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1

Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation.

Jinwoo, Lee

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Non-equilibrium many body dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Riken BNL Research Center Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Many Body Physics was held on September 23-25, 1997 as part of the official opening ceremony of the Center at Brookhaven National Lab. A major objective of theoretical work at the center is to elaborate on the full spectrum of strong interaction physics based on QCD, including the physics of confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, the parton structure of hadrons and nuclei, and the phenomenology of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions related to the up-coming experiments at RHIC. The opportunities and challenges of nuclear and particle physics in this area naturally involve aspects of the many body problem common to many other fields. The aim of this symposium was to find common theoretical threads in the area of non-equilibrium physics and modern transport theories. The program consisted of invited talks on a variety topics from the fields of atomic, condensed matter, plasma, astrophysics, cosmology, and chemistry, in addition to nuclear and particle physics. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for contributions to this workshop.

Creutz, M.; Gyulassy, M.

1997-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

3

Non--Equilibrium Blunt Body Flow 1 Analysis of NonEquilibrium, Hypersonic Blunt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non--Equilibrium Blunt Body Flow 1 Analysis of Non­Equilibrium, Hypersonic Blunt Body Flow streamline quantities and the stagnation point heat transfer in hypersonic flows about spheres or cylinders, as two-- dimensional hypersonic flows about spheres or cylinders exhibit an approximate local similarity

4

Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of Spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has previously been shown that the Einstein equation can be derived from the requirement that the Clausius relation dS = dQ/T hold for all local acceleration horizons through each spacetime point, where dS is one quarter the horizon area change in Planck units, and dQ and T are the energy flux across the horizon and Unruh temperature seen by an accelerating observer just inside the horizon. Here we show that a curvature correction to the entropy that is polynomial in the Ricci scalar requires a non-equilibrium treatment. The corresponding field equation is derived from the entropy balance relation dS =dQ/T+dS_i, where dS_i is a bulk viscosity entropy production term that we determine by imposing energy-momentum conservation. Entropy production can also be included in pure Einstein theory by allowing for shear viscosity of the horizon.

Christopher Eling; Raf Guedens; Ted Jacobson

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Lithium-ion battery modeling using non-equilibrium thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The focus of this thesis work is the application of non-equilibrium thermodynamics in lithium-ion battery modeling. As the demand for higher power and longer lasting batteries increases, the search for materials suitable ...

Ferguson, Todd R. (Todd Richard)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Energy-exchange stochastic models for non-equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-equilibrium steady states are subject to intense investigations but still poorly understood. For instance, the derivation of Fourier law in Hamiltonian systems is a problem that still poses several obstacles. In order to investigate non-equilibrium systems, stochastic models of energy-exchange have been introduced and they have been used to identify universal properties of non-equilibrium. In these notes, after a brief review of the problem of anomalous transport in 1-dimensional Hamiltonian systems, some boundary-driven interacting random systems are considered and the "duality approach" to their rigorous mathematical treatment is reviewed. Duality theory, of which a brief introduction is given, is a powerful technique to deal with Markov processes and interacting particle systems. The content of these notes is mainly based on the papers [10, 11, 12].

Chiara Franceschini; Cristian Giardina

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

7

DSMC predictions of non-equilibrium reaction rates.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) chemical-reaction models recently proposed by Bird and based solely on the collision energy and the vibrational energy levels of the species involved is applied to calculate nonequilibrium chemical-reaction rates for atmospheric reactions in hypersonic flows. The DSMC non-equilibrium model predictions are in good agreement with theoretical models and experimental measurements. The observed agreement provides strong evidence that modeling chemical reactions using only the collision energy and the vibrational energy levels provides an accurate method for predicting non-equilibrium chemical-reaction rates.

Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Steady quantum coherence in non-equilibrium environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the steady state of a three-level system in contact with a non-equilibrium environment, which is composed of two independent heat baths at different temperatures. We derive a master equation to describe the non-equilibrium process of the system. For the three level systems with two dipole transitions, i.e., the $\\Lambda$-type and V-type, we find that the interferences of two transitions in a non-equilibrium environment can give rise to non-vanishing steady quantum coherence, namely, there exist non-zero off-diagonal terms in the steady state density matrix (in the energy representation). Moreover, the non-vanishing off-diagonal terms increase with the temperature difference of the two heat baths. Such interferences of the transitions were usually omitted by secular approximation, for it was usually believed that they only take effect in short time behavior and do not affect the steady state. Here we show that, in non-equilibrium systems, such omission would lead to the neglect of the steady quantum coherence.

Sheng-Wen Li; C. Y. Cai; C. P. Sun

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

Non-equilibrium Condensation Process in a Holographic Superconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the non-equilibrium condensation process in a holographic superconductor. When the temperature T is smaller than a critical temperature T_c, there are two black hole solutions, the Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS black hole and a black hole with a scalar hair. In the boundary theory, they can be regarded as the supercooled normal phase and the superconducting phase, respectively. We consider perturbations on supercooled Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS black holes and study their non-linear time evolution to know about physical phenomena associated with rapidly-cooled superconductors. We find that, for Tsuperconducting order parameter. Finally, we study the time evolution of event and apparent horizons and discuss their correspondence with the entropy of the boundary theory. Our result gives a first step toward the holographic understanding of the non-equilibrium process in superconductors.

Keiju Murata; Shunichiro Kinoshita; Norihiro Tanahashi

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

10

Non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach to open quantum systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open quantum systems are studied from the thermodynamical point of view unifying the principle of maximum informational entropy and the hypothesis of relaxation times hierarchy. The result of the unification is a non-Markovian and local in time master equation that provides a direct connection of dynamical and thermodynamical properties of open quantum systems. The power of the approach is illustrated with the application to the damped harmonic oscillator and the damped driven two-level system resulting in analytical expressions for the non-Markovian and non-equilibrium entropy and inverse temperature.

Vitalii Semin; Francesco Petruccione

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Non-equilibrium Statistical Approach to Friction Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A geometric approach to the friction phenomena is presented. It is based on the holographic view which has recently been popular in the theoretical physics community. We see the system in one-dimension-higher space. The heat-producing phenomena are most widely treated by using the non-equilibrium statistical physics. We take 2 models of the earthquake. The dissipative systems are here formulated from the geometric standpoint. The statistical fluctuation is taken into account by using the (generalized) Feynman's path-integral.

Shoichi Ichinose

2014-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

12

Ethanol reforming in non-equilibrium plasma of glow discharge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of a detailed kinetic study of the main plasma chemical processes in non-equilibrium ethanol/argon plasma are presented. It is shown that at the beginning of the discharge the molecular hydrogen is mainly generated in the reaction of ethanol H-abstraction. Later hydrogen is formed from active H, CH2OH and CH3CHOH and formaldehyde. Comparison with experimental data has shown that the used kinetic mechanism predicts well the concentrations of main species at the reactor outlet.

Levko, D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Is Soret equilibrium a non-equilibrium effect?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent thermophoretic experiments on colloidal suspensions revived an old debate, namely whether the Soret effect is properly described by thermostatics, or necessarily requires non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Based on colloidal transport theory and the entropy production of the related viscous flow, our analysis leads to the conclusion that the equilibrium approach may work for small ions, yet fails for colloidal particles and polymers. Regarding binary molecular mixtures, our results shed some doubt on the validity of thermostatic approaches that derive the Soret coefficient from equilibrium potentials.

Alois Würger

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

14

Non-Equilibrium Conformal Field Theories with Impurities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a construction of non-equilibrium steady states within conformal field theory. These states sustain energy flows between two quantum systems, initially prepared at different temperatures, whose dynamical properties are represented by two, possibly different, conformal field theories connected through an impurity. This construction relies on a real time formulation of conformal defect dynamics based on a field scattering picture parallelizing - but yet different from - the Euclidean formulation. We present the basic characteristics of this formulation and give an algebraic construction of the real time scattering maps that we illustrate in the case of SU(2)-based conformal field theories.

D. Bernard; B. Doyon; J. Viti

2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Multiple temperature kinetic model and gas-kinetic method for hypersonic non-equilibrium flow computations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiple temperature kinetic model and gas-kinetic method for hypersonic non-equilibrium flow. For the non-equilibrium flow computations, i.e., the nozzle flow and hypersonic rarefied flow over flat plate-kinetic method; Hypersonic and rarefied flows 1. Introduction The development of aerospace technology has

Xu, Kun

16

Strongly interacting Fermi gases : non-equilibrium dynamics and dimensional crossover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiments using ultracold atomic gases address fundamental problems in many-body physics. This thesis describes experiments on strongly-interacting gases of fermionic atoms, with a focus on non-equilibrium physics and ...

Sommer, Ariel T. (Ariel Tjodolv)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 26, 052001 (2014) Capturing non-equilibrium phenomena in rarefied  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 26, 052001 (2014) Capturing non-equilibrium phenomena in rarefied polyatomic: 142.104.86.60 On: Mon, 05 May 2014 20:27:14 #12;052001-2 B. Rahimi and H. Struchtrup Phys. Fluids 26

Struchtrup, Henning

18

The Application of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced NMR to Non-Equilibrium Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) yields remarkably detailed structural information about virtually any molecule. However, its application to non-equilibrium systems is hampered by a lack of sensitivity. To increase the amount of signal that can...

Bowen, Sean Michael

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

19

Note: Local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the “local” thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation.

Bresme, F., E-mail: f.bresme@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Physics Section, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Armstrong, J., E-mail: j.armstrong@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Physics Section, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

The unreasonable effectiveness of equilibrium-like theory for interpreting non-equilibrium experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There has been great interest in applying the results of statistical mechanics to single molecule experiements. Recent work has highlighted so-called non-equilibrium work-energy relations and Fluctuation Theorems which take on an equilibrium-like (time independent) form. Here I give a very simple heuristic example where an equilibrium result (the barometric law for colloidal particles) arises from theory describing the {\\em thermodynamically} non-equilibrium phenomenon of a single colloidal particle falling through solution due to gravity. This simple result arises from the fact that the particle, even while falling, is in {\\em mechanical} equilibrium (gravitational force equal the viscous drag force) at every instant. The results are generalized by appeal to the central limit theorem. The resulting time independent equations that hold for thermodynamically non-equilibrium (and even non-stationary) processes offer great possibilities for rapid determination of thermodynamic parameters from single molecule experiments.

R. Dean Astumian

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gc5 non-equilibrium brn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Non-equilibrium solidification and ferrite in d-TRIP steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-equilibrium solidification and ferrite in d-TRIP steel H. L. Yi1 , S. K. Ghosh1 , W. J. Liu1, designed on the basis of equilibrium to contain substantial amounts of d-ferrite, reveal zero or much transformation of d-ferrite into austenite occurs without the required partitioning of solutes

Cambridge, University of

22

Thermal recovery from a fractured medium in local thermal non-equilibrium Rachel Geleta,b,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effective stress is tensile near the injection well, illustrating the thermal contraction of the rock, whileThermal recovery from a fractured medium in local thermal non-equilibrium Rachel Geleta, Australia Abstract Thermal recovery from a hot dry rock reservoir viewed as a deformable fractured medium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

23

Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) under non-equilibrium conditions R. C. Oberthr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

663 Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) under non-equilibrium conditions R. C. Oberthür Institut with the times obtained from quasi- elastic neutron and light scattering, which yield information about neutrons aux petits angles (DNPA) pour l'étude des systèmes hors d'équi- libre thermodynamique est

Boyer, Edmond

24

Transient Analysis of Data Traffic in Cognitive Radio Networks: A Non-equilibrium Statistical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency of spectrum utilization. In cognitive radio systems, a secondary user (without license) can access a licensed spectrum channel if there is no primary user (with license) transmitting over this channel. When1 Transient Analysis of Data Traffic in Cognitive Radio Networks: A Non-equilibrium Statistical

Li, Husheng

25

Radiation transport and density effects in non-equilibrium plasmas Vladimir I. Fisher*, Dimitri V. Fisher, Yitzhak Maron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation transport and density effects in non-equilibrium plasmas Vladimir I. Fisher*, Dimitri V populations and the radiation field in transient non-equilibrium plasmas. In this model, the plasma density to a self-consistent treatment of the radiative transfer. For non-Maxwellian plasmas, the atomic

26

Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Vibrational Non-Equilibrium on the Decay of Grid-Generated Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the fundamental scientific question: ?Does thermal non-equilibrium alter the decay rate of turbulence?? The results of this study show that the answer is ?Yes.? The results demonstrate a clear coupling between thermal non-equilibrium and turbulence transport... ................................................................... 86 2.70 Macor-aluminum test section (exploded view) ....................................... 87 2.71 Upwind flange .......................................................................................... 88 2.72 Macor slab...

Fuller, T. J.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

27

Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of damped Timoshenko and damped Bresse systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we cast damped Timoshenko and damped Bresse systems into a general framework for non-equilibrium thermodynamics, namely the GENERIC (General Equation for Non-Equilibrium Reversible-Irreversible Coupling) framework. The main ingredients of GENERIC consist of five building blocks: a state space, a Poisson operator, a dissipative operator, an energy functional, and an entropy functional. The GENERIC formulation of damped Timoshenko and damped Bresse systems brings several benefits. First, it provides alternative ways to derive thermodynamically consistent models of these systems by construct- ing building blocks instead of invoking conservation laws and constitutive relations. Second, it reveals clear physical and geometrical structures of these systems, e.g., the role of the energy and the entropy as the driving forces for the reversible and irreversible dynamics respectively. Third, it allows us to introduce a new GENERIC model for damped Timoshenko systems that is not existing in the literature.

Manh Hong Duong

2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

28

Heating of thermal non-equilibrium ions by Alfvén wave via nonresonant interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pickup of thermal non-equilibrium ions by Alfvén wave via nonresonant wave-particle interaction is investigated by means of analytical test-particle theory. Some interesting and new results are found. No matter what the initial velocity distribution is, if the background magnetic field, the Alfvén speed, and the Alfvén magnetic field are fixed, the average parallel velocity never changes when t??. Heating effects in the perpendicular and parallel direction just depend on the initial temperature, and the perpendicular temperature increase is more prominent. It is noted that the heating effect of thermal non-equilibrium ions (Kappa ions) is weaker than that of the Maxwellian. This phenomenon may be relative to the heating of ions in the solar corona as well as in some toroidal confinement fusion devices.

Liu, Hai-Feng; Wang, Shi-Qing [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China) [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); The Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China); Li, Ke-Hua [The Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China)] [The Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Strongly anisotropic non-equilibrium phase transition in Ising models with friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The non-equilibrium phase transition in driven two-dimensional Ising models with two different geometries is investigated using Monte Carlo methods as well as analytical calculations. The models show dissipation through fluctuation induced friction near the critical point. We first consider high driving velocities and demonstrate that both systems are in the same universality class and undergo a strongly anisotropic non-equilibrium phase transition, with anisotropy exponent \\theta=3. Within a field theoretical ansatz the simulation results are confirmed. The crossover from Ising to mean field behavior in dependency of system size and driving velocity is analyzed using crossover scaling. It turns out that for all finite velocities the phase transition becomes strongly anisotropic in the thermodynamic limit.

Sebastian Angst; Alfred Hucht; Dietrich E. Wolf

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

Non-equilibrium phase transition in an exactly solvable driven Ising model with friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A driven Ising model with friction due to magnetic correlations has recently been proposed by Kadau et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 137205 (2008)). The non-equilibrium phase transition present in this system is investigated in detail using analytical methods as well as Monte Carlo simulations. In the limit of high driving velocities $v$ the model shows mean field behavior due to dimensional reduction and can be solved exactly for various geometries. The simulations are performed with three different single spin flip rates: the common Metropolis and Glauber rates as well as a multiplicative rate. Due to the non-equilibrium nature of the model all rates lead to different critical temperatures at $v>0$, while the exact solution matches the multiplicative rate. Finally, the cross-over from Ising to mean field behavior as function of velocity and system size is analysed in one and two dimensions.

Alfred Hucht

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

31

Dynamic scaling for the growth of non-equilibrium fluctuations during thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion processes are accompanied by the appearance of non-equilibrium fluctuations, whose size distribution on Earth is strongly affected by the gravity force. In microgravity and at steady state, these fluctuations exhibit generic scale invariance and their size is only limited by the finite dimension of the system. In this work, we investigate experimentally and computationally the development of non-equilibrium fluctuations during a thermophoretic process in microgravity. Both experiments and simulations show that during the onset of fluctuations the scale invariance is present at large wave vectors. In a broader range of wave vectors simulations predict a spinodal-like growth of fluctuations, where the amplitude and length scale of the dominant mode are determined by the thickness of the diffuse layer.

Roberto Cerbino; Yifei Sun; Aleksandar Donev; Alberto Vailati

2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

32

Trace formulae for non-equilibrium Casimir interactions, heat radiation and heat transfer for arbitrary objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed derivation of heat radiation, heat transfer and (Casimir) interactions for N arbitrary objects in the framework of fluctuational electrodynamics in thermal non-equilibrium. The results can be expressed as basis-independent trace formulae in terms of the scattering operators of the individual objects. We prove that heat radiation of a single object is positive, and that heat transfer (for two arbitrary passive objects) is from the hotter to a colder body. The heat transferred is also symmetric, exactly reversed if the two temperatures are exchanged. Introducing partial wave-expansions, we transform the results for radiation, transfer and forces into traces of matrices that can be evaluated in any basis, analogous to the equilibrium Casimir force. The method is illustrated by (re)deriving the heat radiation of a plate, a sphere and a cylinder. We analyze the radiation of a sphere for different materials, emphasizing that a simplification often employed for metallic nano-spheres is typically invalid. We derive asymptotic formulae for heat transfer and non-equilibrium interactions for the cases of a sphere in front a plate and for two spheres, extending previous results. As an example, we show that a hot nano-sphere can levitate above a plate with the repulsive non-equilibrium force overcoming gravity -- an effect that is not due to radiation pressure.

Matthias Krüger; Giuseppe Bimonte; Thorsten Emig; Mehran Kardar

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

33

Non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization in 2D simulations of the solar atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ionization of hydrogen in the solar chromosphere and transition region does not obey LTE or instantaneous statistical equilibrium because the timescale is long compared with important hydrodynamical timescales, especially of magneto-acoustic shocks. We implement an algorithm to compute non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization and its coupling into the MHD equations within an existing radiation MHD code, and perform a two-dimensional simulation of the solar atmosphere from the convection zone to the corona. Analysis of the simulation results and comparison to a companion simulation assuming LTE shows that: a) Non-equilibrium computation delivers much smaller variations of the chromospheric hydrogen ionization than for LTE. The ionization is smaller within shocks but subsequently remains high in the cool intershock phases. As a result, the chromospheric temperature variations are much larger than for LTE because in non-equilibrium, hydrogen ionization is a less effective internal energy buffer. The actual shock temperatures are therefore higher and the intershock temperatures lower. b) The chromospheric populations of the hydrogen n = 2 level, which governs the opacity of Halpha, are coupled to the ion populations. They are set by the high temperature in shocks and subsequently remain high in the cool intershock phases. c) The temperature structure and the hydrogen level populations differ much between the chromosphere above photospheric magnetic elements and above quiet internetwork. d) The hydrogen n = 2 population and column density are persistently high in dynamic fibrils, suggesting that these obtain their visibility from being optically thick in Halpha also at low temperature.

J. Leenaarts; M. Carlsson; V. Hansteen; R. J. Rutten

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

34

Phase-field investigation on the non-equilibrium interface dynamics of rapid alloy solidification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research program reported here is focused on critical issues that represent conspicuous gaps in current understanding of rapid solidification, limiting our ability to predict and control microstructural evolution (i.e. morphological dynamics and microsegregation) at high undercooling, where conditions depart significantly from local equilibrium. More specifically, through careful application of phase-field modeling, using appropriate thin-interface and anti-trapping corrections and addressing important details such as transient effects and a velocity-dependent (i.e. adaptive) numerics, the current analysis provides a reasonable simulation-based picture of non-equilibrium solute partitioning and the corresponding oscillatory dynamics associated with single-phase rapid solidification and show that this method is a suitable means for a self-consistent simulation of transient behavior and operating point selection under rapid growth conditions. Moving beyond the limitations of conventional theoretical/analytical treatments of non-equilibrium solute partitioning, these results serve to substantiate recent experimental findings and analytical treatments for single-phase rapid solidification. The departure from the equilibrium solid concentration at the solid-liquid interface was often observed during rapid solidification, and the energetic associated non-equilibrium solute partitioning has been treated in detail, providing possible ranges of interface concentrations for a given growth condition. Use of these treatments for analytical description of specific single-phase dendritic and cellular operating point selection, however, requires a model for solute partitioning under a given set of growth conditions. Therefore, analytical solute trapping models which describe the chemical partitioning as a function of steady state interface velocities have been developed and widely utilized in most of the theoretical investigations of rapid solidification. However, these solute trapping models are not rigorously verified due to the difficulty in experimentally measuring under rapid growth conditions. Moreover, since these solute trapping models include kinetic parameters which are difficult to directly measure from experiments, application of the solute trapping models or the associated analytic rapid solidification model is limited. These theoretical models for steady state rapid solidification which incorporate the solute trapping models do not describe the interdependency of solute diffusion, interface kinetics, and alloy thermodynamics. The phase-field approach allows calculating, spontaneously, the non-equilibrium growth effects of alloys and the associated time-dependent growth dynamics, without making the assumptions that solute partitioning is an explicit function of velocity, as is the current convention. In the research described here, by utilizing the phase-field model in the thin-interface limit, incorporating the anti-trapping current term, more quantitatively valid interface kinetics and solute diffusion across the interface are calculated. In order to sufficiently resolve the physical length scales (i.e. interface thickness and diffusion boundary length), grid spacings are continually adjusted in calculations. The full trajectories of transient planar growth dynamics under rapid directional solidification conditions with different pulling velocities are described. As a validation of a model, the predicted steady state conditions are consistent with the analytic approach for rapid growth. It was confirmed that rapid interface dynamics exhibits the abrupt acceleration of the planar front when the effect of the non-equilibrium solute partitioning at the interface becomes signi ficant. This is consistent with the previous linear stability analysis for the non-equilibrium interface dynamics. With an appropriate growth condition, the continuous oscillation dynamics was able to be simulated using continually adjusting grid spacings. This oscillatory dynamics including instantaneous jump of interface velocities are consistent

Choi, Jeong

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fundamental Properties of Non-equilibrium Laser-Supported Detonation Wave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For developing laser propulsion, it is very important to analyze the mechanism of Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD), because it can generate high pressure and high temperature to be used by laser propulsion can be categorized as one type of hypersonic reacting flows, where exothermicity is supplied not by chemical reaction but by radiation absorption. I have numerically simulated the 1-D and Quasi-1-D LSD waves propagating through an inert gas, which absorbs CO2 gasdynamic laser, using a 2-temperature model. Calculated results show the fundamental properties of the non-equilibrium LSD Waves.

Shiraishi, Hiroyuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Daido Institute of Technology, 10-3 Taki-haru-cho, Minami-ku, Nagoya (Japan)

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Similarity of coupled non-equilibrium flows behind normal shock waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at constant pressure Dissociation energy per molecule Average energy gained by vibra- tion due to recombination (per unit mass) Average energy lost from vibra- tion due to dissociation (per unit mass) Vibrational energy per unit mass Same as E (T... reverse reaction-rate cons tant N [N&] p Length of non-equilibrium zone Mach number Mass of an atom of nitrogen Number of vibrational levels in- cluded in dissociation energy Concentration of ni trogen Pressure moles/cc dynes/cmE vii Dei R...

Dalton, James Verne

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Potential and flux field landscape theory. II. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of spatially inhomogeneous stochastic dynamical systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have established a general non-equilibrium thermodynamic formalism consistently applicable to both spatially homogeneous and, more importantly, spatially inhomogeneous systems, governed by the Langevin and Fokker-Planck stochastic dynamics with multiple state transition mechanisms, using the potential-flux landscape framework as a bridge connecting stochastic dynamics with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A set of non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations, quantifying the relations of the non-equilibrium entropy, entropy flow, entropy production, and other thermodynamic quantities, together with their specific expressions, is constructed from a set of dynamical decomposition equations associated with the potential-flux landscape framework. The flux velocity plays a pivotal role on both the dynamic and thermodynamic levels. On the dynamic level, it represents a dynamic force breaking detailed balance, entailing the dynamical decomposition equations. On the thermodynamic level, it represents a thermodynamic force generating entropy production, manifested in the non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and more specific examples, the spatial stochastic neuronal model, in particular, are studied to test and illustrate the general theory. This theoretical framework is particularly suitable to study the non-equilibrium (thermo)dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous systems abundant in nature. This paper is the second of a series.

Wu, Wei [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Wang, Jin, E-mail: jin.wang.1@stonybrook.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 130022 Changchun, China and College of Physics, Jilin University, 130021 Changchun (China)

2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

THERMAL NON-EQUILIBRIUM REVISITED: A HEATING MODEL FOR CORONAL LOOPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The location and frequency of events that heat the million-degree corona are still a matter of debate. One potential heating scenario is that the energy release is effectively steady and highly localized at the footpoints of coronal structures. Such an energy deposition drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions in the hydrodynamic equations in longer loops. This heating scenario was considered and discarded by Klimchuk et al. on the basis of their one-dimensional simulations as incapable of reproducing observational characteristics of loops. In this paper, we use three-dimensional simulations to generate synthetic emission images, from which we select and analyze six loops. The main differences between our model and that of Klimchuk et al. concern (1) dimensionality, (2) resolution, (3) geometrical properties of the loops, (4) heating function, and (5) radiative function. We find evidence, in this small set of simulated loops, that the evolution of the light curves, the variation of temperature along the loops, the density profile, and the absence of small-scale structures are compatible with the characteristics of observed loops. We conclude that quasi-steady footpoint heating that drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions cannot yet be ruled out as a viable heating scenario for EUV loops.

Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran [Predictive Science, Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Rd., Ste. 170, San Diego, CA 92121-2910 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Mok, Yung, E-mail: lionel@predsci.com, E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com, E-mail: mikicz@predsci.com, E-mail: amy.r.winebarger@nasa.gov, E-mail: ymok@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, 4129 Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

39

A definition of thermodynamic entropy valid for non-equilibrium states and few-particle systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From a new rigorous formulation of the general axiomatic foundations of thermodynamics we derive an operational definition of entropy that responds to the emergent need in many technological frameworks to understand and deploy thermodynamic entropy well beyond the traditional realm of equilibrium states of macroscopic systems. The new definition is achieved by avoiding to resort to the traditional concepts of "heat" (which restricts $a$ $priori$ the traditional definitions of entropy to the equilibrium domain) and of "thermal reservoir" (which restricts $in$ $practice$ our previous definitions of non-equilibrium entropy to the many-particle domain). The measurement procedure that defines entropy is free from intrinsic limitations and can be applied, $in$ $principle$, even to non-equilibrium states of few-particle systems, provided they are separable and uncorrelated. The construction starts from a previously developed set of carefully worded operational definitions for all the basic concepts. Then, through a new set of fully spelled-out fundamental hypotheses (four postulates and five assumptions) we derive the definitions of energy and entropy of any state, and of temperature of any stable equilibrium state. Finally, we prove the principle of entropy non-decrease, the additivity of entropy differences, the maximum entropy principle, and the impossibility of existence of a thermal reservoir.

Gian Paolo Beretta; Enzo Zanchini

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

40

Lower bounds for ballistic current and noise in non-equilibrium quantum steady states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Let an infinite, homogeneous, many-body quantum system be unitarily evolved for a long time from a state where two halves are independently thermalized. One says that a non-equilibrium steady state emerges if there are nonzero steady currents in the central region. In particular, their presence is a signature of ballistic transport. We analyze the consequences of the current observable being a conserved density; near equilibrium this is known to give rise to linear wave propagation and a nonzero Drude peak. Using the Lieb-Robinson bound, we derive, under a certain regularity condition, a lower bound for the non-equilibrium steady-state current determined by equilibrium averages. This shows and quantifies the presence of ballistic transport far from equilibrium. The inequality suggests the definition of "nonlinear sound velocities", which specialize to the sound velocity near equilibrium in non-integrable models, and "generalized sound velocities", which encode generalized Gibbs thermalization in integrable models. These are bounded by the Lieb-Robinson velocity. The inequality also gives rise to a bound on the energy current noise in the case of pure energy transport. We show that the inequality is satisfied in many models where exact results are available, and that it is saturated at one-dimensional criticality.

Benjamin Doyon

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gc5 non-equilibrium brn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Will there be future deceleration? A study of particle creation mechanism in non-equilibrium thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper deals with non-equilibrium thermodynamics based on adiabatic particle creation mechanism with the motivation of considering it as an alternative choice to explain the recent observed accelerating phase of the universe. Using Friedmann equations, it is shown that the deceleration parameter ($q$) can be obtained from the knowledge of the particle production rate ($\\Gamma$). Motivated from thermodynamical point of view, cosmological solutions are evaluated for the particle creation rates in three cosmic phases, namely, inflation, matter dominated and present late time acceleration. The deceleration parameter ($q$) is expressed as a function of the redshift parameter ($z$), and its variation is presented graphically. Also, statefinder analysis has been presented graphically in three different phases of the universe. Finally, two non-interacting fluids with different particle creation rates are considered as cosmic substratum, and deceleration parameter ($q$) is evaluated. It is examined whether more than one transition of $q$ is possible or not by graphical representations.

Supriya Pan; Subenoy Chakraborty

2015-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

42

Dilution and resonance enhanced repulsion in non-equilibrium fluctuation forces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In equilibrium, forces induced by fluctuations of the electromagnetic field between electrically polarizable objects (microscopic or macroscopic) in vacuum are always attractive. The force may, however, become repulsive for microscopic particles coupled to thermal baths with different temperatures. We demonstrate that this non-equilibrium repulsion can be realized also between macroscopic objects, as planar slabs, if they are kept at different temperatures. It is shown that repulsion can be enhanced by (i) tuning of material resonances in the thermal region, and by (ii) reducing the dielectric contrast due to "dilution". This can lead to stable equilibrium positions. We discuss the realization of these effects for aerogels, yielding repulsion down to sub-micron distances at realistic porosities.

Giuseppe Bimonte; Thorsten Emig; Matthias Kruger; Mehran Kardar

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

43

Dilution and resonance enhanced repulsion in non-equilibrium fluctuation forces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In equilibrium, forces induced by fluctuations of the electromagnetic field between electrically polarizable objects (microscopic or macroscopic) in vacuum are always attractive. The force may, however, become repulsive for microscopic particles coupled to thermal baths with different temperatures. We demonstrate that this non-equilibrium repulsion can be realized also between macroscopic objects, as planar slabs, if they are kept at different temperatures. It is shown that repulsion can be enhanced by (i) tuning of material resonances in the thermal region, and by (ii) reducing the dielectric contrast due to "dilution". This can lead to stable equilibrium positions. We discuss the realization of these effects for aerogels, yielding repulsion down to sub-micron distances at realistic porosities.

Bimonte, Giuseppe; Kruger, Matthias; Kardar, Mehran

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Exponential approach to, and properties of, a non-equilibrium steady state in a dilute gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate a kinetic model of a system in contact with several thermal reservoirs at different temperatures $T_\\alpha$. Our system is a spatially uniform dilute gas whose internal dynamics is described by the nonlinear Boltzmann equation with Maxwellian collisions. Similarly, the interaction with reservoir $\\alpha$ is represented by a Markovian process that has the Maxwellian $M_{T_\\alpha}$ as its stationary state. We prove existence and uniqueness of a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS) and show exponential convergence to this NESS in a metric on probability measures introduced into the study of Maxwellian collisions by Gabetta, Toscani and Wenberg (GTW). This shows that the GTW distance between the current velocity distribution to the steady-state velocity distribution is a Lyapunov functional for the system. We also derive expressions for the entropy production in the system plus the reservoirs which is always positive.

Eric A. Carlen; Joel L. Lebowitz; Clement Mouhot

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

Manipulating shear-induced non-equilibrium transitions by feedback control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulations we investigate non-equilibrium transitions of sheared colloidal films under controlled shear stress $\\sigma_{\\mathrm{xz}}$. In our approach the shear rate $\\dot\\gamma$ is a dynamical variable, which relaxes on a timescale $\\tau_c$ such that the instantaneous, configuration-dependent stress $\\sigma_{\\mathrm{xz}}(t)$ approaches a pre-imposed value. Investigating the dynamics under this "feedback-control" scheme we find unique behavior in regions where the flow curve $\\sigma_{\\mathrm{xz}}(\\dot\\gamma)$ of the uncontrolled system is monotonic. However, in non-monotonic regions our method allows to {\\em select} between dynamical states characterized by different in-plane structure and viscosities. Indeed, the final state strongly depends on $\\tau_c$ relative to an {\\em intrinsic} relaxation time of the uncontrolled system. The critical values of $\\tau_c$ are estimated on the basis of a simple model.

Tarlan A. Vezirov; Sascha Gerloff; Sabine H. L. Klapp

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

46

Interacting dark fluid in the universe bounded by event horizon : A non-equilibrium prescription  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A non-equilibrium thermodynamic analysis has been done for the interacting dark fluid in the universe bounded by the event horizon.From observational evidences it is assumed that at present the matter in the universe is dominated by two dark sectors-dark matter and dark energy. The mutual interaction among them results in spontaneous heat flow between the horizon and the fluid system and the thermal equilibrium will no longer hold.In the present work,the dark matter is chosen in the form of dust while the dark energy is chosen as a perfect fluid with constant equation in one case and holographic dark energy model is chosen in the other.Finally,validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics has been examined in both cases.

Subenoy Chakraborty; Atreyee Biswas

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

47

NON-EQUILIBRIUM THERMODYNAMIC PROCESSES: SPACE PLASMAS AND THE INNER HELIOSHEATH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, empirical kappa distribution, commonly used to describe non-equilibrium systems like space plasmas, has been connected with non-extensive statistical mechanics. Here we show how a consistent definition of the temperature and pressure is developed for stationary states out of thermal equilibrium, so that the familiar ideal gas state equation still holds. In addition to the classical triplet of temperature, pressure, and density, this generalization requires the kappa index as a fourth independent thermodynamic variable that characterizes the non-equilibrium stationary states. All four of these thermodynamic variables have key roles in describing the governing thermodynamical processes and transitions in space plasmas. We introduce a novel characterization of isothermal and isobaric processes that describe a system's transition into different stationary states by varying the kappa index. In addition, we show how the variation of temperature or/and pressure can occur through an 'iso-q' process, in which the system remains in a fixed stationary state (fixed kappa index). These processes have been detected in the proton plasma in the inner heliosheath via specialized data analysis of energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations from Interstellar Boundary Explorer. In particular, we find that the temperature is highly correlated with (1) kappa, asymptotically related to isothermal ({approx}1,000,000 K) and iso-q ({kappa} {approx} 1.7) processes; and (2) density, related to an isobaric process, which separates the 'Ribbon', P Almost-Equal-To 3.2 pdyn cm{sup -2}, from the globally distributed ENA flux, P Almost-Equal-To 2 pdyn cm{sup -2}.

Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J., E-mail: glivadiotis@swri.edu [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

48

Effect of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators on non-equilibrium hypersonic Ankush Bhatia, Subrata Roy, and Ryan Gosse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators on non-equilibrium hypersonic flows Ankush-equilibrium hypersonic flows Ankush Bhatia,1 Subrata Roy,1 and Ryan Gosse2 1 Applied Physics Research Group, Department for a cylindrical body in Mach 17 hypersonic flow is presented. This application focuses on using sinusoidal

Roy, Subrata

49

2-D Hypersonic Non-equilibrium Flow Simulation using r-p Adaptive Time-Implicit Discontinuous Galerkin Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2-D Hypersonic Non-equilibrium Flow Simulation using r-p Adaptive Time-Implicit Discontinuous Aerospace Sciences Meeting #12;1 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2-D Hypersonic Non Galerkin (DG) methods to 2-D hypersonic flow problems. Previous applications of DG method were limited

Roy, Subrata

50

A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia. Abstract The constitutive thermo-hydro-mechanical equations is next applied to simulate circulation tests at the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir. The finer thermo-hydro

Boyer, Edmond

51

Cosmological QCD phase transition in steady non-equilibrium dissipative Ho?ava–Lifshitz early universe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the phase transition from quark–gluon plasma to hadrons in the early universe in the context of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. According to the standard model of cosmology, a phase transition associated with chiral symmetry breaking after the electro-weak transition has occurred when the universe was about 1–10 ?s old. We focus attention on such a phase transition in the presence of a viscous relativistic cosmological background fluid in the framework of non-detailed balance Ho?ava–Lifshitz cosmology within an effective model of QCD. We consider a flat Friedmann–Robertson–Walker universe filled with a non-causal and a causal bulk viscous cosmological fluid respectively and investigate the effects of the running coupling constants of Ho?ava–Lifshitz gravity, ?, on the evolution of the physical quantities relevant to a description of the early universe, namely, the temperature T, scale factor a, deceleration parameter q and dimensionless ratio of the bulk viscosity coefficient to entropy density (?)/s . We assume that the bulk viscosity cosmological background fluid obeys the evolution equation of the steady truncated (Eckart) and full version of the Israel–Stewart fluid, respectively. -- Highlights: •In this paper we have studied quark–hadron phase transition in the early universe in the context of the Ho?ava–Lifshitz model. •We use a flat FRW universe with the bulk viscosity cosmological background fluid obeying the evolution equation of the steady truncated (Eckart) and full version of the Israel–Stewart fluid, respectively.

Khodadi, M., E-mail: M.Khodadi@sbu.ac.ir; Sepangi, H.R., E-mail: hr-sepangi@sbu.ac.ir

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Cosmological QCD phase transition in steady non-equilibrium dissipative Ho?ava-Lifshitz early universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the phase transition from quark-gluon plasma to hadrons in the early universe in the context of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. According to the standard model of cosmology, a phase transition associated with chiral symmetry breaking after the electro-weak transition has occurred when the universe was about $1-10\\mu s$ old. We focus attention on such a phase transition in the presence of a viscous relativistic cosmological background fluid in the framework of non-detailed balance Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz cosmology within an effective model of QCD. We consider a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe filled with a non-causal and causal bulk viscous cosmological fluid respectively and investigate the effects of the running coupling constants of Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity, $\\lambda$, on the evolution of the physical quantities relevant to a description of the early universe, namely, the temperature $T$, scale factor $a$, deceleration parameter $q$ and dimensionless ratio of the bulk viscosity coefficient to entropy density $\\frac{\\xi}{s}$. We assume that the bulk viscosity cosmological background fluid obeys the evolution equation of the steady truncated (Eckart) and full version of the Israel-Stewart fluid, respectively.

M. Khodadi; H. R. Sepangi

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

53

Non-equilibrium quantum systems: Divergence between global and local descriptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Even photosynthesis -- the most basic natural phenomenon underlying Life on Earth -- involves the non-trivial processing of excitations at the pico- and femtosecond scales during light-harvesting. The desire to understand such natural phenomena, as well as interpret the output from ultrafast experimental probes, creates an urgent need for accurate quantitative theories of open quantum systems. However it is unclear how best to generalize the well-established assumptions of an isolated system, particularly under non-equilibrium conditions. Here we compare two popular approaches: a description in terms of a direct product of the states of each individual system (i.e. a local approach) versus the use of new states resulting from diagonalizing the whole Hamiltonian (i.e. a global approach). We show that their equivalence fails when the system is open, in particular under the experimentally ubiquitous condition of a temperature gradient. By solving for the steady-state populations and calculating the heat flux as a test observable, we uncover stark differences between the formulations. This divergence highlights the need to establish rigorous ranges of applicability for such methods in modeling nanoscale transfer phenomena -- including during the light-harvesting process in photosynthesis.

Pedro D. Manrique; Ferney Rodriguez; Luis Quiroga; Neil F. Johnson

2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

54

Non-equilibrium structure and dynamics in a microscopic model of thin film active gels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the presence of ATP, molecular motors generate active force dipoles that drive suspensions of protein filaments far from thermodynamic equilibrium, leading to exotic dynamics and pattern formation. Microscopic modelling can help to quantify the relationship between individual motors plus filaments to organisation and dynamics on molecular and supra-molecular length scales. Here we present results of extensive numerical simulations of active gels where the motors and filaments are confined between two infinite parallel plates. Thermal fluctuations and excluded-volume interactions between filaments are included. A systematic variation of rates for motor motion, attachment and detachment, including a differential detachment rate from filament ends, reveals a range of non-equilibrium behaviour. Strong motor binding produces structured filament aggregates that we refer to as asters, bundles or layers, whose stability depends on motor speed and differential end-detachment. The gross features of the dependence of the observed structures on the motor rate and the filament concentration can be captured by a simple one-filament model. Loosely bound aggregates exhibit super-diffusive mass transport, where filament translocation scales with lag time with non-unique exponents that depend on motor kinetics. An empirical data collapse of filament speed as a function of motor speed and end-detachment is found, suggesting a dimensional reduction of the relevant parameter space. We conclude by discussing the perspectives of microscopic modelling in the field of active gels.

D. A. Head; W. J. Briels; G. Gompper

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

55

Non-equilibrium steady state and subgeometric ergodicity for a chain of three coupled rotors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a chain of three rotors (rotators) whose ends are coupled to stochastic heat baths. The temperatures of the two baths can be different, and we allow some constant torque to be applied at each end of the chain. Under some non-degeneracy condition on the interaction potentials, we show that the process admits a unique invariant probability measure, and that it is ergodic with a stretched exponential rate. The interesting issue is to estimate the rate at which the energy of the middle rotor decreases. As it is not directly connected to the heat baths, its energy can only be dissipated through the two outer rotors. But when the middle rotor spins very rapidly, it fails to interact effectively with its neighbors due to the rapid oscillations of the forces. By averaging techniques, we obtain an effective dynamics for the middle rotor, which then enables us to find a Lyapunov function. This and an irreducibility argument give the desired result. We finally illustrate numerically some properties of the non-equilibrium steady state.

Noé Cuneo; Jean-Pierre Eckmann; Christophe Poquet

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

56

Influence of Penning effect on the plasma features in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a cold plasma source that promises various innovative applications. The influence of Penning effect on the formation, propagation, and other physical properties of the plasma bullets in APPJ remains a debatable topic. By using a 10?cm wide active electrode and a frequency of applied voltage down to 0.5?Hz, the Penning effect caused by preceding discharges can be excluded. It was found that the Penning effect originating in a preceding discharge helps build a conductive channel in the gas flow and provide seed electrons, thus the discharge can be maintained at a low voltage which in turn leads to a smaller propagation speed for the plasma bullet. Photographs from an intensified charge coupled device reveal that the annular structure of the plasma plume for He is irrelevant to the Penning ionization process arising from preceding discharges. By adding NH{sub 3} into Ar to introduce Penning effect, the originally filamentous discharge of Ar can display a rather extensive plasma plume in ambient as He. These results are helpful for the understanding of the behaviors of non-equilibrium APPJs generated under distinct conditions and for the design of plasma jet features, especially the spatial distribution and propagation speed, which are essential for application.

Chang, Zhengshi; Zhang, Guanjun [School of Electrical Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Jiang, Nan; Cao, Zexian, E-mail: zxcao@iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

57

Non-Newtonian behavior and molecular structure of Cooee bitumen under shear flow: a non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rheology and molecular structure of a model bitumen (Cooee bitumen) under shear is investigated in the non-Newtonian regime using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The shear viscosity and normal stress differences of the bitumen mixture are computed at different shear rates and different temperatures. The model bitumen is shown to be a shear-thinning fluid. The corresponding molecular structure is studied at the same shear rates and temperatures. The Cooee bitumen is able to reproduce experimental results showing the formation of nanoaggregates composed of stacks of flat aromatic molecules. These nanoaggregates are immersed in a solvent of saturated hydrocarbon molecules. The nanoaggregates are shown to break up at very high shear rates, leading only to a minor effect on the viscosity of the mixture. At low shear rates, bitumen can be seen as a colloidal suspension of nanoaggregates in a solvent. The slight anisotropy of the whole sample due to the nanoaggregates is considered and quantified...

Lemarchand, Claire A; Todd, Billy D; Daivis, Peter J; Hansen, Jesper S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Comparative analysis of quantum cascade laser modeling based on density matrices and non-equilibrium Green's functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the operation of an 8.5??m quantum cascade laser based on GaInAs/AlInAs lattice matched to InP using three different simulation models based on density matrix (DM) and non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formulations. The latter advanced scheme serves as a validation for the simpler DM schemes and, at the same time, provides additional insight, such as the temperatures of the sub-band carrier distributions. We find that for the particular quantum cascade laser studied here, the behavior is well described by simple quantum mechanical estimates based on Fermi's golden rule. As a consequence, the DM model, which includes second order currents, agrees well with the NEGF results. Both these simulations are in accordance with previously reported data and a second regrown device.

Lindskog, M., E-mail: martin.lindskog@teorfys.lu.se; Wacker, A. [Mathematical Physics, Lund University, Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Wolf, J. M.; Liverini, V.; Faist, J. [ETH Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH-Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Trinite, V.; Maisons, G.; Carras, M. [III-V Lab, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Aidam, R.; Ostendorf, R. [Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

59

Non-equilibrium dynamics of an ultracold Bose gas under a multi-pulsed quantum quench in interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the nonequilibrium dynamical properties of a weakly-interacting Bose gas at zero temperature under the multi-pulsed quantum quench in interaction by calculating one-body, two-body correlation functions and Tan's contact of the model system. The multi-pulsed quench is represented as follows: first suddenly quenching the interatomic interaction from $g_{i}$ to $g_{f}$ at time $t=0$, holding time $t$, and then suddenly quenching interaction from $g_{f}$ back to $g_{i}$, holding the time $t$ sequence $n$ times. In particular, two typical kinds of quenching parameters are chosen, corresponding to $(g_{i}/g_{f}>1)$ and $(g_{i}/g_{f}powerful way of studying the non-equilibrium dynamics of many-body quantum system than the `one-off' quantum quench. Finally, we discuss the ultra-short-range properties of the two-body correlation function after the $n$th quenching, which can be used to probe the `Tan'scontact' in experiments. All our calculations can be tested in current cold atom experiments.

Lei Chen; Zhidong Zhang; Zhaoxin Liang

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

60

Non-Newtonian behavior and molecular structure of Cooee bitumen under shear flow: a non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rheology and molecular structure of a model bitumen (Cooee bitumen) under shear is investigated in the non-Newtonian regime using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The shear viscosity and normal stress differences of the bitumen mixture are computed at different shear rates and different temperatures. The model bitumen is shown to be a shear-thinning fluid. The corresponding molecular structure is studied at the same shear rates and temperatures. The Cooee bitumen is able to reproduce experimental results showing the formation of nanoaggregates composed of stacks of flat aromatic molecules. These nanoaggregates are immersed in a solvent of saturated hydrocarbon molecules. The nanoaggregates are shown to break up at very high shear rates, leading only to a minor effect on the viscosity of the mixture. At low shear rates, bitumen can be seen as a colloidal suspension of nanoaggregates in a solvent. The slight anisotropy of the whole sample due to the nanoaggregates is considered and quantified. The alignment of docosane molecules due to form and intrinsic birefringence and its effect on the rheological properties of the mixture are discussed. The stress optical rule is shown to be valid only in a limited range of shear rates at high temperatures, because this rule neglects the presence of other molecule types than docosane at high shear rates and the effect of intermolecular alignment, which gets more pronounced at high shear rates.

Claire A. Lemarchand; Nicholas P. Bailey; Billy D. Todd; Peter J. Daivis; Jesper S. Hansen

2015-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gc5 non-equilibrium brn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Predicting the stellar and non-equilibrium dust emission spectra of high-resolution simulated galaxies with DART-Ray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the calculation of the stochastically heated dust emission using the 3D ray-tracing dust radiative transfer code DART-Ray, which is designed to solve the dust radiative transfer problem for galaxies with arbitrary geometries. In order to reduce the time required to derive the non-equilibrium dust emission spectra from each volume element within a model, we implemented an adaptive SED library approach, which we tested for the case of axisymmetric galaxy geometries. To show the capabilities of the code, we applied DART-Ray to a high-resolution N-body+SPH galaxy simulation to predict the appearance of the simulated galaxy at a set of wavelengths from the UV to the sub-mm. We analyse the results to determine the effect of dust on the observed radial and vertical profiles of the stellar emission as well as on the attenuation and scattering of light from the constituent stellar populations. We also quantify the proportion of dust re-radiated stellar light powered by young and old stellar populations, bo...

Natale, Giovanni; Tuffs, Richard J; Debattista, Victor P; Fischera, Jörg; Grootes, Meiert W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Modeling of non-equilibrium phenomena in expanding flows by means of a collisional-radiative model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of non-equilibrium in a quasi-one-dimensional nozzle flow are investigated by means of a collisional-radiative model. The gas undergoing the expansion is an air plasma and consists of atoms, molecules, and free electrons. In the present analysis, the electronic excited states of atomic and molecular species are treated as separate pseudo-species. Rotational and vibrational energy modes are assumed to be populated according to Boltzmann distributions. The coupling between radiation and gas dynamics is accounted for, in simplified manner, by using escape factors. The flow governing equations for the steady quasi-one-dimensional flow are written in conservative form and discretized in space by means of a finite volume method. Steady-state solutions are obtained by using a fully implicit time integration scheme. The analysis of the evolution of the electronic distribution functions reveals a substantial over-population of the high-lying excited levels of atoms and molecules in correspondence of the nozzle exit. The influence of optical thickness is also studied. The results clearly demonstrate that the radiative transitions, within the optically thin approximation, drastically reduce the over-population of high-lying electronic levels.

Munafò, A.; Lani, A. [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Rhode-Saint-Genèse (Belgium)] [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Rhode-Saint-Genèse (Belgium); Bultel, A. [CORIA, UMR CNRS 6614, Universitè de Rouen, Site universitaire du Madrillet, Avenue de l'Universitè 76801 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France)] [CORIA, UMR CNRS 6614, Universitè de Rouen, Site universitaire du Madrillet, Avenue de l'Universitè 76801 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France); Panesi, M. [Aerospace Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 306 Talbot Lab, 104 S. Wright St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Aerospace Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 306 Talbot Lab, 104 S. Wright St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

THE ABUNDANCE OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN AND ITS CORRELATION WITH MIDPLANE PRESSURE IN GALAXIES: NON-EQUILIBRIUM, TURBULENT, CHEMICAL MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of spiral galaxies show a strong linear correlation between the ratio of molecular to atomic hydrogen surface density R{sub mol} and midplane pressure. To explain this, we simulate three-dimensional, magnetized turbulence, including simplified treatments of non-equilibrium chemistry and the propagation of dissociating radiation, to follow the formation of H{sub 2} from cold atomic gas. The formation timescale for H{sub 2} is sufficiently long that equilibrium is not reached within the 20-30 Myr lifetimes of molecular clouds. The equilibrium balance between radiative dissociation and H{sub 2} formation on dust grains fails to predict the time-dependent molecular fractions we find. A simple, time-dependent model of H{sub 2} formation can reproduce the gross behavior, although turbulent density perturbations increase molecular fractions by a factor of few above it. In contradiction to equilibrium models, radiative dissociation of molecules plays little role in our model for diffuse radiation fields with strengths less than 10 times that of the solar neighborhood, because of the effective self-shielding of H{sub 2}. The observed correlation of R{sub mol} with pressure corresponds to a correlation with local gas density if the effective temperature in the cold neutral medium of galactic disks is roughly constant. We indeed find such a correlation of R{sub mol} with density. If we examine the value of R{sub mol} in our local models after a free-fall time at their average density, as expected for models of molecular cloud formation by large-scale gravitational instability, our models reproduce the observed correlation over more than an order-of-magnitude range in density.

Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Glover, Simon C. O., E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org, E-mail: glover@uni-heidelberg.de [Zentrum der Astrophysik der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

64

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque C7, supplgment au n07, Tome 40, J u i l l e t 1:979, page C7-871 SOME REMARKSON THE NON-EQUILIBRIUM PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REMARKSON THE NON-EQUILIBRIUM PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS E.F. Gippius, 6.1. Iljukhin and V.N. Kolesnikov. Lebedev of our investigations The main peculiarities of such plasma diagnostics m e discussed i n review re t o the development of the physical base of non-equilibrium plasma spectroscopy. The transient dense

Boyer, Edmond

65

Numerical study of atomic production rate in hydrogen negative ion sources with the effect of non-equilibrium electron energy distribution function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial non-uniformity of the dissociative hydrogen atom (H{sup 0}) production has been investigated in a large negative ion source (JAEA 10 A source) with the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) obtained by a Monte-Carlo simulation code for electron transport in 3D3V (three dimensional real and velocity) space. It has been shown that the H{sup 0} production rate becomes larger in the upper region (one side in the longitudinal direction) of the source chamber. This spatial non-uniformity of the H{sup 0} production profile is mainly explained by the non-equilibrium features of the EEDF in the upper region, i.e., the EEDF consists of thermal electron component with kinetic energy ? < 25 eV and fast electron component with energy ? > 25 eV in the upper region, while the EEDF mainly consists of only thermal electrons in the bottom region. These characteristics for the EEDF and the energy dependence of cross-sections for dissociation and dissociative ionization processes lead to the non-uniform profile of the H{sup 0} production. The above numerical results of the spatial H{sup 0} non-uniformity are validated and confirmed by comparisons with those by spectroscopic measurement. It has been clarified that the non-equilibrium (fast electron) component of the EEDF has a large contribution to the non-uniformity of the H{sup 0} production rate.

Shibata, T.; Hatayama, A. [Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)] [Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Kashiwagi, M.; Inoue, T.; Hanada, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan)

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

66

Spin-polarization and spin-dependent logic gates in a double quantum ring based on Rashba spin-orbit effect: Non-equilibrium Green's function approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spin-dependent electron transport in an open double quantum ring, when each ring is made up of four quantum dots and threaded by a magnetic flux, is studied. Two independent and tunable gate voltages are applied to induce Rashba spin-orbit effect in the quantum rings. Using non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, we study the effects of electron-electron interaction on spin-dependent electron transport and show that although the electron-electron interaction induces an energy gap, it has no considerable effect when the bias voltage is sufficiently high. We also show that the double quantum ring can operate as a spin-filter for both spin up and spin down electrons. The spin-polarization of transmitted electrons can be tuned from ?1 (pure spin-down current) to +1 (pure spin-up current) by changing the magnetic flux and/or the gates voltage. Also, the double quantum ring can act as AND and NOR gates when the system parameters such as Rashba coefficient are properly adjusted.

Eslami, Leila, E-mail: Leslami@iust.ac.ir; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi, E-mail: mahdi@iust.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16846 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Langmuir probe measurements in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized non-equilibrium cutting arc: Analysis of the electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work describes the application of Langmuir probe diagnostics to the measurement of the electron temperature in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized, non-equilibrium cutting arc. The electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe was analysed, assuming that the standard exponential expression describing the electron current to the probe in collision-free plasmas can be applied under the investigated conditions. A procedure is described which allows the determination of the errors introduced in time-averaged probe data due to small-amplitude plasma fluctuations. It was found that the experimental points can be gathered into two well defined groups allowing defining two quite different averaged electron temperature values. In the low-current region the averaged characteristic was not significantly disturbed by the fluctuations and can reliably be used to obtain the actual value of the averaged electron temperature. In particular, an averaged electron temperature of 0.98 ± 0.07 eV (= 11400 ± 800 K) was found for the central core of the arc (30 A) at 3.5 mm downstream from the nozzle exit. This average included not only a time-average over the time fluctuations but also a spatial-average along the probe collecting length. The fitting of the high-current region of the characteristic using such electron temperature value together with the corrections given by the fluctuation analysis showed a relevant departure of local thermal equilibrium in the arc core.

Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B. [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600) Santa Fe (Argentina)] [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600) Santa Fe (Argentina); Kelly, H. [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600) Santa Fe (Argentina) [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600) Santa Fe (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Plasma (CONICET), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA) Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of gravitational screens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the Einstein gravity equations projected on a timelike surface, which represents the time evolution of what we call a gravitational screen. We show that such a screen possesses a surface tension and an internal energy, and that the Einstein equations reduce to the thermodynamic equations of a viscous bubble. We also provide a complete dictionary between gravitational and thermodynamical variables. In the non-viscous cases there are three thermodynamic equations which characterise a bubble dynamics: These are the first law, the Marangoni flow equation and the Young-Laplace equation. In all three equations the surface tension plays a central role: In the first law it appears as a work term per unit area, in the Marangoni flow its gradient drives a force, and in the Young-Laplace equation it contributes to a pressure proportional to the surface curvature. The gravity equations appear as a natural generalization of these bubble equations when the bubble itself is viscous and dynamical. In particular, it shows that the mechanism of entropy production for the viscous bubble is mapped onto the production of gravitational waves. We also review the relationship between surface tension and temperature, and discuss the usual black-hole thermodynamics from this point of view.

Laurent Freidel; Yuki Yokokura

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

Problems on Non-Equilibrium Statistical Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy functional, similar to the problem in dimensional scaling in the H-atom. For the C-atom, we got the ground state energy -37:82 eV with a relative error less than 6 %. The simplest molecular ion, H+ 2 , has been investigated by the quasi...

Kim, Moochan

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

70

Equilibrium and non-equilibrium emission of complex fragments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex fragment emission (Z{gt}2) has been studied in the reactions of 50, 80, and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C, and 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au. Charge, angle, and energy distributions were measured inclusively and in coincidence with other complex fragments, and were used to extract the source rapidities, velocity distributions, and cross sections. The experimental emission velocity distributions, charge loss distributions, and cross sections have been compared with calculations based on statistical compound nucleus decay. The binary signature of the coincidence events and the sharpness of the velocity distributions illustrate the primarily 2-body nature of the {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reaction mechanism between 50 and 100 MeV/u. The emission velocities, angular distributions, and absolute cross sections of fragments of 20{le}Z{le}35 at 50 MeV/u, 19{le}Z{le}28 at 80 MeV/u, and 17{le}Z{le}21 at 100 MeV/u indicate that these fragments arise solely from the binary decay of compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion reactions in which the {sup 139}La projectile picks up about one-half of the {sup 12}C target. In the 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au reactions, the disappearance of the binary signature in the total charge and velocity distributions suggests and increase in the complex fragment and light charged particle multiplicity with increasing target mass. As in the 80 and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reactions, the lighter complex fragments exhibit anisotropic angular distributions and cross sections that are too large to be explained exclusively by statistical emission. 143 refs., 67 figs.

Bowman, D.R.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Non-Equilibrium Pathways during Electrochemical Phase Transformations...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

level, where incomplete reactions and failure are prone to occur. Micrometric-sized lithium-manganese spinel cathode material - Li1+xMn2-xO4 - is one of the state-of-the-art...

72

Non-equilibrium Lorentz gas on a curved space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The periodic Lorentz gas with external field and iso-kinetic thermostat is equivalent, by conformal transformation, to a billiard with expanding phase-space and slightly distorted scatterers, for which the trajectories are straight lines. A further time rescaling allows to keep the speed constant in that new geometry. In the hyperbolic regime, the stationary state of this billiard is characterized by a phase-space contraction rate, equal to that of the iso-kinetic Lorentz gas. In contrast to the iso-kinetic Lorentz gas where phase-space contraction occurs in the bulk, the phase-space contraction rate here takes place at the periodic boundaries.

Felipe Barra; Thomas Gilbert

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

Non-equilibrium electroweak baryogenesis from preheating after inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a novel scenario for baryogenesis in a hybrid inflation model at the electroweak scale, in which the Standard Model Higgs field triggers the end of inflation. One of the conditions for successful baryogenesis, the departure from thermal equilibrium, is naturally achieved at the stage of preheating after inflation. The inflaton oscillations induce large occupation numbers for long-wavelength configurations of Higgs and gauge fields, which leads to a large rate of sphaleron transitions. We estimate this rate during the first stages of reheating and evaluate the amount of baryons produced due to a particular type of higher dimensional CP violating operator. The universe thermalizes through fermion interactions, at a temperature below critical, $T_{rh} < 100$ GeV, preventing the wash-out of the produced baryon asymmetry. Numerical simulations in (1+1) dimensions support our theoretical analysis.

Juan Garcia-Bellido; Dmitri Grigoriev; Alexander Kusenko; Mikhail Shaposhnikov

1999-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

74

Supersonic turbulent boundary layers with periodic mechanical non-equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It was documented that proper roughness selection coupled with a sufficiently strong favorable pressure gradient produced regions of �negative� production in the transport of turbulent stress. This led to localized areas of significant turbulence stress...

Ekoto, Isaac Wesley

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

75

Thermal non-equilibrium transport in colloids Alois Wrger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to an Onsager cross coefficient that describes the coupling between heat and particle flows. In the last decade. Boundary layer approximation 6 B. Double-layer forces 7 C. Transport velocity 8 D. Non-uniform electrolyte condition 15 I. Size dependence 16 III. Dispersion and depletion forces 18 A. Colloid-polymer mixtures 18 B

Boyer, Edmond

76

Is Soret Equilibrium a Non-Equilibrium Effect? Alois Wrger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'Aquitaine, Université de Bordeaux & CNRS, 351 cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence, France Recent thermophoretic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

77

The Principle of Minimal Resistance in Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical models describing the motion of colloidal particles in given velocity fields are presented. In addition to local approaches, leading to well known master equations such as the Langevin and the Fokker-Planck equations, a global description based on path integration is reviewed. This shows that under very broad conditions, during its evolution a dissipative system tends to minimize its energy dissipation in such a way to keep constant the Hamiltonian time rate, equal to the difference between the flux-based and the force-based Rayleigh dissipation functions. At steady state, the Hamiltonian time rate is maximized, leading to a minimum resistance principle. In the unsteady case, we consider the relaxation to equilibrium of harmonic oscillators and the motion of a Brownian particle in shear flow, obtaining results that coincide with the solution of the Fokker-Planck and the Langevin equations.

Mauri, Roberto

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Non-Equilibrium Pathways during Electrochemical Phase Transformations in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell BatteriesArchives Events/NewsYou are here Home

79

Highlights from theHighlights from the YamboYambo project:project: Excitonic polarons and non-equilibriumExcitonic polarons and non-equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in noble metals, PRL 88,Quasiparticles in noble metals, PRL 88, 016409 (2002)016409 (2002) 2002 At the end is coded. Bound excitons in TDDFT,Bound excitons in TDDFT, PRL 91, 256402 (2003)PRL 91, 256402 (2003) Bethe-Salpeter equation is coded. DynamicalDynamical excitons in metals, PRL 91, 176402 (2003)excitons in metals, PRL 91

Marini, Andrea

80

Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rocks Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The USA is embarking upon tackling the serious environmental challenges posed to the world by greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). The dimension of the problem is daunting. In fact, according to the Energy Information Agency, nearly 6 billion metric tons of CO2 were produced in the USA in 2007 with coal-burning power plants contributing about 2 billion metric tons. To mitigate the concerns associated with CO2 emission, geological sequestration holds promise. Among the potential geological storage sites, unmineable coal seams and shale formations in particular show promise because of the probability of methane recovery while sequestering the CO2. However. the success of large-scale sequestration of CO2 in coal and shale would hinge on a thorough understanding of CO2's interactions with host reservoirs. An important parameter for successful storage of CO2 reservoirs would be whether the pressurized CO2 would remain invariant in coal and shale formations under reasonable internal and/or external perturbations. Recent research has brought to the fore the potential of induced seismicity, which may result in caprock compromise. Therefore, to evaluate the potential risks involved in sequestering CO2 in Illinois bituminous coal seams and shale, we studied: (i) the mechanical behavior of Murphysboro (Illinois) and Houchin Creek (Illinois) coals, (ii) thermodynamic behavior of Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ? T ? 300oC, (iii) how high pressure CO2 (up to 20.7 MPa) modifies the viscosity of the host, (iv) the rate of emission of CO2 from Illinois bituminous coal and shale cores if the cores, which were pressurized with high pressure (? 20.7 MPa) CO2, were exposed to an atmospheric pressure, simulating the development of leakage pathways, (v) whether there are any fractions of CO2 stored in these hosts which are resistance to emission by simply exposing the cores to atmospheric pressure, and (vi) how compressive shockwaves applied to the coal and shale cores, which were pressurized with high pressure CO2, determine the fate of sequestered CO2 in these cores. Our results suggested that Illinois bituminous coal in its unperturbed state, i.e., when not pressurized with CO2, showed large variations in the mechanical properties. Modulus varied from 0.7 GPa to 3.4 GPa even though samples were extracted from a single large chunk of coal. We did not observe any glass transition for Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ? T ? 300oC, however, when the coal was pressurized with CO2 at ambient ? P ? 20.7 MPa, the viscosity of the coal decreased and inversely scaled with the CO2 pressure. The decrease in viscosity as a function of pressure could pose CO2 injection problems for coal as lower viscosity would allow the solid coal to flow to plug the fractures, fissures, and cleats. Our experiments also showed a very small fraction of CO2 was absorbed in coal; and when CO2 pressurized coals were exposed to atmospheric conditions, the loss of CO2 from coals was massive. Half of the sequestered gas from the coal cores was lost in less than 20 minutes. Our shockwave experiments on Illinois bituminous coal, New Albany shale (Illinois), Devonian shale (Ohio), and Utica shale (Ohio) presented clear evidence that the significant emission of the sequestered CO2 from these formations cannot be discounted during seismic activity, especially if caprock is compromised. It is argued that additional shockwave studies, both compressive and transverse, would be required for successfully mapping the risks associated with sequestering high pressure CO2 in coal and shale formations.

Malhotra, Vivak

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

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81

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Kinetic Effects of Non-Equilibrium Plasma on Partially  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and more attention for its potential to enhance combustion performance in gas turbines and scramjet engines

Ju, Yiguang

82

Flux-difference split parabolized Navier-Stokes algorithm for non-equilibrium chemically reacting flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A flux-difference split explicit finite-difference algorithm is presented for solving the parabolized form of the equations governing three-dimensional nonequilibrium chemically reacting flows. The algorithm is based on an explicit noniterative, upwind space-marching scheme developed by Korte, but differs in that the unsteady Riemann problem, rather than the steady Riemann problem, is solved. The algorithm allows either a second or an approximately third-order accurate upwind treatment of the convection terms by employing the unsteady approximate Riemann solver of Roe. The source terms of the species transport equations are treated in either an explicit or implicit manner, and the species diffusion terms are modeled with either a Fickian or a multicomponent model. A validation of the algorithm is performed by comparing computational results with the 2-D Mach 14, 15 degree compression-corner data of Holden. The three-dimensional capability of the algorithm is demonstrated by computing Mach 2.7 flow over a swept wedge scramjet fuel injector, and three-dimensional reacting flow capability is demonstrated by a computing a shock-jet interaction concept for mixing and combustion enhancement. 34 refs.

White, J.A.; Korte, J.J.; Gaffney, R.L. Jr. (Analytical Services and Materials, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States) NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Thermo-chemical dynamics and chemical quasi-equilibrium of plasmas in thermal non-equilibrium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine both processes of ionization by electron and heavy-particle impact in spatially uniform plasmas at rest in the absence of external forces. A singular perturbation analysis is used to study the following physical scenario, in which thermal relaxation becomes much slower than chemical reactions. First, electron-impact ionization is investigated. The dynamics of the system rapidly becomes close to a slow dynamics manifold that allows for defining a unique chemical quasi-equilibrium for two-temperature plasmas and proving that the second law of thermodynamics is satisfied. Then, all ionization reactions are taken into account simultaneously, leading to a surprising conclusion: the inner layer for short time scale (or time boundary layer) directly leads to thermal equilibrium. Global thermo-chemical equilibrium is reached within a short time scale, involving only chemical reactions, even if thermal relaxation through elastic collisions is assumed to be slow.

Massot, Marc [Laboratoire EM2C, UPR 288 CNRS - Ecole Centrale Paris (France); Graille, Benjamin [Laboratoire de Mathematiques d'Orsay, UMR 8628 CNRS - Universite Paris-Sud (France); Magin, Thierry E. [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics (Belgium)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

84

Non-Equilibrium Magnetohydrodynamic Behavior of Plasmas having Complex, Evolving Morphology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our main activity has been doing lab experiments where plasmas having morphology and behavior similar to solar and astrophysical plasmas are produced and studied. The solar experiment is mounted on one end of a large vacuum chamber while the astrophysical jet experiment is mounted on the other end. Diagnostics are shared between the two experiments. The solar experiment produces arched plasma loops that behave very much like solar corona loops. The astrophysical jet experiment produces plasma jets that are very much like astrophysical jets. We have also done work on plasma waves, including general wave dispersions, and specific properties of kinetic Alfven waves and of whistler waves.

Bellan, Paul M. [Caltech] [Caltech

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

85

Non-equilibrium self-assembly of a filament coupled to ATP/GTP hydrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the stochastic dynamics of growth and shrinkage of single actin filaments or microtubules taking into account insertion, removal, and ATP/GTP hydrolysis of subunits. The resulting phase diagram contains three different phases: a rapidly growing phase, an intermediate phase and a bound phase. We analyze all these phases, with an emphasis on the bound phase. We also discuss how hydrolysis affects force-velocity curves. The bound phase shows features of dynamic instability, which we characterize in terms of the time needed for the ATP/GTP cap to disappear as well as the time needed for the filament to reach a length of zero, i.e., (to collapse) for the first time. We obtain exact expressions for all these quantities, which we test using Monte Carlo simulations.

Padinhateeri Ranjith; David Lacoste; Kirone Mallick; Jean-Francois Joanny

2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

86

Geometry and temperature dependent thermal conductivity of diamond nanowires: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma etching of polycrystalline diamond films [7], microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition. For theoretical calculations of proper- ties of nanosized diamond materials, polycrystalline diamond thin filmsGeometry and temperature dependent thermal conductivity of diamond nanowires: A non

Melnik, Roderick

87

Non-equilibrium coherent vortex states and subharmonic giant Shapiro steps in Josephson junction arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a review of recent work on the dynamic response of Josephson junction arrays driven by dc and ac currents. The arrays are modeled by the resistively shunted Josephson junction model, appropriate for proximity effect junctions, including self-induced magnetic fields as well as disorder. The relevance of the self-induced fields is measured as a function of a parameter $\\kappa=\\lambda_L/a$, with $\\lambda_L$ the London penetration depth of the arrays, and $a$ the lattice spacing. The transition from Type II ($\\kappa>1$) to Type I ($\\kappa <1$) behavior is studied in detail. We compare the results for models with self, self+nearest-neighbor, and full inductance matrices. In the $\\kappa=\\infty$ limit, we find that when the initial state has at least one vortex-antivortex pair, after a characteristic transient time these vortices unbind and {\\it radiate} other vortices. These radiated vortices settle into a parity-broken, time-periodic, {\\em axisymmetric coherent vortex state} (ACVS), characterized by alternate rows of positive and negative vortices lying along a tilted axis. The ACVS produces subharmonic steps in the current voltage (IV) characteristics, typical of giant Shapiro steps. For finite $\\kappa$ we find that the IV's show subharmonic giant Shapiro steps, even at zero external magnetic field. We find that these subharmonic steps are produced by a whole family of coherent vortex oscillating patterns, with their structure changing as a function of $\\kappa$. In general, we find that these patterns are due to a break down of translational invariance produced, for example, by disorder or antisymmetric edge-fields. The zero field case results are in good qualitative agreement with experiments

Daniel Domínguez; Jorge V. José

1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

88

The behavior of matter under non-equilibrium conditions: Fundamental aspects and applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly discusses concepts of chaotic systems. The topics discusses are: Bernoulli maps; mathematical aspects of the complex spectral representations; and large poincare systems. (LSP)

Prigogine, I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Finite-Temperature Non-equilibrium Quasicontinuum Method based on Langevin Dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concurrent bridging of molecular dynamics and continuum thermodynamics presents a number of challenges, mostly associated with energy transmission and changes in the constitutive description of a material across domain boundaries. In this paper, we propose a framework for simulating coarse dynamic systems in the canonical ensemble using the Quasicontinuum method (QC). The equations of motion are expressed in reduced QC coordinates and are strictly derived from dissipative Lagrangian mechanics. The derivation naturally leads to a classical Langevin implementation where the timescale is governed by vibrations emanating from the finest length scale occurring in the computational cell. The equations of motion are integrated explicitly via Newmark's ({beta} = 0; {gamma} = 1/2) method, leading to a robust numerical behavior and energy conservation. In its current form, the method only allows for wave propagations supported by the less compliant of the two meshes across a heterogeneous boundary, which requires the use of overdamped dynamics to avoid spurious heating due to reflected vibrations. We have applied the method to two independent crystallographic systems characterized by different interatomic potentials (Al and Ta) and have measured thermal expansion in order to quantify the vibrational entropy loss due to homogenization. We rationalize the results in terms of system size, mesh coarseness, and nodal cluster diameter within the framework of the quasiharmonic approximation. For Al, we find that the entropy loss introduced by mesh coarsening varies linearly with the element size, and that volumetric effects are not critical in driving the anharmonic behavior of the simulated systems. In Ta, the anomalies of the interatomic potential employed result in negative and zero thermal expansion at low and high temperatures, respectively.

Marian, J; Venturini, G; Hansen, B; Knap, J; Ortiz, M; Campbell, G

2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

90

A non-equilibrium model for fixed-bed multi-component adiabatic adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to enter the bed. Solutions along a z ~ constant char- acteristic are the history of the. volumn element of the bed located a s constant, This physical interpretat1on is a physical approximation of the real world where adsorber discontinuities... 1 3. 3. 2 3e3e3 3. 3. 4 3. 3. 5 Solution of the multi-component adiabatic adsorption equation, . ~ ~ ~ Fluid phase equations. Fixed-bed solid phase equations. , ~ Construction of the solution surface by stepwise integra- tion...

Harwell, Jeffrey Harry

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Oblique and conical shock similarity laws for non-equilibrium flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. IV. VI. INTRODUCTION REVIEN OF PREVIOUS WORK. OBl I'VE SHOCK VIBRATIONAL SIMILITUDE CHEilllCAL iNOZ -EQUILI BRIIVl EXTENSIOiN TO CONICAL FLON. RE1IARKS AND CONCLUSIONS. REFERENCES APPENDIX Page 12 22 31 37 39 LIST OF FIGUWHS Figure... Normal Shock Vibrational Similarity Param ter Normal Shock Dissociation Similarity Parameter Page 10 Oblique Shock Vibrational Similarity Law 19 Oblique Shock Dissociation Similarity Parameter Conical Shock Dissociation Similarity Parameter...

Holster, Jesse Louis

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Mixing from Fickian Diffusion and Natural Convection in Binary Non-Equilibrium Fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to as secondary recovery mechanisms. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions to hold back climate changes represents one of applications such as improved oil recovery and carbon sequestration. Gas injection into oil reservoirs has long been used to maintain the pressure needed for recovery processes. The subsequent mixing between the gas

Firoozabadi, Abbas

93

Adjoint-Based Aerothermodynamic Shape Design of Hypersonic Vehicles in Non-Equilibrium Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geometries with aerothermodynamic considerations in the presence of high-enthalpy, chemically reactive gas terms R Governing equation residual S Control surface T Temperature U Vector of conserved variables u. The hypersonic vehicle design process requires the synthesis of aerothermodynamic, structural, TPS material

Alonso, Juan J.

94

Stochastic thermodynamics of fluctuating density fields: Non-equilibrium free energy differences under coarse-graining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the stochastic thermodynamics of systems that are described by a time-dependent density field, for example, simple liquids and colloidal suspensions. For a time-dependent change of external parameters, we show that the Jarzynski relation connecting work with the change of free energy holds if the time evolution of the density follows the Kawasaki-Dean equation. Specifically, we study the work distributions for the compression and expansion of a two-dimensional colloidal model suspension implementing a practical coarse-graining scheme of the microscopic particle positions. We demonstrate that even if coarse-grained dynamics and density functional do not match, the fluctuation relations for the work still hold albeit for a different, apparent, change of free energy.

Leonard, T.; Lander, B.; Seifert, U. [II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)] [II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Speck, T. [Institut für Theoretische Physik II, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstraße 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)] [Institut für Theoretische Physik II, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstraße 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

95

Radiative transfer within non Beerian porous media with semitransparent and opaque phases in non equilibrium;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equilibrium; Application to reflooding of a nuclear reactor. Miloud Chahlafia,b,c , Fabien Belleta,b , Florian Transfer 55, 13-14 (2012) 3666-3676" DOI : 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.02.067 #12;nuclear reactor flux Indexes - At the calculation point -+ Dimensionless 3 hal-00680676,version1-19Mar2012 #12;-(j) jth

Boyer, Edmond

96

Thermal non-equilibrium in dispersed flow film boiling in a vertical tube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The departure from thermal equilibrium between a dispersed liquid phase and its vapor at high quality during film boiling is investigated, The departure from equilibruim is manifested by the high resistance to heat transfer ...

Forslund, Robert Paul

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Boiling Crisis as a Non-Equilibrium Drying V. S. Nikolayev, D. A. Beysens, J. Hegseth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crisis is the formation of a vapor film between the heater and the liquid when the heat supply exceeds in the coordinates heat supply ­ heater temperature is sketched in Fig. 1 for the case of stationary boiling experiment, the so called "pool boiling". When the heat supply to the fluid pool is small, only a fluid

Nikolayev, Vadim S.

98

CHF as a Non-Equilibrium Drying Transition V. S. Nikolayev  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

film between the heater and the liquid when the heat supply exceeds a critical value, the critical heat

Nikolayev, Vadim S.

99

Effects of non-equilibrium plasma discharge on counterflow diffusion flame extinction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA b U.S. Air Force and resulted in an increase of extinction strain rates through the coupling between thermal and kinetic effects produces heat, rad- icals, excited species, ions/electrons, and other intermediate species simultaneously

Ju, Yiguang

100

Kinetic effects of non-equilibrium plasma-assisted methane oxidation on diffusion flame extinction limits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

08544, USA b US Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 plasma assisted combustion resulted in fast chemical heat release and extended the extinction limits processes in plasma­flame interactions [1­17]. However, plasma assisted combustion involves strong coupling

Ju, Yiguang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gc5 non-equilibrium brn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

NON-EQUILIBRIUM DYNAMICS OF MANY-BODY QUANTUM SYSTEMS: FUNDAMENTALS AND NEW FRONTIER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rapid progress in nanotechnology and naofabrication techniques has ushered in a new era of quantum transport experiments. This has in turn heightened the interest in theoretical understanding of nonequilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated quantum systems. This project has advanced the frontiers of understanding in this area along several fronts. For example, we showed that under certain conditions, quantum impurities out of equilibrium can be reformulated in terms of an effective equilibrium theory; this makes it possible to use the gamut of tools available for quantum systems in equilibrium. On a different front, we demonstrated that the elastic power of a transmitted microwave photon in circuit QED systems can exhibit a many-body Kondo resonance. We also showed that under many circumstances, bipartite fluctuations of particle number provide an effective tool for studying many-body physics—particularly the entanglement properties of a many-body system. This implies that it should be possible to measure many-body entanglement in relatively simple and tractable quantum systems. In addition, we studied charge relaxation in quantum RC circuits with a large number of conducting channels, and elucidated its relation to Kondo models in various regimes. We also extended our earlier work on the dynamics of driven and dissipative quantum spin-boson impurity systems, deriving a new formalism that makes it possible to compute the full spin density matrix and spin-spin correlation functions beyond the weak coupling limit. Finally, we provided a comprehensive analysis of the nonequilibrium transport near a quantum phase transition in the case of a spinless dissipative resonant-level model. This project supported the research of two Ph.D. students and two postdoctoral researchers, whose training will allow them to further advance the field in coming years.

DeMille, David; LeHur, Karyn

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

102

SciTech Connect: Fe Atomic Data for Non-equilibrium Ionization Plasmas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta)NeutronFIXATIION IN

103

Non-equilibrium raft-like membrane domains under continuous recycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a model for the kinetics of spontaneous membrane domain (raft) assembly that includes the effect of membrane recycling ubiquitous in living cells. We show that the domains have a broad power-law distribution with an average radius that scales with the 1/4 power of the domain lifetime when the line tension at the domain edges is large. For biologically reasonable recycling and diffusion rates the average domain radius is in the tens of nm range, consistent with observations. This represents one possible link between signaling (involving rafts) and traffic (recycling) in cells. Finally, we present evidence that suggests that the average raft size may be the same for all scale-free recycling schemes.

Matthew S. Turner; Pierre Sens; Nicholas D. Socci

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

High-Efficiency Solid State Cooling Technologies: Non-Equilibrium Asymmetic Thermoelectrics (NEAT) Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: Sheetak is developing a thermoelectric-based solid state cooling system to replace typical air conditioners that use vapor compression to cool air. With noisy mechanical components, vapor compression systems use a liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the external environment. With no noisy moving parts or polluting refrigerants, thermoelectric systems rely on an electrical current being passed through the junction of the two different conducting materials to change temperature. Using advanced semiconductor technology, Sheetak is improving solid state cooling systems by using proprietary thermoelectric materials along with other innovations to achieve significant energy efficiency. Sheetak’s new design displaces compressor-based technology; improves reliability; and decreases energy usage. Sheetak’s use of semiconductor manufacturing methods leads to less material use—facilitating cheaper production.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Study of Methane Reforming in Warm Non-Equilibrium Plasma Discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, temperature and other variables determine efficiency of conversion. An efficient process is identified by a high yield and low specific energy of production for the desired product. A study of previous work reveals that higher energy density systems are more...

Parimi, Sreekar

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

Non-equilibrium and local detection of the normal fraction of a trapped two-dimensional Bose gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional Bose gas, a quantity that generally differs from the Bose-Einstein condensed fraction. The idea-Einstein condensation [7]. A possibil- ity explored in [8] is to look at the response of a gas in a toroidal trap for atomic samples, as the superfluid core co-exists with an external ring of normal gas [10]. In p

107

Non-equilibrium Quantum Many-Body Green Function Formalism in the light of Quantum Information Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The following issues are discussed inspired by the recent paper of Kadanoff (arXiv: 1403:6162): (a) Construction of a generalized one-particle Wigner distribution (GWD) function (analog of the classical distribution function) from which the quantum kinetic equation due to Kadanoff and Baym (KB) is derived, often called the Quantum Boltzmann Equation (QBE); (b) The equation obeyed by this has a collision contribution in the form of a two-particle Green function. This term is manipulated to have Kinetic Entropy in parallel to its counterpart in the classical Boltzmann kinetic equation for the classical distribution function. This proved to be problematic in that unlike in the classical Boltzmann kinetic equation, the contribution from the kinetic entropy term was non-positive; (3) Kadanoff surmised that this situation could perhaps be related to quantum entanglement that may not have been included in his theory. It is shown that GWD is not positive everywhere (indicating dynamical quantumness) just like the commonly recognized property of the Wigner function (negative property indicating quantumness of the state). The issue of non-positive feature appearing in approximate evaluation of patently positive entities in many particle systems is here pointed to an early discussion of this issue (Phys. Rev. A10, 1852 (1974)) in terms of a theorem on truncation of cumulant expansion of a probability distribution function due to Marcinkeiwicz. The last issue of presence or absence of entanglement in an approximate evaluation of a many particle correlation poses a new problem; it is considered here in terms of fermionic entanglement theory in the light of density matrix and Green function theory of many-fermion systems. The clue comes from the fact that the Hartree-Fock approximation exhbits no entantanglement in two-particle fermion density matrix and hence also in two-particle Green function.

A. K. Rajgaopal

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

108

A parallel multistate framework for atomistic non-equilibrium reaction dynamics of solutes in strongly interacting organic solvents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a parallel linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM. Forces are obtained using the Hellman-Feynmann relationship, giving continuous gradients, and excellent energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to CCSD(T)-F12 electronic structure theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD3CN -> DF + CD2CN reaction in CD3CN solvent. This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface (PES) whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We use our PES to run MD simulations, and examine a range of transient observables which follow in the wake of reaction, including transient spectra of the DF vibrational band, time dependent profiles of vibrationally excited DF in CD3CN solvent, and relaxation rates for energy flow from DF into the solvent, all of which agree well with experime...

Glowacki, David R; Harvey, Jeremy N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Steady-state film-boiling data in rod-bundle geometry and non-equilibrium correlation assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of 22 steady-state, rod bundle, dispersed flow film boiling experiments has been performed in the Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF), a pressurized-water loop containing 64 full-length electrically heated rods. Test parameters in the upflow experiments cover a wide range of conditions typical of those which might be encountered during a nuclear reactor loss-of-coolant accident. Local equilibrium fluid conditions were calculated using mass and energy conservation considerations. Experimentally determined heat transfer coefficients were compared to several available film boiling heat transfer correlations: Dougall-Rohsenow, Groeneveld 5.7, Groeneveld-Delorme, Chen, Jones-Zuber, and Yoder-Rohsenow. The Groeneveld 5.7 correlation tended to predict the data better than any other correlation tested. The Dougall-Rohsenow correlation tends to overpredict the data while the Yoder-Rohsenow correlation predicted the data better than the other nonequilibrium correlations examined. However, all of the nonequilibrium correlations generally underpredict the heat transfer.

Yoder, G.L.; Morris, D.G.; Mullins, C.B.; Ott, L.J.; Reed, D.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Application of Semi-Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (SGMC) methods to describe non-equilibrium polymer systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the structure of materials, and how this structure affects their properties, is an important step towards the understanding that is necessary in order to apply computational methods to the end of designing ...

Bernardin, Frederick E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Temporal and Dose Kinetics of Tunnel Relaxation of Non-Equilibrium Near-Interfacial Charged Defects in Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is devoted mainly to mathematical aspects of modeling and simulation of tunnel relaxation of nonequilibrium charged oxide traps located at/near the interface insulator - conductive channel, for instance in irradiated MOS devices. The generic form of the tunnel annealing response function was derived from the rate equation for the charged defect buildup and annealing as a linear superposition of the responses of different defects with different time constants. Using this linear response function, a number of important practical problems are analyzed and discussed. Combined tunnel and thermal or RICN annealing, power-like temporal relaxation after a single ion strike into the gate oxide, are described in context of general approach.

Zebrev, Gennady I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Materials Science and Engineering A 449451 (2007) 1217 Non-equilibrium solidification of concentrated FeGe alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the interface diffusive speed (VD) for diffusion-limited or speed of sound (Vs) for collision-limited growth phase change like peritectic reaction during liquid to solid transformation. The Fe-rich part of Fe-equilibrium conditions. The deviation of the chemical equilibrium at the solid­liquid interface and the kinetic

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

113

Non-equilibrium deposition of phase pure Cu{sub 2}O thin films at reduced growth temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) is actively studied as a prototypical material for energy conversion and electronic applications. Here we reduce the growth temperature of phase pure Cu{sub 2}O thin films to 300?°C by intentionally controlling solely the kinetic parameter (total chamber pressure, P{sub tot}) at fixed thermodynamic condition (0.25 mTorr pO{sub 2}). A strong non-monotonic effect of P{sub tot} on Cu-O phase formation is found using high-throughput combinatorial-pulsed laser deposition. This discovery creates new opportunities for the growth of Cu{sub 2}O devices with low thermal budget and illustrates the importance of kinetic effects for the synthesis of metastable materials with useful properties.

Subramaniyan, Archana, E-mail: asubrama@mymail.mines.edu [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Perkins, John D.; Lany, Stephan; Stevanovic, Vladan; Ginley, David S.; Zakutayev, Andriy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); O’Hayre, Ryan P. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Indirect heating of Pt by non-equilibrium electrons in Au in a nanoscale Pt/Au bilayer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-line equivalent-circuit. For optical exciation of either the Pt or Au side of the bilayer, the majority of energy excitations which are then driven out of thermal equilibrium with the vibrations of the atomic lattice.1

Cahill, David G.

115

J. fhys. D:Appl. fhys. 28 (1995)1903-1918.Printed in he UK 1 Non-equilibrium coupled kinetics in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equation coupled to the rate balance equationsfor the vibrationally excited molecules N2(X 'E;, v) and 02(X are studied with the purpose of material treatments or in order to test coating materials for space vehicles

Guerra, Vasco

116

Non-Equilibrium Beta Processes in Neutron Stars: A Relationship between the Net Reaction Rate and the Total Emissivity of Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several different processes could be changing the density in the core of a neutron star, leading to a departure from $\\beta$ equilibrium, quantified by the chemical potential difference $\\delta\\mu\\equiv\\mu_n-\\mu_p-\\mu_e$. The evolution of this quantity is coupled to that of the star's interior temperature $T$ by two functions that quantify the rate at which neutrino-emitting reactions proceed: the net reaction rate (difference between $\\beta$ decay and capture rates), $\\Gamma_{\\rm net}(T,\\delta\\mu)$, and the total emissivity (total energy emission rate in the form of neutrinos and antineutrinos), $\\epsilon_{\\rm tot}(T,\\delta\\mu)$. Here, we present a simple and general relationship between these variables, ${\\partial\\epsilon_{\\rm tot}/\\partial\\delta\\mu=3\\Gamma_{\\rm net}}$, and show that it holds even in the case of superfluid nucleons. This relation may simplify the numerical calculation of these quantities, including superfluid reduction factors.

Sergio Flores-Tulian; Andreas Reisenegger

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

117

The behavior of matter under non-equilibrium conditions: Fundamental aspects and applications. Progress report, July 15, 1991--July 14, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly discusses concepts of chaotic systems. The topics discusses are: Bernoulli maps; mathematical aspects of the complex spectral representations; and large poincare systems. (LSP)

Prigogine, I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Evaluation of technical feasibility of closed-cycle non-equilibrium MHD power generation with direct coal firing. Final report, Task 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program accomplishments in a continuing effort to demonstrate the feasibility of direct coal fired, closed cycle, magnetohydrodynamic power generation are detailed. These accomplishments relate to all system aspects of a CCMHD power generation system including coal combustion, heat transfer to the MHD working fluid, MHD power generation, heat and cesium seed recovery and overall systems analysis. Direct coal firing of the combined cycle has been under laboratory development in the form of a high slag rejection, regeneratively air cooled cyclone coal combustor concept, originated within this program. A hot bottom ceramic regenerative heat exchanger system was assembled and test fired with coal for the purposes of evaluating the catalytic effect of alumina on NO/sub x/ emission reduction and operability of the refractory dome support system. Design, procurement, fabrication and partial installation of a heat and seed recovery flow apparatus was accomplished and was based on a stream tube model of the full scale system using full scale temperatures, tube sizes, rates of temperature change and tube geometry. Systems analysis capability was substantially upgraded by the incorporation of a revised systems code, with emphasis on ease of operator interaction as well as separability of component subroutines. The updated code was used in the development of a new plant configuration, the Feedwater Cooled (FCB) Brayton Cycle, which is superior to the CCMHD/Steam cycle both in performance and cost. (WHK)

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Konference HODNOCEN STAVU A VVOJE LESNCH GEOBIOCENZ LDF, MZLU V BRN 15. -16. 2004 ROLE LOV KA P I FORMOVN LESNCH BIOCENZ NPR D VN, PLAVA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, coppice and coppice with standards woods. Forests of Dìvín are a unique natural-cultural phenomenon, due

Hédl, Radim

120

Non-equilibrium vibrational and electron energy distributions functions in atmospheric nitrogen ns pulsed discharges and \\mus post-discharges: the role of electron molecule vibrational excitation scaling-laws  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formation of the electron energy distribution function in nanosecond atmospheric nitrogen discharges is investigated by means of self-consistent solution of the chemical kinetics and the Boltzmann equation for free electrons. The post-discharge phase is followed to few microseconds. The model is formulated in order to investigate the role of the cross section set, focusing on the vibrational-excitation by electron-impact through resonant channel. Four different cross section sets are considered, one based on internally consistent vibrational-excitation calculations which extend to the whole vibrational ladder, and the others obtained by applying commonly used scaling-laws.

Colonna, Gianpiero; Celiberto, Roberto; Capitelli, Mario; Tennyson, Jonathan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gc5 non-equilibrium brn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Abbreviations: IEF, isoelectric focussing; NEPHGE, non-equilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis; PAGE, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; pI, isoelectric point; SDS, sodium dodecyl sulphate; SI, self-incompatibility; 1-D, 1 dimensional; 2-D, 2 dimensional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; PAGE, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; pI, isoelectric point; SDS, sodium dodecyl sulphate; SI, self-incompatibility@yorku.ca Keywords: cysteine protease, -expansin, mass spectrometry, self-incompatibility ABSTRACT Distylous species of Turnera are strongly self-incompatible, therefore they provide an excellent system for investigations

Shore, Joel S.

122

Thermal Trap for DNA Replication Christof B. Mast and Dieter Braun*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and simultaneously accumulates the replicated molecules in an efficient thermophoretic trap. The non- equilibrium

Kersting, Roland

123

Nonequilibrium quantum kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contains viewgraphs on non-equilibrium quantum kinetics of nuclear reactions at the intermediate and high energy ranges.

Danielewicz, P.

1997-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - accurate chemical equilibrium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Green's function Continuum Non- Equilibrium ... Source: Walker, D. Greg - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vanderbilt University Collection: Engineering 72 Experimental...

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - aminocarboxypropyl transfer reaction Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

non-equilibrium gas-phase chemical reactions... the high-temperature conditions of hypersonic reentry (10,000 degrees). Atmospheric chemical reactions... during hypersonic...

126

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

obtained by include the pore size, pore size distribution, pore number, and surface and mass fractal nature, BRN, 2007). #12;but still fractal pore walls, and a mass fractal pore distribution not seen and retention of water, gas and hydrocarbons, sequestration of wastes, the formation of ore deposits

Stanford University

127

Transcription factors SOX4 and SOX11 function redundantly to regulate the development of mouse retinal ganglion cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lerner Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195 4 College of Life and Environmental Sciences layer while deletion of Brn3b has no effect on the expression of Sox4 and Sox11. Taken together layers: photoreceptors (rods and cones) constitute the outer nuclear layer (ONL); horizontal, bipolar

128

A general proof of Landauer-Büttiker formula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We point out a general argument leading from the formula for currents through an open mesoscopic system given by the theory of non-equilibrium steady states (NESS) to the Landauer-B\\"uttiker formula.

G. Nenciu

2006-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

129

Thermodynamics with 3 Spins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glauber dynamics, applied to the one-dimensional Ising model, provides a tractable model for the study of non-equilibrium, many-body processes driven by a heat bath

Eward May; Jack L. Uretsky

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., Vol. 7, 1974. Printed in Great Britain. 01974 Electron multiplicationin a gas discharge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with large space gradients. More recently, experimental data (Haydon and Stock 1966, Folkard and Haydon 1971 the pressure of the gas and xoa distance introduced to take into account the non-equilibrium effects at small

Friedland, Lazar

131

Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Ultra-Thin Poly(methyl methacrylate) Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermal conductivity of PMMA films with thicknesses from 5 to 50 nanometers and layered over a treated silicon substrate is explored numerically by the application of the reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) technique...

Silva Hernandez, Carlos Ardenis A.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

132

Phenomenology and simulations of active fluids   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active fluids are an interesting new class of non-equilibrium systems in physics. In such fluids, the system is forced out of equilibrium by the individual active particles - in contrast to driven systems where the system ...

Tjhung, Elsen

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

133

Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics of Porous Electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reformulate and extend porous electrode theory for non-ideal active materials, including those capable of phase transformations. Using principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, we relate the cell voltage, ionic ...

Ferguson, Todd Richard

134

Cross Sections: Key for Modeling Vasili Kharchenko  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ... Students and Postdocs: Stefano Bovino, Nick Lewkow, and Marko Gacesa #12;Collisions of Atmospheric Atoms/and Monte Carlo simulations · Calculations of non-equilibrium rates of atmospheric reactions. #12;Simple

Johnson, Robert E.

135

Statistical mechanics of non-Markovian exclusion processes   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process (TASEP) is often considered one of the fundamental models of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, due to its well understood steady state and the fact that it can exhibit ...

Concannon, Robert James

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

136

Tunable spatial heterogeneity in structure and composition within aqueous microfluidic droplets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we demonstrate biphasic microfluidic droplets with broadly tunable internal structures, from simple near-equilibrium drop-in-drop morphologies to complex yet uniform non-equilibrium steady-state structures. ...

Hui, Sophia Lee Su

137

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Strong bow and leading-edge shock waves, and large kinetic energy dissipation on hypersonic molecules, hence variable heat capacities and thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. As a result, significant

Martín, Pino

138

A mathematical and experimental study of caustic flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Dr. Ching Buang Wu A simple non-equilibrium chemical displacement model for continuous, linear, caustic flooding of crude oil is presented. The laboratory experiments were conducted to support the numerical simulation and to verify the results.... The unique feature of this mathematic study is that it includes the chemistry of the acid hydrolysis to produce surfactants and the chemical reaction rate under the non- equilibrium state. The in-situ generated surfactant was presumed to alter the oil...

Shen, Tsu-Cheng

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Lyapunov Exponents and KS Entropy for the Lorentz Gas at Low Densities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lyapunov exponents and the KS entropy for a two dimensional Lorentz gas at low densities are defined for general non-equilibrium states and calculated with the use of a Lorentz-Boltzmann type equation. In equilibrium the density dependence of these quantities predicted by Krylov is recovered and explicit expressions are obtained. The relationship between the KS entropy, Lyapunov exponents, and escape rate, conjectured by Gaspard and Nicolis for non-equilibrium systems is confirmed and generalized.

Henk van Beijeren; J. R. Dorfman

1994-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

140

Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects on isentropic coefficient in argon and helium thermal plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present work, two cases of thermal plasma have been considered; the ground state plasma in which all the atoms and ions are assumed to be in the ground state and the excited state plasma in which atoms and ions are distributed over various possible excited states. The variation of Z?, frozen isentropic coefficient and the isentropic coefficient with degree of ionization and non-equilibrium parameter ?(= T{sub e}/T{sub h}) has been investigated for the ground and excited state helium and argon plasmas at pressures 1?atm, 10?atm, and 100?atm in the temperature range from 6000?K to 60?000?K. For a given value of non-equilibrium parameter, the relationship of Z? with degree of ionization does not show any dependence on electronically excited states in helium plasma whereas in case of argon plasma this dependence is not appreciable till degree of ionization approaches 2. The minima of frozen isentropic coefficient shifts toward lower temperature with increase of non-equilibrium parameter for both the helium and argon plasmas. The lowering of non-equilibrium parameter decreases the frozen isentropic coefficient more emphatically in helium plasma at high pressures in comparison to argon plasma. The increase of pressure slightly reduces the ionization range over which isentropic coefficient almost remains constant and it does not affect appreciably the dependence of isentropic coefficient on non-equilibrium parameter.

Sharma, Rohit [Satyam Institute of Engineering and Technology, Amritsar 143107 (India)] [Satyam Institute of Engineering and Technology, Amritsar 143107 (India); Singh, Kuldip [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India)] [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gc5 non-equilibrium brn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Assessment of reaction-rate predictions of a collision-energy approach for chemical reactions in atmospheric flows.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates is assessed for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary non-equilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological nonequilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, significant differences can be found. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Genetics in the courts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various: (1)TriState 2000 Genetics in the Courts (2) Growing impact of the new genetics on the courts (3)Human testing (4) Legal analysis - in re G.C. (5) Legal analysis - GM ''peanots'', and (6) Legal analysis for State vs Miller

Coyle, Heather; Drell, Dan

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

The mechano-chemistry of cytoskeletal force generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this communication, we propose a model to study the non-equilibrium process by which actin stress fibers develop force in contractile cells. The emphasis here is on the non-equilibrium thermodynamics, which is necessary to address the mechanics as well as the chemistry of dynamic cell contractility. In this setting we are able to develop a framework that relates (a) the dynamics of force generation within the cell and (b) the cell response to external stimuli to the chemical processes occurring within the cell, as well as to the mechanics of linkage between the stress fibers, focal adhesions and extra-cellular matrix.

Mirko Maraldi; Krishna Garikipati

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

Plasma-Enhanced Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels and Fuel Blends Using Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had as its goals the study of fundamental physical and chemical processes relevant to the sustained premixed and non-premixed jet ignition/combustion of low grade fuels or fuels under adverse flow conditions using non-equilibrium pulsed nanosecond discharges.

Cappelli, Mark; Mungal, M Godfrey

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

145

ICAS2002 CONGRESS SIMULATION TECHNIQUES IN HYPERSONIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICAS2002 CONGRESS SIMULATION TECHNIQUES IN HYPERSONIC AEROTHERMODYNAMICS Vladimir V. Riabov Rivier College, Nashua, New Hampshire 03060, USA Keywords: hypersonic non-equilibrium rarefied-gas flows, aero- & thermodynamic coefficients Abstract Hypersonic viscous flows near simple-shape bodies (wedge, cone, disk, plate

Riabov, Vladimir V.

146

Consistent Comparison of Macroscopic and State-to-State Kinetics in Hypersonic Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consistent Comparison of Macroscopic and State-to-State Kinetics in Hypersonic Flows Gianpiero of Chemistry, Bari, 70126, Italy We present a comparison of numerical results in strongly expanding hypersonic variable in non-equilibrium condi- tions, per unit mass I. Introduction In supersonic and hypersonic flows

D'Ambrosio, Domenic

147

2006 Nature Publishing Group Controlled multiple reversals of a ratchet effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© 2006 Nature Publishing Group Controlled multiple reversals of a ratchet effect Cle´cio C. de confined in an asymmetric potential demon- strates an anticipated ratchet effect by drifting along the `easy' ratchet direction when subjected to non-equilibrium fluctu- ations1­3 . This well-known effect

Moshchalkov, Victor V.

148

Thermodynamics for single-molecule stretching experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamics for single-molecule stretching experiments J.M. Rubi,a D. Bedeauxb and S. Kjelstrupb, Trondheim, 7491-Norway May 3, 2006 Abstract We show how to construct non-equilibrium thermodynamics for systems too small to be considered thermodynamically in a traditional sense. Through the use of a non

Kjelstrup, Signe

149

Stochastic thermodynamics, fluctuation theorems, and molecular machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stochastic thermodynamics as reviewed here systematically provides a framework for extending the notions of classical thermodynamics like work, heat and entropy production to the level of individual trajectories of well-defined non-equilibrium ensembles. It applies whenever a non-equilibrium process is still coupled to one (or several) heat bath(s) of constant temperature. Paradigmatic systems are single colloidal particles in time-dependent laser traps, polymers in external flow, enzymes and molecular motors in single molecule assays, small biochemical networks and thermoelectric devices involving single electron transport. For such systems, a first-law like energy balance can be identified along fluctuating trajectories. Various integral and detailed fluctuation theorems, which are derived here in a unifying approach from one master theorem, constrain the probability distributions for work, heat and entropy production depending on the nature of the system and the choice of non-equilibrium conditions. For non-equilibrium steady states, particularly strong results hold like a generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem involving entropy production. Ramifications and applications of these concepts include optimal driving between specified states in finite time, the role of measurement-based feedback processes and the relation between dissipation and irreversibility. Efficiency and, in particular, efficiency at maximum power, can be discussed systematically beyond the linear response regime for two classes of molecular machines, isothermal ones like molecular motors, and heat engines like thermoelectric devices, using a common framework based on a cycle decomposition of entropy production.

Udo Seifert

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

150

Plasmachemical Synthesis of Carbon Suboxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated by thermonuclear fusion reactions resulting in a giant plasma ball. The sun is an example of a thermal plasma and is considered to be in equilibrium however it is also possible to have cold or non-equilibrium plasmas. A thermal plasma can have...

Geiger, Robert

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

151

Free energy inference from partial work measurements Fluctuation Relations (FRs) are among the few general exact results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free energy inference from partial work measurements Fluctuation Relations (FRs) are among the few application is free energy recovery from non-equilibrium pulling experiments in the single molecule field. We is a "partial" work measurement): it leads to a violation of FRs and to wrong free energy estimates

Potsdam, Universität

152

Towards breaking temperature equilibrium in multi-component Eulerian schemes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the effects ofthermal equilibrium on hydrodynamic flows and describe models for breaking the assumption ofa single temperature for a mixture of components in a cell. A computational study comparing pressure-temperature equilibrium simulations of two dimensional implosions with explicit front tracking is described as well as implementation and J-D calculations for non-equilibrium temperature methods.

Grove, John W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Masser, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The beta-Hermite and beta-Laguerre processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we introduce matrix-valued diffusion processes which describe the non-equilibrium situation of the matrix models for the beta-Hermite and the beta-Laguerre ensembles. We also study the corresponding spectral measure process and empirical/singular value process with regard to their limit laws.

Luen-Chau Li

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

154

Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature Anders Lervik transient non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations, heat-transfer through nanometer-scale interfaces processes. We show that the modeling of heat transfer across a nanodroplet/fluid interface requires

Kjelstrup, Signe

155

electronic reprint Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Synchrotron radiation plays a leading role in pure science and in emerging technologies. The Journal Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801, Japan, d Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-H61

Coppens, Philip

156

Please cite this article in press as: Hallegatte, S. et al., Business cycles, bifurcations and chaos in a neo-classical model with investment dynamics, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2007), doi:10.1016/j.jebo.2007.05.001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Macroeconomic dynamics; Non-equilibrium modeling; BusinessPlease cite this article in press as: Hallegatte, S. et al., Business cycles, bifurcations and chaos in a neo-classical model with investment dynamics, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization

Ghil, Michael

157

Conservation-dissipation formalism of irreversible thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a conservation-dissipation formalism (CDF) for coarse-grained descriptions of irreversible processes. This formalism is based on a stability criterion for non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The criterion ensures that non-equilibrium states tend to equilibrium in long time. As a systematic methodology, CDF provides a feasible procedure in choosing non-equilibrium state variables and determining their evolution equations. The equations derived in CDF have a unified elegant form. They are globally hyperbolic, allow a convenient definition of weak solutions, and are amenable to existing numerics. More importantly, CDF is a genuinely nonlinear formalism and works for systems far away from equilibrium. With this formalism, we formulate novel thermodynamics theories for heat conduction in rigid bodies and non-isothermal compressible Maxwell fluid flows as two typical examples. In these examples, the non-equilibrium variables are exactly the conjugate variables of the heat fluxes or stress tensors. The new theory generalizes Cattaneo's law or Maxwell's law in a regularized and nonlinear fashion.

Yi Zhu; Liu Hong; Zaibao Yang; Wen-An Yong

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

158

DOI 10.1140/epje/i2002-10149-2 Eur. Phys. J. E 11, 99104 (2003)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) gases [1] driven into a non-equilibrium steady state by a suitable injection of energy define/2 [3,4,6] (here v0 is the "thermal" r.m.s. velocity). This behavior was observed for the horizontal injection, considering idealized homo- geneous systems of inelastic hard spheres (given the exper- imen

Barrat, Alain

159

Generalized dynamical density functional theory for classical fluids and the significance of inertia and hydrodynamic interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the dynamics of a colloidal fluid including inertia and hydrodynamic interactions, two effects which strongly influence the non-equilibrium properties of the system. We derive a general dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) which shows very good agreement with full Langevin dynamics. In suitable limits, we recover existing DDFTs and a Navier-Stokes-like equation with additional non-local terms.

Benjamin D. Goddard; Andreas Nold; Nikos Savva; Grigorios A. Pavliotis; Serafim Kalliadasis

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

160

CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS: AN EVALUATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS: AN EVALUATION L.C. Castro, D.L. John, and D.L. Pulfrey Department A simple, non-equilibrium model is used to evaluate the likely DC performance of carbon nanotube field and transcon- ductance close to the low-quantum-capacitance limit. Keywords: Carbon nanotubes, field

Pulfrey, David L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gc5 non-equilibrium brn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

One Dimensional Autonomous Equations Can have only equilibrium attractors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One Dimensional Autonomous Equations ( )x f x Can have only equilibrium attractors: a bounded orbit approaches an equilibrium #12;Two Dimensional Autonomous Equations ( , ) ( , ) x f x y y g x y Can have non-equilibrium attractors: for example, periodic orbits #12;Two Dimensional Autonomous Equations ( , ) ( , ) x f x y y g x y

Saleska, Scott

162

Fast Track Communication Efficiency and large deviations in time-asymmetric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-state engine. We find in general that the form of efficiency probability distributions is similar to those systems, molecular motors, large deviations in non-equilibrium systems 1. Introduction As engineeringFast Track Communication Efficiency and large deviations in time-asymmetric stochastic heat engines

Geissler, Phillip

163

Water transport inside a single-walled carbon nanotube driven by temperature gradient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water transport inside a single-walled carbon nanotube driven by temperature gradient J. Shiomi mass transport of a water cluster inside a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) with the diameter of about 1.4 nm. The influence of the non-equilibrium thermal environment on the confined water cluster has

Maruyama, Shigeo

164

Entropy production in irreversible systems described by a Fokker-Planck equation Tnia Tom and Mrio J. de Oliveira  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Entropy production in irreversible systems described by a Fokker-Planck equation Tânia Tomé and the entropy production in nonequilibrium interacting particle systems described by a Fokker-Planck equation equilibrium there will be no production of entropy. A non- equilibrium thermodynamic system in the stationary

de Oliveira, Mário José

165

Landscape Ecology vol. 6 no. 3 pp 147-159 (1992) SPB Academic Publishing bv, The Hague  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape Ecology vol. 6 no. 3 pp 147-159 (1992) SPB Academic Publishing bv, The Hague Landscape, Rheinsprung 9, CH-4051,Basel, Switzerland Keywords: landscape, metapopulation, reproductive systems, life history traits, non-equilibrium Abstract Distribution of genetic diversity in a landscape depends on both

166

Model-based Diagnostics for Propellant Loading Systems Matthew Daigle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-depth analysis and understanding of the underlying physi- cal processes, offer the advanced capability to quickly such as highly non- equilibrium condensation and evaporation of the hydrogen vapor, pressurization, and also the dynamics of liquid hydro- gen and vapor flows inside the system in the presence of he- lium gas. Since

Daigle, Matthew

167

Infrared and reflectron time-of-flight mass spectroscopic study on the synthesis of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sublimation profiles obtained from the ReTOF spectra and infrared spectroscopy of the Department of Chemistry in the formation of glycolaldehyde via non-equilibrium chemistry, which were identified as follows: (i) radical of glycolaldehyde formed, suggesting further thermal chemistry of trapped radicals within the ice matrix

Kaiser, Ralf I.

168

State and Transition Modeling History & Current Concepts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management input · Friedel(1991) concentrated on thresholds ­ "...compatible with state and transition theoryState and Transition Modeling History & Current Concepts Tamzen K. Stringham Oregon State vegetation change #12;· Non-equilibrium Models (States, Transitions and Thresholds) ­ Encompass Range

169

Transport of sorbing solutes in randomly heterogeneous formations: Spatial moments, macrodispersion, and parameter uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Expressions for the spatial moments and macrodispersion tensor for sorbing solutes in heterogeneous formations were presented using a probabilistic model of a fluid residence time coupled with the particle position analysis. The fluid residence time was defined as a fraction of the actual time during which the particle stayed in the mobile fluid phase of the aquifer. The fluid residence time is a random variable whose variability comes as a result of the non-equilibrium sorption properties. The sorbing solute was assumed to be governed with first-order linear kinetics. The closed-form expressions were based on the stationarity in the kinetic process and on the first-order approximation in the hydraulic conductivity field and in the fluid residence time. The non-equilibrium effects were presented as a function of the spatial variability in hydraulic conductivity and temporal variability in the fluid residence time. The importance of the non-equilibrium processes in the field scale was found to be dependent on reaction rates, retardation factor, mean velocity, and on variance and correlation scale of the hydraulic conductivity. The time needed to reach the asymptotic macrodispersivity is dependent on the degree of non-equilibrium processes and distribution coefficient. The impact from the uncertainty in parameters upon the spatial moments was examined and compared with the organic tracer used in the Borden field experiment.

Andricevic, R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

OSP WEEKLY FUNDING BULLETIN Volume 4, Issue 47 November 29, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(RFP) is to be coordinated by the Gulf of Mexico Research Alliance (GOMA) and is about to be finalized. 2 Purpose: AFOSR announces a fiscal year 2011 competition for research to promote and sustain of high electric and magnetic fields; high energy density non-equilibrium processes. Advanced X

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

171

A Steam Quality Comparison between Nanoshell-Mediated Solar Heating and Conventional Electrical Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GP-B-13 A Steam Quality Comparison between Nanoshell-Mediated Solar Heating in the Halas Group has led to the development of a novel, solar- based steam generation method using broadband. This a dramatic and highly non-equilibrium process. As such, investigating the properties of this steam

172

Glow Discharge Enhanced Chemical Reaction: Application in Ammonia Synthesis and Hydrocarbon Gas Cleanup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrocarbons mixture such as EPE (74.8% methane, 8% ethane, 8% ethylene, 2.1% propane and 1.1% Propene). Non-thermal plasmas, due to their unique non-equilibrium characteristics, offer advantages as method of reforming at lower temperature (100-150 º...

Ming, Pingjia

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

173

Subpicosecond time-resolved Raman studies of nonequilibrium excitations in wurtzite GaN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-equilibrium electron distributions as well as phonon dynamics in wurtzite GaN have been measured by subpicosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results have demonstrated that for electron densities n {ge} 5 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3}, the non-equilibrium electron distributions in wurtzite GaN can be very well described by Fermi-Dirac distribution functions with the temperature of electrons substantially higher than that of the lattice. The population relaxation time of longitudinal optical phonons was directly measured to be {tau} {approx_equal} 5 {+-} 1 ps at T = 25 K. The experimental results on the temperature dependence of the lifetime of longitudinal optical phonons suggest that the primary decay channels for these phonons are the decay into (1) one transverse optical phonon and one high energy, longitudinal or transverse acoustical phonons; and (2) one transverse optical phonon and one E{sub 2} phonon.

Tsen, K.T.; Ferry, D.K. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Joshi, R.P. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Botchkarev, A.; Sverdlov, B.; Salvador, A.; Morkoc, H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Coordinated Science Lab.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Charge separation in organic photovoltaic cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a simple model for the geminate electron-hole separation process in organic photovoltaicssss cells, in order to illustrate the influence of dimensionality of conducting channels on the efficiency of the process. The Miller-Abrahams expression for the transition rates between nearest neighbor sites was used for simulating random walks of the electron in the Coulomb field of the hole. The non-equilibrium kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results qualitatively confirm the equilibrium estimations, although quantitatively the efficiency of the higher dimensional systems is less pronounced. The lifetime of the electron prior to recombination is approximately equal to the lifetime prior to dissociation. Their values indicate that electrons perform long stochastic walks before they are captured by the collector or recombined. The non-equilibrium free energy considerably differs from the equilibrium one. The efficiency of the separation process decreases with increasing the distance to the collector, and this...

Giazitzidis, Paraskevas; Bisquert, Juan; Vikhrenko, Vyacheslav S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Development of High-efficiency Thermoelectric Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Utililization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this . CRADA are: 1) Investigation of atomistic structure and nucleation of nanoprecipitates in (PbTe){sub I-x}(AgSbTe2){sub x} (LAST) system; and 2) Development of non-equilibrium synthesis of thermoelectric materials for waste heat recovery. We have made significant accomplishment in both areas. We studied the structure of LAST materials using high resolution imaging, nanoelectron diffraction, energy dispersive spectrum, arid electron energy loss spectrum, and observed a range of nanoparticles The results, published in J. of Applied Physics, provide quantitative structure information about nanoparticles, that is essential for the understanding of the origin of the high thermoelectric performance in this class of materials. We coordinated non-equilibrium synthesis and characterization of thermoelectric materials for waste heat recovery application. Our results, published in J. of Electronic Materials, show enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit and robust mechanical properties in bulk . filled skutterudites.

Li, Qiang

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

Exciton-phonon information flow in the energy transfer process of photosynthetic complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-Markovian and non-equilibrium phonon effects are believed to be key ingredients in the energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes, especially in complexes which exhibit a regime of intermediate exciton-phonon coupling. In this work, we harness a recently developed measure for non-Markovianity to elucidate the information flow between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. We study the measure in the hierarchical equation of motion approach which captures strong system-bath coupling effects and non-equilibrium molecular reorganization. We find that, for a model dimer system and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex, non-Markovianity is significant under realistic physiological conditions. A first step towards experimental quantification is provided by the study of four-wave mixing initial states.

Rebentrost, Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Discrete Boltzmann modeling of liquid-vapor system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We further probe the Discrete Boltzmann Modeling(DBM) of the single-component two phase flows or the liquid-vapor system. There are two kinds of nonequilibrium effects in the system. The first is the Mechanical NonEquilibrium(MNE). The second is the Thermodynamic NonEquilibrium(TNE). The MNE is well described in the traditional fluid dynamic theory. The description of TNE resorts to the gas kinetic theory. Since based on the Boltzmann equation, the DBM makes possible to analyze both the MNE and TNE. The TNE is the main discussion of this work. A major purpose of this work is to show that the DBM results can be used to confirm and/or improve the macroscopic modeling of complex system.

Aiguo Xu; Guangcai Zhang; Yanbiao Gan

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Irreversible Thermodynamics of the Universe: Constraints from Planck Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work deals with irreversible Universal thermodynamics. The homogenous and isotropic flat model of the universe is chosen as open thermodynamical system and non-equilibrium thermodynamics comes into picture due to the mechanism of particle creation. For simplicity, entropy flow is considered only due to heat conduction. Further, due to Maxwell-Cattaneo modified Fourier law for non-equilibrium phenomenon, the temperature satisfies damped wave equation instead of heat conduction equation. Validity of generalized second law of thermodynamics (GSLT) has been investigated for Universe bounded by apparent or event horizon with cosmic substrutum as perfect fluid with constant or variable equation of state or interacting dark species. Finally, we have used three Planck data sets to constrain the thermal conductivity \\lambda and the coupling parameter b^2. These constraints must be satisfied in order for GSLT to hold for Universe bounded by apparent or event horizons.

Subhajit Saha; Atreyee Biswas; Subenoy Chakraborty

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

179

Fluctuations in Single-Shot $?$-Deterministic Work Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the single-shot regime it is argued that the criterion for allowed state transitions ought to be more restricted than the second law of thermodynamics, and is given by a condition called thermo-majorisation. Hence to arrive at a fluctuation theorem for the single-shot scenario, such a restriction has to be taken into account. Here we formulate and prove a tighter fluctuation relation for the single-shot $\\epsilon$-deterministic work extraction. The result links two areas of thermodynamics which have been of great interest recently, fluctuation relations for non-equilibrium processes and the $\\epsilon$-deterministic work extractable from single microscopic non-equilibrium systems. Furthermore, in doing so, we unify the notions of fluctuation in $\\epsilon$-deterministic work extraction and in fluctuation theorems.

Sina Salek; Karoline Wiesner

2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

180

The nonequilibrium Ehrenfest gas: a chaotic model with flat obstacles?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is known that the non-equilibrium version of the Lorentz gas (a billiard with dispersing obstacles, electric field and Gaussian thermostat) is hyperbolic if the field is small. Differently the hyperbolicity of the non-equilibrium Ehrenfest gas constitutes an open problem, since its obstacles are rhombi and the techniques so far developed rely on the dispersing nature of the obstacles. We have developed analytical and numerical investigations which support the idea that this model of transport of matter has both chaotic (positive Lyapunov exponent) and non-chaotic steady states with a quite peculiar sensitive dependence on the field and on the geometry, not observed before. The associated transport behaviour is correspondingly highly irregular, with features whose understanding is of both theoretical and technological interest.

Carlo Bianca; Lamberto Rondoni

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gc5 non-equilibrium brn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Effect of Disorder in Superfluid Double Layer Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the superfluid properties of disordered double layer graphene systems using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The complexity of such a structure makes it imperative to study the effects of lattice vacancies which will inevitably arise during fabrication. We present and compare room temperature performance characteristics for both ideal and disordered bilayer graphene systems in an effort to illustrate the behavior of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in the presence of lattice defects under non-equilibrium conditions. We find that lattice vacancies spread throughout the top layer past the coherence length have a reduced effect compared to the ideal case. However, vacancies concentrated near the metal contacts within the coherence length significantly alter the interlayer superfluid transport properties.

Brian Dellabetta; Matthew J. Gilbert

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

Computation via dynamic self-assembly of idealized protein networks.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe stochastic agent-based simulations of protein-emulating agents to perform computation via dynamic self-assembly. The binding and actuation properties of the types of agents required to construct a RAM machine (equivalent to a Turing machine) are described. We present an example computation and describe the molecular biology and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, and information science properties of this system.

Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Independent electrons model for open quantum systems: Landauer-Buettiker formula and strict positivity of the entropy production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A general argument leading from the formula for currents through an open noninteracting mesoscopic system given by the theory of non-equilibrium steady states (NESS) to the Landauer-Buettiker formula is pointed out. Time reversal symmetry is not assumed. As a consequence it follows that, as far as the system has a nontrivial scattering theory and the reservoirs have different temperatures and/or chemical potentials, the entropy production is strictly positive.

G. Nenciu

2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

184

Modeling for Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specific objectives of this research were: 1. to develop an equilibrium model for chemical aspects of anaerobic reactors; 2. to modify the equilibrium model for non-equilibrium conditions; 3. to incorporate the existing biofilm models into the models above to study the biological and chemical behavior of the fixed-film anaerobic reactors; 4. to experimentally verify the validity of these models; 5. to investigate the biomass-holding ability of difference packing materials for establishing reactor design criteria.

Liu, B. Y. M.; Pfeffer, J. T.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Engineering nuclear spin dynamics with optically pumped nitrogen-vacancy center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a general theory for using an optically pumped diamond nitrogen-vacancy center as a tunable, non-equilibrium bath to control a variety of nuclear spin dynamics (such as dephasing, relaxation, squeezing, polarization, etc.) and the nuclear spin noise. It opens a new avenue towards engineering the dissipative and collective nuclear spin evolution and solves an open problem brought up by the $^{13}$C nuclear spin noise suppression experiment [E. Togan \\textit{et al}., Nature 478, 497 (2011)].

Ping Wang; Jiangfeng Du; Wen Yang

2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Exchange Fluctuation Theorem for correlated quantum systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We extend the Exchange Fluctuation Theorem for energy exchange between thermal quantum systems beyond the assumption of molecular chaos, and describe the non-equilibrium exchange dynamics of correlated quantum states. The relation quantifies how the tendency for systems to equilibrate is modified in high-correlation environments. Our results elucidate the role of measurement disturbance for such scenarios. We show a simple application by finding a semi-classical maximum work theorem in the presence of correlations.

Sania Jevtic; David Jennings; Terry Rudolph; Yuji Hirono; Shojun Nakayama; Mio Murao

2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

Roles of Dry Friction in Fluctuating Motion of Adiabatic Piston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The motion of an adiabatic piston under dry friction is investigated to clarify the roles of dry friction in non-equilibrium steady states. We clarify that dry friction can reverse the direction of the piston motion and causes a discontinuity or a cusp-like singularity for velocity distribution functions of the piston. We also show that the heat fluctuation relation is modified under dry friction.

Tomohiko G. Sano; Hisao Hayakawa

2014-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

188

Signatures of new phenomena in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three classes of observables are discussed which may shed light on the properties of the quark-gluon plasma formed in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions. They are: (1) thermometers: the penetrating probes ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/, ..gamma.., c, (2) barometers: transverse flow via

, and (3) seismometers: fluctuations of dN/dy and dE perpendicular/dy. The need for reliable estimates of the background due to the non-equilibrium processes is emphasized. 49 references.

Gyulassy, M.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Ion pump activity generates fluctuating electrostatic forces in biomembranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the non-equilibrium dynamics of lipid membranes with proteins that actively pump ions across the membrane. We find that the activity leads to a fluctuating force distribution due to electrostatic interactions arising from variation in dielectric constant across the membrane. By applying a multipole expansion we find effects on both the tension and bending rigidity dominated parts of the membranes fluctuation spectrum. We discuss how our model compares with previous studies of force-multipole models.

B. Loubet; M. A. Lomholt

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

190

Normal Heat Conductivity in a strongly pinned chain of anharmonic oscillators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a chain of coupled and strongly pinned anharmonic oscillators subject to a non-equilibrium random forcing. Assuming that the stationary state is approximately Gaussian, we first derive a stationary Boltzmann equation. By localizing the involved resonances, we next invert the linearized collision operator and compute the heat conductivity. In particular, we show that the Gaussian approximation yields a finite conductivity $\\kappa\\sim\\frac{1}{\\lambda^2T^2}$, for $\\lambda$ the anharmonic coupling strength.

R. Lefevere; A. Schenkel

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

191

A proposal for testing subcritical vacuum pair production with high power lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a proposal for testing the prediction of non-equilibrium quantum field theory below the Schwinger limit. The proposed experiments should be able to detect a measurable number of gamma rays resulting from the annihilation of pairs in the focal spot of two opposing high intensity laser beams. We discuss the dependence of the expected number of gamma rays with the laser parameters and compare with the estimated background level of gamma hits for realistic laser conditions.

G. Gregori; D. B. Blaschke; P. P. Rajeev; H. Chen; R. J. Clarke; T. Huffman; C. D. Murphy; A. V. Prozorkevich; C. D. Roberts; G. Röpke; S. M. Schmidt; S. A. Smolyansky; S. Wilks; R. Bingham

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

192

INVARIANT KAPPA DISTRIBUTION IN SPACE PLASMAS OUT OF EQUILIBRIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in Space Physics theory have shown the connection between non-extensive Statistical Mechanics and space plasmas by providing a theoretical basis for the empirically derived kappa distributions commonly used to describe the phase-space distribution functions of these systems. The non-equilibrium temperature and the kappa index that govern these distributions are the two independent controlling parameters of non-equilibrium systems. The significance of the kappa index is primarily given by its role in identifying the non-equilibrium stationary states and measuring their 'thermodynamic distance' from thermal equilibrium, while its physical meaning is connected to the correlation between the system's particles. The classical, single stationary state at equilibrium is generalized into a whole set of different non-equilibrium stationary states labeled by the kappa index. This paper addresses certain crucial issues about the physical meaning and role of the kappa index in identifying stationary states. The origin of the emerged inconsistencies is that the kappa index is not an invariant physical quantity, but instead depends on the degrees of freedom of the system's particles. This leads in several misleading conclusions, such as (1) only large kappa index, practically infinite, can characterize the many-particle kappa distribution, and (2) the correlation between particles depends on the total number of the system's particles. Here we show that a modified kappa index, invariant for any number of degrees of freedom, can be naturally defined. Then, we develop and examine the relevant corrected formulation of many-particle multidimensional kappa distribution, and discuss the physical meaning of the invariant kappa index.

Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J., E-mail: glivadiotis@swri.edu [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX-78238 (United States)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

193

Peculiarities of wave fields in nonlocal media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The article summarizes the studies of wave fields in structured non-equilibrium media describing by means of nonlocal hydrodynamic models. Due to the symmetry properties of models, we derived the invariant wave solutions satisfying autonomous dynamical systems. Using the methods of numerical and qualitative analysis, we have shown that these systems possess periodic, multiperiodic, quasiperiodic, chaotic, and soliton-like solutions. Bifurcation phenomena caused by the varying of nonlinearity and nonlocality degree are investigated as well.

V. A. Danylenko; S. I. Skurativskyi

2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

194

Occam's Razor Cuts Away the Maximum Entropy Principle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I show that the maximum entropy principle can be replaced by a more natural assumption, that there exists a phenomenological function of entropy consistent with the microscopic model. The requirement of existence provides then a unique construction of the related probability density. I conclude the letter with an axiomatic formulation of the notion of entropy, which is suitable for exploration of the non-equilibrium phenomena.

Rudnicki, ?ukasz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The maximum entropy tecniques and the statistical description of systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The maximum entropy technique (MENT) is used to determine the distribution functions of physical values. MENT naturally combines required maximum entropy, the properties of a system and connection conditions in the form of restrictions imposed on the system. It can, therefore, be employed to statistically describe closed and open systems. Examples in which MENT is used to describe equilibrium and non-equilibrium states, as well as steady states that are far from being in thermodynamic equilibrium, are discussed.

B. Z. Belashev; M. K. Suleymanov

2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

196

Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Solidification characterization of a new rapidly solidified Ni-Cr-Co based superalloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solidification characterization of a new rapidly solidified Ni-Cr-Co based superalloy prepared by plasma rotating electrode process was investigated by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The results show that the solidification microstructure changes from dendrites to cellular and microcrystal structures with decreasing powder size. The elements of Co, Cr, W and Ni are enriched in the dendrites, while Mo, Nb and Ti are higher in the interdendritic regions. The relationships between powder size with the average solid-liquid interface moving rate, the average interface temperature gradient and the average cooling rate are established. Microsegregation is increased with larger powder size. The geometric integrity of MC Prime type carbides in the powders changes from regular to diverse with decreasing powder size. The morphology and quantity of carbides depend on the thermal parameters and non-equilibrium solute partition coefficients during rapid solidification. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relations of solidification thermal parameters with powder size are established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relation of non-equilibrium solute partition with powder size is investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solidification microstructure is related to thermal parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The segregation behavior is linked to non-equilibrium partition coefficients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphology and quantity of carbides depend on the above combined factors.

Wu, Kai, E-mail: wk-ustb@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Guoquan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China) [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hu, Benfu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Feng [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Zhang, Yiwen [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China) [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); High Temperature Materials Research Institution, CISRI, Beijing 100081 (China); Tao, Yu; Liu, Jiantao [High Temperature Materials Research Institution, CISRI, Beijing 100081 (China)] [High Temperature Materials Research Institution, CISRI, Beijing 100081 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Generalized model for ultrafast laser induced electron emission from a metal tip  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we will present a brief review of the recently developed non-equilibrium heating and time dependent tunneling model to study the dynamic processes in using an ultrafast laser to induce electron emission from a metallic tip ranging from the multiphoton to the optical tunneling regime. Due to the short time scale of the ultrafast laser pulse, the lattice is found to be in a non-equilibrium condition and a single temperature model is no longer valid. The ultrafast laser heating enhances the electron emission through both the multiphoton and optical tunneling processes rather than over-barrier emission due to thermal heating. The paper is focused on the methodology of how these two effects (non-equilibrium heating and time-dependent tunneling) are combined in a self-consistent model. The model shows a smooth transition of the emitted charge as a function of laser field, ranging from the multiphoton emission regime at low laser field to the optical tunneling regime at high laser field. The paper will conclude with some discussion of future work.

Ang, L. K. [Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore 138682 (Singapore) [Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore 138682 (Singapore); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Pant, M. [Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore 138682 (Singapore)] [Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore 138682 (Singapore)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To probe both the Hydrodynamic Non-Equilibrium (HNE) and Thermodynamic Non-Equilibrium (TNE) in the combustion process, a two-dimensional Multiple-Relaxation-Time (MRT) version of Lattice Boltzmann Kinetic Model(LBKM) for combustion phenomena is presented. The chemical energy released in the progress of combustion is dynamically coupled into the system by adding a chemical term to the LB kinetic equation. Beside describing the evolutions of the conserved quantities, the density, momentum and energy, which are what the Navier-Stokes model describes, the MRT-LBKM presents also a coarse-grained description on the evolutions of some non-conserved quantities. The current model works for both subsonic and supersonic flows with or without chemical reaction. In this model both the specific-heat ratio and the Prandtl number are flexible, the TNE effects are naturally presented in each simulation step. The model is verified and validated via well-known benchmark tests. As an initial application, various non-equilibrium behaviours, including the complex interplays between various HNEs, between various TNEs and between the HNE and TNE, around the detonation wave in the unsteady and steady one-dimensional detonation processes are preliminarily probed. It is found that the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) decreases the local TNE, but increase the global TNE around the detonation wave, that even locally, the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) results in two kinds of competing trends, to increase and to decrease the TNE effects. The physical reason is that the viscosity (or heat conductivity) takes part in both the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses.

Aiguo Xu; Chuandong Lin; Guangcai Zhang; Yingjun Li

2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

200

Novel photonic crystal cavities and related structures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The key accomplishment of this project is to achieve a much more in-depth understanding of the thermal emission physics of metallic photonic crystal through theoretical modeling and experimental measurements. An improved transfer matrix technique was developed to enable incorporation of complex dielectric function. Together with microscopic theory describing emitter radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics, a non-equilibrium thermal emission model is developed. Finally, experimental methodology was developed to measure absolute emissivity of photonic crystal at high temperatures with accuracy of +/-2%. Accurate emissivity measurements allow us to validate the procedure to treat the effect of the photonic crystal substrate.

Luk, Ting Shan

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gc5 non-equilibrium brn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Real-time effective-action approach to the Anderson quantum dot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The non-equilibrium time evolution of an Anderson quantum dot is investigated. The quantum dot is coupled between two leads forming a chemical-potential gradient. We use Kadanoff-Baym dynamic equations within a non-perturbative resummation of the s-channel bubble chains. The effect of the resummation leads to the introduction of a frequency-dependent 4-point vertex. The tunneling to the leads is taken into account exactly. The method allows the determination of the transient as well as stationary transport through the quantum dot, and results are compared with different schemes discussed in the literature (fRG, ISPI, tDMRG and QMC).

Sexty, Denes; Pawlowski, Jan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Real-time effective-action approach to the Anderson quantum dot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The non-equilibrium time evolution of an Anderson quantum dot is investigated. The quantum dot is coupled between two leads forming a chemical-potential gradient. We use Kadanoff-Baym dynamic equations within a non-perturbative resummation of the s-channel bubble chains. The effect of the resummation leads to the introduction of a frequency-dependent 4-point vertex. The tunneling to the leads is taken into account exactly. The method allows the determination of the transient as well as stationary transport through the quantum dot, and results are compared with different schemes discussed in the literature (fRG, ISPI, tDMRG and QMC).

Denes Sexty; Thomas Gasenzer; Jan Pawlowski

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

Entropy Meters and the Entropy of Non-extensive Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In our derivation of the second law of thermodynamics from the relation of adiabatic accessibility of equilibrium states we stressed the importance of being able to scale a system's size without changing its intrinsic properties. This leaves open the question of defining the entropy of macroscopic, but unscalable systems, such as gravitating bodies or systems where surface effects are important. We show here how the problem can be overcome, in principle, with the aid of an `entropy meter'. An entropy meter can also be used to determine entropy functions for non-equilibrium states and mesoscopic systems.

Elliott H. Lieb; Jakob Yngvason

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Self-organization without heat: the geometric ratchet effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We point out a surprising feature of diffusion in inhomogeneous media: under suitable conditions, the rectification of the Brownian paths by a diffusivity gradient can result in initially spread tracers spontaneously concentrating. This "geometric ratchet effect" demonstrates that, in violation of the classical statements of the second law of (non-equilibrium) thermodynamics, self-organization can take place in thermodynamic systems at local equilibrium without heat being produced or exchanged with the environment. We stress the role of Bayesian priors in a suitable reformulation of the second law accommodating this geometric ratchet effect.

Matteo Smerlak; Ahmed Youssef

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Thermodynamics of discrete quantum processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We define thermodynamic configurations and identify two primitives of discrete quantum processes between configurations for which heat and work can be defined in a natural way. This allows us to uncover a general second law for any discrete trajectory that consists of a sequence of these primitives, linking both equilibrium and non-equilibrium configurations. Moreover, in the limit of a discrete trajectory that passes through an infinite number of configurations, i.e. in the reversible limit, we recover the saturation of the second law. Finally, we show that for a discrete Carnot cycle operating between four configurations one recovers Carnot's thermal efficiency.

Janet Anders; Vittorio Giovannetti

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Quantum thermal machines with single nonequilibrium environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a scheme for a quantum thermal machine made by atoms interacting with a single non-equilibrium electromagnetic field. The field is produced by a simple configuration of macroscopic objects held at thermal equilibrium at different temperatures. We show that these machines can deliver all thermodynamic tasks (cooling, heating and population inversion), and this by establishing quantum coherence with the body on which they act. Remarkably, this system allows to reach efficiencies at maximum power very close to the Carnot limit, much more than in existing models. Our findings offer a new paradigm for efficient quantum energy flux management, and can be relevant for both experimental and technological purposes.

Bruno Leggio; Bruno Bellomo; Mauro Antezza

2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

207

Large-scale Fluctuations of Lyapunov Exponents in Diffusive Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a general formalism for computing Lyapunov exponents and their fluctuations in spatially extended systems described by diffusive fluctuating hydrodynamics, thus extending the concepts of dynamical system theory to a broad range of non-equilibrium systems. Our analytical results compare favorably with simulations of a lattice model of heat conduction. We further show how the computation of Lyapunov exponents for the Symmetric Simple Exclusion Process relates to damage spreading and to a two-species pair annihilation process, for which our formalism yields new finite size results.

Tanguy Laffargue; Peter Sollich; Julien Tailleur; Frédéric van Wijland

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

208

A feasibility study of the determination of mass transfer rates from perturbation gas chromatography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and be given as ** ? '". , "-- **. * ? '". . "--( ? '". - *, :, ? ". , 'I. i=1, 2, . . . , (n-l) (4) where " indicates steady-state value and ~y-y-y* 1 i i AX = X ? X * 1 1 1 Por the local equilibrium case, if the flowing phase rate is slow.... (6) into Eq. (4), a set of linearized chro- matographic relations for the multicomponent case including the sorption effects will be obtained. This is well de- monstz'ated in Glover and Lau (19$3). For the non-equilibrium case, finite mass...

Huang, Wei-Yih

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Plastic flow in solids with interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A non-equilibrium theory of isothermal and diffusionless evolution of incoherent interfaces within a plastically deforming solid is developed. The irreversible dynamics of the interface are driven by its normal motion, incoherency (slip and misorientation), and an intrinsic plastic flow; and purely by plastic deformation in the bulk away from the interface. Using the continuum theory for defect distribution (in bulk and over the interface) we formulate a general kinematical framework, derive relevant balance laws and jump conditions, and prescribe a thermodynamically consistent constitutive/kinetic structure for interface evolution.

Anurag Gupta; David Steigmann

2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

210

Is Emergent Universe a Consequence of Particle Creation Process?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model of an emergent universe is formulated using the mechanism of particle creation. Here the universe is considered as a non-equilibrium thermodynamical system with dissipation due to particle creation mechanism. The universe is chosen as spatially flat FRW space-time and the cosmic substratum is chosen as perfect fluid with barotropic equation of state. Both first and second order deviations from equilibrium prescription is considered and it is found that the scenario of emergent universe is possible in both the cases.

Subenoy Chakraborty

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

Analysis of single particle trajectories: when things go wrong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To recover the long-time behavior and the statistics of molecular trajectories from the large number (tens of thousands) of their short fragments, obtained by super-resolution methods at the single molecule level, data analysis based on a stochastic model of their non-equilibrium motion is required. Recently, we characterized the local biophysical properties underlying receptor motion based on coarse-grained long-range interactions, corresponding to attracting potential wells of large sizes. The purpose of this letter is to discuss optimal estimators and show what happens when thing goes wrong.

D. Holcman; N. Hoze; Z. Schuss

2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Finite-size scaling in the quantum phase transition of the open-system Dicke-model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser-driven Bose-Einstein condensate of ultracold atoms loaded into a lossy high-finesse optical resonator exhibits critical behavior and, in the thermodynamic limit, a phase transition between stationary states of different symmetries. The system realizes an open-system variant of the celebrated Dicke-model. We study the transition for a finite number of atoms by means of a Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method adapted to a damped-driven open system. The finite-size scaling exponents are determined and a clear distinction between the non-equilibrium and the equilibrium quantum criticality is found.

G. Konya; D. Nagy; G. Szirmai; P. Domokos

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

213

Broadband electromagnetic response and ultrafast dynamics of few-layer epitaxial graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the broadband optical conductivity and ultrafast carrier dynamics of epitaxial graphene in the few-layer limit. Equilibrium spectra of nominally buffer, monolayer, and multilayer graphene exhibit significant terahertz and near-infrared absorption, consistent with a model of intra- and interband transitions in a dense Dirac electron plasma. Non-equilibrium terahertz transmission changes after photoexcitation are shown to be dominated by excess hole carriers, with a 1.2-ps mono-exponential decay that refects the minority-carrier recombination time.

Choi, Hyunyong; Borondics, Ferenc; Siegel, David A.; Zhou, Shuyun Y.; Martin, Michael C.; Lanzara, Alessandra; Kaindl, Robert A.

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

Macroscopic fluctuations theory of aerogel dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the thermodynamic potential describing the macroscopic fluctuation of the current and local energy of a general class of Hamiltonian models including aerogels. We argue that this potential is neither analytic nor strictly convex, a property that should be expected in general but missing from models studied in the literature. This opens the possibility of describing in terms of a thermodynamic potential non-equilibrium phase transitions in a concrete physical context. This special behaviour of the thermodynamic potential is caused by the fact that the energy current is carried by particles which may have arbitrary low speed with sufficiently large probability.

Raphael Lefevere; Mauro Mariani; Lorenzo Zambotti

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

Efficiency of autonomous soft nano-machines at maximum power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider nano-sized artificial or biological machines working in steady state enforced by imposing non-equilibrium concentrations of solutes or by applying external forces, torques or electric fields. For unicyclic and strongly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power is not bounded by the linear response value 1/2. For strong driving, it can even approach the thermodynamic limit 1. Quite generally, such machines fall in three different classes characterized, respectively, as "strong and efficient", "strong and inefficient", and "balanced". For weakly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power has lost any universality even in the linear response regime.

Udo Seifert

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

216

Method and apparatus for chemically altering fluids in continuous flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a continuous flow fluid reactor for chemically altering fluids. The reactor operates on standard frequency (50 to 60 Hz) electricity. The fluid reactor contains particles that are energized by the electricity to form a corona throughout the volume of the reactor and subsequently a non-equilibrium plasma that interacts with the fluid. Particles may form a fixed bed or a fluid bed. Electricity may be provided through electrodes or through an inductive coil. Fluids include gases containing exhaust products and organic fuels requiring oxidation.

Heath, William O. (Richland, WA); Virden, Jr., Judson W. (Richland, WA); Richardson, R. L. (West Richland, WA); Bergsman, Theresa M. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Method and apparatus for chemically altering fluids in continuous flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a continuous flow fluid reactor for chemically altering fluids. The reactor operates on standard frequency (50 to 60 Hz) electricity. The fluid reactor contains particles that are energized by the electricity to form a corona throughout the volume of the reactor and subsequently a non-equilibrium plasma that interacts with the fluid. Particles may form a fixed bed or a fluid bed. Electricity may be provided through electrodes or through an inductive coil. Fluids include gases containing exhaust products and organic fuels requiring oxidation. 4 figures.

Heath, W.O.; Virden, J.W. Jr.; Richardson, R.L.; Bergsman, T.M.

1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

218

Damping of sound waves in superfluid nucleon-hyperon matter of neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider sound waves in superfluid nucleon-hyperon matter of massive neutron-star cores. We calculate and analyze the speeds of sound modes and their damping times due to the shear viscosity and non-equilibrium weak processes of particle transformations. For that, we employ the dissipative relativistic hydrodynamics of a superfluid nucleon-hyperon mixture, formulated recently [M.E. Gusakov and E.M. Kantor, Phys. Rev. D78, 083006 (2008)]. We demonstrate that the damping times of sound modes calculated using this hydrodynamics and the ordinary (nonsuperfluid) one, can differ from each other by several orders of magnitude.

Elena M. Kantor; Mikhail E. Gusakov

2009-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

219

Quantum Statistical Processes in the Early Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show how the concept of quantum open system and the methods in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics can be usefully applied to studies of quantum statistical processes in the early universe. We first sketch how noise, fluctuation, dissipation and decoherence processes arise in a wide range of cosmological problems. We then focus on the origin and nature of noise in quantum fields and spacetime dynamics. We introduce the concept of geometrodynamic noise and suggest a statistical mechanical definition of gravitational entropy. We end with a brief discussion of the theoretical appropriateness to view the physical universe as an open system.

B. L. Hu

1993-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

220

Ballistic performance comparison of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide MX{sub 2} (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te) metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the transport properties of monolayer MX{sub 2} (M?=?Mo, W; X?=?S, Se, Te) n- and p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) using full-band ballistic non-equilibrium Green's function simulations with an atomistic tight-binding Hamiltonian with hopping potentials obtained from density functional theory. We discuss the subthreshold slope, drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL), as well as gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL) for different monolayer MX{sub 2} MOSFETs. We also report the possibility of negative differential resistance behavior in the output characteristics of nanoscale monolayer MX{sub 2} MOSFETs.

Chang, Jiwon; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K. [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gc5 non-equilibrium brn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Feedback-controlled transport in an interacting colloidal system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) we consider a non-equilibrium system of interacting colloidal particles driven by a constant tilting force through a periodic, symmetric "washboard" potential. We demonstrate that, despite of pronounced spatio-temporal correlations, the particle current can be reversed by adding suitable feedback control terms to the DDFT equation of motion. We explore two distinct control protocols with time delay, focussing on either the particle positions or the density profile. Our study shows that the DDFT is an appropriate framework to implement time-delayed feedback control strategies widely used in other fields of nonlinear physics

Ken Lichtner; Sabine H. L. Klapp

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

222

Manipulation of Colloids by Nonequilibrium Depletion Force in Temperature Gradient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The non-equilibrium distribution of colloids in a polymer solution under a temperature gradient is studied experimentally. A slight increase of local temperature by a focused laser drives the colloids towards the hot region, resulting in the trapping of the colloids irrespective of their own thermophoretic properties. An amplification of the trapped colloid density with the polymer concentration is measured, and is quantitatively explained by hydrodynamic theory. The origin of the attraction is a migration of colloids driven by a non-uniform polymer distribution sustained by the polymer's thermophoresis. These results show how to control thermophoretic properties of colloids.

Hong-Ren Jiang; Hirofumi Wada; Natsuhiko Yoshinaga; Masaki Sano

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

223

Coherent spin mixing dynamics in thermal $^{87}$Rb spin-1 and spin-2 gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the non-equilibrium coherent spin mixing dynamics in ferromagnetic spin-1 and antiferromagnetic spin-2 thermal gases of ultracold $^{87}$Rb atoms. Long lasting spin population oscillations with magnetic field dependent resonances are observed in both cases. Our observations are well reproduced by Boltzmann equations of the Wigner distribution function. Compared to the equation of motion of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates, the only difference here is a factor of two increase in the spin-dependent interaction, which is confirmed directly in the spin-2 case by measuring the relation between the oscillation amplitude and the sample's density.

He, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoke; Wang, Fudong; Xu, Zhifang; Wang, Dajun

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Dynamics of kicked particles in a double-barrier structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the classical and quantum dynamics of periodically kicked particles placed initially within an open double-barrier structure. This system does not obey the Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theorem and displays chaotic dynamics. The phase space features induced by non-KAM nature of the system leads to dynamical features such as the non-equilibrium steady state, classically induced saturation of energy growth and momentum filtering. We also comment on the experimental feasibility of this system as well as its relevance in the context of current interest in classically induced localization and chaotic ratchets.

Harinder Pal; M. S. Santhanam

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

225

Pulsed Electrical Spin Injection into InGaAs Quantum Dots: Studies of the Electroluminescence Polarization Dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present time-resolved studies of the spin polarization dynamics during and after initialization through pulsed electrical spin injection into InGaAs quantum dots embedded in a p-i-n-type spin-injection light-emitting diode. Experiments are performed with pulse widths in the nanosecond range and a time-resolved single photon counting setup is used to detect the subsequent electroluminescence. We find evidence that the achieved spin polarization shows an unexpected temporal behavior, attributed mainly to many-carrier and non-equilibrium effects in the device.

Asshoff, P.; Loeffler, W.; Fluegge, H.; Zimmer, J.; Mueller, J.; Westenfelder, B.; Hu, D. Z.; Schaadt, D. M.; Kalt, H.; Hetterich, M. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik and DFG Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Universitaet Karlsruhe, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

226

Entropy generation in a chemical reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Entropy generation in a chemical reaction is analyzed without using the general formalism of non-equilibrium thermodynamics at a level adequate for advanced undergraduates. In a first approach to the problem, the phenomenological kinetic equation of an elementary first order reaction is used to show that entropy production is always positive. A second approach assumes that the reaction is near equilibrium to prove that the entropy generated is always greater than zero, without any reference to the kinetics of the reaction. Finally, it is shown that entropy generation is related to fluctuations in the number of particles at equilibrium, i.e. it is associated to a microscopic process.

E. N. Miranda

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

227

Rhythmic cluster generation in strongly driven colloidal dispersions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the response of a nematic colloidal dispersion of rods to a driven probe particle which is dragged with high speed through the dispersion perpendicular to the nematic director. In front of the dragged particle, clusters of rods are generated which rhythmically grow and dissolve by rotational motion. We find evidence for a mesoscopic cluster-cluster correlation length, {\\em independent} of the imposed drag speed. Our results are based on non-equilibrium Brownian dynamics computer simulations and in line with a dynamical scaling theory.

H. H. Wensink; H. Löwen

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

228

Photo-activated biological processes as quantum measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We outline a framework for describing photo-activated biological reactions as generalized quantum measurements of external fields, for which the biological system takes on the role of a quantum meter. By using general arguments regarding the Hamiltonian that describes the measurement interaction, we identify the cases where it is essential for a complex chemical or biological system to exhibit non-equilibrium quantum coherent dynamics in order to achieve the requisite functionality. We illustrate the analysis by considering measurement of the solar radiation field in photosynthesis and measurement of the earth's magnetic field in avian magnetoreception.

Atac Imamoglu; K. Birgitta Whaley

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Electron kinetics in a microdischarge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron kinetics during a microdischarge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell/Monte Carlo Collisions model. It is obtained that the electron energy distribution function can be divided into three parts, namely, the non-equilibrium low-energy part, the Maxwellian function at moderate energies, and the high-energy tail. Simulation results showed that the role of the high-energy tail of electron energy distribution increases, when the distance between electrodes increases.

Levko, Dmitry [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France)] [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

230

QCD plasma instability and thermalisation at heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under suitable non-equilibrium conditions QCD plasma can develop plasma instabilities, where some modes of the plasma grow exponentially. It has been argued that these instabilities can play a significant role in the thermalisation of the plasma in heavy-ion collision experiments. We study the instability in SU(2) plasmas using the hard thermal loop effective lattice theory, which is suitable for studying real-time evolution of long wavelength modes in the plasma. We observe that under suitable conditions the plasma can indeed develop an instability which can grow to a very large magnitude, necessary for the rapid thermalisation in heavy-ion collisions.

Dietrich Bodeker; Kari Rummukainen

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

231

Mid infrared optical properties of Ge/Si quantum dots with different doping level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical characterization of the Ge/Si quantum dots using equilibrium and photo-induced absorption spectroscopy in the mid-infrared spectral range was performed in this work. Equilibrium absorption spectra were measured in structures with various doping levels for different light polarizations. Photo-induced absorption spectra measured in undoped structure under interband optical excitation of non-equilibrium charge carriers demonstrate the same features as doped sample in equilibrium conditions. Hole energy spectrum was determined from the analysis of experimental data.

Sofronov, A. N.; Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Shalygin, V. A.; Panevin, V. Yu.; Vinnichenko, M. Ya. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, Polytechnicheskaya str. 29, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tonkikh, A. A. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2 D-06120, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Danilov, S. N. [University of Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

232

Experimental observation of a phase transition in the evolution of many-body systems with dipolar interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-equilibrium dynamics of many-body systems is important in many branches of science, such as condensed matter, quantum chemistry, and ultracold atoms. Here we report the experimental observation of a phase transition of the quantum coherent dynamics of a 3D many-spin system with dipolar interactions, and determine its critical exponents. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on a solid-state system of spins at room-temperature, we quench the interaction Hamiltonian to drive the evolution of the system. The resulting dynamics of the system coherence can be localized or extended, depending on the quench strength. Applying a finite-time scaling analysis to the observed time-evolution of the number of correlated spins, we extract the critical exponents v = s = 0.42 around the phase transition separating a localized from a delocalized dynamical regime. These results show clearly that such nuclear-spin based quantum simulations can effectively model the non-equilibrium dynamics of complex many-body systems, such as 3D spin-networks with dipolar interactions.

Gonzalo A. Alvarez; Dieter Suter; Robin Kaiser

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

233

Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

Manohar Motwani

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

High-Throughput Thin Film Approach for Screening of Temperature-Pressure-Composition Phase Space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many solar energy technologies, for example CIGS and CdTe photovoltaics, utilize materials in thin film form. The equilibrium phase diagrams for these and other more novel solar energy materials are not known or are irrelevant because of the non-equilibrium character of the thin film growth processes. We demonstrate a high-throughput thin film approach for screening of temperature-pressure-composition phase diagrams and phase spaces. The examples in focus are novel solar absorbers Cu-N, Cu-O and p-type transparent conductors in the Cr2O3-MnO system. The composition axis of the Cr2O3-MnO phase diagram was screened using a composition spread method. The temperature axis of the Mn-O phase diagram was screened using a temperature spread method. The pressure axes of the Cu-N and Cu-O phase diagrams were screened using rate spread method with the aid of non-equilibrium growth phenomena. Overall these three methods constitute an approach to high-throughput screening of inorganic thin film phase diagrams. This research is supported by U.S. Department of Energy as a part of two NextGen Sunshot projects and an Energy Frontier Research Center.

Zakutayev, A.; Subramaniyan, A.; Caskey, C. M.; Ndione, P. F.; Richards, R. M.; O'Hayre, R.; Ginley, D. S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The fundamental role of quantized vibrations in coherent light harvesting by cryptophyte algae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of fast vibrations on energy transfer and conversion in natural molecular aggregates is an issue of central interest. This article shows the important role of high-energy quantized vibrations and their non-equilibrium dynamics for energy transfer in photosynthetic systems with highly localized excitonic states. We consider the cryptophyte antennae protein phycoerythrin 545 and show that coupling to quantized vibrations which are quasi-resonant with excitonic transitions is fundamental for biological function as it generates non-cascaded transport with rapid and wider spatial distribution of excitation energy. Our work also indicates that the non-equilibrium dynamics of such vibrations can manifest itself in ultrafast beating of both excitonic populations and coherences at room temperature, with time scales in agreement with those reported in experiments. Moreover, we show that mechanisms supporting coherent excitonic dynamics assist coupling to selected modes that channel energy to preferential sites in the complex. We therefore argue that, in the presence of strong coupling between electronic excitations and quantized vibrations, a concrete and important advantage of quantum coherent dynamics is precisely to tune resonances that promote fast and effective energy distribution.

Avinash Kolli; Edward J. O'Reilly; Gregory D. Scholes; Alexandra Olaya-Castro

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

236

Can Natural Sunlight Induce Coherent Exciton Dynamics?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excitation of a model photosynthetic molecular aggregate by incoherent sunlight is systematically examined. For a closed system, the excited state coherence induced by the sunlight oscillates with an average amplitude that is inversely proportional to the excitonic gap, and reaches a stationary amplitude that depends on the temperature and coherence time of the radiation field. For an open system, the light-induced dynamical coherence relaxes to a static coherence determined by the non-canonical thermal distribution resulting from the entanglement with the phonon bath. The decay of the excited state population to the common ground state establishes a non-equilibrium steady-state flux driven by the sunlight, and it defines a time window to observe the transition from dynamical to static coherence. For the parameters relevant to photosynthetic systems, the exciton dynamics initiated by the sunlight exhibits a non-negligible amount of dynamical coherence (quantum beats) on the sub-picosecond timescale; however, this sub-picosecond time-scale is long enough for light-harvesting systems to establish static coherence, which plays a crucial role in efficient energy transfer. Further, a relationship is established between the non-equilibrium steady-state induced by the sunlight and the coherent dynamics initiated from the ground state by a laser $\\delta$-pulse, thereby making a direct connection between incoherent sunlight excitation and ultrafast spectroscopy.

Jan Olšina; Arend G. Dijkstra; Chen Wang; Jianshu Cao

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

237

Efficiency bounds for nonequilibrium heat engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the efficiency of thermal engines (either quantum or classical) working with a single heat reservoir like atmosphere. The engine first gets an energy intake, which can be done in arbitrary non-equilibrium way e.g. combustion of fuel. Then the engine performs the work and returns to the initial state. We distinguish two general classes of engines where the working body first equilibrates within itself and then performs the work (ergodic engine) or when it performs the work before equilibrating (non-ergodic engine). We show that in both cases the second law of thermodynamics limits their efficiency. For ergodic engines we find a rigorous upper bound for the efficiency, which is strictly smaller than the equivalent Carnot efficiency. I.e. the Carnot efficiency can be never achieved in single reservoir heat engines. For non-ergodic engines the efficiency can be higher and can exceed the equilibrium Carnot bound. By extending the fundamental thermodynamic relation to nonequilibrium processes, we find a rigorous thermodynamic bound for the efficiency of both ergodic and non-ergodic engines and show that it is given by the relative entropy of the non-equilibrium and initial equilibrium distributions.These results suggest a new general strategy for designing more efficient engines. We illustrate our ideas by using simple examples.

Pankaj Mehta; Anatoli Polkovnikov

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

238

Nonuniqueness of two-temperature Guldberg-Waage and Saha equations: Influence on thermophysical properties of SF{sub 6} plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses to study how the choice of Guldberg-Waage and Saha equations affects the thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients of SF{sub 6} plasmas under both thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The species composition is numerically determined using two typical forms of two-temperature Saha equations and Guldberg-Waage equations that have appeared in the literature. The great influence of the choice of the excitation temperature on the plasma composition and hence the thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients is discussed as well. Transport coefficients are calculated with most recent collision interaction potentials by adopting Devoto's electron and heavy particle decoupling approach but expanded to the third-order approximation (second-order for viscosity) within the framework of Chapman-Enskog method. Furthermore, an analysis of the effect of different definitions of Debye length on the properties values was performed as well. The results are computed for various values of pressures from 0.10 atm to 10 atm and non-equilibrium parameter, i.e., ratio of the electron temperature to the heavy particle temperature from 1 to 5 with electron temperature range from 300 to 40 000 K. Both forms of Guldberg-Waage and Saha equations used here can give completely the same value when the two-temperature model reaches the special case of local thermodynamic equilibrium. It has been observed that all above mentioned factors can significantly modify the plasma species composition and consequently affect the thermodynamic and transport properties.

Wang, Weizong [Qian Xuesen Laboratory of Space Technology, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100094 (China) [Qian Xuesen Laboratory of Space Technology, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100094 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Rong, Mingzhe [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Spencer, Joseph W. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, The University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, The University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Free Energy of Hot Gauge Theories with Fermions Through g^5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the free energy density $F$ for gauge theories, with fermions, at high temperature and zero chemical potential. In the expansion $F=T^4 [c_0+c_2 g^2+c_3 g^3+(c'_4\\ln g+c_4)g^4+ (c'_5\\ln g+c_5)g^5+O(g^6)]$, we determine $c'_5$ and $c_5$ analytically by calculating two- and three-loop diagrams. The $g^5$ term constitutes the first correction to the $g^3$ term and is for the non-Abelian case the last power of $g$ that can be computed within perturbation theory. We find that the $g^5$ term receives no contributions from overlapping double-frequency sums and that $c'_5$ vanishes.

Chengxing Zhai; Boris Kastening

1995-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

240

UHM/HNEI EV test and evaluation program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electric vehicle (EV) program of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) focuses primarily on the field testing of promising EV/traction batteries. The intent is to utilize typical driving cycles to develop information that verifies or refutes what is obtained in the laboratory. Three different types of battery were assigned by the US DOE for testing in this program: Sonnenschein Dryfit 6V-160, Exide GC-5, Trojan T-145. We added the following battery to the test program: ALCO2200. HNEI's existing EVs were utilized as test beds. The following EVs were chosen in our program: Converted Ford Escort station wagon, Converted Ford Escort two-door sedan, Converted Ford Escort two-door sedan, Converted Dodge van (typically daily driving distances, 10--30 miles). Capacity testing is a very effective way of monitoring the status of battery modules. Based on capacity tests, corrective action such as battery replacement, additional charging, adjusting terminal connections, etc., may be taken to maintain good performance. About 15,500 miles and 600 cycles have been accumulated on the Sonnenschein Dryfit 6V-160 battery pack. Five of its 18 modules have been changed. Based on DOE's standard, the battery has reached the end of its useful life. Nevertheless, the battery pack is still operational and its operating range is still greater than 40 miles per charge. It is too early to evaluate the life expectancy of the other three batteries, the Trojan T-145, Exide GC-5, and Alco 2200. No module has been replaced in these three packs. The Trojan T-145 battery is a very promising EV traction battery in terms of quality and reliability versus price. HNEI will keep the Trojan and Exide battery packs in operation. The Alco 2200 batteries will be transferred to another vehicle. The Additional Charging Method seems to be an effective way of restoring weak modules. The Smart Voltmeter'' developed by HNEI is a promising way of monitoring the remaining range for an EV.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Plastic flow modeling in glassy polymers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glassy amorphous and semi-crystalline polymers exhibit strong rate, temperature, and pressure dependent polymeric yield. As a rule of thumb, in uniaxial compression experiments the yield stress increases with the loading rate and applied pressure, and decreases as the temperature increases. Moreover, by varying the loading state itself complex yield behavior can be observed. One example that illustrates this complexity is that most polymers in their glassy regimes (i.e., when the temperature is below their characteristic glass transition temperature) exhibit very pronounced yield in their uniaxial stress stress-strain response but very nebulous yield in their uniaxial strain response. In uniaxial compression, a prototypical glassy-polymer stress-strain curve has a stress plateau, often followed by softening, and upon further straining, a hardening response. Uniaxial compression experiments of this type are typically done from rates of 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} up to about 1 s{sup -1}. At still higher rates, say at several thousands per second as determined from Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar experiments, the yield can again be measured and is consistent with the above rule of thumb. One might expect that that these two sets of experiments should allow for a successful extrapolation to yet higher rates. A standard means to probe high rates (on the order of 105-107 S-I) is to use a uniaxial strain plate impact experiment. It is well known that in plate impact experiments on metals that the yield stress is manifested in a well-defined Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL). In contrast however, when plate impact experiments are done on glassy polymers, the HEL is arguably not observed, let alone observed at the stress estimated by extrapolating from the lower strain rate experiments. One might argue that polymer yield is still active but somehow masked by the experiment. After reviewing relevant experiments, we attempt to address this issue. We begin by first presenting our recently developed glassy polymer model. While polymers are well known for their non-equilibrium deviatoric behavior we have found the need for incorporating both equilibrium and non-equilibrium volumetric behavior into our theory. Experimental evidence supporting the notion of non-equilibrium volumetric behavior will be summarized. Our polymer yield model accurately captures the stress plateau, softening and hardening and its yield stress predictions agree well with measured values for several glassy polymers including PMMA, PC, and an epoxy resin. We then apply our theory to plate impact experiments in an attempt to address the questions associated with high rate polymer yield in uniaxial strain configurations.

Clements, Brad [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

242

Shortcuts to adiabaticity for trapped ultracold gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study, experimentally and theoretically, the controlled transfer of harmonically trapped ultracold gases between different quantum states. In particular we experimentally demonstrate a fast decompression and displacement of both a non-interacting gas and an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate which are initially at equilibrium. The decompression parameters are engineered such that the final state is identical to that obtained after a perfectly adiabatic transformation despite the fact that the fast decompression is performed in the strongly non-adiabatic regime. During the transfer the atomic sample goes through strongly out-of-equilibrium states while the external confinement is modified until the system reaches the desired stationary state. The scheme is theoretically based on the invariants of motion and scaling equations techniques and can be generalized to decompression trajectories including an arbitrary deformation of the trap. It is also directly applicable to arbitrary initial non-equilibrium sta...

Schaff, Jean-François; Labeyrie, Guillaume; Vignolo, Patrizia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Shortcuts to adiabaticity for trapped ultracold gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study, experimentally and theoretically, the controlled transfer of harmonically trapped ultracold gases between different quantum states. In particular we experimentally demonstrate a fast decompression and displacement of both a non-interacting gas and an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate which are initially at equilibrium. The decompression parameters are engineered such that the final state is identical to that obtained after a perfectly adiabatic transformation despite the fact that the fast decompression is performed in the strongly non-adiabatic regime. During the transfer the atomic sample goes through strongly out-of-equilibrium states while the external confinement is modified until the system reaches the desired stationary state. The scheme is theoretically based on the invariants of motion and scaling equations techniques and can be generalized to decompression trajectories including an arbitrary deformation of the trap. It is also directly applicable to arbitrary initial non-equilibrium states.

Jean-François Schaff; Pablo Capuzzi; Guillaume Labeyrie; Patrizia Vignolo

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

244

Statistical physics of cerebral embolization leading to stroke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the physics of embolic stroke using a minimal model of emboli moving through the cerebral arteries. Our model of the blood flow network consists of a bifurcating tree, into which we introduce particles (emboli) that halt flow on reaching a node of similar size. Flow is weighted away from blocked arteries, inducing an effective interaction between emboli. We justify the form of the flow weighting using a steady flow (Poiseuille) analysis and a more complicated nonlinear analysis. We discuss free flowing and heavily congested limits and examine the transition from free flow to congestion using numerics. The correlation time is found to increase significantly at a critical value, and a finite size scaling is carried out. An order parameter for non-equilibrium critical behavior is identified as the overlap of blockages' flow shadows. Our work shows embolic stroke to be a feature of the cerebral blood flow network on the verge of a phase transition.

J. P. Hague; E. M. L. Chung

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

245

An improved Monte Carlo study of coherent scattering effects of low energy charged particle transport in Percus-Yevick liquids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We generalize a simple Monte Carlo (MC) model for dilute gases to consider the transport behavior of positrons and electrons in Percus-Yevick model liquids under highly non-equilibrium conditions, accounting rigorously for coherent scattering processes. The procedure extends an existing technique [Wojcik and Tachiya, Chem. Phys. Lett. 363, 3--4 (1992)], using the static structure factor to account for the altered anisotropy of coherent scattering in structured material. We identify the effects of the approximation used in the original method, and develop a modified method that does not require that approximation. We also present an enhanced MC technique that has been designed to improve the accuracy and flexibility of simulations in spatially-varying electric fields. All of the results are found to be in excellent agreement with an independent multi-term Boltzmann equation solution, providing benchmarks for future transport models in liquids and structured systems.

Tattersall, W J; Boyle, G J; White, R D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Plasma Nanoscience: from Nano-Solids in Plasmas to Nano-Plasmas in Solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unique plasma-specific features and physical phenomena in the organization of nanoscale solid-state systems in a broad range of elemental composition, structure, and dimensionality are critically reviewed. These effects lead to the possibility to localize and control energy and matter at nanoscales and to produce self-organized nano-solids with highly unusual and superior properties. A unifying conceptual framework based on the control of production, transport, and self-organization of precursor species is introduced and a variety of plasma-specific non-equilibrium and kinetics-driven phenomena across the many temporal and spatial scales is explained. When the plasma is localized to micrometer and nanometer dimensions, new emergent phenomena arise. The examples range from semiconducting quantum dots and nanowires, chirality control of single-walled carbon nanotubes, ultra-fine manipulation of graphenes, nano-diamond, and organic matter, to nano-plasma effects and nano-plasmas of different states of matter...

Ostrikov, K; Meyyappan, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Understanding the Multi-Scale and Multi-fractal Dynamics of Space Plasmas Through Tsallis Non-Extensive Statistical Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study it is shown that the Tsallis q-extended statistical theory was found efficient to describe faithfully the space plasmas statistics in every case, from the planetic magnetospheres, to solar corona and solar dynamics, as well as cosmic rays and cosmic stars. Moreover, new theoretical concepts and experimental results are presented concerning the space plasma complex dynamics. The significant message of theoretical and experimental issues presented here is the necessity of generalized statistical and dynamical theory for understanding the non-equilibrium dynamics and the complex character of space plasmas. The q-extension of statistics coupled to the fractal extension of dynamics are the novel and appropriate theoretical framework for the description of space plasma complexity.

G. P. Pavlos

2012-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

248

Botanical Ratchets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ratcheting surfaces are a common motif in nature and appear in plant awns and grasses. They are known to profer selective advantages for seed dispersion and burial. In two simple model experiments we show that these anisotropically toothed surfaces naturally serve as motion rectifiers and generically move in a unidirectional manner when subjected to temporally and spatially symmetric excitations of various origins. Using a combination of theory and experiment we show that a linear relation between awn length and ratchet efficiency holds under biologically relevant conditions. Thus, grass awns efficiently transform non-equilibrium environmental stresses into useful work and directed motion using their length as a fluctuation amplifier, yielding a selective advantage to these organelles in many plant species.

I. M. Kuli?; M. Mani; H. Mohrbach; R. Thaokar; L. Mahadevan

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

Micro- and nanodomain imaging in uniaxial ferroelectrics: Joint application of optical, confocal Raman, and piezoelectric force microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of the most effective methods of the domain visualization in model uniaxial ferroelectrics of lithium niobate (LN) and lithium tantalate (LT) family, and relaxor strontium-barium niobate (SBN) have been reviewed in this paper. We have demonstrated the synergetic effect of joint usage of optical, confocal Raman, and piezoelectric force microscopies which provide extracting of the unique information about formation of the micro- and nanodomain structures. The methods have been applied for investigation of various types of domain structures with increasing complexity: (1) periodical domain structure in LN and LT, (2) nanodomain structures in LN, LT, and SBN, (3) nanodomain structures in LN with modified surface layer, (4) dendrite domain structure in LN. The self-assembled appearance of quasi-regular nanodomain structures in highly non-equilibrium switching conditions has been considered.

Shur, V. Ya., E-mail: vladimir.shur@urfu.ru; Zelenovskiy, P. S. [Ferroelectric Laboratory, Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

250

Thermodynamics of accuracy in kinetic proofreading: Dissipation and efficiency trade-offs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high accuracy exhibited by biological information transcription processes is due to kinetic proofreading, i.e., by a mechanism which reduces the error rate of the information-handling process by driving it out of equilibrium. We provide a consistent thermodynamic description of enzyme-assisted assembly processes involving competing substrates, in a Master Equation framework. We introduce and evaluate a measure of the efficiency based on rigorous non-equilibrium inequalities. The performance of several proofreading models are thus analyzed and the related time, dissipation and efficiency vs. error trade-offs exhibited for different discrimination regimes. We finally introduce and analyze in the same framework a simple model which takes into account correlations between consecutive enzyme-assisted assembly steps. This work highlights the relevance of the distinction between energetic and kinetic discrimination regimes in enzyme-substrate interactions.

Rao, Riccardo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Work extraction and thermodynamics for individual quantum systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamics is traditionally concerned with systems comprised of a large number of particles. Here we present a framework for extending thermodynamics to individual quantum systems, including explicitly a thermal bath and work-storage device (essentially a `weight' that can be raised or lowered). We prove that the second law of thermodynamics holds in our framework, and give a simple protocol to extract the optimal amount of work from the system, equal to its change in free energy. Our results apply to any quantum system in an arbitrary initial state, in particular including non-equilibrium situations. The optimal protocol is essentially reversible, similar to classical Carnot cycles, and indeed, we show that it can be used it to construct a quantum Carnot engine.

Paul Skrzypczyk; Anthony J. Short; Sandu Popescu

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

Thermodynamics in f(R,T) Theory of Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A non-equilibrium picture of thermodynamics is discussed at the apparent horizon of FRW universe in $f(R,T)$ gravity, where $R$ is the Ricci scalar and $T$ is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. We take two forms of the energy-momentum tensor of dark components and demonstrate that equilibrium description of thermodynamics is not achievable in both cases. We check the validity of the first and second law of thermodynamics in this scenario. It is shown that the Friedmann equations can be expressed in the form of first law of thermodynamics $T_hdS'_h+T_hd_{\\jmath}S'=-dE'+W'dV$, where $d_{\\jmath}S'$ is the entropy production term. Finally, we conclude that the second law of thermodynamics holds both in phantom and non-phantom phases.

M. Sharif; M. Zubair

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

253

Thermodynamics of accuracy in kinetic proofreading: Dissipation and efficiency trade-offs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high accuracy exhibited by biological information transcription processes is due to kinetic proofreading, i.e., by a mechanism which reduces the error rate of the information-handling process by driving it out of equilibrium. We provide a consistent thermodynamic description of enzyme-assisted assembly processes involving competing substrates, in a Master Equation framework. We introduce and evaluate a measure of the efficiency based on rigorous non-equilibrium inequalities. The performance of several proofreading models are thus analyzed and the related time, dissipation and efficiency vs. error trade-offs exhibited for different discrimination regimes. We finally introduce and analyze in the same framework a simple model which takes into account correlations between consecutive enzyme-assisted assembly steps. This work highlights the relevance of the distinction between energetic and kinetic discrimination regimes in enzyme-substrate interactions.

Riccardo Rao; Luca Peliti

2015-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

254

Local scale invariance and its applications to strongly anisotropic critical phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The generalization of dynamical scaling to local scale invariance is reviewed. Starting from a recapitulation of the phenomenology of ageing phenomena, the generalization of dynamical scaling to local scale transformation for any given dynamical exponent $z$ is described and the two distinct types of local scale invariance are presented. The special case $z=2$ and the associated Ward identity of Schr\\"odinger invariance is treated. Local scale invariance predicts the form of the two-point functions. Existing confirmations of these predictions for (I) the Lifshitz points in spin systems with competing interactions such as the ANNNI model and (II) non-equilibrium ageing phenomena as occur in the kinetic Ising model with Glauber dynamics are described.

Malte Henkel; Alan Picone; Michel Pleimling; Jeremie Unterberger

2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evolution of (001) and (111) facets for selective epitaxial growth inside submicron trenches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of (001) and (111) facets for the epitaxial growth inside submicron trenches is systematically studied in this report. The analysis with the method of “Lagrange multiplier” indicates the equilibrium crystal shape. In the case of non-equilibrium without external fluxes, we employed the “weighted mean curvature” method to mathematically model the inter-facet migration rate for two extreme kinetic cases: “surface diffusion limited” and “surface attachment/detachment limited.” Coupled with external supply of atoms, the self-limited behavior of facet size is theoretically predicted. Moreover, we find that the self-limited stable facet size in trenches of different widths has a specific relationship determined by the surface energy ratio, kinetic rate ratio, and isolated growth rate difference. The two limited cases could be discriminated according to the mathematical fitting of one exponent in this relationship based on the stable facet size in trenches of different widths.

Jiang, S., E-mail: jiang@imec.be; Heyns, M., E-mail: marc.heyns@imec.be [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KULeuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44-bus 2450, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Merckling, C.; Guo, W.; Waldron, N.; Caymax, M. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Vandervorst, W. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Department of Physics and Astronomy, KULeuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D-bus 2418, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Seefeldt, M. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KULeuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44-bus 2450, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Ionization Equilibrium Timescales in Collisional Plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astrophysical shocks or bursts from a photoionizing source can disturb the typical collisional plasma found in galactic interstellar media or the intergalactic medium. The spectrum emitted by this plasma contains diagnostics that have been used to determine the time since the disturbing event, although this determination becomes uncertain as the elements in the plasma return to ionization equilibrium. A general solution for the equilibrium timescale for each element arises from the elegant eigenvector method of solution to the problem of a non-equilibrium plasma described by Masai (1984) and Hughes & Helfand (1985). In general the ionization evolution of an element Z in a constant electron temperature plasma is given by a coupled set of Z+1 first order differential equations. However, they can be recast as Z uncoupled first order differential equations using an eigenvector basis for the system. The solution is then Z separate exponential functions, with the time constants given by the eigenvalues of the r...

Smith, Randall K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Rings in Random Environments: Sensing Disorder Through Topology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study the role of topology in DNA gel electrophoresis experiments via molecular dynamics simulations. The gel is modelled as a 3D array of obstacles from which half edges are removed at random with probability p, thereby generating a disordered environment. Changes in the microscopic structure of the gel are captured by measuring the electrophoretic mobility of ring polymers moving through the medium, while their linear counterparts provide a control system as we show they are insensitive to these changes. We show that ring polymers provide a novel non-invasive way of exploiting topology to sense microscopic disorder. Finally, we compare the results from the simulations with an analytical model for the non-equilibrium differential mobility, and find a striking agreement between simulation and theory

Davide Michieletto; Marco Baiesi; Enzo Orlandini; Matthew S. Turner

2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

258

Building a Road from Light to Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representing the Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion (CSTEC), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE energy. The mission of the Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion (CSTEC) is to design and to synthesize new materials for high efficiency photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric (TE) devices, predicated on new fundamental insights into equilibrium and non-equilibrium processes, including quantum phenomena, that occur in materials over various spatial and temporal scales.

Li, Anton; Bilby, David; Barito, Adam; Vyletel, Brenda

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

259

Introductory statistical mechanics for electron storage rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These lectures introduce the beam dynamics of electron-positron storage rings with particular emphasis on the effects due to synchrotron radiation. They differ from most other introductions in their systematic use of the physical principles and mathematical techniques of the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of fluctuating dynamical systems. A self-contained exposition of the necessary topics from this field is included. Throughout the development, a Hamiltonian description of the effects of the externally applied fields is maintained in order to preserve the links with other lectures on beam dynamics and to show clearly the extent to which electron dynamics in non-Hamiltonian. The statistical mechanical framework is extended to a discussion of the conceptual foundations of the treatment of collective effects through the Vlasov equation.

Jowett, J.M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Friction forces on phase transition fronts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cosmological first-order phase transitions, the microscopic interaction of the phase transition fronts with non-equilibrium plasma particles manifests itself macroscopically as friction forces. In general, it is a nontrivial problem to compute these forces, and only two limits have been studied, namely, that of very slow walls and, more recently, ultra-relativistic walls which run away. In this paper we consider ultra-relativistic velocities and show that stationary solutions still exist when the parameters allow the existence of runaway walls. Hence, we discuss the necessary and sufficient conditions for the fronts to actually run away. We also propose a phenomenological model for the friction, which interpolates between the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic values. Thus, the friction depends on two friction coefficients which can be calculated for specific models. We then study the velocity of phase transition fronts as a function of the friction parameters, the thermodynamic parameters, and the amount of supercooling.

Mégevand, Ariel, E-mail: megevand@mdp.edu.ar [IFIMAR (CONICET–UNMdP), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Deán Funes 3350, (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gc5 non-equilibrium brn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Amplification of Pressure Waves during Vibrational Equilibration of Excited Chemical Reaction Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich - von Neumann - Doring (NEZND) theory of self-sustaining detonation identified amplification of pressure wavelets during equilibration of vibrationally excited reaction products in the reaction zone as the physical mechanism by which exothermic chemical energy release sustains detonation waves. This mechanism leads to the formation of the well-known, complex three-dimensional structure of a self-sustaining detonation wave. This amplification mechanism is postulated to be a general property of subsonic and supersonic reactive flows occurring during: shock to detonation transition (SDT); hot spot ignition and growth; deflagration to detonation transition (DDT); flame acceleration by shock or compression waves; and acoustic (sound) wave amplification. The existing experimental and theoretical evidence for pressure wave amplification by chemical energy release into highly vibrationally excited product molecules under these reactive flow conditions is reviewed in this paper.

Tarver, C M

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Inferring metabolic phenotypes from the exometabolome through a thermodynamic variational principle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Networks of biochemical reactions, like cellular metabolic networks, are kept in non-equilibrium steady states by the exchange fluxes connecting them to the environment. In most cases, feasible flux configurations can be derived from minimal mass-balance assumptions upon prescribing in- and out-take fluxes. Here we consider the problem of inferring intracellular flux patterns from extracellular metabolite levels. Resorting to a thermodynamic out of equilibrium variational principle to describe the network at steady state, we show that the switch from fermentative to oxidative phenotypes in cells can be characterized in terms of the glucose, lactate, oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations. Results obtained for an exactly solvable toy model are fully recovered for a large scale reconstruction of human catabolism. Finally we argue that, in spite of the many approximations involved in the theory, available data for several human cell types are well described by the predicted phenotypic map of the problem.

De Martino, Daniele; De Martino, Andrea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Habitability and Multistability in Earth-like Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the potential multistability of the climate for a planet around the habitable zone. We focus on conditions reminiscent to those of the Earth system, but our investigation aims at presenting a general methodology for dealing with exoplanets. We provide a thorough analysis of the non-equilibrium thermodynamical properties of the climate system and explore, using a a flexible climate model, how such properties depend on the energy input of the parent star, on the infrared atmospheric opacity, and on the rotation rate. It is possible to reproduce the multi-stability properties reminiscent of the paleoclimatologically relevant snowball (SB) - warm (W) conditions. We then study the thermodynamics of the W and SB states, clarifying the role of the hydrological cycle in shaping the irreversibility and the efficiency of the W states, and emphasizing the extreme diversity of the SB states, where dry conditions are realized. Thermodynamics provides the clue for studying the tipping points of the system and le...

Lucarini, Valerio; Boschi, Robert; Kirk, Edilbert; Iro, Nicolas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The robust assembly of small symmetric nano-shells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly symmetric nano-shells are found in many biological systems, such as clathrin cages and viral shells. Several studies have shown that symmetric shells appear in nature as a result of the free energy minimization of a generic interaction between their constituent subunits. We examine the physical basis for the formation of symmetric shells, and using a minimal model we demonstrate that these structures can readily grow from identical subunits under non equilibrium conditions. Our model of nano-shell assembly shows that the spontaneous curvature regulates the size of the shell while the mechanical properties of the subunit determines the symmetry of the assembled structure. Understanding the minimum requirements for the formation of closed nano-shells is a necessary step towards engineering of nano-containers, which will have far reaching impact in both material science and medicine.

Jef Wagner; Roya Zandi

2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

266

On linearization and preconditioning for radiation diffusion coupled to material thermal conduction equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method is an effective algorithm for solving large scale nonlinear equations. One of the most important advantages of JFNK method is that there is no necessity to form and store the Jacobian matrix of the nonlinear system when JFNK method is employed. However, an approximation of the Jacobian is needed for the purpose of preconditioning. In this paper, JFNK method is employed to solve a class of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion coupled to material thermal conduction equations, and two preconditioners are designed by linearizing the equations in two methods. Numerical results show that the two preconditioning methods can improve the convergence behavior and efficiency of JFNK method.

Feng, Tao, E-mail: fengtao2@mail.ustc.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230052 (China) [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230052 (China); Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China); An, Hengbin, E-mail: an_hengbin@iapcm.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Yu, Xijun, E-mail: yuxj@iapcm.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Li, Qin, E-mail: liqin@lsec.cc.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Chinese Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Rongpei, E-mail: zhangrongpei@163.com [Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China)] [Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Thomson parabola spectrometry for gold laser-generated plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The plasma generated from thin gold films irradiated in high vacuum at high intensity ({approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) laser shot is characterized in terms of ion generation through time-of-flight techniques and Thomson parabola spectrometry. Gold ions and protons, accelerated in forward direction by the electric field developed in non-equilibrium plasma, have been investigated. Measurements, performed at PALS laboratory, give information about the gold charge states distributions, the ion energy distributions and the proton acceleration driven as a function of film thickness, laser parameters, and angular emission. The ion diagnostics of produced plasma in forward direction permits to understand some mechanisms developed during its expansion kinetics. The role of the focal position of a laser beam with respect to the target surface, plasma properties, and the possibility to accelerate protons up to energies above 3 MeV has been presented and discussed.

Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Ando, L. [Physics Department of Messina University, V.le F. S. D'Alcontres 31, 9816 S. Agata (Italy); Ullschmied, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Kinetic Theory of Dynamical Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is generally believed that the dynamics of simple fluids can be considered to be chaotic, at least to the extent that they can be modeled as classical systems of particles interacting with short range, repulsive forces. Here we give a brief introduction to those parts of chaos theory that are relevant for understanding some features of non-equilibrium processes in fluids. We introduce the notions of Lyapunov exponents, Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy and related quantities using some simple low-dimensional systems as "toy" models of the more complicated systems encountered in the study of fluids. We then show how familiar methods used in the kinetic theory of gases can be employed for explicit, analytical calculations of the largest Lyapunov exponent and KS entropy for dilute gases composed of hard spheres in d dimensions. We conclude with a brief discussion of interesting, open problems.

R. van Zon; H. van Beijeren; J. R. Dorfman

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

269

Pairing of Lyapunov Exponents for a Hard-Sphere Gas under Shear in the Thermodynamic Limit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a dilute gas of hard spheres under shear. We use one of the predominant models to study this system, namely the SLLOD equations of motion, with an iso-kinetic Gaussian thermostat in between collisions, to get a stationary total peculiar kinetic energy. Based on the previously obtained result that in the non-equilibrium steady state and in case the number of particles $N$ becomes large, the coefficient of dynamical friction representing the iso-kinetic Gaussian thermostat for the SLLOD dynamics fluctuates with $1/\\sqrt{N}$ fluctuations around a fixed value, we show on analytical grounds that for a hard sphere gas at small shear rate and with a large number of spheres, the conjugate pairing of the Lyapunov exponents is expected to be violated at the fourth power of the constant shear rate in the bulk.

Debabrata Panja; Ramses van Zon

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Observation of crystallization slowdown in supercooled para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium quantum liquid mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a quantitative experimental study of the crystallization kinetics of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures of para-hydrogen (pH$_2$) and ortho-deuterium (oD$_2$) by high spatial resolution Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets. We show that in a wide range of compositions the crystallization rate of the isotopic mixtures is significantly reduced with respect to that of the pure substances. To clarify this behavior we have performed path-integral simulations of the non-equilibrium pH$_2$-oD$_2$ liquid mixtures, revealing that differences in quantum delocalization between the two isotopic species translate into different effective particle sizes. Our results provide first experimental evidence for crystallization slowdown of quantum origin, offering a benchmark for theoretical studies of quantum behavior in supercooled liquids.

Matthias Kühnel; José M. Fernández; Filippo Tramonto; Guzmán Tejeda; Elena Moreno; Anton Kalinin; Marco Nava; Davide E. Galli; Salvador Montero; Robert E. Grisenti

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

271

N-type doping of Ge by As implantation and excimer laser annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diffusion and activation of arsenic implanted into germanium at 40?keV with maximum concentrations below and above the solid solubility (8?×?10{sup 19}?cm{sup ?3}) have been studied, both experimentally and theoretically, after excimer laser annealing (??=?308?nm) in the melting regime with different laser energy densities and single or multiple pulses. Arsenic is observed to diffuse similarly for different fluences with no out-diffusion and no formation of pile-up at the maximum melt depth. The diffusion profiles have been satisfactorily simulated by assuming two diffusivity states of As in the molten Ge and a non-equilibrium segregation at the maximum melt depth. The electrical activation is partial and decreases with increasing the chemical concentration with a saturation of the active concentration at 1?×?10{sup 20}?cm{sup ?3}, which represents a new record for the As-doped Ge system.

Milazzo, R.; Napolitani, E., E-mail: enrico.napolitani@unipd.it; De Salvador, D.; Mastromatteo, M.; Carnera, A. [CNR-IMM MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Impellizzeri, G.; Boninelli, S.; Priolo, F.; Privitera, V. [CNR-IMM MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Fisicaro, G.; Italia, M.; La Magna, A. [CNR-IMM, Z.I. VIII Strada 5, 95121 Catania (Italy); Cuscunà, M.; Fortunato, G. [CNR-IMM, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Emergence of Consciousness in the Quantum Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is argued that human consciousness is likely to have emerged during self-consistent evolution of the physical universe through the gradual accumulation of biological entities' ability to tap into the intrinsic non-deterministic potentiality during the global non-equilibrium phase transitions in the quantum universe. Due to the fact that the matter and energy content participating in the global phase transitions in the quantum universe is a continuum, there is in effect an infinite degrees-of-freedom in the substratum, which invalidates the usual deterministic laws of the mechanical evolution, and allows a chance factor to appear in the emergent properties of resonantly-formed quantum particles, especially in the acquired phases of their wave functions. Such chance factors, though occurring mostly randomly during the early cosmic evolution phase, can be harnessed more "purposefully" by the biological entities co-evolving with the physical universe, due in part to the globally entangled nature of quantum int...

Zhang, Xiaolei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Chiral Edge Currents in a Holographic Josephson Junction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the Josephson effect and the appearance of dissipationless edge currents in a holographic Josephson junction configuration involving a chiral, time-reversal breaking, superconductor in 2+1 dimensions. Such a superconductor is expected to be topological, thereby supporting topologically protected gapless Majorana-Weyl edge modes. Such modes manifest themselves in chiral dissipationless edge currents, which we exhibit and investigate in the context of our construction. The physics of the Josephson current itself, though expected to be unconventional in some non-equilibrium settings, is shown to be conventional in our setup which takes place in thermal equilibrium. We comment on various ways in which the expected Majorana nature of the edge excitations, and relatedly the unconventional nature of topological Josephson junctions, can be verified in the holographic context.

Moshe Rozali; Alexandre Vincart-Emard

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

Phase Transformations in Confined Nanosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project discovered that non-equilibrium structures, including chemically ordered structures not observed in bulk systems, form in isolated nanoscale systems. Further, a generalized model was developed that effectively explained the suppression of equilibrium phase transformations. This thermodynamic model considered the free energy decrease associated with the phase transformation was less than the increase in energy associated with the formation of an interphase interface, therefore inhibiting the phase transformation. A critical diameter exists where the system transitions to bulk behavior, and a generalized equation was formulated that successfully predicted this transition in the Fe-Au system. This provided and explains a new route to novel structures not possible in bulk systems. The structural characterization was accomplished using transmission electron microscopy in collaboration with Matthew Kramer of Ames Laboratory. The PI and graduate student visited Ames Laboratory several times a year to conduct the experiments.

Shield, Jeffrey E. [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering] [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering; Belashchenko, Kirill [Department of Physics & Astronomy] [Department of Physics & Astronomy

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

275

Phenomenology of Irreversible Processes from Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose that the space-time evolution of strongly coupled matter formed by ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions can be modelled by phenomenological equations involving the energy-momentum tensor and conserved currents alone. These equations can describe the late stage of local chemical and thermal equilibration of the matter formed after collisions, and its subsequent transition to hydrodynamic expansion in an unified framework. The full set of equations include local energy, momentum and charge conservation; but also additional equations for evolution of non-equilibrium variables. These equations with precisely determined phenomenological parameters can be obtained by the AdS/CFT correspondence. On the gravity side of this correspondence, for vanishing chemical potentials, these phenomenological equations give all solutions of pure gravity in AdS which have regular future horizons. We also discuss field-theoretic grounds for validity of these phenomenological equations.

Ramakrishnan Iyer; Ayan Mukhopadhyay

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Dynamic wormholes with particle creation mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work deals with a spherically symmetric space-time which is asymptotically (at spatial infinity) FRW space-time and represents wormhole configuration: The matter component is divided into two parts--(a) dissipative but homogeneous and isotropic fluid, and (b) an inhomogeneous and anisotropic barotropic fluid. Evolving wormhole solutions are obtained when isotropic fluid is phantom in nature and there is a big rip singularity at the end. Here the dissipative phenomena is due to the particle creation mechanism in non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Using the process to be adiabatic, the dissipative pressure is expressed linearly to the particle creation rate. For two choices of the particle creation rate as a function of the Hubble parameter, the equation of state parameter of the isotropic fluid is constrained to be in the phantom domain, except in one choice, it is possible to have wormhole configuration with normal isotropic fluid.

Supriya Pan; Subenoy Chakraborty

2015-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

277

Metal-poor dwarf galaxies in the SIGRID galaxy sample. II. The electron temperature-abundance calibration and the parameters that affect it  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we use the Mappings photoionization code to explore the physical parameters that impact on the measurement of electron temperature and abundance in HII regions. In the previous paper we presented observations and measurements of physical properties from the spectra of seventeen HII regions in fourteen isolated dwarf irregular galaxies from the SIGRID sample. Here, we analyze these observations further, together with three additional published data sets. We explore the effects of optical thickness, electron density, ionization parameter, ionization source, and non-equilibrium effects on the relation between electron temperature and metallicity. We present a standard model that fits the observed data remarkably well at metallicities between 1/10 and 1 solar. We investigate the effects of optically thin HII regions, and show that they can have a considerable effect on the measured electron temperature, and that there is evidence that some of the observed objects are optically thin. We look at the ...

Nicholls, David C; Sutherland, Ralph S; Jerjen, Helmut; Kewley, Lisa J; Basurah, Hassan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

High-resolution spectroscopy for Doppler-broadening ion temperature measurements of implosions at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future implosion experiments at the national ignition facility (NIF) will endeavor to simultaneously measure electron and ion temperatures with temporal and spatial resolution in order to explore non-equilibrium temperature distributions and their relaxation toward equilibrium. In anticipation of these experiments, and with understanding of the constraints of the NIF facility environment, we have explored the use of Doppler broadening of mid-Z dopant emission lines, such as krypton He-{alpha} at 13 keV, as a diagnostic of time- and potentially space-resolved ion temperature. We have investigated a number of options analytically and with numerical raytracing, and we have identified several promising candidate spectrometer designs that meet the expected requirements of spectral and temporal resolution and data signal-to-noise ratio for gas-filled exploding pusher implosions, while providing maximum flexibility for use on a variety of experiments that potentially include burning plasma.

Koch, J. A.; Stewart, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Shepherd, R.; Schneider, M. B.; Miles, A. R.; Scott, H. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Hsing, W. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-493, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Rate-dependent morphology of Li2O2 growth in Li-O2 batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compact solid discharge products enable energy storage devices with high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities, but solid deposits on active surfaces can disturb charge transport and induce mechanical stress. In this Letter we develop a nanoscale continuum model for the growth of Li2O2 crystals in lithium-oxygen batteries with organic electrolytes, based on a theory of electrochemical non-equilibrium thermodynamics originally applied to Li-ion batteries. As in the case of lithium insertion in phase-separating LiFePO4 nanoparticles, the theory predicts a transition from complex to uniform morphologies of Li2O2 with increasing current. Discrete particle growth at low discharge rates becomes suppressed at high rates, resulting in a film of electronically insulating Li2O2 that limits cell performance. We predict that the transition between these surface growth modes occurs at current densities close to the exchange current density of the cathode reaction, consistent with experimental observations.

Horstmann, B; Mitchell, R; Bessler, W G; Shao-Horn, Y; Bazant, M Z

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Three-fold way to extinction in cyclically competing species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Species extinction occurs regularly and unavoidably in ecological systems. The time scales for extinction can broadly vary and inform on the ecosystem's stability. We study the spatio-temporal extinction dynamics of a paradigmatic population model where three species exhibit cyclic competition. The cyclic dynamics reflects the non-equilibrium nature of the species interactions. We identify three types of dynamics that leave leave their fingerprints in the extinction-time probability distribution: rapid extinction, heteroclinic orbits, and metastable traveling weaves. Based on these three types we develop semi-phenomenological arguments for the functional form and the scaling behavior of the extinction-time probability distribution. These analytical results are supported by extensive numerical simulations.

Rulands, S; Frey, E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gc5 non-equilibrium brn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Global attractors and extinction dynamics of cyclically competing species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transitions to absorbing states are of fundamental importance in non-equilibrium physics as well as ecology. In ecology, absorbing states correspond to the extinction of species. We here study the spatial population dynamics of three cyclically interacting species. The interaction scheme comprises both direct competition between species as in the cyclic Lotka-Volterra model, and separated selection and reproduction processes as in the May-Leonard model. We show that the dynamic processes leading to the transient maintenance of biodiversity are closely linked to attractors of the nonlinear dynamics for the overall species' concentrations. The characteristics of these global attractors change qualitatively at certain threshold values of the mobility, and depend on the relative strength of the different types of competition between species. They give information about the scaling of extinction times with the system size and thereby the stability of biodiversity. We define an effective free energy as the negative...

Rulands, Steffen; Frey, Erwin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L. [Synchrotron Soleil, l'Orme des Merisiers, St. Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Booth, J. P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

C/CrC nanocomposite coating deposited by magnetron sputtering at high ion irradiation conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CrC with the fcc NaCl (B1) structure is a metastable phase that can be obtained under the non-equilibrium conditions of high ion irradiation. A nano-composite coating consisting of amorphous carbon embedded in a CrC matrix was prepared via the unbalanced magnetron sputtering of graphite and Cr metal targets in Ar gas with a high ionized flux (ion-to-neutral ratio Ji/Jn = 6). The nanoscale amorphous carbon clusters self-assembled into layers alternated by CrC, giving the composite a multilayer structure. The phase, microstructure, and composition of the coating were characterized using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The interpretation of the true coating structure, in particular the carbide type, is discussed.

Zhou, Z.; Rainforth, W. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Gass, M. H.; Bleloch, A. [SuperSTEM at Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Ehiassarian, A. P.; Hovsepian, P. Eh. [Materials Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, S1 1WB (United Kingdom)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Experimental demonstration of hot-carrier photo-current in an InGaAs quantum well solar cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An unambiguous observation of hot-carrier photocurrent from an InGaAs single quantum well solar cell is reported. Simultaneous photo-current and photoluminescence measurements were performed for incident power density 0.04–3?kW cm{sup ?2}, lattice temperature 10?K, and forward bias 1.2?V. An order of magnitude photocurrent increase was observed for non-equilibrium hot-carrier temperatures >35?K. This photocurrent activation temperature is consistent with that of equilibrium carriers in a lattice at elevated temperature. The observed hot-carrier photo-current is extracted from the well over an energy selective GaAs barrier, thus integrating two essential components of a hot-carrier solar cell: a hot-carrier absorber and an energy selective contact.

Hirst, L. C.; Walters, R. J. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW., Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Führer, M. F.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

285

A boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precise guidance of heat from one specific location to another is paramount in many industrial and commercial applications, including thermal management and thermoelectric generation. One of the cardinal requirements is a preferential conduction of thermal energy, also known as thermal rectification, in the materials. This study introduces a novel nanomaterial for rectifying heat—the boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier. Classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed on this nanomaterial, and interestingly, the strength of the rectification phenomenon is dissimilar at different operating temperatures. This is due to the contingence of the thermal flux on the conductance at the localized region around the scatterer, which varies with temperature. The rectification performance of the peapod rectifier is inherently dependent on its asymmetry. Last but not least, the favourable rectifying direction in the nanomaterial is established.

Loh, G. C., E-mail: jgloh@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Baillargeat, D. [CNRS-International-NTU-Thales Research Alliance (CINTRA), 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Time-dependent density functional theory quantum transport simulation in non-orthogonal basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Basing on the earlier works on the hierarchical equations of motion for quantum transport, we present in this paper a first principles scheme for time-dependent quantum transport by combining time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and Keldysh's non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. This scheme is beyond the wide band limit approximation and is directly applicable to the case of non-orthogonal basis without the need of basis transformation. The overlap between the basis in the lead and the device region is treated properly by including it in the self-energy and it can be shown that this approach is equivalent to a lead-device orthogonalization. This scheme has been implemented at both TDDFT and density functional tight-binding level. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate our method and comparison with wide band limit approximation is made. Finally, the sparsity of the matrices and computational complexity of this method are analyzed.

Kwok, Yan Ho; Xie, Hang; Yam, Chi Yung; Chen, Guan Hua, E-mail: ghc@everest.hku.hk [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Zheng, Xiao [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)] [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

287

Modulation of the electron transport properties in graphene nanoribbons doped with BN chains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using density-functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function method, the electron transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) doped with BN chains are studied by systematically calculating the energy band structure, density of states and the transmission spectra for the systems. The BN chains destroyed the electronic transport properties of the ZGNRs, and an energy gap appeared for the ZGNRs, and displayed variations from a metal to a wide-gap semiconductor. With an increase in the number of BN chains, the band gap increased gradually in the band structure and the transmission coefficient decreased near the Fermi surface. Additionally, the doping position had a significant effect on the electronic properties of the ZGNRs.

Liu, Wu; Zhang, Kaiwang, E-mail: kwzhang@xtu.edu.cn; Zhong, JianXin [Department of Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Wang, Ru-Zhi, E-mail: wrz@bjut.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Liu, Li-Min, E-mail: limin.liu@csrc.ac.cn [Beijing Computational Science Research Centre, Beijing, 100084 (China)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

The dynamics of technology diffusion and the impacts of climate policy instruments in the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents an analysis of possible uses of climate policy instruments for the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector in a non-equilibrium economic and technology innovation-diffusion perspective. Emissions reductions occur through changes in technology and energy consumption; in this context, investment decision-making opportunities occur periodically, which energy policy can incentivise in order to transform energy systems and meet reductions targets. Energy markets are driven by innovation, dynamic costs and technology diffusion; yet, the incumbent systems optimisation methodology in energy modelling does not address these aspects nor the effectiveness of policy onto decision-making since the dynamics modelled take their source from the top-down `social-planner' assumption. This leads to an underestimation of strong technology lock-ins in cost-optimal scenarios of technology. Our approach explores the global diffusion of low carbon technology in connection to a highly disaggregated sector...

Mercure, J -F; Foley, A M; Chewpreecha, U; Pollitt, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Lattice thermal conductivity of UO{sub 2} using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We applied the non-equilibrium ab-initio molecular dynamics and predict the lattice thermal conductivity of the pristine uranium dioxide for up to 2000?K. We also use the equilibrium classical molecular dynamics and heat-current autocorrelation decay theory to decompose the lattice thermal conductivity into acoustic and optical components. The predicted optical phonon transport is temperature independent and small, while the acoustic component follows the Slack relation and is in good agreement with the limited single-crystal experimental results. Considering the phonon grain-boundary and pore scatterings, the effective lattice thermal conductivity is reduced, and we show it is in general agreement with the sintered-powder experimental results. The charge and photon thermal conductivities are also addressed, and we find small roles for electron, surface polaron, and photon in the defect-free structures and for temperatures below 1500?K.

Kim, Hyoungchul [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); High-Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136–791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kaviany, Massoud, E-mail: kaviany@umich.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

290

Kinetic dielectric decrement revisited: phenomenology of finite ion concentrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the help of a recently developed non-equilibrium approach, we investigate the ionic strength dependence of the Hubbard--Onsager dielectric decrement. We compute the depolarization of water molecules caused by the motion of ions in sodium chloride solutions from the dilute regime (0.035 M) up close to the saturation concentration (4.24 M), and find that the kinetic decrement displays a strong nonmonotonic behavior, in contrast to the prediction of available models. We introduce a phenomenological modification of the Hubbard--Onsager continuum theory, that takes into account the screening due to the ionic cloud at mean field level, and, is able to describe the kinetic decrement at high concentrations including the presence of a pronounced minimum.

Marcello Sega; Sofia Kantorovich; Axel Arnold

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

291

Macroscopic approach to the Casimir friction force  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The general formula is derived for the vacuum friction force between two parallel perfectly flat planes bounding two material media separated by a vacuum gap and moving relative to each other with a constant velocity $\\mathbf{v}$. The material media are described in the framework of macroscopic electrodynamics whereas the nonzero temperature and dissipation are taken into account by making use of the Kubo formulae from non-equilibrium statistical thermodynamics. The formula obtained provides a rigorous basis for calculation of the vacuum friction force within the quantum field theory methods in the condensed matter physics. The revealed $v$-dependence of the vacuum friction force proves to be the following: for zero temperature ($T=0$) it is proportional to $(v/c)^3$ and for $T>0$ this force is linear in $(v/c)$.

V. V. Nesterenko; A. V. Nesterenko

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

Computational Methodologies and Physical Insights into Electronic Energy Transfer in Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine computational techniques and methodologies currently in use to explore electronic excitation energy transfer in the context of light-harvesting complexes in photosynthetic antenna systems, and comment on some new insights into the underlying physics. Advantages and pitfalls of these methodologies are discussed, as are some physical insights into the photosynthetic dynamics. By combining results from molecular modelling of the complexes (structural description) with an effective non-equilibrium statistical description (time evolution), we identify some general features, regardless of the particular distribution in the protein scaffold, that are central to light-harvesting dynamics and, that could ultimately be related to the high efficiency of the overall process. Based on these general common features, some possible new directions in the field are discussed.

Leonardo A. Pachon; Paul Brumer

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

293

Symmetry Relations for Trajectories of a Brownian Motor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Brownian Motor is a nanoscale or molecular device that combines the effects of thermal noise, spatial or temporal asymmetry, and directionless input energy to drive directed motion. Because of the input energy, Brownian motors function away from thermodynamic equilibrium and concepts such as linear response theory, fluctuation dissipation relations, and detailed balance do not apply. The {\\em generalized} fluctuation-dissipation relation, however, states that even under strongly thermodynamically non-equilibrium conditions the ratio of the probability of a transition to the probability of the time-reverse of that transition is the exponent of the change in the internal energy of the system due to the transition. Here, we derive an extension of the generalized fluctuation dissipation theorem for a Brownian motor for the ratio between the probability for the motor to take a forward step and the probability to take a backward step.

R. Dean Astumian

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Statistical Origin of Constituent-Quark Scaling in the QGP hadronization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonextensive statistics in a Blast-Wave model (TBW) is implemented to describe the identified hadron production in relativistic p+p and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Incorporating the core and corona components within the TBW formalism allows us to describe simultaneously some of the major observations in hadronic observables at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC): the Number of Constituent Quark Scaling (NCQ), the large radial and elliptic flow, the effect of gluon saturation and the suppression of hadron production at high transverse momentum (pT) due to jet quenching. In this formalism, the NCQ scaling at RHIC appears as a consequence of non-equilibrium process. Our study also provides concise reference distributions with a least chi2 fit of the available experimental data for future experiments and models.

Zebo Tang; Li Yi; Lijuan Ruan; Ming Shao; Hongfang Chen; Cheng Li; Bedangadas Mohanty; Paul Sorensen; Aihong Tang; Zhangbu Xu

2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

295

Studies of parallel algorithms for the solution of a Fokker-Planck equation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of laser-created plasmas often requires the use of a kinetic model rather than a hydrodynamic one. This model change occurs, for example, in the hot spot formation in an ICF experiment or during the relaxation of colliding plasmas. When the gradients scalelengths or the size of a given system are not small compared to the characteristic mean-free-path, we have to deal with non-equilibrium situations, which can be described by the distribution functions of every species in the system. We present here a numerical method in plane or spherical 1-D geometry, for the solution of a Fokker-Planck equation that describes the evolution of stich functions in the phase space. The size and the time scale of kinetic simulations require the use of Massively Parallel Computers (MPP). We have adopted a message-passing strategy using Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM).

Deck, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Samba, G. [CEA/CEL-V, Villeneuve St. Georges (France). Dept. de Mathematiques Appliquees

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Band filling effects on temperature performance of intermediate band quantum wire solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed studies of solar cell efficiency as a function of temperature were performed for quantum wire intermediate band solar cells grown on the (311)A plane. A remotely doped one-dimensional intermediate band made of self-assembled In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As quantum wires was compared to an undoped intermediate band and a reference p-i-n GaAs sample. These studies indicate that the efficiencies of these solar cells depend on the population of the one-dimensional band by equilibrium free carriers. A change in this population by free electrons under various temperatures affects absorption and carrier transport of non-equilibrium carriers generated by incident light. This results in different efficiencies for both the doped and undoped intermediate band solar cells in comparison with the reference GaAs p-i-n solar cell device.

Kunets, Vas. P., E-mail: vkunets@uark.edu; Furrow, C. S.; Ware, M. E.; Souza, L. D. de; Benamara, M.; Salamo, G. J. [Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Mortazavi, M. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71601 (United States)

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

297

Transverse conductance of DNA nucleotides in a graphene nanogap from first principles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fabrication of solid-state nanopores is becoming increasingly sophisticated. Recently, nanopores were successfully created in graphene and translocation of DNA has been demonstrated. Taken together with an earlier proposal to use graphene nanogaps for the purpose of DNA sequencing, this atomically thin carbon material is becoming recognized as a possible solution to several of the technical issues in electronic nucleobase detection, in particular that of single-base resolution. We have used density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function method to investigate the transverse conductance properties of nucleotides inside a graphene nanogap. In particular, we determined the variation in the transmission function at both zero bias and finite bias due to changes in the nucleotides orientation and lateral position. Although the resulting tunneling current is found to fluctuate over several orders of magnitudes, a distinction between the four DNA bases appears possible, and the graphene nanogap...

Prasongkit, Jariyanee; Pathak, Biswarup; Ahuja, Rajeev; Scheicher, Ralph H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Transverse Electronic Transport through DNA Nucleotides with Functionalized Graphene Electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene nanogaps and nanopores show potential for the purpose of electrical DNA sequencing, in particular because single-base resolution appears to be readily achievable. Here, we evaluated from first principles the advantages of a nanogap setup with functionalized graphene edges. To this end, we employed density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function method to investigate the transverse conductance properties of the four nucleotides occurring in DNA when located between the opposing functionalized graphene electrodes. In particular, we determined the electrical tunneling current variation as a function of the applied bias and the associated differential conductance at a voltage which appears suitable to distinguish between the four nucleotides. Intriguingly, we observe for one of the nucleotides a negative differential resistance effect.

Prasongkit, Jariyanee; Pathak, Biswarup; Ahuja, Rajeev; Scheicher, Ralph H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Absence of jamming in ant trails: Feedback control of self propulsion and noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a model of ant traffic considering individual ants as self-propelled particles undergoing single file motion on a one-dimensional trail. Recent experiments on unidirectional ant traffic in well-formed natural trails showed that the collective velocity of ants remains approximately unchanged, leading to absence of jamming even at very high densities [ John et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 108001 (2009) ]. Assuming a feedback control mechanism of self-propulsion force generated by each ant using information about the distance from the ant in front, our model captures all the main features observed in the experiment. The distance headway distribution shows a maximum corresponding to separations within clusters. The position of this maximum remains independent of average number density. We find a non-equilibrium first order transition, with the formation of an infinite cluster at a threshold density where all the ants in the system suddenly become part of a single cluster.

Chaudhuri, Debasish

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Causal dissipative hydrodynamics for QGP fluid in 2+1 dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2nd order causal dissipative theory, space-time evolution of QGP fluid is studied in 2+1 dimensions. Relaxation equations for shear stress tensors are solved simultaneously with the energy-momentum conservation equations. Comparison of evolution of ideal and viscous QGP fluid, initialized under the same conditions, e.g. same equilibration time, energy density and velocity profile, indicate that in a viscous dynamics, energy density or temperature of the fluid evolve slowly, than in an ideal fluid. Cooling gets slower as viscosity increases. Transverse expansion also increases in a viscous dynamics. For the first time we have also studied elliptic flow of 'quarks' in causal viscous dynamics. It is shown that elliptic flow of quarks saturates due to non-equilibrium correction to equilibrium distribution function, and can not be mimicked by an ideal hydrodynamics.

A. K. Chaudhuri

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Influence of electron–phonon interactions in single dopant nanowire transistors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single dopant nanowire transistors can be viewed as the ultimate miniaturization of nano electronic devices. In this work, we theoretically investigate the influence of the electron-phonon coupling on their transport properties using a non-equilibrium Green's function approach in the self-consistent Born approximation. For an impurity located at the center of the wire we find that, at room temperature, acoustic phonons broaden the impurity level so that the bistability predicted in the ballistic regime is suppressed. Optical phonons are found to have a beneficial impact on carrier transport via a phonon-assisted tunneling effect. We discuss the position and temperature dependence of these effects, showing that such systems might be very promising for engineering of ultimate devices.

Carrillo-Nuñez, H., E-mail: carrillh@iis.ee.ethz.ch; Bescond, M., E-mail: marc.bescond@im2np.fr; Cavassilas, N.; Dib, E.; Lannoo, M. [IM2NP, UMR CNRS 6242, Bât. IRPHE, Technopôle de Château-Gombert, 13384 Marseille, Cedex 13 (France)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

302

Noise Rectification and Fluctuations of an Asymmetric Inelastic Piston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a massive inelastic piston, whose opposite faces have different coefficients of restitution, moving under the action of an infinitely dilute gas of hard disks maintained at a fixed temperature. The dynamics of the piston is Markovian and obeys a continuous Master Equation: however, the asymmetry of restitution coefficients induces a violation of detailed balance and a net drift of the piston, as in a Brownian ratchet. Numerical investigations of such non-equilibrium stationary state show that the velocity fluctuations of the piston are symmetric around the mean value only in the limit of large piston mass, while they are strongly asymmetric in the opposite limit. Only taking into account such an asymmetry, i.e. including a third parameter in addition to the mean and the variance of the velocity distribution, it is possible to obtain a satisfactory analytical prediction for the ratchet drift velocity.

G. Costantini; U. Marini Bettolo Marconi; A. Puglisi

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

Model for bidirectional movement of cytoplasmic dynein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cytoplasmic dynein exhibits a directional processive movement on microtubule filaments and is known to move in steps of varying length based on the number of ATP molecules bound to it and the load that it carries. It is experimentally observed that dynein takes occasional backward steps and the frequency of such backward steps increases as the load approaches the stall force. Using a stochastic process model, we investigate the bidirectional movement of single head of a dynein motor. The probability for backward step is implemented based on Crook's fluctuation theorem of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. We find that the movement of dynein motor is characterized with negative velocity implying backward motion beyond stall force. We observe that the motor moves backward for super stall forces by hydrolyzing the ATP exactly the same way as it does while moving forward for sub stall forces.

S. Sumathy; S. V. M. Satyanarayana

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

304

Spin transport and spin polarization properties in double-stranded DNA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the spin-dependent electron transport through a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations and non-equilibrium Green's function method. We calculate the spin-dependent electron conductance and spin-polarization for different lengths, helix angles, twist angles of dsDNA, the environment-induced dephasing factors, and hopping integral. It is shown that the conductance decreases by increasing the length and dephasing factor. Also, we show that the spin-polarization depends on the helical symmetry and the length of DNA. It is shown that the double-stranded DNA can act as a perfect spin filter. Finally, we show that the sign of spin polarization can be inverted from +1 (?1) to ?1 (+1) for some values of hopping integral.

Simchi, Hamidreza, E-mail: simchi@iust.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narrmak, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Semiconductor Technology Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi, E-mail: mahdi@iust.ac.ir; Mazidabadi, Hossein [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narrmak, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

305

Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

Simchi, Hamidreza, E-mail: simchi@iust.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Semiconductor Technology Center, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi, E-mail: mahdi@iust.ac.ir; Mazidabadi, Hossein [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

306

A high-order harmonic generation apparatus for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a table top setup for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate band structure dynamics of correlated materials driven far from equilibrium by femtosecond laser pulse excitation. With the electron-phonon equilibration time being in the order of 1–2 ps it is necessary to achieve sub-picosecond time resolution. Few techniques provide both the necessary time and energy resolution to map non-equilibrium states of the band structure. Laser-driven high-order harmonic generation is such a technique. In our experiment, a grating monochromator delivers tunable photon energies up to 40 eV. A photon energy bandwidth of 150 meV and a pulse duration of 100 fs FWHM allow us to cover the k-space necessary to map valence bands at different k{sub z} and detect outer core states.

Frietsch, B.; Gahl, C.; Teichmann, M.; Weinelt, M. [Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)] [Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Carley, R. [Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany) [Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Döbrich, K. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schwarzkopf, O.; Wernet, Ph. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Prediction of Transport Properties by Molecular Simulation: Methanol and Ethanol and their mixture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transport properties of liquid methanol and ethanol are predicted by molecular dynamics simulation. The molecular models for the alcohols are rigid, non-polarizable and of united-atom type. They were developed in preceding work using experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data only. Self- and Maxwell-Stefan diffusion coefficients as well as the shear viscosity of methanol, ethanol and their binary mixture are determined using equilibrium molecular dynamics and the Green-Kubo formalism. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics is used for predicting the thermal conductivity of the two pure substances. The transport properties of the fluids are calculated over a wide temperature range at ambient pressure and compared with experimental and simulation data from the literature. Overall, a very good agreement with the experiment is found. For instance, the self-diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity are predicted with average deviations of less 8% for the pure alcohols and 12% for the mixture. The predicted thermal...

Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Vrabec, Jadran; Hasse, Hans

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Rectification induced in N{sub 2}{sup AA}-doped armchair graphene nanoribbon device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By using non-equilibrium Green function formalism in combination with density functional theory, we investigated the electronic transport properties of armchair graphene nanoribbon devices in which one lead is undoped and the other is N{sub 2}{sup AA}-doped with two quasi-adjacent substitutional nitrogen atoms incorporating pairs of neighboring carbon atoms in the same sublattice A. Two kinds of N{sub 2}{sup AA}-doped style are considered, for N dopants substitute the center or the edge carbon atoms. Our results show that the rectification behavior with a large rectifying ratio can be found in these devices and the rectifying characteristics can be modulated by changing the width of graphene nanoribbons or the position of the N{sub 2}{sup AA} dopant. The mechanisms are revealed to explain the rectifying behaviors.

Chen, Tong; Wang, Ling-Ling, E-mail: llwang@hnu.edu.cn; Luo, Kai-Wu; Xu, Liang [School of Physics and Microelectronic and Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Physics and Technology of Hunan Province, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Xiao-Fei, E-mail: xfli@hnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Microelectronic and Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Physics and Technology of Hunan Province, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Department of Electrical and Information Engineering, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

309

A Green's function formalism of energy and momentum transfer in fluctuational electrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative energy and momentum transfer due to fluctuations of electromagnetic fields arising due to temperature difference between objects is described in terms of the cross-spectral densities of the electromagnetic fields. We derive relations between thermal non-equilibrium contributions to energy and momentum transfer and surface integrals of tangential components of the dyadic Green's functions of the vector Helmholtz equation. The expressions derived here are applicable to objects of arbitrary shapes, dielectric functions, as well as magnetic permeabilities. For the case of radiative transfer, we derive expressions for the generalized transmissivity and generalized conductance that are shown to obey reciprocity and agree with theory of black body radiative transfer in the appropriate limit.

Arvind Narayanaswamy; Yi Zheng

2013-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

310

Micro-canonical thermodynamics: Why does heat flow from hot to cold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show how to use a central limit approximation for additive co-cycles to describe non-equilibrium and far from equilibrium thermodynamic behavior. We consider first two weakly coupled Hamiltonian dynamical systems initially at different micro-canonical temperatures. We describe a stochastic model where the energy-transfer between the two systems is considered as a random variable satisfying a central limit approximation. We show that fluctuations in energy observables are linearly related to the heat-transfer (dissipation). As a result, on average, heat flows from hot to cold. We also consider the far from equilibrium situation of a non-Hamiltonian thermostatted system as in Evans et al. {\\em Phys.\\ Rev.\\ Lett.} {\\bf 71}, 2401 (1993). Applying the same central limit approximation we re-derive their relation for the violation of the 2nd law of thermodynamics. We note that time-reversal symmetry is not used in our derivation.

Hans Henrik Rugh

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

311

GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. I. Parameter Space Exploration with 2D Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We utilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to develop a numerical model for GMC-GMC collisions between nearly magnetically critical clouds. The goal is to determine if, and under what circumstances, cloud collisions can cause pre-existing magnetically subcritical clumps to become supercritical and undergo gravitational collapse. We first develop and implement new photodissociation region (PDR) based heating and cooling functions that span the atomic to molecular transition, creating a multiphase ISM and allowing modeling of non-equilibrium temperature structures. Then in 2D and with ideal MHD, we explore a wide parameter space of magnetic field strength, magnetic field geometry, collision velocity, and impact parameter, and compare isolated versus colliding clouds. We find factors of ~2-3 increase in mean clump density from typical collisions, with strong dependence on collision velocity and magnetic field strength, but ultimately limited by flux-freezing in 2D geometries. For geometries enabling flow a...

Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C; Bruderer, Simon

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Large linear magnetoresistance in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report non-saturating linear magnetoresistance (MR) in a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) at a GaAs/AlGaAs heterointerface in the strongly insulating regime. We achieve this by driving the gate voltage below the pinch-off point of the device and operating it in the non-equilibrium regime with high source-drain bias. Remarkably, the magnitude of MR is as large as 500% per Tesla with respect to resistance at zero magnetic field, thus dwarfing most non-magnetic materials which exhibit this linearity. Its primary advantage over most other materials is that both linearity and the enormous magnitude are retained over a broad temperature range (0.3 K to 10 K), thus making it an attractive candidate for cryogenic sensor applications.

Aamir, Mohammed Ali, E-mail: aamir@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Goswami, Srijit, E-mail: aamir@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Ghosh, Arindam [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Baenninger, Matthias; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Tripathi, Vikram [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Pepper, Michael [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University College, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

313

Isotropization from Color Field Condensate in heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The expanding fireball shortly after a heavy ion collision may be qualitatively described by a condensate of color fields or gluons which is analogous to Bose-Einstein-condensation for massive bosonic particles. This condensate is a transient non-equilibrium phenomenon and breaks Lorentz-boost symmetry. The dynamics of color field condensates involves collective excitations and is rather different from the perturbative scattering of gluons. In particular, it provides for an efficient mechanism to render the local pressure approximately isotropic after a short time of 0.2 fm/c. We suggest that an isotropic color field condensate may play a central role for a simple description of prethermalization and isotropization in the early stages of the collision.

Stefan Floerchinger; Christof Wetterich

2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

314

Equilibration in low-dimensional quantum matrix models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matrix models play an important role in studies of quantum gravity, being candidates for a formulation of M-theory, but are notoriously difficult to solve. In this work, we present a fresh approach by introducing a novel exact model provably equivalent with low-dimensional bosonic matrix models. In this equivalent model significant local structure becomes apparent and it can serve as a simple toy model for analytical and precise numerical study. We derive a substantial part of the low energy spectrum, find a conserved charge, and are able to derive numerically the Regge trajectories. To exemplify the usefulness of the approach, we address questions of equilibration starting from a non-equilibrium situation, building upon an intuition from quantum information. We finally discuss possible generalizations of the approach.

R. Hübener; Y. Sekino; J. Eisert

2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

315

Driven synchronization in random networks of oscillators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synchronization is a universal phenomenon found in many non-equilibrium systems. Much recent interest in this area has overlapped with the study of complex networks, where a major focus is determining how a system's connectivity patterns affect the types of behavior that it can produce. Thus far, modeling efforts have focused on the tendency of networks of oscillators to mutually synchronize themselves, with less emphasis on the effects of external driving. In this work we discuss the interplay between mutual and driven synchronization in networks of phase oscillators of the Kuramoto type, and resolve how the structure and emergence of such states depends on the underlying network topology for simple random networks with a given degree distribution. We provide a partial bifurcation analysis, centering on the appearance of a Takens-Bogdanov-Cusp singularity, which broadly separates homogeneous and heterogeneous network behavior in a weak coupling limit, and from which the number, stability and appearance of dr...

Hindes, Jason

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Universal Ideal Behavior and Macroscopic Work Relation of Linear Irreversible Stochastic Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process as the fundamental mathematical description of linear irreversible phenomena, with fluctuations, near an equilibrium. By identifying the underlying circulating dynamics in a stationary process as the natural generalization of classical conservative mechanics, a bridge between a family of OU processes with equilibrium fluctuations and thermodynamics is established through the celebrated Helmholtz theorem. The Helmholtz theorem provides an emergent macroscopic "equation of state" of the entire system, which exhibits a universal ideal thermodynamic behavior. Fluctuating macroscopic quantities are studied from the stochastic thermodynamic point of view and a non-equilibrium work relation is obtained in the macroscopic picture, which may facilitate experimental study and application of the equalities due to Jarzynski, Crooks, and Hatano and Sasa.

Ma, Yi-An

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Flow Decomposition Reveals Dynamical Structure of Markov Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Markov process is widely applied in almost all aspects of literature, especially important for understanding non-equilibrium processes. We introduce a decomposition to general Markov process in this paper. This decomposition decomposes the process into 3 independent parts: stationary distribution, symmetric detailed-balance part and anti-symmetric breaking detailed-balance part. This complete decomposition captures the steady state as well as the dynamics of the process, providing an elegant perspective for construction or analyzing problems. In light of the decomposition, a unique definition of relative entropy is found to formally separate the effect of detailed-balance part and breaking detailed-balance part. We find that the relative Gini entropy production introduced in the paper is not affected by the non-detailed balance part of the process. This property do not holds for other entropy definition in general discrete case.

Jianghong Shi; Tianqi Chen; Bo Yuan; Ping Ao

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

318

Soft matter in hard confinement: phase transition thermodynamics, structure, texture, diffusion and flow in nanoporous media - topical review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial confinement in nanoporous media affects the structure, thermodynamics and mobility of molecular soft matter often markedly. This article reviews thermodynamic equilibrium phenomena, such as physisorption, capillary condensation, crystallisation, self-diffusion, and structural phase transitions as well as selected aspects of the emerging field of spatially confined, non-equilibrium physics, i.e. the rheology of liquids, capillarity-driven flow phenomena, and imbibition front broadening in nanoporous materials. The observations in the nanoscale systems are related to the corresponding bulk phenomenologies. The complexity of the confined molecular species is varied from simple building blocks, like noble gas atoms, normal alkanes and alcohols to liquid crystals, polymers, ionic liquids, proteins and water. Mostly, experiments with mesoporous solids of alumina, carbon, gold, silica, and silicon having pore diameters ranging from a few up to 50 nanometers are presented. The observed peculiarities of nanopo...

Huber, Patrick

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Exploring the mechanisms of protein folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neither of the two prevalent theories, namely thermodynamic stability and kinetic stability, provides a comprehensive understanding of protein folding. The thermodynamic theory is misleading because it assumes that free energy is the exclusive dominant mechanism of protein folding, and attributes the structural transition from one characteristic state to another to energy barriers. Conversely, the concept of kinetic stability overemphasizes dominant mechanisms that are related to kinetic factors. This article explores the stability condition of protein structures from the viewpoint of meso-science, paying attention to the compromise in the competition between minimum free energy and other dominant mechanisms. Based on our study of complex systems, we propose that protein folding is a meso-scale, dissipative, nonlinear and non-equilibrium process that is dominated by the compromise between free energy and other dominant mechanisms such as environmental factors. Consequently, a protein shows dynamic structures,...

Xu, Ji; Ren, Ying; Li, Jinghai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Statistical charge distribution over dust particles in a non-Maxwellian Lorentzian plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of statistical mechanics and charging kinetics, the charge distribution over uniform size spherical dust particles in a non-Maxwellian Lorentzian plasma is investigated. Two specific situations, viz., (i) the plasma in thermal equilibrium and (ii) non-equilibrium state where the plasma is dark (no emission) or irradiated by laser light (including photoemission) are taken into account. The formulation includes the population balance equation for the charged particles along with number and energy balance of the complex plasma constituents. The departure of the results for the Lorentzian plasma, from that in case of Maxwellian plasma, is graphically illustrated and discussed; it is shown that the charge distribution tends to results corresponding to Maxwellian plasma for large spectral index. The charge distribution predicts the opposite charging of the dust particles in certain cases.

Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar-382428 (India); Misra, Shikha, E-mail: shikhamish@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies (CES), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi-110016 (India)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gc5 non-equilibrium brn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Transport, Aharonov-Bohm, and Topological Effects in Graphene Molecular Junctions and Graphene Nanorings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unique ultra-relativistic, massless, nature of electron states in two-dimensional extended graphene sheets, brought about by the honeycomb lattice arrangement of carbon atoms in two-dimensions, provides ingress to explorations of fundamental physical phenomena in graphene nanostructures. Here we explore the emergence of new behavior of electrons in atomically precise segmented graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) and graphene rings with the use of tight-binding calculations, non-equilibrium Green's function transport theory, and a newly developed Dirac continuum model that absorbs the valence-to-conductance energy gaps as position-dependent masses, including topological-in-origin mass-barriers at the contacts between segments. Through transport investigations in variable-width segmented GNRs with armchair, zigzag, and mixed edge terminations we uncover development of new Fabry-Perot-like interference patterns in segmented GNRs, a crossover from the ultra-relativistic massless regime, characteristic of extended gra...

Yannouleas, Constantine; Landman, Uzi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbon decorated with copper clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using non-equilibrium green function with density functional theory, the present study investigates the transport properties of decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon with a copper cluster. We have represented the decoration of zigzag graphene nanoribbon with single copper atom and cluster containing two and three copper atoms. In all the cases, copper atoms tend to occupy the edge state. In addition, we have shown that copper can alter the current-voltage characteristic of zigzag graphene nanoribbon and create new fluctuations and negative differential resistance. These alternations are made due to discontinuity in the combination of orbitals along the graphene nanoribbon. Decoration alters these discontinuities and creates more visible fluctuations. However, in low bias voltages, the changes are similar in all the cases. The study demonstrates that in the decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon, the edge states are the main states for transporting electron from one electrode to another.

Berahman, M.; Sheikhi, M. H., E-mail: msheikhi@shirazu.ac.ir [School of Electrical and Computer Eng, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology Research Institute, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

323

Molecular dynamics simulations of oscillatory Couette flows with slip boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of interfacial slip on steady-state and time-periodic flows of monatomic liquids is investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The fluid phase is confined between atomically smooth rigid walls, and the fluid flows are induced by moving one of the walls. In steady shear flows, the slip length increases almost linearly with shear rate. We found that the velocity profiles in oscillatory flows are well described by the Stokes flow solution with the slip length that depends on the local shear rate. Interestingly, the rate dependence of the slip length obtained in steady shear flows is recovered when the slip length in oscillatory flows is plotted as a function of the local shear rate magnitude. For both types of flows, the friction coefficient at the liquid-solid interface correlates well with the structure of the first fluid layer near the solid wall.

Nikolai V. Priezjev

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

324

Third-generation cylindrical dendrimers based on L-aspargic acid in solutions: hydrodynamic and electrooptical properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Samples of third-generation cylindrical dendrimers with molar masses ranging in the interval 20000...60000 have been studied by the methods of equilibrium and non-equilibrium electrical birefringence, molecular hydrodynamics and optics. It was found that the absolute values of Kerr and flow birefringence constants exceed the values obtained for analogous dendrimers of lower generations. The mechanism of reorientation has proven to be strongly dependent on the physical and chemical properties of the solvent. In chloroform solutions, the studied dendrimers align to the microwave-frequency electric fields according to large-scale mechanism. In dichloroacetic acid solutions, the observed reorientation mechanism is low-scale, which is explained by degradation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Terminal dendritic substituents of the macromolecules have experimentally proven to be oriented mainly along the primary polymer chain.

Ilya Martchenko; Nikolai Tsvetkov

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

325

A theory of finite deformation magneto-viscoelasticity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper deals with the mathematical modelling of large strain magneto-viscoelastic deformations. Energy dissipation is assumed to occur both due to the mechanical viscoelastic effects as well as the resistance offered by the material to magnetisation. Existence of internal damping mechanisms in the body is considered by decomposing the deformation gradient and the magnetic induction into `elastic' and `viscous' parts. Constitutive laws for material behaviour and evolution equations for the non-equilibrium fields are derived that agree with the laws of thermodynamics. To illustrate the theory the problems of stress relaxation, magnetic field relaxation, time dependent magnetic induction and strain are formulated and solved for a specific form of the constitutive law. The results, that show the effect of several modelling parameters on the deformation and magnetisation process, are illustrated graphically.

Saxena, Prashant; Steinmann, Paul

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Anisotropic flow in transport+hydrodynamics hybrid approaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This contribution to the focus issue covers anisotropic flow in hybrid approaches. The historical development of hybrid approaches and their impact on the interpretation of flow measurements is reviewed. The major ingredients of a hybrid approach and the transition criteria between transport and hydrodynamics are discussed. The results for anisotropic flow in (event-by-event) hybrid approaches are presented. Some hybrid approaches rely on hadronic transport for the late stages for the reaction (so called afterburner) and others employ transport approaches for the early non equilibrium evolution. In addition, there are 'full' hybrid calculations where a fluid evolution is dynamically embedded in a transport simulation. After demonstrating the success of hybrid approaches at high RHIC and LHC energies, existing hybrid caluclations for collective flow observables at lower beam energies are discussed and remaining challenges outlined.

Hannah Petersen

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Chiral Edge Currents in a Holographic Josephson Junction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the Josephson effect and the appearance of dissipationless edge currents in a holographic Josephson junction configuration involving a chiral, time-reversal breaking, superconductor in 2+1 dimensions. Such a superconductor is expected to be topological, thereby supporting topologically protected gapless Majorana-Weyl edge modes. Such modes manifest themselves in chiral dissipationless edge currents, which we exhibit and investigate in the context of our construction. The physics of the Josephson current itself, though expected to be unconventional in some non-equilibrium settings, is shown to be conventional in our setup which takes place in thermal equilibrium. We comment on various ways in which the expected Majorana nature of the edge excitations, and relatedly the unconventional nature of topological Josephson junctions, can be verified in the holographic context.

Rozali, Moshe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Thermodynamic Behavior of particular $f(R,T)$ Gravity Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the thermodynamics at the apparent horizon of the FRW universe in $f(R,T)$ theory under non-equilibrium description. The laws of thermodynamics have been discussed for two particular models of $f(R,T)$ theory. The first law of thermodynamics is expressed in the form of Clausius relation $T_hd\\hat{S}_h=\\delta{Q}$, where $\\delta{Q}=-d\\hat{E}+Wd\\mathbb{V}+T_hd_{\\jmath}\\hat{S}$ is the energy flux across the horizon and $d_{\\jmath}\\hat{S}$ is the entropy production term. Furthermore, the conditions to preserve the generalized second law of thermodynamics are established with the constraints of positive temperature and attractive gravity. We have illustrated our results for some concrete models in this theory.

M. Sharif; M. Zubair

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

A model for enhanced fusion reaction in a solid matrix of metal deuterides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our study shows that the cross-section for fusion improves considerably if d-d pairs are located in linear (one-dimensional) chainlets or line defects. Such non-equilibrium defects can exist only in a solid matrix. Further, solids harbor lattice vibrational modes (quanta, phonons) whose longitudinal-optical modes interact strongly with electrons and ions. One such interaction, resulting in potential inversion, causes localization of electron pairs on deuterons. Thus, we have attraction of D+ D- pairs and strong screening of the nuclear repulsion due to these local electron pairs (local charged bosons: acronym, lochons). This attraction and strong coupling permits low-energy deuterons to approach close enough to alter the standard equations used to define nuclear-interaction cross-sections. These altered equations not only predict that low-energy-nuclear reactions (LENR) of D+ D- (and H+ H-) pairs are possible, they predict that they are probable.

K. P. Sinha; A. Meulenberg

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

330

A model for enhanced fusion reaction in a solid matrix of metal deuterides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our study shows that the cross-section for fusion improves considerably if d-d pairs are located in linear (one-dimensional) chainlets or line defects. Such non-equilibrium defects can exist only in a solid matrix. Further, solids harbor lattice vibrational modes (quanta, phonons) whose longitudinal-optical modes interact strongly with electrons and ions. One such interaction, resulting in potential inversion, causes localization of electron pairs on deuterons. Thus, we have attraction of D+ D- pairs and strong screening of the nuclear repulsion due to these local electron pairs (local charged bosons: acronym, lochons). This attraction and strong coupling permits low-energy deuterons to approach close enough to alter the standard equations used to define nuclear-interaction cross-sections. These altered equations not only predict that low-energy-nuclear reactions (LENR) of D+ D- (and H+ H-) pairs are possible, they predict that they are probable.

Sinha, K P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Modeling near-field radiative heat transfer from sharp objects using a general 3d numerical scattering technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the non-equilibrium radiative heat transfer between a plate and finite cylinders and cones, making the first accurate theoretical predictions for the total heat transfer and the spatial heat flux profile for three-dimensional compact objects including corners or tips. We find qualitatively different scaling laws for conical shapes at small separations, and in contrast to a flat/slightly-curved object, a sharp cone exhibits a local \\emph{minimum} in the spatially resolved heat flux directly below the tip. The method we develop, in which a scattering-theory formulation of thermal transfer is combined with a boundary-element method for computing scattering matrices, can be applied to three-dimensional objects of arbitrary shape.

McCauley, Alexander P; Krüger, Matthias; Johnson, Steven G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Shear induced rigidity in athermal materials: a unified statistical framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent studies of athermal systems such as dry grains and dense, non-Brownian suspensions have shown that shear can lead to solidification through the process of shear jamming in grains and discontinuous shear thickening in suspensions. The similarities observed between these two distinct phenomena suggest that the physical processes leading to shear-induced rigidity in athermal materials are universal. We present a non-equilibrium statistical mechanics model, which exhibits the phenomenology of these shear-driven transitions: shear jamming and discontinuous shear thickening in different regions of the predicted phase diagram. Our analysis identifies the crucial physical processes underlying shear-driven rigidity transitions, and clarifies the distinct roles played by shearing forces and the density of grains.

Sumantra Sarkar; Bulbul Chakraborty

2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

333

Entropic fluctuations of XY quantum spin chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider an XY quantum spin chain that consists of a left, center and right part initially at thermal equilibrium at temperatures $T_l$, $T_c$, and $T_r$, respectively. The left and right systems are infinitely extended thermal reservoirs and the central system is a small quantum system linking these two reservoirs. If there is a temperature differential, then heat and entropy will flow from one part of the chain to the other. We consider the Evans-Searles and Gallavotti-Cohen functionals which describe the fluctuations of this flux with respect to the initial state of the system and the non-equilibrium steady state reached by the system in the large time limit. We also define the full counting statistics for the XY chain and consider the associated entropic functional, as well a natural class of functionals that interpolate between the full counting statistics functional and the direct quantization of the variational characterization of the Evans-Searles functional which appears in classical non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. The Jordan-Wigner transformation associates a free Fermi gas and Jacobi matrix to our XY chain. Using this representation we are able to compute the entropic functionals in the large time limit in terms of the scattering data of the underlying Jacobi matrix. We show that the Gallavotti-Cohen and Evans-Searles functionals are identical in this limit. Furthermore, we show that all of these entropic functionals are equal in the large time limit if and only if the underlying Jacobi matrix is reflectionless.

Benjamin Landon

2015-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

334

Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we present the research efforts made by our group at UCLA in the SciDAC project ���¢��������Simulations of turbulent flows with strong shocks and density variations���¢�������. We use shock-fitting methodologies as an alternative to shock-capturing schemes for the problems where a well defined shock is present. In past five years, we have focused on development of high-order shock-fitting Navier-Stokes solvers for perfect gas flow and thermochemical non-equilibrium flow and simulation of shock-turbulence interaction physics for very strong shocks. Such simulation has not been possible before because the limitation of conventional shock capturing methods. The limitation of shock Mach number is removed by using our high-order shock-fitting scheme. With the help of DOE and TeraGrid/XSEDE super computing resources, we have obtained new results which show new trends of turbulence statistics behind the shock which were not known before. Moreover, we are also developing tools to consider multi-species non-equilibrium flows. The main results are in three areas: (1) development of high-order shock-fitting scheme for perfect gas flow, (2) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of interaction of realistic turbulence with moderate to very strong shocks using super computing resources, and (3) development and implementation of models for computation of mutli-species non-quilibrium flows with shock-fitting codes.

Zhong, Xiaolin

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

335

Large dynamic range diagnostics for high current electron LINACs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Jefferson Lab FEL driver accelerator - Energy Recovery Linac has provided a beam with average current of up to 9 mA and beam energy of 135 MeV. The high power beam operations have allowed developing and testing methods and approaches required to set up and tune such a facility simultaneously for the high beam power and high beam quality required for high performance FEL operations. In this contribution we briefly review this experience and outline problems that are specific to high current - high power non-equilibrium linac beams. While the original strategy for beam diagnostics and tuning have proven to be quite successful, some shortcomings and unresolved issues were also observed. The most important issues are the non-equilibrium (non-Gaussian) nature of the linac beam and the presence of small intensity - large amplitude fraction of the beam a.k.a. beam halo. Thus we also present a list of the possible beam halo sources and discuss possible mitigations means. We argue that for proper understanding and management of the beam halo large dynamic range (>10{sup 6}) transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics can be used. We also present results of transverse beam profile measurements with the dynamic range approaching 10{sup 5} and demonstrate the effect the increased dynamic range has on the beam characterization, i.e., emittance and Twiss parameters measurements. We also discuss near future work planned in this field and where the JLab FEL facility will be used for beam tests of the developed of new diagnostics.

Evtushenko, P., E-mail: Pavel.Evtushenko@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

336

Large-deviation principles, stochastic effective actions, path entropies, and the structure and meaning of thermodynamic descriptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The meaning of thermodynamic descriptions is found in large-deviations scaling of the fluctuations probabilities. The primary large-deviations rate function is the entropy, which is the basis for both fluctuation theorems and for characterizing the thermodynamic interactions of systems. Freidlin-Wentzell theory provides a general formulation of large-deviations scaling for non-equilibrium stochastic processes, through a representation in terms of a Hamiltonian dynamical system. A number of related methods now exist to construct the Freidlin-Wentzell Hamiltonian for many kinds of stochastic processes; one method due to Doi and Peliti, appropriate to integer counting statistics, is widely used in reaction-diffusion theory. Using these tools together with a path-entropy method due to Jaynes, we show how to construct entropy functions that both express large-deviations scaling of fluctuations, and describe system-environment interactions, for discrete stochastic processes either at or away from equilibrium. A collection of variational methods familiar within quantum field theory, but less commonly applied to the Doi-Peliti construction, is used to define a "stochastic effective action", which is the large-deviations rate function for arbitrary non-equilibrium paths. We show how common principles of entropy maximization, applied to different ensembles of states or of histories, lead to different entropy functions and different sets of thermodynamic state variables. Yet the relations of among all these levels of description may be constructed explicitly and understood in terms of information conditions. The example systems considered introduce methods that may be used to systematically construct descriptions with all the features familiar from equilibrium thermodynamics, for a much wider range of systems describable by stochastic processes.

Eric Smith

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

337

Size separation in vibrated granular matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent developments in size separation in vibrated granular materials. Motivated by a need in industry to efficiently handle granular materials and a desire to make fundamental advances in non-equilibrium physics, experimental and theoretical investigations have shown size separation to be a complex phenomena. Large particles in a vibrated granular system invariably rise to the top. However, they may also sink to the bottom, or show other patterns depending on subtle variations in physical conditions. While size ratio is a dominant factor, particle specific properties such as density, inelasticity and friction can play an important role. The nature of the energy input, boundary conditions and interstitial air have been also shown to be significant factors in determining spatial distributions. The presence of convection can enhance mixing or lead to size separation. Experimental techniques including direct visualization and magnetic resonance imaging are being used to investigate these properties. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation techniques have been developed to probe size separation. Analytical methods such as kinetic theory are being used to study the interplay between particle size and density in the vibro-fluidized regime, and geometric models have been proposed to describe size separation for deep beds. Besides discussing these studies, we will also review the impact of inelastic collision and friction on the density and velocity distributions to gain a deeper appreciation of the non-equilibrium nature of the system. While a substantial number of studies have been accomplished, considerable work is still required to achieve a firm description of the phenomena.

A. Kudrolli

2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

338

An Information-Theoretic Measure of Uncertainty due to Quantum and Thermal Fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study an information-theoretic measure of uncertainty for quantum systems. It is the Shannon information $I$ of the phase space probability distribution $\\la z | \\rho | z \\ra $, where $|z \\ra $ are coherent states, and $\\rho$ is the density matrix. The uncertainty principle is expressed in this measure as $I \\ge 1$. For a harmonic oscillator in a thermal state, $I$ coincides with von Neumann entropy, $- \\Tr(\\rho \\ln \\rho)$, in the high-temperature regime, but unlike entropy, it is non-zero at zero temperature. It therefore supplies a non-trivial measure of uncertainty due to both quantum and thermal fluctuations. We study $I$ as a function of time for a class of non-equilibrium quantum systems consisting of a distinguished system coupled to a heat bath. We derive an evolution equation for $I$. For the harmonic oscillator, in the Fokker-Planck regime, we show that $I$ increases monotonically. For more general Hamiltonians, $I$ settles down to monotonic increase in the long run, but may suffer an initial decrease for certain initial states that undergo ``reassembly'' (the opposite of quantum spreading). Our main result is to prove, for linear systems, that $I$ at each moment of time has a lower bound $I_t^{min}$, over all possible initial states. This bound is a generalization of the uncertainty principle to include thermal fluctuations in non-equilibrium systems, and represents the least amount of uncertainty the system must suffer after evolution in the presence of an environment for time $t$.

Arlen Anderson; Jonathan J. Halliwell

1993-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To probe both the Mechanical Non-Equilibrium (MNE) and Thermodynamic Non-Equilibrium (TNE) in the combustion procedure, a two-dimensional Multiple-Relaxation-Time (MRT) version of the Lattice Boltzmann Kinetic Model(LBKM) for combustion phenomena is presented. The chemical energy released in the progress of combustion is dynamically coupled into the system by adding a chemical term to the LB kinetic equation. The LB model is required to recover the Navier-Stokes equations with chemical reaction in the hydrodynamic limit. To that aim, we construct a discrete velocity model with $24$ velocities divided into $3$ groups. In each group a flexible parameter is used to control the size of discrete velocities and a second parameter is used to describe the contribution of the extra degrees of freedom. The current model works for both subsonic and supersonic flows with or without chemical reaction. In this model both the specific-heat ratio and the Prandtl number are flexible, the TNE effects are naturally presented in each simulation step. Via the MRT model, it is more convenient to track the effects of TNE and how the TNE influence the MNE behaviors. The model is verified and validated via well-known benchmark tests. It is found that around the detonation wave there are competition between the viscous effect, thermal diffusion effect and the gradient effects of physical quantities. Consequently, with decreasing the collision parameters, (i) the nonequilibrium region becomes wider and the gradients of physical quantities decrease; (ii) the position where the internal energy in the shocking degree of freedom equals the one averaged over all degrees of freedom moves away from the position for the von Neumann peak.

Aiguo Xu; Chuandong Lin; Guangcai Zhang; Yingjun Li

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

340

UHM/HNEI EV test and evaluation program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electric vehicle (EV) program of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) focuses primarily on the field testing of promising EV/traction batteries. The intent is to utilize typical driving cycles to develop information that verifies or refutes what is obtained in the laboratory. Three different types of battery were assigned by the US DOE for testing in this program: Sonnenschein Dryfit 6V-160, Exide GC-5, Trojan T-145. We added the following battery to the test program: ALCO2200. HNEI`s existing EVs were utilized as test beds. The following EVs were chosen in our program: Converted Ford Escort station wagon, Converted Ford Escort two-door sedan, Converted Ford Escort two-door sedan, Converted Dodge van (typically daily driving distances, 10--30 miles). Capacity testing is a very effective way of monitoring the status of battery modules. Based on capacity tests, corrective action such as battery replacement, additional charging, adjusting terminal connections, etc., may be taken to maintain good performance. About 15,500 miles and 600 cycles have been accumulated on the Sonnenschein Dryfit 6V-160 battery pack. Five of its 18 modules have been changed. Based on DOE`s standard, the battery has reached the end of its useful life. Nevertheless, the battery pack is still operational and its operating range is still greater than 40 miles per charge. It is too early to evaluate the life expectancy of the other three batteries, the Trojan T-145, Exide GC-5, and Alco 2200. No module has been replaced in these three packs. The Trojan T-145 battery is a very promising EV traction battery in terms of quality and reliability versus price. HNEI will keep the Trojan and Exide battery packs in operation. The Alco 2200 batteries will be transferred to another vehicle. The Additional Charging Method seems to be an effective way of restoring weak modules. The ``Smart Voltmeter`` developed by HNEI is a promising way of monitoring the remaining range for an EV.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Dissipation of Modified Entropic Gravitational Energy Through Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomenological nature of a new gravitational type interaction between two different bodies derived from Verlinde's entropic approach to gravitation in combination with Sorkin's definition of Universe's quantum information content, is investigated. Assuming that the energy stored in this entropic gravitational field is dissipated under the form of gravitational waves and that the Heisenberg principle holds for this system, one calculates a possible value for an absolute minimum time scale in nature $\\tau=15/16 \\frac{\\Lambda^{1/2}\\hbar G}{c^4}\\sim9.27\\times10^{-105}$ seconds, which is much smaller than the Planck time $t_{P}=(\\hbar G/c^5)^{1/2}\\sim 5.38\\times10^{-44}$ seconds. This appears together with an absolute possible maximum value for Newtonian gravitational forces generated by matter $F_g=32/30\\frac{c^7}{\\Lambda \\hbar G^2}\\sim 3.84\\times 10^{165}$ Newtons, which is much higher than the gravitational field between two Planck masses separated by the Planck length $F_{gP}=c^4/G\\sim1.21\\times10^{44}$ Newtons.

Clovis Jacinto de Matos

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

342

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C. It was found that space group of R3c yielded a better refinement than a cubic structure of Pm3m. Oxygen occupancy was nearly 3 in the region from room temperature to 700 C, above which the occupancy decreased due to oxygen loss. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. The X-Ray data and fracture mechanisms points to non-equilibrium decomposition of the LSFCO OTM membrane. The non-equilibrium conditions could probably be due to the nature of the applied stress field (stressing rates) and leads to transition in crystal structures and increased kinetics of decomposition. The formations of a Brownmillerite or Sr2Fe2O5 type structures, which are orthorhombic are attributed to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The cubic to orthorhombic transitions leads to 2.6% increase in strains and thus residual stresses generated could influence the fracture behavior of the OTM membrane. Continued investigations on the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase-separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials were carried out. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previously characterization, stoichiometry and conductivity measurements for samples of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were reported. In this report, measurements of the chemical and thermal expansion as a function of temperature and p{sub O2} are described.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: Qualitative features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T > 160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future ge...

Ghiglieri, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Direct Observations of Plasma Upflows and Condensation in a Catastrophically Cooling Solar Transition Region Looop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimal observational evidence exists for fast transition region (TR) upflows in the presence of cool loops. Observations of such occurrences challenge notions of standard solar atmospheric heating models, as well as their description of bright TR emission. Using the {\\it EUV Imaging Spectrometer} (EIS) onboard {\\it Hinode}, we observe fast upflows ($v_\\lambda$\\,$\\le$\\,$-$10 km s$^{-1}$) over multiple TR temperatures (5.8\\,$\\le$\\,$\\log T$\\,$\\le$ 6.0) at the footpoint sites of a cool loop ($\\log T$\\,$\\le$\\,6.0). Prior to cool loop energizing, asymmetric flows of $+$\\,5 km s$^{-1}$ and $-$\\,60 km s$^{-1}$ are observed at footpoint sites. These flows speeds and patterns occur simultaneously with both magnetic flux cancellation (at site of upflows only) derived from the {\\it Solar Dynamics Observatory}'s (SDOs) { \\it Helioseismic Magnetic Imager}'s (HMI) line-of-sight magnetogram images, and a 30\\% mass in-flux at coronal heights. The incurred non-equilibrium structure of the cool loop leads to a catastrophic coo...

Orange, N B; Oluseyi, H M; Hesterly, K; Patel, M; Champey, P R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Response to Comment on '#28;Twin Symmetry Texture of Energetically Condensed 2 Niobium Thin Films on Sapphire Substrate' #29; [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523(2011)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Welander commented that in our article [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523(2011)] , Zhao et al claim to have found a new three-dimensional (3D) relationship for niobium-on-sapphire epitaxy?. Welander might have misunderstood the purpose of our article, which was to show that energetic condensation of Nb on sapphire drives crystal growth that is quite distinct from the type of epitaxy encountered in lower energy deposition. Welander is correct about the misidentified crystal-directions in the top-view sapphire lattice (Fig.4[ref.1]). He is also correct about the misorientation of the pole figures in Fig4[ref.1]. In Fig.1 of this response, we have corrected these errors. Perhaps because of these errors, Welander misconstrued our discussion of the Nb crystal growth as claiming a new 3D registry. That was not our intention. Rather, we wished to highlight the role of energetic condensation that drives low-defect crystal growth by a combination of non-equilibrium sub-plantation that disturbs the substrate lattice and thermal annealing that annihilates defects and promotes large-grain crystal growth.

Xin Zhao, Charles Reece, Phillips Larry, Mahadevan Krishnan, Kang Seo

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Horizontal Steam Generator Thermal-Hydraulics at Various Steady-State Power Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three-dimensional computer simulation and analyses of the horizontal steam generator thermal-hydraulics of the WWER 1000 nuclear power plant have been performed for 50% and 75% partial loads, 100% nominal load and 110% over-load. Presented results show water and steam mass flow rate vectors, steam void fraction spatial distribution, recirculation zones, swell level position, water mass inventory on the shell side, and other important thermal-hydraulic parameters. The simulations have been performed with the computer code 3D ANA, based on the 'two-fluid' model approach. Steam-water interface transport processes, as well as tube bundle flow resistance, energy transfer, and steam generation within tube bundles are modelled with {sup c}losure laws{sup .} Applied approach implies non-equilibrium thermal and flow conditions. The model is solved by the control volume procedure, which has been extended in order to take into account the 3D flow of liquid and gas phase. The methodology is validated by comparing numerical and experimental results of real steam generator operational conditions at various power levels of the WWER Novovoronezh, Unit 5. One-dimensional model of the horizontal steam generator has been built with the RELAP 5 standard code on the basis of the multidimensional two-phase flow structure obtained with the 3D ANA code. RELAP 5 and 3D ANA code results are compared, showing acceptable agreement. (authors)

Stevanovic, Vladimir D. [University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia); Stosic, Zoran V.; Kiera, Michael; Stoll, Uwe [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Application of Momentum Transfer Theory for Ion and Electron Transport in Pure Gases and in Gas Mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we have presented two applications of Momentum Transfer Theory (MTT), which were both aimed at obtaining reliable data for modeling of non-equilibrium plasma. Transport properties of ion swarms in presence of Resonant Charge Transfer (RCT) collisions are studied using Momentum Transfer Theory (MTT). Using the developed MTT we tested a previously available anisotropic set of cross-sections for Ar++Ar collisions bay making the comparisons with the available data for the transverse diffusion coefficient. We also developed an anisotropic set of Ne++Ne integral cross-sections based on the available data for mobility, longitudinal and transverse diffusion. Anisotropic sets of cross-sections are needed for Monte Carlo simulations of ion transport and plasma models. Application of Blanc's Law for drift velocities of electrons and ions in gas mixtures at arbitrary reduced electric field strengths E/n0 was studied theoretically and by numerical examples. Corrections for Blanc's Law that include effects of inelastic collisions were derived. In addition we have derived the common mean energy procedure that was proposed by Chiflikian in a general case both for ions and electrons. Both corrected common E/n0 and common mean energy procedures provide excellent results even for electrons at moderate E/n0 where application of Blanc's Law was regarded as impossible. In mixtures of two gases that have negative differential conductivity (NDC) even when neither of the two pure gases show NDC the Blanc's Law procedure was able to give excellent predictions.

Jovanovic, J.V. [Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 68, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Vrhovac, S. B. [Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 68, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Plasma and Ion Assistance in Physical Vapor Deposition: AHistorical Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deposition of films using plasma or plasma-assist can betraced back surprisingly far, namely to the 18th century for arcs and tothe 19th century for sputtering. However, only since the 1960s thecoatings community considered other processes than evaporation for largescale commercial use. Ion Plating was perhaps the first importantprocess, introducing vapor ionization and substrate bias to generate abeam of ions arriving on the surface of the growing film. Ratherindependently, cathodic arc deposition was established as an energeticcondensation process, first in the former Soviet Union in the 1970s, andin the 1980s in the Western Hemisphere. About a dozen various ion-basedcoating technologies evolved in the last decades, all characterized byspecific plasma or ion generation processes. Gridded and gridless ionsources were taken from space propulsion and applied to thin filmdeposition. Modeling and simulation have helped to make plasma and ionseffects to be reasonably well understood. Yet--due to the complex, oftennon-linear and non-equilibrium nature of plasma and surfaceinteractions--there is still a place for the experience plasma"sourcerer."

Anders, Andre

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

349

Light Activated Self-Propelled Colloids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light-activated self-propelled colloids are synthesized and their active motion is studied using optical microscopy. We propose a versatile route using different photoactive materials, and demonstrate a multiwavelength activation and propulsion. Thanks to the photoelectrochemical properties of two semiconductor materials (\\alpha Fe2 O3 and TiO2 ), a light with an energy higher than the bandgap triggers the reaction of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and produces a chemical cloud around the particle. It induces a phoretic attraction with neighbouring colloids as well as an osmotic self- propulsion of the particle on the substrate. We use these mechanisms to form colloidal cargos as well as self-propelled particles where the light-activated component is embedded into a dielectric sphere. The particles are self-propelled along a direction otherwise randomized by thermal fluctuations, and exhibit a persistent random walk. For sufficient surface density, the particles spontaneously form "living crystals" which are mobile, break apart and reform. Steering the particle with an external magnetic field, we show that the formation of the dense phase results from the collisions heads-on of the particles. This effect is intrinsically non-equilibrium and a novel principle of organization for systems without detailed balance. Engineering families of particles self-propelled by different wavelength demonstrate a good understanding of both the physics and the chemistry behind the system and points to a general route for designing new families of self-propelled particles.

J. Palacci; S. Sacanna; S. -H. Kim; G. -R. Yi; D. J. Pine; P. M. Chaikin

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

350

Brownian ratchet in a thermal bath driven by Coulomb friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rectification of unbiased fluctuations, also known as the ratchet effect, is normally obtained under statistical non-equilibrium conditions. Here we propose a new ratchet mechanism where a thermal bath solicits the random rotation of an asymmetric wheel, which is also subject to Coulomb friction due to solid-on-solid contacts. Numerical simulations and analytical calculations demonstrate a net drift induced by friction. If the thermal bath is replaced by a granular gas, the well known granular ratchet effect also intervenes, becoming dominant at high collision rates. For our chosen wheel shape the granular effect acts in the opposite direction with respect to the friction-induced torque, resulting in the inversion of the ratchet direction as the collision rate increases. We have realized a new granular ratchet experiment where both these ratchet effects are observed, as well as the predicted inversion at their crossover. Our discovery paves the way to the realization of micro and sub-micrometer Brownian motors in an equilibrium fluid, based purely upon nano-friction.

A. Gnoli; A. Petri; F. Dalton; G. Gradenigo; G. Pontuale; A. Sarracino; A. Puglisi

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Deceleration of Alpha Particles in the Solar Wind by Instabilities and the Rotational Force: Implications for Heating, Azimuthal Flow, and the Parker Spiral Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protons and alpha particles in the fast solar wind are only weakly collisional and exhibit a number of non-equilibrium features, including relative drifts between particle species. Two non-collisional mechanisms have been proposed for limiting differential flow between alpha particles and protons: plasma instabilities and the rotational force. Both mechanisms decelerate the alpha particles. In this paper, we derive an analytic expression for the rate $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}}$ at which energy is released by alpha-particle deceleration, accounting for azimuthal flow and conservation of total momentum. We find that $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}} > 0 $ at $r r_{\\mathrm{crit}}$. We compare the value of $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}}$ at $r< r_{\\mathrm{crit}}$ with empirical heating rates for protons and alpha particles, denoted $Q_{\\mathrm{p}}$ and $Q_{\\alpha}$, deduced from in-situ measurements of fast-wind streams from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft. We find that $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}}$ exceeds $Q_{\\alpha}$ at $r < 1\\,\\mathrm{AU}$, $Q_{...

Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Hollweg, Joseph V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Studying Complexity in Solar Wind Plasma During Shock Events. Part I: Nonextensive Tsallis Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel results which reveal phase transition processes in the solar wind plasma during shock events are presented in this study which is the first part of a trilogy concerning the solar wind complexity. Solar wind plasma is a typical case of stochastic spatiotemporal distribution of physical magnitudes such as force fields (B, E) and matter fields (particle and current densities or bulk plasma distributions). The results of this study can be understood in the framework of modern theoretical concepts such as non-extensive statistical mechanics (Tsallis, 2009), fractal topology (Zelenyi and Milovanov, 2004), turbulence theory (Frisch,1996), strange dynamics (Zaslavsky, 2002), percolation theory (Milovanov, 1997), anomalous diffusion theory and anomalous transport theory (Milovanov, 2001), fractional dynamics (Tarasov, 2007) and non-equilibrium phase transition theory (Chang, 1992). This study shows clearly the non-extensive and non-Gaussian character of the solar wind plasma and the existence of multi-scale strong correlations from the microscopic to the macroscopic level. This result indicates the inefficiency of classical MHD or plasma statistical theories based on the classical central limit theorem to explain the complexity of the solar wind dynamics, since these theories include smooth and differentiable spatial-temporal functions (MHD theory) or Gaussian statistics (Boltzmann-Maxwell statistical mechanics). However, the results of this study indicate the presence of non-Gaussian non-extensive statistics with heavy tails probability distribution functions, which are related to the q-extension of central limit theorem.

G. P. Pavlos; A. C. Iliopoulos; G. N. Zastenker; L. M. Zelenyi; L. P. Karakatsanis; M. Riazantseva; M. N. Xenakis; E. G. Pavlos

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Universal far-from-equilibrium Dynamics of a Holographic Superconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Symmetry breaking phase transitions are an example of a non-equilibrium process that requires real time treatment, all but impossible in strongly coupled systems with no long-lived quasiparticles. Holographic duality provides such an approach by mapping strongly coupled field theories in D dimensions into weakly coupled quantum gravity in D+1 anti-de Sitter spacetime. We use holographic duality to study formation of topological defects -- nontrivial winding numbers -- in the course of a superconducting transition in a strongly coupled theory in a 1D ring. We observe that when the system undergoes the transition on a quench time \\tau_Q, the condensate builds up with a delay that can be deduced using the Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) from the quench time and the universality class of the theory, as determined from the quasinormal mode spectrum of the dual gravity model. Moreover, typical winding numbers deposited in the ring in the course of the transition exhibit a universal fractional power law dependence on the quench time \\tau_Q which is also predicted by KZM.

Julian Sonner; Adolfo del Campo; Wojciech H. Zurek

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

355

Two-particle irreducible effective actions versus resummation: analytic properties and self-consistency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approximations based on two-particle irreducible (2PI) effective actions (also known as $\\Phi$-derivable, Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis or Luttinger-Ward functionals depending on context) have been widely used in condensed matter and non-equilibrium quantum/statistical field theory because this formalism gives a robust, self-consistent, non-perturbative and systematically improvable approach which avoids problems with secular time evolution. The strengths of 2PI approximations are often described in terms of a selective resummation of Feynman diagrams to infinite order. However, the Feynman diagram series is asymptotic and summation is at best a dangerous procedure. Here we show that, at least in the context of a toy model where exact results are available, the true strength of 2PI approximations derives from their self-consistency rather than any resummation. This self-consistency allows truncated 2PI approximations to capture the branch points of physical amplitudes where adjustments of coupling constants can trigger an instability of the vacuum. This, in effect, turns Dyson's argument for the failure of perturbation theory on its head. As a result we find that 2PI approximations perform better than Pad\\'e approximation, but not as well as Borel summation where the latter is well-defined. Finally, we introduce a hybrid 2PI-Pad\\'e method.

Michael Brown; Ian Whittingham

2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Nonequilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relations for one- and two-particle correlation functions in steady-state quantum transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the non-equilibrium (NE) fluctuation-dissipation (FD) relations in the context of quantum thermoelectric transport through a two-terminal nanodevice in the steady-state. The FD relations for the one- and two-particle correlation functions are derived for a model of the central region consisting of a single electron level. Explicit expressions for the FD relations of the Green's functions (one-particle correlations) are provided. The FD relations for the current-current and charge-charge (two-particle) correlations are calculated numerically. We use self-consistent NE Green's functions calculations to treat the system in the absence and in the presence of interaction (electron-phonon) in the central region. We show that, for this model, there is no single universal FD theorem for the NE steady state. There are different FD relations for each different class of problems. We find that the FD relations for the one-particle correlation function are strongly dependent on both the NE conditions and the interactions, while the FD relations of the current-current correlation function are much less dependent on the interaction. The latter property suggests interesting applications for single-molecule and other nanoscale transport experiments.

Ness, H., E-mail: herve.ness@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Physics, School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, King's College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF), Liege (Belgium); Dash, L. K. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF), Liege (Belgium) [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF), Liege (Belgium); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Influence of Neutron Irradiation in FFTF on the Microstructural and Microchemical Development of Mo-41Re at 470-730ºC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Specimens of Mo-41 wt% Re irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) experience significant and non-monotonic changes in density that arise first from radiation-induced segregation, leading to non-equilibrium phase separation, and second by progressive transmutation of Re to Os. As a consequence the density of Mo-41Re initially decreases and then increases thereafter. Beginning as a single-phase solid solution of Re and Mo, irradiation of Mo-41 wt% Re over a range of temperatures (470-730ºC) to 28-96 dpa produces a high density of thin platelets of a hexagonal close-packed phase identified as a solid solution of Re, Os and possibly a small amount of Mo. These hcp precipitates are thought to form in the alloy matrix as a consequence of strong radiation-induced segregation to Frank loops. Grain boundaries also segregate Re to form the hcp phase, but the precipitates are much bigger and more equiaxed in shape. Although not formed at lower dose, continued irradiation at 730º C leads to the co-formation of late-forming Chi–phase, an equilibrium phase that then competes with the preexisting hcp phase for rhenium.

Edwards, Danny J.; Garner, Francis A.; Gelles, David S.

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Magnetism, entropy, and the first nano-machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The efficiency of bio-molecular motors stems from reversible interactions $\\sim$ $k_B T$; weak bonds stabilizing intermediate states (enabling $direct$ conversion of chemical into mechanical energy). For their (unknown) origins, we suggest that a magnetically structured phase (MSP) formed via accretion of super-paramagnetic particles (S-PPs) by magnetic rocks on the Hadean Ocean floor had hosted motor-like diffusion of ligand-bound S-PPs through its template-layers; its ramifications range from optical activity to quantum coherence. A gentle flux gradient offers both detailed-balance breaking non-equilibrium and $asymmetry$ to a magnetic dipole, undergoing infinitesimal spin-alignment changes. Periodic perturbation of this background by local H-fields of template-partners can lead to periodic high and low-template affinity states, due to the dipole's magnetic degree of freedom. An accompanying magnetocaloric effect allows interchange between system-entropy and bath temperature. We speculate on a magnetic reproducer in a setting close to the mound-scenario of Russell and coworkers that could evolve bio- ratchets.

Gargi Mitra-Delmotte; A. N. Mitra

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Estimation of the shear viscosity at finite net-baryon density from A+A collision data at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 7.7-200$ GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid approaches based on relativistic hydrodynamics and transport theory have been successfully applied for many years for the dynamical description of heavy ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies. In this work a new viscous hybrid model employing the hadron transport approach UrQMD for the early and late non-equilibrium stages of the reaction, and 3+1 dimensional viscous hydrodynamics for the hot and dense quark-gluon plasma stage is introduced. This approach includes the equation of motion for finite baryon number, and employs an equation of state with finite net-baryon density to allow for calculations in a large range of beam energies. The parameter space of the model is explored, and constrained by comparison with the experimental data for bulk observables from SPS and the phase I beam energy scan at RHIC. The favored parameter values depend on energy, but allow to extract the effective value of the shear viscosity coefficient over entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$ in the fluid phase for the whole e...

Karpenko, Iu A; Petersen, H; Bleicher, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Experimental study of a Ne-H{sub 2} Penning Recombination Laser in a helical hollow cathode discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Penning recombination lasers (PRL), as first proposed in, operate in non-equilibrium recombination plasma where the upper laser level (ULL) is populated by the recombination flux and the lower laser level (LLL) is depopulated by Penning reactions. The lack of chemical activity and degradation of the laser mixture, lasing in the visible spectral region and high output power obtained attract the attention to the Ne-H{sub 2} PRL operating on the NeI 585.3 nm line (the 2p{sub 1}-1s{sub 2} transition). Despite the most powerful PRL are pumped by electron beams of relativistic energies, it is of practical interest to realize PRL pumped in a hollow cathode discharge where beam of high energy primary electrons exists. In this study a detailed experimental investigation of a Ne-H{sub 2} PRL operating in a helical hollow cathode discharge is carried out. The obtained data are compared with the results of the theoretical model. The laser tube design is similar to that used in our previous work. The cathode is made of Mo band 10 mm wide, helically wound with a 15 mm pitch to form a cylindrical hollow. Five laser tubes with different cathode diameters (5.5-12 mm) and lengths (110-280 mm) are investigated.

Pramatarov, P.M.; Stefanova, M.S.; Petrov, G.M. [Georgy Nadjakov Institute of Solid State Physics, Sofia (Bulgaria)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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361

In Situ Heating of the 2007 May 19 CME Ejecta Detected by STEREO/PLASTIC and ACE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ measurements of ion charge states can provide unique insight into the heating and evolution of coronal mass ejections when tested against realistic non-equilibrium ionization modeling. In this work we investigate the representation of the CME magnetic field as an expanding spheromak configuration, where the plasma heating is prescribed by the choice of anomalous resistivity and the spheromak dynamics. We chose as a test case, the 19 May 2007 CME observed by STEREO and ACE. The spheromak is an appealing physical model, because the location and degree of heating is fixed by the choice of anomalous resistivity and the spheromak expansion rate which we constrain with observations. This model can provide the heating required between 1.1$R_{\\sun}$ and earth orbit to produce charge states observed in the CME flux rope. However this source of heating in the spheromak alone has difficulty accounting for the rapid heating to Fe$^{8 - 11+}$ at lower heights, as observed in STEREO EUVI due to the rapid radiative ...

Rakowski, Cara E; Lyutikov, Maxim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Mesophases in polyethylene, polypropylene, and poly(1-butene)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contains new views about the amorphous and partially ordered phases of the three polymers listed in the title. The discussion is based on information on structure, thermodynamic stability, and large-amplitude molecular motion. Polyethylene is the basic backbone of all alkene polymers, and the other two are the first members of the vinyl polymers which have stereospecifically placed alkyl side chains. Their multiphase structures consist of metastable crystals, mesophases, and surrounding rigid and mobile amorphous fractions. All these phases have sizes ranging from micrometer dimensions down to nanometers. Besides the phase structures, information about the molecular coupling between the phases must be considered. Depending on temperature, the polymer phases can vary from solid (rigid) to liquid (mobile). New knowledge is also gained by cross-comparison of the title polymers. The experimental information was gained from (a) various forms of slow, fast, and temperature-modulated thermal analysis to identify equilibrium and non-equilibrium states, (b) measurement of structure and morphology at various length scales, and (c) tracing of the large-amplitude molecular motion, the kinetics of order/disorder changes, and the liquid/solid transitions (glass transitions). It is shown that much more needs to be known about the various phases and their coupling to characterize a given polymer and to fine-tune its properties for a given application.

Androsch, Rene J [ORNL; Di Lorenzo, Maria [ORNL; Schick, Christoph [Rostock University, Rostock, Germany; Wunderlich, Bernhard {nmn} [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Stochastic Mean Field Model of Heat Engine partitioned by Fluctuating Piston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a stochastic mean field model of heat engine partitioned by a finite-mass piston. The time evolution equations for the density and the temperature of the enclosed gas are proposed, taking into account the stochastic equation of motion of the piston, and the energy conservation for the gas. Though the heat cycle consisting of finite-time heating and cooling processes is under strong non-equilibrium situations, i. e., the ratio of temperatures of two reservoirs is large, we analyze the efficiency and the power, and derive the semi-analytical expression for the efficiency. We find that the obtained efficiency at the maximum power operation is close to the Chambadal-Novikov-Curzon-Ahlborn (CNCA) efficiency, if the piston is sufficiently heavy and elastic for collisions with particles, even when the system is far from equilibrium. However, the extra heat due to the finiteness of the piston-mass or its inelasticity lowers the efficiency from the CNCA efficiency. The results of our stochastic mean field model are consistent with those for our event driven molecular dynamics simulation.

Tomohiko G. Sano; Hisao Hayakawa

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Controlled Population of Floquet-Bloch States via Coupling to Bose and Fermi Baths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

External driving is emerging as a promising tool for exploring new phases in quantum systems. The intrinsically non-equilibrium states that result, however, are challenging to describe and control. We study the steady states of a periodically driven one-dimensional electronic system, including the effects of radiative recombination, electron-phonon interactions, and the coupling to an external fermionic reservoir. Using a kinetic equation for the populations of the Floquet eigenstates, we show that the steady-state distribution can be controlled using the momentum and energy relaxation pathways provided by the coupling to phonon and Fermi reservoirs. In order to utilize the latter, we propose to couple the system and reservoir via an energy filter which suppresses photon-assisted tunneling. Importantly, coupling to these reservoirs yields a steady state resembling a band insulator in the Floquet basis. The system exhibits incompressible behavior, while hosting a small density of excitations. We discuss transport signatures, and describe the regimes where insulating behavior is obtained. Our results give promise for realizing Floquet topological insulators.

Karthik I. Seetharam; Charles-Edouard Bardyn; Netanel H. Lindner; Mark S. Rudner; Gil Refael

2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

365

On the use of the double floating probe method to infer the difference between the electron and the heavy particles temperatures in an atmospheric pressure, vortex-stabilized nitrogen plasma jet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sweeping double probe measurements in an atmospheric pressure direct current vortex-stabilized plasma jet are reported (plasma conditions: 100 A discharge current, N{sub 2} gas flow rate of 25 Nl/min, thoriated tungsten rod-type cathode, copper anode with 5 mm inner diameter). The interpretation of the double probe characteristic was based on a generalization of the standard double floating probe formulae for non-uniform plasmas coupled to a non-equilibrium plasma composition model. Perturbations caused by the current to the probe together with collisional and thermal processes inside the probe perturbed region were taken into account. Radial values of the average electron and heavy particle temperatures as well as the electron density were obtained. The calculation of the temperature values did not require any specific assumption about a temperature relationship between different particle species. An electron temperature of 10?900 ± 900 K, a heavy particle temperature of 9300 ± 900 K, and an electron density of about 3.5 × 10{sup 22} m{sup ?3} were found at the jet centre at 3.5 mm downstream from the torch exit. Large deviations from kinetic equilibrium were found toward the outer border of the plasma jet. These results showed good agreement with those previously reported by the authors by using a single probe technique. The calculations have shown that this method is particularly useful for studying spraying-type plasma torches operated at power levels of about 15 kW.

Prevosto, L., E-mail: prevosto@waycom.com.ar; Mancinelli, B. R. [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ingeniería Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, 2600 Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe (Argentina)] [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ingeniería Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, 2600 Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe (Argentina); Kelly, H. [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ingeniería Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, 2600 Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe (Argentina) [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ingeniería Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, 2600 Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Plasma (CONICET), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA) Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Tachyon condensation and off-shell gravity/gauge duality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate quasilocal tachyon condensation by using gravity/gauge duality. In order to cure the IR divergence due to a tachyon, we introduce two regularization schemes: AdS space and a d=10 Schwarzschild black hole in a cavity. These provide stable canonical ensembles and thus are good candidates for the endpoint of tachyon condensation. Introducing the Cardy-Verlinde formula, we establish the on-shell gravity/gauge duality. We propose that the stringy geometry resulting from the off-shell tachyon dynamics matches onto the off-shell AdS black hole, where "off-shell" means non-equilibrium configuration. The instability induced by condensation of a tachyon behaves like an off-shell black hole and evolves toward a large stable black hole. The off-shell free energy and its derivative ($\\beta$-function) are used to show the off-shell gravity/gauge duality for the process of tachyon condensation. Further, d=10 Schwarzschild black hole in a cavity is considered for the Hagedorn transition as a possible explanation of the tachyon condensation.

Yun Soo Myung

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

367

Nonequilibrium Thermoelectrics: Low-Cost, High-Performance Materials for Cooling and Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermoelectric materials can be made into coolers (TECs) that use electricity to develop a temperature difference, cooling something, or generators (TEGs) that convert heat directly to electricity. One application of TEGs is to place them in a waste heat stream to recuperate some of the power being lost and putting it to use more profitably. To be effective thermoelectrics, however, materials must have both high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity, a combination rarely found in nature. Materials selection and processing has led to the development of several systems with a figure of merit, ZT, of nearly unity. By using non-equilibrium techniques, we have fabricated higher efficiency thermoelectric materials. The process involves creating an amorphous material through melt spinning and then sintering it with either spark plasma or a hot press for as little as two minutes. This results in a 100% dense material with an extremely fine grain structure. The grain boundaries appear to retard phonons resulting in a reduced thermal conductivity while the electrons move through the material relatively unchecked. The techniques used are low-cost and scaleable to support industrial manufacturing.

Li, Q.

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

368

Cosmological production of H_2 before the formation of the first galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous calculations of the pregalactic chemistry have found that a small amount of H_2, x[H_2]=n[H_2]/n[H] = 2.6e-6, is produced catalytically through the H^-, H_2^+, and HeH^+ mechanisms. We revisit this standard calculation taking into account the effects of the nonthermal radiation background produced by cosmic hydrogen recombination, which is particularly effective at destroying H^- via photodetachment. We also take into consideration the non-equilibrium level populations of H_2^+, which occur since transitions among the rotational-vibrational levels are slow compared to photodissociation. The new calculation predicts a final H_2 abundance of x[H_2] = 6e-7 for the standard cosmology. This production is due almost entirely to the H^- mechanism, with ~1 per cent coming from HeH^+ and ~0.004 per cent from H_2^+. We evaluate the heating of the diffuse pregalactic gas from the chemical reactions that produce H_2 and from rotational transitions in H_2, and find them to be negligible.

Christopher M. Hirata; Nikhil Padmanabhan

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

369

Ballistic vs. diffusive heat transfer across nanoscopic films of layered crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics to study the heat transfer mechanism across sandwich interfacial structures of Si/n-atomic-layers/Si, with 1???n???20 and atomic layers composed of WSe{sub 2} and/or graphene. In the case of WSe{sub 2} sheets, we observe that the thermal resistance of the sandwich structure is increasing almost linearly with the number of WSe{sub 2} sheets, n, indicating a diffusive phonon transport mechanism. By contrast in the case of n graphene layers, the interfacial thermal resistance is more or less independent on the number of layers for 1???n???10, and is associated with ballistic phonon transport mechanism. We attribute the diffusive heat transfer mechanism across WSe{sub 2} sheets to abundant low frequency and low group velocity optical modes that carry most of the heat across the interface. By contrast, in graphene, acoustic modes dominate the thermal transport across the interface and render a ballistic heat flow mechanism.

Shen, Meng; Keblinski, Pawel, E-mail: keblip@rpi.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

370

Molecular dynamics simulation of shock induced ejection on fused silica surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shock response and surface ejection behaviors of fused silica are studied by using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics combining with the Tersoff potential. First, bulk structure and Hugoniot curves of fused silica are calculated and compared with experimental results. Then, the dynamical process of surface ejection behavior is simulated under different loading velocities ranging from 3.5 to 5.0?km?s, corresponding to shock wave velocities from 7.1 to 8.8?km?s. The local atomistic shear strain parameter is used to describe the local plastic deformation under conditions of shock compression or releasing. Our result shows that the shear strain is localized in the bottom area of groove under the shock compression. Surface ejection is observed when the loading velocity exceeds 4.0?km?s. Meanwhile, the temperature of the micro-jet is ?5574.7?K, which is close to experiment measurement. Several kinds of structural defects including non-bridging oxygen are found in the bulk area of the sample after ejection.

Su, Rui [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Xiang, Meizhen; Jiang, Shengli [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Chen, Jun, E-mail: jun-chen@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100087 (China); Wei, Han [Research Center of Laser Fusion, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

371

Negative differential resistance devices by using N-doped graphene nanoribbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, extensive efforts have been devoted to the investigations of negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior in graphene. Here, by performing fully self-consistent density functional theory calculations combined with non-equilibrium Green's function technique, we investigate the transport properties of three molecules from conjugated molecule, one-dimension alkane chain, and single molecule magnet, which are sandwiched between two N-doped zigzag and armchair graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). We observe robust NDR effect in all examined molecular junctions including benzene, alkane, and planar four-coordinated Fe complex. Through the analyses of the calculated electronic structures and the bias-dependent transmission coefficients, we find that the narrow density of states of N-doped GNRs and the bias-dependent effective coupling between the discrete frontier molecular orbitals and the subbands of N-doped GNRs are responsible for the observed NDR phenomenon. These theoretical findings imply that N-doped GNRs hold great potential for building NDR devices based on various molecules.

Huang, Jing, E-mail: jhuang@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: liqun@ustc.edu.cn [School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Anhui Jianzhu University, Hefei, Anhui 230601 (China) [School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Anhui Jianzhu University, Hefei, Anhui 230601 (China); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wang, Weiyi; Li, Qunxiang, E-mail: jhuang@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: liqun@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)] [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Yang, Jinlong [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China) [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I. (University of California, San Diego); Winey, J. Michael (Washington State University); Gupta, Yogendra Mohan (Washington State University); Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd (University of Texas at Austin); Quevedo, Hernan J. (University of Texas at Austin)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

B. B. G. K. Y. Hierarchy Methods for Sums of Lyapunov Exponents for Dilute Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a general method for computing the sum of positive Lyapunov exponents for moderately dense gases. This method is based upon hierarchy techniques used previously to derive the generalized Boltzmann equation for the time dependent spatial and velocity distribution functions for such systems. We extend the variables in the generalized Boltzmann equation to include a new set of quantities that describe the separation of trajectories in phase space needed for a calculation of the Lyapunov exponents. The method described here is especially suitable for calculating the sum of all of the positive Lyapunov exponents for the system, and may be applied to equilibrium as well as non-equilibrium situations. For low densities we obtain an extended Boltzmann equation, from which, under a simplifying approximation, we recover the sum of positive Lyapunov exponents for hard disk and hard sphere systems, obtained before by a simpler method. In addition we indicate how to improve these results by avoiding the simplifying approximation. The restriction to hard sphere systems in $d$-dimensions is made to keep the somewhat complicated formalism as clear as possible, but the method can be easily generalized to apply to gases of particles that interact with strong short range forces.

J. R. Dorfman; Arnulf Latz; Henk van Beijeren

1998-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

374

Is electrospray emission really due to columbic forces?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrospray ionization (ESI) is a widely adopted soft ionization method for mass spectroscopy (MS). In spite of the undeniable success of the technique, its mechanisms are difficult to be analytically modelled because the process is characterized by non-equilibrium conditions. The common belief is that the formation of gas-phase ions takes place at the apex of the Taylor cone via electrophoretic charging. The charge balance implies that a conversion of electrons to ions should occur at the metal-liquid interface of the injector needle. We have detected that the above description is based on unproved assumptions which are not consistent with the correct evaluation of the problem. The comparison between experiments performed under the usual geometry and observations obtained under symmetric field configurations suggests that the emitted droplets cannot be significantly charged or, at least, that any possible ionization mechanism is so poorly efficient to ensure that columbic forces cannot play a major role in jet formation, even in cases where the liquid consists of a solution of ionic species. Further work is required to clearly understand how ionization occurs in ESI-MS.

Aliotta, Francesco, E-mail: aliotta@ipcf.cnr.it; Ponterio, Rosina C.; Salvato, Gabriele; Vasi, Cirino [CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Viale F. Stagno d’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Calandra, Pietro [CNR-Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati, via dei Taurini 19, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Pochylski, Mikolaj [Adam Mickiewicz University, Faculty of Physics, Umultowska 85, PL-62614 Poznan (Poland)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Absorption of a single 500 fs laser pulse at the surface of fused silica: Energy balance and ablation efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ablation of fused silica by a single femtosecond laser pulse of 500 fs pulse duration is investigated from the perspective of efficiency of incident photons to remove matter. We measure the reflected and transmitted fractions of the incident pulse energy as a function of fluence, allowing us to recover the evolution of absorption at the material surface. At the ablation threshold fluence, 25% of incident energy is absorbed. At high fluences, this ratio saturates around 70% due to the appearance of a self-triggered plasma mirror (or shielding) effect. By using the energy balance retrieved experimentally and measurements of the ablated volume, we show that the amount of absorbed energy is far above the bonding energy of fused silica at rest and also above the energy barrier to ablate the material under non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions. Our results emphasize the crucial role of transient plasma properties during the laser pulse and suggest that the major part of the absorbed energy has been used to heat the plasma formed at the surface of the material. A fluence range yielding an efficient and high quality ablation is also defined, which makes the results relevant for femtosecond micromachining processes.

Varkentina, N.; Sanner, N.; Lebugle, M.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, LP3 UMR 7341, 13288 Marseille (France)] [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, LP3 UMR 7341, 13288 Marseille (France)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

Heirarchical Self Assembly: Self Organized nano-structures in a nematically ordered matrix of self assembled polymeric chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report many different nano-structures which are formed when model nano-particles of different sizes (diameter {\\sigma} n ) are allowed to aggregate in a background matrix of semi-flexible self assembled polymeric worm like micellar chains. The different nano-structures are formed by the dynamical arrest of phase-separating mixtures of micellar monomers and nano-particles. The different mor- phologies obtained are the result of an interplay of the available free volume, the elastic energy of deformation of polymers, the density (chemical potential) of the nano-particles in the polymer ma- trix and, of course, the ratio of the size of self assembling nano-particles and self avoidance diameter of polymeric chains. We have used a hybrid semi-grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation scheme to obtain the (non-equilibrium) phase diagram of the self-assembled nano-structures. We observe rod-like structures of nano-particles which get self assembled in the gaps between the nematically ordered chains as well as percolating gel-like network of conjoined nanotubes. We also find a totally unexpected interlocked crystalline phase of nano-particles and monomers, in which each crytal plane of nanoparticles is separated by planes of perfectly organized polymer chains. We identified the con- dition which leads to such interlocked crystal structure. We suggest experimental possibilities of how the results presented in this paper could be used to obtain different nano-structures in the lab.

Shaikh Mubeena; Apratim Chatterji

2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

377

Models of crustal heating in accreting neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heating associated with non-equilibrium nuclear reactions in accreting neutron-star crusts is reconsidered, taking into account suppression of neutrino losses demonstrated recently by Gupta et al. Two initial compositions of the nuclear burning ashes, A=56 and A=106, are considered. Dependence of the integrated crustal heating on uncertainties plaguing pycnonuclear reaction models is studied. One-component plasma approximation is used, with compressible liquid-drop model of Mackie and Baym to describe nuclei. Evolution of a crust shell is followed from 10^8 g/cm^3 to 10^(13.6) g/cm^3 The integrated heating in the outer crust agrees nicely with results of self-considtent multicomponent plasma simulations of Gupta et al.; their results fall between our curves obtained for A=56 and A=106. Total crustal heat per one accreted nucleon ranges between 1.5 MeV to 1.9 MeV for A=106 and A=56, respectively. The value of total crustal heat per nucleon depends weakly on the presence of pycnonuclear reactions at densities 10^(12)-10^(13) g/cm^3. Remarkable insensitivity of the total crustal heat on the details of the distribution of nuclear processes in accreted crust is explained.

P. Haensel; J. L. Zdunik

2007-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

378

A Chandra X-ray study of the mixed-morphology supernova remnant 3C400.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of archival Chandra observations of the mixed-morphology remnant 3C400.2. We analysed spectra of different parts of the remnant to observe if the plasma properties provide hints on the origin of the mixed-morphology class. These remnants often show overionization, which is a sign of rapid cooling of the thermal plasma, and super-solar abundances of elements which is a sign of ejecta emission. Our analysis shows that the thermal emission of 3C400.2 can be well explained by a two component non-equilibrium ionization model, of which one component is underionized, has a high temperature ($kT \\approx 3.9$ keV) and super-solar abundances, while the other component has a much lower temperature ($kT \\approx 0.14$ keV), solar abundances and shows signs of overionization. The temperature structure, abundance values and density contrast between the different model components suggest that the hot component comes from ejecta plasma, while the cooler component has an interstellar matter origin. This ...

Broersen, Sjors

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Conceptual Steps towards Exploring the Fundamental Nature of our Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the basic questions of solar research is the nature of the Sun. We show here how the plasma nature of the Sun leads to the self-generation of solar activity. The release of magnetic, rotational, gravitational, nuclear energies and that of the gravity mode oscillations deviate from uniformity and spherical symmetry. Through instabilities they lead to the emergence of sporadic and localized regions like flux tubes, electric filaments, magnetic elements and high temperature regions. A systematic approach exploring the solar collective degrees of freedom, extending to ordering phenomena of the magnetic features related to Higgs fields, is presented. Handling solar activity as transformations of energies from one form to another one presents a picture on the network of the energy levels of the Sun, showing that the Sun is neither a mere "ball of gas" nor a "quiescent steady-state fusion-reactor machine", but a complex self-organizing system. Since complex self-organizing systems are similar to living systems (and, by some opinion, identical with them), we also consider what arguments indicate the living nature of the Sun. Thermodynamic characteristics of the inequilibrium Sun are found important in this respect and numerical estimations of free energy rate densities and specific exergies are derived. KEY WORDS solar physics, degrees of freedom, self-organizing complex systems, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, astrobiology CLASSIFICATION PACS: 01.70.+w, 96.60.Rd

A. Grandpierre

2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

380

A High Temperature Liquid Plasma Model of the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, a liquid model of the Sun is presented wherein the entire solar mass is viewed as a high density/high energy plasma. This model challenges our current understanding of the densities associated with the internal layers of the Sun, advocating a relatively constant density, almost independent of radial position. The incompressible nature of liquids is advanced to prevent solar collapse from gravitational forces. The liquid plasma model of the Sun is a non-equilibrium approach, where nuclear reactions are free to occur throughout the solar mass. The primary means of addressing internal heat transfer are convection and conduction. As a result of the convective processes on the solar surface, the liquid model brings into question the established temperature of the solar photosphere by highlighting a violation of Kirchhoff's law of thermal emission. Along these lines, the model emphasizes that radiative emission is a surface phenomenon. Strong evidence is provided that the Sun is a high density/high energy liquid plasma. This evidence is based on our knowledge of Planckian thermal emission and condensed matter, including the existence of pressure ionization and liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperatures and pressures. The equations of magnetohydrodynamics are invoked as the proper vehicle for the understanding od stellar convection and structure. Prior to introducing the liquid plasma model, the historic and scientific justifications for the gaseous model of the Sun are reviewed and the gaseous equations of state are also discussed.

Pierre-Marie Robitaille

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

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381

X-ray Fading and Expansion in the "Miniature Supernova Remnant" of GK Persei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a second epoch of Chandra X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the spatially-resolved old nova remnant GK Persei. An ACIS-S3 observation of 97.4 ks was conducted in November 2013 after a lapse of 13.8 years from the last visit in 2000. The X-ray emitting nebula appeared more faint and patchy compared with the first epoch. The flux decline was particularly evident in fainter regions and the mean decline was 30-40 % in the 0.5-1.2 keV energy band. A typical expansion of the brightest part of the remnant was 1.9 arcsec, which corresponds to an expansion rate of 0.14 arcsec yr^{-1}. The soft X-ray spectra extracted from both the 2000 and 2013 data can be explained by a non-equilibrium ionization collisional plasma model convolved with interstellar absorption, though do not allow us to constrain the origin of the flux evolution. The plasma temperature has not significantly evolved since the 2000 epoch and we conclude that the fading of the X-ray emission is due largely to expansion. This implies that recent ...

Takei, D; Yamaguchi, H; Slane, P; Uchiyama, Y; Katsuda, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Synchronization in Complex Oscillator Networks and Smart Grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emergence of synchronization in a network of coupled oscillators is a fascinating topic in various scientific disciplines. A coupled oscillator network is characterized by a population of heterogeneous oscillators and a graph describing the interaction among them. It is known that a strongly coupled and sufficiently homogeneous network synchronizes, but the exact threshold from incoherence to synchrony is unknown. Here we present a novel, concise, and closed-form condition for synchronization of the fully nonlinear, non-equilibrium, and dynamic network. Our synchronization condition can be stated elegantly in terms of the network topology and parameters, or equivalently in terms of an intuitive, linear, and static auxiliary system. Our results significantly improve upon the existing conditions advocated thus far, they are provably exact for various interesting network topologies and parameters, they are statistically correct for almost all networks, and they can be applied equally to synchronization phenomena arising in physics and biology as well as in engineered oscillator networks such as electric power networks. We illustrate the validity, the accuracy, and the practical applicability of our results in complex networks scenarios and in smart grid applications.

Dorfler, Florian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bullo, Francesco [Center for Control, Dynamical Systems and Computation, University of California at Santa Babara, Santa Barbara CA

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

383

The role of radiative reabsorption on the electron energy distribution functions in H{sub 2}/He plasma expansion through a tapered nozzle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A collisional-radiative model for the H{sub 2}/He plasma, coupled to a Boltzmann solver for the free electron kinetics is used to investigate the non-equilibrium conditions created in the expansion of an high-temperature plasma flow through a converging-diverging nozzle, starting from the steady state composition at T{sub 0}=10?000?K and p{sub 0}=1?atm in the reservoir. It is shown that the plasma optical thickness plays a major role on the evolution of macroscopic quantities and internal distributions along the nozzle axis. Structured electron energy distribution functions, characterized by long plateaux and humps, are created due to superelastic collisions of cold electrons and electronically excited atomic hydrogen. The magnitudes of the plateaux are orders of magnitude higher in an optically thick plasma compared with a thin plasma, while the electron-electron collisions play a role in smoothing the peaks created by superelastic collisions between cold electrons and H(n>2)

D'Ammando, Giuliano, E-mail: g.dammando@chimica.uniba.it; Capitelli, Mario, E-mail: mario.capitelli@ba.imip.cnr.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universitá di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy); CNR-IMIP, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Esposito, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.esposito@ba.imip.cnr.it; Laricchiuta, Annarita, E-mail: annarita.laricchiuta@ba.imip.cnr.it; Pietanza, Lucia D., E-mail: daniela.pietanza@ba.imip.cnr.it; Colonna, Gianpiero, E-mail: gianpiero.colonna@ba.imip.cnr.it [CNR-IMIP, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Environmental Impact on the Southeast Limb of the Cygnus Loop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory of the southeast knot of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. In this region, the blast wave propagates through an inhomogeneous environment. Extrinsic differences and subsequent multiple projections along the line of sight rather than intrinsic shock variations, such as fluid instabilities, account for the apparent complexity of the images. Interactions between the supernova blast wave and density enhancements of a large interstellar cloud can produce the morphological and spectral characteristics. Most of the X-ray flux arises in such interactions, not in the diffuse interior of the supernova remnant. Additional observations at optical and radio wavelengths support this account of the existing interstellar medium and its role in shaping the Cygnus Loop, and they demonstrate that the southeast knot is not a small cloud that the blast wave has engulfed. These data are consistent with rapid equilibration of electron and ion temperatures behind the shock front, and the current blast wave velocity v_{bw} approx 330 km/s. Most of this area does not show strong evidence for non-equilibrium ionization conditions, which may be a consequence of the high densities of the bright emission regions.

N. A. Levenson; James R. Graham

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy level alignment and quantum conductance of functionalized metal-molecule junctions: Density functional theory versus GW calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the effect of functional groups (CH{sub 3}*4, OCH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}, Cl, CN, F*4) on the electronic transport properties of 1,4-benzenediamine molecular junctions using the non-equilibrium Green function method. Exchange and correlation effects are included at various levels of theory, namely density functional theory (DFT), energy level-corrected DFT (DFT+?), Hartree-Fock and the many-body GW approximation. All methods reproduce the expected trends for the energy of the frontier orbitals according to the electron donating or withdrawing character of the substituent group. However, only the GW method predicts the correct ordering of the conductance amongst the molecules. The absolute GW (DFT) conductance is within a factor of two (three) of the experimental values. Correcting the DFT orbital energies by a simple physically motivated scissors operator, ?, can bring the DFT conductances close to experiments, but does not improve on the relative ordering. We ascribe this to a too strong pinning of the molecular energy levels to the metal Fermi level by DFT which suppresses the variation in orbital energy with functional group.

Jin, Chengjun; Markussen, Troels; Thygesen, Kristian S., E-mail: thygesen@fysik.dtu.dk [Center for Atomic-scale Materials Design, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Strange, Mikkel; Solomon, Gemma C. [Nano-Science Center and Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)] [Nano-Science Center and Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

386

Extension of the quantum-kinetic model to lunar and Mars return physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high-mass payloads on Mars, and the exploration of the outer planets and their satellites are being considered. A recently introduced molecular-level chemistry model, the quantum-kinetic, or Q-K, model that predicts reaction rates for gases in thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties, is extended in the current work to include electronic energy level transitions and reactions involving charged particles. Like the Q-K procedures for neutral species chemical reactions, these new models are phenomenological procedures that aim to reproduce the reaction/transition rates but do not necessarily capture the exact physics. These engineering models are necessarily efficient due to the requirement to compute billions of simulated collisions in direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations. The new models are shown to generally agree within the spread of reported transition and reaction rates from the literature for near equilibrium conditions.

Liechty, D. S. [Aerothermodynamics Branch, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States)] [Aerothermodynamics Branch, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Lewis, M. J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

A diffuse interface model with immiscibility preservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new, simple, and computationally efficient interface capturing scheme based on a diffuse interface approach is presented for simulation of compressible multiphase flows. Multi-fluid interfaces are represented using field variables (interface functions) with associated transport equations that are augmented, with respect to an established formulation, to enforce a selected interface thickness. The resulting interface region can be set just thick enough to be resolved by the underlying mesh and numerical method, yet thin enough to provide an efficient model for dynamics of well-resolved scales. A key advance in the present method is that the interface regularization is asymptotically compatible with the thermodynamic mixture laws of the mixture model upon which it is constructed. It incorporates first-order pressure and velocity non-equilibrium effects while preserving interface conditions for equilibrium flows, even within the thin diffused mixture region. We first quantify the improved convergence of this formulation in some widely used one-dimensional configurations, then show that it enables fundamentally better simulations of bubble dynamics. Demonstrations include both a spherical-bubble collapse, which is shown to maintain excellent symmetry despite the Cartesian mesh, and a jetting bubble collapse adjacent a wall. Comparisons show that without the new formulation the jet is suppressed by numerical diffusion leading to qualitatively incorrect results.

Tiwari, Arpit, E-mail: atiwari2@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Freund, Jonathan B., E-mail: jbfreund@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Pantano, Carlos [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Friction between Ring Polymer Brushes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction between ring-polymer brushes at melt densities sliding past each other are studied using extensive course-grained molecular dynamics simulations and scaling arguments, and the results are compared to the friction between linear-polymer brushes. We show that for a velocity range spanning over three decades, the frictional forces measured for ring-polymer brushes are half the corresponding friction in case of linear brushes. In the linear-force regime, the weak inter-digitation of two ring brushes compared to linear brushes also leads to a lower number of binary collisions between the monomers of opposing brushes. At high velocities, where the thickness of the inter-digitation layer between two opposing brushes is on the order monomer size regardless of brush topology, stretched segments of ring polymers take a double-stranded conformation. As a result, monomers of the double-stranded segments collide less with the monomers of the opposing ring brush even though a similar number of monomers occupies the inter-digitation layer for ring and linear-brush bilayers. The numerical data obtained from our simulations is consistent with the proposed scaling analysis. Conformation-dependent frictional reduction observed in ring brushes can have important consequences in non-equilibrium bulk systems.

A. Erbas; J. Paturej

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

389

Quantum entanglement phenomena in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent theoretical calculations of quantum entanglement in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes. These works establish, for the first time, a manifestation of this characteristically quantum mechanical phenomenon in biologically functional structures. We begin by summarizing calculations on model biomolecular systems that aim to reveal non-trivial characteristics of quantum entanglement in non-equilibrium biological environments. We then discuss and compare several calculations performed recently of excitonic dynamics in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson light harvesting complex and of the entanglement present in this widely studied pigment-protein structure. We point out the commonalities between the derived results and also identify and explain the differences. We also discuss recent work that examines entanglement in the structurally more intricate light harvesting complex II (LHCII). During this overview, we take the opportunity to clarify several subtle issues relating to entanglement in such biomolecular systems, including the role of entanglement in biological function, the complexity of dynamical modeling that is required to capture the salient features of entanglement in such biomolecular systems, and the relationship between entanglement and other quantum mechanical features that are observed and predicted in light harvesting complexes. Finally, we suggest possible extensions of the current work and also review the options for experimental confirmation of the predicted entanglement phenomena in light harvesting complexes.

K. Birgitta Whaley; Mohan Sarovar; Akihito Ishizaki

2010-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

390

Hyperfine spin qubits in irradiated malonic acid: heat-bath algorithmic cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability to perform quantum error correction is a significant hurdle for scalable quantum information processing. A key requirement for multiple-round quantum error correction is the ability to dynamically extract entropy from ancilla qubits. Heat-bath algorithmic cooling is a method that uses quantum logic operations to move entropy from one subsystem to another, and permits cooling of a spin qubit below the closed system (Shannon) bound. Gamma-irradiated, $^{13}$C-labeled malonic acid provides up to 5 spin qubits: 1 spin-half electron and 4 spin-half nuclei. The nuclei are strongly hyperfine coupled to the electron and can be controlled either by exploiting the anisotropic part of the hyperfine interaction or by using pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques. The electron connects the nuclei to a heat-bath with a much colder effective temperature determined by the electron's thermal spin polarization. By accurately determining the full spin Hamiltonian and performing realistic algorithmic simulations, we show that an experimental demonstration of heat-bath algorithmic cooling beyond the Shannon bound is feasible in both 3-qubit and 5-qubit variants of this spin system. Similar techniques could be useful for polarizing nuclei in molecular or crystalline systems that allow for non-equilibrium optical polarization of the electron spin.

Daniel K. Park; Guanru Feng; Robabeh Rahimi; Stephane Labruyere; Taiki Shibata; Shigeaki Nakazawa; Kazunobu Sato; Takeji Takui; Raymond Laflamme; Jonathan Baugh

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Statistics of polymer adsorption under shear flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using non-equilibrium Brownian dynamics computer simulations, we have investigated the steady state statistics of a polymer chain under three different shear environments: i) linear shear flow in the bulk (no walls), ii) shear vorticity normal to the adsorbing wall, iii) shear gradient normal to the adsorbing wall. The statistical distribution of the chain end-to-end distance and its orientational angles are calculated within our monomer-resolved computer simulations. Over a wide range of shear rates, this distribution can be mapped onto a simple theoretical finite-extensible-nonlinear-elastic dumbbell model with fitted anisotropic effective spring constants. The tails of the angular distribution functions are consistent with scaling predictions borrowed from the bulk dumbbell model. Finally, the frequency of the characteristic periodic tumbling motion has been investigated by simulation as well and was found to be sublinear with the shear rate for the three set-ups, which extends earlier results done in experiments and simulations for free and tethered polymer molecules without adsorption.

Gui-Li He; René Messina; Hartmut Löwen

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

392

The inside outs of AdS(3)/CFT(2): Exact AdS wormholes with entangled CFT duals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the complete family of solutions of 3D gravity (Lambda<0) with two asymptotically AdS exterior regions. The solutions are constructed from data at the two boundaries, which correspond to two independent and arbitrary stress tensors T_R, \\bar T_R, and T_L, \\bar T_L. The two exteriors are smoothly joined on to an interior region through a regular horizon. We find CFT duals of these geometries which are entangled states of two CFT's. We compute correlators between general operators at the two boundaries and find perfect agreement between CFT and bulk calculations. We calculate and match the CFT entanglement entropy (EE) with the holographic EE which involves geodesics passing through the wormhole. We also compute a holographic, non-equilibrium entropy for the CFT using properties of the regular horizon. The construction of the bulk solutions here uses an exact version of Brown-Henneaux type diffeomorphisms which are asymptotically nontrivial and transform the CFT states by two independent unitary operators on the two sides. Our solutions provide an infinite family of explicit examples of the ER=EPR relation of Maldacena and Susskind [arXiv:1306.0533].

Gautam Mandal; Ritam Sinha; Nilakash Sorokhaibam

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

393

LIGA microsystems aging : evaluation and mitigation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deployment of LIGA structures in DP applications requires a thorough understanding of potential long term physical and chemical changes that may occur during service. While these components are generally fabricated from simple metallic systems such as copper, nickel and nickel alloys, the electroplating process used to form them creates microstructural features which differ from those found in conventional (e.g. ingot metallurgy) processing of such materials. Physical changes in non-equilibrium microstructures may occur due to long term exposure to temperatures sufficient to permit atomic and vacancy mobility. Chemical changes, particularly at the surfaces of LIGA parts, may occur in the presence of gaseous chemical species (e.g. water vapor, HE off-gassing compounds) and contact with other metallic structures. In this study, we have characterized the baseline microstructure of several nickel-based materials that are used to fabricate LIGA structures. Solute content and distribution was found to have a major effect on the electroplated microstructures. Microstructural features were correlated to measurements of hardness and tensile strength. Dormancy testing was conducted on one of the baseline compositions, nickel-sulfamate. Groups of specimens were exposed to controlled thermal cycles; subsequent examinations compared properties of 'aged' specimens to the baseline conditions. Results of our testing indicate that exposure to ambient temperatures (-54 C to 71 C) do not result in microstructural changes that might be expected to significantly effect mechanical performance. Additionally, no localized changes in surface appearance were found as a result of contact between electroplated parts.

Cadden, Charles H.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Extended Fokker Planck model: properties and solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the current paper Fokker Planck model of random walks has been extended to non conservative cases characterized by explicit dependence of diffusion and energy on time. A given generalization allows describing of such non equilibrium processes as Levy flights in a classical differential form without use of fractal PDE. Besides it takes into account mixing properties that are obligatory for a certain class of chaotic systems such as Kolmogorov K system. It was shown that an abnormal transport is a consequence of the equilibrium distortion and not stationary diffusion. The particular case of fixed boundaries was considered. According to the received solutions it was shown that a system structure can resist a weak disturbance in the vicinity of the discrete regimes, defined by a system scale and its nonlinear properties. These regimes correspond to the exponential increase of quasi regular structure fluctuations. Only fast disruption of regime is possible for other states of the system. It leads to an immediate transition to the chaos.

Sergey Kamenshchikov

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

395

Preliminary Measurements From A New Flat Plate Facility For Aerodynamic Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper details the design and preliminary measurements used in the characterisation of a new flat plate research facility. The facility is designed specifically to aid in the understanding of entropy generation throughout the boundary layer with special attention given to non-equilibrium flows. Hot-wire measurements were obtained downstream of two turbulence generating grids. The turbulence intensity, integral and dissipation length scale ranges measured are 1.6%-7%, 5mm-17mm and 0.7mm-7mm, respectively. These values compared well to existing correlations. The flow downstream of both grids was found to be homogenous and isotropic. Flow visualisation is employed to determine aerodynamic parameters such as flow 2-dimensionality and the effect of the flap angle on preventing separation at the leading edge. The flow was found to be 2-dimensional over all measurement planes. The non-dimensional pressure distribution of a modern turbine blade suction surface is simulated on the flat plate through the use of a variable upper wall. The Reynolds number range based on wetted plate length and inlet velocity is 70,000-4,000,000.

D. M. McEligot; D. W. Nigg; E. J. Walsh; D. Hernon; M.R.D. Davies

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Shear viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma in a kinetic theory approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main results of heavy ions collision (HIC) at relativistic energy experiments is the very small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the Quark-Gluon Plasma, close to the conjectured lower bound ?/s=1/4? for systems in the infinite coupling limit. Transport coefficients like shear viscosity are responsible of non-equilibrium properties of a system: Green-Kubo relations give us an exact expression to compute these coefficients. We compute shear viscosity numerically using Green-Kubo relation in the framework of Kinetic Theory solving the relativistic transport Boltzmann equation in a finite box with periodic boundary conditions. We investigate a system of particles interacting via anisotropic and energy dependent cross-section in the range of temperature of interest for HIC. Green-Kubo results are in agreement with Chapman-Enskog approximation while Relaxation Time approximation can underestimates the viscosity of a factor 2. The correct analytic formula for shear viscosity can be used to develop a transport theory with a fixed ?/s and have a comparison with physical observables like elliptic flow.

Puglisi, A.; Plumari, S.; Scardina, F.; Greco, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95125 Catania, Italy and Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 63, I-95125 Catania (Italy)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

397

Effect of phase transition on quantum transport in group-IV two-dimensional U-shape device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of phase-transition from the quantum-spin-hall to the band-insulator phase on the transport through a three-terminal U-shape spin-separator has been computationally investigated via non-equilibrium green function formalism. Two-dimensional group-IV elements have been comprehensively appraised as the device material. The device separates the unpolarized current injected at the source-terminal into nearly 100% spin-polarized currents of the opposite polarities at the two drain terminals. The phase-transition activated by the electric-field orthogonal to the device is shown to extensively influence the current magnitude and its spin-polarization, and the effect is stronger for materials with smaller intrinsic spin-orbit coupling. Moreover, the device length and the area under field are shown to critically affect the device characteristics on phase change. It is shown that the same device can be operated as a spin-filter by inducing phase-transition selectively in the channel. The results are important for designing spin-devices from Group-IV monolayers.

Sadi, Mohammad Abdullah; Gupta, Gaurav, E-mail: a0089293@nus.edu.sg; Liang, Gengchiau [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

398

Hawking-Unruh Thermal Radiance as Relativistic Exponential Scaling of Quantum Noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hawking-Unruh effect of thermal radiance from a black hole or observed by an accelerated detector is usually viewed as a geometric effect related to the existence of an event horizon. Here we propose a new viewpoint, that the detection of thermal radiance in these systems is a local, kinematic effect arising from the vacuum being subjected to a relativistic exponential scale transformation. This kinematic effect alters the relative weight of quantum versus thermal fluctuations (noise) between the two vacua. This approach can treat conditions which the geometric approach cannot, such as systems which do not even have an event horizon. An example is the case of an observer whose acceleration is nonuniform or only asymptotically uniform. Since this approach is based on concepts and techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, it is more adept to dynamical problems, such as the dissipation, fluctuation, and entropy aspects of particle creation and phase transitions in black hole collapse and in the early universe.

B. L. Hu

1996-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

399

Dynamics of femtosecond laser absorption of fused silica in the ablation regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the ultrafast absorption dynamics of fused silica irradiated by a single 500?fs laser pulse in the context of micromachining applications. A 60-fs-resolution pump-probe experiment that measures the reflectivity and transmissivity of the target under excitation is developed to reveal the evolution of plasma absorption. Above the ablation threshold, an overcritical plasma with highly non-equilibrium conditions is evidenced in a thin layer at the surface. The maximum electron density is reached at a delay of 0.5?ps after the peak of the pump pulse, which is a strong indication of the occurrence of electronic avalanche. The results are further analyzed to determine the actual feedback of the evolution of the optical properties of the material on the pump pulse. We introduce an important new quantity, namely, the duration of absorption of the laser by the created plasma, corresponding to the actual timespan of laser absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung. Our results indicate an increasing contribution of plasma absorption to the total material absorption upon raising the excitation fluence above the ablation threshold. The role of transient optical properties during the energy deposition stage is characterized and our results emphasize the necessity to take it into account for better understanding and control of femtosecond laser-dielectrics interaction.

Lebugle, M., E-mail: lebugle@lp3.univ-mrs.fr; Sanner, N.; Varkentina, N.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LP3 UMR 7341, 13288 Marseille (France)

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

400

Transition from ultrafast laser photo-electron emission to space charge limited current in a 1D gap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A one-dimensional (1D) model has been constructed to study the transition of the time-dependent ultrafast laser photo-electron emission from a flat metallic surface to the space charge limited (SCL) current, including the effect of non-equilibrium laser heating on metals at the ultrafast time scale. At a high laser field, it is found that the space charge effect cannot be ignored and the SCL current emission is reached at a lower value predicted by a short pulse SCL current model that assumed a time-independent emission process. The threshold of the laser field to reach the SCL regime is determined over a wide range of operating parameters. The calculated results agree well with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is found that the space charge effect is more important for materials with lower work function like tungsten (4.4 eV) as compared to gold (5.4 eV). However for a flat surface, both materials will reach the space charge limited regime at the sufficiently high laser field such as $>$ 5 GV/m with a laser pulse length of tens to one hundred femtoseconds.

Yangjie Liu; L. K. Ang

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Linking Grain Boundary Structure and Composition to Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grain boundary structure and composition is assessed in austenitic stainless steels along with its influence on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in high-temperature water. Brief examples are presented illustrating effects of grain boundary character and segregation on behavior in specific light-water-reactor environments. Although grain boundary engineering can produce an increased fraction of special boundaries in austenitic stainless alloys, practical benefits depend on the boundary orientation distribution. It is critical to recognize that only coherent sigma 3s appear to be resistant to SCC and the behavior of other low sigma boundaries is uncertain. Grain boundary composition can have a dominant effect on IGSCC under certain conditions, but altered interfacial chemistry is not required for cracking. In high-potential oxidizing environments, IGSCC susceptibility is a direct function of the boundary Cr concentration. Non-equilibrium thermal segregation of Cr and Mo is often present in millannealed stainless steels and may influence cracking susceptibility. This initial grain boundary composition alters subsequent radiation-induced segregation and delays irradiation-assisted SCC susceptibility to higher doses. Other alloying elements and impurities in 300-series stainless steels have been seen to enrich grain boundaries, but few have any significant impact on IGSCC susceptibility. One exception is Si that strongly segregates during irradiation. recent results suggest that Si may accelerate crack propagation in both low- and high-potential water environments. Critical research is still needed to isolate individual grain boundary characteristics and quantitatively link to IGSCC.

Bruemmer, Stephen M.

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

Out-of-equilibrium evolution of kinetically constrained many-body quantum systems under purely dissipative dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the relaxation dynamics of quantum many-body systems that undergo purely dissipative dynamics through non-classical jump operators that can establish quantum coherence. Our goal is to shed light on the differences in the relaxation dynamics that arise in comparison to systems evolving via classical rate equations. In particular, we focus on a scenario where both quantum and classical dissipative evolution lead to a stationary state with the same values of diagonal or "classical" observables. As a basis for illustrating our ideas we use spin systems whose dynamics becomes correlated and complex due to dynamical constraints, inspired by kinetically constrained models (KCMs) of classical glasses. We show that in the quantum case the relaxation can be orders of magnitude slower than the classical one due to the presence of quantum coherences. Aspects of these idealized quantum KCMs become manifest in a strongly interacting Rydberg gas under electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) conditions in an appropriate limit. Beyond revealing a link between this Rydberg gas and the rather abstract dissipative KCMs of quantum glassy systems, our study sheds light on the limitations of the use of classical rate equations for capturing the non-equilibrium behavior of this many-body system.

Beatriz Olmos; Igor Lesanovsky; Juan P. Garrahan

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fractal quantum well heterostructures for broadband light emitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine carrier relaxation and radiative recombination in AlGaAs based near IR and AlGaInP based visible fractal quantum well heterostructures. Through temperature dependent photoluminescence, we demonstrate that enhanced population of higher lying energy levels can be achieved by varying the thickness of the layers in the fractal heterostructurd. This distribution of carriers results in room temperature emission over a relatively broad range of wavelengths: approximately 700--855 nm for AlGaAs structures and 575--650 nm for AlGaInP structures. Spectra are compared to theoretical calculations to evaluate the non-equilibrium nature of the carrier distributions. Time resolved photoluminescence measurements demonstrate an approximately linear relationship between the radiative decay time and the layer thickness of the structure. Correspondingly, integrated luminescence measurements at room temperature reveal a factor of four increase in the light output efficiency of the structure as the fractal layer thickness is increased from 50 {angstrom} to 400 {angstrom}. The applicability of these heterostructures to broadband LEDs is discussed.

Crawford, M.H.; Gourley, P.L.; Meissner, K.E.; Sinclair, M.B.; Jones, E.D.; Chow, W.W.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Pre-equilibrium plasma dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approaches towards understanding and describing the pre-equilibrium stage of quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. Focus is on a kinetic theory approach to non-equilibrium dynamics, its extension to include the dynamics of color degrees of freedom when applied to the quark-gluon plasma, its quantum field theoretical foundations, and its relationship to both the particle formation stage at the very beginning of the nuclear collision and the hydrodynamic stage at late collision times. The usefulness of this approach to obtain the transport coefficients in the quark-gluon plasma and to derive the collective mode spectrum and damping rates in this phase are discussed. Comments are made on the general difficulty to find appropriated initial conditions to get the kinetic theory started, and a specific model is given that demonstrates that, once given such initial conditions, the system can be followed all the way through into the hydrodynamical regime. 39 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

Heinz, U.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Lattice-gas model for active vesicle transport by molecular motors with opposite polarities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a multi-species lattice gas model for motor protein driven collective cargo transport on cellular filaments. We use this model to describe and analyze the collective motion of interacting vesicle cargoes being carried by oppositely directed molecular motors, moving on a single biofilament. Building on a totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) to characterize the motion of the interacting cargoes, we allow for mass exchange with the environment, input and output at filament boundaries and focus on the role of interconversion rates and how they affect the directionality of the net cargo transport. We quantify the effect of the various different competing processes in terms of non-equilibrium phase diagrams. The interplay of interconversion rates, which allow for flux reversal and evaporation/deposition processes introduce qualitatively new features in the phase diagrams. We observe regimes of three-phase coexistence, the possibility of phase re-entrance and a significant flexibility in how the different phase boundaries shift in response to changes in control parameters. The moving steady state solutions of this model allows for different possibilities for the spatial distribution of cargo vesicles, ranging from homogeneous distribution of vesicles to polarized distributions, characterized by inhomogeneities or {\\it shocks}. Current reversals due to internal regulation emerge naturally within the framework of this model. We believe this minimal model will clarify the understanding of many features of collective vesicle transport, apart from serving as the basis for building more exact quantitative models for vesicle transport relevant to various {\\it in-vivo} situations.

Sudipto Muhuri; Ignacio Pagonabarraga

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

406

Radiative feedback and cosmic molecular gas: numerical method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from self-consistent 3D numerical simulations of cosmic structure formation with a multi-frequency radiative transfer scheme and non-equilibrium molecular chemistry of 13 primordial species (e-, H, H+, H-, He, He+, He++, H2, H2+, D, D+, HD, HeH+), performed by using the simulation code GADGET. We describe our implementation and show tests for ionized sphere expansion in a static and dynamic density field around a central radiative source, and for cosmological abundance evolution coupled with the cosmic microwave background radiation. As a demonstrative application of radiative feedback on molecular gas, we run also cosmological simulations of early structure formation in a ~1Mpc size box. Our tests agree well with analytical and numerical expectations. Consistently with other works, we find that ionization fronts from central sources can boost H2 fractions in shock-compressed gas. The tight dependence on H2 lead to a corresponding boost of HD fractions, as well. We see a strong lowering of the the typical molecular abundances up to several orders of magnitudes which partially hinders further gas collapse of pristine neutral gas, and clearly suggests the need of re-ionized gas or metal cooling for the formation of the following generation of structures.

Margarita Petkova; Umberto Maio

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

407

Heat conductivity in the beta-FPU lattice. Solitons and breathers as energy carriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper consists of two parts. The first part proposes a new methodological framework within which the heat conductivity in 1D lattices can be studied. The total process of heat conductivity is decomposed into two contributions where the first one is the equilibrium process at equal temperatures T of both lattice ends and the second -- non-equilibrium process with the temperature \\Delta T of one end and zero temperature of the other. The heat conductivity in the limit \\Delta T \\to 0 is reduced to the heat conductivity of harmonic lattice. A threshold temperature T_{thr} scales T_{thr}(N) \\sim N^{-3} with the lattice size N. Some unusual properties of heat conductivity can be exhibited on nanoscales at low temperatures. The thermodynamics of the \\beta-FPU lattice can be adequately approximated by the harmonic lattice. The second part testifies in the favor of the soliton and breather contribution to the heat conductivity in contrast to [N. Li, B. Li, S. Flach, PRL 105 (2010) 054102]. In the continuum limit the \\beta-FPU lattice is reduced to the modified Korteweg - de Vries equation with soliton and breather solutions. Numerical simulations demonstrate their high stability. New method for the visualization of moving solitons and breathers is suggested. An accurate expression for the dependence of the sound velocity on temperature is also obtained. Our results support the conjecture on the solitons and breathers contribution to the heat conductivity.

T. Yu. Astakhova; V. N. Likhachev; G. A. Vinogradov

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

408

Driven synchronization in random networks of oscillators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synchronization is a universal phenomenon found in many non-equilibrium systems. Much recent interest in this area has overlapped with the study of complex networks, where a major focus is determining how a system's connectivity patterns affect the types of behavior that it can produce. Thus far, modeling efforts have focused on the tendency of networks of oscillators to mutually synchronize themselves, with less emphasis on the effects of external driving. In this work we discuss the interplay between mutual and driven synchronization in networks of phase oscillators of the Kuramoto type, and resolve how the structure and emergence of such states depends on the underlying network topology for simple random networks with a given degree distribution. We provide a partial bifurcation analysis, centering on the appearance of a Takens-Bogdanov-Cusp singularity, which broadly separates homogeneous and heterogeneous network behavior in a weak coupling limit, and from which the number, stability and appearance of driven and mutually synchronized states can be determined, as a function of a few parameters. We find transitions such as Saddle-Node-Infinite-Periods, Limit-Point-of-Cycles, and Hopf bifurcations (both branches), as well as multiple bistability regions and dynamics that differ for the network types. This description is connected to the underlying dynamics of oscillator clusters for important states and transitions. Our results can provide a basis for studying the problem of frequency controlling disordered oscillator networks.

Jason Hindes; Christopher R. Myers

2015-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

409

DNS and LES of two-phase flows with cavitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on recent progress in the physical and numerical modeling of compressible two-phase flows that involve phase transition between the liquid and gaseous state of the fluid. The high-speed dynamics of cavitation bubbles is studied in well-resolved simulations (DNS) with a sharp-interface numerical model on a micro scale. The underlying assumption of the employed evaporation/condensation model is that phase change occurs in thermal non-equilibrium and that the associated timescale is larger than that of the wave dynamics. Results for the collapse of a spherical vapor bubble close to a solid wall are discussed for three different bubble-wall configurations. The major challenge for such numerical investigations is to accurately reproduce the dynamics of the interface between liquid and vapor during the entire collapse process, including the high-speed dynamics of the late stages, where compressibility of both phases plays a decisive role. Direct interface resolving simulations are intractable for real wor...

Hickel, Stefan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Quantum Kibble-Zurek physics in the presence of spatially-correlated dissipation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how universal properties of quantum quenches across critical points are modified by a weak coupling to thermal dissipation, focusing on the paradigmatic case of the transverse field Ising model. Beyond the standard quench-induced Kibble-Zurek defect production in the absence of the bath, the bath contributes extra thermal defects. We show that spatial correlations in the noise produced by the bath can play a crucial role: one obtains quantitatively different scaling regimes depending on whether the correlation length of the noise is smaller or larger than the Kibble-Zurek length associated with the quench speed, and the thermal length set by temperature. For the case of spatially-correlated bath noise, additional thermal defect generation is restricted to a window that is both quantum critical and excluded from the non-equilibrium regime surrounding the critical point. We map the dissipative quench problem to a set of effectively independent dissipative Landau-Zener problems. Using this mapping along...

Nalbach, P; Clerk, Aashish A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Gravitationally Induced Particle Production: Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A relativistic kinetic description for the irreversible thermodynamic process of gravitationally induced particle production is proposed in the context of an expanding Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) geometry. We show that the covariant thermodynamic treatment referred to as "adiabatic" particle production provoked by the cosmic time-varying gravitational field has a consistent kinetic counterpart. The variation of the distribution function is associated to a non-collisional kinetic term of quantum-gravitational origin which is proportional to the ratio $\\Gamma/H$, where $\\Gamma$ is the gravitational particle production rate and H is the Hubble parameter. For $\\Gamma gravitation. The resulting non-equilibrium distribution function has the same functional form of equilibrium with the evolution laws corrected by the particle production process. The macroscopic temperature evolution law is also kinetically derived for massive and massless particles. The present approach points to the possibility of an exact (semi-classical) quantum-gravitational kinetic treatment by incorporating back-reaction effects in the cosmic background.

J. A. S. Lima; I. P. Baranov

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

412

Synchronization in Complex Oscillator Networks and Smart Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emergence of synchronization in a network of coupled oscillators is a fascinating topic in various scientific disciplines. A coupled oscillator network is characterized by a population of heterogeneous oscillators and a graph describing the interaction among them. It is known that a strongly coupled and sufficiently homogeneous network synchronizes, but the exact threshold from incoherence to synchrony is unknown. Here we present a novel, concise, and closed-form condition for synchronization of the fully nonlinear, non-equilibrium, and dynamic network. Our synchronization condition can be stated elegantly in terms of the network topology and parameters, or equivalently in terms of an intuitive, linear, and static auxiliary system. Our results significantly improve upon the existing conditions advocated thus far, they are provably exact for various interesting network topologies and parameters, they are statistically correct for almost all networks, and they can be applied equally to synchronization phenomena arising in physics and biology as well as in engineered oscillator networks such as electric power networks. We illustrate the validity, the accuracy, and the practical applicability of our results in complex networks scenarios and in smart grid applications.

Florian Dörfler; Michael Chertkov; Francesco Bullo

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Pattern formation of dipolar colloids in rotating fields: Layering and synchronization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report Brownian dynamics (BD) simulation and theoretical results for a system of spherical colloidal particles with permanent dipole moments in a rotating magnetic field. Performing simulations at a fixed packing fraction and dipole coupling parameter, we construct a full non-equilibrium phase diagram as function of the driving frequency ($\\omega_0$) and field strength ($B_0$). This diagram contains both synchronized states, where the individual particles follow the field with (on average) constant phase difference, and asynchronous states. The synchronization is accompanied by layer formation, i.e. by spatial symmetry-breaking, similar to systems of induced dipoles in rotating fields. In the permanent-dipole case, however, too large $\\omega_0$ yield a breakdown of layering, supplemented by complex changes of the single-particle rotational dynamics from synchronous to asynchronous behavior. We show that the limit frequencies $\\omega_c$ can be well described as a bifurcation in the nonlinear equation of motion of a single particle rotating in a viscous medium. Finally, we present a simple density functional theory, which describes the emergence of layers in perfectly synchronized states as an equilibrium phase transition.

Sebastian Jaeger; Sabine H. L. Klapp

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

414

Gauge field, strings, solitons, anomalies and the speed of life  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It's been said that "mathematics is biology's next microscope, only better; biology is mathematics' next physics, only better". Here we aim for something even better. We try to combine mathematical physics and biology into a picoscope of life. For this we merge techniques which have been introduced and developed in modern mathematical physics, largely by Ludvig Faddeev to describe objects such as solitons and Higgs and to explain phenomena such as anomalies in gauge fields. We propose a synthesis that can help to resolve the protein folding problem, one of the most important conundrums in all of science. We apply the concept of gauge invariance to scrutinize the extrinsic geometry of strings in three dimensional space. We evoke general principles of symmetry in combination with Wilsonian universality and derive an essentially unique Landau-Ginzburg energy that describes the dynamics of a generic string-like configuration in the far infrared. We observe that the energy supports topological solitons, that pertain to an anomaly in the manner how a string is framed around its inflection points. We explain how the solitons operate as modular building blocks from which folded proteins are composed. We describe crystallographic protein structures by multi-solitons with experimental precision, and investigate the non-equilibrium dynamics of proteins under varying temperature. We simulate the folding process of a protein at in vivo speed and with close to pico-scale accuracy using a standard laptop computer: With pico-biology as mathematical physics' next pursuit, things can only get better.

Antti J. Niemi

2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Principle of Stationary Action in Biophysics: Stability in Protein Folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processes that proceed reliably from a variety of initial conditions to a unique final form, regardless of moderately changing conditions, are of obvious importance in biophysics. Protein folding is a case in point. We show that the action principle can be applied directly to study the stability of biological processes. The action principle in classical physics starts with the first variation of the action and leads immediately to the equations of motion. The second variation of the action leads in a natural way to powerful theorems that provide quantitative treatment of stability and focusing and also explain how some very complex processes can behave as though some seemingly important forces drop out. We first apply these ideas to the non-equilibrium states involved in two-state folding. We treat torsional waves and use the action principle to talk about critical points in the dynamics. For some proteins the theory resembles TST. We reach several quantitative and qualitative conclusions. Besides giving an e...

Simmons, Walter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

High-temperature phase transformation in Cr added TiAl base alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have investigated a microstructure evolution of a Ti-48Al-3.5Cr (in at.%) alloy at high-temperatures ({gt} 1,473K). In the alloy annealed at 1673K for 1.8ks, followed by air-cooling, a characteristic microstructure with a feathery fashion was uniformly formed. From a cooling-rate-controlling study, it was found that formation of the feathery structure is accomplished during continuous cooling from 1673K to 1573K, within the {alpha} + {gamma} two-phase region. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the feathery structure is composed of lamellar colonies (5--10{micro}m) which are crystallographically tilted slightly (a few degree) with their neighbors. A surprising fact is that lamellae in each colony are mostly the {gamma} phase with few {alpha}{sub 2} phase less than 5% in volume. This suggests that the feathery structure is a metastable product and has not resulted from the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {alpha} + {gamma} transformation above 1,573 K. Instead, the feathery structure formation should be attributed to the non-equilibrium {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} transformation which occurs at high-temperatures with a small degree of supercooling. The authors discuss this interesting phase transformation in terms of the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} massive transformation, based on the continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram constructed for the present alloy.

Abe, E.; Niinobe, K.; Nobuki, M.; Nakamura, M.; Tsujimoto, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Study on the thermal resistance in secondary particles chain of silica aerogel by molecular dynamics simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the heat transport in secondary particles chain of silica aerogel. The two adjacent particles as the basic heat transport unit were modelled to characterize the heat transfer through the calculation of thermal resistance and vibrational density of states (VDOS). The total thermal resistance of two contact particles was predicted by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD). The defects were formed by deleting atoms in the system randomly first and performing heating and quenching process afterwards to achieve the DLCA (diffusive limited cluster-cluster aggregation) process. This kind of treatment showed a very reasonable prediction of thermal conductivity for the silica aerogels compared with the experimental values. The heat transport was great suppressed as the contact length increased or defect concentration increased. The constrain effect of heat transport was much significant when contact length fraction was in the small range (<0.5) or the defect concentration is in the high range (>0.5). Also, as the contact length increased, the role of joint thermal resistance played in the constraint of heat transport was increasing. However, the defect concentration did not affect the share of joint thermal resistance as the contact length did. VDOS of the system was calculated by numerical method to characterize the heat transport from atomic vibration view. The smaller contact length and greater defect concentration primarily affected the longitudinal acoustic modes, which ultimately influenced the heat transport between the adjacent particles.

Liu, M. [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing100190 (China); Department of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Qiu, L., E-mail: qiulin111@sina.com, E-mail: jzzhengxinghua@163.com; Zheng, X. H., E-mail: qiulin111@sina.com, E-mail: jzzhengxinghua@163.com; Zhu, J.; Tang, D. W. [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing100190 (China)

2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

Phonons in a one-dimensional microfluidic crystal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of a general theoretical framework for describing the behaviour of a crystal driven far from equilibrium has proved difficult1. Microfluidic crystals, formed by the introduction of droplets of immiscible fluid into a liquid-filled channel, provide a convenient means to explore and develop models to describe non-equilibrium dynamics2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. Owing to the fact that these systems operate at low Reynolds number (Re), in which viscous dissipation of energy dominates inertial effects, vibrations are expected to be over-damped and contribute little to their dynamics12, 13, 14. Against such expectations, we report the emergence of collective normal vibrational modes (equivalent to acoustic 'phonons') in a one-dimensional microfluidic crystal of water-in-oil droplets at Reapprox10-4. These phonons propagate at an ultra-low sound velocity of approx100 mum s-1 and frequencies of a few hertz, exhibit unusual dispersion relations markedly different to those of harmonic crystals, and give rise to a variety of crystal instabilities that could have implications for the design of commercial microfluidic systems. First-principles theory shows that these phonons are an outcome of the symmetry-breaking flow field that induces long-range inter-droplet interactions, similar in nature to those observed in many other systems including dusty plasma crystals15, 16, vortices in superconductors17, 18, active membranes19 and nucleoprotein filaments20.

Tsevi Beatus; Tsvi Tlusty; Roy Bar-Ziv

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

419

Transport, Aharonov-Bohm, and Topological Effects in Graphene Molecular Junctions and Graphene Nanorings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unique ultra-relativistic, massless, nature of electron states in two-dimensional extended graphene sheets, brought about by the honeycomb lattice arrangement of carbon atoms in two-dimensions, provides ingress to explorations of fundamental physical phenomena in graphene nanostructures. Here we explore the emergence of new behavior of electrons in atomically precise segmented graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) and graphene rings with the use of tight-binding calculations, non-equilibrium Green's function transport theory, and a newly developed Dirac continuum model that absorbs the valence-to-conductance energy gaps as position-dependent masses, including topological-in-origin mass-barriers at the contacts between segments. Through transport investigations in variable-width segmented GNRs with armchair, zigzag, and mixed edge terminations we uncover development of new Fabry-Perot-like interference patterns in segmented GNRs, a crossover from the ultra-relativistic massless regime, characteristic of extended graphene systems, to a massive relativistic behavior in narrow armchair GNRs, and the emergence of nonrelativistic behavior in zigzag-terminated GNRs. Evaluation of the electronic states in a polygonal graphene nanoring under the influence of an applied magnetic field in the Aharonov-Bohm regime, and their analysis with the use of a relativistic quantum-field theoretical model, unveils development of a topological-in-origin zero-energy soliton state and charge fractionization. These results provide a unifying framework for analysis of electronic states, coherent transport phenomena, and the interpretation of forthcoming experiments in segmented graphene nanoribbons and polygonal rings.

Constantine Yannouleas; Igor Romanovsky; Uzi Landman

2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

Modulation of contact resistance between metal and graphene by controlling the graphene edge, contact area, and point defects: An ab initio study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic first-principles non-equilibrium Green's function study is conducted on the contact resistance between a series of metals (Au, Ag, Pt, Cu, Ni, and Pd) and graphene in the side contact geometry. Different factors such as the termination of the graphene edge, contact area, and point defect in contacted graphene are investigated. Notable differences are observed in structural configurations and electronic transport characteristics of these metal-graphene contacts, depending on the metal species and aforementioned influencing factors. It is found that the enhanced chemical reactivity of the graphene due to dangling bonds from either the unsaturated graphene edge or point defects strengthens the metal-graphene bonding, leading to a considerable contact resistance reduction for weakly interacting metals Au and Ag. For stronger interacting metals Pt and Cu, a slightly reduced contact resistance is found due to such influencing factors. However, the wetting metals Ni and Pd most strongly hybridize with graphene, exhibiting negligible dependence on the above influencing factors. This study provides guidance for the optimization of metal-graphene contacts at an atomic scale.

Ma, Bo; Wen, Yanwei, E-mail: ywwen@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Gong, Cheng; Cho, Kyeongjae [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Chen, Rong [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology and School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Shan, Bin, E-mail: ywwen@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Performance analysis of boron nitride embedded armchair graphene nanoribbon metal–oxide–semiconductor field effect transistor with Stone Wales defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the performance of a hybrid Graphene-Boron Nitride armchair nanoribbon (a-GNR-BN) n-MOSFET at its ballistic transport limit. We consider three geometric configurations 3p, 3p + 1, and 3p + 2 of a-GNR-BN with BN atoms embedded on either side (2, 4, and 6 BN) on the GNR. Material properties like band gap, effective mass, and density of states of these H-passivated structures are evaluated using the Density Functional Theory. Using these material parameters, self-consistent Poisson-Schrodinger simulations are carried out under the Non Equilibrium Green's Function formalism to calculate the ballistic n-MOSFET device characteristics. For a hybrid nanoribbon of width ?5?nm, the simulated ON current is found to be in the range of 265??A–280??A with an ON/OFF ratio 7.1 × 10{sup 6}–7.4 × 10{sup 6} for a V{sub DD}?=?0.68?V corresponding to 10?nm technology node. We further study the impact of randomly distributed Stone Wales (SW) defects in these hybrid structures and only 2.5% degradation of ON current is observed for SW defect density of 3.18%.

Chanana, Anuja; Sengupta, Amretashis; Mahapatra, Santanu [Nano Scale Device Research Laboratory, Department of Electronic Systems Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

422

One-dimensional hybrid-direct kinetic simulation of the discharge plasma in a Hall thruster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to model the non-equilibrium plasma within the discharge region of a Hall thruster, the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) must be obtained accurately. A direct kinetic (DK) simulation method that directly solves the plasma Boltzmann equation can achieve better resolution of VDFs in comparison to particle simulations, such as the particle-in-cell (PIC) method that inherently include statistical noise. In this paper, a one-dimensional hybrid-DK simulation, which uses a DK simulation for heavy species and a fluid model for electrons, is developed and compared to a hybrid-PIC simulation. Time-averaged results obtained from the hybrid-DK simulation are in good agreement with hybrid-PIC results and experimental data. It is shown from a comparison of using a kinetic simulation and solving the continuity equation that modeling of the neutral atoms plays an important role for simulations of the Hall thruster discharge plasma. In addition, low and high frequency plasma oscillations are observed. Although the kinetic nature of electrons is not resolved due to the use of a fluid model, the hybrid-DK model provides spatially and temporally well-resolved plasma properties and an improved resolution of VDFs for heavy species with less statistical noise in comparison to the hybrid-PIC method.

Hara, Kentaro; Boyd, Iain D. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kolobov, Vladimir I. [CFD Research Corporation, Huntsville, Alabama 35805 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Halo Formation in Warm Dark Matter Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrepancies have emerged between the predictions of standard cold dark matter (CDM) theory and observations of clustering on sub-galactic scales. Warm dark matter (WDM) is a simple modification of CDM in which the dark matter particles have initial velocities due either to their having decoupled as thermal relics, or having been formed via non-equilibrium decay. We investigate the nonlinear gravitational clustering of WDM with a high resolution N-body code, and identify a number of distinctive observational signatures. Relative to CDM, halo concentrations and core densities are lowered, core radii are increased, and large halos emerge with far fewer low mass satellites. The number of small halos is suppressed, and those present are formed by `top down' fragmentation of caustics, as part of a `cosmic web' connecting massive halos. Few small halos form outside this web. If we identify small halos with dwarf galaxies, their number, spatial distribution, and formation epoch appear in better agreement with the observations for WDM than they are for CDM.

Paul Bode; Jeremiah P. Ostriker; Neil Turok

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

424

Equilibration processes in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) is thought to contribute about 40-50 % to the baryonic budget at the present evolution stage of the universe. The observed large scale structure is likely to be due to gravitational growth of density fluctuations in the post-inflation era. The evolving cosmic web is governed by non-linear gravitational growth of the initially weak density fluctuations in the dark energy dominated cosmology. Non-linear structure formation, accretion and merging processes, star forming and AGN activity produce gas shocks in the WHIM. Shock waves are converting a fraction of the gravitation power to thermal and non-thermal emission of baryonic/leptonic matter. They provide the most likely way to power the luminous matter in the WHIM. The plasma shocks in the WHIM are expected to be collisionless. Collisionless shocks produce a highly non-equilibrium state with anisotropic temperatures and a large differences in ion and electron temperatures. We discuss the ion and electron heating by the collisionless shocks and then review the plasma processes responsible for the Coulomb equilibration and collisional ionisation equilibrium of oxygen ions in the WHIM. MHD-turbulence produced by the strong collisionless shocks could provide a sizeable non-thermal contribution to the observed Doppler parameter of the UV line spectra of the WHIM.

A. M. Bykov; F. B. S. Paerels; V. Petrosian

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

Gamma-ray burst spectra and spectral correlations from sub-photospheric Comptonization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most important unresolved issues in gamma-ray burst physics is the origin of the prompt gamma-ray spectrum. Its general non-thermal character and the softness in the X-ray band remain unexplained. We tackle these issues by performing Monte Carlo simulations of radiation-matter interactions in a scattering dominated photon-lepton plasma. The plasma -- initially in equilibrium -- is driven to non-equilibrium conditions by a sudden energy injection in the lepton population, mimicking the effect of a shock wave or the dissipation of magnetic energy. Equilibrium restoration occurs due to energy exchange between the photons and leptons. While the initial and final equilibrium spectra are thermal, the transitional photon spectra are characterized by non-thermal features such as power-law tails, high energy bumps, and multiple components. Such non-thermal features are observed at infinity if the dissipation occurs at small to moderate optical depths, and the spectrum is released before thermalization is co...

Chhotray, Atul

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Entropy production of a steady-growth cell with catalytic reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cells generally convert external nutrient resources to support metabolismand growth. Understanding the thermodynamic efficiency of this conversion is essential to determine the general characteristics of cellular growth. Using a simple protocell model with catalytic reaction dynamics to synthesize the necessary enzyme and membrane components from nutrients, the entropy production per unit cell-volume growth is calculated analytically and numerically based on the rate equation for chemical kinetics and linear non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The minimal entropy production per unit cell growth is found to be achieved at a non-zero nutrient uptake rate, rather than at a quasi-static limit as in the standard Carnot engine. This difference appears because the equilibration mediated by the enzyme exists only within cells that grow through enzyme and membrane synthesis. Optimal nutrient uptake is also confirmed by protocell models with many chemical components synthesized through a catalytic reaction network. The possible relevance of the identified optimal uptake to optimal yield for cellular growth is also discussed.

Yusuke Himeoka; Kunihiko Kaneko

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Cell development obeys maximum Fisher information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eukaryotic cell development has been optimized by natural selection to obey maximal intracellular flux of messenger proteins. This, in turn, implies maximum Fisher information on angular position about a target nuclear pore complex (NPR). The cell is simply modeled as spherical, with cell membrane (CM) diameter 10 micron and concentric nuclear membrane (NM) diameter 6 micron. The NM contains about 3000 nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Development requires messenger ligands to travel from the CM-NPC-DNA target binding sites. Ligands acquire negative charge by phosphorylation, passing through the cytoplasm over Newtonian trajectories toward positively charged NPCs (utilizing positive nuclear localization sequences). The CM-NPC channel obeys maximized mean protein flux F and Fisher information I at the NPC, with first-order delta I = 0 and approximate 2nd-order delta I = 0 stability to environmental perturbations. Many of its predictions are confirmed, including the dominance of protein pathways of from 1-4 proteins, a 4nm size for the EGFR protein and the approximate flux value F =10^16 proteins/m2-s. After entering the nucleus, each protein ultimately delivers its ligand information to a DNA target site with maximum probability, i.e. maximum Kullback-Liebler entropy HKL. In a smoothness limit HKL approaches IDNA/2, so that the total CM-NPC-DNA channel obeys maximum Fisher I. Thus maximum information approaches non-equilibrium, one condition for life.

B. R. Frieden; R. A. Gatenby

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

428

New XMM-Newton observations of SNRs in the SMC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A complete overview of the supernova remnant (SNR) population is required to investigate their evolution and interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Recent XMM-Newton observations of the SMC cover three known SNRs (DEM S5, SNR B0050-72.8, and SNR B0058-71.8), which are poorly studied and are X-ray faint. We used new multi-frequency radio-continuum surveys and new optical observations at Ha, [SII], and [OIII] wavelengths, in combination with the X-ray data, to investigate their properties and to search for new SNRs in the SMC. We used X-ray source selection criteria and found one SMC object with typical SNR characteristics (HFPK 334), that was initially detected by ROSAT. We analysed the X-ray spectra and present multi-wavelength morphological studies of the three SNRs and the new candidate. Using a non-equilibrium ionisation collisional plasma model, we find temperatures kT around 0.18 keV for the three known remnants and 0.69 keV for the candidate. The low te...

Filipovic, M D; Winkler, P F; Pietsch, W; Payne, J L; Crawford, E J; De Horta, A Y; Stootman, F H; Reaser, B E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A mechanism for stickness, dealing with extreme events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this letter we study how hyperbolic and non hyperbolic regions in the neighborhood of a resonant island perform a important role allowing or forbidding stickiness phenomenon around islands in conservative systems. The vicinity of the island is composed by non hyperbolic areas that almost prevent the trajectory to visit the island edge. For some specific parameters there are tiny channels embedded in the non hyperbolic area that are associated to hyperbolic fixed points present in the neighborhood of the islands. Such channels allow the trajectory to be injected in the inner portion of the vicinity. When the trajectory crosses the barrier imposed by the non hyperbolic regions, it spends a long time to abandon the surrounding of the island, since the barrier also prevents the trajectory to scape from the neighborhood of the island. In this scenario the non hyperbolic structures are the responsible for the stickiness phenomena, and more than that, the strength of the sticky effect. We reveal that those properties of the phase space allow us to manipulate the existence of extreme events (and the transport associated to it) responsible for the non equilibrium fluctuation of the system. In fact we demonstrate that monitoring very small portions of the phase space (namely $\\approx 4\\times 10^{-4}$ \\% of it) it is possible to generate a completely diffusive system eliminating long time recurrences that result from the stickiness phenomenon.

Taline Suellen Kruger; Paulo Paneque Galuzio; Thiago de Lima Prado; Sergio Roberto Lopes; José Danilo Szezech Jr; Ricardo Luiz Viana

2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

430

Generation of Initial Kinetic Distributions for Simulation of Long-Pulse Charged Particle Beams with High Space-Charge intensity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-consistent Vlasov-Poisson simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel--both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of kinetic distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of unbunched or weakly bunched beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial kinetic distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

Lund, Steven M.; Kikuchi, Takashi; Davidson, Ronald C.

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

431

Generation of initial Vlasov distributions for simulation of charged particle beams with high space-charge intensity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-consistent Vlasov simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel, both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

Lund, S M; Kikuchi, T; Davidson, R C

2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

432

Time-Dependent CO[subscript 2] Sorption Hysteresis in a One-Dimensional Microporous Octahedral Molecular Sieve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of sorbents for next-generation CO{sub 2} mitigation technologies will require better understanding of CO{sub 2}/sorbent interactions. Among the sorbents under consideration are shape-selective microporous molecular sieves with hierarchical pore morphologies of reduced dimensionality. We have characterized the non-equilibrium CO{sub 2} sorption of OMS-2, a well-known one-dimensional microporous octahedral molecular sieve with manganese oxide framework. Remarkably, we find that the degree of CO{sub 2} sorption hysteresis increases when the gas/sorbent system is allowed to equilibrate for longer times at each pressure step. Density functional theory calculations indicate a 'gate-keeping' role of the cation in the tunnel, only allowing CO{sub 2} molecules to enter fully into the tunnel via a highly unstable transient state when CO{sub 2} loadings exceed 0.75 mmol/g. The energy barrier associated with the gate-keeping effect suggests an adsorption mechanism in which kinetic trapping of CO{sub 2} is responsible for the observed hysteretic behavior.

Espinal, Laura; Wong-Ng, Winnie; Kaduk, James A.; Allen, Andrew J.; Snyder, Chad R.; Chiu, Chun; Siderius, Daniel W.; Li, Lan; Cockayne, Eric; Espinal, Anais E.; Suib, Steven L. (IIT); (NIST); (Connecticut)

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2?-, 3?-cyclic-nucleotide-3?-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. • The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. • The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase. • The retina exhibits diminished neurotrophin levels and cellular differentiation. • The toxic effect is apoptotic.

Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (India); Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India); Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin [Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India); Nagar, Geet Kumar [Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute (CSIR-CDRI) (India); Mitra, Kalyan [Electron Microscopy Unit, CSIR-CDRI, Lucknow 226001 (India); Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra, E-mail: sanghmitra@iitr.res.in [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (India); Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the current research, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature in air. Based on these measurements, the charge carrier concentration, net acceptor dopant concentration, activation energy of conduction and mobility were estimated. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature have been completed and reported previously. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affects the mechanical properties. To study the effect of temperature on the membranes when exposed to an inert environment, the membranes (LAFT and Dual phase) were heat treated at 1000 C in air and N{sub 2} atmosphere and hardness and fracture toughness of the membranes were studied after the treatment. The indentation method was used to find the fracture toughness and the effect of the heat treatment on the mechanical properties of the membranes. Further results on the investigation of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appears to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model will serve to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. The in situ electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements were made on LSFT at 1000 and 1200 C over the oxygen activity range from air to 10{sup -15} atm. The electrical conductivity measurements exhibited a p to n type transition at an oxygen activity of 1 x 10{sup -10} at 1000 C and 1 x 10{sup -6} at 1200 C. Thermogravimetric studies were also carried out over the same oxygen activities and temperatures. Based on the results of these measurements, the chemical and mechanical stability range of LSFT were determined and defect structure was established. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes exposed to air and N{sub 2} at 1000 C was done and the XRD and SEM analysis of the specimens were carried out to understand the structural and microstructural changes. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affect the mechanical properties. A complete transformation of fracture behavior was observed in the N{sub 2} treated LSFT samples. Further results to investigate the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Recent results on transient kinetic data are presented. The 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model is used to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was conducted to evaluate the capabilities of different numerical methods used to represent microstructure behavior at the mesoscale for irradiated material using an idealized benchmark problem. The purpose of the mesoscale benchmark problem was to provide a common basis to assess several mesoscale methods with the objective of identifying the strengths and areas of improvement in the predictive modeling of microstructure evolution. In this work, mesoscale models (phase-field, Potts, and kinetic Monte Carlo) developed by PNNL, INL, SNL, and ORNL were used to calculate the evolution kinetics of intra-granular fission gas bubbles in UO2 fuel under post-irradiation thermal annealing conditions. The benchmark problem was constructed to include important microstructural evolution mechanisms on the kinetics of intra-granular fission gas bubble behavior such as the atomic diffusion of Xe atoms, U vacancies, and O vacancies, the effect of vacancy capture and emission from defects, and the elastic interaction of non-equilibrium gas bubbles. An idealized set of assumptions was imposed on the benchmark problem to simplify the mechanisms considered. The capability and numerical efficiency of different models are compared against selected experimental and simulation results. These comparisons find that the phase-field methods, by the nature of the free energy formulation, are able to represent a larger subset of the mechanisms influencing the intra-granular bubble growth and coarsening mechanisms in the idealized benchmark problem as compared to the Potts and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. It is recognized that the mesoscale benchmark problem as formulated does not specifically highlight the strengths of the discrete particle modeling used in the Potts and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Future efforts are recommended to construct increasingly more complex mesoscale benchmark problems to further verify and validate the predictive capabilities of the mesoscale modeling methods used in this study.

Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Tonks, Michael; Biner, Bullent; Millet, Paul; Tikare, Veena; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Andersson , David

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

438

A method for the direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer instability with finite-rate chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new numerical method is presented here that allows to consider chemically reacting gases during the direct numerical simulation of a hypersonic fluid flow. The method comprises the direct coupling of a solver for the fluid mechanical model and a library providing the physio-chemical model. The numerical method for the fluid mechanical model integrates the compressible Navier–Stokes equations using an explicit time advancement scheme and high-order finite differences. This Navier–Stokes code can be applied to the investigation of laminar-turbulent transition and boundary-layer instability. The numerical method for the physio-chemical model provides thermodynamic and transport properties for different gases as well as chemical production rates, while here we exclusively consider a five species air mixture. The new method is verified for a number of test cases at Mach 10, including the one-dimensional high-temperature flow downstream of a normal shock, a hypersonic chemical reacting boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium and a hypersonic reacting boundary layer with finite-rate chemistry. We are able to confirm that the diffusion flux plays an important role for a high-temperature boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Moreover, we demonstrate that the flow for a case previously considered as a benchmark for the investigation of non-equilibrium chemistry can be regarded as frozen. Finally, the new method is applied to investigate the effect of finite-rate chemistry on boundary layer instability by considering the downstream evolution of a small-amplitude wave and comparing results with those obtained for a frozen gas as well as a gas in local thermodynamic equilibrium.

Marxen, Olaf, E-mail: olaf.marxen@vki.ac.be [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States) [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States); Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Genèse (Belgium); Magin, Thierry E. [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Genèse (Belgium)] [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Genèse (Belgium); Shaqfeh, Eric S.G.; Iaccarino, Gianluca [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States)] [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Thermal evolution behavior of carbides and {gamma} Prime precipitates in FGH96 superalloy powder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characteristics of rapidly solidified FGH96 superalloy powder and the thermal evolution behavior of carbides and {gamma} Prime precipitates within powder particles were investigated. It was observed that the reduction of powder size and the increase of cooling rate had transformed the solidification morphologies of atomized powder from dendrite in major to cellular structure. The secondary dendritic spacing was measured to be 1.02-2.55 {mu}m and the corresponding cooling rates were estimated to be in the range of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4}-4.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K{center_dot}s{sup -1}. An increase in the annealing temperature had rendered the phase transformation of carbides evolving from non-equilibrium MC Prime carbides to intermediate transition stage of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, and finally to thermodynamically stable MC carbides. The superfine {gamma} Prime precipitates were formed at the dendritic boundaries of rapidly solidified superalloy powder. The coalescence, growth, and homogenization of {gamma}' precipitates occurred with increasing annealing temperature. With decreasing cooling rate from 650 Degree-Sign C{center_dot}K{sup -1} to 5 Degree-Sign C{center_dot}K{sup -1}, the morphological development of {gamma} Prime precipitates had been shown to proceed from spheroidal to cuboidal and finally to solid state dendrites. Meanwhile, a shift had been observed from dendritic morphology to recrystallized structure between 900 Degree-Sign C and 1050 Degree-Sign C. Moreover, accelerated evolution of carbides and {gamma}' precipitates had been facilitated by the formation of new grain boundaries which provide fast diffusion path for atomic elements. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural characteristic of FGH96 superalloy powder was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relation between microstructure, particle size, and cooling rate was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal evolution behavior of {gamma} Prime and carbides in loose FGH96 powder was studied.

Zhang Lin, E-mail: zhanglincsu@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Liu Hengsan, E-mail: lhsj63@sohu.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); He Xinbo, E-mail: xb_he@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Rafi-ud-din, E-mail: rafiuddi@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Qu Xuanhui, E-mail: quxh@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Qin Mingli, E-mail: mlqin75@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Li Zhou, E-mail: zhouli621@126.com [National Key Lab of High Temperature Structural Materials, Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing, 100095 (China); Zhang Guoqing, E-mail: g.zhang@126.com [National Key Lab of High Temperature Structural Materials, Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing, 100095 (China)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Microscopic quantum structure of black hole and vacuum versus quantum statistical origin of gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Planckon densely piled model of vacuum is proposed. Based on this model, the microscopic quantum structure of Schwarzschild black hole and quantum statistical origin of its gravity are studied. The cutoff of black hole horizon leads to Casimir effect inside the horizon. This effect makes the inside vacuum has less zero quantum fluctuation energy than that of outside vacuum and the spin 1/2 radiation hole excitations are resulted inside the horizon. The mean energy of the radiation hole excitations is related to the temperature decrease of the Hawking-Unruh type by the period law of the Fermion temperature greens function and a temperature difference as well as gravity are created on the horizon. A dual relation of the gravity potentials between inside and outside regions of the black hole is found. An attractor behaviour of the horizon surface is unveiled. The gravity potential inside the black hole is linear in radial coordinate and no singularity exists at the origin of the black hole, in contrast to the conventional conjecture. All the particles absorbed by the black hole have fallen down to the horizon and converted into spin 1/2 radiation quanta with the mean energy related to the Hawking-Unruh temperature, the thermodynamic equilibrium and the mechanical balance make the radiation quanta be tightly bound in the horizon. The gravitation mass $2M$ and physical mass $M$ of the black hole are calculated. The calculated entropy of the black hole is well consistent with Hawking. Outside the horizon, there exist thermodynamic non-equilibrium and mechanical non-balance which lead to an outward centrifugal energy flow and an inward gravitation energy flow. The lost vacuum energy in the negative gravitation potential region has been removed to the black hole surface to form a spherical Planckon shell with the thickness of Planckon diameter so that energy conservation is guaranteed.

Shun-Jin Wang

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

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441

MRI of Heterogeneous Hydrogenation Reactions Using Parahydrogen Polarization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The power of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is its ability to image the internal structure of optically opaque samples and provide detailed maps of a variety of important parameters, such as density, diffusion, velocity and temperature. However, one of the fundamental limitations of this technique is its inherent low sensitivity. For example, the low signal to noise ratio (SNR) is particularly problematic for imaging gases in porous materials due to the low density of the gas and the large volume occluded by the porous material. This is unfortunate, as many industrially relevant chemical reactions take place at gas-surface interfaces in porous media, such as packed catalyst beds. Because of this severe SNR problem, many techniques have been developed to directly increase the signal strength. These techniques work by manipulating the nuclear spin populations to produce polarized} (i.e., non-equilibrium) states with resulting signal strengths that are orders of magnitude larger than those available at thermal equilibrium. This dissertation is concerned with an extension of a polarization technique based on the properties of parahydrogen. Specifically, I report on the novel use of heterogeneous catalysis to produce parahydrogen induced polarization and applications of this new technique to gas phase MRI and the characterization of micro-reactors. First, I provide an overview of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and how parahydrogen is used to improve the SNR of the NMR signal. I then present experimental results demonstrating that it is possible to use heterogeneous catalysis to produce parahydrogen-induced polarization. These results are extended to imaging void spaces using a parahydrogen polarized gas. In the second half of this dissertation, I demonstrate the use of parahydrogen-polarized gas-phase MRI for characterizing catalytic microreactors. Specifically, I show how the improved SNR allows one to map parameters important for characterizing the heat and mass transport in a heterogeneous catalyst bed. This is followed by appendices containing detailed information regarding the design and use of my experimental setup.

Burt, Scott R; Burt, Scott R.

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

442

Vacuum quantum fluctuation energy in expanding universe and dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article is based on the Planckon densely piled vacuum model and the principle of cosmology. With the Planck era as initial conditions and including the early inflation, we have solved the Einstein-Friedmann equations to describe the evolution of the universe. The results are: 1) the ratio of the dark energy density to the vacuum quantum fluctuation energy density is $\\frac{{{\\rho }_{de}}}{{{\\rho }_{vac}}}\\sim{{(\\frac{{{t}_{P}}}{{{T}_{0}}})}^{2}}\\sim{{10}^{-122}} $; 2) at the inflation time ${{t}_{\\inf }}={{10}^{-35}}s$, the calculated universe radiation energy density is $\\rho ({{t}_{\\inf }})\\sim{{10}^{-16}}{{\\rho }_{vac}}$ and the corresponding temperature is ${{E}_{c}}\\sim{{10}^{15}}GeV$ consistent with the GUT phase transition temperature; 3) the expanding universe with vacuum as its environment is a non-equilibrium open system constantly exchanging energy with vacuum; during its expansion, the Planckons in the universe lose quantum fluctuation energy and create the cosmic expansion quanta-cosmons, the energy of cosmons is the lost part of the vacuum quantum fluctuation energy and contributes to the universe energy with the calculated value ${{E}_{\\cos mos}}={{10}^{22}}{{M}_{\\otimes }}{{c}^{2}}$ (where ${{M}_{\\otimes }}$ is solar mass); 4) the total energy of the universe, namely the negative gravity energy plus the positive universe energy is zero; 5) the negative gravity potential and the gravity acceleration related to the creation of cosmons are derived with the nature of outward repulsive force, indicating that the cosmon may be the candidate of the dark energy quantum; 6) both the initial Planck era solution and the infinite asymptotic solution of the Einstein-Friedman equations are unstable: the former tends to expand and the latter tends to shrink, so that the Einstein-Friedman universe will undergo a cyclic evolution of successive expansion and shrinking.

Shun-Jin Wang

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

443

Comments to support the Dipole Dynamical Model (DDM) of Ball Lightning (BL)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present estimates to justify previously proposed by me heuristic Dipole Dynamical Model (DDM) of Ball Lightning (BL). The movement and energy supplying to the dipole BL are due to the atmospheric electric field. Crucial for the detailed analysis of BL is using the new relation of balance of the force of atmospheric electric field (per unit mass of electron cloud) and dipole forces electrons-ions within BL dipole (per unit mass of BL) as the first necessary condition for the existance of BL as an integer. This model is unique because, unlike existing static models, fundamental condition for the existence of Ball Lightning is its forward motion. The virial theorem limiting BL power does not apply to BL which is not closed system like the Sun or Galaxy systems and is strongly dependent part of the infinitely extended in time and space large system. Stability of BL is due to two free parameters with the fundamental role of thermodynamic non-equilibrium, ionization, recombination and translational movement with energy loss by radiation and also excess volumetric positive charge. Polarization degree of BL plasma is characterized by polarizability factor {\\gamma}. An example is presented of calculating the stability of option BL. There is also a possible connection of stability BL with statistical distributions of the atmospheric electric field in time and space. Destruction of BL can also occur due to arising kinematical instability at its accelerating (or decelerating) movement. Maximal energy density in BL DDM does not exceed the value Espec<(10(8) - 10(9)) J/m(3). Resulting indefinitely long BL lifetime is also discussed.

V. N. Soshnikov

2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

White noise approach to the low density limit of a quantum particle in a gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The white noise approach to the investigation of the dynamics of a quantum particle interacting with a dilute and in general non-equilibrium gaseous environment in the low density limit is outlined. The low density limit is the kinetic Markovian regime when only pair collisions (i.e., collisions of the test particle with one particle of the gas at one time moment) contribute to the dynamics. In the white noise approach one first proves that the appropriate operators describing the gas converge in the sense of appropriate matrix elements to certain operators of quantum white noise. Then these white noise operators are used to derive quantum white noise and quantum stochastic equations describing the approximate dynamics of the total system consisting of the particle and the gas. The derivation is given ab initio, starting from the exact microscopic quantum dynamics. The limiting dynamics is described by a quantum stochastic equation driven by a quantum Poisson process. This equation then applied to the derivation of quantum Langevin equation and linear Boltzmann equation for the reduced density matrix of the test particle. The first part of the paper describes the approach which was developed by L. Accardi, I.V. Volovich and the author and uses the Fock-antiFock (or GNS) representation for the CCR algebra of the gas. The second part presents the approach to the derivation of the limiting equations directly in terms of the correlation functions, without use of the Fock-antiFock representation. This approach simplifies the derivation and allows to express the strength of the quantum number process directly in terms of the one-particle $S$-matrix.

Alexander Pechen

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

445

Dissipative hydrodynamics in 2+1 dimension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2+1 dimension, we have simulated the hydrodynamic evolution of QGP fluid with dissipation due to shear viscosity. Comparison of evolution of ideal and viscous fluid, both initialised under the same conditions e.g. same equilibration time, energy density and velocity profile, reveal that the dissipative fluid evolves slowly, cooling at a slower rate. Cooling get still slower for higher viscosity. The fluid velocities on the otherhand evolve faster in a dissipative fluid than in an ideal fluid. The transverse expansion is also enhanced in dissipative evolution. For the same decoupling temperature, freeze-out surface for a dissipative fluid is more extended than an ideal fluid. Dissipation produces entropy as a result of which particle production is increased. Particle production is increased due to (i) extension of the freeze-out surface and (ii) change of the equilibrium distribution function to a non-equilibrium one, the last effect being prominent at large transverse momentum. Compared to ideal fluid, transverse momentum distribution of pion production is considerably enhanced. Enhancement is more at high $p_T$ than at low $p_T$. Pion production also increases with viscosity, larger the viscosity, more is the pion production. Dissipation also modifies the elliptic flow. Elliptic flow is reduced in viscous dynamics. Also, contrary to ideal dynamics where elliptic flow continues to increase with transverse momentum, in viscous dynamics, elliptic flow tends to saturate at large transverse momentum. The analysis suggest that initial conditions of the hot, dense matter produced in Au+Au collisions at RHIC, as extracted from ideal fluid analysis can be changed significantly if the QGP fluid is viscous.

A. K. Chaudhuri

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

446

Past and present of nuclear matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subject of nuclear matter is interesting for many fields of physics ranging from condensed matter to lattice QCD. Knowing its properties is important for our understanding of neutron stars, supernovae and cosmology. Experimentally, we have the most precise information on ground state nuclear matter from the mass formula and from the systematics of monopole vibrations. This gives us the ground state density, binding energy and the compression modulus k at ground state density. However, those methods can not be extended towards the regime we are most interested in, the regime of high density and high temperature. Additional information can be obtained from the observation of neutron stars and of supernova explosions. In both cases information is limited by the rare events that nature provides for us. High energy heavy ion collisions, on the other hand, allow us to perform controlled experiments in the laboratory. For a very short period in time we can create a system that lets us study nuclear matter properties. Density and temperature of the system depend on the mass of the colliding nuclei, on their energy and on the impact parameter. The system created in nuclear collisions has at best about 200 constituents not even close to infinite nuclear matter, and it lasts only for collision times of {approx} 10{sup {minus}22}sec, not an ideal condition for establishing any kind of equilibrium. Extended size and thermal and chemical equilibrium, however, axe a priori conditions of nuclear matter. As a consequence we need realistic models that describe the collision dynamics and non-equilibrium effects in order to relate experimental observables to properties of nuclear matter. The study of high energy nuclear collisions started at the Bevalac. I will try to summarize the results from the Bevalac studies, the highlights of the continuing program, and extension to higher energies without claiming to be complete.

Ritter, H.G.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, EQUILIBRIUM AND NON-EQUILIBRIM ASPECTS OF HOT, DENSE QCD, VOLUME 28.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven, beginning operation this year, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, beginning operation {approximately}2005, will provide an unprecedented range of energies and luminosities that will allow us to probe the Gluon-Quark plasma. At RHIC and LHC, at central rapidity typical estimates of energy densities and temperatures are e * 1-10 GeV/fm3 and T0 * 300 - 900 MeV. Such energies are well above current estimates for the GQ plasma. Initially, this hot, dense plasma is far from local thermal equilibrium, making the theoretical study of transport phenomena, kinetic and chemical equilibration in dense and hot plasmas, and related issues a matter of fundamental importance. During the last few years a consistent framework to study collective effects in the Gluon-Quark plasma, and a microscopic description of transport in terms of the hard thermal (and dense) loops resummation program has emerged. This approach has the potential of providing a microscopic formulation of transport, in the regime of temperatures and densities to be achieved at RHIC and LHC. A parallel development over the last few years has provided a consistent formulation of non-equilibrium quantum field theory that provides a real-time description of phenomena out of equilibrium. Novel techniques including non-perturbative approaches and the dynamical renormalization group techniques lead to new insights into transport and relaxation. A deeper understanding of collective.excitations and transport phenomena in the GQ plasma could lead to recognize novel potential experimental signatures. New insights into small-c physics reveals a striking similarity between small-c and hard thermal loops, and novel real-time numerical simulations have recently studied the parton distributions and their thermalizations in the initial stages of a heavy ion collision.

De Vega, H.J.; Boyanovsky, D. [and others

2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

448

PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, EQUILIBRIUM AND NON-EQUILIBRIM ASPECTTS OF HOT, DENSE QCD, VOLUME 28.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven, beginning operation this year, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, beginning operation {approximately}2005, will provide an unprecedented range of energies and luminosities that will allow us to probe the Gluon-Quark plasma. At RHIC and LHC, at central rapidity typical estimates of energy densities and temperatures are e * 1-10 GeV/fm3 and T0 * 300 - 900 MeV. Such energies are well above current estimates for the GQ plasma. Initially, this hot, dense plasma is far from local thermal equilibrium, making the theoretical study of transport phenomena, kinetic and chemical equilibration in dense and hot plasmas, and related issues a matter of fundamental importance. During the last few years a consistent framework to study collective effects in the Gluon-Quark plasma, and a microscopic description of transport in terms of the hard thermal (and dense) loops resummation program has emerged. This approach has the potential of providing a microscopic formulation of transport, in the regime of temperatures and densities to be achieved at RHIC and LHC. A parallel development over the last few years has provided a consistent formulation of non-equilibrium quantum field theory that provides a real-time description of phenomena out of equilibrium. Novel techniques including non-perturbative approaches and the dynamical renormalization group techniques lead to new insights into transport and relaxation. A deeper understanding of collective.excitations and transport phenomena in the GQ plasma could lead to recognize novel potential experimental signatures. New insights into small-c physics reveals a striking similarity between small-c and hard thermal loops, and novel real-time numerical simulations have recently studied the parton distributions and their thermalizations in the initial stages of a heavy ion collision.

DE VEGA,H.J.; BOYANOVSKY,D. [and others

2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

449

Stochastic Dynamical Structure (SDS) of Nonequilibrium Processes in the Absence of Detailed Balance. II: construction of SDS with nonlinear force and multiplicative noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a whole range of emergent phenomena in non-equilibrium behaviors can be well described by a set of stochastic differential equations. Inspired by an insight gained during our study of robustness and stability in phage lambda genetic switch in modern biology, we found that there exists a classification of generic nonequilibrium processes: In the continuous description in terms of stochastic differential equations, there exists four dynamical elements: the potential function $\\phi$, the friction matrix $ S$, the anti-symmetric matrix $ T $, and the noise. The generic feature of absence of detailed balance is then precisely represented by $T$. For dynamical near a fixed point, whether or not it is stable or not, the stochastic dynamics is linear. A rather complete analysis has been carried out (Kwon, Ao, Thouless, cond-mat/0506280; PNAS, {\\bf 102} (2005) 13029), referred to as SDS I. One important and persistent question is the existence of a potential function with nonlinear force and with multiplicative noise, with both nice local dynamical and global steady state properties. Here we demonstrate that a dynamical structure built into stochastic differential equation allows us to construct such a global optimization potential function. First, we provide the construction. One of most important ingredient is the generalized Einstein relation. We then present an approximation scheme: The gradient expansion which turns every order into linear matrix equations. The consistent of such methodology with other known stochastic treatments will be discussed in next paper, SDS III; and the explicitly connection to statistical mechanics and thermodynamics will be discussed in a forthcoming paper, SDS IV.

P. Ao

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

K(alpha) X-ray Emission Spectra from Highly Charged Fe Ions in EBIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed spectral model has been developed for the computer simulation of the 2p {yields} 1s K{alpha} X-ray emission from highly charged Fe ions in the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT). The spectral features of interest occur in the range from 1.84 {angstrom} to 1.94 {angstrom}. The fundamental radiative emission processes associated with radiationless electron capture or dielectronic recombination, inner-shell electron collisional excitation, and inner-shell electron collisional ionization are taken in account. For comparison, spectral observations and simulations for high-temperature magnetic-fusion (Tokamak) plasmas are reviewed. In these plasmas, small departures from steady-state corona-model charge-state distributions can occur due to ion transport processes, while the assumption of equilibrium (Maxwellian) electron energy distributions is expected to be valid. Our investigations for EBIT have been directed at the identification of spectral features that can serve as diagnostics of extreme non-equilibrium or transient-ionization conditions, and allowance has been made for general (non-Maxwellian) electron energy distributions. For the precise interpretation of the high-resolution X-ray observations, which may involve the analysis of blended spectral features composed of many lines, it has been necessary to take into account the multitude of individual fine-structure components of the K{alpha} radiative transitions in the ions from Fe XVIII to Fe XXV. At electron densities higher than the validity range of the corona-model approximation, collisionally induced transitions among low-lying excited states can play an important role. It is found that inner-shell electron excitation and ionization processes involving the complex intermediate ions from Fe XVIII to Fe XXI produce spectral features, in the wavelength range from 1.89 {angstrom} to 1.94 {angstrom}, which are particularly sensitive to density variations and transient ionization conditions.

Jacobs, V; Beiersdorfer, P

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

451

RADIATION CHEMISTRY 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE JULY 18-23  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2010 Gordon Conference on Radiation Chemistry will present cutting edge research regarding the study of radiation-induced chemical transformations. Radiation Chemistry or 'high energy' chemistry is primarily initiated by ionizing radiation: i.e. photons or particles with energy sufficient to create conduction band electrons and 'holes', excitons, ionic and neutral free radicals, highly excited states, and solvated electrons. These transients often interact or 'react' to form products vastly different than those produced under thermal equilibrium conditions. The non-equilibrium, non-thermal conditions driving radiation chemistry exist in plasmas, star-forming regions, the outer solar system, nuclear reactors, nuclear waste repositories, radiation-based medical/clinical treatment centers and in radiation/materials processing facilities. The 2010 conference has a strong interdisciplinary flavor with focus areas spanning (1) the fundamental physics and chemistry involved in ultrafast (atto/femtosecond) energy deposition events, (2) radiation-induced processes in biology (particularly spatially resolved studies), (3) radiation-induced modification of materials at the nanoscale and cosmic ray/x-ray mediated processes in planetary science/astrochemistry. While the conference concentrates on fundamental science, topical applied areas covered will also include nuclear power, materials/polymer processing, and clinical/radiation treatment in medicine. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present work in poster format or as contributors to the Young Investigator session. The program and format provides excellent avenues to promote cross-disciplinary collaborations.

Thomas Orlando

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

452

Thermalization, Isotropization and Elliptic Flow from Nonequilibrium Initial Conditions with a Saturation Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article we report on our results about the computation of the elliptic flow of the quark-gluon-plasma produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions, simulating the expansion of the fireball by solving the relativistic Boltzmann equation for the parton distribution function tuned at a fixed shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$. Our main goal is to put emphasis on the role of a saturation scale in the initial gluon spectrum, which makes the initial distribution far from a thermalized one. We find that the presence of the saturation scale reduces the efficiency in building-up the elliptic flow, even if the thermalization process is quite fast $\\tau_{therm} \\approx 0.8 \\,\\rm fm/c$ and the pressure isotropization even faster $\\tau_{isotr} \\approx 0.3 \\,\\rm fm/c$. The impact of the non-equilibrium implied by the saturation scale manifests for non-central collisions and can modify the estimate of the viscosity respect to the assumption of full thermalization in $p_T$-space. We find that the estimate of $\\eta/s$ is modified from $\\eta/s \\approx 2/4\\pi$ to $\\eta/s \\approx 1/4\\pi$ at RHIC and from $\\eta/s \\approx 3/4\\pi$ to $\\eta/s \\approx 2/4\\pi$ at LHC. We complete our investigation by a study of the thermalization and isotropization times of the fireball for different initial conditions and values of $\\eta/s$ showing how the latter affects both isotropization and thermalization. Lastly, we have seen that the range of values explored by the phase-space distribution function $f$ is such that at $p_T<0.5\\, \\rm GeV$ the inner part of the fireball stays with occupation number significantly larger than unity despite the fast longitudinal expansion, which might suggest the possibility of the formation of a transient Bose-Einstein Condensate.

Marco Ruggieri; Francesco Scardina; Salvatore Plumari; Vincenzo Greco

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

453

New XMM-Newton observations of SNRs in the SMC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A complete overview of the supernova remnant (SNR) population is required to investigate their evolution and interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Recent XMM-Newton observations of the SMC cover three known SNRs (DEM S5, SNR B0050-72.8, and SNR B0058-71.8), which are poorly studied and are X-ray faint. We used new multi-frequency radio-continuum surveys and new optical observations at Ha, [SII], and [OIII] wavelengths, in combination with the X-ray data, to investigate their properties and to search for new SNRs in the SMC. We used X-ray source selection criteria and found one SMC object with typical SNR characteristics (HFPK 334), that was initially detected by ROSAT. We analysed the X-ray spectra and present multi-wavelength morphological studies of the three SNRs and the new candidate. Using a non-equilibrium ionisation collisional plasma model, we find temperatures kT around 0.18 keV for the three known remnants and 0.69 keV for the candidate. The low temperature, low surface brightness, and large extent of the three remnants indicates relatively large ages. The emission from the new candidate (HFPK 334) is more centrally peaked and the higher temperature suggests a younger remnant. Our