, allows for a test of digital divide beliefs about the role of economic wellbeing in ownership of and skills in using information communication technology. While socioeconomic status was ... Keywords: Armenia, ICT, ICTD, adoption, diffusion, digital divide

Katy E. Pearce

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Information and attitude diffusion in networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of diverse information does not guarantee that a person's views will be equally diverse. Research has consistently shown that attitudinal positions on an issue will lead to selective reception and dissemination of information, which ... Keywords: active dissemination of information, attitude diffusion, information cascades, selective exposure of information

Wai-Tat Fu; Q. Vera Liao

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A Two?Stage Oil Diffusion Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two?stage oil diffusion pump built of glass is described which makes possible the utilization of the advantages of oil without requiring the use of an unusually good coarse vacuum. The novelty of the pump resides in the first stage which is so designed that it cannot clog even with the small clearances needed to work against high pressures.

Joseph E. Henderson

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Some Recent Long-Range Diffusion Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent atmospheric cloud-spreading (relative diffusion) data from a variety of sources are combined to show that the horizontal spreading rate is approximately linear over a time range from 1 to 10 or more hours (20?200 or more km) of downwind ...

F. A. Gifford

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Diffusion Processes in Turbulent Magnetic Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study of the effect of turbulence on diffusion processes within magnetized medium. While we exemplify our treatment with heat transfer processes, our results are quite general and are applicable to different processes, e.g. diffusion of heavy elements. Our treatment is also applicable to describing the diffusion of cosmic rays arising from magnetic field wandering. In particular, we find that when the energy injection velocity is smaller than the Alfven speed the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the opposite regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale $l_A$ at which the turbulent velocity is equal the Alfven velocity is a new important parameter. When the electron mean free path $\\lambda$ is larger than $l_A$, the stronger the the turbulence, the lower thermal conductivity by electrons is. The turbulent motions, however, induces their own advective transport, that can provide effective diffusivity. For clusters of galaxies, we find that the turbulence is the most important agent for heat transfer. We also show that the domain of applicability of the subdiffusion concept is rather limited.

Alex Lazarian

2007-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

428

Diffusion Processes in Turbulent Magnetic Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study of the effect of turbulence on diffusion processes within magnetized medium. While we exemplify our treatment with heat transfer processes, our results are quite general and are applicable to different processes, e.g. diffusion of heavy elements. Our treatment is also applicable to describing the diffusion of cosmic rays arising from magnetic field wandering. In particular, we find that when the energy injection velocity is smaller than the Alfven speed the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the opposite regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale $l_A$ at which the turbulent velocity is equal the Alfven velocity is a new important parameter. When the electron mean free path $\\lambda$ is larger than $l_A$, the stronger the the turbulence, the lower thermal conductivity by electrons is. The turbulent motions, however, induces their own advective transport, that can provide effective diffusivity. For clusters of galaxies, we find that the turbule...

Lazarian, Alex

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The diffusion of mobile phones in India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile phones, which were introduced around a decade ago in 1995-1996 in India, are becoming the dominant means of accessing communication. At the end of 2005-2006, there were 90 million mobile subscribers in India in comparison to 50 million subscribers ... Keywords: Mobile telecommunications, Technology diffusion

Sanjay Kumar Singh

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Microsoft Word - RealTimeRadsWPIFINALFeb06.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

training was provided by BNL, and was essential for the successful deployment of ISOCS at NTS. G.9 PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant's...

431

An asixymmetric diffusion experiment for the determination of diffusion and sorption coefficients of rock samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Waste Management, Shackelford, C.D. , Daniel, D.E. ,ASCE 117(3), 467-484. Shackelford, C.D. , Daniel, D.E. ,diffusion” effects (Shackelford and Daniel, 1991a) may

Takeda, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Background Fact Sheet Transfer of Depleted Uranium and Subsequent Transactions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Background Fact Sheet Background Fact Sheet Transfer of Depleted Uranium and Subsequent Transactions At the direction of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, over many months, the Energy Department (DOE) has been working closely with Energy Northwest (ENW), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and USEC Inc. (USEC) to develop a plan to address the challenges at USEC's Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) that advances America's national security interests, protects taxpayers, and provides benefits for TVA and the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) electric ratepayers and business operations. BPA is ENW's sole customer, purchasing 100 percent of ENW's Columbia Generating Station's electric power as part of BPA's overall

433

Double-pulse and single-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for distinguishing between gaseous and particulate phase analytes  

SciTech Connect

We explore the use of a combination of double-pulse and single-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) methodologies as a means of differentiating between solid-phase and gaseous-phase analytes (namely, carbon) in an aerosol stream. A range of spectral data was recorded for double-pulse and single-pulse configurations, including both ns and fs prepulse widths, while varying the gas-phase mass percentage of the carbon from about 10% to 90% for various fixed carbon concentrations. The carbon emission response, as measured by the peak-to-continuum ratio, was greater for the double-pulse configuration as compared with the single-pulse response and was also enhanced as the percentage of solid-phase carbon was increased. Using a combination of the double-pulse and single-pulse emission signals, a monotonically increasing response function was found to correlate with the percentage of gas-phase analyte. However, individual data points at the measured gas-phase percentages reveal considerable scatter from the predicted trend. Furthermore, the double-pulse to single-pulse ratio was only pronounced with the ns-ns configuration as compared with the fs-ns scheme. Overall, the LIBS methodology has been demonstrated as a potential means to discriminate between gas-phase and particulate-phase fractions of the same elemental species in an aerosol, although future optimization of the temporal parameters should be explored to improve the precision and accuracy of this approach.

Asgill, Michael E.; Brown, Michael S.; Frische, Kyle; Roquemore, William M.; Hahn, David W.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Effect of gaseous corrosion on the strength of SiC and Si sub 3 N sub 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of gaseous corrosion on the room-temperature flexural strength of SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were investigated. Sintered {alpha}-SiC and hot-pressed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were exposed to flowing H{sub 2} or Ar at 1400{degrees}C for 10 h. The explored variables, water vapor pressure in the H{sub 2} or oxygen partial pressure in the Ar, were found to significantly affect the corrosion of these materials. Reductions in room-temperature strength were observed when weight loss resulted from active oxidation, except for the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} exposed in Ar containing O{sub 2}. Large pits that formed during exposure were responsible for the strength reductions. When the P{sub H{sub 2}O} in H{sub 2} or P{sub O{sub 2}} in Ar was high enough to form a thin oxide layer on the sample surface, the observed strength increased, ultimately to values greater than that of the as-polished material. However, under conditions in which a much thicker oxide layer was formed, the strengths were unaffected or decreased slightly, the latter being attributed to the generation of new flaws such as bubbles or cracks in the oxide layer. 34 refs., 8 figs.

Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Novel mass spectrometric instrument for gaseous and particulate characterization and monitoring. Technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the Office of Technology Development as outlined by the director of the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program (EM), Leo Duffy, in 1991 appropriations hearings include conducting an aggressive technology development program for waste management, waste minimization, waste treatment, storage and disposal of waste. This will be done through the development of more effective remediation technology to reduce occupational and public exposure. We are developing a method to monitor airborne emissions from the TSCA plant at Oak Ridge which will provide real-time, accurate, and inexpensive data on the emission of hazardous organic and inorganic chemicals in both gaseous and particulate form, and to assist DOE in maintaining its ambitious schedules and overcoming significant scientific limitations of its current monitoring technologies. In May 1988 under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) established a timetable remedial investigation/feasibility study, and a Federal Facility Agreement is being negotiated with the Environmental Protection Agency and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment. As a result, work has begun on inactive waste sites at ORNL to excavate and isolate wastes in compliance with current standards. In addition, ORNL must comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which regulates generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes and corrective action of releases to the environment of hazardous wastes from active facilities.

Coggiola, M.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Characterization Activities Conducted at the 183-DR Site in Support of an In Situ Gaseous Reduction Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Situ Gaseous Reduction (ISGR) is a technology developed by DOE for the remediation of soil waste sites contaminated with hexavalent chromium. This document presents information associated with characterization activities conducted at the 183-DR site at Hanford, which is associated with a significant groundwater contaminant plume and was formerly a water treatment facility that utilized chromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Geotechnical and chemical data were collected during the excavation of trenches and the drilling of two vadose zone boreholes to support a possible ISGR demonstration at 183-DR. Although elevated total chromium and trace levels of hexavalent chromium were identified from one of the trenches and one of the boreholes, it appears that the boreholes missed the vadose zone contaminant source responsible for the chromium groundwater plume located downgradient of the 183-DR site. Recommendations are provided, however, for future work at 183-DR that may serve to identify the source for the groundwater plume and possibly provide an opportunity for an ISGR demonstration.

Thornton, Edward C.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Olsen, Khris B.; Schalla, Ronald; Cantrell, Kirk J.

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

437

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona,...

438

Does rotation influence double-diffusive fluxes in polar oceans?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffusive (or semi-convection) regime of double-diffusive convection (DDC) is wide-spread in the polar oceans, generating “staircases” consisting of high-gradient interfaces of temperature and salinity separated by convectively mixed layers. ...

J. R. Carpenter; M.-L. Timmermans

439

Modeling of Spectralon diffusers for radiometric calibration in remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Spectralon diffusers for radiometric calibration in remote sensing G. Bazalgette Courre Abstract. Onboard calibration of radiometric measurements in remote sensing is often achieved for publication May 28, 2003. 1 Introduction Light diffusers are used in remote sensing applications

Sprik, Rudolf

440

Stable Schemes for Nonlinear Vertical Diffusion in Atmospheric Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensity of vertical mixing in atmospheric models generally depends on wind shear and static stability, making the diffusion process nonlinear. Traditional implicit numerical schemes, which treat the variables to be diffused implicitly but ...

Claude Girard; Yves Delage

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

SunShot Initiative: Solar Energy Evolution and Diffusion Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Energy Evolution and Diffusion Studies to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Solar Energy Evolution and Diffusion Studies on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative:...

442

Isothermal Ice Crystallization Kinetics in the Gas-Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isothermal Ice Crystallization Kinetics in the Gas-Diffusion Layer of a Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell Title Isothermal Ice Crystallization Kinetics in the Gas-Diffusion Layer...

443

Fundamental Studies of Diffusion and Reactions in Hydrogen Storage Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy production and use [1,2], but adequate hydrogen storageEnergy Fundamental studies of diffusion and reactions in hydrogen storageEnergy 010 "Fundamental studies of diffusion and reactions in hydrogen storage

Van de Walle, Chris G; Peles, Amra; Janotti, Anderson; Wilson-Short, Gareth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A Simulation Study of Diffusion in Microporous Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dynamics simulation of the diffusion of n- butane andi-butane in silicalite. J. Chem. Phys. 108, 2170–2172 (Stefan diffusivity of iso-butane in MFI zeolite. Chem. Phys.

Abouelnasr, Mahmoud Kamal Forrest

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Oceanographic implications of Laboratory Experiments on Diffusive Interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper contains a summary of the results from some laboratory and theoretical studies on the diffusive interface in double diffusive convection, paying particular attention to the recent work of Fernando. A simple model is developed which ...

Harindra J. S. Fernando

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Modeling Vertical and Horizontal Diffusivities with the Sigma Coordinate System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of diffusive terms in numerical ocean models is examined relative to different coordinate systems. The conventional model for horizontal diffusion is found to be incorrect when bottom topographical slopes are large. A new formulation is ...

George L. Mellor; Alan F. Blumberg

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Tritium diffusion in lithium oxide solid breeder materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of data of tritium diffusion in Li/sub 2/O is presented. Also diffusion coefficients in Li/sub 2/O of tritium, lithium, oxygen, hydrogen, and deuterium are given. (MOW)

Shearer, J.A.; Tam, S.W.; Johnson, C.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Development of a micro-FID using a diffusion flame.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A micro-flame ionization detector (micro-FID) was developed operating with a diffusion flame with a folded flame structure. Unlike conventional FIDs, an air-hydrogen diffusion flame was… (more)

Kim, Jihyung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Fuel Cells - Energy Innovation Portal  

A unique gas diffusion electrode technique resulting in little to no leftover methanol, therefore increasing the overall effectiveness and performance ...

450

Fundamental Studies of Diffusion and Reactions in Hydrogen Storage Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamental Science ofEnergy 010 "Fundamental studies of diffusion and reactionsInstitute's (UCEI) Fundamental Science of Energy Working

Van de Walle, Chris G; Peles, Amra; Janotti, Anderson; Wilson-Short, Gareth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Fukushima's decomposition for diffusions associated with semi-Dirichlet forms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we give Fukushima's decomposition for diffusions associated with semi-Dirichlet forms and discuss some related topics.

Ma, Li; Sun, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Pumping Fluid Condensation in Oil Diffusion Pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condensation conditions of the motive fluid in an oil diffusion pump are considered with particular attention to the backstreaming problem. The backstreaming rate is correlated with the temperature of the “cold caps” surrounding the pump nozzle and it is demonstrated that an upper temperature limit exists near 200?°F where such devices cease to function effectively. The effect of “oleophobic” surfaces on cold caps and baffles is discussed. Conditions existing at the inlet of diffusion pumps and in baffles do not warrant attempts to introduce dropwise condensation. The condensation coefficient of pumping vapor at the temperature of the water cooled wall and with the flow rates used at the top nozzle appears to be very close to unity. The usefulness of creep barriers with modern pumping fluids and trap designs is judged to be questionable.

M. H. Hablanian

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

454

Methodology and apparatus for diffuse photon mimaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Non-invasive near infrared optical medical imaging devices for both hematoma detection in the brain and early tumor detection in the breast is achieved using image reconstruction which allows a mapping of the position dependent contrast diffusive propagation constants, which are related to the optical absorption coefficient and scattering coefficient in the tissue, at near infrared wavelengths. Spatial resolutions in the range of 5 mm for adult brain sizes and breast sizes can be achieved. The image reconstruction utilizes WKB approximation on most probable diffusion paths which has as lowest order approximation the straight line-of-sight between the plurality of sources and the plurality of detectors. The WKB approximation yields a set of linear equations in which the contrast optical absorption coefficients are the unknowns and for which signals can be generated to produce a pixel map of the contrast optical resolution of the scanned tissue.

Feng, Shechao C. (Los Angeles, CA); Zeng, Fanan (Los Angeles, CA); Zhao, Hui-Lin (Los Angeles, CA)

1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

455

Methodology and apparatus for diffuse photon imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Non-invasive near infrared optical medical imaging devices for both hematoma detection in the brain and early tumor detection in the breast is achieved using image reconstruction which allows a mapping of the position dependent contrast diffusive propagation constants, which are related to the optical absorption coefficient and scattering coefficient in the tissue, at near infrared wavelengths. Spatial resolutions in the range of 5 mm for adult brain sizes and breast sizes can be achieved. The image reconstruction utilizes WKB approximation on most probable diffusion paths which has as lowest order approximation the straight line-of-sight between the plurality of sources and the plurality of detectors. The WKB approximation yields a set of linear equations in which the contrast optical absorption coefficients are the unknowns and for which signals can be generated to produce a pixel map of the contrast optical resolution of the scanned tissue. 58 figs.

Feng, S.C.; Zeng, F.; Zhao, H.L.

1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

456

Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model  

SciTech Connect

Distributed generation (DG) technologies, such as gas-fired reciprocating engines and microturbines, have been found to be economically beneficial in meeting commercial-sector electrical, heating, and cooling loads. Even though the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that offered by traditional central stations, combined heat and power (CHP) applications using recovered heat can make the overall system energy efficiency of distributed energy resources (DER) greater. From a policy perspective, however, it would be useful to have good estimates of penetration rates of DER under various economic and regulatory scenarios. In order to examine the extent to which DER systems may be adopted at a national level, we model the diffusion of DER in the US commercial building sector under different technical research and technology outreach scenarios. In this context, technology market diffusion is assumed to depend on the system's economic attractiveness and the developer's knowledge about the technology. The latter can be spread both by word-of-mouth and by public outreach programs. To account for regional differences in energy markets and climates, as well as the economic potential for different building types, optimal DER systems are found for several building types and regions. Technology diffusion is then predicted via two scenarios: a baseline scenario and a program scenario, in which more research improves DER performance and stronger technology outreach programs increase DER knowledge. The results depict a large and diverse market where both optimal installed capacity and profitability vary significantly across regions and building types. According to the technology diffusion model, the West region will take the lead in DER installations mainly due to high electricity prices, followed by a later adoption in the Northeast and Midwest regions. Since the DER market is in an early stage, both technology research and outreach programs have the potential to increase DER adoption, and thus, shift building energy consumption to a more efficient alternative.

Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui,Afzal S.

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

457

Collective motion in quantum diffusive environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The general problem of dissipation in macroscopic large-amplitude collective motion and its relation to energy diffusion of intrinsic degrees of freedom of a nucleus is studied. By applying the cranking approach to the nuclear many-body system, a set of coupled dynamical equations for the collective classical variable and the quantum mechanical occupancies of the intrinsic nuclear states is derived. Different dynamical regimes of the intrinsic nuclear motion and its consequences on time properties of collective dissipation are discussed.

V. M. Kolomietz; S. Å berg; S. V. Radionov

2007-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

458

Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model  

SciTech Connect

Distributed generation (DG) technologies, such as gas-fired reciprocating engines and microturbines, have been found to be economically beneficial in meeting commercial-sector electrical, heating, and cooling loads. Even though the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that offered by traditional central stations, combined heat and power (CHP) applications using recovered heat can make the overall system energy efficiency of distributed energy resources (DER) greater. From a policy perspective, however, it would be useful to have good estimates of penetration rates of DER under various economic and regulatory scenarios. In order to examine the extent to which DER systems may be adopted at a national level, we model the diffusion of DER in the US commercial building sector under different technical research and technology outreach scenarios. In this context, technology market diffusion is assumed to depend on the system's economic attractiveness and the developer's knowledge about the technology. The latter can be spread both by word-of-mouth and by public outreach programs. To account for regional differences in energy markets and climates, as well as the economic potential for different building types, optimal DER systems are found for several building types and regions. Technology diffusion is then predicted via two scenarios: a baseline scenario and a program scenario, in which more research improves DER performance and stronger technology outreach programs increase DER knowledge. The results depict a large and diverse market where both optimal installed capacity and profitability vary significantly across regions and building types. According to the technology diffusion model, the West region will take the lead in DER installations mainly due to high electricity prices, followed by a later adoption in the Northeast and Midwest regions. Since the DER market is in an early stage, both technology research and outreach programs have the potential to increase DER adoption, and thus, shift building energy consumption to a more efficient alternative.

Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui,Afzal S.

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

459

Diffusion bonding of commercially pure Ni using Cu interlayer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concentration dependence of diffusivity in a multi-component diffusion system makes it complicated to predict the concentration profiles of diffusing species. This so called chemical diffusivity can be expressed as a function of thermodynamic and kinetic data. DICTRA software can calculate the concentration profiles using appropriate mobility and thermodynamic data. It can also optimize the diffusivity data using experimental diffusivity data. Then the optimized diffusivity data is stored as mobility data which is a linear function of temperature. In this work, diffusion bonding of commercially pure Ni using Cu interlayers is reported. The mobility parameters of Ni-Cu alloy binary systems were optimized using DICTRA/Thermocalc software from the available self-, tracer and chemical diffusion coefficients. The optimized mobility parameters were used to simulate concentration profiles of Ni-Cu diffusion joints using DICTRA/Thermocalc software. The calculated and experimental concentration profiles agreed well at 1100 Degree-Sign C. Agreement between the simulated and experimental profiles was less good at 1050 Degree-Sign C due to the grain boundary contribution to the overall diffusion. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The concentration profiles of Cu in Ni-Cu diffusion joints are modeled. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdiffusion coefficients in Ni-Cu system are optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimized interdiffusion coefficients are expressed as mobility parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulated profiles are comparable with experimental profiles.

Rahman, A.H.M.E., E-mail: a.rahman@my.und.edu; Cavalli, M.N.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Nonlinear analysis of a reaction-diffusion system: Amplitude equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reaction-diffusion system with a nonlinear diffusion term is considered. Based on nonlinear analysis, the amplitude equations are obtained in the cases of the Hopf and Turing instabilities in the system. Turing pattern-forming regions in the parameter space are determined for supercritical and subcritical instabilities in a two-component reaction-diffusion system.

Zemskov, E. P., E-mail: zemskov@ccas.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Dorodnicyn Computing Center (Russian Federation)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gdp gaseous diffusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The diffusion of the Internet: A cross-country analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the process of Internet diffusion across the world using a panel of 214 countries during the period 1990-2004. Countries are classified as low- or high-income and it is shown that the diffusion process is characterized by a different ... Keywords: Digital divide, Internet, Network externalities, O14, O33, O57, S-shape curve, Technological diffusion

Luis Andrés; David Cuberes; Mame Diouf; Tomás Serebrisky

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Does the photon-diffusion coefficient depend on absorption?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and M. C. Edlund, The Elements of Nuclear Reactor Theory (Van Nostrand, New York, 1952), Chaps. 5 and 14 diffusion coefficient gives better agreement with theory than the traditionally accepted photon diffusion diffusion theory by using the two different diffu- sion coefficients, we quantitatively demonstrate

Boas, David

463

Gaseous mercury release during steam curing of aerated concretes that contain fly ash and activated carbon sorbent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gaseous mercury released from aerated concrete during both presteam curing at 25{sup o}C and steam curing at 80{sup o}C was measured in controlled laboratory experiments. Mercury release originated from two major components in the concrete mixture: (1) class F coal fly ash and (2) a mixture of the fly ash and powdered activated carbon onto which elemental mercury was adsorbed. Mercury emitted during each curing cycle was collected on iodated carbon traps in a purge-and-trap arrangement and subsequently measured by cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Through 3 h of presteam curing, the release of mercury from the freshly prepared mixture was less than 0.03 ng/kg of concrete. Releases of total mercury over the 21 h steam curing process ranged from 0.4 to 5.8 ng of mercury/kg of concrete and depended upon mercury concentrations in the concrete. The steam-cured concrete had a higher mercury release rate (ng kg{sup -1} h{sup -1}) compared to air-cured concrete containing fly ash, but the shorter curing interval resulted in less total release of mercury from the steam-cured concrete. The mercury flux from exposed concrete surfaces to mercury-free air ranged from 0.77 to 11.1 ng m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, which was similar to mercury fluxes for natural soils to ambient air of 4.2 ng m{sup -2} h{sup -1} reported by others. Less than 0.022% of the total quantity of mercury present from all mercury sources in the concrete was released during the curing process, and therefore, nearly all of the mercury was retained in the concrete. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Danold W. Golightly; Chin-Min Cheng; Ping Sun; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker; Panuwat Taerakul; William E. Wolfe [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Unattended Monitoring of HEU Production in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants using Automated Aerosol Collection and Laser-based Enrichment Assay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward low carbon energy production. Pivotal to the global nuclear power renaissance is the development and deployment of robust safeguards instrumentation that allows the limited resources of the IAEA to keep pace with the expansion of the nuclear fuel cycle. Undeclared production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains a prim