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1

Oxidation of gallium arsenide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to gallium arsenide semiconductors and, more particularly, to the oxidation of surface layers of gallium arsenide semiconductors for semiconductor device fabrication.

Hoffbauer, M.A.; Cross, J.B.

1991-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

2

Process for forming pure silver ohmic contacts to N- and P-type gallium arsenide materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved process for manufacturing gallium arsenide semiconductor devices having as its components a n-type gallium arsenide substrate layer and a p-type gallium arsenide diffused layer. The improved process comprises forming a pure silver ohmic contact to both the diffuse layer and the substrate layer wherein the n-type layer comprises a substantially low doping carrier concentration.

Hogan, S.J.

1983-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

3

Pure silver ohmic contacts to N- and P- type gallium arsenide materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved process for manufacturing gallium arsenide semiconductor devices having as its components an n-type gallium arsenide substrate layer and a p-type gallium arsenide diffused layer. The improved process comprises forming a pure silver ohmic contact to both the diffused layer and the substrate layer, wherein the n-type layer comprises a substantially low doping carrier concentration.

Hogan, Stephen J. (Golden, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Method for improving the growth of cadmium telluride on a gallium arsenide substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing a gallium arsenide substrate, prior to growing a layer of cadmium telluride on a support surface thereof. The preparation includes the steps of cleaning the gallium arsenide substrate and thereafter forming prepatterned shapes on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate. The layer of cadmium telluride then grown on the prepared substrate results in dislocation densities of approximately 1{times}10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2} or less. The prepatterned shapes on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate are formed by reactive ion etching an original outer surface of the gallium arsenide substrate and into the body of the gallium arsenide substrate to a depth of at least two microns. The prepatterned shapes have the appearance of cylindrical mesas each having a diameter of at lease twelve microns. After the mesas are formed on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate, the substrate is again cleaned.

Reno, J.L.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Effects of asymmetry on electron spin dynamics in gallium arsenide quantum wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work presents optical studies of electron spin dynamics in gallium arsenide (GaAs) quantum wells, focusing on the effect of inversion asymmetric confinement potentials on (more)

Eldridge, Peter Stephen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 2, NO. 2, APRIL 2012 123 Gallium Arsenide Solar Cell Absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 2, NO. 2, APRIL 2012 123 Gallium Arsenide Solar Cell Absorption flat gallium arsenide solar cell, we show that it is possible to modify the flow of light and enhance above the solar cell. The incoupling element is lossless and, thus, has the advantage that no energy

Grandidier, Jonathan

7

Single event upsets in gallium arsenide dynamic logic  

SciTech Connect

The advantages and disadvantages of using gallium arsenide (GaAs) dynamic logic in computers and digital systems are briefly discussed, especially with respect to space applications. A short introduction to the topology and operation of GaAs Two-Phase Dynamic FET Logic (TDFL) circuits is presented. Experiments for testing the SEU sensitivity of GaAs TDFL, using a laser to create charge collection events, are described. Results are used to estimate the heavy-ion, soft error rate for TDFL in a spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, and the dependence of the SEU sensitivity on clock frequency, clock voltage, and clock phase. Analysis of the data includes a comparison between the SEU sensitivities of TDFL and the more common static form of GaAs logic, Directly Coupled FET Logic (DCFL). This is the first reported SEU testing of GaAs dynamic logic.

Fouts, D.J. (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States). ECE Dept.); Weatherford, T. (SFA Inc., Landover, MD (United States)); McMorrow, C.; Melinger, J.S.; Campbell, A.B. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Coated gallium arsenide neutron detectors : results of characterizationmeasurements.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effective detection of special nuclear materials (SNM) is essential for reducing the threat associated with stolen or improvised nuclear devices. Passive radiation detection technologies are primarily based on gamma-ray detection and subsequent isotope identification or neutron detection (specific to neutron sources and SNM). One major effort supported by the Department of Homeland Security in the area of advanced passive detection is handheld or portable neutron detectors for search and localization tasks in emergency response and interdiction settings. A successful SNM search detector will not only be able to confirm the presence of fissionable materials but also establish the location of the source in as short of time as possible while trying to minimize false alarms due to varying background or naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). For instruments based on neutron detectors, this translates to detecting neutrons from spontaneous fission or alpha-n reactions and being able to determine the direction of the source (or localizing the source through subsequent measurements). Polyethylene-coated gallium arsenide detectors were studied because the detection scheme is based on measuring the signal in the gallium arsenide wafers from the electrical charge of the recoil protons produced from the scattering of neutrons from the hydrogen nucleus. The inherent reaction has a directional dependence because the neutron and hydrogen nucleus have equivalent masses. The assessment and measurement of polyethylene-coated gallium arsenide detector properties and characteristics was the first phase of a project being performed for the Department of Homeland Security and the results of these tests are reported in this report. The ultimate goal of the project was to develop a man-portable neutron detection system that has the ability to determine the direction of the source from the detector. The efficiency of GaAs detectors for different sizes of polyethylene layers and different angles between the detector and the neutron source were determined. Preliminary measurements with a neutron generator based on a deuterium-tritium reaction ({approx}14 MeV neutrons) were performed and the results are discussed. This report presents the results of these measurements in terms of efficiency and angular efficiency and compares them to Monte Carlo calculations to validate the calculation scheme in view of further applications. Based on the results of this study, the polyethylene-coated gallium arsenide detectors provide adequate angular resolution based on proton recoil detection from the neutron scattering reaction from hydrogen. However, the intrinsic efficiency for an individual detector is extremely low. Because of this low efficiency, large surface area detectors ( or a large total surface area from many small detectors) would be required to generate adequate statistics to perform directional detection in near-real time. Large surface areas could be created by stacking the detector wafers with only a negligible attenuation of source neutrons. However, the cost of creating such a large array of GaAs is cost-prohibitive at this time.

Klann, R. T.; Perret, G.; Sanders, J.

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

9

Thin film gallium arsenide solar cell research. Third quarterly project report, September 1, 1980-November 30, 1980. [Antireflection coating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major objective of this contract is to produce gallium arsenide solar cells of 10% conversion efficiency in films of less than 10 micrometers thick which have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition on graphite or tungsten coated graphite substrates. Major efforts during this quarter were directed to: (1) the optimization of the deposition of gallium arsenide films of 10 ..mu..m thickness or less on tungsten/graphic substrates, (2) the investigation of the effectiveness of various grain boundary passivation techniques, (3) the deposition of tantalum pentoxide by ion beam sputtering as an antireflection coating, (4) the deposition of gallium aluminium arsenide by the organometallic process, and (5) the fabrication and characterization of large area Schottky barrier type solar cells from gallium arsenide films of about 10 ..mu..m thickness. Various grain boundary passivation techniques, such as the anodic oxidation, thermal oxidation, and ruthenium treatment, have been investigated. The combination of thermal oxidation and ruthenium treatment has been used to fabricate Schottky barrier type solar cells. Large area MOS solar cells of 9 cm/sup 2/ area with AMl efficiency of 8.5% have been fabricated from ruthenium treated gallium arsenide films of 10 ..mu..m thickness. The construction of the apparatus for the deposition of gallium aluminum arsenide by the organometallic process has been completed. The deposition of good quality tantalum pentoxide film as an antireflection coating has been carried out by the ion beam sputtering technique. The short-circuit current density and AMl efficiency of the solar cells are increased by approximately 60%, with a slight increase in the open-circuit voltage. Details are presented. (WHK)

Chu, S. S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Gallium arsenide thin films on tungsten/graphite substrates. Phase II. Quarterly project report No. 2, December 1, 1977-February 28, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this contract are to investigate thin films of gallium arsenide on tungsten/graphite substrates and to prepare solar cells with an AM1 efficiency of 6% or higher by August 1978. Efforts during this quarter have been directed to: (1) the deposition and characterization of gallium arsenide films on tungsten/graphite substrates by the arsenic and arsine processes, (2) the construction and operation of an apparatus for the deposition of titanium dioxide films, and (3) the fabrication and evaluation of MOS solar cells on tungsten/graphite substrates. Gallium arsenide films have been deposited on tungsten/graphite substrates by the reaction of gallium, hydrogen chloride, and arsenic in a hydrogen flow. The structural and electrical properties of these films are very similar to those obtained by the arsine process. The initial stage of the deposition of gallium arsenide films on tungsten/graphite substrates has been investigated by the scanning electron microscopy.

Chu, S.S.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Dynamics of formation of photoresponse in a detector structure made of gallium arsenide  

SciTech Connect

The influence of capture effects on the characteristics of detectors of the ionizing radiation based on semi-insulating gallium arsenide is considered. Generation of nonequilibrium electrons and holes along the entire thickness of the active region was performed under illumination with an infrared light-emitting diode with a wavelength of 0.9 {mu}m. In this case, the situation emerging in the device structure under the effect of X-ray radiation or a high-energy electron beam was simulated. It is shown that the variation in the shape of the output signal with time in this case is caused by variation in the electric field profile due to the capture of holes at deep centers in gallium arsenide. An absolutely different distribution of the electric field emerges in the structure under irradiation of a semitransparent cathode of the structure with a red light-emitting diode, emission of which penetrates into the active region for mere 1 {mu}m. In this case, the transformation of the electric field is caused by the capture of electrons. Under the prolonged effect of such radiation, a space-charge-limited current mode emerges in the device.

Ayzenshtat, G. I., E-mail: ayzen@mail.tomsknet.ru; Lelekov, M. A.; Tolbanov, O. P. [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Single event upsets in gallium arsenide pseudo-complementary MESFET logic  

SciTech Connect

An introduction to gallium arsenide (GaAs) Pseudo-Complementary MESFET Logic (PCML) circuits is presented. PCML was developed to reduce the sensitivity of high-speed GaAs logic to radiation-induced single event upsets (SEUs). Experiments for testing the single-event upset (SEU) sensitivity of GaAs PCML integrated circuits (ICs) are described. The results of the experiments are analyzed. This new type of high-speed, low-power, GaAs logic provides decreased sensitivity to SEUs compared to more traditional circuit designs such as Directly-Coupled FET Logic (DCFL). PCML is fully compatible with existing GaAs E/D MESFET fabrication processes, such as those commonly used to make DCFL.

Fouts, D.J.; Wolfe, K.; Van Dyk, S.E. [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Weatherford, T.R. [SFA Inc., Landover, MD (United States); McMorrow, D.; Melinger, J.S.; Tran, L.H.; Campbell, A.B. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Outdoor Performance of a Thin-Film Gallium-Arsenide Photovoltaic Module  

SciTech Connect

We deployed a 855 cm2 thin-film, single-junction gallium arsenide (GaAs) photovoltaic (PV) module outdoors. Due to its fundamentally different cell technology compared to silicon (Si), the module responds differently to outdoor conditions. On average during the test, the GaAs module produced more power when its temperature was higher. We show that its maximum-power temperature coefficient, while actually negative, is several times smaller in magnitude than that of a Si module used for comparison. The positive correlation of power with temperature in GaAs is due to temperature-correlated changes in the incident spectrum. We show that a simple correction based on precipitable water vapor (PWV) brings the photocurrent temperature coefficient into agreement with that measured by other methods and predicted by theory. The low operating temperature and small temperature coefficient of GaAs give it an energy production advantage in warm weather.

Silverman, T. J.; Deceglie, M. G.; Marion, B.; Cowley, S.; Kayes, B.; Kurtz, S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

An experiment to test the viability of a gallium-arsenide cathode in a SRF electron gun  

SciTech Connect

Strained gallium arsenide cathodes are used in electron guns for the production of polarized electrons. In order to have a sufficient quantum efficiency lifetime of the cathode the vacuum in the gun must be 10{sup -11} Torr or better, so that the cathode is not destroyed by ion back bombardment or through contamination with residual gases. All successful polarized guns are DC guns, because such vacuum levels can not be obtained in normal conducting RF guns. A superconductive RF gun may provide a sufficient vacuum level due to cryo-pumping of the cavity walls. We report on the progress of our experiment to test such a gun with normal GaAs-Cs crystals.

Kewisch,J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.; Wu, Q.; Todd, R.; Wang, E.; Bluem, H.; Holmes, D.; Schultheiss, T.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

15

GALLIUM ARSENIDE SEMICONDUCTOR-BASED NEUTRON DETECTOR  

NEUTRON DETECTOR BENEFITS Portable, ... High Flux Isotope Reactor and Spallation Neutron Source. Several Homeland Security. LINKS TO ONLINE ...

16

Monolithic series-connected gallium arsenide converter development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report the development of monolithic GaAs photovoltaic devices intended to convert light generated by a laser or other bright source to electricity. The converters described here can provide higher operating voltage than is possible using a single-junction converter, owing to use of a monolithic circuit that forms a planar series-connected string of single-junction sub-cells. This planar monolithic circuit is arranged to deliver the desired voltage and current during operation at the maximum power point. The paper describes two-, six-, and twelve-junction converters intended for illumination by a laser diode with a wavelength of 0.8 {mu}m. Design and characterization data are presented for optical power in the range of 100 mW to 1 W. The best conversion efficiency exceeds 50%. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Spitzer, M.B.; McClelland, R.W.; Dingle, B.D.; Dingle, J.E.; Hill, D.S. (Kopin Corp., Taunton, MA (United States)); Rose, B.H. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Session B: Gallium Arsenide Processing Room: University Center ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report thin film InP based resonant tunneling diodes (RTD) and tunneling hot electron transfer amplifiers (THETA) contact bonded to silicon substates.

18

Selective growth experiments on gallium arsenide (100) surfaces patterned using UV-nanoimprint lithography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a nanoimprint lithography (NIL) process and subsequent solid-source molecular beam epitaxy (SSMBE) growth of III-V semiconductors on patterned substrates. In particular, growth of GaAs, GaInAs, and GaInP, and effects of growth temperature ... Keywords: Molecular beam epitaxy, Nanoimprint lithography, Patterned substrates, Selective growth

A. Tukiainen; J. Viheril; T. Niemi; T. Rytknen; J. Kontio; M. Pessa

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Gallium arsenide-based ternary compounds and multi-band-gap solar cell research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aim of this contract is the achievement of a high-efficiency, low-cost solar cell. The basic approach to the problem is centered upon the heteroepitaxial growth of a III-V compound material onto a single-crystal silicon wafer. The growth technique employed is metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The silicon wafer may serve as a mechanical substrate and ohmic contact for a single-junction device, or may contain a p-n junction of its own and form the bottom cell of a two junction tandem solar cell structure. The III-V material for the single-junction case is GaAs and for the two-junction case is either GaAlAs or GaAsP, either material having the proper composition to yield a band gap of approximately 1.7 eV. Results achieved in this contract include the following: (1) a 17.6% efficient GaAs-on-Si solar cell; (2) an 18.5% efficient GaAs-on-Si concentrator solar cell at 400 suns; (3) a 24.8% efficient GaAs-on-GaAs solar cell; (4) a 28.7% efficient GaAs-on-GaAs concentrator solar cell at 200 suns; (5) measurement of the effects of dislocation density and emitter doping on GaAs cells; and (6) improvements in the growth process to achieve reproducible thin AlGaAs window layers with low recombination velocities and environmental stability.

Vernon, S. (Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Sparse gallium arsenide to silicon metal waferbonding for heterogeneous monolithic microwave integrated circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New York Master of Science, Electrical Engineering (AppliedYork Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering RochesterElectronic Thin Film Science: For Electrical Engineers and

Bickford, Justin Robert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Active devices for high temperature microcircuitry. [Silicon and gallium arsenide devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of a program to develop high temperature electronics for geothermal well instrumentation, a number of solid state diode and transistor types were characterized from room temperature to 300/sup 0/C. The temperature dependence and aging stability of transport and leakage properties were measured. Included in the study were silicon diodes, bipolar transistors, JFETs, MOSFETs, and GaAs MESFETs and JFETs. In summary the results are: diodes and bipolar transistors became extremely leaky at high temperature and are therefore of limited use; silicon MOSFETs and GaAs devices showed unacceptable aging instabilities at high temperatures; silicon JFETs from certain manufacturers were sufficiently stable and had suitable temperature dependent characteristics so that operational circuits could be made. Comparisons were made of experimental device characteristics and those predicted by theory. The theoretical calculations were done using standard equations revised to include appropriate temperature dependent parameters. Close agreement between theory and experiment was found, indicating that unexpected high temperature effects were insignificant. In order to facilitate the use of devices in high temperature hybrids, it was necessary to develop bonding and prescreening techniques. A large variance of JFET 300/sup 0/C operating parameters was found even within a single production lot. Consequently, high temperature prescreening allowed each circuit to be specifically ''pretuned.'' Standard solder, epoxy, and chip and wire attachment technologies were not functional at 300/sup 0/C. Gold-germanium solder, aluminum wire to DuPont 9910 gold film, and diffusion barrier pads were developed to allow high temperature attachment.

Palmer, D.W.; Draper, B.L.; McBrayer, J.D.; White, K.R.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Sparse gallium arsenide to silicon metal waferbonding for heterogeneous monolithic microwave integrated circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and V. I. Tsimbal, Electrical Resistivity of Pd-In Alloys,and V. I. Tsimbal, Electrical Resistivity of Pd-In Alloys,and V. I. Tsimbal, Electrical Resistivity of Pd-In Alloys,

Bickford, Justin Robert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Doping of gallium nitride using disilane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: disilane, gallium nitride, metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, organometallic vapor phase epitaxy, silicon doping

A. E. Wickenden; L. B. Rowland; K. Doverspike; D. K. Gaskill; J. A. Freitas, Jr.; D. S. Simons; P. H. Chi

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Gallium interactions with Zircaloy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High fluence ion implantation of Ga ions was conducted ics. on heated Zircaloy-4 in the range of [] Ga ions/[]. Surface effects were studied using SEM and electron microphone analysis. The depth profile of Ga in the Zircaloy was characterized with Rutherford backscattering and SIMS techniques. Results indicate that the Zirc-4 is little affected up to a fluency of [] Ga ions/[]. After implantation of [] Ga ions/[], sub-grain features on the order of 2 gm were observed which may be due to intermetallic compound formation between Ga and Zr. For the highest fluency implant, Ga content in the Zirc-4 reached a saturation value of between 30 and 40 atomic %; significant enhanced diffusion was observed but gallium was not seen to concentrate at grain boundaries.

West, Michael Keith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Gallium Nitride nanowires: synthesis, contacts, electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Gallium Nitride nanowires: synthesis, contacts, electron transport, mechanical resonators, and defects. John E. Fischer University of Pennsylvania. ...

26

Evaluation of critical materials for five advanced design photovoltaic cells with an assessment of indium and gallium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to identify potential material supply constraints due to the large-scale deployment of five advanced photovoltaic (PV) cell designs, and to suggest strategies to reduce the impacts of these production capacity limitations and potential future material shortages. This report presents the results of the screening of the five following advanced PV cell designs: polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide frontwall, polycrystalline gallium arsenide MIS, and advanced concentrator-500X. Each of these five cells is screened individually assuming that they first come online in 1991, and that 25 GWe of peak capacity is online by the year 2000. A second computer screening assumes that each cell first comes online in 1991 and that each cell has 5 GWe of peak capacity by the year 2000, so that the total online cpacity for the five cells is 25 GWe. Based on a review of the preliminary basline screening results, suggestions were made for varying such parameters as the layer thickness, cell production processes, etc. The resulting PV cell characterizations were then screened again by the CMAP computer code. Earlier DOE sponsored work on the assessment of critical materials in PV cells conclusively identtified indium and gallium as warranting further investigation as to their availability. Therefore, this report includes a discussion of the future availability of gallium and indium. (WHK)

Watts, R.L.; Gurwell, W.E.; Jamieson, W.M.; Long, L.W.; Pawlewicz, W.T.; Smith, S.A.; Teeter, R.R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

P-type gallium nitride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

28

P-type gallium nitride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Montara, CA); Fu, Tracy (Berkeley, CA); Ross, Jennifer (Pleasanton, CA); Chan, James (Berkeley, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Electrochemical Solution Growth: Gallium Nitride Crystal ...  

... and economical bulk gallium nirtide (GaN) substrates needed to meet the performance requirements of high-efficiency LED and high-power transistors.

30

Decreased gallium uptake in acute hematogenous osteomyelitis  

SciTech Connect

Decreased radiopharmaceutical uptake was noted on both bone and gallium scans in the case of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis of the right ilium (acetabular roof). This combination of findings is probably rare. The mechanism of decreased gallium uptake is unknown, but may be related to decreased blood flow.

Ang, J.G.; Gelfand, M.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

First principles predictions of intrinsic defects in aluminum arsenide, AlAs : numerical supplement.  

SciTech Connect

This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in aluminum arsenide, AlAs, as computed by density functional theory. This Report serves as a numerical supplement to the results published in: P.A. Schultz, 'First principles predictions of intrinsic defects in Aluminum Arsenide, AlAs', Materials Research Society Symposia Proceedings 1370 (2011; SAND2011-2436C), and intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models.

Schultz, Peter Andrew

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Bismuth in gallium arsenide: Structural and electronic properties of GaAs{sub 1-x}Bi{sub x} alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural and electronic properties of cubic GaAs{sub 1-x}Bi{sub x} alloys with bismuth concentration 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0 are studied using the 'special quasi-random structures' (SQS) approach of Zunger along with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation (EV-GGA). The lattice constant, bulk modulus, derivative of bulk modulus and energy gap vary with bismuth concentration nonlinearly. The present calculations show that the band gap decreases substantially with increasing bismuth concentration and that spin-orbit coupling influences the nature of bonding at high Bi concentrations. - Graphical abstract: Bowing effect of spin-orbit split-off band values versus Bi content with and without spin-orbit coupling for GaAs{sub 1-x}Bi{sub x} (at x=0.25, 0.50 and 0.75). Calculations are done with GGA. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural and electronic properties of GaAs{sub 1-x}Bi{sub x} alloys were studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present results of lattice constant, energy gap, bulk modulus and derivative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The band gap decreases substantially with increasing Bi concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculations of the density of states and charge densities are also presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have performed calculations without and with spin-orbit coupling.

Reshak, Ali Hussain, E-mail: maalidph@yahoo.co.uk [School of Complex Systems, FFWP-South Bohemia University, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); School of Material Engineering, Malaysia University of Perlis, P.O Box 77, d/a Pejabat Pos Besar, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Kamarudin, H. [School of Material Engineering, Malaysia University of Perlis, P.O Box 77, d/a Pejabat Pos Besar, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Auluck, S. [National Physical Laboratory Dr. KS Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Kityk, I.V. [Electrical Engineering Department, Technological University of Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 17/19, Czestochowa (Poland)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Characterizing organometallic-vapor-phase-epitaxy-grown indium gallium nitride islands on gallium nitride for light emitting diode applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The indium-gallium-nitride on gallium-nitride (InGaN/GaN) materials system is a promising candidate for providing a high intensity, high efficiency solution to the yet unsolved problem of (more)

Anderson, Kathy Perkins Jenkins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Method for Plutonium-Gallium Separation by Anodic Dissolution of a Solid Plutonium-Gallium Alloy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Purified plutonium and gallium are efficiently recovered from a solid plutonium-gallium (Pu-Ga) alloy by using an electrorefining process. The solid Pu-Ga alloy is the cell anode, preferably placed in a moving basket within the electrolyte. As the surface of the Pu-Ga anode is depleted in plutonium by the electrotransport of the plutonium to a cathode, the temperature of the electrolyte is sufficient to liquify the surface, preferably at about 500 C, resulting in a liquid anode layer substantially comprised of gallium. The gallium drips from the liquified surface and is collected below the anode within the electrochemical cell. The transported plutonium is collected on the cathode surface and is recovered.

Miller, William E.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

35

Gallium-positive Lyme disease myocarditis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the course of a work-up for fever of unknown origin associated with intermittent arrhythmias, a gallium scan was performed which revealed diffuse myocardial uptake. The diagnosis of Lyme disease myocarditis subsequently was confirmed by serologic titers. One month following recovery from the acute illness, the abnormal myocardial uptake completely resolved.

Alpert, L.I.; Welch, P.; Fisher, N.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Solar cell with a gallium nitride electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar cell which comprises a body of silicon having a P-N junction therein with a transparent conducting N-type gallium nitride layer as an ohmic contact on the N-type side of the semiconductor exposed to solar radiation.

Pankove, Jacques I. (Princeton, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Biological availability of nickel arsenides: toxic effects of particulate Ni/sub 5/As/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect

Considerations of (1) oil shale retort operating conditions, (2) oil shale elemental composition, (3) nickel and arsenic physico-chemical properties, and (4) oil shale matrix structure lead to the suggestion that nickel arsenides may be formed during the oil shale retorting process. The biological effects of nickel arsenides have not been previously studied. However, similarities between nickel subarsenide and nickel subsulfide and nickel subselenimide, both of which are known potent carcinogens, have caused concern that nickel arsenides may have adverse effects on biological systems. To determine if fugitive nickel arsenides from an oil shale retort could pose a threat to personnel in the workplace or to other living organisms in the environment, a program to study the toxicity of nickel arsenides has been initiated. Five stable nickel arsenides (Ni/sub 5/As/sub 2/, Ni/sub 2/As, Ni/sub 11/As/sub 8/, NiAs, and NiAs/sub 2/) and nickel arsenic sulfide (NiAsS) are considered possible species for study.

Gurley, L.R.; Tobey, R.A.; Valdez, J.G.; Halleck, M.S.; Barham, S.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease, 45 patients with various glomerulopathies, excluding lupus nephritis and renal vasculitis, were studied. Persistent renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive scintigram, was graded as + (less than), ++ (equal to), and +++ (greater than) the hepatic uptake. Positive scintigrams were seen in ten of 16 cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, six of 11 cases of proliferative glomerulonephritis, and one case of minimal change, and one of two cases of membranous nephropathy; also in three of six cases of sickle glomerulopathy, two cases of diabetic neuropathy, one of two cases of amyloidosis, and one case of mild chronic allograft rejection. The 25 patients with positive scans were younger than the 20 with negative scans (31 +/- 12 v 42 +/- 17 years; P less than 0.01), and exhibited greater proteinuria (8.19 +/- 7.96 v 2.9 +/- 2.3 S/d; P less than 0.01) and lower serum creatinine values (2 +/- 2 v 4.1 +/- 2.8 mg/dL; P less than 0.01). The amount of proteinuria correlated directly with the intensity grade of the gallium image (P less than 0.02), but there was no correlation between the biopsy diagnosis and the outcome of the gallium scan. It was concluded that gallium scintigraphy is not useful in the differential diagnosis of the glomerular diseases under discussion. Younger patients with good renal function and heavy proteinuria are likely to have a positive renal scintigram regardless of the underlying glomerulopathy.

Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Levy, P.S.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Controlled VLS Growth of Indium, Gallium and Tin Oxide Nanowires via Chemical Vapor Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technique to synthesize indium oxide, gallium oxide, and tinmaterial systems such as indium oxide, gallium oxide and tinand Characterization A. Indium Oxide Nanowires Indium oxide

Johnson, M.C.; Aloni, S.; McCready, D.E.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Survey of the market, supply and availability of gallium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to assess the present consumption and supply of gallium, its potential availability in the satellite power system (SPS) implementation time frame, and commercial and new processing methods for increasing the production of gallium. Findings are reported in detail. The findings strongly suggest that with proper long range planning adequate gallium would be available from free-enterprise world supplies of bauxite for SPS implementation.

Rosi, F.D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Interactions of Zircaloy cladding with gallium: 1998 midyear status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program has been implemented to evaluate the effect of gallium in mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel derived from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium on Zircaloy cladding performance. The objective is to demonstrate that low levels of gallium will not compromise the performance of the MOX fuel system in a light-water reactor. The graded, four-phase experimental program was designed to evaluate the performance of prototypic Zircaloy cladding materials against (1) liquid gallium (Phase 1), (2) various concentrations of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Phase 2), (3) centrally heated surrogate fuel pellets with expected levels of gallium (Phase 3), and (4) centrally heated prototypic MOX fuel pellets (Phase 4). This status report describes the results of a series of tests for Phases 1 and 2. Three types of tests are being performed: (1) corrosion, (2) liquid metal embrittlement, and (3) corrosion-mechanical. These tests will determine corrosion mechanisms, thresholds for temperature and concentration of gallium that may delineate behavioral regimes, and changes in the mechanical properties of Zircaloy. Initial results have generally been favorable for the use of WG-MOX fuel. The MOX fuel cladding, Zircaloy, does react with gallium to form intermetallic compounds at {ge}300 C; however, this reaction is limited by the mass of gallium and is therefore not expected to be significant with a low level (parts per million) of gallium in the MOX fuel. Although continued migration of gallium into the initially formed intermetallic compound can result in large stresses that may lead to distortion, this was shown to be extremely unlikely because of the low mass of gallium or gallium oxide present and expected clad temperatures below 400 C. Furthermore, no evidence for grain boundary penetration by gallium has been observed.

Wilson, D.F.; DiStefano, J.R.; Strizak, J.P.; King, J.F.; Manneschmidt, E.T.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Interactions of zircaloy cladding with gallium -- 1997 status  

SciTech Connect

A four phase program has been implemented to evaluate the effect of gallium in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel derived from weapons grade (WG) plutonium on Zircaloy cladding performance. The objective is to demonstrate that low levels of gallium will not compromise the performance of the MOX fuel system in LWR. This graded, four phase experimental program will evaluate the performance of prototypic Zircaloy cladding materials against: (1) liquid gallium (Phase 1), (2) various concentrations of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Phase 2), (3) centrally heated surrogate fuel pellets with expected levels of gallium (Phase 3), and (4) centrally heated prototypic MOX fuel pellets (Phase 4). This status report describes the results of an initial series of tests for phases 1 and 2. Three types of tests are being performed: (1) corrosion, (2) liquid metal embrittlement (LME), and (3) corrosion mechanical. These tests are designed to determine the corrosion mechanisms, thresholds for temperature and concentration of gallium that may delineate behavioral regimes, and changes in mechanical properties of Zircaloy. Initial results have generally been favorable for the use of WG-MOX fuel. The MOX fuel cladding, Zircaloy, does react with gallium to form intermetallic compounds at {ge} 300 C; however, this reaction is limited by the mass of gallium and is therefore not expected to be significant with a low level (in parts per million) of gallium in the MOX fuel. While continued migration of gallium into the initially formed intermetallic compound results in large stresses that can lead to distortion, this is also highly unlikely because of the low mass of gallium or gallium oxide present and expected clad temperatures below 400 C. Furthermore, no evidence for grain boundary penetration by gallium has been observed.

Wilson, D.F.; DiStefano, J.R.; King, J.F.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Strizak, J.P.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward...

44

Gallium uptake by transferrin and interaction with receptor 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iron acquisition Gallium uptake Temperature-jump kinetics .... Part of this thera- peutic action is ..... are all considered as hard metals [10] and are com-.

45

Cold Atoms Could Replace Hot Gallium in Focused Ion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The high energies needed to focus gallium for milling tasks end up burying small amounts in the sample, contaminating the material. ...

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

46

Interactions of gallium with zircaloy cladding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mastering system was constructed and installed on the current low energy accelerator of the Ion Beam Laboratory in the Department of Nuclear Engineering. Galium was implanted into heated zircaloy targets at nuances of 3x10?, 1x10? and 1x10? ions/cm. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) using 260 keV alpha particles was used to determine the initial estimates of gallium concentration. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and backscattered electron (BSE) imaging was performed to examine concentration and surface morphology, respectively. Zirconium was then implanted to simulate the radiation effects of fission fragments at a fluency of 1.0x10? Zr atoms/cm. RBS results showed enhanced diffusion and indicate saturation of the gallium concentration. Results also showed the possible formation of a Ga-Zr compound.

Mitchell, Lee Josey

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Behavior of Zircaloy Cladding in the Presence of Gallium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has established a dual-track approach to the disposition of plutonium arising from the dismantling of nuclear weapons. Both immobilization and reactor-based mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel technologies are being evaluated. The reactor-based MOX fuel option requires assessment of the potential impact of concentrations of gallium (on the order of 1 to 10 ppm), not present in conventional MOX fuel, on cladding material performance. An experimental program was designed to evaluate the performance of prototypic Zircaloy cladding materials against (1) liquid gallium, and (2) various concentrations of G~03. Three types of tests were performed: (1) corrosion, (2) liquid metal embrittlement, and (3) corrosion-mechanical. These tests were to determine corrosion mechanisms, thresholds for temperature and concentration of gallium that delineate behavioral regimes, and changes in the mechanical properties of Zircaloy. Results have generally been favorable for the use of weapons-grade (WG) MOX fhel. The Zircaloy cladding does react with gallium to form intermetallic compounds at >3000 C; however, this reaction is limited by the mass of gallium and is therefore not expected to be significant with a low level (parts per million) of gallium in the MOX fuel. Furthermore, no evidence for grain boundary penetration by gallium or liquid metal embrittlement was observed.

DiStefano, J.R.; King, J.F.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Strizak, J.P.; Wilson, D.F.

1998-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Interactions of Zircaloy Cladding with Gallium: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has established a dual-track approach to the disposition of plutonium arising from the dismantling of nuclear weapons. Both immobilization and reactor-based mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel technologies are being evaluated. The reactor-based MOX fuel option requires assessment of the potential impact of concentrations of gallium (on the order of 1 to 10 ppm), not present in conventional MOX fhel, on cladding material performance. Three previous repmts"3 identified several compatibility issues relating to the presence of gallium in MOX fuel and its possible reaction with fiel cladding. Gallium initially present in weapons-grade (WG) plutonium is largely removed during processing to produce MOX fhel. After blending the plutonium with uranium, only 1 to 10 ppm gallium is expected in the sintered MOX fuel. Gallium present as gallium oxide (G~OJ could be evolved as the suboxide (G~O). Migration of the evolved G~O and diffusion of gallium in the MOX matrix along thermal gradients could lead to locally higher concentrations of G~03. Thus, while an extremely low concentration of gallium in MOX fiel almost ensures a lack of significant interaction of gallium whh Zircaloy fhel cladding, there remains a small probability that corrosion effects will not be negligible. General corrosion in the form of surface alloying resulting from formation of intermetallic compounds between Zircaloy and gallium should be ma& limited and, therefore, superficial because of the expected low ratio of gallium to the surface area or volume of the Zircaloy cladding. Although the expected concentration of gallium is low and there is very limited volubility of gallium in zirconium, especially at temperatures below 700 "C,4 grain boundary penetration and liquid metal embrittlement (LME) are forms of localized corrosion that were also considered. One fuel system darnage mechanism, pellet clad interaction, has led to some failure of the Zircaloy cladding in light-water reactors (LWRS). This has been attributed to stresses in the cladding and one or more aggressive fission products. Stress corrosion cracking by iodines' 6 and LME by cadmium7>8 have been reported, and it is known that Zircaloy can be embrittled by some low-melting metals, (e.g., mercury).g LME is a form of environmentally induced embrittlement that can induce cracking or loss of ductility. LME requties wetting and a tensile stress, but it does not require corrosion penetration. Experimentally, it has been demonstrated that gallium can cause embrittlement of some alloys (e.g., aluminum) at low temperatures,'"' ] ] but experiments relative to LME of zirconium by gallium have been limited and inconclusive.*2 This report describes a series of tests designed to establish the effects of low levels of residual gallium in WG-MOX fhel on its compatibility with Zircaloy. In addition, to establish damage mechanisms it was important to understand types of cladding interactions and available stiety margins with respect to gallium concentration.

D.F. Wilson; E.T. Manneschmidt; J.F. King; J.P. Strizak; J.R. DiStefano

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Effect of oxidation on the Mechanical Properties of Liquid Gallium and Eutectic Gallium-Indium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid metals exhibit remarkable mechanical properties, in particular large surface tension and low viscosity. However, these properties are greatly affected by oxidation when exposed to air. We measure the viscosity, surface tension, and contact angle of gallium (Ga) and a eutectic gallium-indium alloy (eGaIn) while controlling such oxidation by surrounding the metal with an acid bath of variable concentration. Rheometry measurements reveal a yield stress directly attributable to an oxide skin that obscures the intrinsic behavior of the liquid metals. We demonstrate how the intrinsic viscosity can be obtained with precision through a scaling technique that collapses low- and high-Reynolds number data. Measuring surface tension with a pendant drop method, we show that the oxide skin generates a surface stress that mimics surface tension and develop a simple model to relate this to the yield stress obtained from rheometry. We find that yield stress, surface tension, and contact angle all transition from solid-...

Xu, Qin; Guo, Qiti; Jaeger, Heinrich; Brown, Eric

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Gallium arsenide-based ternary compounds and multi-band-gap solar cell research. Annual subcontract report, 15 April 1988--14 June 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aim of this contract is the achievement of a high-efficiency, low-cost solar cell. The basic approach to the problem is centered upon the heteroepitaxial growth of a III-V compound material onto a single-crystal silicon wafer. The growth technique employed is metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The silicon wafer may serve as a mechanical substrate and ohmic contact for a single-junction device, or may contain a p-n junction of its own and form the bottom cell of a two junction tandem solar cell structure. The III-V material for the single-junction case is GaAs and for the two-junction case is either GaAlAs or GaAsP, either material having the proper composition to yield a band gap of approximately 1.7 eV. Results achieved in this contract include the following: (1) a 17.6% efficient GaAs-on-Si solar cell; (2) an 18.5% efficient GaAs-on-Si concentrator solar cell at 400 suns; (3) a 24.8% efficient GaAs-on-GaAs solar cell; (4) a 28.7% efficient GaAs-on-GaAs concentrator solar cell at 200 suns; (5) measurement of the effects of dislocation density and emitter doping on GaAs cells; and (6) improvements in the growth process to achieve reproducible thin AlGaAs window layers with low recombination velocities and environmental stability.

Vernon, S. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Gallium arsenide-based ternary compounds and multi-band-gap solar cell research. Final subcontract report, 1 April 1988--31 March 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work to achieve a high-efficiency, low-cost solar cell. The basic approach to the problem is centered upon the heteroepitaxial growth of a III-V compound material onto a single-crystal silicon wafer. The growth technique employed throughout this work is metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The silicon wafer may serve as a mechanical substrate and ohmic contact for a single-junction device, or it may contain a p-n junction of its own and form the bottom cell of a two-junction tandem solar cell structure. The III-V material for the single-junction case is GaAs, and for the two-junction case it is either GaAlAs or GaAsP, either material having the proper composition to yield a band gap of approximately 1.7 eV. Results achieved in this contract include (1) a 17.6%-efficient GaAs-on-Si solar cell; (2) an 18.5%-efficient GaAs-on-Si concentrator solar cell at 400 suns; (3) a 24.8%-efficient GaAs-on-GaAs solar cell; (4) a 28.7%-efficient GaAs-on-GaAs concentrator solar cell at 200 suns; (5) the measurement of the effects of dislocation density and emitter doping on GaAs cells; and (6) improvements in the growth process to achieve reproducible thin AlGaAs window layers with low recombination velocities and environmental stability.

Vernon, S. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Thin films of gallium arsenide on low-cost substrates. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8 and topical report No. 3, April 2-July 1, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The seventh quarter of work on the contract is summarized. The metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) technique has been applied to the growth of thin films of GaAs and GaAlAs on inexpensive polycrystalline or amorphous substrate materials (primarily glasses and metals) for use in fabrication of large-area low-cost photovoltaic device structures. Trimethylgallium (TMG), arsine (AsH/sub 3/), and trimethylaluminum (TMAl) are mixed in appropriate concentrations at room temperature in the gaseous state and pyrolyzed at the substrate, which is heated in a vertical reactor chamber to temperatures of 725 to 750/sup 0/C, to produce the desired film composition and properties. The technical activities during the quarter were concentrated on (1) a continuing evaluation of various graphite materials as possible substrates for MO-CVD growith of the polycrystalline GaAs solar cells; (2) attempts to improve the quality (especially the grain size) of polycrystalline GaAs films on Mo sheet and Mo/glass substrates by using HCl vapor during the MO-CVD growith process; (3) further studies of the transport properties of polycrystalline GaAs films, wth emphasis on n-type films; (4) continuing investigations of the properties of p-n junctions in polycrystalline GaAs, with emphasis on the formation and properties of p/sup +//n/n/sup +/ deposited structures; and (5) assembling apparatus and establishing a suitable technique for producing TiO/sub 2/ layers for use as AR coatings on GaAs cells. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Ruth, R.P.; Dapkus, P.D.; Dupuis, R.D.; Johnson, R.E.; Manasevit, H.M.; Moudy, L.A.; Yang, J.J.; Yingling, R.D.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Single-Crystalline Thin Film Used in Photovoltaics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Single-crystalline thin films are made from gallium arsenide (GaAs), a compound semiconductor that is a mixture of gallium and arsenic.

54

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Gallium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zinc Zinc Previous Element (Zinc) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Germanium) Germanium Isotopes of the Element Gallium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 69 60.108% STABLE 71 39.892% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 56 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 57 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 58 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 59 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 60 70 milliseconds Electron Capture 98.40%

55

NIST: X-Ray Mass Attenuation Coefficients - Table 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Gafchromic Sensor, Tissue-Equivalent Gas, Methane Based. Gallium Arsenide, Tissue-Equivalent Gas, Propane Based. Glass ...

56

In-Plane Electronic Anisotropy of Underdoped ___122___ Fe-Arsenide Superconductors Revealed by Measurements of Detwinned Single Crystals  

SciTech Connect

The parent phases of the Fe-arsenide superconductors harbor an antiferromagnetic ground state. Significantly, the Neel transition is either preceded or accompanied by a structural transition that breaks the four fold symmetry of the high-temperature lattice. Borrowing language from the field of soft condensed matter physics, this broken discrete rotational symmetry is widely referred to as an Ising nematic phase transition. Understanding the origin of this effect is a key component of a complete theoretical description of the occurrence of superconductivity in this family of compounds, motivating both theoretical and experimental investigation of the nematic transition and the associated in-plane anisotropy. Here we review recent experimental progress in determining the intrinsic in-plane electronic anisotropy as revealed by resistivity, reflectivity and ARPES measurements of detwinned single crystals of underdoped Fe arsenide superconductors in the '122' family of compounds.

Fisher, Ian Randal

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

57

Effect of oxidation on the Mechanical Properties of Liquid Gallium and Eutectic Gallium-Indium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid metals exhibit remarkable mechanical properties, in particular large surface tension and low viscosity. However, these properties are greatly affected by oxidation when exposed to air. We measure the viscosity, surface tension, and contact angle of gallium (Ga) and a eutectic gallium-indium alloy (eGaIn) while controlling such oxidation by surrounding the metal with an acid bath of variable concentration. Rheometry measurements reveal a yield stress directly attributable to an oxide skin that obscures the intrinsic behavior of the liquid metals. We demonstrate how the intrinsic viscosity can be obtained with precision through a scaling technique that collapses low- and high-Reynolds number data. Measuring surface tension with a pendant drop method, we show that the oxide skin generates a surface stress that mimics surface tension and develop a simple model to relate this to the yield stress obtained from rheometry. We find that yield stress, surface tension, and contact angle all transition from solid-like to liquid behavior at the same critical acid concentration, thereby quantitatively confirming that the wettability of these liquid metals is due to the oxide skin.

Qin Xu; Nikolai Qudalov; Qiti Guo; Heinrich Jaeger; Eric Brown

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

58

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

59

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Wednesday, 21 December 2005 00:00 Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

60

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

62

Boron arsenide thin film solar cell development. Quarterly report No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large portion of the effort expended in the first quarter was devoted to the design, assembly, and testing of the film growth apparatus. The reactor has been completed and tested by depositing boron from diborane gas onto heated quartz substrates. The objective of this effort was to achieve film growth, which has been accomplished. Within the last month, attempts to grow boron arsenide films have been made by introducing both diborane and arsine into the reactor. Thin films have been grown on quartz and sapphire (alumina) substrates. Variations in film thickness, composition, degree of crystallinity, and conductivity have been observed as a result of variation of the deposition parameters, such as type and flow rate of carrier gases, substrate temperature, and substrate materials. X-ray analysis of several samples indicates that films containing boron and arsenic have been grown. No crystalline films have been produced to date. Electrical and optical measurements indicate some correlation between at least one of the films grown and the results achieved by Chu, et al. on BAs. Thus far, the electrical conductivity, film topography, optical absorption, index of refraction, impurity type, and photo-conductivity have been investigated on one sample. This material appears to be B/sub x/As/sub y/ and could be BAs. Further investigations will be required to be conclusive.

Boone, J.L.; Van Doren, T.P.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Preparation Of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Films For Solar Cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High quality thin films of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide useful in the production of solar cells are prepared by electrodepositing at least one of the constituent metals onto a glass/Mo substrate, followed by physical vapor deposition of copper and selenium or indium and selenium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2. Using an AC voltage of 1-100 KHz in combination with a DC voltage for electrodeposition improves the morphology and growth rate of the deposited thin film. An electrodeposition solution comprising at least in part an organic solvent may be used in conjunction with an increased cathodic potential to increase the gallium content of the electrodeposited thin film.

Bhattacharya, Raghu N. (Littleton, CO); Contreras, Miguel A. (Golden, CO); Keane, James (Lakewood, CO); Tennant, Andrew L. (Denver, CO), Tuttle, John R. (Denver, CO); Ramanathan, Kannan (Lakewood, CO); Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CO)

1998-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

64

Appraisal of lupus nephritis by renal imaging with gallium-67  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess the activity of lupus nephritis, 43 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were studied by gallium imaging. Delayed renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive result, was noted in 25 of 48 scans. Active renal disease was defined by the presence of hematuria, pyuria (10 or more red blood cells or white blood cells per high-power field), proteinuria (1 g or more per 24 hours), a rising serum creatinine level, or a recent biopsy specimen showing proliferative and/or necrotizing lesions involving more than 20 percent of glomeruli. Renal disease was active in 18 instances, inactive in 23, and undetermined in seven (a total of 48 scans). Sixteen of the 18 scans (89 percent) in patients with active renal disease showed positive findings, as compared with only four of 23 scans (17 percent) in patients with inactive renal disease (p less than 0.001). Patients with positive scanning results had a higher rate of hypertension (p = 0.02), nephrotic proteinuria (p = 0.01), and progressive renal failure (p = 0.02). Mild mesangial nephritis (World Health Organization classes I and II) was noted only in the patients with negative scanning results (p = 0.02) who, however, showed a higher incidence of severe extrarenal SLE (p = 0.04). It is concluded that gallium imaging is a useful tool in evaluating the activity of lupus nephritis.

Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Hryhorczuk, D.O.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Characteristics of graphene FET directly transformed from a resist pattern through interfacial graphitization of liquid gallium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We found that an extremely thin resist pattern on silicon dioxide can be directly transformed into a graphene field effect transistor (FET) channel via interfacial graphitization of liquid gallium. These patterned graphene FETs have p-type characteristics ... Keywords: Conductance, FET, Gallium, Graphene, Graphitization, Resist, Solid phase reaction

Jun-ichi Fujita; Ryuichi Ueki; Takuya Nishijima; Yosuke Miyazawa

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Measurement of achievable plutonium decontamination from gallium by means of PUREX solvent extraction  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the work described herein was to measure, experimentally, the achievable decontamination of plutonium from gallium by means of the PUREX solvent extraction process. Gallium is present in surplus weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) at a concentration of approximately 1 wt%. Plans are to dispose of surplus WG-Pu by converting it to UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. However, the presence of high concentrations of gallium in plutonium is a potential corrosion problem during the process of MOX fuel irradiation. The batch experiments performed in this study were designed to measure the capability of the PUREX solvent extraction process to separate gallium from plutonium under idealized conditions. Radioactive tracing of the gallium with {sup 72}Ga enabled the accurate measurement of low concentrations of extractable gallium. The experiments approximated the proposed flowsheet for WG-Pu purification, except that only one stage was used for each process: extraction, scrubbing, and stripping. With realistic multistage countercurrent systems, much more efficient separations are generally obtained. The gallium decontamination factor (DF) obtained after one extraction stage was about 3 x 10{sup 6}. After one scrub stage, all gallium measurements were less than the detection limit, which corresponded to DFs >5 x 10{sup 6}. All these values exceed a 10{sup 6} DF needed to meet a hypothetical 10-ppb gallium impurity limit in MOX fuel. The results of this study showed no inherent or fundamental problem with regard to removing gallium from plutonium.

Collins, E.D.; Campbell, D.O.; Felker, L.K.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Gallium phosphide high-temperature bipolar junction transistor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results are reported on the development of a high-temperature (> 350/sup 0/C) gallium phosphide bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for goethermal and other energy applications. This four-layer p/sup +/n/sup -/pp/sup +/ structure was fromed by liquid phase epitaxy using a supercooling technique to insure uniform nucleation of the thin layers. Magnesium was used as the p-type dopant to avoid excessive out-diffusion into the lightly doped base. By appropriate choice of electrodes, the device may also be driven as an n-channel junction field-effect transistor. The gallium phosphide BJT is observed to have a common-emitter current gain peaking in the range of 6 to 10 (for temperatures from 20/sup 0/C to 400/sup 0/C) and a room-temperature, punchthrough-limited, collector-emitter breakdown voltage of approximately -6V. Other parameters of interest include an f/sub/ = 400 KHz (at 20/sup 0/C) and a collector base leakage current = 200 ..mu..A (at 350/sup 0/C).

Zipperian, T.E.; Dawson, L.R.; Caffin, R.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Microsoft PowerPoint - Gallium Oxide_Ramana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gallium Oxide Nanostructures Gallium Oxide Nanostructures for High Temperature Sensors C.V. Ramana (PI) Evgeny Shafirovich (Co-PI) Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso Students: Ernesto Rubio (PhD); S.K. Samala (MS) A.K. Narayana Swamy (PhD); K. Abhilash (MS) Program Manager: Richard Dunst, NETL, DOE Project: DE-FE0007225 Project Period: 10/01/2011 to 09/31/2014 1 06/12/2013 DOE UCR/HBCU Conference, June 11-13, 2013 2  Introduction  Research Objectives  Experiments ► Synthesis ► Characterization  Results and Discussion ► Pure Ga 2 O 3 Thin Films ► W-doped Ga 2 O 3 Thin Films (Physical Methods)  Summary & Future Work 06/12/2013 DOE UCR/HBCU Conference, June 11-13, 2013 3 06/12/2013 DOE UCR/HBCU Conference, June 11-13, 2013 4 Energy Systems High-T High-T High-P High-P

69

Limits on nu_e and anti-nu_e disappearance from Gallium and reactor experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The deficit observed in the Gallium radioactive source experiments is interpreted as a possible indication of the disappearance of electron neutrinos. In the effective framework of two-neutrino mixing we obtain $\\sin^{2}2\\vartheta \\gtrsim 0.03$ and $\\Delta{m}^{2} \\gtrsim 0.1 \\text{eV}^{2}$. The compatibility of this result with the data of the Bugey and Chooz reactor short-baseline antineutrino disappearance experiments is studied. It is found that the Bugey data present a hint of neutrino oscillations with $0.02 \\lesssim \\sin^{2}2\\vartheta \\lesssim 0.08$ and $\\Delta{m}^{2} \\approx 1.8 \\text{eV}^{2}$, which is compatible with the Gallium allowed region of the mixing parameters. This hint persists in the combined analyses of Bugey and Chooz data, of Gallium and Bugey data, and of Gallium, Bugey, and Chooz data.

Mario A. Acero; Carlo Giunti; Marco Laveder

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

70

Size and shape dependence on melting temperature of gallium nitride nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of variation of the size and shape effect on the melting property of gallium nitride nanoparticles with their spherical and cylindrical geometrical feature is theoretically explored. A numerical thermodynamical model has been devoted for the ...

Paneerselvam Antoniammal; Dakshanamoorthy Arivuoli

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The radiation bio-effects of gallum-72 on leukemic cells via a gallium-transferrin complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved methods for treatment of leukemia would be advantageous for patients and the medical community. This thesis reports results of a study of the cytotoxicity of radiolabeled transferrin in cultured leukemic cells. K-562 cells, from an erythroleukemic cell line, were grown and growth curves were plotted for characterization. K-562 cells grew logarithmically from approximately 250,000 cells mL? to 700,000 cells mL? and display a doubling time of approximately 20-21 hours. K-562 cells were exposed to x rays at an absorbed dose of 0, 1, 2, and 4 gray. Growth curves were plotted to create a dose response curve. Percent-cell survival in this experiment, and all subsequent experiments, was determined based on the extrapolation of the growth curves to time zero, as compared to a control. An absorbed dose of 1, 2, and 4 gray corresponded to a survival of 77([]14)%, 45([]7.4)% and 20([]2.4)%, respectively. This cell line is relatively resistant to radiation. K-562 cells were exposed to a radioactive gallium-72/stable gallium nitrate mixture to determine the effect gallium-72 decay has on cell survival . Simultaneously, K-562 cells were exposed to a concentration of stable gallium nitrate equivalent to the total gallium concentration, radioactive and stable, of the gallium-72/stable gallium mixture. This allowed a comparison of radioactive and chemotoxic effects due to gallium-72 and stable gallium, respectively. Exposures to gallium-72, at an activity of 184.0 kBq mL?, and stable gallium nitrate, at a concentration of 116.7 []M, resulted in a cell survival of 61([]10.5)% and 75([]12. 1)%, respectively. The difference is small when error is taken into consideration. Therefore radioactivity had little effect on cell survival at a specific activity of 6.3 MBq mg?. To properly assess the cytotoxicity of gallium-72 the specific activity must be increased. To determine the effect of ape-transferrin on the cytotoxicity of gallium nitrate, K-562 cells were exposed to stable gallium nitrate and increasing amounts of apo-transferrin. Cells exposed to 115.0 []M gallium nitrate exhibited an 82([]8.8)% cell survival compared to 54([]6.9)% following exposure to 115.0 []M gallium nitrate and 3.75 []M apo-transferrin. Apo-transferrin presumably increases cellular uptake of gallium nitrate thereby increasing its cyctotoxic effects.

Forbes, Christen Douglas

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Study of liquid gallium at high pressure using synchrotron x-ray  

SciTech Connect

Liquid gallium has been studied at high pressure up to 2 GPa and ambient temperature in a diamond anvil cell using high energy synchrotron x-ray beam. The total x-ray scattering data of liquid gallium were collected up to Q = 12 A{sup -1} and analyzed using pair distribution functions (PDF). The results indicate that the first nearest neighbor peak and second nearest neighbor (shoulder) peak of PDF in liquid gallium does not change with pressure, whereas the higher order (i.e., third and fourth) nearest neighbor peaks shift towards shorter distance with increasing pressure. Reverse Monte Carlo modeling based on the observed data shows that the coordination number in the liquid gallium increases with pressure from 10.5 at 0.3 GPa to 11.6 at 2 GPa. An atomic arrangement similar to the crystalline phase of Ga(II) with coordination number of 12 is proposed for the locally dense-packed rigid unit in liquid gallium. The volume compression data derived from the structure modeling yield a bulk modulus of 12.1(6) GPa for liquid gallium.

Yu, Tony; Guo Quanzhong; Parise, John [Department of Geosciences, Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2100 (United States); Chen Jiuhua [Department of Geosciences, Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2100 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Center for the Study of Matters at Extreme Conditions, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Ehm, Lars [Department of Geosciences, Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2100 (United States); National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Huang Shu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Center for the Study of Matters at Extreme Conditions, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Luo Shengnian [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

High-Temperature Decomposition of Brnsted Acid Sites in Gallium-Substituted Zeolites  

SciTech Connect

The dehydroxylation of Broensted acid sites (BAS) in Ga-substituted zeolites was investigated at temperatures up to 850 C using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and mass spectrometry-temperature programmed desorption (MS-TPD). X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) revealed that the majority of gallium has tetrahedral coordination even after complete dehydroxylation. The interatomic gallium-oxygen distance and gallium coordination number determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) are consistent with gallium in tetrahedral coordination at low T (< 550 C). Upon heating Ga-Beta and Ga-ZSM5 to 850 C, analysis of the EXAFS showed that 70 and 80% of the gallium was still in tetrahedral coordination. The remainder of the gallium was found to be in octahedral coordination. No trigonal Ga atoms were observed. FTIR measurements carried out at similar temperatures show that the intensity of the OH vibration due to BAS has been eliminated. MS-TPD revealed that hydrogen in addition to water evolved from the samples during dehydroxylation. This shows that dehydrogenation in addition to dehydration is a mechanism that contributes to BAS decomposition. Dehydrogenation was further confirmed by exposing the sample to hydrogen to regenerate some of the BAS as monitored by FTIR and MS-TPD.

K Al-majnouni; N Hould; W Lonergan; D Vlachos; R Lobo

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

About the 12th International Conference on Metal Organic Vapor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... phosphide based materials; Gallium arsenide based materials; High brightness LEDs and solid state lighting; Growth of device structures: LEDs, laser diodes,...

76

The role of screening of the electron-phonon interaction in relaxation of photoexcited electron-hole plasma in semiconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of screening of the interaction of the electron-hole plasma with optical phonons is analytically evaluated by the example of gallium arsenide.

Kumekov, S. E. [Kazakh National Technical University (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: skumekov@mail.ru

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Universal Heat Conduction in the Iron Arsenide Superconductor KFe2As2: Evidence of a d-Wave State  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductivity ? of the iron arsenide superconductor KFe2As2 was measured down to 50 mK for a heat current parallel and perpendicular to the tetragonal c axis. A residual linear term at T?0, ?0/T is observed for both current directions, confirming the presence of nodes in the superconducting gap. Our value of ?0/T in the plane is equal to that reported by Dong et al. [ Phys. Rev. Lett. 104 087005 (2010)] for a sample whose residual resistivity ?0 was 10 times larger. This independence of ?0/T on impurity scattering is the signature of universal heat transport, a property of superconducting states with symmetry-imposed line nodes. This argues against an s-wave state with accidental nodes. It favors instead a d-wave state, an assignment consistent with five additional properties: the magnitude of the critical scattering rate ?c for suppressing Tc to zero; the magnitude of ?0/T, and its dependence on current direction and on magnetic field; the temperature dependence of ?(T).

Reid, J.-Ph.; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Juneau-Fecteau, A.; Gordon, R.T.; Rene de Cotret, S.; Doiron-Leyraud, N.; Saito, T.; Fukazawa, H.; Kohori, Y.; Kihou, K.; Lee, C.H.; Iyo, A.; Eisaki, H.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Taillefer, Louis

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

78

NREL preprints for the 23rd IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Topics covered include various aspects of solar cell fabrication and performance. Aluminium-gallium arsenides, cadmium telluride, amorphous silicon, and copper-indium-gallium selenides are all characterized in their applicability in solar cells.

Fitzgerald, M. [ed.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

(Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Chen, You-Xian (Midland, MI)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

(Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Chen, You-Xian (Midland, MI)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Electron backscatter diffraction of plutonium-gallium alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Los Alamos National Laboratory a recent experimental technique has been developed to characterize reactive metals, including plutonium arid cerium, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Microstructural characterization of plutonium and its alloys by EBSD had been previously elusive primarily because of the extreme toxicity and rapid surface oxidation rate associated with plutonium metal. The experimental techniques, which included ion-sputtering the metal surface using a scanning auger microprobe (SAM) followed by vacuum transfer of the sample from the SAM to the scanning electron microscope (SEM), used to obtain electron backscatter diffraction Kikuchi patterns (EBSPs) and orientation maps for plutonium-gallium alloys are described and the initial microstructural observations based on the analysis are discussed. Combining the SEM and EBSD observations, the phase transformation behavior between the {delta} and {var_epsilon} structures was explained. This demonstrated sample preparation and characterization technique is expected to be a powerful means to further understand phase transformation behavior, orientation relationships, and texlure in the complicated plutonium alloy systems.

Boehlert, C. J. (Carl J.); Zocco, T. G. (Thomas G.); Schulze, R. K. (Roland K.); Mitchell, J. N. (Jeremy N.); Pereyra, R. A. (Ramiro A.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Effect of magnetic field on the mechanical properties of magnetostrictive iron-gallium nanowires  

SciTech Connect

This study experimentally investigates the elastic properties of individual iron-gallium nanowires with and without an applied magnetic bias field. The experiments were conducted with a custom manipulator stage designed for use within a scanning electron microscope, where nanowires were mechanically tested both statically and dynamically. Experiments were also performed in the presence of a 20 Oe dc magnetic field in order to identify any variation in wire properties. The results suggest that iron-gallium nanowires possess an elastic modulus very similar to the macroscale value, tensile strengths of more than double the bulk material, and minor magnetic field induced stiffening at low stresses.

Downey, Patrick R.; Flatau, Alison B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Maryland, 3181 Martin Hall, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); McGary, Patrick D.; Stadler, Bethanie J. H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, 200 Union St., Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

TESLA-FEL 2007-03 Application of low cost GaAs LED as neutron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

neutrons in unbiased Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) Light Emitting Diodes (LED) resulted in a reduction Keywords: COTS components, Displacement damage, Electron Linear Accelerator, GaAs Light emitting diode (LED) Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) light emitting diode (LED) for the assessment of integrated neutron fluence

84

Ternary rare-earth zinc arsenides REZn{sub 1-x}As{sub 2} (RE=La-Nd, Sm)  

SciTech Connect

The ternary rare-earth zinc arsenides REZn{sub 1-x}As{sub 2} (RE=La-Nd, Sm) were prepared by reaction of the elements at 800 deg. C. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a defect SrZnBi{sub 2}-type average structure for the La member (Pearson symbol tI16, space group I4/mmm, Z=4; a=4.0770(9) A, c=20.533(5) A), in contrast to defect HfCuSi{sub 2}-type average structures for the remaining RE members (Pearson symbol tP8, space group P4/nmm, Z=2; a=4.0298(5)-3.9520(4) A, c=10.222(1)-10.099(1) A in the progression from Ce to Sm). The homogeneity range is not appreciable (estimated to be narrower than 0.6<1-x<0.7 in SmZn{sub 1-x}As{sub 2}) and the formula REZn{sub 0.67}As{sub 2} likely represents the Zn-rich phase boundary. The Ce-Nd members are Curie-Weiss paramagnets. LaZn{sub 0.67}As{sub 2} shows activated behavior in its electrical resistivity, whereas SmZn{sub 0.67}As{sub 2} exhibits anomalies in its temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity. - Graphical abstract: LaZn{sub 1-x}As{sub 2} adopts a SrZnBi{sub 2}-type structure whereas the remaining members of the REZn{sub 1-x}As{sub 2} series (RE=Ce-Nd, Sm) adopt a HfCuSi{sub 2}-type structure. Highlights: > REZn{sub 1-x}As{sub 2} adopts SrZnBi{sub 2}-type (RE=La) or HfCuSi{sub 2}-type (RE=Ce-Nd, Sm) structures. > Trends in RE substitution and local distortion around Zn-centered tetrahedra can be rationalized by geometrical factors. > Zn vacancies occur to reduce Zn-As and As-As antibonding interactions.

Stoyko, Stanislav S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Preconceptual design for separation of plutonium and gallium by ion exchange  

SciTech Connect

The disposition of plutonium from decommissioned nuclear weapons, by incorporation into commercial UO{sub 2}-based nuclear reactor fuel, is a viable means to reduce the potential for theft of excess plutonium. This fuel, which would be a combination of plutonium oxide and uranium oxide, is referred to as a mixed oxide (MOX). Following power generation in commercial reactors with this fuel, the remaining plutonium would become mixed with highly radioactive fission products in a spent fuel assembly. The radioactivity, complex chemical composition, and large size of this spent fuel assembly, would make theft difficult with elaborate chemical processing required for plutonium recovery. In fabricating the MOX fuel, it is important to maintain current commercial fuel purity specifications. While impurities from the weapons plutonium may or may not have a detrimental affect on the fuel fabrication or fuel/cladding performance, certifying the effect as insignificant could be more costly than purification. Two primary concerns have been raised with regard to the gallium impurity: (1) gallium vaporization during fuel sintering may adversely affect the MOX fuel fabrication process, and (2) gallium vaporization during reactor operation may adversely affect the fuel cladding performance. Consequently, processes for the separation of plutonium from gallium are currently being developed and/or designed. In particular, two separation processes are being considered: (1) a developmental, potentially lower cost and lower waste, thermal vaporization process following PuO{sub 2} powder preparation, and (2) an off-the-shelf, potentially higher cost and higher waste, aqueous-based ion exchange (IX) process. While it is planned to use the thermal vaporization process should its development prove successful, IX has been recommended as a backup process. This report presents a preconceptual design with material balances for separation of plutonium from gallium by IX.

DeMuth, S.F.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Thermodynamic property evaluation and magnetic refrigeration cycle analysis for gadolinium gallium garnet  

SciTech Connect

Based on relevant material property data and previous model formulations, a magnetothermodynamic property map for gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}) was adapted for refrigeration cycle analysis in the temperature range 4-40 K and the magnetic field range 0-6 T. Employing methods similar to those previously developed for other materials and temperature ranges, assessments of limitations and relative performance were made for Carnot, ideal regenerative, and pseudo-constant field regenerative cycles. It was found that although Carnot cycle limitations on available temperature lift for gadolinium gallium garnet are not as severe as the limitations for materials previously examined, considerable improvement in cooling capacity and temperature lift combinations can be achieved by using regenerative cycles if serious loss mechanisms are avoided.

Murphy, R.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

(Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interefere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Chen, You-Xian (Midland, MI)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Kinetics for the reaction of hydrogen with a plutonium-1 weight percent gallium alloy powder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetics for the reaction of hydrogen with plutonium-1 w/o gallium were measured using powder prepared ''in situ.'' The rates obeyed a first-order rate law and were independent of temperature from -29/degree/ to 355/degree/C. A pressure dependence proportional to P/sup //one-half/ was observed at pressures less than 1 kPa. From 1 to 70 kPa the pressure dependence rapidly decreased. Total pressure dependence could be accurately described by a Langmuir equation. Results indicate an adsorption-controlled reaction at low pressures and a reaction-controlled process at high pressure. 19 refs.

Stakebake, J.L.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Anionic Gallium-Based Metal;#8722;Organic Framework and Its Sorption and Ion-Exchange Properties  

SciTech Connect

A gallium-based metal-organic framework Ga{sub 6}(C{sub 9}H{sub 3}O{sub 6}){sub 8} {center_dot} (C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N){sub 6}(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}NO){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 26} [1, Ga{sub 6}(1,3,5-BTC){sub 8} {center_dot} 6DMA {center_dot} 3DMF {center_dot} 26H{sub 2}O], GaMOF-1; BTC = benzenetricarboxylate/trimesic acid and DMA = dimethylamine, with space group I{bar 4}3d, a = 19.611(1) {angstrom}, and V = 7953.4(6) {angstrom}{sup 3}, was synthesized using solvothermal techniques and characterized by synchrotron-based X-ray microcrystal diffraction. Compound 1 contains isolated gallium tetrahedra connected by the organic linker (BTC) forming a 3,4-connected anionic porous network. Disordered positively charged ions and solvent molecules are present in the pore, compensating for the negative charge of the framework. These positively charged molecules could be exchanged with alkali-metal ions, as is evident by an ICP-MS study. The H{sub 2} storage capacity of the parent framework is moderate with a H{sub 2} storage capacity of {approx}0.5 wt % at 77 K and 1 atm.

Banerjee, Debasis; Kim, Sun Jin; Wu, Haohan; Xu, Wenqian; Borkowski, Lauren A.; Li, Jing; Parise, John B. (Kwangju); (Rutgers); (SBU)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Photovoltaic Single-Crystalline, Thin-Film Cell Basics | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Single-Crystalline, Thin-Film Cell Basics Single-Crystalline, Thin-Film Cell Basics Photovoltaic Single-Crystalline, Thin-Film Cell Basics August 20, 2013 - 2:50pm Addthis Single-crystalline thin films are made from gallium arsenide (GaAs), a compound semiconductor that is a mixture of gallium and arsenic. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is a compound semiconductor, a mixture of gallium and arsenic. Gallium is a byproduct of the smelting of other metals, notably aluminum and zinc, and it is rarer than gold. Arsenic is not rare, but it is poisonous. Gallium arsenide has been developed for use in solar cells at about the same time that it has been developed for light-emitting diodes, lasers, and other electronic devices that use light. GaAs solar cells offer several benefits: The GaAs bandgap is 1.43 eV-nearly ideal for single-junction solar

91

Electrical effect of titanium diffusion on amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, thermal diffusion phenomenon of Ti into amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide ({alpha}-IGZO) was carefully investigated with secondary ion mass spectroscopy, I-V, and R{sub s} measurement systems and HSC chemistry simulation tool. According to the experimental and simulated results, the diffused Ti atoms were easily oxidized due to its lowest oxidation free energy. Since oxygen atoms were decomposed from the {alpha}-IGZO during the oxidation of Ti, the number of oxygen vacancies working as electron-donating sites in {alpha}-IGZO was dramatically increased, contributing to the decrease of resistivity ({rho}) from 1.96 {Omega} cm (as-deposited {alpha}-IGZO) to 1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}{Omega} cm (350 Degree-Sign C annealed {alpha}-IGZO).

Choi, Seung-Ha [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Development Group of Oxide Semiconductor, Samsung Display, Yongin 446-711 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Woo-Shik [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Park, Jin-Hong [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

92

Atomistic model of helium bubbles in gallium-stabilized plutonium alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The varying thermodynamic stability of gallium- (Ga-) stabilized plutonium (Pu) alloys with temperature affords a unique setting for the development of self-irradiation damage. Here, fundamental characteristics of helium (He) bubbles in these alloys with respect to temperature, gallium concentration, and He-to-vacancy ratio are modeled at the atomistic level with a modified embedded atom potential that takes account of this varying stability. Aside from the bubbles themselves, the surrounding matrix material is single-crystal metal or alloy. As a function of temperature, with a 2:1 He-to-vacancy ratio in a 5-at. % Ga fcc lattice, a 1.25-nm bubble is very stable up to about 1000 K. At 1000 K, the bubble distorts the surrounding lattice and precipitates a liquid zone, as is consistent with the phase diagram for the model material. Between 300 and 500 K, this same bubble relaxes slightly through interstitial emission. At 300 K, with a 2:1 He-to-vacancy ratio in a 2.5-at. % Ga fcc lattice, the Ga stabilization is less effective in the model to the point where the bubble distorts the local lattice and expands significantly. Similarly, at 300 K, if the He-to-vacancy ratio is increased to 3:1, there is significant local lattice distortion, as well as ejection of some He atoms into the lattice. The formation of new bubbles is not observed, because those events take place on a longer time scale than can be simulated with the present approach.

Valone, S. M.; Baskes, M. I. [Materials Science and Technology Division and Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Martin, R. L. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Energy Basics: Single-Crystalline Thin Film Used in Photovoltaics  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

is not rare, but it is poisonous. Gallium arsenide has been developed for use in solar cells at about the same time that it has been developed for light-emitting diodes,...

94

Test vehicle detector characterization system for the Boeing YAL-1 airborne laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The test vehicle detector characterization system provides a convenient and efficient tool for rapidly evaluating the optical sensitivity of the GAP6012, GAP100, GAP300, and GAP1000 indium gallium arsenide detectors used ...

Steininger-Holmes, Jason Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Preparation of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide precursor films by electrodeposition for fabricating high efficiency solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic cell exhibiting an overall conversion efficiency of 13.6% is prepared from a copper-indium-gallium-diselenide precursor thin film. The film is fabricated by first simultaneously electrodepositing copper, indium, gallium, and selenium onto a glass/molybdenum substrate (12/14). The electrodeposition voltage is a high frequency AC voltage superimposed upon a DC voltage to improve the morphology and growth rate of the film. The electrodeposition is followed by physical vapor deposition to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In.sub.1-n Ga.sub.x)Se.sub.2, with the ratio of Ga/(In+Ga) being approximately 0.39.

Bhattacharya, Raghu N. (Littleton, CO); Hasoon, Falah S. (Arvada, CO); Wiesner, Holm (Golden, CO); Keane, James (Lakewood, CO); Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CO); Ramanathan, Kannan (Golden, CO)

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

96

Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

Vernon, Stanley M. (Wellesley, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The design, construction, and testing of a nuclear fuel rod thermal simulation system to study gallium/Zircaloy interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of gallium in weapons grade plutonium has raised many questions concerning its use in light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods. The biggest concern is that the gallium will migrate down the thermal gradient in the fuel rod and deposit on the inner surface of the clad, which could cause it to fail. In order to study these effects, a fuel rod thermal simulation system (FRTSS) has been developed to recreate the shape and magnitude of the temperature profile in pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods. The system uses electrically heated simulated fuel rods inside of a large, natural convection heat exchanger that uses lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) (45 <% Pb, 55 <% Bi) as the working fluid. The simulated rods consist of small diameter electric heaters, annular pellets of depleted uranium/cerium oxide doped with approximately 10 ppm of gallium, a small helium filled gap, and generic Zircaloy IV cladding. The system is controlled through a computer-based data acquisition system that is used to record temperature data and operate the various pieces of equipment. A simple mathematical model was used to design the heat exchanger and predict the temperature profile within the simulated rods. Results from system tests indicated that the mathematical model was capable of predicting heater surface temperatures within 6.15% +/- 1.82% and clad outer surface temperatures within 1.91% +/- 4.46%. In addition, the tests also revealed that the system could accurately simulate the temperature profiles of operating PWR fuel rods. Consequently, the FRTSS provides a safe and effective means for studying gallium migration in the fuel pellets and its subsequent interactions with Zircaloy IV.

Allison, Christopher Curtis

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Reference Data for the Density and Viscosity of Liquid Cadmium, Cobalt, Gallium, Indium, Mercury, Silicon, Thallium, and Zinc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The available experimental data for the density and viscosity of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, mercury, silicon, thallium, and zinc have been critically examined with the intention of establishing both a density and a viscosity standard. All experimental data have been categorized into primary and secondary data according to the quality of measurement, the technique employed and the presentation of the data, as specified by a series of criteria. The proposed standard reference correlations for the density of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, silicon, thallium, and zinc are characterized by percent deviations at the 95% confidence level of 0.6, 2.1, 0.4, 0.5, 2.2, 0.9, and 0.7, respectively. In the case of mercury, since density reference values already exist, no further work was carried out. The standard reference correlations for the viscosity of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, mercury, silicon, thallium, and zinc are characterized by percent deviations at the 95% confidence level of 9.4, 14.0, 13.5, 2.1, 7.3, 15.7, 5.1, and 9.3, respectively.

Assael, Marc J.; Armyra, Ivi J.; Brillo, Juergen; Stankus, Sergei V.; Wu Jiangtao; Wakeham, William A. [Chemical Engineering Department, Aristotle University, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Institut fuer Materialphysik im Weltraum, Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, 51170 Koeln (Germany); Kutateladze Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Brunch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentyev ave. 1, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Center of Thermal and Fluid Science, School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Chemical Engineering Department, Imperial College, London SW7 2BY (United Kingdom)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Induction, helicity, and alpha effect in a toroidal screw flow of liquid gallium  

SciTech Connect

We investigate experimentally induction mechanisms in a screw flow of gallium in a toroidal channel. The flow is nonstationary and operated in a spin-down regime: the channel (and fluid) are initially set into solid body rotation; as the channel is stopped the fluid is set into strong helical motion by diverters located inside the channel. In this study, we put a particular emphasis on the induction generated by these helical motions, which are expected to develop over the entire range of turbulent scales. We apply an external magnetic field either perpendicular to the channel axis parallel to it. At large scales the nonlinear induction mechanisms are associated with the Parker stretch and twist effect and with the expulsion due to overall rotation. Induction mechanisms can also originate in the small scale helicity as in the alpha induction effect of mean-field magnetohydrodynamics. Our measurements yield an upper bound for the alpha coefficient, significantly lower than estimates based on dimensional analysis. We discuss the consequences of our observations for the engineering of homogeneous dynamos in the laboratory.

Stepanov, R.; Denisov, S.; Noskov, V. [Institute of Continuous Media MechanicsKorolyov 1, 614061 Perm (Russian Federation); Volk, R.; Frick, P.; Pinton, J.-F. [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Ecole Normale Superieur de Lyon, CNRS UMR5672, 46 allee d'Italie, 69007 Lyon (France)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Surface Composition, Work Function, and Electrochemical Characteristics of Gallium-Doped Zinc Oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO) possesses the electric conductivity, thermal stability, and earth abundance to be a promising transparent conductive oxide replacement for indium tin oxide electrodes in a number of molecular electronic devices, including organic solar cells and organic light emitting diodes. The surface chemistry of GZO is complex and dominated by the hydrolysis chemistry of ZnO, which influences the work function via charge transfer and band bending caused by adsorbates. A comprehensive characterization of the surface chemical composition and electrochemical properties of GZO electrodes is presented, using both solution and surface adsorbed redox probe molecules. The GZO surface is characterized using monochromatic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy after the following pretreatments: (i) hydriodic acid etch, (ii) potassium hydroxide etch, (iii) RF oxygen plasma etching, and (iv) high-vacuum argon-ion sputtering. The O 1s spectra for the GZO electrodes have contributions from the stoichiometric oxide lattice, defects within the lattice, hydroxylated species, and carbonaceous impurities, with relative near-surface compositions varying with pretreatment. Solution etching procedures result in an increase of the work function and ionization potential of the GZO electrode, but yield different near surface Zn:Ga atomic ratios, which significantly influence charge transfer rates for a chemisorbed probe molecule. The near surface chemical composition is shown to be the dominant factor in controlling surface work function and significantly influences the rate of electron transfer to both solution and tethered probe molecules.

Ratcliff, E. L.; Sigdel, A. K.; Macech, M. R.; Nebesny, K.; Lee, P. A.; Ginley, D. S.; Armstrong, N. R.; Berry, J. J.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

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101

The Influence of Lewis Acid/Base Chemistry on the Removal of Gallium by Volatility from Weapons-Grade Plutonium Dissolved in Molten Chlorides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been proposed that GaCl{sub 3} can be removed by direct volatilization from a Pu-Ga alloy that is dissolved in a molten chloride salt. Although pure GaCl{sub 3} is quite volatile (boiling point: 201 deg. C), the behavior of GaCl{sub 3} dissolved in chloride salts is quite different because of solution effects and is critically dependent upon the composition of the solvent salt (i.e., its Lewis acid/base character). In this technical note, the behavior of gallium in prototypical Lewis acid and Lewis base salts is contrasted. It is found that gallium volatility is suppressed in basic melts and promoted in acidic melts. These results have an important influence on the potential for simple gallium removal in molten salt systems.

Williams, David F.; Cul, Guillermo D. del [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Toth, Louis M. [Electrochemical Systems (United States); Collins, Emory D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Arsenides, Phosphides - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 27, 2010 ... Besides the known challenges of III/V on IV heteroepitaxy, like charge .... Although carbon tetrahalogenides, such as CBr4, CCl4, and CBrCl3,...

103

Nuclear fuels technologies: Thermally induced gallium removal system (TIGRS), fiscal year 1998 research and development test plan  

SciTech Connect

This document details the research and development (R and D) activities that will be conducted in Fiscal Year 1998 (FY98) by the Thermally Induced Gallium Removal System (TIGRS) team for the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition. This work is a continuation and extension of experimental activities that have been conducted in support of using weapons-derived plutonium in the fabrication of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel for reactor-based plutonium disposition. The ultimate purpose of this work is to demonstrate adequate Thermally Induced Gallium Removal with a prototypic system. This Test Plan presents more than the FY98 R and D efforts in order to frame the Task in its entirety. To achieve the TIGRS Program objectives, R and D activities during the next two years will be focused on (1) process development leading to a prototypic TIGRS design, and (2) prototypic TIGRS design and testing leading to and including a prototypic demonstration of TIGRS operation. Both the process development and system testing efforts will consist of a series of surrogate-based cold tests and plutonium-based hot tests. Some of this testing has already occurred and will continue into FY99.

Buksa, J.J.; Butt, D.P.; Chidester, K.; DeMuth, S.F.; Havrilla, G.J.; James, C.A.; Kolman, D.G.

1997-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

104

Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

Curtis, Calvin J. (Lakewood, CO); Miedaner, Alexander (Boulder, CO); Van Hest, Maikel (Lakewood, CO); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO); Nekuda, Jennifer A. (Lakewood, CO)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Gallium-Nitride Transistors for High-Efficiency Industrial Power Supplies, Phase 1: State of Semiconductor Development and Industrial Power Supply Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper describes recent advancements in the development of Gallium-Nitride (GaN) transistors for power conversion applications. This wide bandgap semiconductor has the potential to reduce losses and improve performance of power converters. The industrial power supply market is described and the application of GaN to power conversion in this segment is introduced for future work.

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

106

Chemical thermodynamics of nuclear materials. IX. High temperature heat capacity of plutonium-3. 2 at. % gallium alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heat capacity of delta-stabilized plutonium (Pu - 3.2 at. % Ga) has been determined from 330 to 700/sup 0/K by an adiabatic calorimeter. The heat capacity for this alloy may be expressed by: Cp (Pu-3.2 at. % Ga)/(J K/sup -1/ mol/sup -1/) = 39.249 - 0.0264 (T/K) + 3.595 x 10/sup 5/ (T/K)/sup 2/ - 2.506 x 10/sup 5/ (K/T)/sup 2/. It was found that a large contribution to the heat capacity is due to the electronic heat capacity. The thermal functions for this plutonium-gallium alloy are calculated to 700/sup 0/K.

Adams, R.O.; Oetting, F.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Compact, Interactive Electric Vehicle Charger: Gallium-Nitride Switch Technology for Bi-directional Battery-to-Grid Charger Applications  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: HRL Laboratories is using gallium nitride (GaN) semiconductors to create battery chargers for electric vehicles (EVs) that are more compact and efficient than traditional EV chargers. Reducing the size and weight of the battery charger is important because it would help improve the overall performance of the EV. GaN semiconductors process electricity faster than the silicon semiconductors used in most conventional EV battery chargers. These high-speed semiconductors can be paired with lighter-weight electrical circuit components, which helps decrease the overall weight of the EV battery charger. HRL Laboratories is combining the performance advantages of GaN semiconductors with an innovative, interactive battery-to-grid energy distribution design. This design would support 2-way power flow, enabling EV battery chargers to not only draw energy from the power grid, but also store and feed energy back into it.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Electrical Bias as an Alternate Method for Reproducible Measurement of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (CIGS) Photovoltaic Modules: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Light-to-dark metastable changes in thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules can introduce uncertainty when measuring module performance on indoor flash testing equipment. This study describes a method to stabilize module performance through forward-bias current injection rather than light exposure. Measurements of five pairs of thin-film copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) PV modules indicate that forward-bias exposure maintained the PV modules at a stable condition (within 1%) while the unbiased modules degraded in performance by up to 12%. It was additionally found that modules exposed to forward bias exhibited stable performance within about 3% of their long-term outdoor exposed performance. This carrier-injection method provides a way to reduce uncertainty arising from fast transients in thin-film module performance between the time a module is removed from light exposure and when it is measured indoors, effectively simulating continuous light exposure by injecting minority carriers that behave much as photocarriers do. This investigation also provides insight into the initial light-induced transients of thin-film modules upon outdoor deployment.

Deline, C.; Stokes, A.; Silverman, T. J.; Rummel, S.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Derived reference doses for three compounds used in the photovoltaics industry: Copper indium diselenide, copper gallium diselenide, and cadmium telluride  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic modules made from copper indium diselenide (CIS), copper gallium diselenide (CGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe) arc nearing commercial development. A wide range of issues are being examined as these materials move from the laboratory to large-scale production facilities to ensure their commercial success. Issues of traditional interest include module efficiency, stability and cost. More recently, there is increased focus given to environmental, health and safety issues surrounding the commercialization of these same devices. An examination of the toxicological properties of these materials, and their chemical parents is fundamental to this discussion. Chemicals that can present large hazards to human health or the environment are regulated often more strictly than those that are less hazardous. Stricter control over how these materials are handled and disposed can increase the costs associated with the production and use of these modules dramatically. Similarly, public perception can be strongly influenced by the inherent biological hazard that these materials possess. Thus, this report: presents a brief background tutorial on how toxicological data are developed and used; overviews the toxicological data available for CIS, CGS and CdTe; develops ``reference doses`` for each of these compounds; compares the reference doses for these compounds with those of their parents; discusses the implications of these findings to photovoltaics industry.

Moskowitz, P.D.; Bernholc, N.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.

1995-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

110

Low energy solar neutrino experiments: The Soviet American Gallium Experiment (SAGE). Final report, August 12, 1988--October 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Two {sup 71}Ga experiments are currently in operation. The first is the 60 ton Soviet American Gallium Experiment (SAGE) at Baksan, which has recently reported a signal level of 73+18/{minus}16(stat)+5/{minus}7(syst) SNU; the second is the 30 ton GALLEX experiment at Gran Sasso, which sees 87{+-}14{+-}7 SNU. Both results are consistent, and both suggest a neutrino flux level low compared to the total expected from standard solar model calculations. It is not possible, however, to make a case for flux levels lower than the p-p prediction. Assuming the experiments are correct (Neutrino source calibrations are planned for both SAGE and GALLEX in the near future.), it is not at all clear yet whether the answer lies with the neutrino physics, solar physics, or a combination of both. Nevertheless, though solar model effects cannot be ruled out, if the Homestake and Kamiokande results are taken at face value, then these two experiments alone imply that neutrino oscillations or some similar particle physics result must be present to some degree. This report reviews the SAGE experiment and recent results. Non-radiochemical experiments are also discussed, with an emphasis on the Kamiokande water Cerenkov results.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs : numerical supplement.  

SciTech Connect

This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide, GaAs, as computed by density functional theory. This Report serves as a numerical supplement to the results published in: P.A. Schultz and O.A. von Lilienfeld, 'Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs', Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci Eng., Vol. 17, 084007 (2009), and intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models. The numerical results for density functional theory calculations of properties of simple intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide are presented.

Schultz, Peter Andrew

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Preliminary materials assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presently, there are two SPS reference design concepts (one using silicon solar cells; the other using gallium arsenide solar cells). A materials assessment of both systems was performed based on the materials lists set forth in the DOE/NASA SPS Reference System Report: Concept Development and Evaluation Program. This listing identified 22 materials (plus miscellaneous and organics) used in the SPS. Tracing the production processes for these 22 materials, a total demand for over 20 different bulk materials (copper, silicon, sulfuric acid, etc.) and nealy 30 raw materials (copper ore, sand, sulfur ore, etc.) was revealed. Assessment of these SPS material requirements produced a number of potential material supply problems. The more serious problems are those associated with the solar cell materials (gallium, gallium arsenide, sapphire, and solar grade silicon), and the graphite fiber required for the satellite structure and space construction facilities. In general, the gallium arsenide SPS option exhibits more serious problems than the silicon option, possibly because gallium arsenide technology is not as well developed as that for silicon. Results are presented and discussed in detail. (WHK)

Teeter, R.R.; Jamieson, W.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Ion exchange separation of plutonium and gallium (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent, and (3) facility size  

SciTech Connect

The following report summarizes an effort intended to estimate within an order-of-magnitude the (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent amounts, and (3) facility size, for ion exchange (IX) separation of plutonium and gallium. This analysis is based upon processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr. The technical basis for this summary is detailed in a separate document, {open_quotes}Preconceptual Design for Separation of Plutonium and Gallium by Ion Exchange{close_quotes}. The material balances of this separate document are based strictly on stoichiometric amounts rather than details of actual operating experience, in order to avoid classification as Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. This approximation neglets the thermodynamics and kinetics which can significantly impact the amount of reagents required. Consequently, the material resource requirements and waste amounts presented here would normally be considered minimums for processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr; however, the author has compared the inventory estimates presented with that of an actual operating facility and found them similar. Additionally, the facility floor space presented here is based upon actual plutonium processing systems and can be considered a nominal estimate.

DeMuth, S.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

Highest transmittance and high-mobility amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide films on flexible substrate by room-temperature deposition and post-deposition anneals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin films of the highest transmittance reported in literature were initially deposited onto flexible polymer substrates at room temperature. The films were annealed in vacuum, air, and oxygen to enhance their electrical and optical performances. Electrical and optical characterizations were done before and after anneals. A partial reversal of the degradation in electrical properties upon annealing in oxygen was achieved by subjecting the films to subsequent vacuum anneals. A model was developed based on film texture and structural defects which showed close agreement between the measured and calculated carrier mobility values at low carrier concentrations (2-6 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}).

Gadre, Mandar J. [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Alford, T. L. [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Flexible Display Center at Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85284 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Three Alkali-Metal-Gold-Gallium Systems. Ternary Tunnel Structures and Some Problems with Poorly Ordered Cations  

SciTech Connect

Six new intermetallic compounds have been characterized in the alkali metal (A = Na, Rb, Cs)goldgallium systems. Three isostructural compounds with the general composition A0.55Au2Ga2, two others of AAu3Ga2 (A = Rb, Cs), and the related Na13Au41.2Ga30.3 were synthesized via typical high-temperature reactions and their crystal structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis: Na0.56(9)Au2Ga2 (I, I4/mcm, a = 8.718(1) , c = 4.857(1) , Z = 4), Rb0.56(1)Au2Ga2 (II, I4/mcm, a = 8.950(1) , c = 4.829(1) , Z = 4), Cs0.54(2)Au2Ga2 (III, I4/mcm, a = 9.077(1) , c = 4.815(1) , Z = 4), RbAu3Ga2 (IV, Pnma, a = 13.384(3) , b = 5.577(1) , c = 7.017(1) , Z = 4), CsAu3Ga2 (V, Pnma, a = 13.511(3) , b = 5.614(2) , c = 7.146(1) , Z = 4), Na13Au41.2(1)Ga30.3(1) (VI, P6 mmm, a = 19.550(3) , c = 8.990(2) , Z = 2). The first three compounds (IIII) are isostructural with tetragonal K0.55Au2Ga2 and likewise contain planar eight-member Au/Ga rings that stack along c to generate tunnels and that contain varying degrees of disordered NaCs cations. The cation dispositions are much more clearly and reasonably defined by electron density mapping than through least-squares refinements with conventional anisotropic ellipsoids. Orthorhombic AAu3Ga2 (IV, V) are ordered ternary Rb and Cs derivatives of the SrZn5 type structure, demonstrating structural variability within the AAu3Ga2 family. All attempts to prepare an isotypic NaAu3Ga2 were not successful, but yielded only a similar composition Na13Au41.2Ga30.3 (NaAu3.17Ga2.33) (VI) in a very different structure with two types of cation sites. Crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) analysis obtained from tight-binding electronic structure calculations for idealized IIV via linear muffin-tin-orbital (LMTO) methods emphasized the major contributions of heteroatomic AuGa bonding to the structural stability of these compounds. The relative minima (pseudogaps) in the DOS curves for IV correspond well with the valence electron counts of known representatives of this structure type and, thereby, reveal some magic numbers to guide the search for new isotypic compounds. Theoretical calculation of total energies vs volumes obtained by VASP (Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package) calculations for KAu3Ga2 and RbAu3Ga2 suggest a possible transformation from SrZn5- to BaZn5-types at high pressure.

Smetana, Volodymyr; Miller, Gordon J.; Corbett, John D.

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

116

An Ultra High Speed Test System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The test-head subsystem presented uses gallium arsenide pin electronics to provide nonrepeating zero data rates up to 1.2 Gb/s. The device under test is connected to laser-scanned optical sensors, and the test system receivers use an electrooptic measurement ...

Francois Henley

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

SOLERAS - University Research Project. Progress report No. 3, 1984-85 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accomplishments of solar energy research projects maintained by nine US universities are summarized. Some research topics covered include: photosynthesis; passive cooling; crystal growth of gallium arsenides; concentrating optics for PV conversion; amorphous silicon alloys; solar insolation; solar ponds; and wind power. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

SOLERAS - University Research Project. Progress report 1, December 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress to date on each of the research efforts in direct solar energy applications at public and private institutions of higher education and research in the United States is addressed. Some research topics covered include: concentrating optics for PV conversion; wind power; solar ponds; photosynthesis; amorphous silicon alloys; passive cooling; crystal growth of gallium arsenides; and solar insolation.

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Transport and strain relaxation in wurtzite InAs-GaAs core-shell heterowires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indium-arsenide-gallium-arsenide (InAs-GaAs) core-shell, wurtzite nanowires have been grown on GaAs (001) substrates. The core-shell geometries (core radii 11 to 26 nm, shell thickness >2.5 nm) exceeded equilibrium critical values for strain relaxation via dislocations, apparent from transmission electron microscopy. Partial axial relaxation is detected in all nanowires increasing exponentially with size, while radial strain relaxation is >90%, but undetected in nanowires with both smaller core radii electron field-effect mobility compared to bare InAs nanowires.

Kavanagh, Karen L. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Salfi, Joe; Savelyev, Igor; Blumin, Marina; Ruda, Harry E. [Centre for Advanced Nanotechnology, University of Toronto, 170 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada)

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

120

Crystal field disorder effects in the optical spectra of Nd{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}-doped calcium lithium niobium gallium garnets laser crystals and ceramics  

SciTech Connect

The optical spectroscopic properties of RE{sup 3+} (Nd, 1 at. % or Yb, 1 to 10 at. %)-doped calcium-lithium-niobium-gallium garnet (CLNGG) single crystals and ceramics in the 10 K-300 K range are analyzed. In these compositionally disordered materials, RE{sup 3+} substitute Ca{sup 2+} in dodecahedral sites and the charge compensation is accomplished by adjusting the proportion of Li{sup +}, Nb{sup 5+}, and Ga{sup 3+} to the doping concentration. The crystals and ceramics show similar optical spectra, with broad and structured (especially at low temperatures) bands whose shape depends on temperature and doping concentration. At 10 K, the Nd{sup 3+4}I{sub 9/2}{yields}{sup 4}F{sub 3/2,5/2} and Yb{sup 3+2}F{sub 7/2}{yields}{sup 2}F{sub 5/2} absorption bands, which show prospect for diode laser pumping, can be decomposed in several lines that can be attributed to centers with large differences in the crystal field. The positions of these components are the same, but the relative intensity depends on the doping concentration and two main centers dominate the spectra. Non-selective excitation evidences broad emission bands, of prospect for short-pulse laser emission, whereas the selective excitation reveals the particular emission spectra of the various centers. The modeling reveals that the nonequivalent centers correspond to RE{sup 3+} ions with different cationic combinations in the nearest octahedral and tetrahedral coordination spheres, and the most abundant two centers have 4Nb and, respectively, 3Nb1Li in the nearest octahedral sphere. At 300 K, the spectral resolution is lost. It is then inferred that the observed optical bands are envelopes of the spectra of various structural centers, whose resolution is determined by the relative contribution of the temperature-dependent homogeneous broadening and the effects of crystal field disordering (multicenter structure, inhomogeneous broadening). The relevance of spectroscopic properties for selection of pumping conditions and of laser design that would enable utilization of the broad optical bands for efficient laser emission and reduced heat generation is discussed.

Lupei, V.; Lupei, A.; Gheorghe, C.; Gheorghe, L.; Achim, A. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lab. ECS, Bucharest (Romania); Ikesue, A. [World-Lab Co. Ltd., Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Measurement of the solar neutrino capture rate with gallium metal. III: Results for the 2002--2007 data-taking period  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Russian-American experiment SAGE began to measure the solar neutrino capture rate with a target of gallium metal in Dec. 1989. Measurements have continued with only a few brief interruptions since that time. We give here the experimental improvements in SAGE since its last published data summary in Dec. 2001. Assuming the solar neutrino production rate was constant during the period of data collection, combined analysis of 168 extractions through Dec. 2007 gives a capture rate of solar neutrinos with energy more than 233 keV of 65.4 (+3.1)(-3.0) (stat) (+2.6)(-2.8) (syst) SNU. The weighted average of the results of all three Ga solar neutrino experiments, SAGE, Gallex, and GNO, is now 66.1 +/- 3.1 SNU, where statistical and systematic uncertainties have been combined in quadrature. During the recent period of data collection a new test of SAGE was made with a reactor-produced 37Ar neutrino source. The ratio of observed to calculated rates in this experiment, combined with the measured rates in the three prior 51Cr neutrino-source experiments with Ga, is 0.87 +/- 0.05. A probable explanation for this low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. If we assume these cross sections are zero, then the standard solar model including neutrino oscillations predicts a total capture rate in Ga in the range of 63-66 SNU with an uncertainty of about 4%, in good agreement with experiment. We derive the current value of the neutrino flux produced in the Sun by the proton-proton fusion reaction to be (6.0 +/- 0.8) x 10^(10)/(cm^2 s), which agrees well with the pp flux predicted by the standard solar model. Finally, we show that the data are consistent with the assumption that the solar neutrino production rate is constant in time.

SAGE Collaboration; J. N. Abdurashitov; V. N. Gavrin; V. V. Gorbachev; P. P. Gurkina; T. V. Ibragimova; A. V. Kalikhov; N. G. Khairnasov; T. V. Knodel; I. N. Mirmov; A. A. Shikhin; E. P. Veretenkin; V. E. Yants; G. T. Zatsepin; T. J. Bowles; S. R. Elliott; W. A. Teasdale; J. S. Nico; B. T. Cleveland; J. F. Wilkerson

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Profile NeutronDetector 9-16-04..pmd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GALLIUM ARSENIDE SEMICONDUCTOR-BASED GALLIUM ARSENIDE SEMICONDUCTOR-BASED NEUTRON DETECTOR B E N E F I T S Portable, Accurate Device Detects and Monitors Neutrons and Nuclear Materials * More accurate and sensitive than other technologies * Performance won't degrade over time * Easy implementation and deployment * Rugged, lightweight, and portable for field use * Reduces false readings * Requires less power * Low mass-production cost (about $1 per chip) * Neutron detection * Detecting and monitoring nuclear materials and weapons * Permanent installations and portable field operation * High-vacuum environments (e.g., physics labs and space platforms) An advanced neutron detector developed by Argonne National Laboratory and Kansas State University accurately detects neutrons and finds concealed nuclear weapons and materials, even in harsh or challenging environments. The key

123

Development of electrochemical photovoltaic cells. Third technical progress report, November 1, 1979-January 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of stable, efficient, electrochemical photovoltaic cells based on silicon and gallium arsenide in non-aqueous electrolyte systems is being investigated. The effect of surface condition of silicon electrodes on electrochemical and physical characteristics has been studied. An electrode-supporting electrolyte interaction in acetonitrile has been identified which leads to etching of the surface. Improved performance can result, which has practical significance. Gallium arsenide electrodes have been electrochemically characterized in cells containing propylene carbonate with a ferrocene/ferricenium redox additive. Degradation of the ferricenium salt under illumination has been investigated. Other redox couples studied to date have not given promising results. Long-term stability experiments have been deferred while a better understanding of electrode behavior is being obtained.

Byker, H.J.; Schwerzel, R.E.; Wood, V.E.; Austin, A.E.; Brooman, E.W.

1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

World Supply and Demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Gallium arsenide ingot, wafer, and device manufacturers...X Sweden Semitronics AB X United Kingdom General Electricity Company (U.K.) X X X X X MCP Electronic Materials Ltd. X United States Airtron Division of Litton Industries X Anadigics Inc. X X X Applied Solar Energy Corporation X X AT & T Bell Laboratories X X X X Bertram Laboratories X Crystal Specialties,...

125

SOLERAS - University Research Project. Progress report 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress to date on each of the research efforts in direct solar energy applications at public and private institutions of higher education and research in the United States is addressed. Some research topics covered include: concentrating optics for PV conversion; wind power; solar ponds; photosynthesis; amorphous silicon alloys; passive cooling; crystal growth of gallium arsenides; and solar insolation. The period of work covered by these reports is June 1984 through February 1985.

Not Available

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Ga-Zr (Gallium - Zirconium)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ga-Zr crystallographic data...Ga 5 Zr 3 44.0 oC 32 Cmcm Ga 3 Zr 2 47 oF 40 Fdd 2 βGaZr 56.7 ? ? αGaZr 56.7 tI 16 I 4 1 / amd Ga 4 Zr 5 62.1 hP 18 P 6 3 / mcm Ga 2 Zr 3 66 tP 10 P 4/ mbm Ga 3 Zr 5 68.6 hP 16 P 6 3 / mcm GaZr 2 72.4 tI 12 I 4/ mcm (βZr) ~94 to 100 cI 2 Im m (αZr) 99.4 to 100 hP 2 P 6 3 / mmc...

127

Ba-Ga (Barium - Gallium)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ba-Ga crystallographic data...Ba-Ga crystallographic data Phase Composition, wt% Ga Pearson symbol Space group (Ba) 0 cI 2 Im m Ba 10 Ga 4.8 cF 176 Fd m Ba 8 Ga 7 30.8 cP 60 P 2 1 3 BaGa 2 50.4 hP 3 P 6/ mmm BaGa 4 67 tI 10 I 4/ mmm (Ga) 100 hP 2 P 6 3 / mmc...

128

Gallium interactions with zircaloy cladding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of Ga from weapons-grade plutonium MOX fuel on zircaloy-IV cladding during power reactor operation have been simulated by implantations of 100 keV Ga-69 ions into a polished zircaloy-IV sample while the sample was maintained at a typical cladding temperature of 375{degrees}C. Analyses were based on scanning electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering of 280 keV He-3 ions, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Subgrains at the zircaloy-IV surface formed at a Ga fluence equivalent to total release of approximately 12 ppm by weight of Ga from the fuel. The subgrains may be an intermetallic compound of Zr{sub 2}Ga. Enhanced diffusion of Ga was observed, but Ga concentrations decreased 3 orders of magnitude over a depth of 3000 {angstrom}.

Hart, R.R.; Rennie, J.; Aucoin, K.; West, M. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Boron arsenide thin film solar cell development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyrolytic decomposition of diborane and arsine has been used in attempts to grow polycrystalline BAs films. This method, however, produced only amorphous films for deposition temperatures below 920/sup 0/C and polycrystalline boron subarsenide (B/sub 12/As/sub 2/) flms for deposition temperatures above this value. The amorphous films have been determined to have a significant arsenic content but the actual stoichiometry was not obtained. The films were adherent on single crystal sapphire (0001), (111) silicon, (0001) SiC, and polycrystalline SiC but were found not to be adherent to substrates of fused quartz, tungsten, and molybdenum. It was also found that all films deposited above 650/sup 0/C were p-type while those deposited below 600/sup 0/C were usually n-type. Polycrystalline BAs and B/sub 12/As/sub 2/ was produced by reaction of the elements in a closed tube. The amorphous films showed an indirect or non-direct optical bandgap from 1.0 to 1.7 eV with the most probable values between 1.2 to 1.4 eV. The crystalline BAs powder shows a bandgap near 1.0 eV. Photoconductance time constants have been measured for films deposited on (0001) sapphire and (0001) SiC. Attempts at doping the amorphous films were generally unsuccessful. A polycrystalline powder sample was successfully doped with sulfur. Attempts were made to produce a Schottky barrier diode by evaporating Al dots onto an amorphous film on graphite without a post-evaporation anneal. An MIS structure was also attempted by baking an amorphous film in air at 280/sup 0/C before evaporation of aluminum. Although nonlinear characteristics were obtained, none of the devices showed any photovoltaic response. A p-type amorphous film was deposited on an n-type silicon substrate to form a p-n heterojunction. This device did exhibit a photovoltaic response but it is believed that the photogeneration was occurring primarily in the silicon substrate.

Boone, J.L.; Van Doren, T.P.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

R6, Low Field Electron Transport in Mixed Arsenide Antimonide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixed anion InAsySb1-y quantum wells (QW) with high electron mobility are excellent candidates for direct integration with high hole...

131

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oxysulfide (Gd2O2S) oxysulfide (Gd2O2S) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.42266 Density 7.44 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 493.3 eV Minimum ionization 1.257 MeV g-1cm2 9.352 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 96.1 g cm-2 12.92 cm Nuclear interaction length 160.1 g cm-2 21.52 cm Pion collision length 121.5 g cm-2 16.33 cm Pion interaction length 190.2 g cm-2 25.57 cm Radiation length 8.49 g cm-2 1.141 cm Critical energy 11.27 MeV (for e-) 10.89 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 15.96 g cm-2 2.146 cm Plasma energy 51.10 eV Muon critical energy 199. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* O 8 2.00 0.084528 S 16 1.00 0.084690 Gd 64 2.00 0.830782 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries

132

High-efficiency solar cell and method for fabrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-efficiency 3- or 4-junction solar cell is disclosed with a theoretical AM0 energy conversion efficiency of about 40%. The solar cell includes p-n junctions formed from indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN), gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium gallium aluminum phosphide (InGaAlP) separated by n-p tunnel junctions. An optional germanium (Ge) p-n junction can be formed in the substrate upon which the other p-n junctions are grown. The bandgap energies for each p-n junction are tailored to provide substantially equal short-circuit currents for each p-n junction, thereby eliminating current bottlenecks and improving the overall energy conversion efficiency of the solar cell. Additionally, the use of an InGaAsN p-n junction overcomes super-bandgap energy losses that are present in conventional multi-junction solar cells. A method is also disclosed for fabricating the high-efficiency 3- or 4-junction solar cell by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). 4 figs.

Hou, H.Q.; Reinhardt, K.C.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

High-efficiency solar cell and method for fabrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-efficiency 3- or 4-junction solar cell is disclosed with a theoretical AM0 energy conversion efficiency of about 40%. The solar cell includes p-n junctions formed from indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN), gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium gallium aluminum phosphide (InGaAlP) separated by n-p tunnel junctions. An optional germanium (Ge) p-n junction can be formed in the substrate upon which the other p-n junctions are grown. The bandgap energies for each p-n junction are tailored to provide substantially equal short-circuit currents for each p-n junction, thereby eliminating current bottlenecks and improving the overall energy conversion efficiency of the solar cell. Additionally, the use of an InGaAsN p-n junction overcomes super-bandgap energy losses that are present in conventional multi-junction solar cells. A method is also disclosed for fabricating the high-efficiency 3- or 4-junction solar cell by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD).

Hou, Hong Q. (Albuquerque, NM); Reinhardt, Kitt C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Gallium composition dependence of crystallographic and thermoelectric properties in polycrystalline type-I Ba{sub 8}Ga{sub x}Si{sub 46-x} (nominal x=14-18) clathrates prepared by combining arc melting and spark plasma sintering methods  

SciTech Connect

The gallium composition dependence of crystallographic and thermoelectric properties in polycrystalline n-type Ba{sub 8}Ga{sub x}Si{sub 46-x} (nominal x=14-18) compounds with the type-I clathrate structure is presented. Samples were prepared by combining arc melting and spark plasma sintering methods. Powder x-ray diffraction, Rietveld analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy show that the solubility limit of gallium in the type-I clathrate phase is close to x=15, which is slightly higher than that for a single crystal. The carrier concentration at room temperature decreases from 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} to 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} as the Ga content x increases. The Seebeck coefficient, the electrical conductivity, and the thermal conductivity vary systematically with the carrier concentration when the Ga content x varies. The effective mass (2.0m{sub 0}), the carrier mobility (10 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}), and the lattice thermal conductivity (1.1 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}) are determined for the Ga content x=14.51. The dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit ZT is about 0.55 at 900 K for the Ga content x=14.51. The calculation of ZT using the experimentally determined material parameters predicts ZT=0.8 (900 K) at the optimum carrier concentration of about 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. - Graphical abstract: The gallium composition dependence of crystallographic and thermoelectric properties is presented on polycrystalline n-type Ba{sub 8}Ga{sub x}Si{sub 46-x} with the type-I clathrate structure prepared by combining arc melting and spark plasma sintering methods. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT reaches 0.55 at 900 K due to the increase in the Ga content (close to x=15), and a calculation predicts further improvement of ZT at the optimized carrier concentration. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystallographic properties of Ba{sub 8}Ga{sub x}Si{sub 46-x} clathrates are characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arc melting and spark plasma sintering process enables increase of Ga content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We elucidate the Ga composition dependence of thermoelectric properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermoelectric figure of merit ZT is improved due to the increased Ga content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculation predicts a potential ZT=0.8 at 900 K at optimized carrier concentration.

Anno, Hiroaki, E-mail: anno@rs.tus.ac.jp [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Yamaguchi, 1-1-1 Daigaku-Dori, Sanyoonoda 756-0884 (Japan) [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Yamaguchi, 1-1-1 Daigaku-Dori, Sanyoonoda 756-0884 (Japan); JST, CREST, 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Yamada, Hiroki; Nakabayashi, Takahiro; Hokazono, Masahiro [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Yamaguchi, 1-1-1 Daigaku-Dori, Sanyoonoda 756-0884 (Japan)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Yamaguchi, 1-1-1 Daigaku-Dori, Sanyoonoda 756-0884 (Japan); Shirataki, Ritsuko [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Yamaguchi, 1-1-1 Daigaku-Dori, Sanyoonoda 756-0884 (Japan) [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Yamaguchi, 1-1-1 Daigaku-Dori, Sanyoonoda 756-0884 (Japan); JST, CREST, 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Argonne CNM Highlight: Superhydrophobicity on Silver Nanoplates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superhydrophobicity on Silver Nanoplates Superhydrophobicity on Silver Nanoplates Superhydrophobic silver nanoplates Representations of water droplets on a GaAs substrate covered with the Ag nanoplates; as featured on back cover of the journal issue Gallium arsenide wafers decorated with silver nanoplates result in composite surfaces of varying hydrophobocity. CNM researchers and collaborators at Clemson have accomplished this in part by coating the silver nanoplates with self-assembled monolayers of alkyl thiol molecules. By carefully controlling reaction conditions, the size, thickness, and surface roughness of the individual silver nanoplates are tuned to produce different topographic structures and roughness of the composite surfaces. This in turn influences the surface hydrophobicity. The composite surfaces

136

Nuclear radiation detectors based on a matrix of ion-implanted p-i-n diodes on undoped GaAs epilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of nuclear detectors which represent matrices of p-i-n diodes were fabricated based on undoped gallium arsenide epitaxial layers by ion implantation technology. The detectors have a size of the active area of 0.4 Multiplication-Sign 0.4 and 0.9 Multiplication-Sign 0.9 cm{sup 2}. Electrical characteristics of fabricated detectors and results of measurements of fast neutrons spectra of {sup 241}Am-Be source by the recoil protons method are discussed.

Baryshnikov, F. M.; Britvich, G. I.; Chernykh, A. V.; Chernykh, S. V.; Chubenko, A. P.; Didenko, S. I.; Koltsov, G. I. [National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS', Leninskiy prospect 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for High Energy Physics, Polshhad nauki 1, 142281 Protvino (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS', Leninskiy prospect 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the RAS, Leninskiy prospect 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS', Leninskiy prospect 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

137

Plating on difficult-to-plate metals: what's new  

SciTech Connect

Some of the changes since 1970 in procedures for plating on such materials as titanium, molybdenum, silicon, aluminum, and gallium arsenide are summarized. While basic procedures for plating some of these materials were developed as many as 30 to 40 years ago, changes in the end uses of the plated products have necessitated new plating processes. In some cases, vacuum techniques - such as ion bombardment, ion implantation, and vacuum metallization - have been introduced to improve the adhesion of electrodeposits. In other cases, these techniques have been used to deposit materials upon which electrodeposits are required.

Wiesner, H.J.

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Quantum interference and control of the dynamic Franz-Keldysh effect: Generation and detection of terahertz space-charge fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dynamic Franz Keldysh Effect (DFKE) is produced and controlled in bulk gallium arsenide by quantum interference without the aid of externally applied fields and is spatially and temporally resolved using ellipsometric pump-probe techniques. The {approx}3 THz internal driving field for the DFKE is a transient space-charge field that is associated with a critically damped coherent plasma oscillation produced by oppositely traveling ballistic electron and hole currents that are injected by two-color quantum interference techniques. The relative phase and polarization of the two pump pulses can be used to control the DFKE.

Wang, Rui [Laboratory for Photonics and Quantum Electronics, 138 IATL, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States) [Laboratory for Photonics and Quantum Electronics, 138 IATL, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States); Jacobs, Paul; Smirl, Arthur L. [Laboratory for Photonics and Quantum Electronics, 138 IATL, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Laboratory for Photonics and Quantum Electronics, 138 IATL, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Zhao, Hui [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States)

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nanobeam Photonic Crystal Cavity Light-Emitting Diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results on electrically driven nanobeam photonic crystal cavities formed out of a lateral p-i-n junction in gallium arsenide. Despite their small conducting dimensions, nanobeams have robust electrical properties with high current densities possible at low drive powers. Much like their two-dimensional counterparts, the nanobeam cavities exhibit bright electroluminescence at room temperature from embedded 1,250 nm InAs quantum dots. A small room temperature differential gain is observed in the cavities with minor beam self-heating suggesting that lasing is possible. These results open the door for efficient electrical control of active nanobeam cavities for diverse nanophotonic applications.

Shambat, Gary; Petykiewicz, Jan; Mayer, Marie A; Sarmiento, Tomas; Harris, James; Haller, Eugene E; Vuckovic, Jelena

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The state of the art of thin-film photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin-film photovoltaic technologies, based on materials such as amorphous or polycrystalline silicon, copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and gallium arsenide, offer the potential for significantly reducing the cost of electricity generated by photovoltaics. The significant progress in the technologies, from the laboratory to the marketplace, is reviewed. The common concerns and questions raised about thin films are addressed. Based on the progress to date and the potential of these technologies, along with continuing investments by the private sector to commercialize the technologies, one can conclude that thin-film PV will provide a competitive alternative for large-scale power generation in the future.

Surek, T.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

References and Notes for Gallium ( Ga )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. (US) 48, 334 (1952). ND82, JHM Neijzen and A. Donszelmann, Physica 114C, 241 (1982). The stated ...

142

Controlling Gallium Nitride Polarity on Native Substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and Power Conversion ... Potential Ceramic Dielectrics for Air Force Applications.

143

Electronic properties of gallium nitride nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a systematic study of the electrical transport in GaN nanowires. Particularly, the effect of the surrounding dielectric on the conductivity of GaN nanowires is experimentally shown for the first time. ...

Yoon, Joonah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Development of gallium nitride power transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GaN-based high-voltage transistors have outstanding properties for the development of ultra-high efficiency and compact power electronics. This thesis describes a new process technology for the fabrication of GaN power ...

Piedra, Daniel, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

NREL: News - NREL Reports 31.1% Efficiency for III-V Solar Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

913 913 NREL Reports 31.1% Efficiency for III-V Solar Cell Conversion-efficiency mark is a world record for a two-junction solar cell measured under one-sun illumination June 24, 2013 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Lab has announced a world record of 31.1% conversion efficiency for a two-junction solar cell under one sun of illumination. NREL Scientist Myles Steiner announced the new record June 19 at the 39th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference in Tampa, Fla. The previous record of 30.8% efficiency was held by Alta Devices. The tandem cell was made of a gallium indium phosphide cell atop a gallium arsenide cell, has an area of about 0.25 square centimeters and was measured under the AM1.5 global spectrum at 1,000 W/m2. It was grown inverted, similar to the NREL-developed inverted metamorphic multi-junction

146

Heat load of a P-doped GaAs photocathode in SRF electron gun  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many efforts were made over the last decades to develop a better polarized electron source for the high energy physics. Several laboratories operate DC guns with the Gallium-Arsenide photo-cathode, which yield a highly polarized electron beam. However, the beam's emittance might well be improved using a Superconducting RF electron gun, which delivers beams of higher brightness than DC guns does, because the field gradient at the cathode is higher. SRF guns with metal cathodes and CsTe cathodes have been tested successfully. To produce polarized electrons, a Gallium-Arsenide photo-cathode must be used: an experiment to do so in a superconducting RF gun is under way at BNL. Since the cathode will be normal conducting, the problem about the heat load stemming from the cathode arises. We present our measurements of the electrical resistance of GaAs at cryogenic temperatures, a prediction of the heat load and the verification by measuring the quality factor of the gun with and without cathode.

Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Jain, A.; Gupta, R.; Holmes, D.

2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

147

InGaAsN/GaAs heterojunction for multi-junction solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An InGaAsN/GaAs semiconductor p-n heterojunction is disclosed for use in forming a 0.95-1.2 eV bandgap photodetector with application for use in high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction is formed by epitaxially growing on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) or germanium (Ge) substrate an n-type indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN) layer having a semiconductor alloy composition In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As.sub.1-y N.sub.y with 070%.

Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Klem, John F. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Eric D. (Edgewood, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy applied to indium arsenide quantum dot structures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The technique of Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy (STORM) has been investigated for use on nanostructures. It has been demonstrated as a viable technique to (more)

Byrnes, Daniel P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Magnetism and superconductivi[t]y in Pr-based filled skutterudite arsenides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.4.2 Electrical Resistivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.2 Electrical Resistivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.2.3 CEF E?ects on Electrical Resistivity . . 3.3

Sayles, Todd Allen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power Stories of Discovery & Innovation Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power Enlarge Photo Courtesy of University of Illinois Mechanically flexible, high efficiency solar module that uses an interconnected array of microscale GaAs photovoltaic cells, grown in a multilayer stack on a wafer and then printed onto a sheet of plastic. Enlarge Photo 04.15.11 Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power New method of fabricating semiconductors from gallium arsenide promises more affordable solar power, improved semiconductor devices. The biggest single barrier to widespread adoption of solar power continues to be the cost of solar cells. University of Illinois materials scientists supported by the DOE Office of Science have scored a

151

COBRA: Determining Atomic Positions in Thin-Film Structures and Interfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COBRA: Determining Atomic Positions in Thin-Film Structures and Interfaces COBRA: Determining Atomic Positions in Thin-Film Structures and Interfaces Coherent Bragg rod analyses (COBRA) experiments using synchrotron x-rays at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (MHATT-CAT and PNC-CAT beamlines) directly revealed the sub-angstrom atomic interaction of epitaxial films with substrates. Information on how atoms in the adjoining layers of the film and substrate rearrange to mimic each other may lead to improvements in semiconductor manufacturing and the development of novel heterostructure materials, such as multilayer ferroelectrics, magnetic nanostructures and thin film superconductors. COBRA electron density map of a Gd2O3 film on a gallium arsenide substrate. The peaks correspond to folded Gd atomic positions parallel to the plane of the substrate.

152

CX-005363: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5363: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5363: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005363: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar Junction's 100 Megawatt Manufacturing Line CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 03/04/2011 Location(s): San Jose, California Office(s): Loan Guarantee Program Office The Department of Energy's proposed action is to issue a loan guarantee to Solar Junction to finance a 100 megawatt (MW) solar cell manufacturing line for multifunction photovoltaic solar cells to expand their existing 7 MW Demonstration Facility at 401 Charcot Avenue, San Jose, California 95131. The proposed project will commercialize an entirely new class of high-efficiency solar cells and concentrating photovoltaic components that incorporate high performance junctions formed with a tunable band gap semiconductor material, Gallium Indium Nitride Arsenide.

153

Spire Semiconductor formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Semiconductor formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC Semiconductor formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Spire Semiconductor (formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC) Place Hudson, New Hampshire Zip 3051 Product Spire-owned US-based manufacturer of gallium-arsenide (GaAs) cells; offers design and manufacturing capabilities of concentrator cells. References Spire Semiconductor (formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Spire Semiconductor (formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC) is a company located in Hudson, New Hampshire . References ↑ "Spire Semiconductor (formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Spire_Semiconductor_formerly_Bandwidth_Semiconductor_LLC&oldid=351621"

154

TVDG LET Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To The B N L Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator To The B N L Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator TVDG LET Calculator This program calculates the Peak LET, Corresponding Energy and Range as well as the LET and Range at the Specified Energy for the Specified Ion in the Specified Target. Select the Target Material from the dropdown list. Select the Ion Specie from the dropdown list. Enter the Total Ion Energy in the text box. This is equal to the Atomic Mass times the Energy/Nucleon. Click the 'Calculate' button or press the 'Enter' key. The Peak LET, Corresponding Energy and Range as well as the LET and Range at the Specified Energy for the Specified Ion in the Specified Target will be returned. Select your Target from the list Air Aluminum Oxide Carbon Copper Gallium Arsenide Gold Polyester Polyethylene Silicon Silicon Dioxide Skin Soda Lime Glass Sodium Iodide Water Select your Ion from the list

155

Definition: Semiconductor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Semiconductor Semiconductor Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Semiconductor Any material that has a limited capacity for conducting an electric current. Certain semiconductors, including silicon, gallium arsenide, copper indium diselenide, and cadmium telluride, are uniquely suited to the photovoltaic conversion process.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A semiconductor is a material which has electrical conductivity to a degree between that of a metal (such as copper) and that of an insulator (such as glass). Semiconductors are the foundation of modern solid state electronics, including transistors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), quantum dots and digital and analog integrated circuits. A semiconductor may have a number of unique properties, one of which is the

156

NREL photovoltaic subcontract reports: Abstracts and document control information, 1 August 1991--31 July 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains document control information and abstracts for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontracted photovoltaic program publications. It also lists source information on additional publications that describe US Department of Energy (DOE) PV research activities. It is not totally exhaustive, so it lists NREL contacts for requesting further information on the DOE and NREL PV programs. This report covers the period from August 1, 1991, through July 31, 1992. The purpose of continuing this type of publication is to help people keep abreast of specific PV interests, while maintaining a balance on the costs to the PV program. The information in this report is organized under PV technology areas: Amorphous silicon research; polycrystalline thin films (including copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and thin-film silicon); crystalline materials and advanced concepts (including silicon, gallium arsenide, and other group III-V materials); and PV manufacturing technology development (which may include manufacturing information for various types of PV materials).

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A Study of the Activated GaAs Surface for Application as an Electron Source in Particle Accelerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of type III-V semiconductor materials as photocathodes has in recent years become a focus for the High Energy Physics community. Once activated to a negative electron affinity (NEA) state and illuminated by a laser, these materials can be used as a high-brightness source of both polarised and un-polarised electrons in some modern accelerators, for example, ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers in Combined Experiments) at Daresbury Laboratory. This paper will focus on the use of gallium arsenide (GaAs) as a photocathode, and detail the reconfiguration and re-commissioning of two vacuum systems that support standard surface science techniques such as ultraviolet/X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS/XPS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The paper will present details of cleaning GaAs in order to maximise quantum efficiency and will provide evidence from XPS and LEED to demonstrate what is happening at the atomic level.

Chanlek, N. [University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Herbert, J. D.; Jones, L. B.; Middleman, K. J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Jones, R. M. [University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

158

Ion Trap in a Semiconductor Chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electromagnetic manipulation of isolated atoms has led to many advances in physics, from laser cooling and Bose-Einstein condensation of cold gases to the precise quantum control of individual atomic ion. Work on miniaturizing electromagnetic traps to the micrometer scale promises even higher levels of control and reliability. Compared with 'chip traps' for confining neutral atoms, ion traps with similar dimensions and power dissipation offer much higher confinement forces and allow unparalleled control at the single-atom level. Moreover, ion microtraps are of great interest in the development of miniature mass spectrometer arrays, compact atomic clocks, and most notably, large scale quantum information processors. Here we report the operation of a micrometer-scale ion trap, fabricated on a monolithic chip using semiconductor micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. We confine, laser cool, and measure heating of a single 111Cd+ ion in an integrated radiofrequency trap etched from a doped gallium arsenide (GaAs) heterostructure.

D. Stick; W. K. Hensinger; S. Olmschenk; M. J. Madsen; K. Schwab; C. Monroe

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

159

Polymer photovoltaic cells: enhanced efficiencies via a network of internal donoracceptor heterojunctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The carrier collection efficiency (?c) and energy conversion efficiency (?e) of polymer photovoltaic cells were improved by blending of the semiconducting polymer with C60 or its functionalized derivatives. Composite films of poly(2-methoxy-5-(2-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) and fullerenes exhibit ?c of about 29 percent of electrons per photon and ?e of about 2.9 percent, efficiencies that are better by more than two orders of magnitude than those that have been achieved with devices made with pure MEH-PPV. The efficient charge separation results from photoinduced electron transfer from the MEH-PPV (as donor) to C60 (as acceptor); the high collection efficiency results from a bicontinuous network of internal donor-acceptor heterojunctions. The need to develop inexpensive renewable energy sources continues to stimulate new approaches to production of efficient, lowcost photovoltaic devices. Although inorganic semiconductors (silicon, amorphous silicon, gallium arsenide, and sulfide

G. Yu; J. Gao; J. C. Hummelen; F. Wudl; A. J. Heeger

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Regenerative mode photo electrochemical cells in molten salt electrolytes. 1st four monthly report (1/31/80)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most promising photoelectrodes selected for use in the butyl pyridinium chloride-aluminum chloride room temperature molten salt are n-type silicon, gallium arsenide and cadmium telluride. The solubilities of these semiconductors are low, and their conduction and valence band edges are favorably located. Cadmium selenide and sulfide showed significant solubility in the melt, and the conduction band edge for p-type cadmium telluride was too close to the aluminum deposition potential. Several reversible redox couples have been identified, which could potentially be used in a photoelectrochemical cell. These include W/sup 5 +//W/sup 6 +/ and Eu/sup 2 +//Eu/sup 3 +/ as well as ferrocene and its derivatives.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

The Story of a Cutting-Edge Solar Startup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Story of a Cutting-Edge Solar Startup The Story of a Cutting-Edge Solar Startup The Story of a Cutting-Edge Solar Startup June 20, 2012 - 9:40am Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Watch the video to learn how Alta Devices manufacturers high performance solar cells at a low cost. Alta Devices is rethinking how high performance solar cells are made. The Silicon Valley startup has taken gallium arsenide -- an expensive semiconductor material that is incredibly efficient at turning sunlight into electricity -- and developed a commercially viable processes for manufacturing it into solar modules. In 2009, Alta Devices was selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Incubator program. Now in its sixth iteration,

162

Electrochemical investigation of the gallium nitride-aqueous electrolyte interface  

SciTech Connect

GaN (E{sub g} = {approximately}3.4 eV) was photoelectrochemically characterized and the energetic position of its bandedges determined with respect to SHE. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was employed to analyze the interface, determine the space charge layer capacitance, and, subsequently obtain the flatband potential of GaN in different aqueous electrolytes. The flatband potential of GaN varied at an approximately Nernstian rate in aqueous buffer electrolytes of different pHs indicating acid-base equilibria at the interface.

Kocha, S.S.; Peterson, M.W.; Arent, D.J.; Turner, J.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Photoconversion Branch; Redwing, J.M.; Tischler, M.A. [Advanced Technology Materials, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

SYNTHESIS OF HIGH-PURITY BULK COPPER INDIUM GALLIUM SELENIDE ...  

A sputtering target formed by the method can have an oxygen content of 10 ppm by weight, ... Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; Electricity Transmission;

164

Superconductivity in gallium-substituted Ba8Si46 clathrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of superconductivity in Ga-substituted type-I silicon clathrates. We prepared samples of the general formula Ba8Si46-xGax, with different values of x. We show that Ba8Si40Ga6 is a bulk superconductor, with an onset at T-C approximate to 3.3 K. For x=10 and higher, no superconductivity was observed down to T=1.8 K. This represents a strong suppression of superconductivity with increasing Ga content, compared to Ba8Si46 with T-C approximate to 8 K. Suppression of superconductivity can be attributed primarily to a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level, caused by a reduced integrity of the sp(3)-hybridized networks as well as the lowering of carrier concentration. These results are corroborated by first-principles calculations, which show that Ga substitution results in a large decrease of the electronic density of states at the Fermi level, which explains the decreased superconducting critical temperature within the BCS framework. To further characterize the superconducting state, we carried out magnetic measurements showing Ba8Si40Ga6 to be a type-II superconductor. The critical magnetic fields were measured to be H-C1 approximate to 35 Oe and H-C2 approximate to 8.5 kOe. We deduce the London penetration depth lambda approximate to 3700 A and the coherence length xi(c)approximate to 200 A. Our estimate of the electron-phonon coupling reveals that Ba8Si40Ga6 is a moderate phonon-mediated BCS superconductor.

Li, Yang; Zhang, Ruihong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Ning; Luo, Z. P.; Ma, Xingqiao; Cao, Guohui; Feng, Z. S.; Hu, Chia-Ren; Ross, Joseph H., Jr.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Formation mechanisms of spatially-directed zincblende gallium nitride nanocrystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the spatially selective formation of GaN nanocrystals embedded in GaAs. Broad-area N{sup +} implantation followed by rapid thermal annealing leads to the formation of nanocrystals at the depth of maximum ion damage. With additional irradiation using a Ga{sup +} focused ion beam, selective lateral positioning of the nanocrystals within the GaAs matrix is observed in isolated regions of increased vacancy concentration. Following rapid thermal annealing, the formation of zincblende GaN is observed in the regions of highest vacancy concentration. The nucleation of zincblende nanocrystals over the wurtzite phase of bulk GaN is consistent with the predictions of a thermodynamic model for the nanoscale size-dependence of GaN nucleation.

Wood, A. W. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Collino, R. R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Cardozo, B. L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Naab, F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Wang, Y. Q. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Lab, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Goldman, R. S. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Nanoscale-Structured Gallium Nitride Pillars for Light-Emitting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... using top-down fabrication scheme, D. Paramanik, A. Motayed, GS Aluri, J.-Y. Ha, S. Krylyuk, AV Davydov, M. King, S. McLaughlin, S. Gupta, and H ...

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nanofabrication of gallium nitride photonic crystal light-emitting diodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a comparison of nanofabrication technologies for the fabrication of 2D photonic crystal structures on GaN/InGaN blue LEDs. Such devices exhibit enhanced brightness and the possibility of controlling the angular emission profile of emitted ... Keywords: GaN dry-etching, Light-emitting diodes, Nanolithography, Photonic crystals

Ali Z. Khokhar; Keith Parsons; Graham Hubbard; Faiz Rahman; Douglas S. Macintyre; Chang Xiong; David Massoubre; Zheng Gong; Nigel P. Johnson; Richard M. De La Rue; Ian M. Watson; Erdan Gu; Martin D. Dawson; Steve J. Abbott; Martin D. B. Charlton; Martin Tillin

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Rutherford backscattering analysis of gallium implanted 316 stainless steel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion implantation of Ga ions into 316 stainless steel was performed at fluences ranging from 8x10? to 10? ions/cm. The depth profile of Ga in the steel was analyzed via Rutherford Backscattering and ToFSIMS. The surface effects were characterized with SEM analysis. Results indicate that Ga saturation was reached at fluences between 2-6x10? ions/cm. The maximum Ga concentration occurred near the surface and was between 20 and 25 atomic percent. A constant Ga concentration of 5% was attained at 300 [] and deeper. The possible enhanced diffusion of Ga was observed, but not necessarily through the grain boundaries. Although there was no indication of compound formation, significant pitting was observed at high fluences. Repassivation characteristics of stainless steel may be inhibited at high fluences; therefore future studies are recommended.

Ortensi, Javier

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Supply Chain Dynamics of Tellurium (Te), Indium (In), and Gallium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CdTe Solar Cells, Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 90 (2006) 2263-2271. 3 CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 1986. 4 M.A. Green, K....

170

Analysis of photovoltaic/thermal electric power plant systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual definition and performance evaluation of a 100 megawatt (MW) hybrid photovoltaic/thermal electric power plant has been carried out. The concept utilizes the ability of gallium arsenide photovoltaic cells to achieve high conversion efficiency at high incident fluxes and elevated temperatures. Solar energy is focused by a field of steerable mirrors (heliostats) onto a tower mounted receiver whose outer surface is covered with gallium arsenide (AlGaAs/GaAs) solar cells and whose inner surface is a water boiler. The solar cells convert a fraction of the incident radiation into electrical energy, and the remaining energy is extracted at approximately 200/sup 0/C and used to power a Rankine cycle turbine generator (bottoming cycle). Water is used as the solar cell array coolant, as the thermodynamic working fluid, and as the thermal energy storage medium. Parametric studies were conducted to select conceptual design parameters and operational characteristics which imply the lowest levelized busbar electric energy costs. Parameters varied were collector area, condenser surface area, fan power, ambient temperature, and electric and thermal energy storage capacities. The report describes the concept, outlines the design analysis method, summarizes the parametric study results, and defines the selected plant configuration. The lowest levelized busbar electric energy generation cost, 70 mills/kilowatt-hr., was achieved with a relatively small collector area, 0.8 x 10/sup 6/ square meters, and no stored energy. A rough comparison of this combined power plant with a similar photovoltaic plant, operated at lower solar cell temperature and with no bottoming cycle, showed the busbar cost of electricity (BBEC) from the combined system to be approximately 9% lower.

Gluck, D.F.; Kelley, W.A.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Structural and physical properties of layered oxy-arsenides LnRuAsO (Ln=La, Nd, Sm, Gd)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycrystalline samples of LaRuAsO, NdRuAsO, SmRuAsO, and GdRuAsO have been synthesized and studied using powder x-ray diffraction, electrical transport, magnetization, and heat capacity measurements. Variations in structural properties across the series reveal a trend toward more ideal tetrahedral coordination around Ru as the size of the rare earth element is reduced. The lattice parameters of these Ru compounds show a more anisotropic response to variation in Ln than their Fe analogs, and significant anisotropy in thermal expansion is also observed. Transport measurements show metallic behavior, and carrier concentrations near 10{sup 21}-10{sup 22} electrons per cm{sup 3} are inferred from simple analysis of Hall effect measurements. Anomalies in resistivity, magnetization, and heat capacity indicate antiferromagnetic ordering of rare earth moments at 5 K for GdRuAsO, 4.5 K for SmRuAsO, and heat capacity of LaRuAsO, NdRuAsO, SmRuAsO, and GdRuAsO. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental investigation of LaRuAsO, NdRuAsO, SmRuAsO, and GdRuAsO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anisotropic lattice response to changing Ln radius and temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ru coordination becomes more ideal as Ln radius is reduced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport measurements reveal metallic conduction dominated by electrons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic measurements indicate antiferromagnetic ordering Nd, Sm, and Gd moments.

McGuire, Michael A., E-mail: McGuireMA@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); May, Andrew F.; Sales, Brian C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Rapid liquid phase epitaxial growth studies of GaAs: Final report, July 1984-June 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single crystal layers of gallium arsenide have been grown on (111) and (100) oriented GaAs substrates from a flowing, GaAs saturated, gallium solution with a few degrees temperature differential across the liquid/solid interface. Very high growth rates, on the order of 8..mu..m per minute, have been observed. Such rates are in agreement with the growth theory developed as part of this program, and are about two orders greater than those typically achieved in conventional, static solution, liquid phase epitaxy. Both undoped and p-doped (Si) GaAs layers have been grown and some of their material properties measured. Good crystallinity was inferred from the narrowness of x-ray diffraction lines and from the intensities of the photoluminescence responses of all specimens sampled. While these results do not prove that the epi material is of photovoltaic quality, they indicate both a high crystallographic perfection and a low density of life-time poisoning impurities; conditions which are usually necessary for PV device development. Thus far, smooth surfaces have not been produced directly by the rapid liquid phase epitaxy (RLPE) process. The rough surface morphologies are due, at least in part, to incomplete wipe off of the liquid when the substrate is withdrawn at the end of the growth cycle. Another potential source is growth instabilities which will be discussed later. This report summarizes the three year research program of the RLPE process sponsored by DOE-SOLERAS.

Gerritsen, H.J.; Crisman, E.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Amorphous Gallium Indium Zinc Oxide NonvolatileAmorphous gallium indium zinc oxide thin film transistors:Effects in Amorphous GalliumIndium Zinc- xv Oxide Thin Film

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Synthesis and characterization of visible emission from rare-earth doped aluminum nitride, gallium nitride and gallium aluminum nitride powders and thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to improve sealing and prevent the ingress of air, as shownimproved sealing and prevented the ingress of air, which

Tao, Jonathan Huai-Tse

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Crystallographic and magnetic phase transitions in the layered ruthenium oxy-arsenides TbRuAsO and DyRuAsO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The crystallographic and physical properties of TbRuAsO and DyRuAsO at and below room temperature are reported, including full structure refinements from powder X-ray diffraction data and measured electrical and thermal transport properties, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity. Both compounds are isostructural to LaFeAsO (ZrCuSiAs-type, P4/nmm) at room temperature. However, DyRuAsO undergoes a symmetry-lowering crystallographic phase transition near 25 K, and adopts an orthorhombic structure (Pmmn) below this temperature. This structural distortion is unlike those observed in the analogous Fe compounds. Magnetic phase transitions are observed in both compounds which suggest antiferromagnetic ordering of lanthanide moments occurs near 7.0 K in TbRuAsO and 10.5 K in DyRuAsO. The nature of the structural distortion as well as thermal conductivity and heat capacity behaviors indicate strong coupling between the magnetism and the lattice. The behaviors of both materials show magnetic ordering of small moments on Ru may occur at low temperatures.

McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Lattice distortions in layered type arsenides LnTAs{sub 2} (Ln=La-Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb; T=Ag, Au): Crystal structures, electronic and magnetic properties  

SciTech Connect

The lanthanide coinage-metal diarsenides LnTAs{sub 2} (Ln=La, Ce-Nd, Sm; T=Ag, Au) have been reinvestigated and their structures have been refined from single crystal X-ray data. Two different distortion variants of the HfCuSi{sub 2} type are found: PrAgAs{sub 2}, NdAgAs{sub 2}, SmAgAs{sub 2}, GdAgAs{sub 2}, TbAgAs{sub 2}, NdAuAs{sub 2} and SmAuAs{sub 2} crystallize as twofold superstructures in space group Pmcn with the As atoms of their planar layers forming zigzag chains, whereas LaAgAs{sub 2}, CeAgAs{sub 2} and PrAuAs{sub 2} adopt a fourfold superstructure (space group Pmca) with cis-trans chains of As atoms. The respective atomic positions can be derived from the HfCuSi{sub 2} type by group-subgroup relations. The compounds with zigzag chains of As atoms exhibit metallic behaviour while those with cis-trans chains are semiconducting as measured on powder pellets. The majority of the compounds including 4f elements show antiferromagnetic ordering at T{sub N}<20 K. - Text3: Zigzig vs. cis-trans.

Rutzinger, D.; Bartsch, C. [Anorganische Chemie, Fachrichtung Chemie und Lebensmittelchemie, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Doerr, M. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Rosner, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Neu, V. [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer metallische Werkstoffe, Helmholtzstr. 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Doert, Th., E-mail: thomas.doert@chemie.tu-dresden.d [Anorganische Chemie, Fachrichtung Chemie und Lebensmittelchemie, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Ruck, M. [Anorganische Chemie, Fachrichtung Chemie und Lebensmittelchemie, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Photovoltaics: From the laboratory to the marketplace  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaics (PV), the direct conversion of sunlight to electricity, is experiencing significant improvements in technology performance and lowered costs. Fostering these improvements, the SERI Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development (PV AR D) Project supports research and provides services to the US PV industry. This paper presents the recent advances and future direction of the PV project. Research areas are Fundamental and Supporting Research, Advanced Thin-Film Materials, High-Efficiency Materials, Module Development, and Systems Development. Materials of interest include amorphous silicon, copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, crystalline silicon, gallium arsenide and related alloys, transparent conductors, antireflection coatings, substrates, and encapsulants. The PV project inherently provides technology transfer that helps industry shorten the time to bring R D advances to the marketplace. SERI annually performs over 10,000 measurements for the entire PV community, participates in collaborative research, and welcomes visiting scientists. Two specific areas of recently increased national focus are: (1) manufacturing processes for cost-effective PV modules, and (2) systems development for high-value utility applications. The SERI research approach is based on facilitating direct contact between industry, electric utilities, and others interested in PV technology. This approach heavily relies on SERI/industry partnerships. The arrangements vary to address generic and company-specific problems to improve the US industry's competitive position and accelerate greater electric utility deployment of PV systems. 5 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Basso, T.S.; Surek, T.; Thornton, J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Inverted Metamorphic Multijunction (IMM) Cell Processing Instructions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical report details the processing schedule used to fabricate Inverted Metamorphic Multijunction (IMM) concentrator solar cells at The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). These devices are used as experimental test structures to support the research at NREL that is focused on increasing the efficiency of photovoltaic power conversion. They are not intended to be devices suitable for deployment in working concentrator systems primarily because of heat sinking issues. The process schedule was developed to be compatible with small sample sizes and to afford relatively rapid turn-around times, in support of research efforts. The report describes the use of electro deposition of gold for both the back and front contacts. Electro-deposition is used because of its rapid turn around time and because it is a benign metallization technique that is seldom responsible for damage to the semiconductors. The layer transfer technique is detailed including the use of a commercially available adhesive and the etching away of the parent gallium arsenide substrate. Photolithography is used to define front contact grids as well as the mesa area of the cell. Finally, the selective wet chemical etchant system is introduced and its use to reveal the back contact is described.

Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Young, M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Mission analysis of photovoltaic solar energy conversion. Volume IV. Supplementary studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A discussion is presented of the most significant problems associated with the production and deployment of photovoltaic arrays. The principal chemical compounds to be used in the manufacture of silicon, gallium arsenide, and cadmium sulfide photovoltaic arrays are discussed with respect to physical and chemical properties, sources of the raw materials required to extract or synthesize these materials, the methods of manufacture, storage and handling in large quantities, transportation restrictions, spills, leaks, ignition and explosion. A discussion of safety hazards associated with the finished products is followed by an analysis of the toxicological properties of all raw, refined, and finished chemical species involved. The principal tool used in the evaluation of incentive strategies was a new Public Utility Financial Analysis and Planning Model which is described in some detail. After adaptation to match the characteristics of photovoltaic plants, it was used in the comparative evaluation of six different incentive strategies. The candidate strategies, the rationale for their selection, and the results of the comparative evaluation are presented. An account is given of an attempt to assess the full non-internalized costs of coal-fired power generation. A detailed description is given of the various damage elements and their associated societal costs for coal production, coal transportation, and coal-fired power generation. (MHR)

Leonard, S. L.; Breisacher, P.; Munjal, P. K.; Neiss, J. A.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system concept development and evaluation program: atmospheric effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken a preliminary, three-year program to investigate the impacts of the construction and operation of a satellite power system, of unprecedented scale. The Department of Energy's program, titled The Concept Development and Evaluation Program, focused its investigations on a Reference System description that calls for the use of either silicon (Si) or gallium aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) photovoltaic cells on 60 satellites to be constructed in GEO over a 30-yr period. Rectennas would be constructed on the ground to receive microwave energy from the satellites. Each satellite-rectenna pair is designed to produce 5 GW of power on an essentially continuous basis for use as a baseload power source for an electric power distribution system. The environmental assessment part of the program was divided into five interdependent task areas. The present document constitutes the final technical report on one of the five task areas, the Assessment of the Atmospheric Effects, and as such presents an in-depth summary of work performed during the assessment program. The issues associated with SPS activities in the troposphere are examined. These include tropospheric weather modification related to rectenna operations and rocket launches, and air quality impacts related to rocketlaunch ground clouds. Then progressing upward through the various levels of the atmosphere, the principal middle and upper atmospheric effects associated with rocket effluents are analyzed. Finally, all of the potential SPS atmospheric effects are summarized.

Rote, D.M.; Brubaker, K.L.; Lee, J.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

PVT -- A photovoltaic/thermal concentrator total energy system: Final phase 1 project report. Building opportunities in the U.S. for photovoltaics (PV:BONUS) Two  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

United Solar completed its Phase 1 report and its proposal for Phase 2 of the PVBONUS Two program at the end of March 1998. At the same time, it also completed and submitted a proposal to the California Energy Commission PIER program for additional funding to cost-share development and testing of a pre-production model of the PVT-14. It was unsuccessful in both of these proposed efforts. While waiting for the proposal decisions, work continued in April and May to analyze the system design and component decisions described below. This document is a final summation report on the Phase 1 effort of the PVBONUS Two program that describes the key technical issues that United Solar and its subcontractor, Industrial Solar Technology Corporation, worked on in preparation of a Phase 2 award. The decisions described were ones that will guide the design and fabrication of a pre-production prototype of a 1500:1 mirrored concentrator with gallium arsenide cells when United solar resumes its development work. The material below is organized by citing the key components that underwent a design review, what the company considered, what was decided, the name of the expected supplier, if not to be produced in-house, and some information about expected costs. The cost figures given are usually budgetary estimates, not the result of firm quotations or extensive analysis.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

NREL photovoltaic subcontract reports: Abstracts and document control information, 1 August 1992--31 July 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains document control information and abstracts for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) program publications. It also lists source information on additional publications that describe US Department of Energy (DOE) PV research activities. It is not totally exhaustive, so it lists NREL contacts for requesting further information on the DOE and NREL PV programs. This report covers the period from August 1, 1992, through July 31, 1993. This report is published periodically, with the previous one covering the period from August 1, 1991, through July 31, 1992. The purpose of continuing this type of publication is to help keep people abreast of specific PV interests, while maintaining a balance on the costs to the PV program. The information in this report is organized under PV technology areas: Amorphous Silicon Research; Polycrystalline Thin Films (including copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and thin-film silicon); Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts (including silicon, gallium arsenide, and other group III-V materials); PV Manufacturing Technology Development (which may include manufacturing information for various types of PV materials).

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Gallium Safety in the Laboratory INEEL/CON-03-00078  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

This is a preprint of a paper intended for publication in a This is a preprint of a paper intended for publication in a journal or proceedings. Since changes may be made before publication, this preprint should not be cited or reproduced without permission of the author. This document was prepared as a account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, or any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for any third party's use, or the results of such use, of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed in this report, or represents that its use by such third party would not infringe privately owned rights. The views expressed in this paper are

184

Analysis of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistor contact metal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 157-159 (2008). 22 W.L. Bragg, Philosophical Magazine Series 6, 40:236, 169-189 (1920). 23 N.E. Holden, Pure & Appl. Chem. 52, 2349-2384 (1979). 24 J.F. Shackelford and W. Alexander, Materials science and engineering handbook, ed. 3. (CRC...

Kiani, Ahmed; Hasko, David G.; Milne, William I.; Flewitt, Andrew J.

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Quantum wells on indium gallium arsenic compositionally graded buffers realized by molecular beam epitaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a long time, there has been a desire to extend the emission wavelength of GaAs-based quantum well lasers, with the aim of eventually replacing InP with GaAs as the substrate of choice for communication applications. ...

Choy, Henry Kwong Hin, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Synthesis, Structure, and Molecular Dynamics of Gallium Complexes of Schizokinen and the Amphiphilic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The activation parameters found for the two sequential steps of the proton independent pathway were Hq ) 25 ( 3 kcal M-1 , Sq ) 25 ( 7 cal M-1 K-1 and Hq ) 17.1 ( 0.2 kcal M-1 , Sq ) 0.3 ( 2.7 cal M-1 K-1 organic compounds that are produced by microorganisms in response to iron deficiency. These compounds

Groves, John T.

187

Dependence of carrier mobility on an electric field in gallium selenide crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dependence of the mobility of charge carriers on voltage has been studied in undoped GaSe single crystals and crystals doped with gadolinium; the latter crystals have exhibited various values of dark resistivity ({rho}{sub d.r} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4}-10{sup 8} {Omega} cm at 77 K) and of the doping level (N = 10{sup -5}, 10{sup -4}, 10{sup -3}, 10{sup -2}, and 10{sup -1} at %). It is established that the dependence of the charge-carrier mobility on the electric field applied to the sample E {=} 10{sup 4} {Omega} cm) and in lightly doped GaSe crystals (N {<=} 10{sup -2} at %) in the region of T {<=} 150 K. It is found that this dependence is not related to heating of the charge carriers by an electric field; rather, it is caused by elimination of drift barriers as a result of injection.

Abdinov, A. Sh., E-mail: abdinov_axmed@yahoo.com; Babaeva, R. F., E-mail: Babaeva-Rena@yandex.ru; Rzayev, R. M. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Structure and electronic properties of saturated and unsaturated gallium nitride nanotubes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The atomic and electronic structures of saturated and unsaturated GaN nanotubes along the [001] direction with (100) lateral facets are studied using first-principles calculations. Atomic relaxation of nanotubes shows that appreciable distortion occurs in the unsaturated nanotubes. All the nanotubes considered, including saturated and unsaturated ones, exhibit semiconducting, with a direct band gap. Surface states arisen from the threefold-coordinated N and Ga atoms at the lateral facets exist inside the bulk-like band gap. When the nanotubes saturated with hydrogen, these dangling bond bands are removed from the band gap, but the band gap decreases with increasing the wall thickness of the nanotubes.

Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Shengjie; Li, Jingbo; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

ISOTHERMAL (DELTA)/(ALPHA-PRIME) TRANSFORMATION AND TTT DIAGRAM IN A PLUTONIUM GALLIUM ALLOY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used as an alternative approach to determining the tine-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram for the martensitic delta to alpha-prime transformation in a Pu-2.0 at% Ga alloy. Previous work suggests that the TTT diagram for a similar alloy exhibits an unusual double-C curve for isothermal holds of less than 100 minutes. Here, we extend this diagram to 18 hours, and confirm the double-C curve behavior. When the sample is cooled prior to the isothermal holds, the delta to alpha-prime transformation is observed as several overlapping exothermic peaks. These peaks are very reproducible, and they are believed to be the result of different kinds of delta to alpha-prime martensitic transformation. This may be due to the presence of different nucleation sites and/or different morphologies.

Oudot, B P; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

190

Synthesis, characterization, and biotemplated assembly of indium nitride and indium gallium nitride nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A low-temperature, ambient pressure solution synthesis of colloidal InN nanoparticles is presented. This synthesis utilizes a previously dismissed precursor and results in individual, non-aggregated nanoparticles with ...

Hsieh, Jennifer Chia-Jen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

GaN CVD Reactions: Hydrogen and Ammonia Decomposition and the Desorption of Gallium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Isotopic labeling experiments have revealed correlations between hydrogen reactions, Ga desorption, and ammonia decomposition in GaN CVD. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to demonstrate that hydrogen atoms are available on the surface for reaction after exposing GaN(0001) to deuterium at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen reactions also lowered the temperature for Ga desorption significantly. Ammonia did not decompose on the surface before hydrogen exposure. However, after hydrogen reactions altered the surface, N15H3 did undergo both reversible and irreversible decomposition. This also resulted in the desorption of N2 of mixed isotopes below the onset of GaN sublimation, This suggests that the driving force of the high nitrogen-nitrogen bond strength (226 kcal/mol) can lead to the removal of nitrogen from the substrate when the surface is nitrogen rich. Overall, these findings indicate that hydrogen can influence G-aN CVD significantly, being a common factor in the reactivity of the surface, the desorption of Ga, and the decomposition of ammonia.

Bartram, Michael E.; Creighton, J. Randall

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Interfacial Mechanics of the Thin Oxide Skin on Liquid Gallium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to micromold the metal for these applications is enabled by the ... The oxide skin is elastic and yields under a critical stress, at which point the metal flows. ... Interface Bond Strength of HIP-Clad Depleted Uranium and 6061- Aluminum ... Quantitative NanoSIMS Analysis of Grain Boundary Segregation in Bulk...

193

Diffusion, Uptake and Release of Hydrogen in p-type Gallium Nitride: Theory and Experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The diffusion, uptake, and release of H in p-type GaN are modeled employing state energies from density-function theory and compared with measurements of deuterium uptake and release using nuclear-reaction analysis. Good semiquantitative agreement is found when account is taken of a surface permeation barrier.

MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; PETERSEN,GARY A.; WAMPLER,WILLIAM R.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; HAN,JUNG

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

194

The equilibrium state of hydrogen in gallium nitride: Theory and experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Formation energies and vibrational frequencies for H in wurtzite GaN were calculated from density functional theory and used to predict equilibrium state occupancies and solid solubilities for p-type, intrinsic, and n-type material. The solubility of deuterium (D) was measured at 600--800 C as a function of D{sub 2} pressure and doping and compared with theory. Agreement was obtained by reducing the H formation energies 0.2 eV from ab-initio theoretical values. The predicted stretch-mode frequency for H bound to the Mg acceptor lies 5% above an observed infrared absorption attributed to this complex. It is concluded that currently recognized H states and physical processes account for the equilibrium behavior of H examined in this work.

MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; PETERSEN,GARY A.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; WAMPLER,WILLIAM R.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; HAN,JUNG

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

195

Scintigraphic evaluation of Lyme disease: Gallium-67 imaging of Lyme myositis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A patient suffering from Lyme disease had cardiac conduction abnormalities, symptoms of arthritis, and myalgia. A Ga-67 image showed evidence of endomyocarditis, but intense skeletal muscle uptake pointed to Lyme myositis. Reference is made to two other case reports of Lyme myositis.

Kengen, R.A.; v.d. Linde, M.; Sprenger, H.G.; Piers, D.A. (Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Preconceptual Design For Separation Of Plutonium And Gallium By Ion Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................................. 5 2.0 BACKGROUND.........................................................................5 3.0 PROCESS DESCRIPTION.............................................................6 3.1 Oxidation of Metal...............................................................7 3.2 Dissolution of Oxide............................................................ 8 3.3 Ion Exchange (IX).............................................................. 8 3.4 Plutonium Product Preparation................................................ 10 3.5 Recycle Operations..............................................................10 3.6 Waste Generation................................................................10 4.0 MATERIAL BALANCES...............................................................11 4.1 Dissolution of Oxide............................................................ 11 4.2 IX Feed Pretreatment.............................

Scott Demuth; Scott F. Demuth

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Radiation-Hardened Gallium Nitride Detector and Arrays for Fusion Diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This poster reports testing to confirm that GaN devices exhibit the extreme radiation hardness needed for use at the NIF, functioning properly after 1x10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2} proton irradiation in one year.

Sun, K. X., and MacNeil, L.

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

198

SAGE: Solar Neutrino Data from SAGE, the Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

SAGE is a solar neutrino experiment based on the reaction 71Ga + n goes to 71Ge + e-. The 71Ge atoms are chemically extracted from a 50-metric ton target of Ga metal and concentrated in a sample of germane gas mixed with xenon. The atoms are then individually counted by observing their decay back to 71Ga in a small proportional counter. The distinguishing feature of the experiment is its ability to detect the low-energy neutrinos from proton-proton fusion. These neutrinos, which are made in the primary reaction that provides the Sun's energy, are the major component of the solar neutrino flux and have not been observed in any other way. To shield the experiment from cosmic rays, it is located deep underground in a specially built facility at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory in the northern Caucasus mountains of Russia. Nearly 100 measurements of the solar neutrino flux have been made during 1990-2000, and their combined result is a neutrino capture rate that is well below the prediction of the Standard Solar Model. The significant suppression of the solar neutrino flux that SAGE and other solar neutrino experiments have observed gives a strong indication for the existence of neutrino oscillations. [copied from the SAGE homepage at http://ewi.npl.washington.edu/SAGE/SAGE.html

SAGE Collaboration

199

Transparent Conducting Contacts Based on Zinc Oxide Substitutionally Doped with Gallium: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are a critical element in photovoltaic devices. This paper describes research on Ga:ZnO (a TCO candidate) using a high-throughput combinatorial approach.

Gorrie, C. W.; Reese, M.; Perkins, J. D.; Alleman, J. L.; Dabney M. S.; To, B.; Ginley, D. S.; Berry, J. J.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Synthesis and optical properties of CsC1-doped gallium-sodium-sulfide glasses  

SciTech Connect

Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}S (GNS) glasses doped with CsCl were synthesized in open crucibles under inert atmosphere. The evaporative loss of CsCl during glass melting was measured by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and corrected for by biasing the CsCl concentration in the mixture of starting materials to obtain glasses with accurately controlled stoichiometry. Glass transition temperatures, refractive index dispersions, and band edge energies were measured for four GNS:CsCl glasses, and the respective values were found to significantly improve over earlier studies that did not mitigate CsCl evaporative losses. The refractive index dispersion measurements indicate that the Cs{sup +} and Cl{sup -} radii are 16% larger in GNS:CsCl glass than in bulk crystalline CsCl. The band edge energy increases from 2.97 eV in GNS glass to 3.32 eV in GNS glass doped with 20 mol% CsCl as a result of introducing Cl{sup -} ions having a large optical electronegativity. The large bandgap of 3.32 eV and the low (450 cm{sup -1}) phonon energy make GNS:20%CsCl an attractive host material for rare-earth ions with radiative transitions in the near ultra-violet, visible, and near-infrared spectral regions.

Hehlen, Markus P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bennett, Bryan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Darrick J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Castro, Alonso [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tornga, Stephanie C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Commercialization of gallium nitride nanorod arrays on silicon for solid-state lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One important component in energy usage is lighting, which is currently dominated by incandescent and fluorescent lamps. However, due to potentially higher efficiencies and thus higher energy savings, solid-state lighting ...

Wee, Qixun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Using the genetic algorithm to design gallium indium nitride/gallium nitride light-emitting diodes with reduced efficiency droop and reduced spectral instability with respect to injection current  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today we are witnessing a fast growing trend that is redefining the concept of lighting. Numerous governments from all over the world have passed legislation to phase out incandescent light bulbs, with the objective of encouraging energy-efficient ...

Roya Mirhosseini / Partha S. Dutta

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Investigation of Tunable Diode Spectroscopy for Monitoring Gases in Geothermal Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of an investigation directed at the development of instrument-tation for the real-time monitoring of gases, such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and chloride (HCl), in geothermal process streams is described. The geothermal power industry has an interest in the development of new low maintenance techniques since improved capabilities could lead to considerable cost savings through the optimization of various gas abatement processes. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy was identified as a candidate tech-nology for this application and a commercial instrument was specified and procured for testing. The measurement principle involved the use of solid state diode lasers and frequency modulation techniques. The gallium arsenide diode lasers employed emit light in the 0.7 to 2.0 micron region of the electromagnetic spectrum. This region contains the overtone and combination absorption bands of a number of species of industrial interest, including H2S and HCl. A particular device can be tuned over a small range to match the absorption line by changing its applied temperature and current. The diode current can also be sinusoidally modulated in frequency as it is tuned across the line. This modulation allows measurements to be conducted at frequencies where the laser intensity noise is minimal; and therefore, very high signal-to-noise measurements are possible. The feasibility of using this technology in various types of geothermal process streams has been explored. The results of laboratory and field studies are presented along with new advances in laser technology that could allow more sensitive and selective measurements to be performed.

J. K. Partin

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Satellite power system. Concept development and evaluation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Reference System description emphasizes technical and operational information required in support of environmental, socioeconomic, and comparative assessment studies. Supporting information has been developed according to a guideline of implementing two 5 GW SPS systems per year for 30 years beginning with an initial operational data of 2000 and with SPS's being added at the rate of two per year (10 GW/year) until 2030. The Reference System concept, which features gallium--aluminum--arsenide (GaAlAs) and silicon solar cell options, is described in detail. The concept utilizes a planar solar array (about 55 km/sup 2/) built on a graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic structure. The silicon array uses a concentration ratio of one (no concentration), whereas the GaAlAs array uses a concentration ratio of two. A one-kilometer diameter phased array microwave antenna is mounted on one end. The antenna uses klystrons as power amplifiers with slotted waveguides as radiating elements. The satellite is constructed in geosynchronous orbit in a six-month period. The ground receiving stations (rectenna) are completed during the same time period. The other two major components of an SPS program are (1) the construction bases in space and launch and mission control bases on earth and (2) fleets of various transportation vehicles that support the construction and maintenance operations of the satellites. These transportation vehicles include Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles (HLLV), Personnel Launch Vehicles (PLV), Cargo Orbit Transfer Vehicles (COTV), and Personnel Orbit Transfer Vehicles (POTV). The earth launch site chosen is the Kennedy Space Center, pending further study.

Not Available

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Ultrafast dynamics of Coulomb correlated excitons in GaAs quantum wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author measures the transient nonlinear optical response of room temperature excitons in gallium arsenide quantum wells via multi-wave mixing experiments. The dynamics of the resonantly excited excitons is directly reflected by the ultrafast decay of the induced nonlinear polarization, which radiates the detected multi-wave mixing signal. She characterizes this ultrafast coherent emission in both amplitude and phase, using time- and frequency-domain measurement techniques, to better understand the role of Coulomb correlation in these systems. To interpret the experimental results, the nonlinear optical response of a dense medium is calculated using a model including Coulomb interaction. She contributes three new elements to previous theoretical and experimental studies of these systems. First, surpassing traditional time-integrated measurements, she temporally resolves the amplitude of the ultrafast coherent emission. Second, in addition to measuring the third-order four-wave mixing signal, she also investigates the fifth-order six-wave mixing response. Third, she characterizes the ultrafast phase dynamics of the nonlinear emission using interferometric techniques with an unprecedented resolution of approximately 140 attoseconds. The author finds that effects arising from Coulomb correlation dominate the nonlinear optical response when the density of excitons falls below 3 {times} 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2}, the saturation density. These signatures of Coulomb correlation are investigated for increasing excitation density to gradually screen the interactions and test the validity of the model for dense media. The results are found to be qualitatively consistent with both the predictions of the model and with numerical solutions to the semiconductor Bloch equations. Importantly, the results also indicate current experimental and theoretical limitations, which should be addressed in future research.

Mycek, M.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Electrical and optical performance characteristics of 0.74eV p/n InGaAs monolithic interconnected modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been a traditional trade-off in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion development between system efficiency and power density. This trade-off originates from the use of front surface spectral controls such as selective emitters and various types of filters. A monolithic interconnected module (MIM) structure has been developed which allows for both high power densities and high system efficiencies. The MIM device consists of many individual indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) cells series-connected on a single semi-insulating indium phosphide (InP) substrate. The MIM is exposed to the entire emitter output, thereby maximizing output power density. An infrared (IR) reflector placed on the rear surface of the substrate returns the unused portion of the emitter output spectrum back to the emitter for recycling, thereby providing for high system efficiencies. Initial MIM development has focused on a 1 cm{sup 2} device consisting of eight series interconnected cells. MIM devices, produced from 0.74 eV InGaAs, have demonstrated V{sub oc} = 3.2 volts, J{sub sc} = 70 mA/cm{sup 2} and a fill factor of 66% under flashlamp testing. Infrared (IR) reflectance measurements (> 2 {micro}m) of these devices indicate a reflectivity of > 82%. MIM devices produced from 0.55 eV InGaAs have also been demonstrated. In addition, conventional p/n InGaAs devices with record efficiencies (11.7% AM0) have been demonstrated.

Wilt, D.M.; Weizer, V.G. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Fatemi, N.S.; Jenkins, P.P.; Hoffman, R.W. Jr. [Essential Research Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Jain, R.K. [National Research Council, Washington, DC (United States); Murray, C.S.; Riley, D.R. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., West Mifflin, PA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF AN INTEGRATED PULSE MODULATED S-BAND POWER AMPLIFIER IN GALLIUM NITRIDE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

The design of power amplifiers in any semi-conductor process is not a trivia exercise and it is often encountered that the simulated solution is qualitatively different than the results obtained. Phenomena such as oscillation occurring either in-band or out of band and sometimes at subharmonic intervals, continuous spectrum noticed in some frequency bands, often referred to as chaos, and jumps and hysteresis effects can all be encountered and render a design useless. All of these problems might have been identified through a more rigorous approach to stability analysis. Designing for stability is probably the one area of amplifier design that receives the least amount of attention but incurs the most catastrophic of effects if it is not performed properly. Other parameters such as gain, power output, frequency response and even matching may suitable mitigation paths. But the lack of stability in an amplifier has no mitigating path. In addition to of loss of the design completely there are the increased production cycle costs, costs involved with investigating and resolving the problem and the costs involved with schedule slips or delays resulting from it. The Linville or Rollett stability criteria that many microwave engineers follow and rely exclusively on is not sufficient by itself to ensure a stable and robust design. It will be shown that the universal belief that unconditional stability is obtained through an analysis of the scattering matrix S to determine if 1 and |{Delta}{sub S}| < 1 is only part of the procedure and other tools must be used to validate the criteria. The research shown contributes to the state of the art by developing a more thorough stability design technique for designing amplifiers of any class, whether that be current mode or switch mode, than is currently undertaken with the goal of obtaining first pass design success.

STEVE SEDLOCK

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

208

High temperature step-flow growth of gallium phosphide by molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Post-growth surface morphologies of high-temperature homoepitaxial GaP films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been studied. Smooth, stepped surface morphologies of MBE-grown layers, measured by atomic force microscopy, were found for a wide range of substrate temperatures and P{sub 2}:Ga flux ratios. A MOCVD-based growth study performed under similar conditions to MBE-grown samples shows a nearly identical smooth, step-flow surface morphology, presenting a convergence of growth conditions for the two different methods. The additional understanding of GaP epitaxy gained from this study will impact its use in applications that include GaP-based device technologies, III-V metamorphic buffers, and III-V materials integration with silicon.

Ratcliff, C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Grassman, T. J.; Ringel, S. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Institute for Materials Research, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Carlin, J. A. [Institute for Materials Research, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

209

Frster Resonance Energy Transfer Mediated White-Light-Emitting Rhodamine Fluorophore Derivatives-Gamma Phase Gallium Oxide Nanostructures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The global lighting source energy consumption accounts for about 22% of the total electricity generated. New high-efficiency solid-state light sources are needed to reduce the (more)

Chiu, Wan Hang Melanie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Electron-beam induced electric-hydraulic expansion in a silica-shelled gallium microball-nanotube structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heteroshape-heteroscale structure of silica-shelled Ga microball-nanotube was fabricated. Under in situ electron-beam irradiation, an abnormally large and fast expansion of Ga was observed. Failed by a sole routine heating effect of electron-beam, the expansion was explained by an electric-hydraulic expansion effect taking into account a huge inner pressure induced by the repelling Coulomb force of positively charged Ga ions on the Ga microball surface. The ions were accumulated due to knocking-out of Ga electrons under irradiation and shielding effect of a silica shell which prevents the charge balance restoration. A circuit model is proposed to calculate the accumulation of Ga ions.

Gao, Y. H.; Sun, M.; Su, J. [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO), School of Physics, College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), LuoyuRoad 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhi, C. Y.; Golberg, D.; Bando, Y. [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Duan, X. F. [Institute of Physics, Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

211

Silicon-germanium/gallium phosphide material in high power density thermoelectric modules. Final report, February 1980--September 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of work on the characterization of an improved Si-Ge alloy and the fabrication of thermoelectric devices. The improved Si-Ge alloy uses a small addition of GaP in n- and p- type 80 at.% Si-20 at.% Ge; this addition reduces the thermal conductivity, thereby increasing its figure of merit and conversion efficiency. The thermoelectric devices fabricated include multicouples intended for use in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) and ring-type modules intended for use with nuclear reactor heat sources. This report summarizes the effort in the material as well as the device areas and discusses individual phases of each area. Results should form basis for further effort.

Not Available

1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Reactor with Gallium Promoted ZSM-5 Catalyst.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The huge energy demand of our society is causing fossil fuel resources to diminish rapidly. Therefore, it is critical to search for alternative energy resources. (more)

Shi, Jian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Comparative band alignment of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics on gallium nitride  

SciTech Connect

Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, HfO{sub 2} films, and HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} stacked structures were deposited on n-type, Ga-face, GaN wafers using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). The wafers were first treated with a wet-chemical clean to remove organics and an in-situ combined H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasma at 650 Degree-Sign C to remove residual carbon contamination, resulting in a clean, oxygen-terminated surface. This cleaning process produced slightly upward band bending of 0.1 eV. Additional 650 Degree-Sign C annealing after plasma cleaning increased the upward band bending by 0.2 eV. After the initial clean, high-k oxide films were deposited using oxygen PEALD at 140 Degree-Sign C. The valence band and conduction band offsets (VBOs and CBOs) of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN and HfO{sub 2}/GaN structures were deduced from in-situ x-ray and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS and UPS). The valence band offsets were determined to be 1.8 and 1.4 eV, while the deduced conduction band offsets were 1.3 and 1.0 eV, respectively. These values are compared with the theoretical calculations based on the electron affinity model and charge neutrality level model. Moreover, subsequent annealing had little effect on these offsets; however, the GaN band bending did change depending on the annealing and processing. An Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was investigated as an interfacial passivation layer (IPL), which, as results suggest, may lead to improved stability, performance, and reliability of HfO{sub 2}/IPL/GaN structures. The VBOs were {approx}0.1 and 1.3 eV, while the deduced CBOs were 0.6 and 1.1 eV for HfO{sub 2} with respect to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GaN, respectively.

Yang Jialing; Eller, Brianna S.; Zhu Chiyu; England, Chris; Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

On the Mass Eigenstate Composition of the 8B Neutrinos from the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present data of gallium experiments provide indirectly the only experimental limit on the fraction of $\

A. Kopylov; V. Petukhov

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

215

Ammothermal Growth of Gan Substrates For Leds: High-Pressure Ammonothermal Process for Bulk Gallium Nitride Crystal Growth for Energy Efficient Commercially Competitive Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The new GaN crystal growth method is adapted from that used to grow quartz crystals, which are very inexpensive and represent the second-largest market for single crystals for electronic applications (after silicon). More extreme conditions are required to grow GaN crystals and therefore a new type of chemical growth chamber was invented that is suitable for large-scale manufacturing. A new process was developed that grows GaN crystals at a rate that is more than double that of current processes. The new technology will enable GaN substrates with best-in-world quality at lowest-in-world prices, which in turn will enable new generations of white LEDs, lasers for full-color displays, and high-performance power electronics.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Structural TEM study of nonpolar a-plane gallium nitride grown on (112_0) 4H-SiC by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nitride grown on (1120) 4H-SiC by organometallic vapor phasea-plane GaN grown on a 4H-SiC substrate with an AlN buffergrown on (0001) Al 2 O 3 , 6H-SiC or free- standing GaN

Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Wagner, Brian; Reitmeier, Zachary J.; Preble, Edward A.; Davis, Robert F.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Indium-Gallium Segregation in CuIn$_{x}$Ga$_{1-x}$Se$_2$: An ab initio based Monte Carlo Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin-film solar cells with CuIn$_x$Ga$_{1-x}$Se$_2$ (CIGS) absorber are still far below their efficiency limit, although lab cells reach already 19.9%. One important aspect is the homogeneity of the alloy. Large-scale simulations combining Monte Carlo and density functional calculations show that two phases coexist in thermal equilibrium below room temperature. Only at higher temperatures, CIGS becomes more and more a homogeneous alloy. A larger degree of inhomogeneity for Ga-rich CIGS persists over a wide temperature range, which may contribute to the low observed efficiency of Ga-rich CIGS solar cells.

Ludwig, Christian D R; Felser, Claudia; Schilling, Tanja; Windeln, Johannes; Kratzer, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Calculation of oxygen diffusion in plutonium oxide films during the high-temperature oxidation of plutonium-1 weight percent gallium in 500 torr of air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxygen self-diffusion in PuO/sub 1.995/ was calculated from rate constants obtained for the parabolic oxidation of the Pu-1 wt % Ga alloy in 500-torr dry air between 250 and 480/degree/C. The activation energy for oxygen vacancy diffusion in the n-type PuO/sub 2-x/ is 22.6 kcal/mole. Results from this investigation are compared with other reported results, and possible explanation for the difference in results is discussed. 21 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Stakebake, J.L.

1988-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

219

Atomic-level cotrol of the thermoelectric properties in polytypoid nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an alloy of indium and gallium oxide. In the IGZO nanowireof 500-900 K for bulk indium zinc oxide (IZO, In 2 O 3 (ZnO)nanowires IZO and indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO, In 2-x Ga

C.Andrews, Sean

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

In This Issue:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... each sample showed enrichment to approximately ... variations in commercial high-purity gallium ... Reference Materials: Uranium isotopic standard ref ...

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Available Technologies - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

Advanced Materials; Biofuels; ... alternative semiconductor materials to be ... (copper indium gallium selenide) have potential, but their raw material sources are ...

222

Publications from Research Conducted at FIE-TAX | ORNL Neutron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thaler A., Ni N., Canfield P. C., McQueeney R. J., Schmalian J., Goldman A. I., "Unconventional pairing in the iron arsenide superconductors", Physical Review B 81, 140501...

223

LATE NEWS: KK3, Non-Catalytic Synthesis of GaN Nanostructures ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have observed the synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) nanopowders on boron ... as 400C. The synthesis process is based on the reaction between gallium atoms from the decomposition of gallium acetylacetonate and ammonia gas molecules. ... the crystal structure and growth mechanism of the grown nanostructures.

224

Structural tuning of residual conductivity in highly mismatched III-V layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new process to control the electrical conductivity of gallium nitride layers grown on a sapphire substrate has been developed. This process is based on initially coating the sapphire substrate with a thin layer of aluminum nitride, then depositing the gallium nitride thereon. This process allows one to controllably produce gallium nitride layers with resistivity varying over as much as 10 orders of magnitude, without requiring the introduction and activation of suitable dopants.

Han, Jung (Albuquerque, NM); Figiel, Jeffrey J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Solar Photovoltaic Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

From 2002 to 2007 the market for Copper Indium Gallium Selenide ... According to the U.S. Energy Information Administrations 2010 International Energy Outlook, ...

226

THERMODYNAMICS OF SOLID AND LIQUID GROUP III-V ALLOYS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature anomalous heat capacities,(! ) a maximum in theestimated high-temperature heat capacity of gallium ratherfrom low temperature heat capacity measurements. The

Anderson, T.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Copper Indium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Cluster Tool Capabilities Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Cluster Tool Capabilities The Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (CIGS) cluster tool in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory offers powerful capabilities with integrated chambers for depositing, processing, measuring, and characterizing photovoltaic materials and devices. You can read more on the rationale for developing this cluster tool and its capabilities, and check out the National Solar Technology Roadmap for CIGS Photovoltaics. Contact Miguel Contreras for more details on these capabilities. The Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide cluster tool, manufactured by DCA Instruments, will be operational in 2009. Techniques will include evaporation; radiofrequency, direct-current (DC), and pulsed DC sputtering;

228

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Abstract: Although the efficiency of the Gallium Nitride (GaN) Light Emitting-Diode (LED) has improved in the past decade, a great opportunity ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

229

Development of a Bulk GaN Growth Technique for Low Defect Density...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enabling Next-Generation Power Electronics: Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) Technique for Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates Karen Waldrip Dept. 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D...

230

Optical Tech Div 1999 - Technical Highlights - Figure 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of wavelength are shown for six materials: germanium (Ge), silicon (Si), gallium arside (GaAs), magnesium oxide (MgO), lithium fluoride (LiF), and ...

231

Optical Technology Division 1999 - Technical Highlights ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of wavelength are shown for six materials: germanium (Ge), silicon (Si), gallium arside (GaAs), magnesium oxide (MgO), lithium fluoride (LiF), and ...

232

Index of Semiconductor Process Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hydrogen Bromide, HBr. Vinyl Fluoride. C 2 H 3 F. Hydrogen Chloride, HCl. Vinyl Chloride. C 2 H 3 Cl. Hydrogen Fluoride, HF. Trimethyl Gallium. ...

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

233

NIST: Marie Curie and the NBS Radium Standards ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1908, he received his Doctorate in Physics from Imperial ... of the radioisotope gallium-67 (Physical Review 54 ... which is still in use in nuclear medicine ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

234

Nonoxide Fluorescent Nanoparticles - Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name ... y of the dopanmatert Gallium Indium ... Bloo Solar; EPOD Solar. AQT; Canrom. New Solar Ventures;

235

at-meeting technical program in .pdf format  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 24, 1998 ... trical Engr., Walter Scott Engr. Center, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 USA; ...... Radiative Efficiency of High Quality Gallium Nitride Thin Films: Peter.

236

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Reactor and Gallium Anomalies with intense (anti)neutrino emitters Thierry Lasserre (CEA) Abstract: Several observed anomalies in neutrino oscillation data can be explained by...

237

NETL: NEPA Categorical Exclusions - January 2010 to March 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EEProject Management Center Y 352010 Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices Applied Materials, Inc. Santa Clara, CA EEBETD Y 352010 Red Birch...

238

Solid-State Lighting: 2012 Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frank Cerio, Veeco Instruments Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices Vivek Agrawal, Applied Materials Driving Down HB-LED Costs:...

239

Solid-State Lighting Issue 28: Scientific Literature (Mid May...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National University of Kaohsiung (Taiwan): "Wavelength shift of gallium nitride light emitting diode with p-down structure." W.H. Lan, IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices,...

240

List of common materials available for ESTAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 20 Calcium 21 Scandium 22 Titanium 23 Vanadium 24 Chromium 25 Manganese 26 Iron 27 Cobalt 28 Nickel 29 Copper 30 Zinc 31 Gallium 32 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NIST: Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data - Atomic Number  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 20 Calcium 21 Scandium 22 Titanium 23 Vanadium 24 Chromium 25 Manganese 26 Iron 27 Cobalt 28 Nickel 29 Copper 30 Zinc 31 Gallium 32 ...

242

It's Elemental - The Element Germanium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is in the semiconductor industry. When doped with small amounts of arsenic, gallium, indium, antimony or phosphorus, germanium is used to make transistors for use in...

243

Journal of Research Volume 15  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Atomic weight of gallium, p. 409 Lundell, GEF; Hoffman, JI http://dx ... Design and construction of an experimental diffusion battery, p. 441 Proffitt, MJ ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

244

Visit the National Academies Press online, the authoritative ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the US electricity generation, and oil prices should not ... swings and a poor heating, ventilating, and air ... to gallium nitride growth is home-built, and ...

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

245

Solibro AB | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Solibro AB Place Uppsala, Sweden Zip 751 21 Sector Solar Product Develops thin film solar cells using copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). References Solibro...

246

Applied Quantum Technology AQT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AQT Jump to: navigation, search Name Applied Quantum Technology (AQT) Place Santa Clara, California Zip 95054 Product California-based manufacturer of CIGS (copper indium gallium...

247

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestme...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Transphorm, Inc. -High Performance Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistor Modules for Agile Power Electronics CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date:...

248

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Transphorm, Inc. -High Performance Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistor Modules for Agile Power Electronics CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date:...

250

Clean process to destroy arsenic-containing organic compounds with recovery of arsenic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reduction method is provided for the treatment of arsenic-containing organic compounds with simultaneous recovery of pure arsenic. Arsenic-containing organic compounds include pesticides, herbicides, and chemical warfare agents such as Lewisite. The arsenic-containing compound is decomposed using a reducing agent. Arsine gas may be formed directly by using a hydrogen-rich reducing agent, or a metal arsenide may be formed using a pure metal reducing agent. In the latter case, the arsenide is reacted with an acid to form arsine gas. In either case, the arsine gas is then reduced to elemental arsenic. 1 fig.

Upadhye, R.S.; Wang, F.T.

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

251

Evidence for three-dimensional Fermi-surface topology of the layered electron-doped iron superconductor Ba(Fe1 xCox)2As2  

SciTech Connect

The electronic structure of electron doped iron-arsenide superconductors Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} has been measured with Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy. The data reveal a marked photon energy dependence of points in momentum space where the bands cross the Fermi energy, a distinctive and direct signature of three-dimensionality in the Fermi surface topology. By providing a unique example of high temperature superconductivity hosted in layered compounds with three-dimensional electronic structure, these findings suggest that the iron-arsenides are unique materials, quite different from the cuprates high temperature superconductors.

Vilmercati, P. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fedorov, A. V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Vobornik, I. [TASC National Laboratory, Trieste, Italy; Manju, U. [TASC National Laboratory, Trieste, Italy; Panaccione, G. [TASC National Laboratory, Trieste, Italy; Goldoni, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza, Italy; Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL; Jin, Rongying [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL; Mannella, Norman [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Preparation of CIGS-based solar cells using a buffered electrodeposition bath  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic cell exhibiting an overall conversion efficiency of at least 9.0% is prepared from a copper-indium-gallium-diselenide thin film. The thin film is prepared by simultaneously electroplating copper, indium, gallium, and selenium onto a substrate using a buffered electro-deposition bath. The electrodeposition is followed by adding indium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film.

Bhattacharya, Raghu Nath (Littleton, CO)

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

253

The effect of encapsulation on the morphology and chemical composition of InAs/GaAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to fabricate an effective device structure based on InAs quantum dots (QDs), the QD layers must be encapsulated within a matrix that has a wider band gap. This encapsulation is usually achieved by the overgrowth of GaAs. Coherent strained InAs/GaAs ... Keywords: encapsulation, indium arsenide, quantum dots, transmission electron microscopy

D. Zhi; M. Wei; R. E. Dunin-Borkowski; P. A. Midgley; D. W. Pashley; T. S. Jones; B. A. Joyce; P. F. Fewster; P. J. Goodhew

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

I'm happy to report that The Earth Observer is beginning its 20th year as a NASA publication. The first issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arsenide GHG greenhouse gas GHP geothermal heat pump GSA General Services Administration GSHP ground source heat pump GS-IHP ground source integrated heat pump GUI graphical user interface GW gigawatt GWh Reliability and Security TES thermal energy storage TM3PS Tactical Modular Mobile Microgrid Power Systems TPD

255

Method of making V.sub.3 Ga superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for producing a vanadium-gallium superconductor wire having aluminum as a component thereof is disclosed, said wire being encased in a gallium bearing copper sheath. The superconductors disclosed herein may be fabricated under normal atmospheres and room temperatures by forming a tubular shaped billet having a core composed of an alloy of vanadium and aluminum and an outer sheath composed of an alloy of copper, gallium and aluminum. Thereafter the entire billet is swage reduced to form a wire therefrom and heat treated to form a layer of V.sub.3 Ga in the interior of the wire.

Dew-Hughes, David (Bellport, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride LED (Light Emitting Diode) Devices CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03052010 Location(s): Santa Clara,...

257

CX-010974: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-010974: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Low-Cost Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Gallium Nitride (GaN) Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle...

258

Power Electronics Reliability Kick Off Meeting ? Silicon Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

failure modes of post-silicon power electronic (PE) devices such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) switches. * Seek opportunities for condition monitoring (CM)...

259

CX-010973: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-010973: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Low-Cost Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Gallium Nitride (GaN) Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle...

260

Long-Term Performance Data and Analysis of CIS/CIGS Modules Deployed Outdoors (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-term performance data of copper indium diselenide (CIS) and gallium-alloyed CIS (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) modules are investigated to assess the reliability of this technology.

del Cueto, J. A.; Kroposki, B.; Rummel, S.; Anderberg, A.

2008-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Embedded Atom Method for studying shock processes in materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief overview of a shock-induced phase transition in gallium will be presented showing the discovery of a meta-stable phase prior to shock melting will be...

262

CX-001137: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride LED (Light Emitting Diode) Devices CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03052010 Location(s): Santa Clara,...

263

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride LED (Light Emitting Diode) Devices CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03052010 Location(s): Santa Clara,...

264

Barrier Coatings for Thin Film Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, September 1, 2002 -- January 30, 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program has involved investigations of the stability of CdTe and copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) solar cells under damp heat conditions and effects of barrier coatings.

Olsen, L. C.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01042010 - 12312011 Santa Clara, Ca Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices To develop a multi-chamber system such as a two MOCVD chambers, one...

266

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University Ph.D. Thesis by Peter Eschbach, "Investigation of Buffer Layers in Copper Indium Gallium Selenium Solar Cells" (2002) 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 Binding Energy (eV)...

267

Research Highlights | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on structural properties of new materials, brought a sample from the solid solution of indium-gallium-magnesium-oxide (i.e., InGaCu0.60Mg0.40O4) to the workshop. "The...

268

Semiconductor Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an alloy of indium and gallium oxide. In the IGZO nanowireprecipitation of indium in zinc oxide. Journal of PhysicsO 3 (ZnO) n ), and indium iron zinc oxide (IFZO, In 2-x Fe x

Fardy, Melissa Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Nanocrystal Photovoltaics: The Case of Cu2S-CdS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solid was gallium- or indium- oxide because the EGaIn wasCdS Microarrays on Indium Tin Oxide Substrates Appliedpole figure ITO - indium tin oxide RMS root mean square

Rivest, Jessica Louis Baker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Wrapping process for fabrication of A-15 superconducting composite wires  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for fabricating superconducting wires wherein a billet of copper containing filaments of niobium or vanadium is rolled to form a strip which is wrapped about a tin-alloy core to form a composite. The alloy is a tin-copper alloy for niobium filaments and a gallium-copper alloy for vanadium filaments. The composite is then drawn down to a desired wire size and heat treated. During the heat treatment process, the tin in the bronze reacts with the niobium to form the superconductor niobium tin. In the case where vanadium is used, the gallium in the gallium bronze reacts with the vanadium to form the superconductor vanadium gallium. This new process eliminates the costly annealing steps, external tin plating and drilling of bronze ingots required in a number of prior art processes.

Suenaga, M.; Klamut, C.J.; Luhman, T.S.

1980-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Alternative Energy Technologies Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(LCDs), flat panel displays, optical coatings, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) antistatic coatings, strain gauges, gas sensors. Light-emitting diodes (LED's) Power amplifiers for cell phones Indium Gallium #12

Scott, Christopher

272

JEM Table of Contents: November 1995 - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doping of Gallium Nitride Using Disilane [pp. 1547-1550] A.E. Wickenden, L.B. Rowland, K. Doverspike, D.K. Gaskill, J.A. Freitas, Jr., D.S. Simons, and P.H. Chi.

273

PTIP Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name PTIP Ltd Place South Africa Sector Solar Product Thin-film Copper-indium-gallium-sulphur-selenide solar cell technology spinout from the...

274

Nuvosun Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 94303-4601 Product California-based copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) thin film PV maker. References Nuvosun Inc1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

275

MOCVD growth of In GaP-based heterostructures for light emitting devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, we examine fundamental materials processes in the growth of indium gallium phosphide (InGaP) via metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). In particular, we realize improvements in the epitaxial integration ...

McGill, Lisa Megan, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Long-Term Performance Data and Analysis of CIS/CIGS Modules Deployed Outdoors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-term performance data of copper indium diselenide (CIS) and gallium-alloyed CIS (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) modules are investigated to assess the reliability of this technology.

del Cueto, J.A.; Rummel, S.; Kroposki, B.; Anderberg, A.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-High Performance Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistor Modules for Agile Power Electronics CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08052010 Location(s): California Office(s):...

278

Amorphous silicon/polycrystalline thin film solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved photovoltaic solar cell is described including a p-type amorphous silicon layer, intrinsic amorphous silicon, and an n-type polycrystalline semiconductor such as cadmium sulfide, cadmium zinc sulfide, zinc selenide, gallium phosphide, and gallium nitride. The polycrystalline semiconductor has an energy bandgap greater than that of the amorphous silicon. The solar cell can be provided as a single-junction device or a multijunction device.

Ullal, H.S.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

279

Sulfide-Driven Arsenic Mobilization from Arsenopyrite and Black Shale Pyrite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examined the hypothesis that sulfide drives arsenic mobilization from pyritic black shale by a sulfide-arsenide exchange and oxidation reaction in which sulfide replaces arsenic in arsenopyrite forming pyrite, and arsenide (As-1) is concurrently oxidized to soluble arsenite (As+3). This hypothesis was tested in a series of sulfide-arsenide exchange experiments with arsenopyrite (FeAsS), homogenized black shale from the Newark Basin (Lockatong formation), and pyrite isolated from Newark Basin black shale incubated under oxic (21% O2), hypoxic (2% O2, 98% N2), and anoxic (5% H2, 95% N2) conditions. The oxidation state of arsenic in Newark Basin black shale pyrite was determined using X-ray absorption-near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). Incubation results show that sulfide (1 mM initial concentration) increases arsenic mobilization to the dissolved phase from all three solids under oxic and hypoxic, but not anoxic conditions. Indeed under oxic and hypoxic conditions, the presence of sulfide resulted in the mobilization in 48 h of 13-16 times more arsenic from arsenopyrite and 6-11 times more arsenic from isolated black shale pyrite than in sulfide-free controls. XANES results show that arsenic in Newark Basin black shale pyrite has the same oxidation state as that in FeAsS (-1) and thus extend the sulfide-arsenide exchange mechanism of arsenic mobilization to sedimentary rock, black shale pyrite. Biologically active incubations of whole black shale and its resident microorganisms under sulfate reducing conditions resulted in sevenfold higher mobilization of soluble arsenic than sterile controls. Taken together, our results indicate that sulfide-driven arsenic mobilization would be most important under conditions of redox disequilibrium, such as when sulfate-reducing bacteria release sulfide into oxic groundwater, and that microbial sulfide production is expected to enhance arsenic mobilization in sedimentary rock aquifers with major pyrite-bearing, black shale formations.

Zhu, W.; Young, L; Yee, N; Serfes, M; Rhine, E; Reinfelder, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Final Technical Report of project: "Contactless Real-Time Monitoring of Paper Mechanical Behavior During Papermaking"  

SciTech Connect

The early precursors of laser ultrasonics on paper were Prof. Y. Berthelot from the Georgia Institute of Technology/Mechanical Engineering department, and Prof. P. Brodeur from the Institute of Paper Science and Technology, both located in Atlanta, Georgia. The first Ph.D. thesis that shed quite some light on the topic, but also left some questions unanswered, was completed by Mont A. Johnson in 1996. Mont Johnson was Prof. Berthelot's student at Georgia Tech. In 1997 P. Brodeur proposed a project involving himself, Y. Berthelot, Dr. Ken Telschow and Mr. Vance Deason from INL, Honeywell-Measurex and Dr. Rick Russo from LBNL. The first time the proposal was not accepted and P. Brodeur decided to re-propose it without the involvement from LBNL. Rick Russo proposed a separate project on the same topic on his side. Both proposals were finally accepted and work started in the fall of 1997 on the two projects. Early on, the biggest challenge was to find an optical detection method which could detect laser-induced displacements of the web surface that are of the order of .1 micron in the ultrasonic range. This was to be done while the web was having an out-of-plane amplitude of motion in the mm range due to web flutter; while moving at 10 m/s to 30 m/s in the plane of the web, on the paper machine. Both teams grappled with the same problems and tried similar methods in some cases, but came up with two similar but different solutions one year later. The IPST, GT, INL team found that an interferometer made by Lasson Technologies Inc. using the photo-induced electro-motive force in Gallium Arsenide was able to detect ultrasonic waves up to 12-15 m/s. It also developed in house an interferometer using the Two-Wave Mixing effect in photorefractive crystals that showed good promises for on-line applications, and experimented with a scanning mirror to reduce motion-induced texture noise from the web and improve signal to noise ratio. On its side, LBNL had the idea to combine a commercial Mach-Zehnder interferometer to a spinning mirror synchronized to the web speed, in order to make almost stationary measurements. The method was demonstrated at up to 10 m/s. Both teams developed their own version of a web simulator that was driving a web of paper at 10 m/s or higher. The Department of Energy and members of the Agenda 2020 started to make a push for merging the two projects. This made sense because their topics were really identical but this was not well received by Prof. Brodeur. Finally IPST decided to reassign the direction of the IPST-INL-GT project in the spring of 1999 to Prof. Chuck Habeger so that the two teams could work together. Also at this time, Honeywell-Measurex dropped as a member of the team. It was replaced by ABB Industrial Systems whose engineers had extensive previous experience of working with ultrasonic sensors on paperboard. INL also finished its work on the project as its competencies were partly redundant with LBNL. From the summer of 1999, the IPST-GT and LBNL teams were working together and helped each other often by collaborating and visiting either laboratory when was necessary. Around the beginning of 2000, began an effort at IPST to create an off-line laser-ultrasonics instrument that could perform automated measurements of paper and paperboard's bending stiffness. It was widely known that the mechanical bending tests of paper used for years by the paper industry were very inaccurate and exhibited poor reproducibility; therefore the team needed a new instrument of reference to validate its future on-line results. In 1999-2000, the focus of the on-line instrument was on a pre-industrial demonstration on a pilot coater while reducing the damage to the web caused by the generation laser, below the threshold where it could be visible by the naked eye. During the spring of 2000 Paul Ridgway traveled to IPST and brought with him a redesigned system still using the same Mach-Zehnder interferometer as before, but this time employing an electric motor-driven spinning mirror instead of the previously belt-driven m

Emmanuel Lafond; Paul Ridgway; Ted Jackson; Rick Russo; Ken Telschow; Vance Deason; Yves Berthelot; David Griggs; Xinya Zhang; Gary Baum

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pressure-Composition-Temperature (PCT) data are presented for the plutonium-hydrogen (Pu-H) and plutonium-deuterium (Pu-D) systems in the solubility region up to terminal solubility (precipitation of PuH{sub 2}). The heats of solution for PuH{sub s} and PuD{sub s} are determined from PCT data in the ranges 350-625 C for gallium alloyed Pu and 400-575 C for unalloyed Pu. The solubility of high purity plutonium alloyed with 2 at.% gallium is compared to high purity unalloyed plutonium. Significant differences are found in hydrogen solubility for unalloyed Pu versus gallium alloyed Pu. Differences in hydrogen solubility due to an apparent phase change are observable in the alloyed and unalloyed solubilities. The effect of iron impurities on Pu-Ga alloyed Pu is shown via hydrogen solubility data as preventing complete homogenization.

Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bridgewater, Jon S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ward, John W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

SOLDERING OF ALUMINUM BASE METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent deals with the soldering of aluminum to metals of different types, such as copper, brass, and iron. This is accomplished by heating the aluminum metal to be soldered to slightly above 30 deg C, rubbing a small amount of metallic gallium into the part of the surface to be soldered, whereby an aluminum--gallium alloy forms on the surface, and then heating the aluminum piece to the melting point of lead--tin soft solder, applying lead--tin soft solder to this alloyed surface, and combining the aluminum with the other metal to which it is to be soldered.

Erickson, G.F.

1958-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

283

Faraday rotation and sensitivity of (100) bismuth-substituted ferrite garnet films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated the Faraday rotation of in-plane magnetized bismuth-substituted ferrite garnet films grown by liquid phase epitaxy on (100) oriented gadolinium gallium garnet substrates. The Faraday spectra were measured for photon energies between 1.7- 2.6 eV. To interprete the spectra, we use a model based on two electric dipole transitions, one tetrahedral and one octahedral. Furthermore, the Faraday rotation sensitivity was measured at 2.3 eV, and found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predicitions. In particular, we find that the sensitivity increases linearly with the bismuth content and nonlinearly with the gallium content. 1 I.

L. E. Helseth; A. G. Solovyev; R. W. Hansen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Synthesis and characterization of GaN thin films deposited on different substrates using a low-cost electrochemical deposition technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gallium nitride GaN thin films were deposited on three different substrates; Si (111), Si (100) and ITO coated glass using electrochemical deposition technique at 20 Degree-Sign C. A mixture of gallium nitrate, ammonium nitrate was used as electrolyte. The deposited films were investigated at room temperature by a series of material characterization techniques, namely; scanning electron microscopy (SEM), EDX and X-ray diffraction (XRD). SEM images and EDX results indicated that the growth of GaN films varies according to the substrates. XRD analyses showed the presence of hexagonal wurtzite and cubic zinc blende GaN phases with the crystallite size around 18-29 nm.

Al-Heuseen, K.; Hashim, M. R. [Al-Balqa Applied University, Ajloun University College (Jordan); School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800-Penang (Malaysia)

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

285

Optical method for automated real time control of elemental composition, distribution, and film thickness in CIGS solar cell production  

The solar industry has shown significant growth over the past decade. From 2002 to 2007 the market for Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS) grew at a 60% annual rate and it is estimated that the global CIGS market will grow to $7.6 billion by 2016. ...

286

Not Your Grandma's Quilt Researchers develop technique to keep cool high-power semiconductor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

devices used in wireless applications, traffic lights and electric cars By Sean Nealon On MAY 8, 2012 in everything from traffic lights to electric cars. Gallium Nitride (GaN), a semiconductor material found by the Nano-Device Laboratory research group led byAlexander Balandin, professor of electrical engineering

287

Experience making mixed oxide fuel with plutonium from dismantled weapons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixed depleted UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} (MOX) pellets prototypic of fuel proposed for use in commercial power reactors were made with plutonium recovered from dismantled weapons. We characterized plutonium dioxide powders that were produced at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LANL and LLNL) using various methods to recover the plutonium from weapons parts and to convert It to oxide. The gallium content of the PUO{sub 2} prepared at LANL was the same as in the weapon alloy while the content of that prepared at LLNL was less. The MOX was prepared with a five weight percent plutonium content. We tested various MOX powders milling methods to improve homogeneity and found vibratory milling superior to ball milling. The sintering behavior of pellets made with the PuO{sub 2} from the two laboratories was similar. We evaluated the effects of gallium and of erbium and gadolinium, that are added to the MOX fuel as deplorable neutron absorbers, on the pellet fabrication process and an the sintered pellets. The gallium content of the sintered pellets was <10 ppm, suggesting that the gallium will not be an issue in the reactor, but that it will be an Issue in the operation of the fuel fabrication processing equipment unless it is removed from the PuO{sub 2} before it is blended with the UO{sub 2}.

Blair, H.T.; Ramsey, K.B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Aluminum battery alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

When you think of the film industry, what comes to mind? Entertainment. In this issue you will discover how films not only bring us the latest adventures but also are being sculptured at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rooftop market. Solyndra uses a copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) absorber layer in its solar cell to create revolutionary optics, semiconductors, medical devices, and solar cells. Spring 2009 In This Issue information, visit: www.jbg3.net Alumni Spotlight Phil Kraus (B.S. '93) is the director of technology at solar

Demirel, Melik C.

290

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report II.D Electrolytic Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" (in press: International Journal of Hydrogen Energy). 3. "Evaluation of RF-Sputtered Indium-Tin Oxide-Si:Ge), copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS), iron oxide (Fe2O3), etc.] that match energy requirements (Primary Contact) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 (303) 275-4270, fax

291

Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 939435138  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..............................................................................................................9 The Art of the Deal: How Can the Air Force Successfully Execute Renewable Energy Transactions of an Incident High-Energy Electromagnetic Beam ....21 Fusion Centers: Securing America's Homeland from Threats of an Incident High-Energy Electromagnetic Beam ... 23 Near-Field Imaging of Charge Transport in Gallium Nitride

292

Photonic-crystal GaN light-emitting diodes with tailored guided modes distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photonic-crystal GaN light-emitting diodes with tailored guided modes distribution Aurélien David of photonic crystal PhC -assisted gallium nitride light-emitting diodes LEDs to the existence of unextracted a promising but challenging solution towards efficient solid-state lighting. Conventional GaN-based light-emitting

Recanati, Catherine

293

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOR GALLIUM NITRIDE LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DEVICES DECEMBER 2012 CEC5002013027 Prepared for: California Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices is the final report for the grant, PIR10055, conducted by Applied the Energy Commission at 9163271551. #12;3 ABSTRACT For light emitting diodes (LEDs) to realiz

294

Aluminum battery alloys  

SciTech Connect

Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

Thompson, David S. (Richmond, VA); Scott, Darwin H. (Mechanicsville, VA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Catalysts for hydrocarbon conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalyst, particularly useful in catalytic reforming and for producing highly pure aromatic hydrocarbons, comprising an alumina carrier and containing, expressed in proportion of the weight of the alumina carrier: 005 to 1% of platinum 01 to 4% of gallium, indium or thallium 01 to 2% of tungsten, and 1 to 10% of halogen.

Le P. J.; Malmaison, R.; Marcilly, C.; Martino, G.; Miquel, J.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

296

FF1, n+GaAs Sheet Resistance Saturation and Implications to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These results can be explained via the interaction of three phenomena: a) an ... level, b) the tendency of gallium vacancies to form complexes with silicon donor ... B1, Phonon Engineering through Crystal Chemistry ... CC4, Response of Graphene-Based Field Effect Devices Exposed to Gamma and Neutron Irradiation.

297

In Situ Calibration of the SeaBird 9plus CTD Thermometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Sea-Bird Electronics (SBE 35) deep ocean reference thermometer is used with the SBE 9plus CTD system to calibrate the SBE 3 ocean thermometers of the CTD. The SBE 35 is standardized in water-triple-point and gallium-melting-point cells. The SBE ...

Hiroshi Uchida; Kentaro Ohyama; Satoshi Ozawa; Masao Fukasawa

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Direct imaging of the structural domains in the iron pnictides AFe[subscript 2]As[subscript 2] (A=Ca, Sr, Ba)  

SciTech Connect

The parent compounds of recently discovered iron-arsenide superconductors, AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} with alkaline earth A=Ca,Sr,Ba, undergo simultaneous structural and magnetic phase transitions at a temperature T{sub SM}. Using a combination of polarized light microscopy and spatially resolved high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction we show that the orthorhombic distortion leads to the formation of 45{sup o}-type structural domains in all parent compounds. Domains penetrate through the sample thickness in the c direction and are not affected by crystal imperfections such as growth terraces. The domains form regular stripe patterns in the plane with a characteristic dimension of 10--50 {mu}m. The direction of the stripes is fixed with respect to the tetragonal (100) and (010) directions but can change by 90{sup o} on thermal cycling through the transition. This domain pattern may have profound implications for intrinsic disorder and anisotropy of iron arsenides.

Tanatar, M.A.; Kreyssig, A.; Nandi, S.; Ni, N.; Bud'ko, S.L.; Canfield, P.C.; Goldman, A.I.; Prozorov, R.; (Ames)

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

299

CX-000845: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0845: Categorical Exclusion Determination 0845: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000845: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25A2445 - Ammonothermal Bulk Gallium Nitride (GaN) Crystal Growth for Energy Efficient Lighting CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/15/2010 Location(s): New York Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy This project plans to address the vast energy loss and consumption associated with conventional lighting by developing a new route to large, high-quality, single crystals of gallium nitride. These crystals will serve as substrates for light emitting diodes offering high-efficiency lighting. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000845.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-009889: Categorical Exclusion Determination Power Electronics Research and Development Program Plan

300

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 9940 of 29,416 results. 31 - 9940 of 29,416 results. Download CX-010893: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modification to Demolish Building 900A and Reconstruct Building 900 Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.15 Date: 06/28/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010893-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010894: Categorical Exclusion Determination Graphene-Based Composite Sensor for Energy Applications CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/27/2013 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010894-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010895: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Industrialization of Indium Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Transphorm Takes Energy Efficiency to a New Level | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transphorm Takes Energy Efficiency to a New Level Transphorm Takes Energy Efficiency to a New Level Transphorm Takes Energy Efficiency to a New Level February 24, 2012 - 1:20pm Addthis Transphorm's gallium nitride semiconductors could be used to make operating photovoltaic panels, like these on the roof of the Research Support Facility, motor drives and transistors more energy efficient. | Photo courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Transphorm's gallium nitride semiconductors could be used to make operating photovoltaic panels, like these on the roof of the Research Support Facility, motor drives and transistors more energy efficient. | Photo courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts?

302

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 13680 of 26,764 results. 71 - 13680 of 26,764 results. Download CX-010895: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Industrialization of Indium Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride (InGaN/GaN) Light Emitting Diodes LEDs on Patterned Sapphire Substrate (PSS) for Low Cost Emitter Architecture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/27/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010895-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010896: Categorical Exclusion Determination California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative (SUMMARY Categorical Exclusion) CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 06/27/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010896-categorical-exclusion-determination

303

Bright Lights and Even Brighter Ideas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bright Lights and Even Brighter Ideas Bright Lights and Even Brighter Ideas Bright Lights and Even Brighter Ideas July 3, 2013 - 2:04pm Addthis Kim Kisslinger, a researcher at Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials seen here with a focused-ion beam instrument, reduced the indium gallium nitride (InGaN) samples to a thickness of just 20 nanometers to prepare them for electron microscopy. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Kim Kisslinger, a researcher at Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials seen here with a focused-ion beam instrument, reduced the indium gallium nitride (InGaN) samples to a thickness of just 20 nanometers to prepare them for electron microscopy. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

304

Concerning the energy levels of silver in Ge-Si alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emission from impurity states of silver (an element of the IB subgroup) in a Ge-Si alloy, containing 18 at % Si, has been studied. The donor level of silver has been found in crystals doubly doped with gallium and silver, while its first acceptor level has been revealed in crystals doped with only silver. Single crystals were grown by pulling from a melt using a feeding rod. Doping with gallium was performed by introducing this element into the feeding rod, and silver was introduced into the crystals via diffusion. The positions of the donor and first acceptor Ag levels with respect to the top of the valence band were found by analyzing the temperature dependence of the Hall coefficient and the electroneutrality equation for the crystal: 0.06 and 0.29 eV, respectively.

Tahirov, V. I. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan); Agamaliev, Z. A. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan); Sadixova, S. R.; Guliev, A. F.; Gahramanov, N. F., E-mail: n_gakhramanov@mail.ru [Sumgait State University (Azerbaijan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

eCopy, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

he submitted manuscript has been authored he submitted manuscript has been authored ria contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W·31·10S-ENG·38. Accordingly. the U. S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty·free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so~ for U. S. Government purposes. IDENTIFICATION OF ROOT CAUSE OF VIBRATION OF A LIQUID .. GALLIUM .. COOLED SILICON MONOCHROMATOR AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ABATEMENT by S. S. Chen, S. Zhu, M. W. Wambsganss, and J. A. J endrzejczyk Energy Technology Division W.K.Lee Experimental Facilities Division August 1994 Work supported by U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Basic Energy Sciences LS-240 IDENTIFICATION OF ROOT CAUSE OF VIBRATION OF A LIQUID .. GALlIUM .. COOLED SILICON MONOCHROMATOR AND

306

CX-009000: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Categorical Exclusion Determination 0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009000: Categorical Exclusion Determination "High Quality, Low Cost Bulk Gallium Nitride (GaN) Substrates Grown by the Electrochemical Solution Growth Method CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/20/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to MEMC Electronic Materials, Inc. MEMC would conduct research and development activities for a two phase project to develop a new process method for growing large bulk gallium nitrate (GaN) crystals at low cost with improved functional properties." CX-009000.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3,

307

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Massachusetts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 CX-006559: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dedham Municipal Solar Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 08/22/2011 Location(s): Dedham, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 17, 2011 CX-006556: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gallium Nitride Electronics for Grid Applications CX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/17/2011 Location(s): Cambridge, Massachusetts Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 17, 2011 CX-006555: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gallium Nitride Electronics for Grid Applications CX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/17/2011 Location(s): Lexington, Massachusetts Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy

308

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Arkansas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Arkansas Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Arkansas Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Arkansas. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 16, 2013 CX-010974: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Low-Cost Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Gallium Nitride (GaN) Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction... CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Arkansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 16, 2013 CX-010973: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Low-Cost Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Gallium Nitride (GaN) Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction... CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Arkansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

309

Transphorm Takes Energy Efficiency to a New Level | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transphorm Takes Energy Efficiency to a New Level Transphorm Takes Energy Efficiency to a New Level Transphorm Takes Energy Efficiency to a New Level February 24, 2012 - 1:20pm Addthis Transphorm's gallium nitride semiconductors could be used to make operating photovoltaic panels, like these on the roof of the Research Support Facility, motor drives and transistors more energy efficient. | Photo courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Transphorm's gallium nitride semiconductors could be used to make operating photovoltaic panels, like these on the roof of the Research Support Facility, motor drives and transistors more energy efficient. | Photo courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts?

310

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A9 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 17, 2011 August 17, 2011 CX-006556: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gallium Nitride Electronics for Grid Applications CX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/17/2011 Location(s): Cambridge, Massachusetts Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 17, 2011 CX-006555: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gallium Nitride Electronics for Grid Applications CX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/17/2011 Location(s): Lexington, Massachusetts Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 16, 2011 CX-006538: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bringing Hydrogen Fuel Cell Systems into Green Communities - University Retirement Center at Davis Green Energy Community

311

CX-004886: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

86: Categorical Exclusion Determination 86: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004886: Categorical Exclusion Determination Copper Indium Gallium Sulfur-Selenide (CIGSS) Manufacturing Plant CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 01/05/2011 Location(s): San Jose, California Office(s): Loan Guarantee Program Office The Department of Energy's proposed action is to issue a loan guarantee to Stion Corporation to retrofit Stion's solar panel manufacturing plant at 6321 San Ignacio Avenue in San Jose, California and expand into an adjacent building at 6331 San Ignacio Avenue in order to establish a 135 megawatt nameplate capacity manufacturing plant. Stion produces monolithically integrated thin film photovoltaic modules using single-junction Copper Indium Gallium Sulfur-Selenide (CIGSS) absorbers. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

312

Peering into a Quantum Well | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Peering into a Quantum Well Peering into a Quantum Well Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights SBIR/STTR Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 09.01.11 Peering into a Quantum Well Supercomputer simulation illuminates mysterious "droop" in solid-state lighting. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Gallium nitride light-emitting diode. Image courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Gallium nitride light-emitting diode. Despite being cool, ultra-efficient, and long-lasting, solid-state lighting has yet to conquer the general lighting market partly due to a problem called "efficiency droop." New findings from simulations carried out at

313

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 13980 of 28,560 results. 71 - 13980 of 28,560 results. Download CX-010894: Categorical Exclusion Determination Graphene-Based Composite Sensor for Energy Applications CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/27/2013 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010894-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010895: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Industrialization of Indium Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride (InGaN/GaN) Light Emitting Diodes LEDs on Patterned Sapphire Substrate (PSS) for Low Cost Emitter Architecture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/27/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010895-categorical-exclusion-determination

314

Preparation of cuxinygazsen (X=0-2, Y=0-2, Z=0-2, N=0-3) precursor films by electrodeposition for fabricating high efficiency solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High quality thin films of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide useful in the production of solar cells are prepared by electrodepositing at least one of the constituent metals onto a glass/Mo substrate, followed by physical vapor deposition of copper and selenium or indium and selenium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2. Using an AC voltage of 1-100 KHz in combination with a DC voltage for electrodeposition improves the morphology and growth rate of the deposited thin film. An electrodeposition solution comprising at least in part an organic solvent may be used in conjunction with an increased cathodic potential to increase the gallium content of the electrodeposited thin film.

Bhattacharya, Raghu N. (Littleton, CO); Contreras, Miguel A. (Golden, CO); Keane, James (Lakewood, CO); Tennant, Andrew L. (Denver, CO); Tuttle, John R. (Denver, CO); Ramanathan, Kannan (Lakewood, CO); Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CO)

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

315

Lyme carditis. Electrophysiologic and histopathologic study  

SciTech Connect

To further define the nature of Lyme carditis, electrophysiologic study and endomyocardial biopsy were performed in a patient with Lyme disease, whose principal cardiac manifestation was high-degree atrioventricular block. Intracardiac recording demonstrated supra-Hisian block and complete absence of an escape mechanism. Gallium 67 scanning demonstrated myocardial uptake, and right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy revealed active lymphocytic myocarditis. A structure compatible with a spirochetal organism was demonstrated in one biopsy specimen. It is concluded that Lyme disease can produce active myocarditis, as suggested by gallium 67 imaging and confirmed by endomyocardial biopsy. Furthermore, the presence of high-grade atrioventricular block in this disease requires aggressive management with temporary pacemaker and corticosteroid therapy.

Reznick, J.W.; Braunstein, D.B.; Walsh, R.L.; Smith, C.R.; Wolfson, P.M.; Gierke, L.W.; Gorelkin, L.; Chandler, F.W.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Low Energy Solar Neutrinos and Spin Flavour Precession  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility that the Gallium data effectively indicates a time modulation of the solar active neutrino flux in possible connection to solar activity is examined on the light of spin flavour precession to sterile neutrinos as a subdominant process in addition to oscillations. We distinguish two sets of Gallium data, relating them to high and low solar activity. Such modulation affects principally the low energy neutrinos ($pp$ and $^7 Be$) so that the effect, if it exists, will become most clear in the forthcoming Borexino and LENS experiments and will provide evidence for a neutrino magnetic moment. Using a model previously developed, we perform two separate fits in relation to low and high activity periods to all solar neutrino data. These fits include the very recent charged current spectrum from the SNO experiment. We also derive the model predictions for Borexino and LENS experiments.

Bhag C. Chauhan; Joao Pulido; R. S. Raghavan

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

317

Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography.

Green, Mark A. (West Lafayette, IN); Tsang, Brenda W. (Lafayette, IN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography. 6 figures.

Green, M.A.; Tsang, B.W.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

319

NREL Spurred the Success of Multijunction Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many scientists once believed that high-quality gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) alloys could not be grown for use as semiconductors because the alloys would separate. However, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) thought differently, and they employed GaInP in a material combination that allowed the multijunction cell to flourish. The multijunction cell is now the workhorse that powers satellites and the catalyst for renewed interest in concentrator photovoltaic products.

Not Available

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Nuclear fuels technologies fiscal year 1998 research and development test plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of research and development (R and D) activities are planned at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in FY98 in support of the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). During the past few years, the ability to fabricate mixed oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel using surplus-weapons plutonium has been researched, and various experiments have been performed. This research effort will be continued in FY98 to support further development of the technology required for MOX fuel fabrication for reactor-based plutonium disposition. R and D activities for FY98 have been divided into four major areas: (1) feed qualification/supply, (2) fuel fabrication development, (3) analytical methods development, and (4) gallium removal. Feed qualification and supply activities encompass those associated with the production of both PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} feed materials. Fuel fabrication development efforts include studies with a new UO{sub 2} feed material, alternate sources of PuO{sub 2}, and determining the effects of gallium on the sintering process. The intent of analytical methods development is to upgrade and improve several analytical measurement techniques in support of other R and D and test fuel fabrication tasks. Finally, the purpose of the gallium removal system activity is to develop and integrate a gallium removal system into the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) design and the Phase 2 Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) demonstration line. These four activities will be coordinated and integrated appropriately so that they benefit the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. This plan describes the activities that will occur in FY98 and presents the schedule and milestones for these activities.

Alberstein, D.; Blair, H.T.; Buksa, J.J. [and others

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NREL Produces Highly Efficient, Wide-Bandgap, Thin-Film Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are finding new ways to manufacture thin-film solar cells made from copper, indium, gallium, and selenium - called CIGS cells - that are different than conventional CIGS solar cells. Their use of high-temperature glass, designed by SCHOTT AG, allows higher fabrication temperatures, opening the door to new CIGS solar cells employing light-absorbing materials with wide 'bandgaps.'

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

P-64: A Comparative Study of Metal Oxide Coated Indium-tin Oxide Anodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indium-tin oxide anodes capped with certain oxides of metals enhance while other oxides degrade the hole-injection and quantum efficiencies of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The oxides of tin, zinc, praseodymium, yttrium, gallium, terbium and titanium have been investigated. The power efficiency of an OLED with a 1nm thick praseodymium oxide cap is improved by 2.5 times over that of a conventional OLED without an oxide capped anode.

For Organic Light-Emitting; Chengfeng Qiu; Haiying Chen; Zhilang Xie; Man Wong; Hoi Sing Kwok

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Overview and Challenges of Thin Film Solar Electric Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, we report on the significant progress made worldwide by thin-film solar cells, namely, amorphous silicon (a-Si), cadmium telluride (CdTe), and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technology status is also discussed in detail. In addition, R&D and technology challenges in all three areas are elucidated. The worldwide estimated projection for thin-film PV technology production capacity announcements are estimated at more than 5000 MW by 2010.

Ullal, H. S.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Electron-doping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron-doping Electron-doping evolution of the low-energy spin excitations in the iron arsenide superconductor BaFe 2-x Ni x As 2 Miaoyin Wang, 1 Huiqian Luo, 2 Jun Zhao, 1 Chenglin Zhang, 1 Meng Wang, 2,1 Karol Marty, 3 Songxue Chi, 4 Jeffrey W. Lynn, 4 Astrid Schneidewind, 5,6 Shiliang Li, 2, * and Pengcheng Dai 1,2,3,† 1 Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1200, USA 2 Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190, China 3 Neutron Scattering Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6393, USA 4 NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899, USA 5 Gemeinsame Forschergruppe HZB, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, D-14109

325

2010-0124-NScD-Dai-SC in chalcoginide[2][1]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fig. 1. Magnetic structure Fig. 1. Magnetic structure of the (a) iron chalco- genide, and (b) iron pnic- tide systems, showing exchange couplings of the Heisenburg Hamiltonian. SNS shows novel spin waves in iron chalcogenide Fe 1.05 Te Measurements conducted at the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL have determined exchange couplings in the mag- netically ordered chalcogenide Fe1.05Te, a nonsuperconducting member of the iron-based family of superconductors. The results show the exchange pairings thought to be related to superconductivity occur in a next-nearest-neighbor ordering of atoms, rather than in nearest-neighbor order as in a previously studied iron arsenide. Researchers from the University of Tennessee, ORNL, and other institutions collaborated to study the spin waves in Fe

326

Rosenkranz-082511 - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rosenkranz-082511 Rosenkranz-082511 MATERIALS SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SPEAKER: Dr. Stephan Rosenkranz Materials Science Division Argonne National Laboratory TITLE: "Resonant spin excitations in Iron Arsenide superconductors" DATE: Thursday, August 25, 2011 TIME: 11:00 a.m. PLACE: Building 212 / A-157 HOST: Anand Bhattacharya Refreshments will be served at 10:45 a.m. ABSTRACT: The iron pnictides have attracted great interest following the discovery of superconductivity up to 50K and because of their superficial similarities with the cuprate superconductors. In both systems, superconductivity emerges when longrange antiferromagnetic order is suppressed by doping or pressure. This indicates that spin correlations are intimately connected with superconductivity and may be involved in the

327

Formation of manganese {delta}-doped atomic layer in wurtzite GaN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the formation of a {delta}-doped manganese layer embedded within c-plane wurtzite gallium nitride using a special molecular beam epitaxy growth process. Manganese is first deposited on the gallium-poor GaN (0001) surface, forming a {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign reconstructed phase. This well-defined surface reconstruction is then nitrided using plasma nitridation, and gallium nitride is overgrown. The manganese content of the {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign phase, namely one Mn per each {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign unit cell, implies that the MnGaN alloy layer has a Mn concentration of up to 33%. The structure and chemical content of the surface are monitored beginning from the initial growth stage up through the overgrowth of 20 additional monolayers (MLs) of GaN. An exponential-like drop-off of the Mn signal with increasing GaN monolayers, as measured by Auger electron spectroscopy, indicates that the highly concentrated Mn layer remains at the {delta}-doped interface. A model of the resultant {delta}-doped structure is formulated based on the experimental data, and implications for possible spintronic applications are discussed.

Shi Meng; Chinchore, Abhijit; Wang Kangkang; Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Liu Yinghao; Smith, Arthur R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Highly efficient blue organic light emitting device using indium-free transparent anode Ga:ZnO with scalability for large area coating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of economically-produced and environmentally-stable transparent conductive oxide (TCO) coatings is critical for the development of a variety of electronic devices requiring transparent electrodes. Such devices include liquid crystal display pixels and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs),[1, 2] solar cell applications,[3, 4] and electrically heated windows.[5, 6] The materials fulfilling these requirements are usually wide band gap inorganic transparent conductive oxides (TCOs). Tin-doped indium oxide, or ITO, has traditionally been used for electronic TCO applications because of its low resistivity, high work function and transparency. Due to the increasing cost and limited supply of indium and its tendency to migrate in to the device, there has been increasing research interest to substitute ITO with an indium-free material. A number of alternative metal oxides and doped oxides have been evaluated as TCO materials with varying degrees of success.[7, 8] Among these alternatives to ITO, gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO) [2, 9] and aluminium-doped zinc oxide (AZO) [10, 11] have drawn particular attention. These materials have been demonstrated to have resistivities and transparencies approaching those of the best ITO, low toxicity, and much lower materials cost. Although AZO is attractive as a TCO electrode material, GZO features a greater resistance to oxidation as a result of galliums greater electronegativity compared to Submitted to 2 aluminum.[12, 13

Wang, Liang (Frank); Matson, Dean W.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James S.; Bonham, Charles C.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Berry, J. J.; Ginley, D. S.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Electronic structure of BAs and boride III-V alloys  

SciTech Connect

Boron arsenide, the typically ignored member of the Group-III--V arsenide series BAs-AlAs-GaAs-InAs is found to resemble silicon electronically: its {Gamma} conduction-band minimum is p-like ({Gamma}{sub 15}), not s-like ({Gamma}{sub 1c}), it has an X{sub 1c}-like indirect band gap, and its bond charge is distributed almost equally on the two atoms in the unit cell, exhibiting nearly perfect covalency. The reasons for these are tracked down to the anomalously low atomic p orbital energy in the boron and to the unusually strong s--s repulsion in BAs relative to most other Group-III--V compounds. We find unexpected valence-band offsets of BAs with respect to GaAs and AlAs. The valence-band maximum (VBM) of BAs is significantly higher than that of AlAs, despite the much smaller bond length of BAs, and the VBM of GaAs is only slightly higher than in BAs. These effects result from the unusually strong mixing of the cation and anion states at the VBM. For the BAs-GaAs alloys, we find (i) a relatively small ({approx}3.5 eV) and composition-independent band-gap bowing. This means that while addition of small amounts of nitrogen to GaAs lowers the gap, addition of small amounts of boron to GaAs raises the gap; (ii) boron ''semilocalized'' states in the conduction band (similar to those in GaN-GaAs alloys); and (iii) bulk mixing enthalpies that are smaller than in GaN-GaAs alloys. The unique features of boride Group-III--V alloys offer new opportunities in band-gap engineering.

Hart, Gus L. W.; Zunger, Alex

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Electronic structure of BAs and boride IIIV alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boron arsenide, the typically-ignored member of the IIIV arsenide series BAsAlAsGaAs InAs is found to resemble silicon electronically: its ? conduction band minimum is p-like (?15), not s-like (?1c), it has an X1c-like indirect band gap, and its bond charge is distributed almost equally on the two atoms in the unit cell, exhibiting nearly perfect covalency. The reasons for these are tracked down to the anomalously low atomic p orbital energy in the boron and to the unusually strong ss repulsion in BAs relative to most other IIIV compounds. We find unexpected valence band offsets of BAs with respect to GaAs and AlAs. The valence band maximum (VBM) of BAs is significantly higher than that of AlAs, despite the much smaller bond length of BAs, and the VBM of GaAs is only slightly higher than in BAs. These effects result from the unusually strong mixing of the cation and anion states at the VBM. For the BAsGaAs alloys, we find (i) a relatively small (?3.5 eV) and composition-independent band gap bowing. This means that while addition of small amounts of nitrogen to GaAs lowers the gap, addition of small amounts of boron to GaAs raises the gap (ii) boron semi-localized states in the conduction band (similar to those in GaNGaAs alloys), and (iii) bulk mixing enthalpies which are smaller than in GaNGaAs alloys. The unique features of boride IIIV alloys offer new opportunities in band gap engineering. I.

Gus L. W. Hart; Alex Zunger

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Electronics Power Electronics The power electronics activity focuses on research and development (R&D) for flexible, integrated, modular power electronics for power conditioning and control, including a power switch stage capable of running a variety of motors and loads. Efforts are underway to reduce overall system costs for these vehicles through the elimination of additional cooling loops to keep the power electronics within their safe operation ranges. These challenges are being met within the program through research in: Silicon carbide and Gallium Nitride semiconductors, which can be operated at much higher temperatures than current silicon semiconductors; Packaging innovations for higher temperature operation; Improved thermal control technologies; and

332

FORMING PROTECTIVE FILMS ON METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are described of inhibiting the corrosion of ferrous metal by contact with heavy liquid metals such as bismuth and gallium at temperatures above 500 icient laborato C generally by bringing nltrogen and either the metal zirconium, hafnium, or titanium into reactlve contact with the ferrous metal to form a thin adherent layer of the nitride of the metal and thereafter maintaining a fractional percentage of the metal absorbed in the heavy liquid metal in contact with the ferrous metal container. The general purpose for uslng such high boiling liquid metals in ferrous contalners would be as heat transfer agents in liquid-metal-fueled nuclear reactors.

Gurinsky, D.H.; Kammerer, O.F.; Sadofsky, J.; Weeks, J.R.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

333

Mapping the nonlinear optical susceptibility by noncollinear second harmonic generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method, based on noncollinear second harmonic generation, to evaluate the non-zero elements of the nonlinear optical susceptibility. At a fixed incidence angle, the generated signal is investigated by varying the polarization state of both fundamental beams. The resulting polarization charts allows to verify if Kleinman symmetry rules can be applied to a given material or to retrieve the absolute value of the nonlinear optical tensor terms, from a reference measurement. Experimental measurements obtained from Gallium Nitride layers are reported. The proposed method does not require an angular scan thus is useful when the generated signal is strongly affected by sample rotation

Larciprete, M C; Giardina, M; Belardini, A; Centini, M; Sibilia, 1 C; Bertolotti, M; Passaseo, A; Tasco, V

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Definition: Photovoltaics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaics Photovoltaics Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Photovoltaics Pertaining to the direct conversion of light into electricity[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Photovoltaics (PV) is a method of generating electrical power by converting solar radiation into direct current electricity using semiconductors that exhibit the photovoltaic effect. Photovoltaic power generation employs solar panels composed of a number of solar cells containing a photovoltaic material. Materials presently used for photovoltaics include monocrystalline silicon, polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, cadmium telluride, and copper indium gallium selenide/sulfide. Due to the increased demand for renewable energy sources, the manufacturing of solar cells and photovoltaic arrays has advanced

335

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photovoltaic Engineering Photovoltaic Engineering Photovoltaic (PV) Engineering at NREL supports commercial and emerging PV technology development. Our support covers the following three areas: Engineering Testing and Evaluation. We provide engineering testing and evaluation of PV products developed by companies during work sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). We determine if products meet performance criteria established by DOE for a company's contractual obligations. Standards Development. We support the development of national and international standards. Current work includes investigating methods of preconditioning cadmium telluride and copper indium gallium diselenide PV modules so that when they are tested for reporting conditions, the results are correlated with subsequent field measurements.

336

Power Electronics Reliability Kick Off Meeting … Silicon Power Corp. & Sandia Labs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reliability Reliability 2010 Update Conference - DOE ESS Program November 4, 2010 Mark A. Smith - Systems Readiness & Sustainment Technologies Robert Kaplar, Matthew Marinella, Reinhard Brock, James Stanley, and Michael King - Radiation Hard CMOS Technology Stan Atcitty - Energy Infrastructure and Distributed Energy Resources Sandia National Laboratories Thanks to Dr. Imre Gyuk for supporting this work. Project Goals * Use experiments and modeling to investigate and characterize stress-related failure modes of post-silicon power electronic (PE) devices such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) switches. * Seek opportunities for condition monitoring (CM) and prognostics and health management (PHM) to further enhance the reliability of power electronics devices and equipment.

337

Photovoltaic Energy Program Overview, Fiscal Year 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This ''annual report'' details the FY 2000 achievements of the U.S. Department of Energy PV Program in the categories of Research and Development, Technology Development, and Systems Engineering and Applications. Highlights include development of a record-breaking concentrator solar cell that is 32.4% efficient; fabrication of a record CIGS (copper indium gallium diselenide) cell at 18.8% efficiency; sharing an R and D 100 award with Siemens Solar Industries and the California Energy Commission for development and deployment of commercial CIS thin-film modules; and support for the efforts of the PV Industry Roadmap Workshop.

Weis-Taylor, P.

2001-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

338

Self Assembly of Nano Metric Metallic Particles for Realization of Photonic and Electronic Nano Transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: In this paper, we present the self assembly procedure as well as experimental results of a novel method for constructing well defined arrangements of self assembly metallic nano particles into sophisticated nano structures. The self assembly concept is based on focused ion beam (FIB) technology, where metallic nano particles are self assembled due to implantation of positive gallium ions into the insulating material (e.g., silica as in silicon on insulator wafers) that acts as intermediary layer between the substrate and the negatively charge metallic nanoparticles.

Asaf Shahmoon; Ofer Limon; Olga Girshevitz; Zeev Zalevsky

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Thermodynamics and Structure of Plutonium Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to investigate the chemical and structural effects of gallium and impurity elements, iron and nickel, on the phase behavior and crystallography of Pu-Ga alloys. This was done utilizing a theoretical chemical approach to predict binary and ternary alloy energetics, phase stability, and transformations. The modeling results were validated with experimental data derived from the synthesis of selected alloys and advanced characterization tools. The ultimate goal of this work was to develop a robust predictive capability for studying the thermodynamics and the structure-properties relationships in complex materials of high relevance to the Laboratory and DOE mission.

Allen, P G; Turchi, P A; Gallegos, G F

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

The consequences of high injected carrier densities on carrier localisation and efficiency droop in InGaN/GaN quantum well structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the concentration of the randomly distributed In atoms on the optical properties of InGaN/GaN quantum wells. On the basis of this comparison of theory with experiment we attribute the reduction in the S- shape temperature dependence to the saturation... , the buffer layer was grown in a Thomas Swan 6x2 metalorganic vapour-phase epitaxy reactor using trimethyl gallium (TMG), silane (SiH4) and ammonia (NH3) as precursors, with hydrogen as the carrier gas. The GaN buffer layer was deposited at 1020 C on a...

Hammersley, S; Watson-Parris, D; Dawson, P; Godfrey, M; Badcock, T; Kappers, M; McAleese, C; Oliver, R; Humphreys, C

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Waste reduction and process improvements in the analysis of plutonium by x-ray fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

Significant modifications were made to a sample preparation process for quantifying gallium in plutonium metal by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence. These changes were made to minimize waste and improve process safety and efficiency. Sample sizes were reduced, cheaper sample preparation acids were used, and safety improvements were implemented. Using this modified process, results from analyzing a batch oftest samples indicated that relative precision and accuracy were {approx}0.2% and {approx}0.1% respectively, which is comparable to that obtained using the older, established sample preparation method.

Worley, Christopher G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sodweberg, Constance B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Townsend, Lisa E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Performance testing and Bayesian Reliability Analysis of small diameter, high power electric heaters for the simulation of nuclear fuel rod temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conversion of plutonium from a nuclear weapon to nuclear reactor fuel requires an evaluation of the residual gallium as a potential corrosive material within an operating nuclear fuel element. Homogeneous trace levels of gallium may remain following conversion and have the potential to migrate along the thermal gradient within the fuel and concentrate at the cladding-fuel contact zone. A system to investigate this material transport phenomenon was constructed using small diameter (0.18 inch), indirect electric heaters to simulate the centerline temperatures of operating nuclear fuel in a pressurized water reactor. The heater was inserted into annular surrogate fuel pellets containing depleted uranium, cerium oxide and trace quantities (10 ppm) of gallium to perform an initial study of the gallium migration using non-plutonium fuels and evaluate the performance of the simulation system. Heat was removed from the operating heaters by using an innovative liquid metal heat exchanger. The heaters were of a new design and were required to operate at a nominal temperature of 1000?C and for a minimum of 5000 hours. An evaluation of the expected heater lifetime and the thermal simulation system was needed in order to justify the high expense of a proposed full test using prototypic mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) containing plutonium from converted nuclear weapons. Bayesian reliability analysis methods were used to determine the expected heater failure rate because of the expected short test duration and the small sample size. Results from the operation of the simulation system and lifetime data indicate the current heater design is capable of producing the required temperatures and thermal gradients normally found in operating nuclear fuels. However, a design weakness in the heaters resulted in an unacceptably high failure rate of the heaters. The heaters were determined to have a reliability of 0.83 % at 5000 hours of operation with a Mean Time to Failure (MTTF) of 485 hours. The current heater design would require some modification and further testing prior to beginning a full scale test using prototypic MOX fuel pellets.

O'Kelly, David Sean

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Light water reactor mixed-oxide fuel irradiation experiment  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is sponsoring and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading an irradiation experiment to test mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium. In this multiyear program, sealed capsules containing MOX fuel pellets fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The planned experiments will investigate the utilization of dry-processed plutonium, the effects of WG plutonium isotopics on MOX performance, and any material interactions of gallium with Zircaloy cladding.

Hodge, S.A.; Cowell, B.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

345

Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

346

NREL Scientists Spurred the Success of Multijunction Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Before 1984, many scientists believed that high-quality gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) alloys could not be grown for use as semiconductors because the alloys would separate. One researcher at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) thought differently. His name was Jerry Olson, and his innovative thinking changed solar history. Olson identified a material combination that allowed the multijunction cell to flourish. It is now the workhorse that powers satellites and the catalyst for renewed interest in concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) products.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Research on the basic understanding of high efficiency in silicon solar cells. Annual report, 1 December 1982-30 November 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of research designed to develop a basic understanding of high-efficiency silicon solar cells and achieve cell efficiencies greater than 17% by employing innovative concepts of material preparation, cell design, and fabrication technology. The research program consisted of a theoretical effort to develop models for very high-efficiency cell designs, experimental verification of the designs, and improved understanding of efficiency-limiting mechanisms such as heavy doping effects and bulk and surface recombination. Research was performed on high-lifetime float-zone silicon, the baseline materials, low-resistivity gallium-doped czochralski silicon, and boron-doped float-zone silicon.

Rohatgi, A.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Transient radiation-induced absorption in the materials for a GSGG laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials used in the optical elements of a 1,061 m GSGG (gadolinium scandium gallium garnet) laser have been tested for transient radiation-induced absorption. The transient radiation-induced absorption in KK1, Schott S7005 and S7010, and M382 glasses have been determined for discrete wavelengths in the range 440--750 nm. Also, the transient radiation-induced absorption in {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} and MgO doped LiNbO{sub 3} has been measured at 1,061 nm. Mathematical expressions composed of exponentials are fitted to the data.

Brannon, P.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Microsoft Word - 25A2445 Continued  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This ARPA-E program plans to address the vast energy loss and consumption associated with conventional lighting by developing a new This ARPA-E program plans to address the vast energy loss and consumption associated with conventional lighting by developing a new route to large, high-quality, single crystals of gallium nitride. These crystals will serve as substrates for LEDs offering high-efficiency lighting. Around 8% of the energy consumption in the U.S. is from lighting, and by 2025, the U.S. could consume as much as 1,000 TWh per year. In addition, conventional light sources can account for more than 25% of a building's energy demands in the forms of direct energy for lighting, waste heat from the lights, and higher HVAC costs due to the waste heat. With its more efficient light production and minimal waste heat, gallium-nitride (GaN) Solid- State Lighting (SSL) technology has the potential to reduce energy consumption by

350

It's Elemental - The Element Zinc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copper Copper Previous Element (Copper) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Gallium) Gallium The Element Zinc [Click for Isotope Data] 30 Zn Zinc 65.38 Atomic Number: 30 Atomic Weight: 65.38 Melting Point: 692.68 K (419.53°C or 787.15°F) Boiling Point: 1180 K (907°C or 1665°F) Density: 7.134 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 12 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the German word zink. Say what? Zinc is pronounced as ZINK. History and Uses: Although zinc compounds have been used for at least 2,500 years in the production of brass, zinc wasn't recognized as a distinct element until much later. Metallic zinc was first produced in India sometime in the 1400s by heating the mineral calamine (ZnCO3) with wool. Zinc was rediscovered by

351

A new optical parametric amplifier based on lithium thioindate used for sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopic studies of the Amide I mode of an interfacial model peptide  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new optical parametric amplifier (OPA) that employs lithium thioindate, LiInS{sub 2} (LIS), to create tunable infrared light between 1500 cm{sup -1} and 2000 cm{sup -1}. The OPA based on LIS described within provides intense infrared light with a good beam profile relative to similar OPAs built on silver gallium sulfide, AgGaS{sub 2} (AGS), or silver gallium selenide, AgGaSe{sub 2} (AGSe). We have used the new LIS OPA to perform surface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy of the amide I vibrational mode of a model peptide at the hydrophobic deuterated polystyrene (d{sub 8}-PS)-phosphate buffered saline interface. This model polypeptide (which is known to be an ?-helix in the bulk solution under the high ionic strength conditions employed here) contains hydrophobic leucyl (L) residues and hydrophilic lysyl (K) residues, with sequence Ac-LKKLLKLLKKLLKL-NH{sub 2}. The amide I mode at the d{sub 8}-PS-buffer interface was found to be centered around 1655 cm{sup -1}. This can be interpreted as the peptide having maintained its {alpha}-helical structure when adsorbed on the hydrophobic surface, although other interpretations are discussed.

York, Roger L.; Holinga, George J.; Guyer, Dean R.; McCrea, Keith R.; Ward, Robert S.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2008-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

352

Potential mechanisms for corrosion and stress corrosion cracking failure of 3013 storage containers composed of 316 stainless steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The degradation of 316 stainless steel (SS) storage container materials is a potential problem for radioactive waste disposition. Container materials will be exposed to significant ionizing radiation, elevated temperatures, embrittling and/or alloying agents (e.g., gallium), chloride-containing compounds (as much as 20 wt% Cl or Cl{sup {minus}}), oxidizing compounds, and a limited quantity of moisture. Additionally, containers will contain welds that have heterogeneous composition due to solute segregation and that may retain significant residual stress. All of the above-listed environmental and material conditions have been shown to be deleterious to material integrity under certain conditions. Unfortunately, the precise conditions within each container and environment is unknown and may vary widely from container to container. Thus, no single test or set of tests will be able mimic the broad range of storage container conditions. Additionally, material behavior cannot be predicted because the synergistic effects of temperature, time, chloride, moisture, sensitization, weldments, salt formation, etc., have not been fully studied. The complexity and uncertainty of storage conditions precludes any detailed recommendations. This document attempts to detail selected previous studies and to suggest some general guidelines for storage of radioactive waste. Because of the voluminous research in this area, this review cannot be considered to be comprehensive. Readers are directed to references that contain detailed reviews of particular processes for more information. Note that the effect of gallium on the degradation of SS storage containers has been discussed elsewhere and will not be discussed here.

Kolman, D.G.; Butt, D.P.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Viscoelastic properties of oxide-coated liquid metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many liquid metals exposed to air develop an oxide film on their outer surface. This film is sufficiently solid-like to provide mechanical stability to small liquid metal droplets, yet weak enough to allow the droplets to be malleable. These properties are useful in both micro-electronics and microfluidics; however, little is known about how to characterize them. Here we probe the elastic, yielding, and relaxation properties of oxide-coated gallium and eutectic gallium indium using a rheometer equipped with a parallel-plate geometry. By using parallel plates of different size, we show that surface stresses dominate bulk stresses. These experiments also demonstrate that the apparent elastic properties of the oxide film are highly sensitive to its strain history. Moreover, the apparent elasticity is sensitive to the stresses stored in the oxide skin. We probe these stresses and their time-dependence, with both torque and normal force measurements. We also characterize the time-dependence of the elasticity by observing free vibrations of the rheometer. We rationalize the strain history and time-dependence in terms of oxidation and show that despite this dependence, reproducible elasticity measurements can be obtained due to the ability of shear to produce a state that is independent of the strain history. 2009 The Society of Rheology. ?DOI: 10.1122/1.3236517? I.

Ryan J. Larsen A; Michael D. Dickey B; George M. Whitesides; David A. Weitz C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

FEA analysis of diamond as IMCA{close_quote}s monochromator crystal  

SciTech Connect

A great deal of effort has been make in recent years in the field of undulator high heat load optics, and currently there are several tractable options [Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 69}, 2792 (1994); Nucl. Instrum. Methods A {bold 266}, 517 (1988); Nucl. Instrum. Methods A {bold 239}, 555 (1993)]. Diamond crystals offer some attractive options{endash}water as the coolant, the use of established monochromator mechanisms, simpler monochromator design as compared to the use of liquid nitrogen or gallium. The use of diamond crystals as the optical elements in a double-crystal monochromator for the IMCA-CAT and MR-CAT ID beamlines has been studied. A first crystal mounting scheme using an indium-gallium eutectic as the heat transfer medium developed in collaboration with DND-CAT and M. Hart will be presented. A FEA analysis of the IMCA-CAT ID beamline arrangement using the APS undulator A as the radiaiton source will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Chrzas, J.; Cimpoes, S.; Ivanov, I.N. [CSRRI, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3301 S. Dearborn Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Quarterly progress report on the evaluation of critical materials for photovoltaic cells  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the activities included in this program are as follows: (1) characterize new and improved photovoltaic cell designs and production processes for subsequent analysis; (2) review or screen these designs for potential material shortages or other constraints; (3) carry out investigations of the probable costs of new sources of materials potentially in short supply, concentrating on gallium and indium; and (4) identify options for coping with or mitigating the problems identified. The methodology and data base used in the CMAP (Critical Material Analysis Program) computer program were developed as part of a broad scale DOE program to review the potential material constraints of all solar programs. The photovoltaic report screened 13 cells in 15 systems and assumed 100% material utilization (process efficiency) in producing the photovoltaic cells. This study emphasizes the availability of cell fabrication feedstock materials and the effects of process efficiencies on material availability by adding characterizations of photovoltaic production processes. This quarterly report presents the results of work with emphasis on Task I, the characterization of photovoltaic cells and their production processes. Task IIA, CMAP Modification, Data Base Development and Operation has been initiated. Task IIB, Review, Integration, Interpretation and Analysis of Screening will begin once the baseline screening has been completed in Task IIA. Work on Task IIIA, the Assessment of Future Costs and Supplies of Gallium and Indium and Task IIIB, Economics of Coal Derived PV Materials have been initiated. Progress and initial results are reported. (WHK)

Watts, R.L.; Pawlewicz, W.W.; Gurwell, W.E.; Jamieson, W.M.; Long, L.W.; Smith, S.A.; Teeter, R.R.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ambient-temperature Conditioning as a Probe of Double-C Transformation Mechanisms in Pu-2.0 at. % Ga  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gallium-stabilized Pu-2.0 at. % Ga alloy undergoes a partial or incomplete low-temperature martensitic transformation from the metastable {delta} phase to the gallium-containing, monoclinic {alpha}{prime} phase near -100 C. This transformation has been shown to occur isothermally and it displays anomalous double-C kinetics in a time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram, where two nose temperatures anchoring an upper- and lower-C describe minima in the time for the initiation of transformation. The underlying mechanisms responsible for the double-C behavior are currently unresolved, although recent experiments suggest that a conditioning treatment--wherein, following an anneal at 375 C, the sample is held at a sub-anneal temperature for a period of time--significantly influences the upper-C of the TTT diagram. As such, elucidating the effects of the conditioning treatment upon the {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation can provide valuable insights into the fundamental mechanisms governing the double-C kinetics of the transition. Following a high-temperature anneal, a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was used to establish an optimal conditioning curve that depicts the amount of {alpha}{prime} formed during the transformation as a function of conditioning temperature for a specified time. With the optimal conditioning curve as a baseline, the DSC was used to explore the circumstances under which the effects of the conditioning treatment were destroyed, resulting in little or no transformation.

Jeffries, J R; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

357

Method of making an icosahedral boride structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for fabricating thin films of an icosahedral boride on a silicon carbide (SiC) substrate is provided. Preferably the icosahedral boride layer is comprised of either boron phosphide (B.sub.12 P.sub.2) or boron arsenide (B.sub.12 As.sub.2). The provided method achieves improved film crystallinity and lowered impurity concentrations. In one aspect, an epitaxially grown layer of B.sub.12 P.sub.2 with a base layer or substrate of SiC is provided. In another aspect, an epitaxially grown layer of B.sub.12 As.sub.2 with a base layer or substrate of SiC is provided. In yet another aspect, thin films of B.sub.12 P.sub.2 or B.sub.12 As.sub.2 are formed on SiC using CVD or other vapor deposition means. If CVD techniques are employed, preferably the deposition temperature is above 1050.degree. C., more preferably in the range of 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C., and still more preferably approximately 1150.degree. C.

Hersee, Stephen D. (3712 Silver Ave. SE., Albuquerque, NM 87108); Wang, Ronghua (939 Buena Vista Dr., SE., Apt. F203, Albuquerque, NM 87106); Zubia, David (4409 Buckingham Dr., El Paso, TX 79902); Aselage, Terrance L. (62 Avenida Del Sol, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Emin, David (1502 Harvard Ct. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106)

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

358

Performance, problems, and expectations of concentrator photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The photovoltaic cell or solar cell can be used to convert sunlight directly into electrical energy and its relatively simple construction and absence of moving parts make these devices attractive for terrestrial power generation applications. The primary problem preventing large-scale application is the very high cost of solar cell arrays. For example, the most advanced solar cell is the silicon cell and, currently in the United States, silicon solar arrays cost about $15,000 per peak kilowatt in moderately large quantities. One approach to reducing the cost of solar cell arrays is to concentrate sunlight on the cells and increase the specific output power density of the cells. In this approach, expensive solar cell area is replaced by, hopefully, less expensive reflective or refractive concentrator materials. The United States Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) is supporting a program to develop concentrator photovoltaic systems with the primary objective to develop low-cost reliable systems for widespread terrestrial applications. The specific long-term cost goal for these systems is $500 per peak kilowatt by 1982. The most promising solar cell systems for concentrator applications are silicon and galium arsenide and these materials have received the most attention to date in the ERDA program. Design, preliminary performance testing results, and cost estimates for concentrator photovoltaic systems are discussed.

Burgess, E.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Method of and apparatus for measuring vapor density  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method are disclosed which determine the concentration of an individual component, such as water vapor, of a multi-component mixture, such as a gaseous mixture for cooling a nuclear reactor. A hygrometer apparatus includes an infrared source for producing a broadband infrared energy beam that includes a strong water vapor absorption band and a weak water vapor absorption region. The beam is chopped to select infrared pulses. A temporally first pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region, a temporally second pulse has a wavelength in the strong band and a temporally third pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region. A fourth reference pulse representing background radiation is interposed in such chopped pulses. An indium arsenide infrared sensor is responsive to the pulses for generating an output signal in proportion to an equation given in the patent where N1 is proportional to the transmission through the sample of the first signal, N4 is related to the background radiation, and [K2 (N2-N4) + K3 (N3-N4)] is the time-weighted average of the transmission through the sample of the second and third pulses applicable at the time of the second pulse, with the reference pulse N4 being subtracted in each case to render the ratio independent of variations in the background radiation. 11 figs.

Nelson, L.D.; Cerni, T.A.

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

360

Method of and apparatus for measuring vapor density  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method determine the concentration of an individual component, such as water vapor, of a multi-component mixture, such as a gaseous mixture for cooling a nuclear reactor. A hygrometer apparatus includes an infrared source for producing a broadband infrared energy beam that includes a strong water vapor absorption band and a weak water vapor absorption region. The beam is chopped to select infrared pulses. A temporally first pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region, a temporally second pulse has a wavelength in the strong band and a temporally third pulse has a wavlength in the weakly absorbing region. A fourth reference pulse representing background radiation is interposed in such chopped pulses. An indium arsenide infrared sensor is responsive to the pulses for generating an output signal in proportion to: ##EQU1## where N1 is proportional to the transmission through the sample of the first signal, N4 is related to the background radiation, and [K2 (N2-N4)+K3 (N3-N4)] is the time-weighted average of the transmission through the sample of the second and third pulses applicable at the time of the second pulse, with the reference pulse N4 being subtracted in each case to render the ratio independent of variations in the background radiation.

Nelson, Loren D. (Morrison, CO); Cerni, Todd A. (Littleton, CO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 17070 of 31,917 results. 61 - 17070 of 31,917 results. Download CX-001136: Categorical Exclusion Determination 130 Lumens Per Watt 1000 Lumen Warm White LEDs (Light-Emitting Diodes) for Illumination CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 03/05/2010 Location(s): San Jose, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001136-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001137: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride LED (Light Emitting Diode) Devices CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/05/2010 Location(s): Santa Clara, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001137-categorical-exclusion-determination

362

California | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 10, 2011 January 10, 2011 Vintage DOE: What is Fusion This edition of vintage DOE pulls a discussion of nuclear fusion from the video archive. January 10, 2011 CX-004965: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-City-Walnut Creek CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 01/10/2011 Location(s): Walnut Creek, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy January 5, 2011 CX-004886: Categorical Exclusion Determination Copper Indium Gallium Sulfur-Selenide (CIGSS) Manufacturing Plant CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 01/05/2011 Location(s): San Jose, California Office(s): Loan Guarantee Program Office December 17, 2010 EIS-0455: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact Statement Genesis Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA December 17, 2010 EIS-0403: DOE and BLM Notice of Availability of the Draft Programmatic

363

HelioVolt Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HelioVolt Corporation HelioVolt Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name HelioVolt Corporation Place Austin, Texas Zip TX 78744 Product Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) thin-film PV module manufacturer based in Austin, Texas. Website http://www.heliovolt.net/ Coordinates 30.267605°, -97.742984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.267605,"lon":-97.742984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

364

NREL Scientists Spurred the Success of Multijunction Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), Innovation: The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists Spurred the Success Scientists Spurred the Success of Multijunction Solar Cells Before 1984, many scientists believed that high-quality gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) alloys could not be grown for use as semiconductors because the alloys would separate. One researcher at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) thought differently. His name was Jerry Olson, and his innovative thinking changed solar history. Olson identified a material combination that allowed the multijunction cell to flourish. It is now the workhorse that powers satellites and the catalyst for renewed interest in concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) products. In the early 1980s, Olson was a scientist at SERI, the predecessor of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). At the time, solar researchers were looking for the ideal combina-

365

PII: S0141-6359(00)00045-3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microgrooving Microgrooving and microthreading tools for fabricating curvilinear features D.P. Adams a, *, M.J. Vasile b , A.S.M. Krishnan b a Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA, b Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA, USA Received 16 February 2000; accepted in revised form 4 May 2000 Abstract This paper presents techniques for fabricating microscopic, curvilinear features in a variety of workpiece materials. Microgrooving and microthreading tools with cutting widths as small as 13 ␮m are made by focused ion beam sputtering and used for ultraprecision machining. Tool fabrication involves directing a 20 keV gallium beam at polished cylindrical punches made of cobalt M42 high-speed steel or C2 tungsten carbide to create a number of critically aligned facets. Sputtering produces rake facets of desired angle and cutting edges having radii of curvature equal to 0.4 ␮m.

366

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Thin Film Photovoltaic Partnership Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin Film Photovoltaic Partnership Project Thin Film Photovoltaic Partnership Project NREL's Thin Film Photovoltaic (PV) Partnership Project led R&D on emerging thin-film solar technologies in the United States from 1994 to 2009. The project made many advances in thin-film PV technologies that allowed the United States to attain world leadership in this area of solar technology. Three national R&D teams focused on thin-film semiconductor materials: amorphous silicon (a-Si), cadmium telluride (CdTe), and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and its alloys. The Module Reliability Team and Environmental Health and Safety Team were crosscutting. The teams comprised researchers from the solar industry, academia, and NREL who focused their efforts on improving materials, devices, and manufacturing processes-all

367

DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass April 22, 2010 - 4:20pm Addthis Delaware-based DuPont is working to develop ultra-thin moisture protective films for photovoltaic panels - so thin they're about 1,000 times thinner than a human hair. DuPont is working on new photovoltaic technology that will let manufacturers of copper indium gallium selenide, or CIGS, solar cells and organic light emitting diodes, or OLED, displays protect products with thin layers of ceramic and polymer material instead of glass. These ultra-thin protective films could help prevent deterioration from moisture. Because of their potential to reduce the cost of producing solar energy, "thin-film PV modules are projected to be the fastest-growing segment of

368

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Product List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List List Please select an available isotope product from the lists below. If you would like an isotope product that is not listed, you can make a request by clicking here. Stable Isotope Products Radio-Isotope Products Antimony Argon (Alt) Barium Bromine Bromine (Alt) Cadmium Calcium Carbon (Alt) Cerium Chlorine Chlorine (Alt) Chromium Copper Dysprosium Erbium Europium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Hafnium Helium (Alt) Indium Iridium Iron Krypton (Alt) Lanthanum Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon (Alt) Nickel Nitrogen (Alt) Osmium Oxygen (Alt) Palladium Platinum Potassium Rhenium Rubidium Ruthenium Samarium Selenium Silicon Silver Strontium Sulfur Sulfur (Alt) Tantalum Tellurium Thallium Tin Titanium Tungsten Vanadium Xenon (Alt) Ytterbium Zinc Zirconium Actinium-225 Aluminum-26 Americium-241

369

JX Crystals Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

JX Crystals Inc JX Crystals Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name JX Crystals Inc Place Issaquah, Washington State Zip 98027 Sector Solar Product JX Crystals designs and manufactures thermophotovoltaic gallium-antimonide cells for solar applications. Coordinates 47.530095°, -122.033799° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.530095,"lon":-122.033799,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

370

BridgeLux Inc former eLite Optoelectronics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BridgeLux Inc former eLite Optoelectronics BridgeLux Inc former eLite Optoelectronics Jump to: navigation, search Name BridgeLux Inc (former eLite Optoelectronics) Place Sunnyvale, California Zip 94086 Product Developer and provider of indium gallium nitride light emitting diodes (InGaN LEDs) for solid state lighting, mobile appliance, signage, and automotive applications. References BridgeLux Inc (former eLite Optoelectronics)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. BridgeLux Inc (former eLite Optoelectronics) is a company located in Sunnyvale, California . References ↑ "BridgeLux Inc (former eLite Optoelectronics)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=BridgeLux_Inc_former_eLite_Optoelectronics&oldid=34303

371

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: New York | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 15, 2010 January 15, 2010 CX-000845: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25A2445 - Ammonothermal Bulk Gallium Nitride (GaN) Crystal Growth for Energy Efficient Lighting CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/15/2010 Location(s): New York Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy December 29, 2009 CX-000273: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pressure Sensor and Telemetry Methods for Measurement while Drilling in Geothermal Wells CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/29/2009 Location(s): New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office December 21, 2009 CX-001281: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hire Experts, Lighting Retrofits, and Install Solar Lights CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 12/21/2009 Location(s): Suffolk, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

372

Synthetic laser medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

Stokowski, S.E.

1987-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2010 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research for the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy, Biomass Program to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas. In recent years this research has primarily involved the further development of a silica-supported catalyst containing rhodium and manganese that was selected from earlier catalyst screening tests. A major effort during 2010 was to examine alternative catalyst supports to determine whether other supports, besides the Davisil 645 silica, would improve performance. Optimization of the Davisil 645 silica-supported catalyst also was continued with respect to candidate promoters iridium, platinum, and gallium, and examination of selected catalyst preparation and activation alternatives for the baseline RhMn/SiO2 catalyst.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; White, J. F.; Rummel, Becky L.; Stevens, Don J.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Advanced Power Electronics for LED Drivers: Advanced Technologies for integrated Power Electronics  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: MIT is teaming with Georgia Institute of Technology, Dartmouth College, and the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) to create more efficient power circuits for energy-efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through advances in 3 related areas. First, the team is using semiconductors made of high-performing gallium nitride grown on a low-cost silicon base (GaN-on-Si). These GaN-on-Si semiconductors conduct electricity more efficiently than traditional silicon semiconductors. Second, the team is developing new magnetic materials and structures to reduce the size and increase the efficiency of an important LED power component, the inductor. This advancement is important because magnetics are the largest and most expensive part of a circuit. Finally, the team is creating an entirely new circuit design to optimize the performance of the new semiconductors and magnetic devices it is using.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A InGaN/GaN quantum dot green ({lambda}=524 nm) laser  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of self-organized InGaN/GaN quantum dot lasers are reported. The laser heterostructures were grown on c-plane GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and the laser facets were formed by focused ion beam etching with gallium. Emission above threshold is characterized by a peak at 524 nm (green) and linewidth of 0.7 nm. The lowest measured threshold current density is 1.2 kA/cm{sup 2} at 278 K. The slope and wall plug efficiencies are 0.74 W/A and {approx}1.1%, respectively, at 1.3 kA/cm{sup 2}. The value of T{sub 0}=233 K in the temperature range of 260-300 K.

Zhang Meng; Banerjee, Animesh; Lee, Chi-Sen; Hinckley, John M.; Bhattacharya, Pallab [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Center for Nanoscale Photonics and Spintronics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

2011-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

Constricted glow discharge plasma source  

SciTech Connect

A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Dickinson, Michael (San Leandro, CA); Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Winnetka, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Growth and structure of photosensitive Pb{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te(Ga) epitaxial films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth and structure of (1-1.5)-{mu}m-thick Pb{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te(Ga)(x = 0.06) films with 0.4-0.9 at % of gallium, grown on BaF{sub 2}(111) and Pb{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}Te (x = 0.2) (100) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy, have been investigated. It is established that the films are crystallized into an fcc structure, and their growth planes are (111) and (100), according to the substrate orientation. The optimal conditions for obtaining high-resistivity photosensitive p-and n-type films with a perfect crystal structure (W{sub 1/2} = 80''-100'') have been determined.

Nuriev, I. R.; Sadygov, R. M.; Nazarov, A. M., E-mail: afinnazarov@yahoo.com [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Lattice vibrations of pure and doped GaSe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bridgman method is used to grow especially undoped and doped single crystals of GaSe. Composition and impurity content of the grown crystals were determined using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) method. X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, photoluminescence (PL), and IR transmission measurements were performed at room temperature. The long wavelength lattice vibrations of four modifications of GaSe were described in the framework of modified one-layer linear-chain model which also takes into consideration the interaction of the selenium (Se) atom with the second nearest neighbor gallium (Ga) atom in the same layer. The existence of an eight-layer modification of GaSe is suggested and the vibrational frequencies of this modification are explained in the framework of a lattice dynamical model considered in the present work. Frequencies and the type of vibrations (gap, local, or resonance) for the impurity atoms were calculated and compared with the experimental results.

Allakhverdiev, K. [Materials Institute, Marmara Research Center, TUBITAK, Gebze/Kocaeli 41470 (Turkey) and Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: kerim.allahverdi@mam.gov.tr; Baykara, T. [Materials Institute, Marmara Research Center, TUBITAK, Gebze/Kocaeli 41470 (Turkey); Ellialtioglu, S. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey); Hashimzade, F. [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan); Huseinova, D. [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan); Kawamura, K. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Kaya, A.A. [Materials Institute, Marmara Research Center, TUBITAK, Gebze/Kocaeli 41470 (Turkey); Kulibekov, A.M. [Department of Physics, Mugla University, Mugla 48000 (Turkey); Onari, S. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan)

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

379

The distribution of Ga and Sb impurities in Ge-Si crystals grown by the Bridgman method using a feeding rod  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gallium- and antimony-doped Ge{sub 1-x}Si{sub x} crystals (0 {<=} x {<=} 0.25) have been grown by the improved Bridgman method using a silicon seed and a macrohomogeneous feeding Ge-Si rod of the corresponding composition. The impurity concentration profiles along the grown crystals were determined from Hall measurements. The mathematical problem of impurity distribution along two-component mixed crystals grown from a melt with uniform and graded composition is solved in the Pfann approximation and within the virtual-crystal model for the solid solution. It is shown that the experimental impurity distributions in Ge{sub 1-x}Si{sub x} crystals are described well by the data calculated on the assumption of linear change in the impurity segregation coefficient with the crystal composition.

Azhdarov, G. Kh., E-mail: zangi@physics.ab.az [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan); Zeynalov, Z. M. [Ganja State University (Azerbaijan); Huseynli, L. A. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

BridgeLux | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BridgeLux BridgeLux Jump to: navigation, search Logo: BridgeLux Name BridgeLux Address 1170 Sonora Court Place Sunnyvale, California Zip 94086 Sector Efficiency Product Designs and makes high power indium gallium nitride light emitting diodes Website http://www.bridgelux.com/ Coordinates 37.371138°, -121.998365° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.371138,"lon":-121.998365,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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381

NREL: Awards and Honors - R&D 100 Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D 100 Awards R&D 100 Awards Since its inception as the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) in 1977, NREL/SERI has won 52 R&D 100 awards. 2013 Image Processing Occupancy Sensor (IPOS) Isothermal Battery Calorimeters (IBCs) Mono-crystalline Solar Cells 2012 Desiccant-enhanced Evaporative (DEVAP) Air-Conditioning Cycle SJ3 Solar Cells 2011 Innovalight Silicon Ink Process Flash Quantum Efficiency (Flash QE) System for Solar Cells Optical Cavity Furnace 2010 "Black Silicon" Nanocatalytic Wet-Chemical Etch Amonix 7700 Solar Power Generator 2009 Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS) SkyTrough(tm) Parabolic Trough Solar Concentrating Collector PowerPlane UX Microbattery 2008 Inverted Metamorphic Multijunction (IMM) Solar Cell Hybrid CIGS (Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide)

382

Microsoft Word - FINAL Materials Strategy Request for Information May 5 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Strategy Materials Strategy Request for Information (RFI) DATE: May 6, 2010 SUBJECT: Request for Information (RFI) DESCRIPTION: The Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced its intent to develop its first-ever strategic plan for addressing the role of rare earth and other materials in energy technologies and processes. In support of this effort, DOE is seeking information from stakeholders on rare earth elements and other materials used in energy technologies, particularly clean energy components and applications, and energy efficiency technologies. Examples include lanthanum and lithium use in batteries, neodymium use in permanent magnet motors and compact fluorescent light bulbs, gallium and ytterbium use in photovoltaics, as well as the use of these materials in other clean energy

383

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defect-Driven Magnetism in Mn-doped GaN Defect-Driven Magnetism in Mn-doped GaN Semiconductors doped with magnetic elements are very interesting materials. In these materials, the magnetic impurities interact with and induce magnetism in the semiconductor host. Thus, they have the potential for combining magnetism with the rich electronic behavior of semiconductors, which may lead to new generations of low-power-consumption electronics, non-volatile memories, and field-configurable logic devices. Gallium nitride doped with Mn is particularly interesting because it is one of the few materials for which magnetism above room temperature has been reported, making it a candidate room-temperature magnetic semiconductor. Photo: Gan Molecules Illustration of the crystal structures derived from x-ray results and calculations. In ideal GaN (left), a Mn atom substitutes

384

Global Solar Energy Inc GSE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GSE GSE Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Solar Energy Inc (GSE) Place Tucson, Arizona Zip 85747 Sector Solar Product US-based manufacturer of thin-film copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells with factory in Tucson, Arizona. Coordinates 32.221553°, -110.969754° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.221553,"lon":-110.969754,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

385

Main Title 32pt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electroactive Ionic Liquids: Electroactive Ionic Liquids: A New Approach to Flow Batteries 2. Gallium Nitride Substrates for Power Electronics: Electrochemical Solution Growth Karen Waldrip, PhD Advanced Power Sources R&D Sandia National Labs, Albuquerque, NM knwaldr@sandia.gov Sandia National Laboratories' Programs Electroactive Ionic Liquids: A New Approach To Flow Batteries Date Travis Anderson David Ingersoll Chad Staiger Karen Waldrip Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Flow Batteries *No cross contamination *Flexible layout *High cycle life *Large, tunable capacity *Low maintenance vanadium redox couples are

386

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 13730 of 26,764 results. 21 - 13730 of 26,764 results. Download CX-010974: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Low-Cost Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Gallium Nitride (GaN) Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction... CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Arkansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010974-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010975: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Climate Control and Cabin Preconditioning using Zonal Distribution, Advanced Heat Pump... CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010975-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010976: Categorical Exclusion Determination

387

Cree Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cree Inc Cree Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Cree Inc Place Durham, North Carolina Zip 27703 Product Cree develops and manufactures semiconductor materials and devices based on silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN), silicon (Si) and related compounds. Coordinates 45.396265°, -122.755099° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.396265,"lon":-122.755099,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

388

DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass April 22, 2010 - 4:20pm Addthis Delaware-based DuPont is working to develop ultra-thin moisture protective films for photovoltaic panels - so thin they're about 1,000 times thinner than a human hair. DuPont is working on new photovoltaic technology that will let manufacturers of copper indium gallium selenide, or CIGS, solar cells and organic light emitting diodes, or OLED, displays protect products with thin layers of ceramic and polymer material instead of glass. These ultra-thin protective films could help prevent deterioration from moisture. Because of their potential to reduce the cost of producing solar energy, "thin-film PV modules are projected to be the fastest-growing segment of

389

U.S. DEPARTIVmNT OF ENFRGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEP.A DETFmllNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTIVmNT OF ENFRGY DEPARTIVmNT OF ENFRGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEP.A DETFmllNATION RECIPIENT:MEMC Electronic Materials, Inc. Page 1 of2 STATE: MO PROJECT TITLE: High Quality, Low Cost Bulk Gallium Nitride (GaN) Substrates Grown by the Electrochemical Solution Growth Method Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000560 Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EE0005755 GF0-0005755-001 G05755 Based on my r eview of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and

390

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Product Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Product Search Product Search Step 1 - Enter your search criteria below. Element Name Actinium Aluminum Americium Antimony Argon Arsenic Astatine Barium Berkelium Beryllium Bismuth Bohrium Boron Bromine Cadmium Caesium Calcium Californium Carbon Cerium Chlorine Chromium Cobalt Copernicium Copper Curium Darmstadtium Dubnium Dysprosium Einsteinium Erbium Europium Fermium Fluorine Francium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Gold Hafnium Hassium Helium Holmium Hydrogen Indium Iodine Iridium Iron Krypton Lanthanum Lawrencium Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Manganese Meitnerium Mendelevium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon Neptunium Nickel Niobium Nitrogen Nobelium Osmium Oxygen Palladium Phosphorus Platinum Plutonium Polonium Potassium Praseodymium Promethium Protactinium Radium Radon Rhenium Rhodium Roentgenium Rubidium Ruthenium Rutherfordium Samarium Scandium Seaborgium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Tantalum Technetium Tellurium Terbium Thallium Thorium Thulium Tin Titanium Tungsten Ununhexium Ununoctium Ununpentium Ununquadium Ununseptium Ununtrium Uranium Vanadium Xenon Ytterbium Yttrium Zinc Zirconium

391

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 8950 of 29,416 results. 41 - 8950 of 29,416 results. Download CX-000845: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25A2445 - Ammonothermal Bulk Gallium Nitride (GaN) Crystal Growth for Energy Efficient Lighting CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/15/2010 Location(s): New York Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000845-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000839: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25A1089 - Electroville: High-Amperage Energy Storage Device-Energy Storage for the Neighborhood CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/15/2010 Location(s): Massachusetts Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000839-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000860: Categorical Exclusion Determination

392

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

331, 331, W(A} 2010·047, CH-1569 The Petitioner, Applied Materials, Inc., (Applied) was awarded the subject cooperative agreement with DOE for the performance of work entitled, "Recovery Act: Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices." The objective of the work is to achieve cost reduction of solid-state lighting (SSL) through improvements in manufacturing equipment, processes, and techniques. The primary objectives of the program are to reduce energy use and resulting pollutants by encouraging the adoption and installation of improved solid-state lighting products and to bolster the US manufacturing and technology base for related technologies. The program will support advanced manufacturing of LEOs to make SSL a more competitive

393

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Testing and Analysis to Advance R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing and Analysis to Advance R&D Testing and Analysis to Advance R&D Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. Text Alternative NREL has capabilities and experts in measurements, characterization, reliability, engineering, scientific computing, and theory to support photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) across a range of conversion technologies and scales. Conversion technologies include the primary areas of silicon, polycrystalline thin films (cadmium telluride [CdTe], copper indium gallium diselenide [CIGS]), III-V-based multijunctions, and organic PV. And scales of interest range from materials, to cells, modules, and systems. Measurements and Characterization Photo of a hand holding tweezers pinching a square wafer that is striped gold and black. We provide a huge range of techniques for measuring and characterizing PV

394

Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strata DB235 FIB/SEM (Focused Ion Beam/High Reolution Scanning Electron Microscope) Strata DB235 FIB/SEM (Focused Ion Beam/High Reolution Scanning Electron Microscope) FEI Strata DB235 FIB/SEM (Focused Ion Beam/High Reolution Scanning Electron Microscope) This is a versatile field emission scanning electron microscope integrated with a focused ion beam column that is used for sophisticated SEM and TEM sample preparation, micromachining, and ultrahigh resolution SEM imaging. The microscope is also equipped for x-ray microanalysis and crystallographic orientation imaging. Microscope consists of a Hexalens SFEG electron beam column, and a Magnum ion beam column with a gallium liquid metal ion source. Imaging with both secondary electrons and ions. Digital image acquisition. Small, stable, high brightness Schottky based field emission electron source provides 1.5 nm resolution at 30 kV. Three electron beam lens modes - normal imaging, high resolution imaging, and EDS imaging.

395

CX-002541: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41: Categorical Exclusion Determination 41: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002541: Categorical Exclusion Determination Emerging Renewables Industries: Copper, Indium, Gallium, Selenium (CIGS) Linear Source Thermal Deposition CX(s) Applied: B2.2, B5.1 Date: 05/19/2010 Location(s): St. Paul, Minnesota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The State of Minnesota plans to provide $800,000 in Recovery Act funds to Veeco Instrument, Inc. at 4900 Constellation Drive, St. Paul, Minnesota 55127 for the purchase of equipment and related activities in the manufacturing of thin film solar panels. Veeco Instruments, Inc. is a provider of process and metrology equipment used to manufacture data storage, semiconductor, wireless, lighting and solar equipment. Veeco's St.

396

Development of a Bulk GaN Growth Technique for Low Defect Density, Large-Area Native Substrates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next-Generation Power Electronics: Next-Generation Power Electronics: Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) Technique for Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates Karen Waldrip Dept. 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D Sandia National Labs, Albuquerque, NM knwaldr@sandia.gov, (505) 844-1619 Acknowledgements: Mike Soboroff, Stan Atcitty, Nancy Clark, and John Boyes David Ingersoll, Frank Delnick, and Travis Anderson 2010 DOE Peer Review, Nov. 2-4, Washington, DC Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories Project Objective

397

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2010 5, 2010 CX-006103: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-City-San Clemente CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B5.1 Date: 03/05/2010 Location(s): San Clemente, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 5, 2010 CX-001054: Categorical Exclusion Determination Aquantis 2.5 Megawatt Ocean Current Generation Device CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 03/05/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 5, 2010 CX-001137: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride LED (Light Emitting Diode) Devices CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/05/2010 Location(s): Santa Clara, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

398

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Request a New Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Request a New Product Request a New Product Step 1 - Enter the new product's criteria below. Element Name Actinium Aluminum Americium Antimony Argon Arsenic Astatine Barium Berkelium Beryllium Bismuth Bohrium Boron Bromine Cadmium Caesium Calcium Californium Carbon Cerium Chlorine Chromium Cobalt Copernicium Copper Curium Darmstadtium Dubnium Dysprosium Einsteinium Erbium Europium Fermium Fluorine Francium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Gold Hafnium Hassium Helium Holmium Hydrogen Indium Iodine Iridium Iron Krypton Lanthanum Lawrencium Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Manganese Meitnerium Mendelevium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon Neptunium Nickel Niobium Nitrogen Nobelium Osmium Oxygen Palladium Phosphorus Platinum Plutonium Polonium Potassium Praseodymium Promethium Protactinium Radium Radon Rhenium Rhodium Roentgenium Rubidium Ruthenium Rutherfordium Samarium Scandium Seaborgium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Tantalum Technetium Tellurium Terbium Thallium Thorium Thulium Tin Titanium Tungsten Ununhexium Ununoctium Ununpentium Ununquadium Ununseptium Ununtrium Uranium Vanadium Xenon Ytterbium Yttrium Zinc Zirconium

399

Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Restore Performance of Electrical  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Restore Performance of Electrical Circuits Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights Highlight Archives News & Events Publications Contact BES Home 04.27.12 Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Restore Performance of Electrical Circuits Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Scientific Achievement Designed chemical interactions of liquid-metal-filled microcapsules target areas of microstructural damage and restore conductive pathways. Significance and Impact Selective self-healing mechanism extends the lifetime and reliability of electronic devices including battery electrodes. Research Details Liquid Indium-Gallium metal-filled microcapsules restore nearly 99% of the

400

CX-004937: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

937: Categorical Exclusion Determination 937: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004937: Categorical Exclusion Determination Transphorm, Inc. -High Performance Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistor Modules for Agile Power Electronics CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/05/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Funding will support laboratory research, design, testing, and fabrication of the first hybrid multichip power modules for inverters/converters operating at 1 megahertz, capable of being retrofitted to older generation motors, embedded in new motors, and in grid-tied photovoltaic inverters. The proposed work is consistent with the goal of Agile Delivery of Electric Power Technology (ADEPT): fundamental advances in soft magnetics, high voltage switches, and reliable, high-density charge storage. Proposed work

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 8160 of 31,917 results. 51 - 8160 of 31,917 results. Download CX-002564: Categorical Exclusion Determination FPE Renewables, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/26/2010 Location(s): Lynden, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002564-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002399: Categorical Exclusion Determination California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project (Fountain Valley, California) CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/25/2010 Location(s): Fountain Valley, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002399-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002541: Categorical Exclusion Determination Emerging Renewables Industries: Copper, Indium, Gallium, Selenium (CIGS)

402

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2010 5, 2010 CX-000839: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25A1089 - Electroville: High-Amperage Energy Storage Device-Energy Storage for the Neighborhood CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/15/2010 Location(s): Massachusetts Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy January 15, 2010 CX-000845: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25A2445 - Ammonothermal Bulk Gallium Nitride (GaN) Crystal Growth for Energy Efficient Lighting CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/15/2010 Location(s): New York Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy January 15, 2010 CX-000852: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25A4800 - High Energy Permanent Magnets for Hybrid Vehicles and Alternative Energy CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/15/2010 Location(s): Delaware Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy

403

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 15470 of 31,917 results. 61 - 15470 of 31,917 results. Download CX-004937: Categorical Exclusion Determination Transphorm, Inc. -High Performance Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistor Modules for Agile Power Electronics CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/05/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004937-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Federal Register Notice for January 2012 Meeting Federal Register Notice for January 2012 URTAC Meeting http://energy.gov/fe/downloads/federal-register-notice-january-2012-meeting Download TBH-0080- In the Matter of Billy Joe Baptist This decision will consider an Order to Show Cause that I issued on February 3, 2009, regarding a March 6, 2008, whistleblower complaint filed

404

I-III-VI.sub.2 based solar cell utilizing the structure CuInGaSe.sub.2 CdZnS/ZnO  

SciTech Connect

A thin film I-III-VI.sub.2 based solar cell having a first layer of copper indium gallium selenide, a second layer of cadmium zinc sulfide, a double layer of zinc oxide, and a metallization structure comprised of a layer of nickel covered by a layer of aluminum. An optional antireflective coating may be placed on said metallization structure. The cadmium zinc sulfide layer is deposited by means of an aqueous solution growth deposition process and may actually consist of two layers: a low zinc content layer and a high zinc content layer. Photovoltaic efficiencies of 12.5% at Air Mass 1.5 illumination conditions and 10.4% under AMO illumination can be achieved.

Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA); Stewart, John M. (Seattle, WA)

1992-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

405

Pulsed atomic layer epitaxy of quaternary AlInGaN layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this letter, we report on a material deposition scheme for quaternary Al{sub x}In{sub y}Ga{sub 1-x--y}N layers using a pulsed atomic layer epitaxy (PALE) technique. The PALE approach allows accurate control of the quaternary layer composition and thickness by simply changing the number of aluminum, indium, and gallium pulses in a unit cell and the number of unit cell repeats. Using PALE, AlInGaN layers with Al mole fractions in excess of 40% and strong room-temperature photoluminescence peaks at 280 nm can easily be grown even at temperatures lower than 800{sup o}C. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

Zhang, J.; Kuokstis, E.; Fareed, Q.; Wang, H.; Yang, J.; Simin, G.; Asif Khan, M.; Gaska, R.; Shur, M.

2001-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

406

VACUUM SEALING MEANS FOR LOW VACUUM PRESSURES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>A vacuum seal is designed in which the surface tension of a thin layer of liquid metal of low vapor pressure cooperates with adjacent surfaces to preclude passages of gases across pressure differentials as low as 10/sup -8/ mm Hg. Mating contiguous surfaces composed of copper, brass, stainless steel, nickel, molybdenum, tungsten, tantalum, glass, quartz, and/or synthetic mica are disposed to provide a maximum tolerance, D, expressed by 2 gamma /P/sub 1/, where gamma is the coefflcient of the surface tension of the metal sealant selected in dynes/cm/sub 2/. Means for heating the surfaces remotely is provided where temperatures drop below about 250 deg C. A sealant consisting of an alloy of gallium, indium, and tin, among other combinations tabulated, is disposed therebetween after treating the surfaces to improve wettability, as by ultrasonic vibrations, the surfaces and sealants being selected according to the anticipated experimental conditions of use. (AEC)

Milleron, N.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

407

Chlorine adsorption on the InAs (001) surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorine adsorption on the In-stabilized InAs(001) surface with {zeta}-(4 Multiplication-Sign 2) and {beta}3 Prime -(4 Multiplication-Sign 2) reconstructions and on the Ga-stabilized GaAs (001)-{zeta}-(4 Multiplication-Sign 2) surface has been studied within the electron density functional theory. The equilibrium structural parameters of these reconstructions, surface atom positions, bond lengths in dimers, and their changes upon chlorine adsorption are determined. The electronic characteristics of the clean surface and the surface with adsorbed chlorine are calculated. It is shown that the most energetically favorable positions for chlorine adsorption are top positions over dimerized indium or gallium atoms. The mechanism of chlorine binding with In(Ga)-stabilized surface is explained. The interaction of chlorine atoms with dimerized surface atoms weakens surface atom bonds and controls the initial stage of surface etching.

Bakulin, A. V.; Eremeev, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Tereshchenko, O. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, sSiberian Branch (Russian Federation); Kulkova, S. E., E-mail: kulkova@ispms.tsc.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

LMA and sterile neutrinos: a case for resonance spin flavour precession?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open questions remain after the confirmation of LMA as the dominant solution to the solar neutrino deficit. These are the apparent time modulation of the solar neutrino event rates in the Homestake, Gallium and SuperKamiokande experiments, possibly related to solar magnetic activity, the discrepancy between the event rate in the Homestake experiment and its theoretical prediction and the absence of the electron spectrum upturn in SuperKamiokande at energies below 6-8 MeV. We search for a possible understanding of these questions in the context of resonant spin flavour precession to sterile neutrinos, assuming a class of magnetic field profiles anchored in the upper radiation/lower convection zone. We consider the simplest such model beyond the standard 2$\

Bhag C. Chauhan; Joao Pulido

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY ANALYSIS IN THE PRODUCTION OF METALS USED IN PHOTOVOLTAICS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Material flows and emissions in all the stages of production of zinc, copper, aluminum, cadmium, indium, germanium, gallium, selenium, tellurium, and molybdenum were investigated. These metals are used selectively in the manufacture of solar cells, and emission and energy factors in their production are used in the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of photovoltaics. Significant changes have occurred in the production and associated emissions for these metals over the last 10 years, which are not described in the LCA databases. Furthermore, emission and energy factors for several of the by-products of the base metal production were lacking. This report aims in updating the life-cycle inventories associated with the production of the base metals (Zn, Cu, Al, Mo) and in defining the emission and energy allocations for the minor metals (Cd, In, Ge, Se, Te and Ga) used in photovoltaics.

FTHENAKIS,V.M.; KIM, H.C.; WANG, W.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

Unusual Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Bulk Sintered GaP Doped with Copper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robust room temperature ferromagnetism is obtained in single phase Gallium Phosphide doped with Cu{sup 2+} prepared by simple solid state reaction route. The saturation magnetization at 300 K is 1.5 times 10{sup -2} emu/g and the coercivity was found to be 125 Oe. A strong ferromagnetic resonance signal confirms the long range magnetic order which persists to temperatures as high as 739 K. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) indicate that Cu is in a +2 state. Ab initio calculations also show that the ferromagnetic ordering is energetically favorable in Cu doped GaP. When the spin-orbit coupling is included we get an enhanced total magnetic moment of 0.31 muB with a local moment on Cu 0.082 and on P 0.204 mu{sub B}. per atom.

Owens, F. J.; Gupta, A.; Rao, K. V.; Iqbal, Z.; Osorio Guillen, J. M.; Ahuja, R.; Guo, J.-H.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Energize Your Photovoltaics: NREL's Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique collaborative facility where industry and universities can work closely with NREL scientists on integrated equipment to answer pressing questions related to photovoltaics (PV). The integrated equipment includes deposition, processing, and characterization tools. We work with a wide range of PV materials, from crystalline silicon to thin-films (amorphous, nano- and microcrystalline silicon, copper indium gallium diselenide, cadmium telluride) to organic PV. The PDIL integrates all the data to: Automate control via recipes; Share data easily and securely; and Facilitate analysis. The PDIL integrates all the tools to: Eliminate air exposure between steps; Sequence steps in any order ; and Incorporate combinatorial techniques. The PDIL integrates all the materials to: Provide greater device flexibility; Allow diverse experts to work together; and Better support industry and universities.

Not Available

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The importance of intra-molecular electron spin relaxation in small molecular semiconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electron spin relaxation rate (eSR) is investigated on several organic semiconductors of different morphologies and molecular structures, using avoided level crossing muon spectroscopy as a local spin probe. We find that two functionalized acenes (polycrystalline tri(isopropyl)silyl-pentacene and amorphous 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyltetracene) exhibit eSRs with an Arrhenius-like temperature dependence, each with two characteristic energy scales similar to those expected from vibrations. Polycrystalline tris(8-hydroxyquinolate)gallium shows a similar behavior. The observed eSR for these molecules is no greater than 0.85 MHz at 300 K. The variety of crystal structures and transport regimes that these molecules possess, as well as the local nature of the probe, strongly suggest an intra-molecular phenomenon general to many organic semiconductors, contrasting the commonly assumed spin relaxation models based on inter-molecular charge carrier transport.

L. Schulz; M. Willis; L. Nuccio; P. Shusharov; S. Fratini; F. L. Pratt; W. P. Gillin; T. Kreouzis; M. Heeney; N. Stingelin; C. A. Stafford; D. J. Beesley; C. Bernhard; J. E. Anthony; I. Mckenzie; J. S. Lord; A. J. Drew

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

413

Direct Numerical Simulation Of Solidification Microstructures Affected By Fluid Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of fluid flow on the solidification morphology of pure materials and solute microsegregation patterns of binary alloys are studied using a computational methodology based on a front tracking/finite difference method. A general single-field formulation is presented for the full coupling of phase change, fluid flow, heat and solute transport. This formulation accounts for interfacial rejection/absorption of latent heat and solute, interfacial anisotropies, discontinuities in material properties between the liquid and solid phases, shrinkage/expansion upon solidification and motion and deformation of the solid. Numerical results are presented for the two-dimensional dendritic solidification of pure succinonitrile and the solidification of globulitic grains of a Plutonium-Gallium alloy. For both problems, comparisons are made between solidification without fluid flow and solidification within a shear flow. Introduction Nearly all materials of engineering interest have, at som...

Damir Juric

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Ductile alloy and process for preparing composite superconducting wire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alloy for the commercial production of ductile superconducting wire is prepared by melting together copper and at least 15 weight percent niobium under non-oxygen-contaminating conditions, and rapidly cooling the melt to form a ductile composite consisting of discrete, randomly distributed and orientated dendritic-shaped particles of niobium in a copper matrix. As the wire is worked, the dendritric particles are realigned parallel to the longitudinal axis and when drawn form a plurality of very fine ductile superconductors in a ductile copper matrix. The drawn wire may be tin coated and wound into magnets or the like before diffusing the tin into the wire to react with the niobium. Impurities such as aluminum or gallium may be added to improve upper critical field characteristics.

Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Finnemore, Douglas K. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA); Ostenson, Jerome E. (Ames, IA)

1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

415

Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous-silicon solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 May 1991--30 April 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluorine-doped zinc oxide was shown to have the lowest absorption loss of any of the known transparent conductors. An apparatus was constructed to deposit textured, transparent, conductive, fluorine-doped zinc oxide layers with uniform thickness over a 10 cm by 10 cm area, using inexpensive, high-productivity atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. Amorphous silicon solar cells grown on these textured films show very high peak quantum efficiencies (over 90%). However, a significant contact resistance develops at the interface between the amorphous silicon and the zinc oxide. Transparent, conductive gallium-doped zinc oxide films were grown by APCVD at a low enough temperature (260{degree}C) to be deposited on amorphous silicon as a final conductive back contact to solar cells. A quantum-mechanical theory of bonding was developed and applied to some metal oxides; it forms a basis for understanding TCO structures and the stability of their interfaces with silicon.

Gordon, R.G.; Hu, J.; Lacks, D.; Musher, J.; Thornton, J.; Liang, H. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Spectroscopic Analysis of Impurity Precipitates in CdS Films  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Impurities in cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are a concern in the fabrication of copper (indium, gallium) diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic devices. Devices incorporating chemical-bath-deposited (CBD) CdS are comparable in quality to devices incorporating purer CdS films grown using vacuum deposition techniques, despite the higher impurity concentrations typically observed in the CBD CdS films. In this paper, we summarize and review the results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Auger, electron microprobe, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses of the impurities in CBD CdS films. We show that these impurities differ as a function of substrate type and film deposition conditions. We also show that some of these impurities exist as 10{sup 2} micron-scale precipitates.

Webb, J. D.; Keane, J.; Ribelin, R.; Gedvilas, L.; Swartzlander, A.; Ramanathan, K.; Albin, D. S.; Noufi, R.

1999-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Micromilling of Metal Alloys with Focused Ion Beam-Fabricated Tools  

SciTech Connect

This work combines focused ion beam sputtering and ultra-precision machining as a first step in fabricating microstructure in metals and alloys. Specifically, {approx}25{micro}m diameter micro-end mills are made from cobalt M42 high-speed steel and C2 micrograin tungsten carbide tool blanks by ion beam sputtering. A 20 keV focused gallium beam defines tool cutting edges having radii of curvature < 0.1{micro}m. Micro-end mills having 2, 4 and 5 cutting edges successfully machine small trenches in 6061-T4 aluminum, brass, 4340 steel and polymethyl methacrylate. Machined trench widths are approximately equal to the tool diameters and surface roughnesses (rms) are {approx}150 nm or less. Microtools are robust and operate for more than 6 hours without fracture. Results from ultra-precision machining aluminum at feed rates as high as 50 mm/minute are included.

ADAMS,DAVID P.; VASILE,M.J.; BENAVIDES,GILBERT L.; CAMPBELL,ANN N.

1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

418

Power electronics reliability.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project's goals are: (1) use experiments and modeling to investigate and characterize stress-related failure modes of post-silicon power electronic (PE) devices such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) switches; and (2) seek opportunities for condition monitoring (CM) and prognostics and health management (PHM) to further enhance the reliability of power electronics devices and equipment. CM - detect anomalies and diagnose problems that require maintenance. PHM - track damage growth, predict time to failure, and manage subsequent maintenance and operations in such a way to optimize overall system utility against cost. The benefits of CM/PHM are: (1) operate power conversion systems in ways that will preclude predicted failures; (2) reduce unscheduled downtime and thereby reduce costs; and (3) pioneering reliability in SiC and GaN.

Kaplar, Robert James; Brock, Reinhard C.; Marinella, Matthew; King, Michael Patrick; Stanley, James K.; Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Waste reduction process improvements in the analysis of plutonium by x-ray fluorescence: results from multiple data sets  

SciTech Connect

To minimize waste, improve process safety, and minimize costs, modifications were implemented to a method for quantifying gallium in plutonium metal using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence. These changes included reducing sample sizes, reducing ion exchange process volumes, using cheaper reagent grade acids, eliminating the use of HF acid, and using more robust containment film for sample analysis. Relative precision and accuracy achieved from analyzing multiple aliquots from a single parent sample were {approx}0.2% and {approx}0.1% respectively. The same precision was obtained from analyzing a total of four parent materials, and the average relative accuracy from all the samples was 0.4%, which is within programmatic uncertainty requirements.

Worley, Christopher G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Soderberg, Constance B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Townsend, Lisa E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Corrosion of alloy 718 in a mercury thermal convection loop  

SciTech Connect

Two thermal convection loops (TCLs) fabricated from annealed alloy 718 continuously circulated mercury (Hg) with 1000 wppm gallium (Ga), respectively, for about 5000 h, duplicating previous TCL tests for annealed 316L. In each case, the maximum loop temperature was 305C, the minimum temperature was 242C, and the Hg flow rate was approximately 1.2 m/min. Unlike the 316L exposed to Hg, which above about 260C exhibited a thin, porous surface layer depleted in Ni and Cr, the alloy 718 coupons revealed essentially no wetting and, therefore, no interaction with that Hg at any temperature. Alloy 718 coupons suspended in the loops revealed inconsequentially small weight changes, and both the coupons and loop tubing exhibited no detectable metallographic evidence of attack.

Pawel, S.J.; DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Deterministic nano-assembly of a coupled quantum emitter - photonic crystal cavity system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interaction of a single quantum emitter with its environment is a central theme in quantum optics. When placed in highly confined optical fields, such as those created in optical cavities or plasmonic structures, the optical properties of the emitter can change drastically. In particular, photonic crystal (PC) cavities show high quality factors combined with an extremely small mode volume. Efficiently coupling a single quantum emitter to a PC cavity is challenging because of the required positioning accuracy. Here, we demonstrate deterministic coupling of single Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers to high-quality gallium phosphide PC cavities, by deterministically positioning their 50 nm-sized host nanocrystals into the cavity mode maximum with few-nanometer accuracy. The coupling results in a 25-fold enhancement of NV center emission at the cavity wavelength. With this technique, the NV center photoluminescence spectrum can be reshaped allowing for efficient generation of coherent photons, providing new opportunities for quantum science.

T. van der Sar; J. Hagemeier; W. Pfaff; E. C. Heeres; S. M. Thon; H. Kim; P. M. Petroff; T. H. Oosterkamp; D. Bouwmeester; R. Hanson

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

422

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Efficient Switches for Solar Power Conversion: Four Quadrant GaN Switch Enabled Three Phase Grid-Tied Microinverters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar ADEPT Project: Transphorm is developing power switches for new types of inverters that improve the efficiency and reliability of converting energy from solar panels into useable electricity for the grid. Transistors act as fast switches and control the electrical energy that flows in an electrical circuit. Turning a transistor off opens the circuit and stops the flow of electrical current; turning it on closes the circuit and allows electrical current to flow. In this way a transistor can be used to convert DC from a solar panel into AC for use in a home. Transphorms transistors will enable a single semiconductor device to switch electrical currents at high-voltage in both directionsmaking the inverter more compact and reliable. Transphorm is using Gallium Nitride (GaN) as a semiconductor material in its transistors instead of silicon, which is used in most conventional transistors, because GaN transistors have lower losses at higher voltages and switching frequencies.

None

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

425

White paper: CeLAND - Investigation of the reactor antineutrino anomaly with an intense 144Ce-144Pr antineutrino source in KamLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose to test for short baseline neutrino oscillations, implied by the recent reevaluation of the reactor antineutrino flux and by anomalous results from the gallium solar neutrino detectors. The test will consist of producing a 75 kCi 144Ce - 144Pr antineutrino source to be deployed in the Kamioka Liquid Scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND). KamLAND's 13m diameter target volume provides a suitable environment to measure energy and position dependence of the detected neutrino flux. A characteristic oscillation pattern would be visible for a baseline of about 10 m or less, providing a very clean signal of neutrino disappearance into a yet-unknown, "sterile" state. Such a measurement will be free of any reactor-related uncertainties. After 1.5 years of data taking the Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly parameter space will be tested at > 95% C.L.

A. Gando; Y. Gando; S. Hayashida; H. Ikeda; K. Inoue; K. Ishidoshiro; H. Ishikawa; M. Koga; R. Matsuda; S. Matsuda; T. Mitsui; D. Motoki; K. Nakamura; Y. Oki; M. Otani; I. Shimizu; J. Shirai; F. Suekane; A. Suzuki; Y. Takemoto; K. Tamae; K. Ueshima; H. Watanabe; B. D. Xu; S. Yamada; Y. Yamauchi; H. Yoshida; T. Banks; B. E. Berger; M. Cribier; P. Decowski; J. A. Detwiler; M. Durero; D. Dwyer; Y. Efremenko; S. Enomoto; V. Fischer; B. K. Fujikawa; J. Gaffiot; V. M. Gelis; H. J. Karwowski; Yu. G. Kolomensky; A. Kozlov; V. N. Kornoukhov; T. Lasserre; J. G. Learned; A. Letourneau; D. Lhuillier; J. Maricic; D. M. Markoff; S. Matsuno; G. Mention; R. Milincic; T. ODonnell; I. S. Saldikov; L. Scola; G. V. Tikhomirov; Ch. Veyssiere; M. Vivier; S. Yoshida

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

426

Chip-Scale Power Conversion for LED Lighting: Integrated Power Chip Converter for Solid-State Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ADEPT Project: Teledyne is developing cost-effective power drivers for energy-efficient LED lights that fit on a compact chip. These power drivers are important because they transmit power throughout the LED device. Traditional LED driver components waste energy and don't last as long as the LED itself. They are also large and bulky, so they must be assembled onto a circuit board separately which increases the overall manufacturing cost of the LED light. Teledyne is shrinking the size and improving the efficiency of its LED driver components by using thin layers of an iron magnetic alloy and new gallium nitride on silicon devices. Smaller, more efficient components will enable the drivers to be integrated on a single chip, reducing costs. The new semiconductors in Teledyne's drivers can also handle higher levels of power and last longer without sacrificing efficiency. Initial applications for Teledyne's LED power drivers include refrigerated grocery display cases and retail lighting.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Stress testing on silicon carbide electronic devices for prognostics and health management.  

SciTech Connect

Power conversion systems for energy storage and other distributed energy resource applications are among the drivers of the important role that power electronics plays in providing reliable electricity. Wide band gap semiconductors such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) will help increase the performance and efficiency of power electronic equipment while condition monitoring (CM) and prognostics and health management (PHM) will increase the operational availability of the equipment and thereby make it more cost effective. Voltage and/or temperature stress testing were performed on a number of SiC devices in order to accelerate failure modes and to identify measureable shifts in electrical characteristics which may provide early indication of those failures. Those shifts can be interpreted and modeled to provide prognostic signatures for use in CM and/or PHM. Such experiments will also lead to a deeper understanding of basic device physics and the degradation mechanisms behind failure.

Kaplar, Robert James; Brock, Reinhard C.; Marinella, Matthew; King, Michael Patrick; Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Solar neutrino experiments: An update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The situation in solar neutrino physics has changed drastically in the past few years, so that now there are four neutrino experiments in operation, using different methods to look at different regions of the solar neutrino energy spectrum. These experiments are the radiochemical {sup 37}Cl Homestake detector, the realtime Kamiokande detector, and the different forms of radiochemical {sup 71}Ga detectors used in the GALLEX and SAGE projects. It is noteworthy that all of these experiments report a deficit of observed neutrinos relative to the predictions of standard solar models (although in the case of the gallium detectors, the statistical errors are still relatively large). This paper reviews the basic principles of operation of these neutrino detectors, reports their latest results and discusses some theoretical interpretations. The progress of three realtime neutrino detectors that are currently under construction, SuperKamiok, SNO and Borexino, is also discussed.

Hahn, R.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Sun's Interior Metallicity Constrained by Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observed solar neutrino fluxes are employed to constrain the interior composition of the Sun. Including the effects of neutrino flavor mixing, the results from Homestake, Sudbury, and Gallium experiments constrain the Mg, Si, and Fe abundances in the solar interior to be within a factor 0.89 to 1.34 of the surface values with 68% confidence. If the O and/or Ne abundances are increased in the interior to resolve helioseismic discrepancies with recent standard solar models, then the nominal interior Mg, Si, and Fe abundances are constrained to a range of 0.83 to 1.24 relative to the surface. Additional research is needed to determine whether the Sun's interior is metal poor relative to its surface.

Guillermo Gonzalez

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

430

2003FebDraft3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-Vol. 1 No. 2 3-Vol. 1 No. 2 Focused Ion Beam Systems Advance Technology at Manufacturing Science & Technology Center A second focused ion beam (FIB) system has been brought to 14100 for con- tinued research and development of microscale and nanoscale fab- rication techniques. Installation is nearly complete and by the time this article is published, a second tightly focused beam of atoms will be bombarding some of the hardest materials known. FIB systems precisely remove material from a solid object by ion bombardment. A focused beam of gallium can be guided to trace simple or complex geometric patterns, and may also be controlled in position and time to cut three-dimen- sional shapes. The material removal process does not heat the object being shaped and there are no large forces on the sample during ion shaping.

431

Structure and properties of rhombohedral CePd{sub 3}Ga{sub 8}: A variant of the cubic parent compound with BaHg{sub 11} structure type  

SciTech Connect

Single crystals of a new intermetallic gallide, R-CePd{sub 3}Ga{sub 8}, have been synthesized from excess molten gallium. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that R-CePd{sub 3}Ga{sub 8} crystallizes in the R-3m space group with a=b=c=8.4903(10) A and {alpha}={beta}={gamma}=89.993(17). R-CePd{sub 3}Ga{sub 8} is a variant of the cubic BaHg{sub 11} structure type with three structural units: a Ce-centered polyhedron, a distorted cube of Pd{sub 2}Ga{sub 6} and a Pd-centered cuboctahedron. The distortions of these units are compared to undistorted analogous units in intermetallic compounds with BaHg{sub 11} structure type. Field and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements on R-CePd{sub 3}Ga{sub 8} reveal a paramagnetic material with strong antiferromagnetic correlations and a magnetization consistent with Ce{sup 3+}. Electrical resistance measurements indicate Kondo behavior between localized Ce{sup 3+} magnetic moments. - Graphical Abstract: Single crystals of CePd{sub 3}Ga{sub 8} have been synthesized from Ga flux. This new compound is the first rhombohedral variant of the cubic BaHg{sub 11} structure type. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Single crystals of CePd{sub 3}Ga{sub 8} were synthesized from gallium flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle CePd{sub 3}Ga{sub 8} is the first rhombohedral variant of the cubic BaHg{sub 11} structure type. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Paramagnetic with antiferromagnetic correlations. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Magnetization consistent with Ce{sup 3+}.

Macaluso, Robin T., E-mail: robin.macaluso@unco.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO 80639 (United States); Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Francisco, Melanie [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL60208 (United States); Young, David P.; Stadler, Shane [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mitchell, John F.; Geiser, Urs [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hong, Han-yul [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO 80639 (United States); Kanatzidis, Mercouri G. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL60208 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of some Group III and Group V elements and alloys by solid state electrochemical techniques  

SciTech Connect

The Gibbs free energy of forming gallium sesquioxide and indium sesquioxide are measured using a CO$sub 2$--CO--O$sub 2$ gas reference electrode and calcia stabilized zirconia as the solid electrolyte. The free energies are: $delta$G$sup 0$/sub f/($beta$-Ga$sub 2$O$sub 3$(c)) equals -(265,309 +- 152) + (82.47 +- 0.16) (T/K) cal mol$sup -1$ and $delta$G$sup 0$/sub f/(In$sub 2$O$sub 3$ (c)) equals -(223,160 +- 137) + (79.47 +- 0.12) (T/K) cal mol$sup -$.$sup 1$ A solid state galvanic cell is employed to measure gallium activities in Ga--Sb liquid alloys. Results show moderate negative deviations from ideality in the composition range 0.039 less than x/sub Ga/ less than 0.833. Partial molar enthalpies and entropies are calculated, and agree wih calorimetric data. Results are combined with calorimetric data to calculate the liquidus temperatures of the Ga--Sb system, which are in excellent agreement with measurements. Effect of short-range ordering is also investigated. Coulometric titration techniques are used to investigate the solubility and diffusivity of oxygen in liquid indium. Dissolved atomic oxygen is found to follow Henry's law and a saturation solubility of x$sub 0$/sup sat/ equals 3.3 x 10$sup -3$ is determined at 908$sup 0$K. From a galvanostatic response of an indium electrode, an oxygen diffusivity of 2.2 x 10$sup -6$ cm$sup 2$ s$sup -1$ is found, in good agreement with other available data. (LK)

Anderson, T.J.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Production of films and powders for semiconductor device applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for chemical bath deposition of selenide and sulfide salts as films and powders employable as precursors for the fabrication of solar cell devices. The films and powders include (1) Cu{sub x}Se{sub n}, wherein x=1--2 and n=1--3; (2) Cu{sub x}Ga{sub y}Se{sub n}, wherein x=1--2, y=0--1 and n=1--3; (3) Cu{sub x}In{sub y}Se{sub n}, wherein x=1--2.27, y=0.72--2 and n=1--3; (4) Cu{sub x}(InGa){sub y}Se{sub n}, wherein x=1--2.17, y=0.96--2 and n=1--3; (5) In{sub y}Se{sub n}, wherein y=1--2.3 and n=1--3; (6) Cu{sub x}S{sub n}, wherein x=1--2 and n=1--3; and (7) Cu{sub x}(InGa){sub y}(SeS){sub n}, wherein x=1--2, y=0.07--2 and n=0.663--3. A reaction vessel containing therein a substrate upon which will form one or more layers of semiconductor material is provided, and relevant solution mixtures are introduced in a sufficient quantity for a sufficient time and under favorable conditions into the vessel to react with each other to produce the resultant salt being prepared and deposited as one or more layers on the substrate and as a powder on the floor of the vessel. Hydrazine is present during all reaction processes producing non-gallium containing products and optionally present during reaction processes producing gallium-containing products to function as a strong reducing agent and thereby enhance reaction processes. 4 figs.

Bhattacharya, R.N.; Noufi, R.; Li Wang

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

434

If sterile neutrinos exist, how can one determine the total solar neutrino fluxes?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 8B solar neutrino flux inferred from a global analysis of solar neutrino experiments is within 11% (1 sigma) of the predicted standard solar model value if only active neutrinos exist, but could be as large as 1.7 times the standard prediction if sterile neutrinos exist. We show that the total 8B neutrino flux (active plus sterile neutrinos) can be determined experimentally to about 10% (1 sigma) by combining charged current measurements made with the KamLAND reactor experiment and with the SNO CC solar neutrino experiment, provided the LMA neutrino oscillation solution is correct and the simulated performance of KamLAND is valid. Including also SNO NC data, the sterile component of the 8B neutrino flux can be measured by this method to an accuracy of about 12% (1 sigma) of the standard solar model flux. Combining Super-Kamiokande and KamLAND measurements and assuming the oscillations occur only among active neutrinos, the 8B neutrino flux can be measured to 6% (1 sigma); the total flux can be measured to an accuracy of about 9%. The total 7Be solar neutrino flux can be determined to an accuracy of about 28% (1 sigma) by combining measurements made with the KamLAND, SNO, and gallium neutrino experiments. One can determine the total 7Be neutrino flux to a one sigma accuracy of about 11% or better by comparing data from the KamLAND experiment and the BOREXINO solar neutrino experiment provided both detectors work as expected. The pp neutrino flux can be determined to about 15% using data from the gallium, KamLAND, BOREXINO, and SNO experiments.

John N. Bahcall; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; C. Pena-Garay

2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

435

Symmetry-Breaking Orbital Anisotropy Observed for Detwinned Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 above the Spin Density Wave Transition  

SciTech Connect

Nematicity, defined as broken rotational symmetry, has recently been observed in competing phases proximate to the superconducting phase in the cuprate high temperature superconductors. Similarly, the new iron-based high temperature superconductors exhibit a tetragonal to orthorhombic structural transition (i.e. a broken C{sub 4} symmetry) that either precedes or is coincident with a collinear spin density wave (SDW) transition in undoped parent compounds, and superconductivity arises when both transitions are suppressed via doping. Evidence for strong in-plane anisotropy in the SDW state in this family of compounds has been reported by neutron scattering, scanning tunneling microscopy, and transport measurements. Here we present an angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of detwinned single crystals of a representative family of electron-doped iron-arsenide superconductors, Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} in the underdoped region. The crystals were detwinned via application of in-plane uniaxial stress, enabling measurements of single domain electronic structure in the orthorhombic state. At low temperatures, our results clearly demonstrate an in-plane electronic anisotropy characterized by a large energy splitting of two orthogonal bands with dominant d{sub xz} and d{sub yz} character, which is consistent with anisotropy observed by other probes. For compositions x > 0, for which the structural transition (T{sub S}) precedes the magnetic transition (T{sub SDW}), an anisotropic splitting is observed to develop above T{sub SDW}, indicating that it is specifically associated with T{sub S}. For unstressed crystals, the band splitting is observed close to T{sub S}, whereas for stressed crystals the splitting is observed to considerably higher temperatures, revealing the presence of a surprisingly large in-plane nematic susceptibility in the electronic structure.

Yi, Ming

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

436

High Efficiency Nanostructured III-V Photovoltaics for Solar Concentrator Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High Efficiency Nanostructured III-V Photovoltaics for Solar Concentrators project seeks to provide new photovoltaic cells for Concentrator Photovoltaics (CPV) Systems with higher cell efficiency, more favorable temperature coefficients and less sensitivity to changes in spectral distribution. The main objective of this project is to provide high efficiency III-V solar cells that will reduce the overall cost per Watt for power generation using CPV systems.This work is focused both on a potential near term application, namely the use of indium arsenide (InAs) QDs to spectrally "tune" the middle (GaAs) cell of a SOA triple junction device to a more favorable effective bandgap, as well as the long term goal of demonstrating intermediate band solar cell effects. The QDs are confined within a high electric field i-region of a standard GaAs solar cell. The extended absorption spectrum (and thus enhanced short circuit current) of the QD solar cell results from the increase in the sub GaAs bandgap spectral response that is achievable as quantum dot layers are introduced into the i-region. We have grown InAs quantum dots by OMVPE technique and optimized the QD growth conditions. Arrays of up to 40 layers of strain balanced quantum dots have been experimentally demonstrated with good material quality, low residual stain and high PL intensity. Quantum dot enhanced solar cells were grown and tested under simulated one sun AM1.5 conditions. Concentrator solar cells have been grown and fabricated with 5-40 layers of QDs. Testing of these devices show the QD cells have improved efficiency compared to baseline devices without QDs. Device modeling and measurement of thermal properties were performed using Crosslight APSYS. Improvements in a triple junction solar cell with the insertion of QDs into the middle current limiting junction was shown to be as high as 29% under one sun illumination for a 10 layer stack QD enhanced triple junction solar cell. QD devices have strong potential for net gains in efficiency at high concentration.

Hubbard, Seth

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

437

It's Elemental - The Periodic Table of Elements - Elements Listed by Atomic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic Number Atomic Number 1 Hydrogen H 2 Helium He 3 Lithium Li 4 Beryllium Be 5 Boron B 6 Carbon C 7 Nitrogen N 8 Oxygen O 9 Fluorine F 10 Neon Ne 11 Sodium Na 12 Magnesium Mg 13 Aluminum Al 14 Silicon Si 15 Phosphorus P 16 Sulfur S 17 Chlorine Cl 18 Argon Ar 19 Potassium K 20 Calcium Ca 21 Scandium Sc 22 Titanium Ti 23 Vanadium V 24 Chromium Cr 25 Manganese Mn 26 Iron Fe 27 Cobalt Co 28 Nickel Ni 29 Copper Cu 30 Zinc Zn 31 Gallium Ga 32 Germanium Ge 33 Arsenic As 34 Selenium Se 35 Bromine Br 36 Krypton Kr 37 Rubidium Rb 38 Strontium Sr 39 Yttrium Y 40 Zirconium Zr 41 Niobium Nb 42 Molybdenum Mo 43 Technetium Tc 44 Ruthenium Ru 45 Rhodium Rh 46 Palladium Pd 47 Silver Ag 48 Cadmium Cd 49 Indium In 50 Tin Sn 51 Antimony Sb 52 Tellurium Te 53 Iodine I 54 Xenon Xe 55 Cesium Cs 56 Barium Ba 57 Lanthanum La 58 Cerium Ce

438

It's Elemental - The Periodic Table of Elements - Elements Listed by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Name Chemical Name Actinium Ac 89 Aluminum Al 13 Americium Am 95 Antimony Sb 51 Argon Ar 18 Arsenic As 33 Astatine At 85 Barium Ba 56 Berkelium Bk 97 Beryllium Be 4 Bismuth Bi 83 Bohrium Bh 107 Boron B 5 Bromine Br 35 Cadmium Cd 48 Calcium Ca 20 Californium Cf 98 Carbon C 6 Cerium Ce 58 Cesium Cs 55 Chlorine Cl 17 Chromium Cr 24 Cobalt Co 27 Copernicium Cn 112 Copper Cu 29 Curium Cm 96 Darmstadtium Ds 110 Dubnium Db 105 Dysprosium Dy 66 Einsteinium Es 99 Erbium Er 68 Europium Eu 63 Fermium Fm 100 Flerovium Fl 114 Fluorine F 9 Francium Fr 87 Gadolinium Gd 64 Gallium Ga 31 Germanium Ge 32 Gold Au 79 Hafnium Hf 72 Hassium Hs 108 Helium He 2 Holmium Ho 67 Hydrogen H 1 Indium In 49 Iodine I 53 Iridium Ir 77 Iron Fe 26 Krypton Kr 36 Lanthanum La 57 Lawrencium Lr 103 Lead Pb 82 Lithium Li 3 Livermorium Lv 116

439

CeLAND: search for a 4th light neutrino state with a 3 PBq 144Ce-144Pr electron antineutrino generator in KamLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The reactor neutrino and gallium anomalies can be tested with a 3-4 PBq (75-100 kCi scale) 144Ce-144Pr antineutrino beta-source deployed at the center or next to a large low-background liquid scintillator detector. The antineutrino generator will be produced by the Russian reprocessing plant PA Mayak as early as 2014, transported to Japan, and deployed in the Kamioka Liquid Scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) as early as 2015. KamLAND's 13 m diameter target volume provides a suitable environment to measure the energy and position dependence of the detected neutrino flux. A characteristic oscillation pattern would be visible for a baseline of about 10 m or less, providing a very clean signal of neutrino disappearance into a yet-unknown, sterile neutrino state. This will provide a comprehensive test of the electron dissaperance neutrino anomalies and could lead to the discovery of a 4th neutrino state for Delta_m^2 > 0.1 eV^2 and sin^2(2theta) > 0.05.

A. Gando; Y. Gando; S. Hayashida; H. Ikeda; K. Inoue; K. Ishidoshiro; H. Ishikawa; M. Koga; R. Matsuda; S. Matsuda; T. Mitsui; D. Motoki; K. Nakamura; Y. Oki; M. Otani; I. Shimizu; J. Shirai; F. Suekane; A. Suzuki; Y. Takemoto; K. Tamae; K. Ueshima; H. Watanabe; B. D. Xu; S. Yamada; Y. Yamauchi; H. Yoshida; M. Cribier; M. Durero; V. Fischer; J. Gaffiot; N. Jonqueres; A. Kouchner; T. Lasserre; D. Leterme; A. Letourneau; D. Lhuillier; G. Mention; G. Rampal; L. Scola; Ch. Veyssiere; M. Vivier; P. Yala; B. E. Berger; A. Kozlov; T. Banks; D. Dwyer; B. K. Fujikawa; K. Han; Yu. G. Kolomensky; Y. Mei; T. O'Donnell; P. Decowski; D. M. Markoff; S. Yoshida; V. N. Kornoukhov; T. V. M. Gelis; G. V. Tikhomirov; J. G. Learned; J. Maricic; S. Matsuno; R. Milincic; H. J. Karwowski; Y. Efremenko; A. Detwiler; S. Enomoto

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

440

Magnetic-resonance and thermophysical studies of the magnetic phase diagram for a GdFe{sub 2.1}Ga{sub 0.9}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} single crystal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The antiferromagnetic resonance, heat capacity, magnetic properties, and magnetic phase diagram of a GdFe{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} crystal in which some of the iron ions were substituted by diamagnetic gallium ions have been investigated. It has been found that the Neel temperature upon diamagnetic substitution decreased to 17 K compared to 38 K in the unsubstituted crystal. The effective exchange and anisotropy fields for GdFe{sub 2.1}Ga{sub 0.9}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} have been estimated from the field dependences of magnetization and resonance measurements. The magnetic phase diagram of the crystal has been constructed from magnetic and resonance measurements. In GdFe{sub 2.1}Ga{sub 0.9}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4}, there is no spontaneous reorientation and, in the absence of a magnetic field, the crystal remains an easy-axis one in the entire domain of magnetic ordering. The critical field of the reorientation transition to an induced easy-plane state in a magnetic field along the trigonal axis has been found to increase compared to that in the unsubstituted crystal.

Pankrats, A. I.; Petrakovskii, G. A.; Tugarinov, V. I., E-mail: vit@iph.krasn.ru; Kartashev, A. V.; Temerov, V. L. [Russian Academy of Science, Siberian Branch, Kirensky Institute of Physics (Russian Federation)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gd2o2s gallium arsenide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Mechanism of photoreductive stripping of iron(III) in a liquid-liquid extraction system and its application for a hydrometallurgical process  

SciTech Connect

The mechanism of the photoreductive stripping of iron(III) in the liquid-liquid extraction process was investigated by employing (2-ethylhexyl)phosphonic acid mono(2-ethylhexyl) ester (EHPNA) and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as extractants, n-dodecane and kerosene as diluents, and a xenon lamp as the light source. The photoreductive stripping of iron(III) progressed by photoirradiation following an initial induction period caused by dissolved oxygen in the extraction system. The iron(III)-extractant complex was photoexcited in the organic phase and photoreduced to the iron(II) complex by electron donation from the water at the aqueous/organic interface. A kinetic study of the photoreductive stripping of iron(III) revealed that the photochemical reduction of iron(III) was the rate-determining step. The removal of iron from a simulated zinc refinery residue solution by using liquid-liquid extraction combined with photochemical reduction of iron was also investigated, showing that the rare metals in the refinery residue, gallium and indium, were recovered effectively and leaving almost all iron(III) in the aqueous phase.

Nishihama, Syouhei; Hirai, Takayuki; Komasawa, Isao

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Three-neutrino model analysis of the world's oscillation data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model of neutrino oscillation experiments is constructed. The experiments incorporated are: solar neutrinos (Chlorine, Gallium, Super-K, and SNO), reactor neutrinos (Bugey and CHOOZ), beam stop neutrinos (LSND decay at rest and decay in flight), and atmospheric neutrinos. Utilizing this model and the standard three-neutrino mixing extension of the standard model, the data are analyzed. Solutions for the mixing angles and mass-squared differences are found to occur in pairs corresponding to the interchange $\\Delta m^2_{12} \\leftrightarrow \\Delta m^2_{23}$. Two pairs of solutions are found that reasonably reproduce the data, including the LSND data. These solutions are $\\theta_{12}\\approx 0.5$, $\\theta_{13}\\approx 0.1$, $\\theta_{23}\\approx 0.7$, $\\Delta m^2_{12} \\approx 5\\times 10^{-5}$ eV$^2$ and $\\Delta m^2_{23} \\approx 0.2$ eV$^2$ or 2.4 eV$^2$. Other statistically significant solutions are also found which produce negligible oscillations for the LSND experiments.

Latimer, D C

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

High Efficiency LED Lamp for Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a three-year project to demonstrate high efficiency, solid-state lamps based on gallium nitride/silicon carbide light-emitting diodes. Novel chip designs and fabrication processes are described for a new type of nitride light-emitting diode with the potential for very high efficiency. This work resulted in the demonstration of blue light-emitting diodes in the one watt class that achieved up to 495 mW of light output at 350 mA drive current, corresponding to quantum and wall plug efficiencies of 51% and 45%, respectively. When combined with a phosphor in Cree's 7090 XLamp package, these advanced blue-emitting devices resulted in white light-emitting diodes whose efficacy exceeded 85 lumens per watt. In addition, up to 1040 lumens at greater than 85 lumens per watt was achieved by combining multiple devices to make a compact white lamp module with high optical efficiency.

James Ibbetson

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Small Area Array-Based LED Luminaire Design  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a three-year project to demonstrate high efficiency LED luminaire designs based on small area array-based gallium nitride diodes. Novel GaN-based LED array designs are described, specifically addressing the thermal, optical, electrical and mechanical requirements for the incorporation of such arrays into viable solid-state LED luminaires. This work resulted in the demonstration of an integrated luminaire prototype of 1000 lumens cool white light output with reflector shaped beams and efficacy of 89.4 lm/W at CCT of 6000oK and CRI of 73; and performance of 903 lumens warm white light output with reflector shaped beams and efficacy of 63.0 lm/W at CCT of 2800oK and CRI of 82. In addition, up to 1275 lumens cool white light output at 114.2 lm/W and 1156 lumens warm white light output at 76.5 lm/W were achieved if the reflector was not used. The success to integrate small area array-based LED designs and address thermal, optical, electrical and mechanical requirements was clearly achieved in these luminaire prototypes with outstanding performance and high efficiency.

Thomas Yuan

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

445

Characterization of GaN nanowires grown on PSi, PZnO and PGaN on Si (111) substrates by thermal evaporation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this research, we used an easy and inexpensive method to synthesize highly crystalline GaN nanowires (NWs); on different substrates such as porous silicon (PSi), porous zinc oxide (PZnO) and porous gallium nitride (PGaN) on Si (111) wafer by thermal evaporation using commercial GaN powder without any catalyst. Micro structural studies by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope measurements reveal the role of different substrates in the morphology, nucleation and alignment of the GaN nanowires. The degree of alignment of the synthesized nanowires does not depend on the lattice mismatch between wires and their substrates. Further structural and optical characterizations were performed using high resolution X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicate that the nanowires are of single-crystal hexagonal GaN. The quality and density of grown GaN nanowires for different substrates are highly dependent on the lattice mismatch between the nanowires and their substrates and also on the size of the porosity of the substrates. Nanowires grown on PGaN have the best quality and highest density as compared to nanowires on other substrates. By using three kinds of porous substrates, we are able to study the increase in the alignment and density of the nanowires.

Shekari, Leila; Hassan, Haslan Abu; Thahab, Sabah M.; Hassan, Zainuriah [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Materials Engineering Department, College of Engineering, University of Kufa, Najaf (Iraq); Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

446

Unlikely Combination of Experiments With a Novel High-Voltage CIGS Photovoltaic Array: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new high-voltage array comprising bipolar strings of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) modules was inaugurated in 2005. It is equipped with a unique combination of tests, which likely have never before been deployed simultaneously within a single array: full current-voltage (I-V) traces, high-voltage leakage current measurements, and peak-power tracking or temporal stepped-bias profiling. The array nominally produces 1 kW power at 1 sun. The array's electrical characteristics are continuously monitored and controlled with a programmable electronic load interfaced to a data acquisition system (DAS), that also records solar and meteorological data. The modules are mounted with their frames electrically isolated from earth ground, in order to facilitate measurement of the leakage currents that arise between the high voltage bias developed in the series-connected cells and modules and their mounting frames. Because the DAS can perform stepped biasing of the array as a function of time, synchronous detection of the leakage current data with alternating bias is available. Leakage current data and their dependence on temperature and voltage are investigated. Array power data are analyzed across a wide range of varying illuminations and temperatures from the I-V traces. Array performance is also analyzed from an energy output perspective using peak-power tracking data.

del Cueto, J. A.; Sekulic, B. R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Application of CIS to high-efficiency PV module fabrication. Annual technical progress report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors investigated the interactions between the soda-lime glass substrate, the Mo contract film and the CIS absorber layer. Excessive Na diffusion through the Mo layer was found to be the reason for excessive interaction between the substrate and the CIS layers obtained by the H{sub 2}Se selenization technique. This chemical interaction influenced the stoichiometric uniformity of the absorbers. Addition of Ga into the CIS layers by the two-stage selenization technique yielded graded absorber structures with higher Ga content near the Mo/absorber interface. Gallium was later diffused through the absorber film by a high-temperature annealing step, and large bandgap alloys were obtained. Solar cells with active-area efficiencies of close to 12% were fabricated on these CIGS layers. Sulfur addition experiments were also carried out during this period. By controlling the Se and S availability to the precursors during the reaction step of the process, various S profiles were obtained in high-bandgap absorber layers. The highest-efficiency cell made on S-containing absorbers was about 10% efficient. A low-cost, non-vacuum technique was successfully developed for CIS film growth. Layers prepared using this novel approach were used for solar-cell and submodule fabrication. Solar cells with active-area efficiencies around 13% were demonstrated; submodules with efficiencies above 8% were also fabricated. These results represent the best PV devices ever produced on CIS layers obtained by a non-vacuum technique.

Basol, B.; Kapur, V.; Leidholm, C.; Halani, A. [International Solar Electric Technology, Inglewood, CA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

STANDARD PHYSICS SOLUTION TO THE SOLAR NEUTRINO PROBLEM?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 8 B solar neutrino flux predicted by the standard solar model (SSM) is consistent within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties with that observed at Kamiokande. The Gallium and Chlorine solar neutrino experiments, however, seem to imply that the 7 Be solar neutrino flux is strongly suppressed compared with that predicted by the SSM. If the 7 Be solar neutrino flux is suppressed, still it can be due to astrophysical effects not included in the simplistic SSM. Such effects include short term fluctuations or periodic variation of the temperature in the solar core, rotational mixing of 3 He in the solar core, and dense plasma effects which may strongly enhance p-capture by 7 Be relative to e-capture. The new generation of solar observations which already look non stop deep into the sun, like Superkamiokande through neutrinos, and SOHO and GONG through acoustic waves, may point at the correct solution. Only Superkamiokande and/or future solar neutrino experiments, such as SNO, BOREXINO and HELLAZ, will be able to find out whether the solar neutrino problem is caused by neutrino properties beyond the minimal standard electroweak model or whether it is just a problem of the too simplistic standard solar model. 1 1

Arnon Dar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Resonant Spin-Flavor Precession Solution to the Solar Neutrino Problem and electron antineutrinos from the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have found allowed squared mass difference, magnetic field, mixing angle - regions for the Resonant Spin-Flavor Precession Solution to the Solar Neutrino Problem fitted with the data of all acting solar neutrino experiments. The typical mass difference region varying in dependence on the mixing angle is allowed for some discrete magnetic field regions in a wide range for the fixed neutrino transition magnetic moment. Except of the first allowed range with the lowest field strength the magnetic field amplitude within other discrete allowed regions depend essentially on the shape of a regular magnetic field profile in the convective zone of the Sun. For the non-zero neutrino mixing one can find at 99.9% C.L. an upper limit on the mixing, originated by the non-observation of electron antineutrinos in the SuperKamiokande detector. This limit occurs also sensitive to the magnetic field profile. While at 67% C.L. there is another more stringent upper limit coming from inconsistency of the gallium experiments with others. A new allowed region appears in the case of an additional assumption that the Homestake data are 1.3 times less than the experimental event rate.

A. A. Bykov; V. Yu. Popov; T. I. Rashba; V. B. Semikoz

2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

450

Development of bacterial cultures which can metabolize structural analogs of dioxin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Widely present in the environment, the highly-toxic compound 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been found to resist microbial biodegradation. To develop an anaerobic biodegradation approach for soils and sediments contaminated with TCDD, methanogenic and denitrifying cultures were established on a variety of chloroaromatic substrates, including 2-chlorophenol, 3-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,3-dichlorophenol, 3,4-dichlorophenol, 4,5-dichlorocatechol and catechol, using an inoculum from Newtown Creek (New York, NY). Dehalogenation was observed, with monochlorophenols producing phenol and dichlorophenols producing monochlorinated phenols and phenol. Based on gas production, the chlorinated catechol did not appear to undergo biodegradation under any condition, while catechol was degraded under methanogenic conditions. Select cultures amended with a mixture of chloroaromatics and n-butanol, a solubilizing agent, exhibited depressed gas production under both anaerobic conditions. Biodegradation of TCDD adsorbed onto particles of gallium oxide is under investigation with an amalgamation of the active single-substrate methanogenic cultures. 29 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Rugge, C.D. (SRE, Inc., Pine Brook, NJ (United States)); Ahlert, R.C. (Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)); O'Connor, O.A. (Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Corrosion of type 316L stainless steel in a mercury thermal convection loop  

SciTech Connect

Two thermal convection loops fabricated from 316L stainless steel containing mercury (Hg) and Hg with 1000 wppm gallium (Ga), respectively, were operated continuously for about 5000 h. In each case, the maximum loop temperature was constant at about 305 degrees C and the minimum temperature was constant at about 242 degrees C. Coupons in the hot leg of the Hg-loop developed a posous surface layer substantially depleted of nickel and chromium, which resulted in a transformation to ferrite. The coupon exposed at the top of the hot leg in the Hg-loop experienced the maximum degradation, exhibiting a surface layer extending an average of 9-10 mu m after almost 5000 h. Analysis of the corrosion rate data as a function of temperature (position) in the Hg-loop suggests wetting by the mer cury occurred only above about 255 degrees C and that the rate limiting step in the corrosion process above 255 degrees C is solute diffusion through the saturated liquid boundary layer adjacent to the corroding surface. The latter factor suggests that the corrosion of 316L stainless steel in a mercury loop may be velocity dependent. No wetting and no corrosion were observed on the coupons and wall specimens removed from the Hg/Ga loop after 5000 h of operation.

DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Pawel, S.J.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy ofGaP_{1-x}N_x Photocorroded as a Result of Hydrogen Productionthrough Water Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells produce hydrogen gas through the sunlight driven electrolysis of water. By extracting hydrogen and oxygen from water and storing solar energy in the H-H bond, they offer a promising renewable energy technology. Addition of dilute amounts of nitrogen to III-V semiconductors has been shown to dramatically increase the stability of these materials for hydrogen production. In an effort to learn more about the origin of semiconductor photocorrosion in PEC cells, three samples of p-type GaP with varying levels of nitrogen content (0%, 0.2%, 2%) were photocorroded and examined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). GaPN samples were observed to be more efficient during the hydrogen production process than the pure GaP samples. Sample surfaces contained gallium oxides in the form of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ga(OH){sub 3} and phosphorus oxide (P{sub 2}O{sub 5}), as well as surface oxides from exposure to air. A significant shift in intensity from bulk to surface peaks dramatic nitrogen segregation to the surface during photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Further investigations, including using a scanning electron microscope to investigate sample topography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis for solution analyses, are under way to determine the mechanism for these changes.

Mayer, Marie A.; /Illinois U., Urbana /SLAC

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

453

Manufacturing technology development for CuInGaSe sub 2 solar cell modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report describes research performed by Boeing Aerospace and Electronics under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology project. We anticipate that implementing advanced semiconductor device fabrication techniques to the production of large-area CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS)/Cd{sub 1-y}Zn{sub y}S/ZnO monolithically integrated thin-film solar cell modules will enable 15% median efficiencies to be achieved in high-volume manufacturing. We do not believe that CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) can achieve this efficiency in production without sufficient gallium to significantly increase the band gap, thereby matching it better to the solar spectrum (i.e., x{ge}0.2). Competing techniques for CIS film formation have not been successfully extended to CIGS devices with such high band gaps. The SERI-confirmed intrinsic stability of CIS-based photovoltaics renders them far superior to a-Si:H-based devices, making a 30-year module lifetime feasible. The minimal amounts of cadmium used in the structure we propose, compared to CdTe-based devices, makes them environmentally safer and more acceptable to both consumers and relevant regulatory agencies. Large-area integrated thin-film CIGS modules are the product most likely to supplant silicon modules by the end of this decade and enable the cost improvements which will lead to rapid market expansion.

Stanbery, B.J. (Boeing Aerospace and Electronics Co., Seattle, WA (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

455

Viscous Glass Sealants for SOFC Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two series of silicate glasses that contain gallium as the primary critical component have been identified and optimized for viscous sealing of solid oxide fuel cells operating from 650 to 850°C. Both series of glass sealants crystallize partially upon heat treatment and yield multiphase microstructures that allow viscous flow at temperatures as low as 650°C. A fully amorphous sealant was also developed by isolating, synthesizing and testing a silicate glass of the same composition as the remnant glassy phase in one of the two glass series. Of ~40 glasses tested for longer than 500 hours, a set of 5 glasses has been further tested for up to 1000h in air, wet hydrogen, and against both yttria-stabilized zirconia and aluminized stainless steel. In some cases the testing times reached 2000h. The reactivity testing has provided new insight into the effects of Y, Zr, and Al on bulk and surface crystallization in boro-gallio-silicate glasses, and demonstrated that at least 5 of the newly-developed glasses are viable viscous sealants.

Scott Misture

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part 2 of the project (this report) uses the conclusions from Part 1 as a point of departure to focus on two objectives: producing a more detailed and conservative assessment of the manufacturing process and providing a comparative LCA with other lighting products based on the improved manufacturing analysis and taking into consideration a wider range of environmental impacts. In this study, we first analyzed the manufacturing process for a white-light LED (based on a sapphire-substrate, blue-light, gallium-nitride LED pumping a yellow phosphor), to understand the impacts of the manufacturing process. We then conducted a comparative LCA, looking at the impacts associated with the Philips Master LEDbulb and comparing those to a CFL and an incandescent lamp. The comparison took into account the Philips Master LEDbulb as it is now in 2012 and then projected forward what it might be in 2017, accounting for some of the anticipated improvements in LED manufacturing, performance and driver electronics.

Scholand, Michael; Dillon, Heather E.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Process Development for CIGS-Based Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules; Phase I Technical Report, 5 February 1998--4 February 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by Global Solar Energy (GSE) under Phase I of this subcontract. GSE has initiated an extensive and systematic plan to accelerate the commercialization of thin-film photovoltaics (PV) on copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). GSE is developing the technology to deposit and monolithically integrate CIGS photovoltaics on a flexible substrate. CIGS-deposited on flexible substrates can be fabricated into either flexible or rigid modules. Low-cost, rigid PV panels for remote power, bulk/utility, telecommunications, and rooftop applications will be produced by affixing the flexible CIGS to an expensive rigid panel by lamination or adhesive. In the GSE approach, long (up to 700 m) continuous rolls of substrate are processed, as opposed to individual small glass plates. In combination with roll-to-roll processing, GSE is developing evaporation deposition operations that enable low-cost and high-efficiency CIGS modules. Efforts are under way to transition the CIGS deposition process into manufacturing at GSE. CIGS process development is focused on synchronizing the operation of the effusion sources, the Se delivery profile, substrate temperature, and a host of other parameters. GSE has selected an interconnect scheme and procured, installed, and tested the equipment necessary to implement the cell interconnection for thin-film CIGS modules on a polyimide substrate.

Britt, J., Wiedeman, S.; Wendt, R.; Albright, S.

1999-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

458

ANALYSIS AND EXAMINATION OF MOX FUEL FROM NONPROLIFERATION PROGRAMS  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of the nation s surplus plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. Four lead assemblies were manufactured and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg heavy metal. This was the first commercial irradiation of MOX fuel with a 240Pu/239Pu ratio of less than 0.10. Five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. The performance of the rods was analyzed with AREVA s next-generation GALILEO code. The results of the analysis confirmed that the fuel rods had performed safely and predictably, and that GALILEO is applicable to MOX fuel with a low 240Pu/239Pu ratio as well as to standard MOX. The results are presented and compared to the GALILEO database. In addition, the fuel cladding was tested to confirm that traces of gallium in the fuel pellets had not affected the mechanical properties of the cladding. The irradiated cladding was found to remain ductile at both room temperature and 350 C for both the axial and circumferential directions.

McCoy, Kevin [Areva NP; Machut, Dr McLean [Areva NP; Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Blanpain, Patrick [AREVA NP SAS; Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Absorptivity of semiconductors used in the production of solar cell panels  

SciTech Connect

The dependence of the absorptivity of semiconductors on the thickness of the absorbing layer is studied for crystalline silicon (c-Si), amorphous silicon (a-Si), cadmium telluride (CdTe), copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}, CIS), and copper gallium diselenide (CuGaSe{sub 2}, CGS). The calculations are performed with consideration for the spectral distribution of AM1.5 standard solar radiation and the absorption coefficients of the materials. It is shown that, in the region of wavelengths {lambda} = {lambda}{sub g} = hc/E{sub g}, almost total absorption of the photons in AM1.5 solar radiation is attained in c-Si at the thickness d = 7-8 mm, in a-Si at d = 30-60 {mu}m, in CdTe at d = 20-30 {mu}m, and in CIS and CGS at d = 3-4 {mu}m. The results differ from previously reported data for these materials (especially for c-Si). In previous publications, the thickness needed for the semiconductor to absorb solar radiation completely was identified with the effective light penetration depth at a certain wavelength in the region of fundamental absorption for the semiconductor.

Kosyachenko, L. A., E-mail: lakos@chv.ukrpack.net; Grushko, E. V.; Mikityuk, T. I. [Chernivtsy National University (Ukraine)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Technical report for the generic site add-on facility for plutonium polishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide environmental data and reference process information associated with incorporating plutonium polishing steps (dissolution, impurity removal, and conversion to oxide powder) into the genetic-site Mixed-Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MOXFF). The incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will enable the removal of undesirable impurities, such as gallium and americium, known to be associated with the plutonium. Moreover, unanticipated impurities can be removed, including those that may be contained in (1) poorly characterized feed materials, (2) corrosion products added from processing equipment, and (3) miscellaneous materials contained in scrap recycle streams. These impurities will be removed to the extent necessary to meet plutonium product purity specifications for MOX fuels. Incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will mean that the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) will need to produce a plutonium product that can b e dissolved at the MOXFF in nitric acid at a suitable rate (sufficient to meet overall production requirements) with the minimal usage of hydrofluoric acid, and its complexing agent, aluminum nitrate. This function will require that if the PDCF product is plutonium oxide powder, that powder must be produced, stored, and shipped without exceeding a temperature of 600 C.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Radiochemical Solar Neutrino Experiments - Successful and Otherwise.  

SciTech Connect

Over the years, several different radiochemical systems have been proposed as solar neutrino detectors. Of these, two achieved operating status and obtained important results that helped to define the current field of neutrino physics: the first solar-neutrino experiment, the Chlorine Detector ({sup 37}Cl) that was developed by chemist Raymond Davis and colleagues at the Homestake Mine, and the subsequent Gallium ({sup 71}Ga) Detectors that were operated by (a) the SAGE collaboration at the Baksan Laboratory and (b) the GALLEX/GNO collaborations at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. These experiments have been extensively discussed in the literature and in many previous International Neutrino Conferences. In this paper, I present important updates to the results from SAGE and GALLEX/GNO. I also review the principles of the radiochemical detectors and briefly describe several different detectors that have been proposed. In light of the well-known successes that have been subsequently obtained by real-time neutrino detectors such as Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, SNO, and KamLAND, I do not anticipate that any new radiochemical neutrino detectors will be built. At present, only SAGE is still operating; the Chlorine and GNO radiochemical detectors have been decommissioned and dismantled.

Hahn,R.L.

2008-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

462

On the Solar Neutrino Problems, SNO experimental data and low-energy nuclear forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solar Neutrino Problems (SNP's) are analysed within the Standard Solar Model (BP2000) supplemented by the reduction of the solar neutrino fluxes through the decrease of the solar core temperature. The former can be realized through the enhancement of the astrophysical factor for solar proton burning. The enhancement, the upper bound of which is restricted by the helioseismological d