Sample records for gauge solid core

  1. Fabricating the Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ring, Peter J.; Sayre, Edwin D. [Advanced Methods and Materials, Inc., 1190 Mountain View-Alviso Road, Suite P, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Houts, Mike [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid core heatpipe nuclear reactor has the potential to be the most dependable concept for the nuclear space power system. The design of the conversion system employed permits multiple failure modes instead of the single failure mode of other concepts. Regardless of the material used for the reactor, either stainless steel, high-temperature alloys, Nb1Zr, Tantalum Alloys or MoRe Alloys, making the solid core by machining holes in a large diameter billet is not satisfactory. This is because the large diameter billet will have large grains that are detrimental to the performance of the reactor due to grain boundary diffusion. The ideal fabrication method for the solid core is by hot isostatic pressure diffusion bonding (HIPing). By this technique, wrought fine-grained tubes of the alloy chosen are assembled into the final shape with solid cusps and seal welded so that there is a vacuum in between all surfaces to be diffusion bonded. This welded structure is then HIPed for diffusion bonding. A solid core made of Type 321 stainless steel has been satisfactorily produced by Advanced Methods and Materials and is undergoing evaluation by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

  2. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

    1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween, and each interconnect wall consists of thin layers of the cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of interconnect material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002-0.05 cm thick.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPheeters, C.C.; Mrazek, F.C.

    1988-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700 C and 1,100 C. 8 figs.

  5. Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPheeters, Charles C. (Plainfield, IL); Mrazek, Franklin C. (Hickory Hills, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700.degree. C. and 1100.degree. C.

  6. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  7. A Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor with Cylindrical Thermoelectric Converter Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayre, Edwin D. [218 Brooke Acres Drive, Los Gatos, CA 95032 (United States); Vaidyanathan, Sam [6663 Pomander Place, San Jose, CA 95120 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear space power system that consists of a solid metal nuclear reactor core with heat pipes carrying energy to a cylindrical thermoelectric converter surrounding each of the heat pipes with a heat pipe radiator surrounding the thermoelectric converter is the most simple and reliable space power system. This means no single point of failure since each heat pipe and cylindrical converter is a separate power system and if one fails it will not affect the others. The heat pipe array in the solid core is designed so that if an isolated heat pipe or even two adjacent heat pipes fail, the remaining heat pipes will still transport the core heat without undue overheating of the uranium nitride fuel. The primary emphasis in this paper is on simplicity, reliability and fabricability of such a space nuclear power source. The core and heat pipes are made of Niobium 1% Zirconium alloy (Nb1Zr), with rhenium lined fuel tubes, bonded together by hot isostatic pressure (HIPing) and with sodium as the heat pipe working fluid, can be operated up to 1250K. The cylindrical thermoelectric converter is made by depositing the constituents of the converter around a Nb1%Zr tube and encasing it in a Nb 1% Zr alloy tube and HIPing the structure to get final bonding and to produce residual compressive stresses in all brittle materials in the converter. A radiator heat pipe filled with potassium that operates at 850K is bonded to the outside of the cylindrical converter for cooling. The solid core heat pipe and cylindrical converter are mated by welding during the final assembly. A solid core reactor with 150 heat pipes with a 0.650-inch (1.65 cm) ID and a 30-inch (76.2 cm) length with an output of 8 Watts per square inch as demonstrated by the SP100 PD2 cell tests will produce about 80 KW of electrical power. An advanced solid core reactor made with molybdenum 47% rhenium alloy, with lithium heat pipes and the PD2 theoretical output of 11 watts per square inch or advanced higher temperature converter to operate at 1350K could produce a greater output of approximately 100KW.

  8. Serially connected solid oxide fuel cells having monolithic cores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herceg, J.E.

    1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output. The cell core has an array of cell segments electrically serially connected in the flow direction, each segment consisting of electrolyte walls and interconnect that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageways; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte composite materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick. Between 2 and 50 cell segments may be connected in series.

  9. Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge Jean´veloppement, La Paz, Bolivia Received 24 April 2002; revised 6 June 2002; accepted 6 June 2002; published 10 the equilibrium line of the Zongo glacier (2.4 km2 ), Bolivia (16°S). Study of the influence of wind, air

  10. Core-Shell Diamond as a Support for Solid-Phase Extraction and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Support for Solid-Phase Extraction and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography. Core-Shell Diamond as a Support for Solid-Phase Extraction and High-Performance Liquid...

  11. Parallel Solution-Adaptive Method for Predicting Solid Propellant Rocket Motor Core Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groth, Clinton P. T.

    Parallel Solution-Adaptive Method for Predicting Solid Propellant Rocket Motor Core Flows Doctor PROPELLANT ROCKET MOTOR CORE FLOWS Jai Singh Sachdev Doctor of Philosophy Graduate Department of Aerospace for predicting two-dimensional axisymmetric tur- bulent multi-phase (gas-particle) solid propellant rocket motor

  12. A vectorized heat transfer model for solid reactor cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rider, W.J.; Cappiello, M.W.; Liles, D.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new generation of nuclear reactors includes designs that are significantly different from light water reactors. Among these new reactor designs is the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). In addition, nuclear thermal rockets share a number of similarities with terrestrial HTGRs and would be amenable to similar types of analyses. In these reactors, the heat transfer in the solid core mass is of primary interest in design and safety assessment. One significant safety feature of these reactors is the capability to withstand a loss of pressure and forced cooling in the primary system and still maintain peak fuel temperatures below the safe threshold for retaining the fission products. To accurately assess the performance of gas-cooled reactors during these types of transients, a Helium/Hydrogen Cooled Reactor Analysis (HERA) computer code has been developed. HERA has the ability to model arbitrary geometries in three dimensions, which allows the user to easily analyze reactor cores constructed of prismatic graphite elements. The code accounts for heat generation in the fuel, control rods and other structures; conduction and radiation across gaps; convection to the coolant; and a variety of boundary conditions. The numerical solution scheme has been optimized for vector computers, making long transient analyses economical. Time integration is either explicit or implicit, which allows the use of the model to accurately calculate both short- or long-term transients with an efficient use of computer time. Both the basic spatial and temporal integration schemes have been benchmarked against analytical solutions. Also, HERA has been used to analyze a depressurized loss of forced cooling transient in a HTGR with a very detailed three-dimensional input model. The results compare favorably with other means of analysis and provide further validation of the models and methods. 18 refs., 11 figs.

  13. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology Research Call (Round 6)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce four selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

  14. ur solid Earth undergoes constant change from motions within its core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLeod, Dennis

    O ur solid Earth undergoes constant change from motions within its core to the surface. Solid Earth is the physical planet we live on, not the oceans or atmosphere. Motions near Earth's cen- ter affect the geodynamo, which generates the Earth's magnetic field. Convection within Earth's mantle drives plate

  15. Tetraphosphine Linker Scaffolds with a Tetraphenyltin Core for Superior Immobilized Catalysts: A Solid-State NMR Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, Melanie Ingrid

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    TETRAPHOSPHINE LINKER SCAFFOLDS WITH A TETRAPHENYLTIN CORE FOR SUPERIOR IMMOBILIZED CATALYSTS: A SOLID-STATE NMR STUDY A Thesis by MELANIE INGRID PERERA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... Catalysts: A Solid-State NMR Study Copyright 2011 Melanie Ingrid Perera TETRAPHOSPHINE LINKER SCAFFOLDS WITH A TETRAPHENYLTIN CORE FOR SUPERIOR IMMOBILIZED CATALYSTS: A SOLID-STATE NMR STUDY A Thesis by MELANIE INGRID PERERA Submitted...

  16. Lunar Nuclear Power Plant With Solid Core Reactor, Heatpipes and Thermoelectric Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayre, Edwin D. [Engineering Consultant, 218 Brooke Acres Drive, Los Gatos, CA 95032 (United States); Ring, Peter J. [Advanced Methods and Materials, 1190 Mountain View-Alviso Rd. Suite P, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Brown, Neil [Engineering Consultant, 5134 Cordoy Lane, San Jose, CA 95124 (United States); Elsner, Norbert B.; Bass, John C. [Hi-Z Technology, Inc., 7606 Miramar Rd. Suite 7400, San Diego, CA 92126 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a lunar nuclear power plant with the advantages of minimum mass, with no moving parts, no pumped liquid coolant, a solid metal rugged core, with no single point of failure. The electrical output is 100 kilowatts with a 500 kilowatt thermal reactor. The thermoelectric converters surround the potassium heatpipes from the core and water heatpipes surround the converter and connect to the radiator. The solid core reactor is made from HT9 alloy. The fuel is uranium oxide with 90% enrichment. The thermoelectric converter is bonded to the outside of the 1.10 inch ID heat pipe and is 30 inches long. The thermoelectric couple is Si/SiGe-Si/SiC Quantum Well with over 20% efficiency with an 890 K hot side and a 490 K cold side and produces 625 Watts. 176 converters produce 110 kWe. With less than 10% loss in controls this yields 100 kWe for use. The cylindrical thermoelectric converter is designed and fabricated by HIPing to keep brittle materials in compression and to ensure conductivity. The solid core is fabricated by machining the heatpipe tubes with 6 grooves that are diffusion bonded together by HIPing to form the fuel tubes. The maximum temperature of the heat pipes is 940 K and the return flow temperature is 890 K. The reactor core is hexagonal shaped, 61 cm. wide and 76.2 cm high with 12 rotating control drums surrounding it. There is shielding to protect components and human habitation. The radiator is daisy shaped at 45 degrees with each petal 5.5 meters long. The design life is ten years.

  17. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 3)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce eight selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

  18. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 4)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce 13 selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

  19. Method of fabricating a monolithic core for a solid oxide fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zwick, Stanley A. (Woodridge, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for forming a core for use in a solid oxide fuel cell that electrochemically combines fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output. The core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support consisting instead only of the active anode, cathode, electrolyte and interconnect materials. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching electrolyte material therebetween, and each interconnect wall consists of the cathode and anode materials sandwiching interconnect material therebetween. The electrolyte and interconnect walls define a plurality of substantially parallel core passageways alternately having respectively the inside faces thereof with only the anode material or with only the cathode material exposed. In the wall structure, the electrolyte and interconnect materials are only 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and the cathode and anode materials are only 0.002-0.05 cm thick. The method consists of building up the electrolyte and interconnect walls by depositing each material on individually and endwise of the wall itself, where each material deposit is sequentially applied for one cycle; and where the depositing cycle is repeated many times until the material buildup is sufficient to formulate the core. The core is heat cured to become dimensionally and structurally stable.

  20. Use of Solid Hydride Fuel for Improved long-Life LWR Core Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenspan, E

    2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of improving the performance of PWR and BWR cores by using solid hydride fuels instead of the commonly used oxide fuel. The primary measure of performance considered is the bus-bar cost of electricity (COE). Additional performance measures considered are safety, fuel bundle design simplicity – in particular for BWR’s, and plutonium incineration capability. It was found that hydride fuel can safely operate in PWR’s and BWR’s without restricting the linear heat generation rate of these reactors relative to that attainable with oxide fuel. A couple of promising applications of hydride fuel in PWR’s and BWR’s were identified: (1) Eliminating dedicated water moderator volumes in BWR cores thus enabling to significantly increase the cooled fuel rods surface area as well as the coolant flow cross section area in a given volume fuel bundle while significantly reducing the heterogeneity of BWR fuel bundles thus achieving flatter pin-by-pin power distribution. The net result is a possibility to significantly increase the core power density – on the order of 30% and, possibly, more, while greatly simplifying the fuel bundle design. Implementation of the above modifications is, though, not straightforward; it requires a design of completely different control system that could probably be implemented only in newly designed plants. It also requires increasing the coolant pressure drop across the core. (2) Recycling plutonium in PWR’s more effectively than is possible with oxide fuel by virtue of a couple of unique features of hydride fuel – reduced inventory of U-238 and increased inventory of hydrogen. As a result, the hydride fuelled core achieves nearly double the average discharge burnup and the fraction of the loaded Pu it incinerates in one pass is double that of the MOX fuel. The fissile fraction of the Pu in the discharged hydride fuel is only ~2/3 that of the MOX fuel and the discharged hydride fuel is more proliferation resistant. Preliminary feasibility assessment indicates that by replacing some of the ZrH1.6 by ThH2 it will be possible to further improve the plutonium incineration capability of PWR’s. Other possibly promising applications of hydride fuel were identified but not evaluated in this work. A number of promising oxide fueled PWR core designs were also found as spin-offs of this study: (1) The optimal oxide fueled PWR core design features smaller fuel rod diameter of D=6.5 mm and a larger pitch-to-diameter ratio of P/D=1.39 than presently practiced by industry – 9.5mm and 1.326. This optimal design can provide a 30% increase in the power density and a 24% reduction in the cost of electricity (COE) provided the PWR could be designed to have the coolant pressure drop across the core increased from the reference 29 psia to 60 psia. (2) Using wire wrapped oxide fuel rods in hexagonal fuel assemblies it is possible to design PWR cores to operate at 54% higher power density than the reference PWR design that uses grid spacers and a square lattice, provided 60 psia coolant pressure drop across the core could be accommodated. Uprating existing PWR’s to use such cores could result in 40% reduction in the COE. The optimal lattice geometry is D = 8.08 mm and P/D = 1.41. The most notable advantages of wire wraps over grid spacers are their significant lower pressure drop, higher critical heat flux and improved vibrations characteristics.

  1. DOE Announces Selections from Solid-State Lighting Core Technologies Funding Opportunity Announcement and Laboratory Call

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pleased to announce the selection of sixteen (16) applications in response to the Solid-State...

  2. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic cross flow core and manifolding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poeppel, R.B.; Dusek, J.T.

    1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention discloses a monolithic core construction having the flow passageways for the fuel and for the oxidant gases extended transverse to one another, whereby full face core manifolding can be achieved for these gases and their reaction products. The core construction provides that only anode material surround each fuel passageway and only cathode material surround each oxidant passageway, each anode and each cathode further sandwiching at spaced opposing sides electrolyte and interconnect materials to define electrolyte and interconnect walls. Webs of the cathode and anode material hold the electrolyte and interconnect walls spaced apart to define the flow passages. The composite anode and cathode wall structures are further alternately stacked on one another (with the separating electrolyte or interconnect material typically being a single common layer) whereby the fuel passageways and the oxidant passageways are disposed transverse to one another.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic cross flow core and manifolding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL); Dusek, Joseph T. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention discloses a monolithic core construction having the flow passageways for the fuel and for the oxidant gases extended transverse to one another, whereby full face core manifolding can be achieved for these gases and their reaction products. The core construction provides that only anode material surround each fuel passageway and only cathode material surround each oxidant passageway, each anode and each cathode further sandwiching at spaced opposing sides electrolyte and interconnect materials to define electrolyte and interconnect walls. Webs of the cathode and anode material hold the electrolyte and interconnect walls spaced apart to define the flow passages. The composite anode and cathode wall structures are further alternately stacked on one another (with the separating electrolyte or interconnect material typically being a single common layer) whereby the fuel passageway and the oxidant passageways are disposed transverse to one another.

  4. Solid core dipoles and switching power supplies: lower cost light sources?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benesch, Jay; Facility, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of improvements in power semiconductors, moderate frequency switching supplies can now provide the hundreds of amps typically required by accelerators with zero-to-peak noise in the kHz region ~0.06% in current or voltage mode. Modeling was undertaken using a finite electromagnetic program to determine if eddy currents induced in the solid steel of CEBAF magnets and small supplemental additions would bring the error fields down to the 5ppm level needed for beam quality. The expected maximum field of the magnet under consideration is 0.85T and the DC current required to produce that field is used in the calculations. An additional 0.1% current ripple is added to the DC current at discrete frequencies 360 Hz, 720 Hz or 7200 Hz. Over the region of the pole within 0.5% of the central integrated BdL the resulting AC field changes can be reduced to less than 1% of the 0.1% input ripple for all frequencies, and a sixth of that at 7200 Hz. Doubling the current, providing 1.5T central field, yielded the sa...

  5. Tetraphosphine Linker Scaffolds with a Tetraphenyltin Core for Superior Immobilized Catalysts: A Solid-State NMR Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, Melanie Ingrid

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    the mechanism of the phosphonium formation in more detail by utilizing solid-state NMR spectroscopy. It has also been a point of interest to study the linkers and catalysts under realistic conditions, in the presence of solvents. Therefore, HRMAS (high...

  6. Probing the Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy . Probing the Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron Solid-State...

  7. Geoantineutrino Spectrum, 3He/4He-ratio Distribution in the Earth's Interior and Slow Nuclear Burning on the Boundary of the Liquid and Solid Phases of the Earth's Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. D. Rusov; V. N. Pavlovich; V. N. Vaschenko; V. A. Tarasov; T. N. Zelentsova; V. N. Bolshakov; D. A. Litvinov; S. I. Kosenko; O. A. Byegunova

    2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The description problem of geoantineutrino spectrum and reactor antineutrino experimental spectrum in KamLAND, which takes place for antineutrino energy \\~2.8 MeV, and also the experimental results of the interaction of uranium dioxide and carbide with iron-nickel and silicaalumina melts at high pressure (5-10 GP?) and temperature (1600-2200C) have motivated us to consider the possible consequences of the assumption made by V.Anisichkin and coauthors that there is an actinid shell on boundary of liquid and solid phases of the Earth's core. We have shown that the activation of a natural nuclear reactor operating as the solitary waves of nuclear burning in 238U- and/or 232Th-medium (in particular, the neutron- fission progressive wave of Feoktistov and/or Teller-Ishikawa-Wood) can be such a physical consequence. The simplified model of the kinetics of accumulation and burnup in U-Pu fuel cycle of Feoktistov is developed. The results of the numerical simulation of neutron-fission wave in two-phase UO2/Fe medium on a surface of the Earth's solid core are presented. The georeactor model of 3He origin and the 3He/4He-ratio distribution in the Earth's interior is offered. It is shown that the 3He/4He ratio distribution can be the natural quantitative criterion of georeactor thermal power. On the basis of O'Nions-Evensen-Hamilton geochemical model of mantle differentiation and the crust growth supplied by actinid shell on the boundary of liquid and solid phases of the Earth's core as a nuclear energy source (georeactor with power of 30 TW), the tentative estimation of geoantineutrino intensity and geoantineutrino spectrum on the Earth surface are given.

  8. DOE Announces Selection of National Laboratory Center for Solid-State Lighting R&D and Seven Projects for Core Technology Research in Nanotechnology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce the selection of the National Laboratory Center for Solid-State Lighting...

  9. Generalizing twisted gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duenas-Vidal, Alvaro; Vazquez-Mozo, Miguel A. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the twisting of gauge symmetry in noncommutative gauge theories and show how this can be generalized to a whole continuous family of twisted gauge invariances. The physical relevance of these twisted invariances is discussed.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: QD core shell heterostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    QD core shell heterostructures Introduction of Prof. David Kelley and UC Merced to SSLS On January 11, 2012, in Energy Efficiency, News, News & Events, Partnership, Solid-State...

  11. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

  12. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

  13. Light-induced gauge fields for ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Goldman; G. Juzeliunas; P. Ohberg; I. B. Spielman

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauge fields are central in our modern understanding of physics at all scales. At the highest energy scales known, the microscopic universe is governed by particles interacting with each other through the exchange of gauge bosons. At the largest length scales, our universe is ruled by gravity, whose gauge structure suggests the existence of a particle - the graviton - that mediates the gravitational force. At the mesoscopic scale, solid-state systems are subjected to gauge fields of different nature: materials can be immersed in external electromagnetic fields, but they can also feature emerging gauge fields in their low-energy description. In this review, we focus on another kind of gauge field: those engineered in systems of ultracold neutral atoms. In these setups, atoms are suitably coupled to laser fields that generate effective gauge potentials in their description. Neutral atoms "feeling" laser-induced gauge potentials can potentially mimic the behavior of an electron gas subjected to a magnetic field, but also, the interaction of elementary particles with non-Abelian gauge fields. Here, we review different realized and proposed techniques for creating gauge potentials - both Abelian and non-Abelian - in atomic systems and discuss their implication in the context of quantum simulation. While most of these setups concern the realization of background and classical gauge potentials, we conclude with more exotic proposals where these synthetic fields might be made dynamical, in view of simulating interacting gauge theories with cold atoms.

  14. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  15. Core Specialization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cores per node for handling system services, and thus reduce the effects of timing jitter due to interruptions from the operating system at the expense of (possibly) requiring...

  16. Non-Abelian Lattice Gauge Theories in Superconducting Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mezzacapo; E. Rico; C. Sabín; I. L. Egusquiza; L. Lamata; E. Solano

    2015-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a digital quantum simulator of non-Abelian pure-gauge models with a superconducting circuit setup. Within the framework of quantum link models, we build a minimal instance of a pure $SU(2)$ gauge theory, using triangular plaquettes involving geometric frustration. This realization is the least demanding, in terms of quantum simulation resources, of a non-Abelian gauge dynamics. We present two superconducting architectures that can host the quantum simulation, estimating the requirements needed to run possible experiments. The proposal establishes a path to the experimental simulation of non-Abelian physics with solid-state quantum platforms.

  17. Non-Abelian Lattice Gauge Theories in Superconducting Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mezzacapo, A; Sabín, C; Egusquiza, I L; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a digital quantum simulator of non-Abelian pure-gauge models with a superconducting circuit setup. Within the framework of quantum link models, we build a minimal instance of a pure $SU(2)$ gauge theory, using triangular plaquettes involving geometric frustration. This realization is the least demanding, in terms of quantum simulation resources, of a non-Abelian gauge dynamics. We present two superconducting architectures that can host the quantum simulation, estimating the requirements needed to run possible experiments. The proposal establishes a path to the experimental simulation of non-Abelian physics with solid-state quantum platforms.

  18. HELIUM, SOLID 1 Helium, Solid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glyde, Henry R.

    HELIUM, SOLID 1 Helium, Solid Henry R. Glyde Introduction Helium was first solidified at the famous focused on the melting curve, the specific heat, and the thermal conductivity of solid helium as a test criterion of melting does not hold in solid helium. This pioneering work up to 1957 is elegantly

  19. Natural Poincare gauge model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrovandi, R.; Pereira, J.G.

    1986-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Because it acts on space-time and is not semisimple, the Poincare group cannot lead to a gauge theory of the usual kind. A candidate model is discussed which keeps itself as close as possible to the typical gauge scheme. Its field equations are the Yang-Mills equations for the Poincare group. It is shown that there exists no Lagrangian for these equations.

  20. Unparticle actions and gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilderton, Anton [School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the requirement of gauge invariance is not enough to fix the form of interactions between unparticles and gauge fields, thus revealing a wide new class of gauged unparticle actions. Our approach also allows us to construct operators which create gauge invariant colored unparticles. We discuss both their perturbative and nonperturbative properties.

  1. Lattice Gauge Tensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietro Silvi; Enrique Rico; Tommaso Calarco; Simone Montangero

    2014-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a unified framework to describe lattice gauge theories by means of tensor networks: this framework is efficient as it exploits the high amount of local symmetry content native of these systems describing only the gauge invariant subspace. Compared to a standard tensor network description, the gauge invariant one allows to speed-up real and imaginary time evolution of a factor that is up to the square of the dimension of the link variable. The gauge invariant tensor network description is based on the quantum link formulation, a compact and intuitive formulation for gauge theories on the lattice, and it is alternative to and can be combined with the global symmetric tensor network description. We present some paradigmatic examples that show how this architecture might be used to describe the physics of condensed matter and high-energy physics systems. Finally, we present a cellular automata analysis which estimates the gauge invariant Hilbert space dimension as a function of the number of lattice sites and that might guide the search for effective simplified models of complex theories.

  2. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were scanned after tank supernatant was removed. 4. Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds. This sampler was designed and built to remove small sections of the mounds to evaluate concentrations of the stainless steel solids at different special locations. 5. Computer driven positioner that placed the laser rangefinders and the core sampler in appropriate locations over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank where mixing is poor. These devices and techniques were effective to estimate the movement, location, and concentrations of the solids representing heavier particles and could perform well at a larger scale The experiment contained two campaigns with each comprised of ten cycles to fill and empty the scaled staging tank. The tank was filled without mixing, but emptied, while mixing, in seven batches; the first six were of equal volumes of 13.1 gallons each to represent the planned fullscale batches of 145,000 gallons, and the last, partial, batch of 6.9 gallons represented a full-scale partial batch of 76,000 gallons that will leave a 72-inch heel in the staging tank for the next cycle. The sole difference between the two campaigns was the energy to mix the scaled staging tank, i.e., the nozzle velocity and jet rotational speed of the two jet pumps. Campaign 1 used 22.9 ft/s, at 1.54 rpm based on past testing and Campaign 2 used 23.9 ft/s at 1.75 rpm, based on visual observation of minimum velocity that allowed fast settling solids, i.e., sand and stainless steel, to accumulate on the scaled tank bottom.

  3. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Solid-State Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III-Nitride core-shell nanowire arrayed solar cells On April 27, 2012, in Energy, Energy Efficiency, News, News & Events, Solid-State Lighting In a new EFRC-supported publication...

  5. Gauge Invariance and Holographic Renormalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keun-Young Kim; Kyung Kiu Kim; Yunseok Seo; Sang-Jin Sin

    2015-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the gauge invariance of physical observables in holographic theories under the local diffeomorphism. We find that gauge invariance is intimately related to the holographic renormalisation: the local counter terms defined in the boundary cancel most of gauge dependences of the on-shell action as well as the divergences. However, there still remain gauge dependent pieces in the on-shell action under some residual gauge transformation, while the equations of motion are invariant. We prove the invariance of the Green's functions under this residual gauge symmetry in the context of constructing numerical solutions by which all related AC transports are computed simultaneously.

  6. Holographic Gauge Mediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benini, Francesco; /Princeton U.; Dymarsky, Anatoly; /Stanford U., ITP; Franco, Sebastian; /Santa Barbara, KITP; Kachru, Shamit; Simic, Dusan; /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC; Verlinde, Herman; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss gravitational backgrounds where supersymmetry is broken at the end of a warped throat, and the SUSY-breaking is transmitted to the Standard Model via gauginos which live in (part of) the bulk of the throat geometry. We find that the leading effect arises from splittings of certain 'messenger mesons,' which are adjoint KK-modes of the D-branes supporting the Standard Model gauge group. This picture is a gravity dual of a strongly coupled field theory where SUSY is broken in a hidden sector and transmitted to the Standard Model via a relative of semi-direct gauge mediation.

  7. Wild Quiver Gauge Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulio Bonelli; Kazunobu Maruyoshi; Alessandro Tanzini

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study N=2 supersymmetric SU(2) gauge theories coupled to non-Lagrangian superconformal field theories induced by compactifying the six dimensional A_1 (2,0) theory on Riemann surfaces with irregular punctures. These are naturally associated to Hitchin systems with wild ramification whose spectral curves provide the relevant Seiberg-Witten geometries. We propose that the prepotential of these gauge theories on the Omega-background can be obtained from the corresponding irregular conformal blocks on the Riemann surfaces via a generalization of the coherent state construction to the case of higher order singularities.

  8. Gauge transformations in non-perturbative chiral gauge theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner Kerler

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconsider gauge-transformation properties in chiral gauge theories on the lattice observing all pertinent information and show that these properties are actually determined in a general way for any gauge group and for any value of the index. In our investigations we also clarify several related issues.

  9. Chiral Gauge Theory for Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Jackiw; S. -Y. Pi

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a chiral gauge theory to describe fractionalization of fermions in graphene. Thereby we extend a recently proposed model, which relies on vortex formation. Our chiral gauge fields provide dynamics for the vortices and also couple to the fermions.

  10. Core Specialization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSOConvertingCopy ServicesCore

  11. Gauge Theory of Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A gauge theory of quantum gravity is formulated, in which an internal, field dependent metric is introduced which non-linearly realizes the gauge fields on the non-compact group $SL(2,C)$, while linearly realizing them on $SU(2)$. Einstein's $SL(2,C)$ invariant theory of gravity emerges at low energies, since the extra degrees of freedom associated with the quadratic curvature and the internal metric only dominate at high energies. In a fixed internal metric gauge, only the the $SU(2)$ gauge symmetry is satisfied, the particle spectrum is identified and the Hamiltonian is shown to be bounded from below. Although Lorentz invariance is broken in this gauge, it is satisfied in general. The theory is quantized in this fixed, broken symmetry gauge as an $SU(2)$ gauge theory on a lattice with a lattice spacing equal to the Planck length. This produces a unitary and finite theory of quantum gravity.

  12. Fiber optic gap gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Billy E. (Livermore, CA); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA); Larsen, Greg J. (Brentwood, CA); Sanchez, Roberto J. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A lightweight, small size, high sensitivity gauge for indirectly measuring displacement or absolute gap width by measuring axial strain in an orthogonal direction to the displacement/gap width. The gap gauge includes a preferably titanium base having a central tension bar with springs connecting opposite ends of the tension bar to a pair of end connector bars, and an elongated bow spring connected to the end connector bars with a middle section bowed away from the base to define a gap. The bow spring is capable of producing an axial strain in the base proportional to a displacement of the middle section in a direction orthogonal to the base. And a strain sensor, such as a Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor, is connected to measure the axial strain in the base, so that the displacement of the middle section may be indirectly determined from the measurement of the axial strain in the base.

  13. Infrared Maximally Abelian Gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tereza Mendes; Attilio Cucchieri; Antonio Mihara

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The confinement scenario in Maximally Abelian gauge (MAG) is based on the concepts of Abelian dominance and of dual superconductivity. Recently, several groups pointed out the possible existence in MAG of ghost and gluon condensates with mass dimension 2, which in turn should influence the infrared behavior of ghost and gluon propagators. We present preliminary results for the first lattice numerical study of the ghost propagator and of ghost condensation for pure SU(2) theory in the MAG.

  14. Gauge Dependence of Gravitational Correction to Running of Gauge Couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artur R. Pietrykowski

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently an interesting idea has been put forward by Robinson and Wilczek that incorporation of quantized gravity in the framework of abelian and nonabelian gauge theories results in a correction to the running of gauge coupling and, in consequence, to increase of the Grand Unification scale and to the asymptotic freedom. In this paper it is shown by explicit calculations that this correction depends on the choice of gauge.

  15. Axions in gauge mediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, Linda M.; Dine, Michael; Festuccia, Guido; Ubaldi, Lorenzo [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz California 95064 (United States)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In supersymmetric theories, the presence of axions usually implies the existence of a noncompact, (pseudo)moduli space. In gauge-mediated models, the axion would seem a particularly promising dark matter candidate. The cosmology of the moduli then constrains the gravitino mass and the axion decay constant; the former cannot be much below 10 MeV; the latter cannot be much larger than 10{sup 13} GeV. Axinos, when identifiable, are typically heavy and do not play an important role in cosmology.

  16. Gauge theories in noncommutative geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Masson

    2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this review we present some of the fundamental mathematical structures which permit to define noncommutative gauge field theories. In particular, we emphasize the theory of noncommutative connections, with the notions of curvatures and gauge transformations. Two different approaches to noncommutative geometry are covered: the one based on derivations and the one based on spectral triples. Examples of noncommutative gauge field theories are given to illustrate the constructions and to display some of the common features.

  17. Quantization of gauge fields in gauges involving extra ghosts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henneaux, M.

    1983-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nielsen's recently proposed quantization rules, with gauge-fixing terms of the form F/sub a/..gamma../sup ab/F/sub b//2..cap alpha.., where ..gamma../sup a/b is field dependent, are shown to lead to an S matrix which is both unitary and gauge independent. The demonstration relies on the canonical form of the path integral.

  18. Analytical Model of Tidal Distortion and Dissipation for a Giant Planet with a Viscoelastic Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storch, Natalia I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present analytical expressions for the tidal Love numbers of a giant planet with a solid core and a fluid envelope. We model the core as a uniform, incompressible, elastic solid, and the envelope as a non-viscous fluid satisfying the $n=1$ polytropic equation of state. We discuss how the Love numbers depend on the size, density, and shear modulus of the core. We then model the core as a viscoelastic Maxwell solid and compute the tidal dissipation rate in the planet as characterized by the imaginary part of the Love number $k_2$. Our results improve upon existing calculations based on planetary models with a solid core and a uniform ($n=0$) envelope. Our analytical expressions for the Love numbers can be applied to study tidal distortion and viscoelastic dissipation of giant planets with solid cores of various rheological properties, and our general method can be extended to study tidal distortion/dissipation of super-earths.

  19. Solid electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA); Alamgir, Mohamed (Dedham, MA)

    1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized (encapsulated) in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing complexes (solvates) formed between a Li salt such as LiAsF.sub.6, LiCF.sub.3 SO.sub.3 or LiClO.sub.4 and a mixture of aprotic organic solvents having high dielectric constants such as ethylene carbonate (EC) (dielectric constant=89.6) and propylene carbonate (PC) (dielectric constant=64.4) in a polymer matrix such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(tetraethylene glycol diacrylate), or poly(vinyl pyrrolidinone).

  20. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Denny, Edward C. (Knoxville, TN)

    2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  1. Gauge invariant hydrogen atom Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei-Min Sun; Xiang-Song Chen; Xiao-Fu Lu; Fan Wang

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    For quantum mechanics of a charged particle in a classical external electromagnetic field, there is an apparent puzzle that the matrix element of the canonical momentum and Hamiltonian operators is gauge dependent. A resolution to this puzzle is recently provided by us in [2]. Based on the separation of the electromagnetic potential into pure gauge and gauge invariant parts, we have proposed a new set of momentum and Hamiltonian operators which satisfy both the requirement of gauge invariance and the relevant commutation relations. In this paper we report a check for the case of the hydrogen atom problem: Starting from the Hamiltonian of the coupled electron, proton and electromagnetic field, under the infinite proton mass approximation, we derive the gauge invariant hydrogen atom Hamiltonian and verify explicitly that this Hamiltonian is different from the Dirac Hamiltonian, which is the time translation generator of the system. The gauge invariant Hamiltonian is the energy operator, whose eigenvalue is the energy of the hydrogen atom. It is generally time-dependent. In this case, one can solve the energy eigenvalue equation at any specific instant of time. It is shown that the energy eigenvalues are gauge independent, and by suitably choosing the phase factor of the time-dependent eigenfunction, one can ensure that the time-dependent eigenfunction satisfies the Dirac equation.

  2. Compatibility of radial, Lorenz and harmonic gauges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena Magliaro; Claudio Perini; Carlo Rovelli

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe that the radial gauge can be consistently imposed \\emph{together} with the Lorenz gauge in Maxwell theory, and with the harmonic traceless gauge in linearized general relativity. This simple observation has relevance for some recent developments in quantum gravity where the radial gauge is implicitly utilized.

  3. Building Gauge Theories: The Natural Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. Garcia Canal; F. A. Schaposnik

    2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of a gauge field theory for elementary particles usually starts by promoting global invariance of the matter action to a local one, this in turn implying the introduction of gauge fields. We present here a procedure that runs the other way: starting from the action for gauge fields, matter is gauge invariantly coupled on the basis of Lorentz invariance and charge conservation. This natural approach prevents using the concept of particles separated from gauge fields that mediate interactions.

  4. Core Drilling Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tank Farms workers demonstrate core drilling capabilities for Hanford single-shell tanks. Core drilling is used to determine the current condition of each tank to assist in the overall assessment...

  5. Energy-momentum conservation laws in gauge theory with broken gauge symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sardanashvily

    2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    If a Lagrangian of gauge theory of internal symmetries is not gauge-invariant, the energy-momentum fails to be conserved in general.

  6. Optical Abelian Lattice Gauge Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Tagliacozzo; A. Celi; A. Zamora; M. Lewenstein

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a general framework for the realization of a family of abelian lattice gauge theories, i.e., link models or gauge magnets, in optical lattices. We analyze the properties of these models that make them suitable to quantum simulations. Within this class, we study in detail the phases of a U(1)-invariant lattice gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions originally proposed by Orland. By using exact diagonalization, we extract the low-energy states for small lattices, up to 4x4. We confirm that the model has two phases, with the confined entangled one characterized by strings wrapping around the whole lattice. We explain how to study larger lattices by using either tensor network techniques or digital quantum simulations with Rydberg atoms loaded in optical lattices where we discuss in detail a protocol for the preparation of the ground state. We also comment on the relation between standard compact U(1) LGT and the model considered.

  7. Renormalization in Coulomb gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrasi, A., E-mail: aandrasi@irb.hr ['Rudjer Boskovic' Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Taylor, John C., E-mail: J.C.Taylor@damtp.cam.ac.uk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Highlights: > The Hamiltonian in the Coulomb gauge of QCD contains a non-linear Christ-Lee term. > We investigate the UV divergences from higher order graphs. > We find that they cannot be absorbed by renormalization of the Christ-Lee term. - Abstract: In the Coulomb gauge of QCD, the Hamiltonian contains a non-linear Christ-Lee term, which may alternatively be derived from a careful treatment of ambiguous Feynman integrals at 2-loop order. We investigate how and if UV divergences from higher order graphs can be consistently absorbed by renormalization of the Christ-Lee term. We find that they cannot.

  8. Renormalization in Coulomb gauge QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Andrasi; J. C. Taylor

    2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Coulomb gauge of QCD, the Hamiltonian contains a non-linear Christ-Lee term, which may alternatively be derived from a careful treatment of ambiguous Feynman integrals at 2-loop order. We investigate how and if UV divergences from higher order graphs can be consistently absorbed by renormalization of the Christ-Lee term. We find that they cannot.

  9. Geometrical Methods in Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrique de A. Gomes

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we explore the geometrical interpretation of gauge theories through the formalism of fiber bundles. Moreover, we conduct an investigation in the topology of fiber bundles, providing a proof of the Classification Theorem. In the last chapter we present some applications, such as electromagnetism and generalized Kaluza-Klein Theory.

  10. Frozen ghosts in thermal gauge field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. V. Landshoff; A. Rebhan

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We review an alternative formulation of gauge field theories at finite temperature where unphysical degrees of freedom of gauge fields and the Faddeev-Popov ghosts are kept at zero temperature.

  11. A nanocrystal strain gauge for luminescence detection of mechanical forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Local microscale stresses play a crucial role in inhomogeneous mechanical processes from cell motility to material failure. However, it remains difficult to spatially resolve stress at these small length scales. While contact-probe and non-contact based techniques have been used to quantify local mechanical behavior in specific systems with high stiffness or stress and spatial resolution, these methods cannot be used to study a majority of micromechanical systems due to spectroscopic and geometrical constraints. We present here the design and implementation of a luminescent nanocrystal strain gauge, the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod. The tetrapod can be incorporated into many materials, yielding a local stress measurement through optical fluorescence spectroscopy of the electronically confined CdSe core states. The stress response of the tetrapod is calibrated and utilized to study mechanical behavior in single polymer fibers. We expect that tetrapods can be used to investigate local stresses in many other mechanical systems.

  12. Multi-step contrast sensitivity gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintana, Enrico C; Thompson, Kyle R; Moore, David G; Heister, Jack D; Poland, Richard W; Ellegood, John P; Hodges, George K; Prindville, James E

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray contrast sensitivity gauge is described herein. The contrast sensitivity gauge comprises a plurality of steps of varying thicknesses. Each step in the gauge includes a plurality of recesses of differing depths, wherein the depths are a function of the thickness of their respective step. An X-ray image of the gauge is analyzed to determine a contrast-to-noise ratio of a detector employed to generate the image.

  13. Solid Waste (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

  14. Gauge Invariant Spectral Cauchy Characteristic Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey J. Handmer; Béla Szilágyi; Jeffrey Winicour

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present gauge invariant spectral Cauchy characteristic extraction. We compare gravitational waveforms extracted from a head-on black hole merger simulated in two different gauges by two different codes. We show rapid convergence, demonstrating both gauge invariance of the extraction algorithm and consistency between the legacy Pitt null code and the much faster Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC).

  15. Chemical Convention in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Ironsulfur System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Y. (Michigan); (UC)

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    By reanalyzing Apollo lunar seismograms using array-processing methods, a recent study suggests that the Moon has a solid inner core and a fluid outer core, much like the Earth. The volume fraction of the lunar inner core is 38%, compared with 4% for the Earth. The pressure at the Moon's core-mantle boundary is 4.8 GPa, and that at the ICB is 5.2 GPa. The partially molten state of the lunar core provides constraints on the thermal and chemical states of the Moon: The temperature at the inner core boundary (ICB) corresponds to the liquidus of the outer core composition, and the mass fraction of the solid core allows us to infer the bulk composition of the core from an estimated thermal profile. Moreover, knowledge on the extent of core solidification can be used to evaluate the role of chemical convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo. Sulfur is considered an antifreeze component in the lunar core. Here we investigate the melting behavior of the Fe-S system at the pressure conditions of the lunar core, using the multi-anvil apparatus and synchrotron and laboratory-based analytical methods. Our goal is to understand compositionally driven convection in the lunar core and assess its role in generating an internal magnetic field in the early history of the Moon.

  16. Gauge Configurations for Lattice QCD from The Gauge Connection

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Gauge Connection is an experimental archive for lattice QCD and a repository of gauge configurations made freely available to the community. Contributors to the archive include the Columbia QCDSP collaboration, the MILC collaboration, and others. Configurations are stored in QCD archive format, consisting of an ASCII header which defines various parameters, followed by binary data. NERSC has also provided some utilities and examples that will aid users in handling the data. Users may browse the archive, but are required to register for a password in order to download data. Contents of the archive are organized under four broad headings: Quenched (more than 1200 configurations); Dynamical, Zero Temperature (more than 300 configurations); MILC Improved Staggered Asqtad Lattices (more than 7000 configurations); and Dynamical, Finite Temperature (more than 1200 configurations)

  17. Conformal Scaling Gauge Symmetry and Inflationary Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue-Liang Wu

    2004-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Considering the conformal scaling gauge symmetry as a fundamental symmetry of nature in the presence of gravity, a scalar field is required and used to describe the scale behavior of universe. In order for the scalar field to be a physical field, a gauge field is necessary to be introduced. A gauge invariant potential action is constructed by adopting the scalar field and a real Wilson-like line element of the gauge field. Of particular, the conformal scaling gauge symmetry can be broken down explicitly via fixing gauge to match the Einstein-Hilbert action of gravity. As a nontrivial background field solution of pure gauge has a minimal energy in gauge interactions, the evolution of universe is then dominated at earlier time by the potential energy of background field characterized by a scalar field. Since the background field of pure gauge leads to an exponential potential model of a scalar field, the universe is driven by a power-law inflation with the scale factor $a(t) \\sim t^p$. The power-law index $p$ is determined by a basic gauge fixing parameter $g_F$ via $p = 16\\pi g_F^2[1 + 3/(4\\pi g_F^2) ]$. For the gauge fixing scale being the Planck mass, we are led to a predictive model with $g_F=1$ and $p\\simeq 62$.

  18. Holographic Representation of Higher Spin Gauge Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debajyoti Sarkar; Xiao Xiao

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Extending the results of \\cite{Heem}, \\cite{KLRS} on the holographic representation of local gauge field operators in anti de Sitter space, here we construct the bulk operators for higher spin gauge fields in the leading order of $\\frac{1}{N}$ expansion. Working in holographic gauge for higher spin gauge fields, we show that gauge field operators with integer spin $s>1$ can be represented by an integration over a ball region, which is the interior region of the spacelike bulk lightcone on the boundary. The construction is shown to be AdS-covariant up to gauge transformations, and the two-point function between higher spin gauge fields and boundary higher spin current exhibit singularities on both bulk and boundary lightcones. We also comment on possible extension to the level of three-point functions and carry out a causal construction for higher spin fields in de Sitter spacetime.

  19. DOE Announces Selections from Solid-State Lighting Core Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    more than 10,000 hours. Recipient: Eastman Kodak Company Title: Quantum-Dot Light Emitting Diode Summary: The applicant is creating low cost inorganic light emitting diodes,...

  20. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    large-scale manufacturing of robust P-OLED lamps. Recipient: Crystal IS, Inc. Title: GaN-ready aluminum nitride substrates for cost-effective, very low dislocation density...

  1. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    OLEDs with longer lifetimes. Recipient: Sandia National Laboratories Title: Semi-polar GaN Materials Technology for High IQE Green LEDs Funding Source: American Recovery and...

  2. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to low-cost practice. Recipient: Inlustra Technologies Title: High efficiency non-polar GaN-based LEDs Team Members: University of California, Santa Barbara Summary: This project...

  3. The solid-core heat-exchanger nuclear rocket program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malenfant, R.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As measured by the results of its accomplishments, the nuclear rocket program was a success. Why, then, was it cancelled? In my opinion, the cancellation resulted from the success of the Apollo program. President Kennedy declared that putting a man on the moon by 1969 would be a national objective. Upon the Apollo program`s completion, space spectaculars lost their attraction, and the manned exploration of Mars, which could have been accomplished with nuclear rockets, was shelved. Perhaps another generation of physicists and engineers will experience the thrill and satisfaction of participating in a nuclear-propulsion-based program for space exploration in decades to come.

  4. Solids fluidizer-injector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulicz, Tytus R. (Hickory Hills, IL)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and process for fluidizing solid particles by causing rotary motion of the solid particles in a fluidizing chamber by a plurality of rotating projections extending from a rotatable cylinder end wall interacting with a plurality of fixed projections extending from an opposite fixed end wall and passing the solid particles through a radial feed orifice open to the solids fluidizing chamber on one side and a solid particle utilization device on the other side. The apparatus and process are particularly suited for obtaining intermittent feeding with continual solids supply to the fluidizing chamber. The apparatus and process are suitable for injecting solid particles, such as coal, to an internal combustion engine.

  5. Secure Core Contact Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secure Core Contact Information C. E. Irvine irvine@nps.edu 831-656-2461 Department of Computer for the secure management of local and/or remote information in multiple contexts. The SecureCore project Science Graduate School of Operations and Information Sciences www.cisr.nps.edu Project Description

  6. Feasibility and economics of existing PWR transition to a higher power core using annular fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beccherle, Julien

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The internally and externally cooled annular fuel is a new type of fuel for PWRs that enables an increase in core power density by 50% within the same or better safety margins as the traditional solid fuel. Each annular ...

  7. Optical Rain Gauge and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Comparisons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen→andDistribution,Rain Gauge and

  8. On the continuum limit of gauge-fixed compact U(1) lattice gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhasish Basak; Asit K De; Tilak Sinha

    2003-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the continuum limit of a compact formulation of the lattice U(1) gauge theory in 4 dimensions using a nonperturbative gauge-fixed regularization. We find clear evidence of a continuous phase transition in the pure gauge theory for all values of the gauge coupling (with gauge symmetry restored). When probed with quenched staggered fermions with U(1) charge, the theory clearly has a chiral transition for large gauge couplings. We identify the only possible region in the parameter space where a continuum limit with nonperturbative physics may appear.

  9. Core shroud corner joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  10. Fluxes, Gaugings and Gaugino Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -P. Derendinger; C. Kounnas; P. M. Petropoulos

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the correspondence between the N = 1 superstring compactifications with fluxes and the N = 4 gauged supergravities, we study effective N = 1 four-dimensional supergravity potentials arising from fluxes and gaugino condensates in the framework of orbifold limits of (generalized) Calabi-Yau compactifications. We give examples in heterotic and type II orientifolds in which combined fluxes and condensates lead to vacua with small supersymmetry breaking scale. We clarify the respective roles of fluxes and condensates in supersymmetry breaking, and analyze the scaling properties of the gravitino mass.

  11. Midland Core Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, Noel

    2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities for the repository during this quarter. The repository holds drill cores and cuttings samples from oil wells that can be viewed or checked out by users.

  12. Localization principle in SUSY gauge theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosomichi, Kazuo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Localization principle is a powerful analytic tool in supersymmetric gauge theories which enables one to perform supersymmetric path integrals explicitly. Many important formulae have been obtained, and they led to a major breakthrough in the understanding of gauge theories at strong coupling as well as the dynamics of branes in M-theory. Some of those results are reviewed, focusing especially on Pestun's solution to four-dimensional N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories on S^4 and the subsequent developments on three or four-dimensional gauge theories on spheres.

  13. SUSY gauge theory on graded manifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sardanashvily; W. Wachowski

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Lagrangian classical field theory of even and odd fields is adequately formulated in terms of fibre bundles and graded manifolds. In particular, conventional Yang-Mills gauge theory is theory of connections on smooth principal bundles, but its BRST extension involves odd ghost fields an antifields on graded manifolds. Here, we formulate Yang-Mills theory of Grassmann-graded gauge fields associated to Lie superalgebras on principal graded bundles. A problem lies in a geometric definition of odd gauge fields. Our goal is Yang--Mills theory of graded gauge fields and its BRST extension.

  14. Emergency core cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenewerk, William E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Glasgow, Lyle E. (Westlake Village, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  15. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Noah A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  16. Core Values | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Core Values Core Values People - People are our most important resource. We respect and use our experience and skills and appreciate our diversity. Business Excellence - We are...

  17. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  18. Tetraphenylborate Solids Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, D.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Edwards, T.B.

    1997-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Tetraphenylborate solids provide a potentially large source of benzene in the slurries produced in the In-Tank Precipitation process. The stability of the solids is an important consideration in the safety analysis of the process and we desire an understanding of the factors that influence the rate of conversion of the solids to benzene.

  19. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  20. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; Gail Geiger; Kevin Keegan; Larry Chick

    2004-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with the option of piped-in water (Demonstration System A). Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from July 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003, under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks: Task 1 System Design and Integration; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5 Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6 System Fabrication; Task 7 System Testing; Task 8 Program Management; Task 9 Stack Testing with Coal-Based Reformate; and Task 10 Technology Transfer from SECA CORE Technology Program. In this reporting period, unless otherwise noted Task 6--System Fabrication and Task 7--System Testing will be reported within Task 1 System Design and Integration. Task 8--Program Management, Task 9--Stack Testing with Coal Based Reformate, and Task 10--Technology Transfer from SECA CORE Technology Program will be reported on in the Executive Summary section of this report.

  1. Gravitational Correction to Running of Gauge Couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean P. Robinson; Frank Wilczek

    2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the contribution of graviton exchange to the running of gauge couplings at lowest non-trivial order in perturbation theory. Including this contribution in a theory that features coupling constant unification does not upset this unification, but rather shifts the unification scale. When extrapolated formally, the gravitational correction renders all gauge couplings asymptotically free.

  2. Solid Waste Management Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Solid Waste Management Program Written Program Cornell University 8/28/2012 #12;Solid Waste.................................................................... 4 4.2.1 Compost Solid Waste Treatment Facility.................................................................... 4 4.2.2 Pathological Solid Waste Treatment Facility

  3. Solids fluidizer-injector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulicz, T.R.

    1990-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and process are described for fluidizing solid particles by causing rotary motion of the solid particles in a fluidizing chamber by a plurality of rotating projections extending from a rotatable cylinder end wall interacting with a plurality of fixed projections extending from an opposite fixed end wall and passing the solid particles through a radial feed orifice open to the solids fluidizing chamber on one side and a solid particle utilization device on the other side. The apparatus and process are particularly suited for obtaining intermittent feeding with continual solids supply to the fluidizing chamber. The apparatus and process are suitable for injecting solid particles, such as coal, to an internal combustion engine. 3 figs.

  4. Can (electric-magnetic) duality be gauged?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunster, Claudio [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Casilla 1469, Valdivia (Chile); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Henneaux, Marc [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Casilla 1469, Valdivia (Chile); Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes, ULB-Campus Plaine CP231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a formulation of the Maxwell theory in terms of two vector potentials, one electric and one magnetic. The action is then manifestly invariant under electric-magnetic duality transformations, which are rotations in the two-dimensional internal space of the two potentials, and local. We ask the question: Can duality be gauged? The only known and battle-tested method of accomplishing the gauging is the Noether procedure. In its decanted form, it amounts to turning on the coupling by deforming the Abelian gauge group of the free theory, out of whose curvatures the action is built, into a non-Abelian group which becomes the gauge group of the resulting theory. In this article, we show that the method cannot be successfully implemented for electric-magnetic duality. We thus conclude that, unless a radically new idea is introduced, electric-magnetic duality cannot be gauged. The implication of this result for supergravity is briefly discussed.

  5. Gauge effects on phase transitions in superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Shopova; T. E. Tsvetkov; D. I. Uzunov

    2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Classic and recent results for gauge effects on the properties of the normal-to-superconducting phase transition in bulk and thin film superconductors are reviewed. Similar problems in the description of other natural systems (liquid crystals, quantum field theory, early universe) are also discussed. The relatively strong gauge effects on the fluctuations of the ordering field at low spatial dimensionality D and, in particular, in thin (quasi-2D) films are considered in details. A special attention is paid to the fluctuations of the gauge field. It is shown that the mechanism in which these gauge fluctuations affect on the order of the phase transition and other phase transition properties varies with the variation of the spatial dimensionality D. The problem for the experimental confirmation of the theoretical predictions about the order of the phase transitions in gauge systems is discussed.

  6. Infrared scaling solutions beyond the Landau gauge: The maximally Abelian gauge and Abelian infrared dominance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Q. Huber; Reinhard Alkofer; Kai Schwenzer

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Functional equations like exact renormalization group and Dyson-Schwinger equations have contributed to a better understanding of non-perturbative phenomena in quantum field theories in terms of the underlying Green functions. In Yang-Mills theory especially the Landau gauge has been used, as it is the most accessible gauge for these methods. The growing understanding obtained in this gauge allows to proceed to other gauges in order to obtain more information about the relation of different realizations of the confinement mechanism. In the maximally Abelian gauge first results are very encouraging as a variant of Abelian infrared dominance is found: The Abelian part of the gauge field propagator is enhanced at low momenta and thereby dominates the dynamics in the infrared. Its role is therefore similar to that of the ghost propagator in the Landau gauge, where one denotes the corresponding phenomenon as ghost dominance. Also the ambiguity of two different types of solutions (decoupling and scaling) exists in both gauges. Here we present how the two solutions are related in the maximally Abelian gauge. The intricacy of the system of functional equations in this gauge required the development of some new tools and methods as, for example, the automated derivation of the equations by the program DoFun. We also present results for linear covariant and ghost anti-ghost symmetric gauges.

  7. Gauge Trimming of Neutrino Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab /UC, Irvine; de Gouvea, Andre; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that under a new U(1) gauge symmetry, which is non-anomalous in the presence of one ''right-handed neutrino'' per generation and consistent with the standard model Yukawa couplings, the most general fermion charges are determined in terms of four rational parameters. This generalization of the B-L symmetry with generation-dependent lepton charges leads to neutrino masses induced by operators of high dimensionality. Neutrino masses are thus naturally small without invoking physics at energies above the TeV scale, whether neutrinos are Majorana or Dirac fermions. This ''Leptocratic'' Model predicts the existence of light quasi-sterile neutrinos with consequences for cosmology, and implies that collider experiments may reveal the origin of neutrino masses.

  8. A 50 kV solid state multipulse kicker modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walstrom, P. L. (Peter L.); Cook, E. G. (Edward G.)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance requirements, design concepts, and test results for a prototype multipulse kicker modulator based on solid-state switches and a voltage-adding transformer topology are described. Tape-wound cores are stacked to form the transformer primary windings and a cylindrical pipe that passes through the circular inner diameters of the cores serves as the secondary winding of the step-up transformer. Boards containing MOSFET switches, trigger circuitry, and energy-storage capacitors plug into the core housings. A 50 kV prototype modulator that meets most of the facility requirements has been designed, fabricated, and tested at LLNL. More recent work has been concerned with designing and testing cores and boards with the full volt-second capability needed for 24-pulse operation. Results of the 50 kV prototype tests, preliminary tests of the full-volt-second cores and boards, and future development needs are described.

  9. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA); Dahl, Leslie R. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  10. The effective action in Coulomb gauge QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Andrasi; J. C. Taylor

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    At 2-loop order, Feynman integrals in the Coulomb gauge are divergent over the internal energy variables. Nevertheless, it is known how to calculate the effective action provided that the external gluon fields are all transverse. We show that, for the two-gluon Greens function as an example, the method can be extended to include longitudinal external fields. The longitudinal Greens functions appear in the BRST identities. As an intermediate step, we use a flow gauge, which interpolates between the Feynman and Coulomb gauges.

  11. The effective action in Coulomb gauge QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Andrasi; J. C. Taylor

    2015-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    At 2-loop order, Feynman integrals in the Coulomb gauge are divergent over the internal energy variables. Nevertheless, it is known how to calculate the effective action provided that the external gluon fields are all transverse. We show that, for the two-gluon Greens function as an example, the method can be extended to include longitudinal external fields. The longitudinal Greens functions appear in the BRST identities. As an intermediate step, we use a flow gauge, which interpolates between the Feynman and Coulomb gauges.

  12. A computer program to determine the specific power of prismatic-core reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobranich, D.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer program has been developed to determine the maximum specific power for prismatic-core reactors as a function of maximum allowable fuel temperature, core pressure drop, and coolant velocity. The prismatic-core reactors consist of hexagonally shaped fuel elements grouped together to form a cylindrically shaped core. A gas coolant flows axially through circular channels within the elements, and the fuel is dispersed within the solid element material either as a composite or in the form of coated pellets. Different coolant, fuel, coating, and element materials can be selected to represent different prismatic-core concepts. The computer program allows the user to divide the core into any arbitrary number of axial levels to account for different axial power shapes. An option in the program allows the automatic determination of the core height that results in the maximum specific power. The results of parametric specific power calculations using this program are presented for various reactor concepts.

  13. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Technology for Greener Airplanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Technology for Greener Airplanes Larry Chick/Mike Rinker Energy Materials Group Pacific Northwest National Laboratory September 30, 2010 #12;2 2 SOFC Technology Development at PNNL PNNL has been active in SOFC development since 1987. Major participant in SECA Core Technology

  14. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Magno, Scott (Dublin, CA); Wang, Ruiping (Fremont, CA); Derouane, Eric (Liverpool, GB)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  15. Solid Waste Management (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solid waste facilities operating in Connecticut must abide by these regulations, which describe requirements and procedures for issuing construction and operating permits; environmental...

  16. Solid Waste Permits (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality administers the rules and regulations governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery, and reuse of solid waste protect the air,...

  17. Solid Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of...

  18. Solid Waste Management (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act encourages the Department of Environmental Quality and Health Department representatives to develop and encourage methods for disposing solid waste that are environmentally sound, that...

  19. More on the continuum limit of gauge-fixed compact U(1) lattice gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asit K. De; Tilak Sinha

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We have verified various proposals that were suggested in our last paper concerning the continuum limit of a compact formulation of the lattice U(1) pure gauge theory in 4 dimensions using a nonperturbative gauge-fixed regularization. Our study reveals that most of the speculations are largely correct. We find clear evidence of a continuous phase transition in the pure gauge theory at "arbitrarily" large couplings. When probed with quenched staggered fermions with U(1) charge, the theory clearly has a chiral transition for large gauge couplings whose intersection with the phase transition in the pure gauge theory continues to be a promising area for nonperturbative physics. We probe the nature of the continuous phase transition by looking at gauge field propagators in the momentum space and locate the region on the critical manifold where free photons can be recovered.

  20. Exceptional Collections and del Pezzo Gauge Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher P. Herzog

    2004-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Stacks of D3-branes placed at the tip of a cone over a del Pezzo surface provide a way of geometrically engineering a small but rich class of gauge/gravity dualities. We develop tools for understanding the resulting quiver gauge theories using exceptional collections. We prove two important results for a general quiver gauge theory: 1) we show the ordering of the nodes can be determined up to cyclic permutation and 2) we derive a simple formula for the ranks of the gauge groups (at the conformal point) in terms of the numbers of bifundamentals. We also provide a detailed analysis of four node quivers, examining when precisely mutations of the exceptional collection are related to Seiberg duality.

  1. Translational-invariant noncommutative gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Ardalan; N. Sadooghi

    2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized translational invariant noncommutative field theory is analyzed in detail, and a complete description of translational invariant noncommutative structures is worked out. The relevant gauge theory is described, and the planar and nonplanar axial anomalies are obtained.

  2. Translational-invariant noncommutative gauge theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardalan, F. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), School of Physics, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadooghi, N. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized translational-invariant noncommutative field theory is analyzed in detail, and a complete description of translational-invariant noncommutative structures is worked out. The relevant gauge theory is described, and the planar and nonplanar axial anomalies are obtained.

  3. Holographic realization of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostas Skenderis; Marika Taylor

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The general gauge mediation scenario provides a framework in which properties of a visible sector with soft supersymmetry breaking are computed from current correlation functions in the supersymmetry breaking hidden sector. In this paper we will use holography to model strongly coupled hidden sectors by weakly curved geometries and describe how the current correlators relevant for general gauge mediation are computed by holographic methods. We illustrate the general setup by a toy example which captures most of the relevant features.

  4. Quantum communication, reference frames and gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. van Enk

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider quantum communication in the case that the communicating parties not only do not share a reference frame but use imperfect quantum communication channels, in that each channel applies some fixed but unknown unitary rotation to each qubit. We discuss similarities and differences between reference frames within that quantum communication model and gauge fields in gauge theory. We generalize the concept of refbits and analyze various quantum communication protocols within the communication model.

  5. Noncommutative Gauge Theory with Covariant Star Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zet, G. [Physics Department, 'Gh. Asachi' Technical University, 700050 Iasi (Romania)

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a noncommutative gauge theory with covariant star product on a space-time with torsion. In order to obtain the covariant star product one imposes some restrictions on the connection of the space-time. Then, a noncommutative gauge theory is developed applying this product to the case of differential forms. Some comments on the advantages of using a space-time with torsion to describe the gravitational field are also given.

  6. Landau gauge condensates from global color model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao Zhang; Wei-qin Zhao

    2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the dimension-2 gluon pair condensate $g^2$ and the dimension-4 mixed quark-gluon condensate $$ in Landau gauge within the framework of global color model. The result for the dynamical gluon mass is within the range given by other independent determinations. The obtained mixed Landau gauge condensate $$ is clearly dependent on the definitions of the condensates. We show that the consistent result may be obtained when the same definitions are used.

  7. Trace anomaly of the conformal gauge field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sladkowski, J

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed by Bastianelli and van Nieuwenhuizen new method of calculations of trace anomalies is applied in the conformal gauge field case. The result is then reproduced by the heat equation method. An error in previous calculation is corrected. It is pointed out that the introducing gauge symmetries into a given system by a field-enlarging transformation can result in unexpected quantum effects even for trivial configurations.

  8. Chaotic thermalization in classical gauge theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woitek, Marcio; Krein, Gastao [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz, 271 - Bloco II, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the idea that chaos concepts might be useful for understanding the thermalization in gauge theories. The SU(2) Higgs model is discussed as a prototype of system with gauge fields coupled to matter fields. Through the numerical solution of the equations of motion, we are able to characterize chaotic behavior via the corresponding Lyapunov exponent. Then it is demonstrated that the system's approach to equilibrium can be understood through direct application of the principles of Statistical Mechanics.

  9. Harada–Tsutsui gauge recovery procedure: From Abelian gauge anomalies to the Stueckelberg mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lima, Gabriel Di Lemos Santiago, E-mail: gabriellemos3@hotmail.com

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Revisiting a path-integral procedure developed by Harada and Tsutsui for recovering gauge invariance from anomalous effective actions, it is shown that there are two ways to achieve gauge symmetry: one already presented by the authors, which is shown to preserve the anomaly in the sense of standard current conservation law, and another one which is anomaly-free, preserving current conservation. It is also shown that the application of the Harada–Tsutsui technique to other models which are not anomalous but do not exhibit gauge invariance allows the identification of the gauge invariant formulation of the Proca model, also done by the referred authors, with the Stueckelberg model, leading to the interpretation of the gauge invariant map as a generalization of the Stueckelberg mechanism. -- Highlights: • A gauge restoration technique from Abelian anomalous models is discussed. • It is shown that there is another way that leads to gauge symmetry restoration from such technique. • It is shown that the first gauge restoration preserves the anomaly, while the proposed second one is free from anomalies. • It is shown that the proposed gauge symmetry restoration can be identified with the Stueckelberg mechanism.

  10. Derivative expansion and gauge independence of the false vacuum decay rate in various gauges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Metaxas

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In theories with radiative symmetry breaking, the calculation of the false vacuum decay rate requires the inclusion of higher-order terms in the derivative expansion of the effective action. I show here that, in the case of covariant gauges, the presence of infrared singularities forbids the consistent calculation by keeping the lowest-order terms. The situation is remedied, however, in the case of $R_{\\xi}$ gauges. Using the Nielsen identities I show that the final result is gauge independent for generic values of the gauge parameter $v$ that are not anomalously small.

  11. Closed string field theory in a-gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masako Asano; Mitsuhiro Kato

    2012-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a-gauge, a class of covariant gauges developed for bosonic open string field theory, is consistently applied to the closed string field theory. A covariantly gauge-fixed action of massless fields can be systematically derived from a-gauge-fixed action of string field theory.

  12. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  13. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

  14. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  15. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  16. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  17. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO); Grohmann, Karel (Littleton, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO); Richard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  18. Solid Flame: Fundamentals and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukasyan, Alexander

    ;Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS) Or Combustion Synthesis TECHNOLOGY FOR MATERIAL (solid) ignition front propagation cooling The Phenomenon of Wave Localization for Solid State Self-propagating) 1.0000 Temperature (K) 2744 Gas products amount (mol) 6.00E-15 Products heat capacity (J/K) 74

  19. A Higgs Boson Composed of Gauge Bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himpsel, F J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed to replace the Higgs boson of the standard model by a Lorentz- and gauge-invariant combination of SU(2) gauge bosons. A pair of Higgs bosons is identified with pairs of gauge bosons by setting their mass Lagrangians equal to each other. That immediately determines the mass of this composite Higgs boson. It becomes simply half of the vacuum expectation value of the standard Higgs boson and matches the observed mass with tree-level accuracy (2%). The two parameters of the standard Higgs potential are replaced by one-loop self-interactions of the SU(2) gauge bosons. The Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking is generalized from scalars to vectors. The transverse components acquire finite vacuum expectation values which generate masses for the gauge bosons. This concept leads beyond the standard model by enabling calculations of the Higgs mass and its potential without adjustable parameters. It can be applied to non-abelian gauge theories in general, such as grand unified mo...

  20. Choice of Gauge in Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Hajicek

    1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is an extended version of the talk given at 19th Texas Symposium of Relativistic Astrophysics and Cosmology, Paris, 1998. It reviews of some recent work; mathematical details are skipped. It is well-known that a choice of gauge in generally covariant models has a twofold pupose: not only to render the dynamics unique, but also to define the spacetime points. A geometric way of choosing gauge that is not based on coordinate conditions---the so-called covariant gauge fixing---is described. After a covariant gauge fixing, the dynamics is unique and the background manifold points are well-defined, but the description remains invariant with respect to all diffeomorphisms of the background manifold. Transformations between different covariant gauge fixings form the well-known Bergmann-Komar group. Each covariant gauge fixing determines a so-called Kucha\\v{r} decomposition. The construction of the quantum theory is based on the Kucha\\v{r} form of the action and the Dirac method of operator constraints. It is demonstrated that the Bergmann-Komar group is too large to be implementable by unitary maps in the quantum domain.

  1. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Lentz, E. J. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Baird, Mark L [ORNL; Chertkow, Merek A [ORNL; Lee, Ching-Tsai [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Blondin, J. M. [North Carolina State University; Bruenn, S. W. [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  2. A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress, and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution.

  3. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-matallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved, 1) To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug. 2) investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys. 3) Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  4. Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solid Waste Management Division of the Department of Environmental Quality regulates solid waste disposal or any person who generates, collects, transports, processes, and/or disposes of solid...

  5. COMPILATION OF DISPOSABLE SOLID WASTE CASK EVALUATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THIELGES, J.R.; CHASTAIN, S.A.

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Disposable Solid Waste Cask (DSWC) is a shielded cask capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of six non-fuel core components or approximately 27 cubic feet of radioactive solid waste. Five existing DSWCs are candidates for use in storing and disposing of non-fuel core components and radioactive solid waste from the Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell, ultimately shipping them to the 200 West Area disposal site for burial. A series of inspections, studies, analyses, and modifications were performed to ensure that these casks can be used to safely ship solid waste. These inspections, studies, analyses, and modifications are summarized and attached in this report. Visual inspection of the casks interiors provided information with respect to condition of the casks inner liners. Because water was allowed to enter the casks for varying lengths of time, condition of the cask liner pipe to bottom plate weld was of concern. Based on the visual inspection and a corrosion study, it was concluded that four of the five casks can be used from a corrosion standpoint. Only DSWC S/N-004 would need additional inspection and analysis to determine its usefulness. The five remaining DSWCs underwent some modification to prepare them for use. The existing cask lifting inserts were found to be corroded and deemed unusable. New lifting anchor bolts were installed to replace the existing anchors. Alternate lift lugs were fabricated for use with the new lifting anchor bolts. The cask tiedown frame was modified to facilitate adjustment of the cask tiedowns. As a result of the above mentioned inspections, studies, analysis, and modifications, four of the five existing casks can be used to store and transport waste from the Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell to the disposal site for burial. The fifth cask, DSWC S/N-004, would require further inspections before it could be used.

  6. ARM - Ice Cores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, FeatureListGeneralPastIce Cores Outreach Home Room

  7. 2001 BTS Core Databook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment of Energy with6, 2014, 6:32 p.m. (MST)BTS CORE

  8. Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes rules for the permitting, posting of security, construction, operation, closure, maintenance and remediation of solid waste disposal sites; disposal of solid waste in ways that...

  9. Solid Waste Rules (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The solid waste statute applies to construction and demolition debris, appliances, recyclables, and the facilities that collect, process, and dispose of solid waste. DES oversees the management of...

  10. Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

  11. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS TO ESTIMATE ACCUMULATED SOLIDS IN NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.; Steeper, T.; Steimke, J.

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy has a large number of nuclear waste tanks. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles, e.g., plutonium containing, could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to remove most of the solids. Then the volume and shape of the residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for plutonium were measured. This paper discusses the overall test results, which indicated heavy solids only accumulate during the first few transfer cycles, along with the techniques and equipment designed and employed in the test. Those techniques include: Magnetic particle separator to remove stainless steel solids, the plutonium surrogate from a flowing stream; Magnetic wand used to manually remove stainless steel solids from samples and the tank heel; Photographs were used to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds by developing a composite of topographical areas; Laser rangefinders to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds; Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds; Computer driven positioner that placed the laser rangefinders and the core sampler over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank in locations where jet velocities were low. These devices and techniques were very effective to estimate the movement, location, and concentrations of the solids representing plutonium and are expected to perform well at a larger scale. The operation of the techniques and their measurement accuracies will be discussed as well as the overall results of the accumulated solids test.

  12. Solid Waste Management (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act aims to establish and maintain a cooperative state and local program of planning and technical and financial assistance for comprehensive solid waste management. No person shall construct,...

  13. Solid model design simplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, A.L.; Rivera, J.J.; Webb, A.J.; Hensinger, D.M.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents an investigation of approaches to improving the quality of Pro/Engineer-created solid model data for use by downstream applications. The investigation identified a number of sources of problems caused by deficiencies in Pro/Engineer`s geometric engine, and developed prototype software capable of detecting many of these problems and guiding users towards simplified, useable models. The prototype software was tested using Sandia production solid models, and provided significant leverage in attacking the simplification problem.

  14. Solid polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA); Alamgir, Mohamed (Dedham, MA); Choe, Hyoun S. (Waltham, MA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of poly(vinyl sulfone) and lithium salts, and their use in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The lithium salts comprise low lattice energy lithium salts such as LiN(CF.sub.3 SO.sub.2).sub.2, LiAsF.sub.6, and LiClO.sub.4.

  15. Solid polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, K.M.; Alamgir, M.; Choe, H.S.

    1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to Li ion (Li{sup +}) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of poly(vinyl sulfone) and lithium salts, and their use in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The lithium salts comprise low lattice energy lithium salts such as LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}, LiAsF{sub 6}, and LiClO{sub 4}. 2 figs.

  16. Feynman rules for Coulomb gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrasi, A. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)] [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Taylor, J.C., E-mail: jct@damtp.cam.ac.uk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coulomb gauge in nonabelian gauge theories is attractive in principle, but beset with technical difficulties in perturbation theory. In addition to ordinary Feynman integrals, there are, at 2-loop order, Christ-Lee (CL) terms, derived either by correctly ordering the operators in the Hamiltonian, or by resolving ambiguous Feynman integrals. Renormalization theory depends on the sub-graph structure of ordinary Feynman graphs. The CL terms do not have a sub-graph structure. We show how to carry out renormalization in the presence of CL terms, by re-expressing these as 'pseudo-Feynman' integrals. We also explain how energy divergences cancel. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In Coulomb gauge QCD, we re-express Christ-Lee terms in the Hamiltonian as pseudo-Feynman integrals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This gives a subgraph structure, and allows the ordinary renormalization process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It also leads to cancellation of energy-divergences.

  17. Gauge Orbit Types for Generalized Connections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fleischhack

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Different versions for defining Ashtekar's generalized connections are investigated depending on the chosen smoothness category for the paths and graphs -- the label set for the projective limit. Our definition covers the analytic case as well as the case of webs. Then the orbit types of the generalized connections are determined for compact structure groups. The stabilizer of a connection is homeomorphic to the holonomy centralizer, i.e. the centralizer of its holonomy group, and the homeomorphism class of the gauge orbit is completely determined by the holonomy centralizer. Furthermore, the stabilizers of two connections are conjugate in the gauge group if and only if their holonomy centralizers are conjugate in the structure group. Finally, the gauge orbit type of a connection is defined to be the conjugacy class of its holonomy centralizer equivalently to the standard definition via stabilizers.

  18. Solution of the Gribov problem from gauge invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurt Langfeld; Tom Heinzl; Anton Ilderton; Martin Lavelle; David McMullan

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach to gauge fixed Yang-Mills theory is derived using the Polyakov-Susskind projection techniques to build gauge invariant states. In our approach, in contrast to the Faddeev-Popov method, the Gribov problem does not prevent the gauge group from being factored out of the partition function. Lattice gauge theory is used to illustrate the method via a calculation of the static quark-antiquark potential generated by the gauge fields in the fundamental modular region of Coulomb gauge.

  19. Emergent noncommutative gravity from a consistent deformation of gauge theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortese, Ignacio; Garcia, J Antonio [Departamento de Fisica de Altas Energias, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico D. F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from a standard noncommutative gauge theory and using the Seiberg-Witten map, we propose a new version of a noncommutative gravity. We use consistent deformation theory starting from a free gauge action and gauging a killing symmetry of the background metric to construct a deformation of the gauge theory that we can relate with gravity. The result of this consistent deformation of the gauge theory is nonpolynomial in A{sub {mu}.} From here we can construct a version of noncommutative gravity that is simpler than previous attempts. Our proposal is consistent and is not plagued with the problems of other approaches like twist symmetries or gauging other groups.

  20. Feynman rules for Coulomb gauge QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Andrasi; J. C. Taylor

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coulomb gauge in nonabelian gauge theories is attractive in principle, but beset with technical difficulties in perturbation theory. In addition to ordinary Feynman integrals, there are, at 2-loop order, Christ-Lee (CL) terms, derived either by correctly ordering the operators in the Hamiltonian, or by resolving ambiguous Feynman integrals. Renormalization theory depends on the subgraph structure of ordinary Feynamn graphs. The CL terms do not have subgraph structure. We show how to carry out enormalization in the presene of CL terms, by re-expressing these as `pseudo-Feynman' inegrals. We also explain how energy divergences cancel.

  1. Gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking and moduli stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alwis, S. P. de [Physics Department, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A generic lesson of string theory is that the coupling constants of an effective low energy theory are determined by the vacuum values of a set of fields - the so-called moduli - some of which are stabilized at relatively low masses by nonperturbative effects. We argue that the physics of these moduli cannot be separated from the issues of dynamical and gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking. To illustrate this point we present a modified version of the type IIB Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi model where the criteria for gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking may be realized.

  2. Gauge Theories in Noncommutative Homogeneous Kähler Manifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshiaki Maeda; Akifumi Sako; Toshiya Suzuki; Hiroshi Umetsu

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a gauge theory on a noncommutative homogeneous K\\"ahler manifold, where we employ the deformation quantization with separation of variables for K\\"ahler manifolds formulated by Karabegov. A key point in this construction is to obtaining vector fields which act as inner derivations for the deformation quantization. We show that these vector fields are the only Killing vector fields. We give an explicit construction of this gauge theory on noncommutative ${\\mathbb C}P^N$ and noncommutative ${\\mathbb C}H^N$.

  3. HTTF Core Stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

  4. Comparison of the gradient flow with cooling in $SU(3)$ pure gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Bonati; Massimo D'Elia

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The gradient (Wilson) flow has been introduced recently in order to provide a solid theoretical framework for the smoothing of ultraviolet noise in lattice gauge configurations. It is interesting to ask how it compares with other, more heuristic and numerically cheaper smoothing techniques, such as standard cooling. In this study we perform such a comparison, focusing on observables related to topology. We show that, already for moderately small lattice spacings, standard cooling and the gradient flow lead to equivalent results, both for average quantities and configuration by configuration.

  5. Solid Target Options S. Childress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    power is higher than for existing solid target designs - but not by a large factor. · NuMI graphite beam power) · High beam power solid targets frequently use higher z materials for increased yield plusSolid Target Options NuFACT'00 S. Childress Solid Target Options · The choice of a primary beam

  6. Mass-radius relations and core-envelope decompositions of super-Earths and sub-Neptunes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, Alex R.; Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Verne, Wesley, E-mail: arhowe@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Computer Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many exoplanets have been discovered with radii of 1-4 R {sub ?}, between that of Earth and Neptune. A number of these are known to have densities consistent with solid compositions, while others are 'sub-Neptunes' likely to have significant H{sub 2}-He envelopes. Future surveys will no doubt significantly expand these populations. In order to understand how the measured masses and radii of such planets can inform their structures and compositions, we construct models both for solid layered planets and for planets with solid cores and gaseous envelopes, exploring a range of core masses, H{sub 2}-He envelope masses, and associated envelope entropies. For planets in the super-Earth/sub-Neptune regime for which both radius and mass are measured, we estimate how each is partitioned into a solid core and gaseous envelope, associating a specific core mass and envelope mass with a given exoplanet. We perform this decomposition for both ''Earth-like'' rock-iron cores and pure ice cores, and find that the necessary gaseous envelope masses for this important sub-class of exoplanets must range very widely from zero to many Earth masses, even for a given core mass. This result bears importantly on exoplanet formation and envelope evaporation processes.

  7. From Lattice Gauge Theories to Hydrogen Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manu Mathur; T. P. Sreeraj

    2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Using canonical transformations we obtain a complete and most economical realization of the loop or physical Hilbert space of pure $SU(2)_{2+1}$ lattice gauge theory in terms of Wigner coupled Hilbert spaces of hydrogen atoms. One hydrogen atom is assigned to every plaquette of the lattice. The SU(2) gauge theory loop basis states over a plaquette are the bound energy eigenstates $|n l m>$ of the corresponding hydrogen atom. The Wigner couplings of these hydrogen atom energy eigenstates on different plaquettes provide a complete SU(2) gauge theory loop basis on the entire lattice. The loop basis is invariant under simultaneous rotations of all hydrogen atoms. The dual description of this basis diagonalizes all Wilson loop operators and is given in terms of hyperspherical harmonics on the SU(2) group manifold $S^3$. The SU(2) loop dynamics is governed by a "SU(2) spin Hamiltonian" without any gauge fields. The relevance of the hydrogen atom basis and its dynamical symmetry group SO(4,2) in SU(2) loop dynamics in weak coupling continuum limit ($g^2\\rightarrow 0$) is emphasized.

  8. New gauge boson searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, J.L. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Physics); Rizzo, T.G. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Physics Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery reach of the Tevatron in the 1990's for new gauge bosons which originate in a wide range of extensions to the Standard Model is obtained. Most searches make use of the conventional leptonic decay mode of the Z{prime}, whereas others require the observation of a dijet mass peak above the QCD background from hadronic decays. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Hydropower Potential Scoping Study Gauging Interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6/19/2013 1 Hydropower Potential Scoping Study ­ Gauging Interest Generating Resources Advisory and associated technologies. ­ Hydropower upgrades, new hydropower projects 2 Purpose Develop a hydro supply curve to determine the hydropower development potential in the NW region ­ Council's Seventh Power Plan

  10. Dyonic Instantons in Five Dimensional Gauge Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil. D. Lambert; David Tong

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that there exist finite energy, non-singular instanton solutions for five-dimensional theories with broken gauge symmetry. The soliton is supported against collapse by a non-zero electric charge. The low-energy dynamics of these solutions is described by motion on the ADHM moduli space with potential.

  11. Fourier Accelerated Conjugate Gradient Lattice Gauge Fixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Hudspith

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide details of the first implementation of a non-linear conjugate gradient method for Landau and Coulomb gauge fixing with Fourier acceleration. We find clear improvement over the Fourier accelerated steepest descent method, with the average time taken for the algorithm to converge to a fixed, high accuracy, being reduced by a factor of 2 to 4.

  12. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brower, Richard C.

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    SciDAC-2 Project The Secret Life of Quarks: National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, from March 15, 2011 through March 14, 2012. The objective of this project is to construct the software needed to study quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of the strong interactions of sub-atomic physics, and other strongly coupled gauge field theories anticipated to be of importance in the energy regime made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It builds upon the successful efforts of the SciDAC-1 project National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, in which a QCD Applications Programming Interface (QCD API) was developed that enables lattice gauge theorists to make effective use of a wide variety of massively parallel computers. This project serves the entire USQCD Collaboration, which consists of nearly all the high energy and nuclear physicists in the United States engaged in the numerical study of QCD and related strongly interacting quantum field theories. All software developed in it is publicly available, and can be downloaded from a link on the USQCD Collaboration web site, or directly from the github repositories with entrance linke http://usqcd-software.github.io

  13. Noncommutative gauge theories and Lorentz symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Chakraborty, Biswajit; Kumar, Kuldeep [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector 3, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We explicitly derive, following a Noether-like approach, the criteria for preserving Poincare invariance in noncommutative gauge theories. Using these criteria we discuss the various spacetime symmetries in such theories. It is shown that, interpreted appropriately, Poincare invariance holds. The analysis is performed in both the commutative as well as noncommutative descriptions and a compatibility between the two is also established.

  14. ACCELERATION INDUCED SPIN ITS GAUGE GEOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerlach, Ulrich

    @math.ohio­state.edu ABSTRACT Does there exist a purely quantum mechanical characterization of gravitation? To this end at each event. A unique and natural law of parallel transport of quantum states between different events conclusion that gravitation is to be identified with the gauge geometry of the group [SU(1; 1)] 1 . #12

  15. Gauge Theory on a Four Sphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Hameeda

    2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we will analyze the quantization of a gauge theory on a four sphere. This will be done by mode expanding all the fields in the theory in terms of harmonic modes. We will also analyse the BRST symmetry of this theory.

  16. Manifest Verification of QCD Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Kun Qian

    2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the magnetic moment of gluon, find if QCD is nongauge SU(3) theory then the magnetic moment of gluon varnishes, but if QCD is gauge theory then the magnetic moment of gluon will not vanishes. The magnetic moment of gluon can be measured by investigate the E-M decay of gluball.

  17. anomalous gauge couplings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fichet; Gero von Gersdorff 2013-11-26 16 Anomalous gauge-boson couplings and the Higgs-boson mass HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: We study anomalous gauge-boson couplings...

  18. Lyapunov spectra in SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, C. [Physics Department, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0305 (United States)] [Physics Department, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0305 (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a method for calculating the Lyapunov characteristic exponents of lattice gauge theories. The complete Lyapunov spectrum of SU(2) gauge theory is obtained and Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is calculated. Rapid convergence with lattice size is found.

  19. Giant planet formation: episodic impacts vs. gradual core growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broeg, Christopher

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the growth of gas giant planets in the core accretion scenario. The core growth is not modeled as a gradual accretion of planetesimals but as episodic impacts of large mass ratios, i.e. we study impacts of 0.02 - 1 Earth masses onto cores of 1-15 Earth masses. Such impacts could deliver the majority of solid matter in the giant impact regime. We focus on the thermal response of the envelope to the energy delivery. Previous studies have shown that sudden shut off of core accretion can dramatically speed up gas accretion. We therefore expect that giant impacts followed by periods of very low core accretion will result in a net increase in gas accretion rate. This study aims at modelling such a sequence of events and to understand the reaction of the envelope to giant impacts in more detail. To model this scenario, we spread the impact energy deposition over a time that is long compared to the sound crossing time, but very short compared to the Kelvin-Helmholtz time. The simulations are done in spher...

  20. On the Definition of Gauge Field Operators in Lattice Gauge-Fixed Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Giusti; M. L. Paciello; S. Petrarca; B. Taglienti; M. Testa

    1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the problem of defining the gauge four-potential on the lattice, in terms of the natural link variables. Different regularized definitions are shown, through non perturbative numerical computation, to converge towards the same continuum renormalized limit.

  1. Dimension two vacuum condensates in gauge-invariant theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Bykov; A. A. Slavnov

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauge dependence of the dimension two condensate in Abelian and non-Abelian Yang-Mills theory is investigated.

  2. A Generalized Maximal Abelian Gauge in SU(3) Lattice Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, W W; Tucker, William W.; Stack, John D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a generalized Maximum Abelian Gauge (MAG). We work with this new gauge on 12^4 lattices for beta=5.7,5.8 and 16^4 lattices for beta=5.9,6.0. We also introduce a form of abelian projection related to the generalized MAG. We measure U(1)xU(1) wilson loops and single color magnetic current densities.

  3. Solid state switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  4. Gauge theories in noncommutative geometry December 7, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    permit to define noncommutative gauge field theories. In particular, we emphasize the theory of noncom of noncommutative gauge field theories are given to illustrate the constructions and to display some of the common differential structures [21­23; 27; 28; 30; 63; 65]. However, all the noncommutative gauge field theories

  5. Climatology of extreme rainfall from rain gauges and weather radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    by conventional rain gauge networks. A 10-year radar-based climatology of rainfall depths for durations of 15 minClimatology of extreme rainfall from rain gauges and weather radar Aart Overeem #12;Thesis:30 PM in the Aula #12;Aart Overeem Climatology of extreme rainfall from rain gauges and weather radar

  6. Electron Abundance in Protostellar Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Padoan; Karen Willacy; William Langer; Mika Juvela

    2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of the fractional electron abundance, Xe, in protostellar cores relies on observations of molecules, such as DCO+, H13CO+ and CO, and on chemical models to interpret their abundance. Studies of protostellar cores have revealed significant variations of Xe from core to core within a range 10^-8core age, extinction and density. We compute numerically the intensity of the radiation field within a density distribution generated by supersonic turbulence. Taking into account the lines of sight in all directions, the effective visual extinction in dense regions is found to be always much lower than the extinction derived from the column density along a fixed line of sight. Dense cores with volume and column densities comparable to observed protostellar cores have relatively low mass-averaged visual extinction, 2mag <= A_V <= 5mag, such that photo-ionization can sometimes be as important as cosmic ray ionization. Chemical models, including gas-grain chemistry and time dependent gas depletion and desorption, are computed for values of visual extinction in the range 2mag <= A_V <= 6mag, and for a hydrogen gas density of 10^4cm^-3$, typical of protostellar cores. The models presented here can reproduce some of the observed variations of ion abundance from core to core as the combined effect of visual extinction and age variations. The range of electron abundances predicted by the models is relatively insenstive to density over 10^4 to 10^6 cm^{-3}.

  7. ANALYSIS OF THE SALT FEED TANK CORE SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Cheng, W.

    2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) immobilizes and disposes of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Low-level waste (LLW) streams from processes at SRS are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the SPF for treatment and disposal. The Salt Feed Tank (SFT) at the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) holds approximately 6500 gallons of low level waste from Tank 50 as well as drain water returned from the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) vaults. Over the past several years, Saltstone Engineering has noted the accumulation of solids in the SFT. The solids are causing issues with pump performance, agitator performance, density/level monitoring, as well as taking up volume in the tank. The tank has been sounded at the same location multiple times to determine the level of the solids. The readings have been 12, 25 and 15 inches. The SFT is 8.5 feet high and 12 feet in diameter, therefore the solids account for approximately 10 % of the tank volume. Saltstone Engineering has unsuccessfully attempted to obtain scrape samples of the solids for analysis. As a result, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with developing a soft core sampler to obtain a sample of the solids and to analyze the core sample to aid in determining a path forward for removing the solids from the SFT. The source of the material in the SFT is the drain water return system where excess liquid from the Saltstone disposal vaults is pumped back to the SFT for reprocessing. It has been shown that fresh grout from the vault enter the drain water system piping. Once these grout solids return to the SFT, they settle in the tank, set up, and can't be reprocessed, causing buildup in the tank over time. The composition of the material indicates that it is potentially toxic for chromium and mercury and the primary radionuclide is cesium-137. Qualitative measurements show that the material is not cohesive and will break apart with some force.

  8. Solid polymer electrolyte compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garbe, James E. (Stillwater, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Hamrock, Steven J. (St. Paul, MN); Le, Dinh Ba (St. Paul, MN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrolyte composition is featured that includes a solid, ionically conductive polymer, organically modified oxide particles that include organic groups covalently bonded to the oxide particles, and an alkali metal salt. The electrolyte composition is free of lithiated zeolite. The invention also features cells that incorporate the electrolyte composition.

  9. Shock initiation studies of low density HMX using electromagnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress gauges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Alcon, R.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Graham, R.A.; Anderson, M.U. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress rate gauges have been used to measure the shock response of low density octotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) (1.24 &/cm{sup 3}). In experiments done at LANL, magnetic particle velocity gauges were located on both sides of the explosive. In nearly identical experiments done at SNL, PVDF stress rate gauges were located at the same positions so both particle velocity and stress histories were obtained for a particular experimental condition. Unreacted Hugoniot data were obtained and an EOS was developed by combining methods used by Hayes, Sheffield and Mitchell (for describing the Hugoniot of HNS at various densities) with Hermann`s P-{alpha} model. Using this technique, it is only necessary to know some thermodynamic constants or the Hugoniot of the initially solid material and the porous material sound speed to obtain accurate unreacted Hugoniots for the porous explosive. Loading and reaction paths were established in the stress-particle velocity plane for some experimental conditions. This information was used to determine a global reaction rate of {approx} 0.13 {mu}s{sup {minus}1} for porous HMX shocked to 0.8 GPa. At low input stresses the transmitted wave profiles had long rise times (up to 1 {mu}s) due to the compaction processes.

  10. Gauge Potential Formulations of the Spin Hall Effect in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. F. Dayi; E. Yunt

    2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different gauge potential methods are engaged to calculate explicitly the spin Hall conductivity in graphene. The graphene Hamiltonian with spin-orbit interaction is expressed in terms of kinematic momenta by introducing a gauge potential. A formulation of the spin Hall conductivity is established by requiring that the time evolution of this kinematic momentum vector vanishes. We then calculated the conductivity employing the Berry gauge fields. We show that both of the gauge fields can be deduced from the pure gauge field arising from the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformations.

  11. Bent core liquid crystal elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verduzco, R.; DiMasi, E.; Luchette, P.; Ho Hong, S.; Harden, J.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Kilbey II, S.M.; Sprunt, S.; Gleeson, G.T. Jakli, A.

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid crystal (LC) elastomers with bent-core side-groups incorporate the properties of bent-core liquid crystals in a flexible and self-supporting polymer network. Bent-core liquid crystal elastomers (BCEs) with uniform alignment were prepared by attaching a reactive bent-core LC to poly(hydrogenmethylsiloxane) and crosslinking with a divinyl crosslinker. Phase behavior studies indicate a nematic phase over a wide temperature range that approaches room temperature, and thermoelastic measurements show that these BCEs can reversibly change their length by more than a factor of two upon heating and cooling. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies reveal multiple, broad low-angle peaks consistent with short-range smectic C order of the bent-core side groups. A comparison of these patterns with predictions of a Landau model for short-range smectic C order shows that the length scale for smectic ordering in BCEs is similar to that seen in pure bent-core LCs. The combination of rubber elasticity and smectic ordering of the bent-core side groups suggests that BCEs may be promising materials for sensing, actuating, and other advanced applications.

  12. Test Plan - Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.; Fowley, M. D.

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan documents the highlights of the Solids Accumulations Scouting Studies test; a project, from Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), that began on February 1, 2012. During the last 12 weeks considerable progress has been made to design and plan methods that will be used to estimate the concentration and distribution of heavy fissile solids in accumulated solids in the Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-AW-105 (AW-105), which is the primary goal of this task. This DST will be one of the several waste feed delivery staging tanks designated to feed the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Note that over the length of the waste feed delivery mission AW-105 is currently identified as having the most fill empty cycles of any DST feed tanks, which is the reason for modeling this particular tank. At SRNL an existing test facility, the Mixing Demonstration Tank, which will be modified for the present work, will use stainless steel particles in a simulant that represents Hanford waste to perform mock staging tanks transfers that will allow solids to accumulate in the tank heel. The concentration and location of the mock fissile particles will be measured in these scoping studies to produce information that will be used to better plan larger scaled tests. Included in these studies is a secondary goal of developing measurement methods to accomplish the primary goal. These methods will be evaluated for use in the larger scale experiments. Included in this plan are the several pretest activities that will validate the measurement techniques that are currently in various phases of construction. Aspects of each technique, e.g., particle separations, volume determinations, topographical mapping, and core sampling, have been tested in bench-top trials, as discussed herein, but the actual equipment to be employed during the full test will need evaluation after fabrication and integration into the test facility.

  13. ENVIR 202: EARTH, AIR, WATER 22 Jan 2003 BACKGROUND DISCUSSION FOR THE SCIENCE CORE: ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and convection (thermal energy flow in solids and fluids) E7 A Solar Pond (energy conversion and storage, solar to thermal): E8 Your Next Car? The hydrogen fuel cell (energy conversion, chemical to electrical and reverse1 ENVIR 202: EARTH, AIR, WATER 22 Jan 2003 BACKGROUND DISCUSSION FOR THE SCIENCE CORE: ENERGY P

  14. Experimental constraints on the thermodynamics and sound velocities of hcp-Fe to core pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jennifer M.

    that comprises the volume-dependent phonon density of states (DOS) of e-Fe at eleven compression points. From information about the partitioning behavior of iron isotopes in equilibrium processes involving solid e providing a new tight constraint on the density dependence of e-Fe's sound velocities to outer core

  15. PARALLEL SOLUTION-ADAPTIVE SCHEME FOR MULTI-PHASE CORE FLOWS IN ROCKET MOTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groth, Clinton P. T.

    PARALLEL SOLUTION-ADAPTIVE SCHEME FOR MULTI-PHASE CORE FLOWS IN ROCKET MOTORS J. S. Sachdev , C. P motors (SRM). An Eulerian formulation is used for both the gas and particle phases, which leads THE internal flow dynamics of a solid propellant rocket motor (SRM) is very complex. The com- bustion

  16. Matrix product states for gauge field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boye Buyens; Jutho Haegeman; Karel Van Acoleyen; Henri Verschelde; Frank Verstraete

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix product state formalism is used to simulate Hamiltonian lattice gauge theories. To this end, we define matrix product state manifolds which are manifestly gauge invariant. As an application, we study 1+1 dimensional one flavour quantum electrodynamics, also known as the massive Schwinger model, and are able to determine very accurately the ground state properties and elementary one-particle excitations in the continuum limit. In particular, a novel particle excitation in the form of a heavy vector boson is uncovered, compatible with the strong coupling expansion in the continuum. We also study non-equilibrium dynamics by simulating the real-time evolution of the system induced by a quench in the form of a uniform background electric field.

  17. Tensor gauge field localization in branes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tahim, M. O. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, C.P. 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Departamento de Ciencias da Natureza, Faculdade de Ciencias, Educacao e Letras do Sertao Central (FECLESC), Universidade Estadual do Ceara, 63900-000 Quixada, Ceara (Brazil); Cruz, W. T. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, C.P. 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Ceara (CEFETCE), Unidade Descentralizada de Juazeiro do Norte, 63040-000 Juazeiro do Norte, Ceara (Brazil); Almeida, C. A. S. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, C.P. 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we study localization of a Kalb-Ramond tensorial gauge field on a membrane described by real scalar fields. The membrane is embedded in an AdS-type five-dimensional bulk space, which mimics a Randall-Sundrum scenario. First, we consider a membrane described by only a single real scalar field. In that scenario we find that there is no localized tensorial zero mode. When we take into account branes described by two real scalar fields with internal structures, we obtain again a nonlocalized zero mode for a Kalb-Ramond tensorial gauge field. After modifying our model of one single scalar field by coupling the dilaton to the Kalb-Ramond field, we find that this result is changed. Furthermore, we analyze Kaluza-Klein massive modes and resonance structures.

  18. Viable axion from gauged flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berenstein, David; Perkins, Erik [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a string-inspired nonsupersymmetric extension of the standard model with gauged anomalous U(1) flavor symmetries. Consistency requires the Green-Schwarz (GS) mechanism to cancel mixed anomalies. The additional required scalars provide Stueckelberg masses for the Z{sup '} particles associated to the gauged flavor symmetry, so they decouple at low energies. Our models also include a complex scalar field {phi} to generate Froggatt-Nielsen mass terms for light particles, giving a partial solution to the fermion mass problem. A residual approximate (anomalous) global symmetry survives at low energies. The associated pseudo-Goldstone mode is the phase of the {phi} scalar field, and it becomes the dominant contribution to the physical axion. An effective field theory analysis that includes neutrino masses gives a prediction for the axion decay constant. We find a simple model where the axion decay constant is in the center of the allowed window.

  19. Gauge theory of gravity and supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaul, Romesh K. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai 600 113 (India)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a formulation of gravity in terms of a theory based on complex SU(2) gauge fields with a general coordinate invariant action functional quadratic in the field strength. Self-duality or anti-self-duality of the field strength emerges as a constraint from the equations of motion of this theory. This in turn leads to Einstein gravity equations for a dilaton and an axion conformally coupled to gravity for the self-dual constraint. The analysis has also been extended to N=1 and 2 super Yang-Mills theory of complex SU(2) gauge fields. This leads to, besides other equations of motion, self-duality/anti-self-duality of generalized supercovariant field strengths. The self-dual case is then shown to yield as its solutions N=1, 2 supergravity equations, respectively.

  20. Solid Waste Act (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of the Solid Waste Act is to authorize and direct the establishment of a comprehensive solid waste management program. The act states details about specific waste management...

  1. Solid Waste Management Program (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solid Waste Management Program in the Department of Natural Resources regulates the management of solid waste in the state of Missouri. A permit is required prior to the construction or...

  2. Delaware Solid Waste Authority (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) runs three landfills, all of which recover methane and generate electricity with a total capacity of 24 MWs. The DSWA Solid Waste Plan includes goals,...

  3. Solid Waste Disposal Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation and management of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. A fee is applied to all solid waste disposed in the...

  4. TRANSPORT NUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION Lutgard C. De Jonghe TWO-AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION Lutgard C. De JongheAND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION Lutgard C. De Jonghe

  5. Gauge invariance and massive torsionic scalar field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikodem J. Poplawski

    2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hojman-Rosenbaum-Ryan-Shepley dynamical theory of torsion preserves local gauge invariance of electrodynamics and makes minimal coupling compatible with torsion. It also allows propagation of torsion in vacuum. It is known that implications of this model disagree with the Eotvos-Dicke-Braginsky solar tests of the principle of equivalence. We modify this theory and make it consistent with experiment by introducing a massive component of the torsionic potential.

  6. Torsion and gauge-invariant massive electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabbata, V. de (Univ. of Ferrara, Sezione di Ferrara (Italy)); Sivaram, C. (Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore (India)); Andrade, L.G. de (Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors study electrodynamics in Einstein-Cartan space-time, that is, in space-time with torsion, and show an analogy with the Chern-Simons gauge-invariant massive electrodynamics. In their case, however, there is no arbitrary parameter, the torsion Q playing the role of the Chern-Simons parameter k. This leads to bounds on the photon mass, charge, and torsion coupling.

  7. Jet fragmentation and gauge/string duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshitaka Hatta; Toshihiro Matsuo

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an analog of e^+e^- annihilation in gauge theories which have a dual string description in asymptotically AdS_5 space and discuss the nature of jet fragmentation. We construct the timelike anomalous dimension which governs the scale dependence of the fragmentation function. In the limit of infinite 't Hooft coupling, the average multiplicity rises linearly with the energy and the inclusive spectrum is peaked at the kinematical boundary.

  8. Solid state electrochemical current source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Potanin, Alexander Arkadyevich (Sarov, RU); Vedeneev, Nikolai Ivanovich (Sarov, RU)

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A cathode and a solid state electrochemical cell comprising said cathode, a solid anode and solid fluoride ion conducting electrolyte. The cathode comprises a metal oxide and a compound fluoride containing at least two metals with different valences. Representative compound fluorides include solid solutions of bismuth fluoride and potassium fluoride; and lead fluoride and potassium fluoride. Representative metal oxides include copper oxide, lead oxide, manganese oxide, vanadium oxide and silver oxide.

  9. Heat Recovery From Solid Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, O. W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    areas of evaluation, including the cost of fuel, cost of solid waste disposal, plant energy requirements, available technology, etc....

  10. Long cycle life solid-state solid polymer electrolyte cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1988-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a rechargeable solid-state lithium conducting solid polymer electrolyte electrochemical cell comprising: a lithium intercalation compound negative electrode selected from the group consisting of: MoO/sub 2/; RuO/sub 2/; WO; OsO/sub 2/; IrO/sub 2/; and Mo1/2V1/2O/sub 2/; a lithium ion conducting solid polymer electrolyte comprising a lithium ion conducting supporting electrolyte complexed with a solid polymer contacting the negative electrode on one side; and a lithium intercalation compound positive electrode contacting the opposite side of the solid polymer electrolyte.

  11. About consistence between pi N Delta spin-3/2 gauge couplings and electromagnetic gauge invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Badagnani; C. Barbero; A. Mariano

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the consistence between the recently proposed "spin 3/2 gauge" interaction for the Delta resonance with nucleons and pions, and the fundamental electromagnetic gauge invariance in any radiative amplitude. Chiral symmetric pion-derivative pi N Delta couplings can be substituted through a linear transformation to get Delta-derivative ones, which have the property of decoupling the 1/2 field components of the Delta propagator. Nevertheless, the electromagnetic gauge invariance introduced through minimal substitution in all derivatives, can only be fulfilled at a given order n without destroying the spin 3/2 one by dropping n+1 order terms within an effective field theory (EFT) framework with a defined power counting. In addition, we show that the Ward identity for the gamma Delta gamma vertex cannot be fulfilled with a trimmed 3/2 propagator, which should be necessary in order to keep the spin 3/2 gauge symmetry in the radiative case for the gamma Delta gamma amplitude. Finally, it is shown that radiative corrections of the spin 3/2 gauge strong vertexes at one loop, reintroduce the conventional interaction.

  12. Two Species of Vortices in a massive Gauged Non-linear Sigma Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Alonso-Izquierdo; Wifredo Garcia Fuertes; Juan Mateos Guilarte

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-linear sigma models with scalar fields taking values on $\\mathbb{C}\\mathbb{P}^n$ complex manifolds are addressed. In the simplest $n=1$ case, where the target manifold is the $\\mathbb{S}^2$ sphere, we describe the scalar fields by means of stereographic maps. In this case when the $\\mathbb{U}(1)$ symmetry is gauged and Maxwell and mass terms are allowed, the model accommodates stable self-dual vortices of two kinds with different energies per unit length and where the Higgs field winds at the cores around the two opposite poles of the sphere. Allowing for dielectric functions in the magnetic field, similar and richer self-dual vortices of different species in the south and north charts can be found by slightly modifying the potential. Two different situations are envisaged: either the vacuum orbit lies on a parallel in the sphere, or one pole and the same parallel form the vacuum orbit. Besides the self-dual vortices of two species, there exist BPS domain walls in the second case. Replacing the Maxwell contribution of the gauge field to the action by the second Chern-Simons secondary class, only possible in $(2+1)$-dimensional Minkowski space-time, new BPS topological defects of two species appear. Namely, both BPS vortices and domain ribbons in the south and the north charts exist because the vacuum orbit consits of the two poles and one parallel. Formulation of the gauged $\\mathbb{C}\\mathbb{P}^2$ model in a Reference chart shows a self-dual structure such that BPS semi-local vortices exist. The transition functions to the second or third charts break the $\\mathbb{U}(1)\\times\\mathbb{S}\\mathbb{U}(2)$ semi-local symmetry, but there is still room for standard self-dual vortices of the second species. The same structures encompassing $N$ complex scalar fields are easily generalized to gauged $\\mathbb{C}\\mathbb{P}^N$ models.

  13. A blurred interface formulation of The Reference Map Technique for Fluid-Solid Interactions and Fluid-Solid-Solid Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valkov, Boris Ivanov

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present a blurred interface method for Fluid-Solid Interactions (FSI) and multiple solids immersed in a fluid or FSSI (Fluid-Solid-Solid Interactions) based on the reference map technique as presented by ...

  14. Solid waste handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents estimates of the solid radioactive waste quantities that will be generated in the Separations, Low-Level Waste Vitrification and High-Level Waste Vitrification facilities, collectively called the Tank Waste Remediation System Treatment Complex, over the life of these facilities. This study then considers previous estimates from other 200 Area generators and compares alternative methods of handling (segregation, packaging, assaying, shipping, etc.).

  15. Solar solids reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yudow, B.D.

    1986-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar powered kiln is provided, that is of relatively simple design and which efficiently uses solar energy. The kiln or solids reactor includes a stationary chamber with a rearward end which receives solid material to be reacted and a forward end through which reacted material is disposed of, and a screw conveyor extending along the bottom of the chamber for slowly advancing the material between the chamber ends. Concentrated solar energy is directed to an aperture at the forward end of the chamber to heat the solid material moving along the bottom of the chamber. The solar energy can be reflected from a mirror facing at an upward incline, through the aperture and against a heat-absorbing material near the top of the chamber, which moves towards the rear of the chamber to distribute heat throughout the chamber. Pumps at the forward and rearward ends of the chamber pump heated sweep gas through the length of the chamber, while minimizing the flow of gas through an open aperture through which concentrated sunlight is received.

  16. Solar solids reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yudow, Bernard D. (Chicago, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar powered kiln is provided, that is of relatively simple design and which efficiently uses solar energy. The kiln or solids reactor includes a stationary chamber with a rearward end which receives solid material to be reacted and a forward end through which reacted material is disposed of, and a screw conveyor extending along the bottom of the chamber for slowly advancing the material between the chamber ends. Concentrated solar energy is directed to an aperture at the forward end of the chamber to heat the solid material moving along the bottom of the chamber. The solar energy can be reflected from a mirror facing at an upward incline, through the aperture and against a heat-absorbing material near the top of the chamber, which moves towards the rear of the chamber to distribute heat throughout the chamber. Pumps at the forward and rearward ends of the chamber pump heated sweep gas through the length of the chamber, while minimizing the flow of gas through an open aperture through which concentrated sunlight is received.

  17. Local Gauge Transformation for the Quark Propagator in an SU(N) Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aslam, M Jamil; Gutierrez-Guerrero, L X

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an SU(N) gauge field theory, the n-point Green functions, namely, propagators and vertices, transform under the simultaneous local gauge variations of the gluon vector potential and the quark matter field in such a manner that the physical observables remain invariant. In this article, we derive this intrinsically non perturbative transformation law for the quark propagator within the system of covariant gauges. We carry out its explicit perturbative expansion till O(g_s^6) and, for some terms, till O(g_s^8). We study the implications of this transformation for the quark-anti-quark condensate, multiplicative renormalizability of the massless quark propagator, as well as its relation with the quark-gluon vertex at the one-loop order. Setting the color factors C_F=1 and C_A=0, Landau-Khalatnikov-Fradkin transformation for the abelian case of quantum electrodynamics is trivially recovered.

  18. Packaging of solid state devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A package for one or more solid state devices in a single module that allows for operation at high voltage, high current, or both high voltage and high current. Low thermal resistance between the solid state devices and an exterior of the package and matched coefficient of thermal expansion between the solid state devices and the materials used in packaging enables high power operation. The solid state devices are soldered between two layers of ceramic with metal traces that interconnect the devices and external contacts. This approach provides a simple method for assembling and encapsulating high power solid state devices.

  19. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Solids Washing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, David L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Toth, James J.; Huckaby, James L.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  20. Functional Partitioning to Optimize End-to-End Performance on Many-core Architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Min [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL] [ORNL; Butt, Ali R [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Meng, Fei [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Xiaosong [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Youngjae [ORNL] [ORNL; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scaling computations on emerging massive-core supercomputers is a daunting task, which coupled with the significantly lagging system I/O capabilities exacerbates applications end-to-end performance. The I/O bottleneck often negates potential performance benefits of assigning additional compute cores to an application. In this paper, we address this issue via a novel functional partitioning (FP) runtime environment that allocates cores to specific application tasks - checkpointing, de-duplication, and scientific data format transformation - so that the deluge of cores can be brought to bear on the entire gamut of application activities. The focus is on utilizing the extra cores to support HPC application I/O activities and also leverage solid-state disks in this context. For example, our evaluation shows that dedicating 1 core on an oct-core machine for checkpointing and its assist tasks using FP can improve overall execution time of a FLASH benchmark on 80 and 160 cores by 43.95% and 41.34%, respectively.

  1. Fluctuation and gauge effects on the critical behavior of superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diana V. Shopova; Dimo I. Uzunov

    2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauge effects on the fluctuation properties of the normal-to-superconducting phase transition in bulk and thin film superconductors are reviewed. Similar problems in the description of other natural systems (liquid crystals, quantum field theory, early universe) are also discussed. The relatively strong gauge effects on the fluctuations of the ordering field at low spatial dimensionality $D$ and, in particular, in thin (quasi-2D) films are considered in details. A special attention is paid to the fluctuations of the gauge field. It is shown that the mechanism, in which these gauge fluctuations affect the phase transition order and other phase transition properties varies with the variation of spatial dimensionality $D$. The problem for the experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions about the order of phase transitions in gauge systems is discussed. Related topics: gauge effects on the critical behavior of unconventional superconductors, disorder, quantum fluctuations in a close vicinity of ultra-low phase transition temperatures, are also briefly discussed.

  2. Path Integral Quantization of Quantum Gauge General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Wu

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Path integral quantization of quantum gauge general relativity is discussed in this paper. First, we deduce the generating functional of green function with external fields. Based on this generating functional, the propagators of gravitational gauge field and related ghost field are deduced. Then, we calculate Feynman rules of various interaction vertices of three or four gravitational gauge fields and vertex between ghost field and gravitational gauge field. Results in this paper are the bases of calculating vacuum polarization of gravitational gauge field and vertex correction of gravitational couplings in one loop diagram level. As we have pointed out in previous paper, quantum gauge general relativity is perturbative renormalizable, and a formal proof on its renormalizability is also given in the previous paper. Next step, we will calculate one-loop and two-loop renormalization constant, and to prove that the theory is renormalizable in one-loop and two-loop level by direct calculations.

  3. Improved gauge driver for the generalized harmonic Einstein system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindblom, Lee; Szilagyi, Bela [Theoretical Astrophysics 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new gauge driver is introduced for the generalized harmonic (GH) representation of Einstein's equation. This new driver allows a rather general class of gauge conditions to be implemented in a way that maintains the hyperbolicity of the combined evolution system. This driver is more stable and effective and, unlike previous drivers, allows stable evolutions using the dual-frame evolution technique. Appropriate boundary conditions for this new gauge driver are constructed, and a new boundary condition for the 'gauge' components of the spacetime metric in the GH Einstein system is introduced. The stability and effectiveness of this new gauge driver are demonstrated through numerical tests, which impose a new damped-wave gauge condition on the evolutions of single black-hole spacetimes.

  4. Vortex and gap generation in gauge models of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Oliveira; C. E. Cordeiro; A. Delfino; W. de Paula; T. Frederico

    2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective quantum field theoretical continuum models for graphene are investigated. The models include a complex scalar field and a vector gauge field. Different gauge theories are considered and their gap patterns for the scalar, vector, and fermion excitations are investigated. Different gauge groups lead to different relations between the gaps, which can be used to experimentally distinguish the gauge theories. In this class of models the fermionic gap is a dynamic quantity. The finite-energy vortex solutions of the gauge models have the flux of the "magnetic field" quantized, making the Bohm-Aharonov effect active even when external electromagnetic fields are absent. The flux comes proportional to the scalar field angular momentum quantum number. The zero modes of the Dirac equation show that the gauge models considered here are compatible with fractionalization.

  5. Noncommutative geometric gauge theory from superconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, C Y

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Noncommutative geometric gauge theory is reconstructed based on the superconnection concept. The bosonic action of the Connes-Lott model including the symmetry breaking Higgs sector is obtained by using a new generalized derivative, which consists of the usual 1-form exterior derivative plus an extra element called {\\it matrix derivative}, for curvatures. We first derive the matrix derivative based on superconnections then show how the matrix derivative can give rise to spontaneous symmetry breaking. We comment on the correspondence between the generalized derivative and the generalized Dirac operator of the Connes-Lott model.

  6. Continuum regularization of gauge theory with fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, H.S.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuum regularization program is discussed in the case of d-dimensional gauge theory coupled to fermions in an arbitrary representation. Two physically equivalent formulations are given. First, a Grassmann formulation is presented, which is based on the two-noise Langevin equations of Sakita, Ishikawa and Alfaro and Gavela. Second, a non-Grassmann formulation is obtained by regularized integration of the matter fields within the regularized Grassmann system. Explicit perturbation expansions are studied in both formulations, and considerable simplification is found in the integrated non-Grassmann formalism.

  7. Noncommutative Geometric Gauge Theory from Superconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang-Yeong Lee

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Noncommutative geometric gauge theory is reconstructed based on the superconnection concept. The bosonic action of the Connes-Lott model including the symmetry breaking Higgs sector is obtained by using a new generalized derivative, which consists of the usual 1-form exterior derivative plus an extra element called the matrix derivative, for the curvatures. We first derive the matrix derivative based on superconnections and then show how the matrix derivative can give rise to spontaneous symmetry breaking. We comment on the correspondence between the generalized derivative and the generalized Dirac operator of the Connes-Lott model.

  8. Energy-momentum tensors in gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sardanashvily

    2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In field theory on a fibre bundle Y->X, an energy-momentum current is associated to a lift onto Y of a vector field on X. Such a lift by no means is unique, and contains a vertical part. It follows that: (i) there are a set of different energy-momentum currents, (ii) the Noether part of an energy-momentum current can not be taken away, (iii) if a Lagrangian is not gauge-invariant, the energy-momentum fails to be conserved.

  9. Gauge Gravity and Space-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Wu

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    When we discuss problems on gravity, we can not avoid some fundamental physical problems, such as space-time, inertia, and inertial reference frame. The goal of this paper is to discuss the logic system of gravity theory and the problems of space-time, inertia, and inertial reference frame. The goal of this paper is to set up the theory on space-time in gauge theory of gravity. Based on this theory, it is possible for human kind to manipulate physical space-time on earth, and produce a machine which can physically prolong human's lifetime.

  10. Natural semidirect gauge mediation and D-branes at singularities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argurio, Riccardo [Physique Theorique et Mathematique and International Solvay Institutes, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 231, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Bertolini, Matteo [SISSA and INFN-Sezione di Trieste Via Beirut 2, I 34014 Trieste (Italy); Ferretti, Gabriele [Department of Fundamental Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Mariotti, Alberto [Theoretische Natuurkunde and International Solvay Institutes, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider semidirect gauge mediation models of supersymmetry breaking where the messengers are composite fields and their supersymmetric mass is naturally generated through quartic superpotential couplings. We show that such composite messenger models can be easily embedded in quiver gauge theories arising from D-branes at Calabi-Yau singularities, and argue that semidirect gauge mediation is in fact a very natural option for supersymmetry breaking in D-brane models. We provide several explicit examples and discuss their salient phenomenological properties.

  11. A perturbative and gauge invariant treatment of gravitational wave memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lydia Bieri; David Garfinkle

    2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a perturbative treatment of gravitational wave memory. The coordinate invariance of Einstein's equations leads to a type of gauge invariance in perturbation theory. As with any gauge invariant theory, results are more clear when expressed in terms of manifestly gauge invariant quantities. Therefore we derive all our results from the perturbed Weyl tensor rather than the perturbed metric. We derive gravitational wave memory for the Einstein equations coupled to a general energy-momentum tensor that reaches null infinity.

  12. Multiple choice of gauge generators and consistency of interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. L. Lyakhovich; A. A. Sharapov

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    It is usually assumed that any consistent interaction either deforms or retains the gauge symmetries of the corresponding free theory. We propose a simple model where an obvious irreducible gauge symmetry does not survive an interaction, while the interaction is consistent as it preserves the number of physical degrees of freedom. The model turns out admitting a less obvious reducible set of gauge generators which is compatible with the interaction and smooth in coupling constant. Possible application to gravity models is discussed.

  13. QCD plasma parameters and the gauge-dependent gluon propagator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobes, R.; Kunstatter, G.; Rebhan, A. (Department of Physics, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada) Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Wien, Wiedner Haupstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria))

    1990-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the Ward identities that determine the gauge dependence of the QCD dispersion relations obtained from the ordinary gluon propagator in a certain class of gauges. These identities hold for complex structure functions at both zero and finite temperature. A direct consequence of our analysis is that the gauge dependence of the gluon-plasma damping constant obtained in recent one-loop calculations is due to an inconsistent approximation scheme.

  14. Gauge-flation and Cosmic No-Hair Conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Maleknejad; M. M. Sheikh-Jabbari; Jiro Soda

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauge-flation, inflation from non-Abelian gauge fields, was introduced in [1,2]. In this work, we study the cosmic no-hair conjecture in gauge-flation. Starting from Bianchi-type I cosmology and through analytic and numeric studies we demonstrate that the isotropic FLRW inflation is an attractor of the dynamics of the theory and that the anisotropies are damped within a few e-folds, in accord with the cosmic no-hair conjecture.

  15. Gelcasting Alumina Cores for Investment Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janney, M A; Klug, F J

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General Electric currently uses silica investment casting cores for making superalloy turbine blades. The silica core technology does not provide the degree of dimensional control needed for advanced turbine system manufacture. The sum of the various process variables in silica core manufacturing produces cores that have more variability than is allowed for in advanced, power-generation gas turbine airfoils.

  16. Gravitational Contributions to Gauge Green's Functions and Asymptotic Free Power-Law Running of Gauge Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong Tang; Yue-Liang Wu

    2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform an explicit one-loop calculation for the gravitational contributions to the two-, three- and four-point gauge Green's functions with paying attention to the quadratic divergences. It is shown for the first time in the diagrammatic calculation that the Slavnov-Taylor identities are preserved even if the quantum graviton effects are included at one-loop level, such a conclusion is independent of the choice of regularization schemes. We also present a regularization scheme independent calculation based on the gauge condition independent background field framework of Vilkovisky-DeWitt's effective action with focusing on both the quadratic divergence and quartic divergence that is not discussed before. With the harmonic gauge condition, the results computed by using the traditional background field method can consistently be recovered from the Vilkovisky-DeWitt's effective action approach by simply taking a limiting case, and are found to be the same as the ones yielded by the diagrammatic calculation. As a consequence, in all the calculations, the symmetry-preserving and divergent-behavior-preserving loop regularization method can consistently lead to a nontrivial gravitational contribution to the gauge coupling constant with an asymptotic free power-law running at one loop near the Planck scale.

  17. Intrinsic Shapes of Molecular Cloud Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Jones; Shantanu Basu; John Dubinski

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We conduct an analysis of the shapes of molecular cloud cores using recently compiled catalogs of observed axis ratios of individual cores mapped in ammonia or through optical selection. We apply both analytical and statistical techniques to deproject the observed axis ratios in order to determine the true distribution of cloud core shapes. We find that neither pure oblate nor pure prolate cores can account for the observed distribution of core shapes. Intrinsically triaxial cores produce distributions which agree with observations. The best-fit triaxial distribution contains cores which are more nearly oblate than prolate.

  18. Non-Abelian discrete gauge symmetries in F-theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas W. Grimm; Tom G. Pugh; Diego Regalado

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of non-Abelian discrete gauge symmetries in four-dimensional F-theory compactifications is investigated. Such symmetries are shown to arise from seven-brane configurations in genuine F-theory settings without a weak string coupling description. Gauge fields on mutually non-local seven-branes are argued to gauge both R-R and NS-NS two-form bulk axions. The gauging is completed into a generalisation of the Heisenberg group with either additional seven-brane gauge fields or R-R bulk gauge fields. The former case relies on having seven-brane fluxes, while the latter case requires torsion cohomology and is analysed in detail through the M-theory dual. Remarkably, the M-theory reduction yields an Abelian theory that becomes non-Abelian when translated into the correct duality frame to perform the F-theory limit. The reduction shows that the gauge coupling function depends on the gauged scalars and transforms non-trivially as required for the groups encountered. This field dependence agrees with the expectations for the kinetic mixing of seven-branes and is unchanged if the gaugings are absent.

  19. Stability of the Gauge Equivalent Classes in Inverse Stationary ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    scattering and the attenuating coefficients up to a gauge transformation. ...... [24] Mokhtar -K M 1997 Mathematical Topics in Neutron Transport Theory (World ...

  20. Stability of the Gauge Equivalent Classes in Inverse Stationary ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    mines the gauge equivalent class of the attenuation and scattering coefficients. ...... [18] M. Mokhtar-Kharroubi, Mathematical Topics in Neutron Transport Theory

  1. Aspects of 7D and 6D gauged supergravities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jong, Der-Chyn

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction to yield a matter coupled gauged supergravity in six dimensions with 8 real supersymmetry. Solving these conditions we nd that the SO(2;2) and SO(3;1) gauged 7D supergravities give a U(1)R, and the SO(2;1) gauged 7D supergravity gives an Sp(1)R... such that a R-symmetry gauging survives. These are referred to as the SO(3;1);SO(2;1) and SO(2;2) models, in which these groups re- fer to isometries of manifolds parametrized by the scalar elds that arise in the 7D theory. The 6D models we obtain describe...

  2. Aspects of 7d and 6d gauged supergravities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jong, Der-Chyn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction to yield a matter coupled gauged supergravity in six dimensions with 8 real supersymmetry. Solving these conditions we nd that the SO(2;2) and SO(3;1) gauged 7D supergravities give a U(1)R, and the SO(2;1) gauged 7D supergravity gives an Sp(1)R... such that a R-symmetry gauging survives. These are referred to as the SO(3;1);SO(2;1) and SO(2;2) models, in which these groups re- fer to isometries of manifolds parametrized by the scalar elds that arise in the 7D theory. The 6D models we obtain describe...

  3. Gauge Theories on an Interval: Unitarity Without a Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csaki, Csaba; Grojean, Christophe; Murayama, Hitoshi; Luigi, Pilo; Terning, John

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    breaking without a Higgs boson. Gauge Theories on anscattering amplitude. The Higgs boson is localized at y = ?Rreal scalar ?eld, the Higgs boson. At tree level, the

  4. Reply to 'Comment on 'Noncommutative gauge theories and Lorentz symmetry''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Chakraborty, Biswajit; Kumar, Kuldeep [S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector 3, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a reply to the preceding 'Comment on 'Noncommutative gauge theories and Lorentz symmetry'', Phys. Rev. D 77, 048701 (2008) by Alfredo Iorio.

  5. Aspects of 7d and 6d gauged supergravities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jong, Der-Chyn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction to yield a matter coupled gauged supergravity in six dimensions with 8 real supersymmetry. Solving these conditions we nd that the SO(2;2) and SO(3;1) gauged 7D supergravities give a U(1)R, and the SO(2;1) gauged 7D supergravity gives an Sp(1)R... such that a R-symmetry gauging survives. These are referred to as the SO(3;1);SO(2;1) and SO(2;2) models, in which these groups re- fer to isometries of manifolds parametrized by the scalar elds that arise in the 7D theory. The 6D models we obtain describe...

  6. Aspects of 7D and 6D gauged supergravities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jong, Der-Chyn

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction to yield a matter coupled gauged supergravity in six dimensions with 8 real supersymmetry. Solving these conditions we nd that the SO(2;2) and SO(3;1) gauged 7D supergravities give a U(1)R, and the SO(2;1) gauged 7D supergravity gives an Sp(1)R... such that a R-symmetry gauging survives. These are referred to as the SO(3;1);SO(2;1) and SO(2;2) models, in which these groups re- fer to isometries of manifolds parametrized by the scalar elds that arise in the 7D theory. The 6D models we obtain describe...

  7. Anisotropic inflation with non-abelian gauge kinetic function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murata, Keiju [DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Soda, Jiro, E-mail: K.Murata@damtp.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: jiro@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study an anisotropic inflation model with a gauge kinetic function for a non-abelian gauge field. We find that, in contrast to abelian models, the anisotropy can be either a prolate or an oblate type, which could lead to a different prediction from abelian models for the statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of cosmological fluctuations. During a reheating phase, we find chaotic behaviour of the non-abelian gauge field which is caused by the nonlinear self-coupling of the gauge field. We compute a Lyapunov exponent of the chaos which turns out to be uncorrelated with the anisotropy.

  8. Grain alignment in starless cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, T. J.; Bagley, M. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Krejny, M. [Cree Inc., 4600 Silicon Dr., Durham, NC (United States); Andersson, B.-G. [SOFIA Science Center, USRA, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Bastien, P., E-mail: tjj@astro.umn.edu [Centre de recherche en astrophysique du Québec and Départment de Physique, Université de Montréal, Montréal (Canada)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present near-IR polarimetry data of background stars shining through a selection of starless cores taken in the K band, probing visual extinctions up to A{sub V}?48. We find that P{sub K}/?{sub K} continues to decline with increasing A{sub V} with a power law slope of roughly ?0.5. Examination of published submillimeter (submm) polarimetry of starless cores suggests that by A{sub V}?20 the slope for P versus ? becomes ??1, indicating no grain alignment at greater optical depths. Combining these two data sets, we find good evidence that, in the absence of a central illuminating source, the dust grains in dense molecular cloud cores with no internal radiation source cease to become aligned with the local magnetic field at optical depths greater than A{sub V}?20. A simple model relating the alignment efficiency to the optical depth into the cloud reproduces the observations well.

  9. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  10. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  11. Massive Quiescent Cores in Orion. -- II. Core Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, D; Goldsmith, P F; Langer, W D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have surveyed submillimeter continuum emission from relatively quiescent regions in the Orion molecular cloud to determine how the core mass function in a high mass star forming region compares to the stellar initial mass function. Such studies are important for understanding the evolution of cores to stars, and for comparison to formation processes in high and low mass star forming regions. We used the SHARC II camera on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory telescope to obtain 350 \\micron data having angular resolution of about 9 arcsec, which corresponds to 0.02 pc at the distance of Orion. Our analysis combining dust continuum and spectral line data defines a sample of 51 Orion molecular cores with masses ranging from 0.1 \\Ms to 46 \\Ms and a mean mass of 9.8 \\Ms, which is one order of magnitude higher than the value found in typical low mass star forming regions, such as Taurus. The majority of these cores cannot be supported by thermal pressure or turbulence, and are probably supercritical.They are th...

  12. Kansalliskirjasto Dublin Core Dublin Core metadataformaatin suomalainen versio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    - Medical Subject Headings 3. DDC - Dewey Decimal Classification 4. LCC - Library of Congress Classification: - Merkintäjärjestelmät: #12;Kansalliskirjasto Dublin Core 2(6) 1. LCSH - Library of Congress Subject Headings 2. MESH 5. UDC - Universal Decimal Classification Suomalaiset merkintäjärjestelmät katso sfs_aihe.pdf Kuvaus

  13. Core Values | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCool MagneticCoos BayCore FileCore

  14. Laminated grid and web magnetic cores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sefko, John (Monroeville, PA); Pavlik, Norman M. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laminated magnetic core characterized by an electromagnetic core having core legs which comprise elongated apertures and edge notches disposed transversely to the longitudinal axis of the legs, such as high reluctance cores with linear magnetization characteristics for high voltage shunt reactors. In one embodiment the apertures include compact bodies of microlaminations for more flexibility and control in adjusting permeability and/or core reluctance.

  15. Attack of fragmented-core debris on concrete in the presence of water. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Bradley, D.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the unlikely event that core debris escapes the reactor pressure vessel, the interactions of the debris with concrete, structural materials, and coolant become the driving force for severe accident phenomena. The Ex-Vessel Core Debris Interactions Program at Sandia National Laboratories is an experimental research effort to characterize these interactions and the magnitude of safety-related phenomena such as flammable gas generation, aerosol production, fission product release, and concrete attack. Major areas of study within the program include molten core simultants in contact with concrete, high pressure melt streaming into scaled reactor cavities, the addition of coolant to high-temperature melt/concrete interactions, and the attack of hot, solid core debris on concrete. This paper describes results from the last of these efforts, i.e., hot, but not molten debris attacking concrete.

  16. Thermalization in a Holographic Confining Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Takaaki; Rosen, Christopher

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time dependent perturbations of states in a 3+1 dimensional confining gauge theory are considered in the context of holography. The perturbations are induced by varying the gauge theory's coupling to a dimension three scalar operator in time. The dual gravitational theory belongs to a class of Einstein-dilaton theories which exhibit a mass gap at zero temperature and a first order deconfining phase transition at finite temperature. The perturbation is realized in various thermal bulk solutions by specifying time dependent boundary conditions on the scalar, and we solve the fully backreacted Einstein-dilaton equations of motion subject to these boundary conditions. We compute the characteristic time scale of many thermalization processes, noting that in every case we examine, this time scale is determined by the imaginary part of the lowest lying quasi-normal mode of the final state black brane. We quantify the dependence of this final state on parameters of the quench, and construct a dynamical phase diagram....

  17. Nonextensive lattice gauge theories: algorithms and methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael B. Frigori

    2014-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy phenomena presenting strong dynamical correlations, long-range interactions and microscopic memory effects are well described by nonextensive versions of the canonical Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical mechanics. After a brief theoretical review, we introduce a class of generalized heat-bath algorithms that enable Monte Carlo lattice simulations of gauge fields on the nonextensive statistical ensemble of Tsallis. The algorithmic performance is evaluated as a function of the Tsallis parameter q in equilibrium and nonequilibrium setups. Then, we revisit short-time dynamic techniques, which in contrast to usual simulations in equilibrium present negligible finite-size effects and no critical slowing down. As an application, we investigate the short-time critical behaviour of the nonextensive hot Yang-Mills theory at q- values obtained from heavy-ion collision experiments. Our results imply that, when the equivalence of statistical ensembles is obeyed, the long-standing universality arguments relating gauge theories and spin systems hold also for the nonextensive framework.

  18. Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew. MJ

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Distromet disdrometer model RD-80 and NovaLynx tipping bucket rain gauge model 260-2500E-12 are two devices deployed a few meters apart to measure the character and amount of liquid precipitation. The main purpose of the disdrometer is to measure drop size distribution, which it does over 20 size classes from 0.3 mm to 5.4 mm. The data from both instruments can be used to determine rain rate. The disdrometer results can also be used to infer several properties including drop number density, radar reflectivity, liquid water content, and energy flux. Two coefficients, N0 and ?, from an exponential fit between drop diameter and drop number density, are routinely calculated. Data are collected once a minute. The instruments make completely different kinds of measurements. Rain that falls on the disdrometer sensor moves a plunger on a vertical axis. The disdrometer transforms the plunger motion into electrical impulses whose strength is proportional to drop diameter. The rain gauge is the conventional tipping bucket type. Each tip collects an amount equivalent to 0.01 in. of water, and each tip is counted by a data acquisition system anchored by a Campbell CR1000 data logger.

  19. Thermalization in a Holographic Confining Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takaaki Ishii; Elias Kiritsis; Christopher Rosen

    2015-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Time dependent perturbations of states in a 3+1 dimensional confining gauge theory are considered in the context of holography. The perturbations are induced by varying the gauge theory's coupling to a dimension three scalar operator in time. The dual gravitational theory belongs to a class of Einstein-dilaton theories which exhibit a mass gap at zero temperature and a first order deconfining phase transition at finite temperature. The perturbation is realized in various thermal bulk solutions by specifying time dependent boundary conditions on the scalar, and we solve the fully backreacted Einstein-dilaton equations of motion subject to these boundary conditions. We compute the characteristic time scale of many thermalization processes, noting that in every case we examine, this time scale is determined by the imaginary part of the lowest lying quasi-normal mode of the final state black brane. We quantify the dependence of this final state on parameters of the quench, and construct a dynamical phase diagram. Further support for a universal scaling regime in the abrupt quench limit is provided.

  20. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alamgir, M.; Abraham, K.M.

    1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li[sup +]) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride). 3 figures.

  1. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alamgir, Mohamed (Dedham, MA); Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride).

  2. Studying the Breaking Mechanism of Polymer-Based In-Situ Gelled Acids using Solid Breaker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zhida

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    of this study is to examine the working mechanisms of the solid breaker and the factors that affect the breaking time. The flowback of the spent acid and the core damage induced by it will also be assessed in detail. Viscosity and rheological experimental...

  3. Solid State Reactor Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, G.T.

    2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas of research were undertaken: (1) establishing the design and safety-related basis via neutronic and reactor control assessments with the graphite foam as heat transfer medium; (2) evaluating the thermal performance of the graphite foam for heat removal, reactor stability, reactor operations, and overall core thermal characteristics; (3) characterizing the physical properties of the graphite foam under normal and irradiated conditions to determine any effects on structure, dimensional stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion; and (4) developing a power conversion system design to match the reactor operating parameters.

  4. Solid Waste Management (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute contains provisions for solid waste management systems, groundwater monitoring, liability for pollution, permitting, inspections, and provisions for waste reduction and recycling...

  5. Solid Waste Management Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection, transportation, processing, treatment, and disposal. It requires that municipalities submit plans for municipal...

  6. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, J.M.

    1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 {micro}m. 30 figs.

  7. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John M. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 .mu.m.

  8. Stability of Molten Core Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INL’s LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

  9. SOLID OXIDE PLANAR AND TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    SOLID OXIDE PLANAR AND TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS Dynamic Simulation Approach Modular Approach: Individual simulation modules for each fuel cell type · Tubular SOFC · Planar SOFC · MCFC · PEM Reformer · Slow pressure transients #12;Fuel Cell Assumptions · H2 electrochemically oxidized only · CO consumed

  10. Solid and gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, H.; Wells, A.W.; Frommell, E.A.; Flenory, P.B.

    1987-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This review covers methods of sampling, analyzing, and testing coal, coke, and coal-derived solids covered during the period of October 1984 through Sept 30, 1986. Energy Research Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts were used as the reference sources. In most categories the volume of material available made it necessary to limit the number of publications in the review. This review also surveys publications concerned with methods for the chemical, physical, and instrumental analyses of gaseous fuels and related materials. Articles of significance appearing in foreign journals and the patent literature that were not available at the time of the last review are also included. Chemical Abstracts and Energy Research Abstracts were used extensively as reference sources. Some selectivity was necessary in order to include the most pertinent publications in preparing this review.

  11. Solid state rapid thermocycling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A solid state heat exchanger with a first well and second well is coupled to a power module. A thermoelectric element is coupled to the first well, the second well, and the power module, is configured to transfer thermal energy from the first well to the second well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a first direction, and is configured to transfer thermal energy from the second well to the first well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a second direction. A controller may be coupled to the thermoelectric elements, and may switch the direction of current flowing through the thermoelectric element in response to a determination by sensors coupled to the wells that the amount of thermal energy in the wells falls below or exceeds a pre-determined threshold.

  12. Logging-while-coring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David S.; Myers, Gregory J.

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

  13. Logging-while-coring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David S. (New York, NY); Myers, Gregory J. (Cornwall, NY)

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

  14. On the WDVV equations in five-dimensional gauge theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. K. Hoevenaars; R. Martini

    2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well-known that the perturbative prepotentials of four-dimensional N=2 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories satisfy the generalized WDVV equations, regardless of the gauge group. In this paper we study perturbative prepotentials of the five-dimensional theories for some classical gauge groups and determine whether or not they satisfy the WDVV system.

  15. Non-Abelian discrete gauge symmetries in F-theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimm, Thomas W; Regalado, Diego

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of non-Abelian discrete gauge symmetries in four-dimensional F-theory compactifications is investigated. Such symmetries are shown to arise from seven-brane configurations in genuine F-theory settings without a weak string coupling description. Gauge fields on mutually non-local seven-branes are argued to gauge both R-R and NS-NS two-form bulk axions. The gauging is completed into a generalisation of the Heisenberg group with either additional seven-brane gauge fields or R-R bulk gauge fields. The former case relies on having seven-brane fluxes, while the latter case requires torsion cohomology and is analysed in detail through the M-theory dual. Remarkably, the M-theory reduction yields an Abelian theory that becomes non-Abelian when translated into the correct duality frame to perform the F-theory limit. The reduction shows that the gauge coupling function depends on the gauged scalars and transforms non-trivially as required for the groups encountered. This field dependence agrees with the exp...

  16. EFFECTS OF SPIN-TORSION IN GAUGE THEORY Chris Doran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    physical field. The connec- tion between torsion and quantum spin emerged later [2, 11, 12] when or observations. Within GTG, torsion is viewed as a physical field derived from the gravitational gauge fieldsEFFECTS OF SPIN-TORSION IN GAUGE THEORY GRAVITY Chris Doran , Anthony Lasenby, Anthony Challinor

  17. Tensor Networks for Lattice Gauge Theories with continuous groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Tagliacozzo; Alessio Celi; Maciej Lewenstein

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss how to formulate lattice gauge theories in the Tensor Network language. In this way we obtain both a consistent truncation scheme of the Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theories and a Tensor Network variational ansatz for gauge invariant states that can be used in actual numerical computation. Our construction is also applied to the simplest realization of the quantum link models/gauge magnets and provides a clear way to understand their microscopic relation with Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theories. We also introduce a new set of gauge invariant operators that modify continuously Rokshar-Kivelson wave functions and can be used to extend the phase diagram of known models. As an example we characterize the transition between the deconfined phase of the $Z_2$ lattice gauge theory and the Rokshar-Kivelson point of the U(1) gauge magnet in 2D in terms of entanglement entropy. The topological entropy serves as an order parameter for the transition but not the Schmidt gap.

  18. Bulk viscosity of gauge theory plasma at strong coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Buchel

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a lower bound on bulk viscosity of strongly coupled gauge theory plasmas. Using explicit example of the N=2^* gauge theory plasma we show that the bulk viscosity remains finite at a critical point with a divergent specific heat. We present an estimate for the bulk viscosity of QGP plasma at RHIC.

  19. Lattice Gauge Fields and Discrete Noncommutative Yang-Mills Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ambjorn; Y. M. Makeenko; J. Nishimura; R. J. Szabo

    2000-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a lattice formulation of noncommutative Yang-Mills theory in arbitrary even dimensionality. The UV/IR mixing characteristic of noncommutative field theories is demonstrated at a completely nonperturbative level. We prove a discrete Morita equivalence between ordinary Yang-Mills theory with multi-valued gauge fields and noncommutative Yang-Mills theory with periodic gauge fields. Using this equivalence, we show that generic noncommutative gauge theories in the continuum can be regularized nonperturbatively by means of {\\it ordinary} lattice gauge theory with 't~Hooft flux. In the case of irrational noncommutativity parameters, the rank of the gauge group of the commutative lattice theory must be sent to infinity in the continuum limit. As a special case, the construction includes the recent description of noncommutative Yang-Mills theories using twisted large $N$ reduced models. We study the coupling of noncommutative gauge fields to matter fields in the fundamental representation of the gauge group using the lattice formalism. The large mass expansion is used to describe the physical meaning of Wilson loops in noncommutative gauge theories. We also demonstrate Morita equivalence in the presence of fundamental matter fields and use this property to comment on the calculation of the beta-function in noncommutative quantum electrodynamics.

  20. Gauge invariant composite fields out of connections, with examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cédric Fournel; Jordan François; Serge Lazzarini; Thierry Masson

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we put forward a systematic and unifying approach to construct gauge invariant composite fields out of connections. It relies on the existence in the theory of a group valued field with a prescribed gauge transformation. As an illustration, we detail some examples. Two of them are based on known results: the first one provides a reinterpretation of the symmetry breaking mechanism of the electroweak part of the Standard Model of particle physics; the second one is an application to Einstein's theory of gravity described as a gauge theory in terms of Cartan connections. The last example depicts a new situation: starting with a gauge field theory on Atiyah Lie algebroids, the gauge invariant composite fields describe massive vector fields. Some mathematical and physical discussions illustrate and highlight the relevance and the generality of this approach.

  1. Coulomb gauge Gribov copies and the confining potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Heinzl; Kurt Langfeld; Martin Lavelle; David McMullan

    2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the approach, initiated by Marinari et al., to the static inter-quark potential based on Polyakov lines of finite temporal extent, evaluated in Coulomb gauge. We show that, at small spatial separations, the potential can be understood as being between two separately gauge invariant colour charges. At larger separations Gribov copies obstruct the non-perturbative identification of individually gauge invariant colour states. We demonstrate, for the first time, how gauge invariance can be maintained quite generally by averaging over Gribov copies. This allows us to extend the analysis of the Polyakov lines and the corresponding, gauge invariant quark-antiquark state to all distance scales. Using large scale lattice simulations, we show that this interpolating state possesses a good overlap with the ground state in the quark-antiquark sector and yields the full static inter-quark potential at all distances. A visual representation of the Gribov copies on the lattice is also presented.

  2. Noncommutative Gauge Field Theories: A No-Go Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Chaichian; P. Prešnajder; M. M. Sheikh-Jabbari; A. Tureanu

    2001-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying the general structure of the noncommutative (NC) local groups, we prove a no-go theorem for NC gauge theories. According to this theorem, the closure condition of the gauge algebra implies that: 1) the local NC $u(n)$ {\\it algebra} only admits the irreducible n by n matrix-representation. Hence the gauge fields are in n by n matrix form, while the matter fields {\\it can only be} in fundamental, adjoint or singlet states; 2) for any gauge group consisting of several simple-group factors, the matter fields can transform nontrivially under {\\it at most two} NC group factors. In other words, the matter fields cannot carry more than two NC gauge group charges. This no-go theorem imposes strong restrictions on the NC version of the Standard Model and in resolving the standing problem of charge quantization in noncommutative QED.

  3. Extended core for motor/generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An extended stator core in a motor/generator can be utilized to mitigate losses in end regions of the core and a frame of the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses, the stator core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent to or greater than a length of a magnetically active portion in the rotor. Alternatively, a conventional length stator core can be utilized with a shortened magnetically active portion to mitigate losses in the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses in the core caused by stator winding, the core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent or greater than a length of stator winding.

  4. Extended core for motor/generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An extended stator core in a motor/generator can be utilized to mitigate losses in end regions of the core and a frame of the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses, the stator core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent to or greater than a length of a magnetically active portion in the rotor. Alternatively, a conventional length stator core can be utilized with a shortened magnetically active portion to mitigate losses in the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses in the core caused by stator winding, the core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent or greater than a length of stator winding.

  5. OTDR strain gauge for smart skins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercel, S.W.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical time-domain reflectometry (OTDR) is a simple and rugged technique for measuring quantities such as strain that affect the propagation of light in an optical fiber. For engineering applications of OTDR, it is important to know the repeatable limits of its performance. The author constructed an OTDR-based, submillimeter resolution strain measurement system from off-the-shelf components. The systems repeatably resolves changes in time of flight to within {plus_minus}2 ps. Using a 1-m, single-mode fiber as a gauge and observing the time of flight between Fresnel reflections, a repeatable sensitivity of 400 microstrains was observed. Using the same fiber to connect the legs of a 3-dB directional coupler to form a loop, a repeatable sensitivity of 200 microstrains was observed. Realizable changes to the system that should improve the repeatable sensitivity to 20 microstrains or less are discussed.

  6. EARLY EVOLUTION OF PRESTELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horedt, G. P., E-mail: g.horedt@online.de [Kronwinkler 50, D-81245, Munich (Germany)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Prestellar cores are approximated by singular polytropic spheres. Their early evolution is studied analytically with a Bondi-like scheme. The considered approximation is meaningful for polytropic exponents {gamma} between 0 and 6/5, implying radial power-law density profiles between r {sup -1} and r {sup -2.5}. Gravitationally unstable Jeans and Bonnor-Ebert masses differ at most by a factor of 3.25. Tidally stable prestellar cores must have a mean density contrast {approx}> 8 with respect to the external parent cloud medium. The mass-accretion rate relates to the cube of equivalent sound speed, as in Shu's seminal paper. The prestellar masses accreted over 10{sup 5} years cover the whole stellar mass spectrum; they are derived in simple closed form, depending only on the polytropic equation of state. The stellar masses that can be formed via strict conservation of angular momentum are at most of the order of a brown dwarf.

  7. Processing of Activated Core Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

  8. Laminated electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.

    1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially abutting tapered laminations extending radially outwardly from a centerline axis to collectively define a radially inner bore and a radially outer circumference. Each of the laminations includes radially inner and outer edges and has a thickness increasing from the inner edge toward the outer edge to provide a substantially continuous path adjacent the circumference. This pump is used in nuclear fission reactors. 19 figs.

  9. TMI-2 core shipping preparations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, L.J.; (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Barkanic, R.J. (Bechtel North American Power Corporation (United States)); Conaway, W.T. II (GPU Nuclear Corporation, Three Mile Island, Middletown, PA (United States)); Schmoker, D.S. (Nuclear Packaging, Inc., Federal Way, WA (United States))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience.

  10. False Vacuum Lumps with the Fermionic Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yutaka Hosotani; Ramin G. Daghigh

    2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable gravitating lumps with a false vacuum core surrounded by the true vacuum in a scalar field potential exist in the presence of fermions at the core. These objects may exist in the universe at various scales.

  11. Scaling Turbo Boost to a 1000 cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S, Ananth Narayan; Fedorova, Alexandra

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intel Core i7 processor code named Nehalem provides a feature named Turbo Boost which opportunistically varies the frequencies of the processor's cores. The frequency of a core is determined by core temperature, the number of active cores, the estimated power consumption, the estimated current consumption, and operating system frequency scaling requests. For a chip multi-processor(CMP) that has a small number of physical cores and a small set of performance states, deciding the Turbo Boost frequency to use on a given core might not be difficult. However, we do not know the complexity of this decision making process in the context of a large number of cores, scaling to the 100s, as predicted by researchers in the field.

  12. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Solid Xenon Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balakishiyeva, Durdana N.; Saab, Tarek [University of Florida (United States); Mahapatra, Rupak [Texas A and M University (United States); Yoo, Jonghee [FNAL (United States)

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystals like Germanium and Silicon need to be grown in specialized facilities which is time and money costly. It takes many runs to test the detector once it's manufactured and mishaps are very probable. It is of a great challenge to grow big germanium crystals and that's why stacking them up in a tower is the only way at the moment to increase testing mass. Liquid Noble gas experiments experiencing contamination problems, their predicted energy resolution at 10 keV and lower energy range is not as good as predicted. Every experiment is targeting one specific purpose, looking for one thing. Why not to design an experiment that is diverse and build a detector that can search for Dark Matter, Solar Axions, Neutrinoless Double Beta decay, etc. Solid Xenon detector is such detector. We designed a simple Xenon crystal growing chamber that was put together at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The first phase of this experiment was to demonstrate that a good, crack free Xenon crystal can be grown (regardless of many failed attempts by various groups) and our first goal, 1 kg crystal, was successful.

  14. Optimal Solid Space Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory and computations are provided for building of optimal (minimum weight) solid space towers (mast) up to one hundred kilometers in height. These towers can be used for tourism; scientific observation of space, observation of the Earth surface, weather and upper atmosphere experiment, and for radio, television, and communication transmissions. These towers can also be used to launch spaceships and Earth satellites. These macroprojects are not expensive. They require strong hard material (steel). Towers can be built using present technology. Towers can be used (for tourism, communication, etc.) during the construction process and provide self-financing for further construction. The tower design does not require human work at high altitudes; the tower is separated into sections; all construction can be done at the Earth surface. The transport system for a tower consists of a small engine (used only for friction compensation) located at the Earth surface. Problems involving security, control, repair, and stability of the proposed towers are addressed in other cited publications.

  15. Illinois Solid Waste Management Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

     It is the purpose of this Act to reduce reliance on land disposal of solid waste, to encourage and promote alternative means of managing solid waste, and to assist local governments with solid...

  16. Eugene Solid Waste Management Market Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Eugene Solid Waste Management Market Analysis Prepared By: Mitchell Johnson Alex Sonnichsen #12;Eugene Solid Waste Management Market Analysis May 2012 Page 1 Summary This study examines the economic impact of the solid waste management system

  17. Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laufer, Michael Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a simulant fluid to match the dynamics of fuel pebbles andfuel pebbles through reactor cores with and without coupled fluid

  18. Stiffening solids with liquid inclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Style; Rostislav Boltyanskiy; Benjamin Allen; Katharine E. Jensen; Henry P. Foote; John S. Wettlaufer; Eric R. Dufresne

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    From bone and wood to concrete and carbon fibre, composites are ubiquitous natural and engineering materials. Eshelby's inclusion theory describes how macroscopic stress fields couple to isolated microscopic inclusions, allowing prediction of a composite's bulk mechanical properties from a knowledge of its microstructure. It has been extended to describe a wide variety of phenomena from solid fracture to cell adhesion. Here, we show experimentally and theoretically that Eshelby's theory breaks down for small liquid inclusions in a soft solid. In this limit, an isolated droplet's deformation is strongly size-dependent with the smallest droplets mimicking the behaviour of solid inclusions. Furthermore, in opposition to the predictions of conventional composite theory, we find that finite concentrations of small liquid inclusions enhance the stiffness of soft solids. A straight-forward extension of Eshelby's theory, accounting for the surface tension of the solid-liquid interface, explains our experimental observations. The counterintuitive effect of liquid-stiffening of solids is expected whenever droplet radii are smaller than an elastocapillary length, given by the ratio of the surface tension to Young's modulus of the solid matrix.

  19. Formulation of quantum mechanics in terms of gauge transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Vatsya

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Formulations of quantum mechanics incorporating the Weyl gauge transformations are studied in this article and developed further. In the process, impact of the method of observation on its outcome is interpreted in terms of the assigned gauges by incorporating properties of the corresponding experimental arrangement in defining them. Further, the assigned gauge is explicitly incorporated in the Feynman path integral formulation of quantum mechanics. The resulting wavefunction, which is not uniquely defined, represents a gauge equivalence class. The representative wavefunction is still obtained by the original path integral method. Methods to obtain the pertinent information about the assigned gauges supplementing the representative wavefunction are discussed. The probability density is shown to be a uniquely defined gauge invariant quantity but at the expense of some information describing the observable effects contained in gauge factors. In the standard quantum mechanics, a wavefunction is assumed to be defined within a phase factor while the probability density is phase-independent, paralleling these results. Also, the path integral method is used to deduce the Klein-Gordon equation for the representative wavefunction in the Riemannian spaces in a more streamlined manner than the previous derivations.

  20. FISSION REACTORS KEYWORDS: core-barrel vibra-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    FISSION REACTORS KEYWORDS: core-barrel vibra- tions, in-core neutron noise, shell- mode vibrations CALCULATION OF THE NEUTRON NOISE INDUCED BY SHELL-MODE CORE-BARREL VIBRATIONS IN A 1-D, TWO-GROUP, TWO-REGION SLAB REACTOR MODEL CARL SUNDE,* CHRISTOPHE DEMAZI�RE, and IMRE PÁZSIT Chalmers University of Technology

  1. UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team MINUTES November 19, 2012 Regents Room, Chapman Hall, 10 Strategic Planning Core team with oversight, coordination, and providing campus leadership with strategic strategic planning framework. c. Distinguished Core Team from Operational teams (Functional and Thematic). 4

  2. Solid Waste Management Act (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to establishing a comprehensive program of controlling all phases of solid waste management and assigning responsibilities for solid waste management to the Secretary of Department of...

  3. 100 MHz NMR Thorium (Solids) | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    100 MHz NMR Thorium (Solids) 100 MHz NMR Thorium (Solids) Research applications Samples containing paramagnetics Soils (SOM and NOM) Metal oxide materials for catalysis...

  4. Solid Waste Management Program (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Dakota's Solid Waste Management Program offers loans and grants for solid waste disposal, recycling, and waste tire projects. Funds are available for private or public projects, and...

  5. Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter establishes the permitting standards for solid waste sites or facilities, the standards applicable to all solid waste sites or facilities, and the standards for certification of...

  6. Is SU(2) lattice gauge theory a spin glass?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Grady

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A new order parameter is constructed for SU(2) lattice gauge theory in the context of the two-real-replica method normally used for spin glasses. The order parameter is sensitive to a global Z2 subgroup of the gauge symmetry which is seen to break spontaneously at $\\beta = 4/g^2 = 1.96\\pm 0.01$. No gauge fixing is required. Finite size scaling is consistent with a high-order paramagnet to spin glass transition with a critical exponent $\

  7. Quantized gauge-affine gravity in the superfiber bundle approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Meziane; M. Tahiri

    2005-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantization of gauge-affine gravity within the superfiber bundle formalism is proposed. By introducing an even pseudotensorial 1-superform over a principal superfibre bundle with superconnection, we obtain the geometrical Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) and anti-BRST transformations of the fields occurring in such a theory. Reducing the four-dimensional general affine group double-covering to the Poincare group double-covering we also find the BRST and anti-BRST transformations of the fields present in Einstein's gravity. Furthermore, we give a prescription leading to the construction of both BRST-invariant gauge-fixing action for gauge-affine gravity and Einstein's gravity.

  8. Simulating plasma instabilities in SU(3) gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Berges; D. Gelfand; S. Scheffler; D. Sexty

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute nonequilibrium dynamics of plasma instabilities in classical-statistical lattice gauge theory in 3+1 dimensions. The simulations are done for the first time for the SU(3) gauge group relevant for quantum chromodynamics. We find a qualitatively similar behavior as compared to earlier investigations in SU(2) gauge theory. The characteristic growth rates are about 25 % lower for given energy density, such that the isotropization process is slower. Measured in units of the characteristic screening mass, the primary growth rate is independent of the number of colors.

  9. Pure SU(3) lattice gauge theory using operators and states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. B. Bronzan

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study pure SU(3) gauge theory on a large lattice, using Schrodinger's equation. Our approximate solution uses a basis of roughly 1000 states. Gauge invariance is recovered when the color content of the ground state is extrapolated to zero. We are able to identify the gauge invariant excitations that remain when the extrapolation is performed. In the weak coupling limit, we obtain promising results when we compare the excitation energies (masses) to known results, which we derive. We discuss the application of our nonperturbative method to the regime where glueballs are present.

  10. Gauge Symmetry and Supersymmetry of Multiple M2-Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Bagger; Neil Lambert

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous work we proposed a field theory model for multiple M2-branes based on an algebra with a totally antisymmetric triple product. In this paper we gauge a symmetry that arises from the algebra's triple product. We then construct a supersymmetric theory that is consistent with all the symmetries expected of a multiple M2-brane theory: 16 supersymmetries, conformal invariance, and an SO(8) R-symmetry that acts on the eight transverse scalars. The gauge field is not dynamical. The result is a new type of maximally supersymmetric gauge theory in three dimensions.

  11. On the defect induced gauge and Yukawa fields in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corneliu Sochichiu

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider lattice deformations (both continuous and topological) in the hexagonal lattice Hubbard model in the tight binding approximation to graphene, involving operators with the range up to next-to-neighbor. In the low energy limit, we find that these deformations give rise to couplings of the electronic Dirac field to an external scalar (Yukawa) and gauge fields. The fields are expressed in terms of original defects. As a by-product we establish that the next-to-nearest order is the minimal range of deformations which produces the complete gauge and scalar fields. We consider an example of Stone--Wales defect, and find the associated gauge field.

  12. Experimental Methods to Estimate Accumulated Solids in Nuclear Waste Tanks - 13313

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, Mark R.; Steeper, Timothy J.; Steimke, John L. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy has a large number of nuclear waste tanks. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles, e.g., plutonium containing, could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to remove most of the solids. Then the volume and shape of the residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for plutonium were measured. This paper discusses the overall test results, which indicated heavy solids only accumulate during the first few transfer cycles, along with the techniques and equipment designed and employed in the test. Those techniques include: - Magnetic particle separator to remove stainless steel solids, the plutonium surrogate from a flowing stream. - Magnetic wand used to manually remove stainless steel solids from samples and the tank heel. - Photographs were used to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds by developing a composite of topographical areas. - Laser range finders to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds. - Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds. - Computer driven positioner that placed the laser range finders and the core sampler over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank in locations where jet velocities were low. These devices and techniques were very effective to estimate the movement, location, and concentrations of the solids representing plutonium and are expected to perform well at a larger scale. The operation of the techniques and their measurement accuracies will be discussed as well as the overall results of the accumulated solids test. (authors)

  13. Generator stator core vent duct spacer posts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, John Wesley (Schenectady, NY); Tong, Wei (Clifton Park, NY)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Generator stator cores are constructed by stacking many layers of magnetic laminations. Ventilation ducts may be inserted between these layers by inserting spacers into the core stack. The ventilation ducts allow for the passage of cooling gas through the core during operation. The spacers or spacer posts are positioned between groups of the magnetic laminations to define the ventilation ducts. The spacer posts are secured with longitudinal axes thereof substantially parallel to the core axis. With this structure, core tightness can be assured while maximizing ventilation duct cross section for gas flow and minimizing magnetic loss in the spacers.

  14. Cogeneration/Cogeneration - Solid Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyle, F. B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the rationale for cogeneration and basic turbine types available. Special considerations for cogeneration in conjunction with solid waste firing are outlined. Optimum throttle conditions for cogeneration are significantly...

  15. Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These sections articulate rules for the maintenance and operation of solid waste disposal facilities, as well as site assignment procedures. Applications for site assignment will be reviewed by the...

  16. Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws governs the operation of solid waste facilities. It seeks to encourage sustainable waste management practices and to mitigate adverse effects, such as...

  17. Solid Waste Management Rules (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules establish procedures and standards to protect public health and the environment by ensuring the safe, proper, and sustainable management of solid waste in Vermont. The rules apply to...

  18. Cogeneration/Cogeneration - Solid Waste 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyle, F. B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the rationale for cogeneration and basic turbine types available. Special considerations for cogeneration in conjunction with solid waste firing are outlined. Optimum throttle conditions for cogeneration are significantly...

  19. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, Daniel, A

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document we describe work done under the SciDAC-1 Project National Computerational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory. The objective of this project was to construct the computational infrastructure needed to study quantim chromodynamics (QCD). Nearly all high energy and nuclear physicists in the United States working on the numerical study of QCD are involved in the project, as are Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). A list of the serior participants is given in Appendix A.2. The project includes the development of community software for the effective use of the terascale computers, and the research and development of commodity clusters optimized for the study of QCD. The software developed as part of this effort is pubicly available, and is being widely used by physicists in the United States and abroad. The prototype clusters built with SciDAC-1 fund have been used to test the software, and are available to lattice guage theorists in the United States on a peer reviewed basis.

  20. Lepton Flavor Violation in Flavored Gauge Mediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Calibbi; Paride Paradisi; Robert Ziegler

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the anatomy and phenomenology of Lepton Flavor Violation (LFV) in the context of Flavored Gauge Mediation (FGM). Within FGM, the messenger sector couples directly to the MSSM matter fields with couplings controlled by the same dynamics that explains the hierarchies in the SM Yukawas. Although the pattern of flavor violation depends on the particular underlying flavor model, FGM provides a built-in flavor suppression similar to wave function renormalization or SUSY Partial Compositeness. Moreover, in contrast to these models, there is an additional suppression of left-right (LR) flavor transitions by third-generation Yukawas that in particular provides an extra protection against flavor-blind phases. We exploit the consequences of this setup for lepton flavor phenomenology, assuming that the new couplings are controlled by simple U(1) flavor models that have been proposed to accommodate large neutrino mixing angles. Remarkably, it turns out that in the context of FGM these models can pass the impressive constraints from LFV processes and leptonic EDMs even for light superpartners, therefore offering the possibility of resolving the longstanding muon g-2 anomaly.

  1. Particlelike solutions to classical noncommutative gauge theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, A. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct perturbative static solutions to the classical field equations of noncommutative U(1) gauge theory for the three cases: (a) space-time noncommutativity, (b) space-space noncommutativity, and (c) both (a) and (b). The solutions tend to the Coulomb solution at spatial infinity and are valid for intermediate values of the radial coordinate r. They yield a self-charge inside a sphere of radius r centered about the origin which increases with decreasing r for case (a), and decreases with decreasing r for case (b). For case (a) this may mean that the exact solution screens an infinite charge at the origin, while for case (b) it is plausible that the charge density is well behaved at the origin, as happens in Born-Infeld electrodynamics. For both cases (a) and (b) the self-energy in the intermediate region grows faster as r tends to the origin than that of the Coulomb solution. It then appears that the divergence of the classical self-energy is more severe in the noncommutative theory than it is in the corresponding commutative theory. We compute the lowest order effects of these solutions on the hydrogen atom spectrum and use them to put experimental bounds on the space-time and space-space noncommutative scales. For the former we get a significant improvement over previous bounds. We find that cases (a) and (b) have different experimental signatures.

  2. Gauge symmetry breaking in orbifold model building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Trapletti

    2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the gauge symmetry breaking mechanism due to orbifold projections in orbifold model building. We explicitly show the existence of a scale of breaking if such a symmetry breaking is due to freely-acting orbifold operators only, i.e. in case the breaking is realized non-locally in the internal space. We show that such a scale is related to the compactification moduli only, and that there are no extra continuous parameters, at least in semirealistic models with N=1 SUSY in four dimensions. In this sense, the mechanism is peculiarly different from the standard Higgs (or Hosotani) symmetry breaking mechanism. We show that the mechanism also differs from that present in standard orbifold models where, even in presence of discrete Wilson lines, a scale of breaking is generically missing, since the breaking is localized in specific points in the internal space. We review a set of background geometries where the described non-local breaking is realized, both in the case of two and six extra dimensions. In the latter case, relevant in string model building, we consider both heterotic and open string compactifications.

  3. Platinum Monolayer on IrFe Core–Shell Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki K.; Kuttiyiel, K.A.; Su, D.; Adzic, R.R.

    2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We synthesized high activity and stability platinum monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported IrFe core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing. The formation of Ir shells on IrFe solid-solution alloy cores has been verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Pt monolayers were deposited on IrFe core-shell nanoparticles by galvanic replacement of underpotentially deposited Cu adatoms on the Ir shell surfaces. The specific and Pt mass activities for the ORR on the Pt monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalyst are 0.46 mA/cm{sup 2} and 1.1 A/mg{sub Pt}, which are much higher than those on a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. High durability of Pt{sub ML}/IrFe/C has also been demonstrated by potential cycling tests. These high activity and durability observed can be ascribed to the structural and electronic interaction between the Pt monolayer and the IrFe core-shell nanoparticles.

  4. The universal criterion for switching a magnetic vortex core in soft magnetic nanodots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.-S.; Kim, S.-K.; Yu, Y.-S.; Choi, Y.-S.; Guslienko, K. Y.; Jung, H.; Fischer, P.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The universal criterion for ultrafast vortex core switching between core-up and -down vortex bi-states in soft magnetic nanodots was empirically investigated by micromagnetic simulations and combined with an analytical approach. Vortex-core switching occurs whenever the velocity of vortex core motion reaches a critical value, which is {nu}{sub c} = 330 {+-} 37 m/s for Permalloy, as estimated from numerical simulations. This critical velocity was found to be {nu}{sub c} = {eta}{sub c}{gamma} {radical}A{sub ex} with A{sub ex} the exchange stiffness, {gamma} the gyromagnetic ratio, and an estimated proportional constant {eta}{sub c} = 1.66 {+-} 0.18. This criterion does neither depend on driving force parameters nor on the dimension or geometry of the magnetic specimen. The phase diagrams for the vortex core switching criterion and its switching time with respect to both the strength and angular frequency of circular rotating magnetic fields were derived, which offer practical guidance for implementing vortex core switching into future solid state information storage devices.

  5. Core Competencies | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy Copy of FINAL SG DemoCore

  6. Core Universities | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCool MagneticCoos BayCore File

  7. Core Holes | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open EnergyAl., 1987) | Open

  8. Core Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands Jump|Information Dobson, EtCore

  9. Parity-violating vertices for spin-3 gauge fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boulanger, Nicolas; Leclercq, Serge; Cnockaert, Sandrine [Universite de Mons-Hainaut, Academie Wallonie-Bruxelles, Mecanique et Gravitation, Avenue du Champ de Mars 6, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes, U.L.B. Campus Plaine, C.P. 231, B-1050, Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of constructing consistent parity-violating interactions for spin-3 gauge fields is considered in Minkowski space. Under the assumptions of locality, Poincare invariance, and parity noninvariance, we classify all the nontrivial perturbative deformations of the Abelian gauge algebra. In space-time dimensions n=3 and n=5, deformations of the free theory are obtained which make the gauge algebra non-Abelian and give rise to nontrivial cubic vertices in the Lagrangian, at first order in the deformation parameter g. At second order in g, consistency conditions are obtained which the five-dimensional vertex obeys, but which rule out the n=3 candidate. Moreover, in the five-dimensional first-order deformation case, the gauge transformations are modified by a new term which involves the second de Wit-Freedman connection in a simple and suggestive way.

  10. Uniform Gauge for D1-brane in General Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluson, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct uniform gauge D1-brane action in general background. We also discuss how this action transforms under double Wick rotation and determine transformation properties of background fields.

  11. The Higgs boson as a gauge field in extra dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Serone

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    I review, at a general non-technical level, the main properties of models in extra dimensions where the Higgs field is identified with some internal component of a gauge field.

  12. Suppressions and cascades : insights from gauge/gravity dualities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ejaz, Qudsia Jabeen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At present, there are no non-perturbative analytic methods available for investigating gauge theories at large couplings. Consequently, it is desirable to explore more avenues to gain qualitative and quantitative insights. ...

  13. Gauging Employment Growth in Wisconsin: State-By-State Comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Gauging Employment Growth in Wisconsin: State; 2 Employment growth in Wisconsin continues to lag both the national rate of job growth as well as the rates of employment increase in most other states

  14. Gauge-invariant Green function dynamics: A unified approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swiecicki, Sylvia D., E-mail: sswiecic@physics.utoronto.ca; Sipe, J.E., E-mail: sipe@physics.utoronto.ca

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a gauge-invariant description of Green function dynamics introduced by means of a generalized Peirels phase involving an arbitrary differentiable path in space–time. Two other approaches to formulating a gauge-invariant description of systems, the Green function treatment of Levanda and Fleurov [M. Levanda, V. Fleurov, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 6 (1994) 7889] and the usual multipolar expansion for an atom, are shown to arise as special cases of our formalism. We argue that the consideration of paths in the generalized Peirels phase that do not lead to introduction of an effective gauge-invariant Hamiltonian with polarization and magnetization fields may prove useful for the treatment of the response of materials with short electron correlation lengths. -- Highlights: •Peirels phase for an arbitrary path in space–time established. •Gauge-invariant Green functions and the Power–Zienau–Wooley transformation connected. •Limitations on possible polarization and magnetization fields established.

  15. The gauge algebra of double field theory and Courant brackets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Chris

    We investigate the symmetry algebra of the recently proposed field theory on a doubled torus that describes closed string modes on a torus with both momentum and winding. The gauge parameters are constrained fields on the ...

  16. A gauge invariant cluster algorithm for the Ising spin glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Langfeld; M. Quandt; W. Lutz; H. Reinhardt

    2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The frustrated Ising model in two dimensions is revisited. The frustration is quantified in terms of the number of non-trivial plaquettes which is invariant under the Nishimori gauge symmetry. The exact ground state energy is calculated using Edmond's algorithm. A novel cluster algorithm is designed which treats gauge equivalent spin glasses on equal footing and allows for efficient simulations near criticality. As a first application, the specific heat near criticality is investigated.

  17. Cancellation of energy-divergences in Coulomb gauge QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Andraši; J. C. Taylor

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Coulomb gauge of nonabelian gauge theories there are in general, in individual graphs, 'energy-divergences' on integrating over the loop energy variable for fixed loop momentum. These divergences are avoided in the Hamiltonian, phase-space formulation. But, even in this formulation, energy-divergences re-appear at 2-loop order. We show in an example how these cancel between graphs as a consequence of Ward identities.

  18. Electroweak phase transition in a model with gauged lepton number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfredo Aranda; Enrique Jiménez; Carlos A. Vaquera-Araujo

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we study the electroweak phase transition in a model with gauged lepton number. Here, a family of vector-like leptons is required in order to cancel the gauge anomalies. Furthermore, these leptons can play an important role in the transition process. We find that this framework is able to provide a strong transition, but only for a very limited number of cases.

  19. A Maxwell's equations, Coulomb gauge analysis of two scatterers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowell, Kelly Jean

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A MAXWELL'S EQUATIONS, COULOMB GAUGE ANALYSIS OF TWO SCATTERERS A Thesis by KELLY JEAN CROWELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1990 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering A MAXWELL'S EQUATIONS, COULOMB GAUGE ANALYSIS OF TWO SCATTERERS A Thesis by KELLY JEAN CROWELL Approved as to style and content by: Robert D. Nevels (Chairman of Committee) D. R. Halverson...

  20. Noncommutative SU(N) gauge theory and asymptotic freedom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latas, D.; Radovanovic, V. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Trampetic, J. [Theoretical Physics Division, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we analyze a version of the SU(N) gauge theory on noncommutative space-time which is one-loop renormalizable to first order in the expansion in the noncommutativity parameter {theta}. The one-loop renormalizability is obtained through the modification of the initial 'minimal' action, with the gauge fields in the adjoint representation of SU(N), and by the renormalization of the noncommutativity parameter {theta}.

  1. Noncommuting Electric Fields and Algebraic Consistency in Noncommutative Gauge theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabin Banerjee

    2003-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that noncommuting electric fields occur naturally in $\\theta$-expanded noncommutative gauge theories. Using this noncommutativity, which is field dependent, and a hamiltonian generalisation of the Seiberg-Witten Map, the algebraic consistency in the lagrangian and hamiltonian formulations of these theories, is established. A comparison of results in different descriptions shows that this generalised map acts as canonical transformation in the physical subspace only. Finally, we apply the hamiltonian formulation to derive the gauge symmetries of the action.

  2. Superstring dominated early universe and epoch dependent gauge coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    1997-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We have explored the possibility that the universe at very early stage was dominated by (macroscopic) heterotic strings. We have found that the dimensionless parameter $G\\mu$ for the heterotic strings varies from $10^{-2}$ to $10^{-4}$ as the universe evolve from the matter dominance to radiation dominance. This led to the interesting consequence of epoch dependent gauge coupling constant. The gauge coupling constant at early times was found to be much stronger than the present strong interaction.

  3. Stability, creation and annihilation of charges in gauge theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilderton, Anton [School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)], E-mail: antoni@maths.tcd.ie; Lavelle, Martin [School of Computing and Mathematics, University of Plymouth, Plymouth PL48AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: martin.lavelle@plymouth.ac.uk; McMullan, David [School of Computing and Mathematics, University of Plymouth, Plymouth PL48AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: david.mcmullan@plymouth.ac.uk

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how to construct physical, minimal energy states for systems of static and moving charges. These states are manifestly gauge invariant. For charge-anticharge systems we also construct states in which the gauge fields are restricted to a finite volume around the location of the matter fields. Although this is an excited state, it is not singular, unlike all previous finite volume descriptions. We use our states to model the processes of pair creation and annihilation.

  4. The core legion object model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, M.; Grimshaw, A. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legion project at the University of Virginia is an architecture for designing and building system services that provide the illusion of a single virtual machine to users, a virtual machine that provides secure shared object and shared name spaces, application adjustable fault-tolerance, improved response time, and greater throughput. Legion targets wide area assemblies of workstations, supercomputers, and parallel supercomputers, Legion tackles problems not solved by existing workstation based parallel processing tools; the system will enable fault-tolerance, wide area parallel processing, inter-operability, heterogeneity, a single global name space, protection, security, efficient scheduling, and comprehensive resource management. This paper describes the core Legion object model, which specifies the composition and functionality of Legion`s core objects-those objects that cooperate to create, locate, manage, and remove objects in the Legion system. The object model facilitates a flexible extensible implementation, provides a single global name space, grants site autonomy to participating organizations, and scales to millions of sites and trillions of objects.

  5. On 3-gauge transformations, 3-curvatures, and Gray-categories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei, E-mail: wwang@zju.edu.cn [Department of Mathematics, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China)] [Department of Mathematics, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the 3-gauge theory, a 3-connection is given by a 1-form A valued in the Lie algebra g, a 2-form B valued in the Lie algebra h, and a 3-form C valued in the Lie algebra l, where (g,h,l) constitutes a differential 2-crossed module. We give the 3-gauge transformations from one 3-connection to another, and show the transformation formulae of the 1-curvature 2-form, the 2-curvature 3-form, and the 3-curvature 4-form. The gauge configurations can be interpreted as smooth Gray-functors between two Gray 3-groupoids: the path 3-groupoid P{sub 3}(X) and the 3-gauge group G{sup L} associated to the 2-crossed module L, whose differential is (g,h,l). The derivatives of Gray-functors are 3-connections, and the derivatives of lax-natural transformations between two such Gray-functors are 3-gauge transformations. We give the 3-dimensional holonomy, the lattice version of the 3-curvature, whose derivative gives the 3-curvature 4-form. The covariance of 3-curvatures easily follows from this construction. This Gray-categorical construction explains why 3-gauge transformations and 3-curvatures have the given forms. The interchanging 3-arrows are responsible for the appearance of terms with the Peiffer commutator (, )

  6. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, Elias (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

  7. Municipal Solid Waste in The United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    2007 Facts and Figures Municipal Solid Waste in The United States #12;United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste (5306P) EPA530-R-08-010 November 2008 www.epa.gov #12;MUNICIPAL SOLID ............................................................................................................................... 1 WHAT IS INCLUDED IN MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

  8. Municipal Solid Waste in The United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barlaz, Morton A.

    2011 Facts and Figures Municipal Solid Waste in The United States #12;United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste (5306P) EPA530-R-13-001 May 2013 www.epa.gov #12;MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE IN THE UNITED STATES: 2011 FACTS AND FIGURES Table of Contents Chapter Page MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

  9. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, E.

    1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon. 5 Figs.

  10. Jet quenching in hot strongly coupled gauge theories revisited: 3-point correlators with gauge-gravity duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Arnold; Diana Vaman

    2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of high-energy jet stopping in strongly-coupled plasmas have lacked a clear gauge-theory specification of the initial state. We show how to set up a well-defined gauge theory problem to study jet stopping in pure {\\cal N}=4 super Yang Mills theory (somewhat analogous to Hofman and Maldacena's studies at zero temperature) and solve it by using gauge-gravity duality for real-time, finite-temperature 3-point correlators. Previous studies have found that the stopping distance scales with energy as E^{1/3} (with disagreement on the gauge coupling dependence). We do find that none of the jet survives beyond this scale, but we find that almost all of our jet stops at a parametrically smaller scale proportional to (E L)^{1/4}, where L is the size of the space-time region where the jet is initially created.

  11. Low-energy U(1) x USp(2M) gauge theory from simple high-energy gauge group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sven Bjarke Gudnason; Kenichi Konishi

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an explicit example of the embedding of a near BPS low-energy (U(1) x USp(2M))/Z_2 gauge theory into a high-energy theory with a simple gauge group and adjoint matter content. This system possesses degenerate monopoles arising from the high-energy symmetry breaking as well as non-Abelian vortices due to the symmetry breaking at low energies. These solitons of different codimensions are related by the exact homotopy sequences.

  12. Strong-field approximation for intense-laser-atom processes: The choice of gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Milosevic, D.B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Becker, W. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong-field approximation (SFA) can be and has been applied in both length gauge and velocity gauge with quantitatively conflicting answers. For ionization of negative ions with a ground state of odd parity, the predictions of the two gauges differ qualitatively: in the envelope of the angular-resolved energy spectrum, dips in one gauge correspond to humps in the other. We show that the length-gauge SFA matches the exact numerical solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation.

  13. A new look at the problem of gauge invariance in quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dan Solomon

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum field theory is assumed to be gauge invariant. However it is well known that when certain quantities are calculated using perturbation theory the results are not gauge invariant. The non-gauge invariant terms have to be removed in order to obtain a physically correct result. In this paper we will examine this problem and determine why a theory that is supposed to be gauge invariant produces non-gauge invariant results.

  14. Solid oxide electrochemical reactor science.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Neal P. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO); Stechel, Ellen Beth; Moyer, Connor J. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO); Ambrosini, Andrea; Key, Robert J. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-oxide electrochemical cells are an exciting new technology. Development of solid-oxide cells (SOCs) has advanced considerable in recent years and continues to progress rapidly. This thesis studies several aspects of SOCs and contributes useful information to their continued development. This LDRD involved a collaboration between Sandia and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) ins solid-oxide electrochemical reactors targeted at solid oxide electrolyzer cells (SOEC), which are the reverse of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC). SOECs complement Sandia's efforts in thermochemical production of alternative fuels. An SOEC technology would co-electrolyze carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with steam at temperatures around 800 C to form synthesis gas (H{sub 2} and CO), which forms the building blocks for a petrochemical substitutes that can be used to power vehicles or in distributed energy platforms. The effort described here concentrates on research concerning catalytic chemistry, charge-transfer chemistry, and optimal cell-architecture. technical scope included computational modeling, materials development, and experimental evaluation. The project engaged the Colorado Fuel Cell Center at CSM through the support of a graduate student (Connor Moyer) at CSM and his advisors (Profs. Robert Kee and Neal Sullivan) in collaboration with Sandia.

  15. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Solid Lighting Core Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiangeng Xue; Elliot Douglas

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate an ultra-effective light extraction mechanism that can be universally applied to all top-emitting white OLEDs (TE-WOLEDs) and can be integrated with thin film encapsulation techniques. The scope of work proposed in this project includes four major areas: (1) optical modeling; (2) microlens and array fabrication; (3) fabrication, encapsulation, and characterization of TE-WOLEDs; and (4) full device integration and characterization. First, the light extraction efficiency in a top-emitting OLED with or without a microlens array are modeled using wave optics. Second, individual microlenses and microlens arrays are fabricated by inkjet printing of microdroplets of a liquid thiol-ene monomer with high refractive index followed by photopolymerization. Third, high efficiency top-emitting white OLEDs are fabricated, and fully characterized. Finally, optimized microlens arrays are fabricated on TE-WOLEDs with dielectric barrier layers. The overall light extraction efficiency of these devices, as well as its wavelength and angular dependencies, are measured by comparing the efficiencies of devices with and without microlens arrays. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the feasibility of applying inkjet printed microlens arrays to enhance the light extraction efficiency of top-emitting white OLEDs. We have shown that the geometry (contact angle) of the printed microlenses can be controlled by controlling the surface chemistry prior to printing the lenses. A 90% enhancement in the light extraction efficiency has been achieved with printed microlens array on a top-emitting white OLED, which can be further improved to 140% using a more close-packed microlens array fabricated from a molding process. Future work will focus on improvement of the microlens fabrication process to improve the array fill factor and the contact angle, as well as use transparent materials with a higher index of refraction. We will also further optimize the procedures for integrating the microlenses on the top-emitting white OLEDs and characterize the overall light extraction enhancement factor when the microlens array is attached.

  16. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Solid State Lighting Core Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franky So; Paul Holloway; Jiangeng Xue

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The project objective is to demonstrate high efficiency white emitting OLED devices with a target luminous efficiency between 100 1m/W and 150 1m/W with integrated microcavity structure and down conversion phosphors. The main focus of this work will be on three areas: (1) demonstration of a 2X reduction in OLED device operating voltage by employing the appropriate dopants in the carrier transporting layers; (2) demonstration of a 3X light out-coupling efficiency enhancement by incorporating microcavity structure in the OLED devices; and (3) demonstration of a 2X down-conversion efficiency enhancement (from blue to white) using phosphors.

  17. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Pigarov, Alexander

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project of Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program was aimed at providing a high-fidelity whole-tokamak modeling for the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program and ITER through coupling separate components for each of the core region, edge region, and wall, with realistic plasma particles and power sources and turbulent transport simulation. The project also aimed at developing advanced numerical algorithms, efficient implicit coupling methods, and software tools utilizing the leadership class computing facilities under Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The FACETS project was conducted by a multi-discipline, multi-institutional teams, the Lead PI was J.R. Cary (Tech-X Corp.). In the FACETS project, the Applied Plasma Theory Group at the MAE Department of UCSD developed the Wall and Plasma-Surface Interaction (WALLPSI) module, performed its validation against experimental data, and integrated it into the developed framework. WALLPSI is a one-dimensional, coarse grained, reaction/advection/diffusion code applied to each material boundary cell in the common modeling domain for a tokamak. It incorporates an advanced model for plasma particle transport and retention in the solid matter of plasma facing components, simulation of plasma heat power load handling, calculation of erosion/deposition, and simulation of synergistic effects in strong plasma-wall coupling.

  18. Formulation of spinors in terms of gauge fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiv R. Vatsya

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown in the present paper that the transformation relating a parallel transported vector in a Weyl space to the original one is the product of a multiplicative gauge transformation and a proper orthochronous Lorentz transformation. Such a Lorentz transformation admits a spinor representation, which is obtained and used to deduce the transportation properties of a Weyl spinor, which are then expressed in terms of a composite gauge group defined as the product of a multiplicative gauge group and the spinor group. These properties render a spinor amenable to its treatment as a particle coupled to a multidimensional gauge field in the framework of the Kaluza-Klein formulation extended to multidimensional gauge fields. In this framework, a fiber bundle is constructed with a horizontal, base space and a vertical, gauge space, which is a Lie group manifold, termed its structure group. For the present, the base is the Minkowski spacetime and the vertical space is the composite gauge group mentioned above. The fiber bundle is equipped with a Riemannian structure, which is used to obtain the classical description of motion of a spinor. In its classical picture, a Weyl spinor is found to behave as a spinning charged particle in translational motion. The corresponding quantum description is deduced from the Klein-Gordon equation in the Riemann spaces obtained by the methods of path-integration. This equation in the present fiber bundle reduces to the equation for a spinor in the Weyl geometry, which is close to but differs somewhat from the squared Dirac equation.

  19. Coupled Full-Core Problem witssh VERA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inc Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Core Physics, Inc. Southern States Energy Board City University of New York Texas A&M University Florida State University University of...

  20. Material with core-shell structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhrs, Claudia (Rio Rancho, NM); Richard, Monique N. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dehne, Aaron (Maumee, OH); Phillips, Jonathan (Rio Rancho, NM); Stamm, Kimber L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Fanson, Paul T. (Brighton, MI)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  1. Compression of solid CO/sub 2/ at 296 K to 10 GPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, B.

    1982-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume of solid CO/sub 2/ was measured at 296 K from 1 to 10 GPa using a high pressure, x-ray diffraction technique. The compression of NaF was used as the pressure gauge. The data are converted to the velocity plane and linearly fit. The volumes and bulk moduli are calculated from the fit as a function of pressure. Previous compression studies are discussed and a recent a priori calculation is shown to agree well with the present data.

  2. Solid-Liquid Interfacial Premelting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yang; Asta, Mark; Laird, Brian Bostian

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    liquid-liquid miscibility gap, negligible solubility of Pb in the Al solid phase, and a large melting point separa- tion (600 K for Pb and 933 K for Al). We have previously reported results from MD simulations on this system at 625 K, a temperature just... undergoes a roughening transition about 100 K below the melting point of Al. Simulation details.—In our simulations of the Al-Pb solid-liquid interface, we employ a classical many-body potential developed by Landa et al. [42] to model the inter- atomic...

  3. Solid-state lithium battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  4. Solid evacuated microspheres of hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turnbull, Robert J. (Urbana, IL); Foster, Christopher A. (Champaign, IL); Hendricks, Charles D. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for producing solid, evacuated microspheres comprised of hydrogen. The spheres are produced by forming a jet of liquid hydrogen and exciting mechanical waves on the jet of appropriate frequency so that the jet breaks up into drops with a bubble formed in each drop by cavitation. The drops are exposed to a pressure less than the vapor pressure of the liquid hydrogen so that the bubble which is formed within each drop expands. The drops which contain bubbles are exposed to an environment having a pressure just below the triple point of liquid hydrogen and they thereby freeze giving solid, evacuated spheres of hydrogen.

  5. TRANSITION PATH SAMPLING STUDIES OF SOLID-SOLID TRANSFORMATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruenwald, Michael

    isomerizations, or transport processes in solids, are characterized by widely disparate timescales. While. Many processes occurring in nature and technology such as the folding of a protein or the transport the freezing point, can remain in this supercooled state for hours or even days. Thus, the time scale

  6. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gasenzer, Thomas [Universitat Heidelberg, Institut fur Theoretische Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); GSI, ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany); McLerran, Larry [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, RIKEN BNL Research Center Upton NY (United States); China Central Normal University, Physics Department, Wuhan (China); Pawlowski, Jan M [Universitat Heidelberg, Institut fur Theoretische Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); GSI, ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany); Sexty, Denes [Universitat Heidelberg, Institut fur Theoretische Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); GSI, ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  7. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixedmore »point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.« less

  8. Gauge/Gravity Theory with Running Dilaton and Running Axion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girma Hailu

    2007-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new gauge/gravity duality construction of the Klebanov-Strassler throat which takes corrections to the anomalous mass dimension proposed in [1] into account on the gauge theory side and both the dilaton and the axion run on the gravity side. The corresponding supergravity solutions are found using equations for type IIB flows with N=1 supersymmetry obtained in [2]. We find that magnetic couplings of the axion to D7-branes filling 4-d spacetime and wrapping 4-cycles at locations of duality transitions and invisible Dirac 8-branes whose worldvolume emanates from the worldvolume of the D7-branes are the sources for the runnings of the dilaton and the axion. Our construction provides the first explicit example of a gauge/gravity duality mapping with a running dilaton or a running axion which is an important component towards finding gravity duals to gauge theories with physically more interesting renormalization group flows such as pure confining gauge theories in four dimensions. The D7-branes also serve as gravitational source for Seiberg duality transitions. The supergravity background has distinct features which could be useful for constructing cosmological models and studying possibilities for probing stringy signatures from the early universe.

  9. Gauge-preheating and the end of axion inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adshead, Peter; Scully, Timothy R; Sfakianakis, Evangelos I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the onset of the reheating epoch at the end of axion-driven inflation where the axion is coupled to an Abelian, $U(1)$, gauge field via a Chern-Simons interaction term. We focus primarily on $m^2\\phi^2$ inflation and explore the possibility that preheating can occur for a range of coupling values consistent with recent observations and bounds on the overproduction of primordial black holes. We find that for a wide range of parameters preheating is efficient. In certain cases the inflaton is seen to transfer all its energy to the gauge fields within a few oscillations. We find that the gauge fields on sub-horizon scales end in an unpolarized state, due to the existence of strong rescattering between the inflaton and gauge modes. We also present a preliminary study of an axion monodromy model coupled to $U(1)$ gauge fields, seeing a similarly efficient preheating behavior as well as indications that the coupling strength has an effect on the creation of oscillons.

  10. Noncommutative gauge theory and symmetry breaking in matrix models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosse, Harald; Steinacker, Harold [Department of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Lizzi, Fedele [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); High Energy Physics Group, Departament d'Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos Universitat de Barcelona Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how the fields and particles of the standard model can be naturally realized in noncommutative gauge theory. Starting with a Yang-Mills matrix model in more than four dimensions, an SU(n) gauge theory on a Moyal-Weyl space arises with all matter and fields in the adjoint of the gauge group. We show how this gauge symmetry can be broken spontaneously down to SU(3){sub c}xSU(2){sub L}xU(1){sub Q}[resp. SU(3){sub c}xU(1){sub Q}], which couples appropriately to all fields in the standard model. An additional U(1){sub B} gauge group arises which is anomalous at low energies, while the trace-U(1) sector is understood in terms of emergent gravity. A number of additional fields arise, which we assume to be massive, in a pattern that is reminiscent of supersymmetry. The symmetry breaking might arise via spontaneously generated fuzzy spheres, in which case the mechanism is similar to brane constructions in string theory.

  11. Geometrical Hyperbolic Systems for General Relativity and Gauge Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Abrahams; A. Anderson; Y. Choquet-Bruhat; J. W. York Jr

    1996-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution equations of Einstein's theory and of Maxwell's theory---the latter used as a simple model to illustrate the former--- are written in gauge covariant first order symmetric hyperbolic form with only physically natural characteristic directions and speeds for the dynamical variables. Quantities representing gauge degrees of freedom [the spatial shift vector $\\beta^{i}(t,x^{j})$ and the spatial scalar potential $\\phi(t,x^{j})$, respectively] are not among the dynamical variables: the gauge and the physical quantities in the evolution equations are effectively decoupled. For example, the gauge quantities could be obtained as functions of $(t,x^{j})$ from subsidiary equations that are not part of the evolution equations. Propagation of certain (``radiative'') dynamical variables along the physical light cone is gauge invariant while the remaining dynamical variables are dragged along the axes orthogonal to the spacelike time slices by the propagating variables. We obtain these results by $(1)$ taking a further time derivative of the equation of motion of the canonical momentum, and $(2)$ adding a covariant spatial derivative of the momentum constraints of general relativity (Lagrange multiplier $\\beta^{i}$) or of the Gauss's law constraint of electromagnetism (Lagrange multiplier $\\phi$). General relativity also requires a harmonic time slicing condition or a specific generalization of it that brings in the Hamiltonian constraint when we pass to first order symmetric form. The dynamically propagating gravity fields straightforwardly determine the ``electric'' or ``tidal'' parts of the Riemann tensor.

  12. DISTRIBUTION COEFICIENTS (KD) GENERATED FROM A CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Core samples originating from Vault 4, Cell E of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) were collected in September of 2008 (Hansen and Crawford 2009, Smith 2008) and sent to SRNL to measure chemical and physical properties of the material including visual uniformity, mineralogy, microstructure, density, porosity, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), and chemical composition. Some data from these experiments have been reported (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). In this study, leaching experiments were conducted with a single core sample under conditions that are representative of saltstone performance. In separate experiments, reducing and oxidizing environments were targeted to obtain solubility and Kd values from the measurable species identified in the solid and aqueous leachate. This study was designed to provide insight into how readily species immobilized in saltstone will leach from the saltstone under oxidizing conditions simulating the edge of a saltstone monolith and under reducing conditions, targeting conditions within the saltstone monolith. Core samples were taken from saltstone poured in December of 2007 giving a cure time of nine months in the cell and a total of thirty months before leaching experiments began in June 2010. The saltstone from Vault 4, Cell E is comprised of blast furnace slag, class F fly ash, portland cement, and Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) Batch 2 salt solution. The salt solution was previously analyzed from a sample of Tank 50 salt solution and characterized in the 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) report (Zeigler and Bibler 2009). Subsequent to Tank 50 analysis, additional solution was added to the tank solution from the Effluent Treatment Project as well as from inleakage from Tank 50 pump bearings (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). Core samples were taken from three locations and at three depths at each location using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit (1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; 3-1, 3-2, 3-3) (Hansen and Crawford 2009). Leaching experiments were conducted with a section of core sample 3-2. All cores from location 3 were drilled without using water. Core sample 3-2 was drilled from approximately six inches to a depth of approximately 13 inches. Approximately six inches of the core was removed but it broke into two pieces during removal from the bit. At the time of drilling, core material appeared olive green in color (Smith 2008). The fact that the samples were cored as olive green and were received after storage with a gray outer layer is indicative that some oxidation had occurred prior to leaching studies.

  13. Core-Level Activity Prediction for Multi-Core Power Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    1 Core-Level Activity Prediction for Multi-Core Power Management W. Lloyd Bircher1 and Lizy, University of Texas at Austin Abstract - Existing power management techniques operate by reducing performance generated by the workloads on individual cores. This causes sub-optimal power management and over

  14. Core Science Requirement Final Document Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagalante, Anthony F.

    Core Science Requirement ­ Final Document ­ Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and MENDEL SCIENCE EXPERIENCE COURSES Core requirement of 2 semesters of science with laboratory; requirement to be met by the end of the sophomore year Rationale Science literacy is an integral part of the intellectual

  15. Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction,...

  16. Pre-supernova neutrino emissions from ONe cores in the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae: are they distinguishable from those of Fe cores?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kato, Chinami; Yamada, Shoichi; Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Takashi; Ishidoshiro, Koji

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aiming to distinguish two types of progenitors of core collapse supernovae, i.e., one with a core composed mainly of oxygen and neon (abbreviated as ONe core) and the other with an iron core (or Fe core), we calculated the luminosities and spectra of neutrinos emitted from these cores prior to gravitational collapse, taking neutrino oscillation into account. We found that the total energies emitted as $\\bar{\

  17. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Di Croce, A. Michael (Murrysville, PA); Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA)

    1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row.

  18. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Di Croce, A.M.; Draper, R.

    1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row. 5 figures.

  19. Solid lithium-ion electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ji-Guang (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li.sub.2 O--CeO.sub.2 --SiO.sub.2 system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications.

  20. Solid lithium-ion electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, J.G.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li{sub 2}O--CeO{sub 2}--SiO{sub 2} system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications. 12 figs.

  1. Solid-state radioluminescent compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Gill, John T. (Miamisburg, OH); Hawkins, Daniel B. (Fairbanks, AK); Renschler, Clifford L. (Tijeras, NM); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Smith, Henry M. (Overland Park, KS)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state radioluminescent composition for light source comprises an optically clear polymer organic matrix containing tritiated organic materials and dyes capable of "red" shifting primary scintillation emissions from the polymer matrix. The tritiated organic materials are made by reducing, with tritium, an unsaturated organic compound that prior to reduction contains olefinic or alkynylic bonds.

  2. The Formation and Evolution of Prestellar Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe André; Shantanu Basu; Shu-ichiro Inutsuka

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving our understanding of the initial conditions and earliest stages of star formation is crucial to gain insight into the origin of stellar masses, multiple systems, and protoplanetary disks. We review the properties of low-mass dense cores as derived from recent millimeter/submillimeter observations of nearby molecular clouds and discuss them in the context of various contemporary scenarios for cloud core formation and evolution. None of the extreme scenarios can explain all observations. Pure laminar ambipolar diffusion has relatively long growth times for typical ionization levels and has difficulty satisfying core lifetime constraints. Purely hydrodynamic pictures have trouble accounting for the inefficiency of core formation and the detailed velocity structure of individual cores. A possible favorable scenario is a mixed model involving gravitational fragmentation of turbulent molecular clouds close to magnetic criticality. The evolution of the magnetic field and angular momentum in individual cloud cores after the onset of gravitational collapse is also discussed. In particular, we stress the importance of radiation-magnetohydrodynamical processes and resistive MHD effects during the protostellar phase. We also emphasize the role of the formation of the short-lived first (protostellar) core in providing a chance for sub-fragmentation into binary systems and triggering MHD outflows. Future submillimeter facilities such as Herschel and ALMA will soon provide major new observational constraints in this field. On the theoretical side, an important challenge for the future will be to link the formation of molecular clouds and prestellar cores in a coherent picture.

  3. UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team Minutes Tuesday, December 18, 2012 Regents Room, Chapman Hall, 8-10 a.m. 1. Welcome and meeting objectives 2. Core Team Suggested Guidelines ("Ground Rules") a. Communication (within team and with across campus and others) Input is always welcomed Open communication

  4. UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

  5. Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments Christiane Jablonowski (University of Michigan-13/2006 #12;Motivation · Test cases for 3D dynamical cores on the sphere ­ are hard to find in the literature groups ­ lack standardized & easy-to-use analysis techniques · Idea: Establish a collection of test cases

  6. Lateral restraint assembly for reactor core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorholt, Wilhelm (San Diego, CA); Luci, Raymond K. (Del Mar, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A restraint assembly for use in restraining lateral movement of a reactor core relative to a reactor vessel wherein a plurality of restraint assemblies are interposed between the reactor core and the reactor vessel in circumferentially spaced relation about the core. Each lateral restraint assembly includes a face plate urged against the outer periphery of the core by a plurality of compression springs which enable radial preloading of outer reflector blocks about the core and resist low-level lateral motion of the core. A fixed radial key member cooperates with each face plate in a manner enabling vertical movement of the face plate relative to the key member but restraining movement of the face plate transverse to the key member in a plane transverse to the center axis of the core. In this manner, the key members which have their axes transverse to or subtending acute angles with the direction of a high energy force tending to move the core laterally relative to the reactor vessel restrain such lateral movement.

  7. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  8. Experto Universitario Java Sesin 1: Spring core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA Spring core Puntos a tratar 2 #12;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA Spring core

  9. Method and apparatus for recovering unstable cores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGuire, Patrick L. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus suitable for stabilizing hydrocarbon cores are given. Such stabilized cores have not previously been obtainable for laboratory study, and such study is believed to be required before the hydrate reserves can become a utilizable resource. The apparatus can be built using commercially available parts and is very simple and safe to operate.

  10. Module Handbook Core Univ. of Oldenburg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    Energy Conversion Process · Location Dependence of Wind Energy Potential and Wind Energy Forecasting/EUREC Course 2008/2009 #12;EUREC Core Courses at University of Oldenburg, 1st Semester Wind Energy Module Module Description: Wind Energy Field: Core Oldenburg Courses: Wind Energy Wind Energy

  11. MATERIALS CURRICULUM Major: Core Courses : 21 Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, N.

    :0 Diffusion in Solids MT 225 3:0 Deformation and Failure Mechanisms at Elevated Temperatures MT 233 3, and nanotechnology. MT 101 3:0 January (4th Semester) Introduction to Materials Science Bonding, types of materials of structural characterization. Thermodynamics of solid solutions, phase diagrams, defects, diffusion

  12. Matrix product states for Hamiltonian lattice gauge theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boye Buyens; Karel Van Acoleyen; Jutho Haegeman; Frank Verstraete

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade tensor network states (TNS) have emerged as a powerful tool for the study of quantum many body systems. The matrix product states (MPS) are one particular case of TNS and are used for the simulation of 1+1 dimensional systems. In [1] we considered the MPS formalism for the simulation of the Hamiltonian lattice gauge formulation of 1+1 dimensional one flavor quantum electrodynamics, also known as the massive Schwinger model. We deduced the ground state and lowest lying excitations. Furthermore, we performed a full quantum real-time simulation for a quench with a uniform background electric field. In this proceeding we continue our work on the Schwinger model. We demonstrate the advantage of working with gauge invariant MPS by comparing with MPS simulations on the full Hilbert space, that includes numerous non-physical gauge variant states. Furthermore, we compute the chiral condensate and recover the predicted UV-divergent behavior.

  13. Smooth interpolation of lattice gauge fields by signal processing methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James E. Hetrick

    1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We digitally filter the Fourier modes of the link angles of an abelian lattice gauge field which produces the Fourier modes of a continuum $A_\\mu(x)$ that exactly reproduces the lattice links through their definition as phases of finite parallel transport. The constructed interpolation is smooth ($C^\\infty$), free from transition functions, and gauge equivariant. After discussing some properties of this interpolation, we discuss the non-abelian generalization of the method, arriving for SU(2), at a Cayley parametrization of the links in terms of the Fourier modes of $A^c_\\mu(x)$. We then discuss the use of a maximum entropy type method to address gauge invariance in the non-abelian case.

  14. Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, B.W.

    1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge. 3 figures.

  15. Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

  16. Highly Effective Action from Large N Gauge Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyun Seok Yang

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently John H. Schwarz put forward a conjecture that the world-volume action of a probe D3-brane in an AdS5 x S5 background of type IIB superstring theory can be reinterpreted as the highly effective action (HEA) of four-dimensional N=4 superconformal field theory on the Coulomb branch. We argue that the HEA can be derived from the noncommutative (NC) field theory representation of the AdS/CFT correspondence and the Seiberg-Witten (SW) map defining a spacetime field redefinition between ordinary and NC gauge fields. It is based only on the well-known facts that the master fields of large N matrices are higher-dimensional NC U(1) gauge fields and the SW map is a local coordinate transformation eliminating U(1) gauge fields known as the Darboux theorem in symplectic geometry.

  17. Quantized gauge-affine gravity in the superfiber bundle approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meziane, A.; Tahiri, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite d'Oran Es-senia, 31100 Oran (Algeria)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantization of gauge-affine gravity within the superfiber bundle formalism is proposed. By introducing an even pseudotensorial 1-superform over a principal superfiber bundle with superconnection, we obtain the geometrical Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) and anti-BRST transformations of the fields occurring in such a theory. Reducing the four-dimensional general affine group double-covering GA(4,R) to the Poincare group double-covering ISO(1,3) we also find the BRST and anti-BRST transformations of the fields present in Einstein's gravity. Furthermore, we give a prescription leading to the construction of both BRST-invariant gauge-fixing action for gauge-affine gravity and Einstein's gravity.

  18. CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandvik, Tobias

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    cores with 4 · 106 transistors each gives 10 times the performance as 1 big core 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 x 108Number of transistors P e r f o r m a n c e CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors – p.8/36 Everyone is going parallel Every major chip vendor... on Many-core Processors – p.22/36 Stencil operations Evaluate ?2u?x2 on a regular grid: DO K=2,NK-1 DO J=2,NJ-1 DO I=2,NI-1 D2UDX2(I,J,K) = (U(I+1,J,K) - 2.0*U(I,J,K) + & U(I-1,J,K))/(DX*DX) END DO END DO END DO CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors – p.23...

  19. PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  20. Muon g-2 Anomaly and Dark Leptonic Gauge Boson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hye-Sung [W& M

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major motivations to search for a dark gauge boson of MeV-GeV scale is the long-standing muon g-2 anomaly. Because of active searches such as fixed target experiments and rare meson decays, the muon g-2 favored parameter region has been rapidly reduced. With the most recent data, it is practically excluded now in the popular dark photon model. We overview the issue and investigate a potentially alternative model based on the gauged lepton number or U(1)_L, which is under different experimental constraints.

  1. Janis-Newman algorithm: simplifications and gauge field transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harold Erbin

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Janis-Newman algorithm is an old but very powerful tool to generate rotating solutions from static ones through a set of complex coordinate transformations. Several solutions have been derived in this way, including solutions with gauge fields. However, the transformation of the latter was so far always postulated as an ad hoc result. In this paper we propose a generalization of the procedure, extending it to the transformation of the gauge field. We also present a simplification of the algorithm due to G. Giampieri. We illustrate our prescription on the Kerr-Newman solution.

  2. Gauge Theory of Gravity Requires Massive Torsion Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer W. Kuhne

    1998-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the greatest unsolved issues of the physics of this century is to find a quantum field theory of gravity. According to a vast amount of literature unification of quantum field theory and gravitation requires a gauge theory of gravity which includes torsion and an associated spin field. Various models including either massive or massless torsion fields have been suggested. We present arguments for a massive torsion field, where the probable rest mass of the corresponding spin three gauge boson is the Planck mass.

  3. Gauge and Higgs Boson Masses from an Extra Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham Moir; Peter Dziennik; Nikos Irges; Francesco Knechtli; Kyoko Yoneyama

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present novel calculations of the mass hierarchy of the $SU(2)$ pure gauge theory on a space-time lattice with an orbifolded fifth dimension. This theory has three parameters; the gauge coupling $\\beta$, the anisotropy $\\gamma$, which is a measure of the ratio of the lattice spacing in the four dimensions to that in the fifth dimension, and the extent of the extra dimension $N_{5}$. Using a large basis of scalar and vector operators we explore in detail the spectrum along the $\\gamma = 1$ line, and for the first time we investigate the spectrum for $\\gamma \

  4. Conjugate Directions in Lattice Landau and Coulomb Gauge Fixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Hudspith

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide details expanding on our implementation of a non-linear conjugate gradient method with Fourier acceleration for lattice Landau and Coulomb gauge fixing. We find clear improvement over the Fourier accelerated steepest descent method, with the average time taken for the algorithm to converge to a fixed, high accuracy, being reduced by a factor of 2 to 4. We show such improvement for the logarithmic definition of the gauge fields here, having already shown this to be the case for a more common definition. We also discuss the implementation of an optimal Fourier accelerated steepest descent method.

  5. Gauge Theories on de Sitter space and Killing Vectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabin Banerjee

    2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a general method for studying a manifestly covariant formulation of $p$-form gauge theories on the de Sitter space. This is done by stereographically projecting the corresponding theories, defined on flat Minkowski space, onto the surface of a de Sitter hyperboloid. The gauge fields in the two descriptions are mapped by conformal Killing vectors allowing for a very transparent analysis and compact presentation of results. As applications, the axial anomaly is computed and the electric-magnetic duality is exhibited. Finally, the zero curvature limit is shown to yield consistent results.

  6. A note on Gauge Theories Coupled to Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Banks; Matt Johnson; Assaf Shomer

    2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the bound on gauge couplings $e\\geq m/m_p$, suggested by Arkani-Hamed et.al. We show this bound can be derived from simple semi-classical considerations and holds in spacetime dimensions greater than or equal to four. Non abelian gauge symmetries seem to satisfy the bound in a trivial manner. We comment on the case of discrete symmetries and close by performing some checks for the bound in higher dimensions in the context of string theory.

  7. Maps for currents and anomalies in noncommutative gauge theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kumar, Kuldeep [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector 3, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive maps relating currents and their divergences in non-Abelian U(N) noncommutative gauge theory with the corresponding expressions in the ordinary (commutative) description. For the U(1) theory, in the slowly-varying-field approximation, these maps are also seen to connect the star-gauge-covariant anomaly in the noncommutative theory with the standard Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly in the commutative version. For arbitrary fields, derivative corrections to the maps are explicitly computed up to O({theta}{sup 2})

  8. Energy Transfer Dynamics and Dopant Luminescence in Mn-Doped CdS/ZnS Core/Shell Nanocrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hsiang-Yun

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    intensity calibration. A 370 nm light emitting diode was used as the excitation light source. . 32 Figure 9 Absorption spectra of Mn-doped CdS/ZnS nanocrystals with (sample 1, solid) and without (sample 2, dashed) Ostwald ripening with the same CdS core... with core size and shell thickness of 3.6 and ~1.8 nm, respectively. The luminescence spectra were taken using a CCD spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics) without intensity calibration using a 370 nm light emitting diode as the excitation light source...

  9. Energy Transfer Dynamics and Dopant Luminescence in Mn-Doped CdS/ZnS Core/Shell Nanocrystals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hsiang-Yun

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    intensity calibration. A 370 nm light emitting diode was used as the excitation light source. . 32 Figure 9 Absorption spectra of Mn-doped CdS/ZnS nanocrystals with (sample 1, solid) and without (sample 2, dashed) Ostwald ripening with the same CdS core... with core size and shell thickness of 3.6 and ~1.8 nm, respectively. The luminescence spectra were taken using a CCD spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics) without intensity calibration using a 370 nm light emitting diode as the excitation light source...

  10. Solid Waste Assessment Fee Exemptions (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A person who owns, operates, or leases an approved solid waste disposal facility is exempt from the payment of solid waste assessment fees, upon the receipt of a Certificate of Exemption from the...

  11. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Manufacturing Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Manufacturing Overview Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing R Reserved. 3 The Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrochemistry #12;Copyright © 2011 Versa Power Systems. All Rights

  12. Solid waste education in children's museums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Jennifer Campbell

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid waste education in museum environments is an increasingly popular educational tool; however, no documents exist detailing the specifics of such educational approaches. A study was therefore conducted to identify and describe solid waste...

  13. Solid Waste Resource Recovery Financing Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State of Texas encourages the processing of solid waste for the purpose of extracting, converting to energy, or otherwise separating and preparing solid waste for reuse. This Act provides for...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Solid-State Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solid-State Lighting InAs Quantum Dot Transitions On April 5, 2011, in EC, Energy, Energy Efficiency, News, Solid-State Lighting March 1, 2011singlepic id364 w320 h240...

  15. Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute expresses the strong support of the State of Wisconsin for the reduction of the amount of solid waste generated, the reuse, recycling and composting of solid waste, and resource...

  16. Gaines County Solid Waste Management Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes the Gaines County Solid Waste Management District, a governmental body to develop and carry out a regional water quality protection program through solid waste management and...

  17. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells More Documents & Publications Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Technology for Greener Airplanes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Power System...

  18. Sandia Energy - Solid-State Lighting Technology: Current State...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solid-State Lighting Technology: Current State of the Art and Grand Challenges Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Overview Solid-State Lighting...

  19. Energy savings with solid-state ballasted high-pressure sodium lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of three types of solid-state ballasts used to operate high-pressure sodium lamps is discussed. Each type of solid-state ballast has been designed to operate an HPS lamp of a different wattage (150, 200, and 400 watts). The performance of these ballasts compared to standard core-coil ballasts operating the same HPS lamps shows that system efficiency improves as much as 17%. The solid-state ballasted HPS system also demonstrates excellent regulation with respect to input voltage and output power. These new ballasts can dim the HPS lamps and reduce flicker from more than 60% to less than 3%. Refitting street lighting with these new HPS systims provides an attractive return on initial capital investment.

  20. Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste.

  1. Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

  2. REVERSIBLE SOLID OXIDE CELLS Mogens Mogensen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorkendorff2 and Torben Jacobsen3 1 Fuel Cell and Solid State Chemistry Department Risø National Laboratory The reversibility of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), i.e. that they could also work in the solid oxide electrolyser at a cell voltage of 1.48 V, which is the overall thermo-neutral voltage. Assuming an electricity cost of 3

  3. Energy and solid/hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

  4. Solid Waste Diversion Plan Fallen Star, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    Solid Waste Diversion Plan DO HO DUH Fallen Star, 2012 Stuart Collection UC San Diego Updated July 2012 Prepared by: Facilities Management #12;UC San Diego Solid Waste Diversion Plan Table of Contents Overview Location and Areas Covered Recycling and Solid Waste Management Contact Campus/Medical Center

  5. Advanced Characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste Ashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste Ashes Preparatory thesis Randi Skytte Pedersen is to investigate Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) ashes with respect to particle sizes, structures and composition with characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) ashes from the Danish power plant M°abjergværket, Holstebro. MSW

  6. Solid-state membrane module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, John Howard (Salt Lake City, UT); Taylor, Dale M. (Murray, UT)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state membrane modules comprising at least one membrane unit, where the membrane unit has a dense mixed conducting oxide layer, and at least one conduit or manifold wherein the conduit or manifold comprises a dense layer and at least one of a porous layer and a slotted layer contiguous with the dense layer. The solid-state membrane modules may be used to carry out a variety of processes including the separating of any ionizable component from a feedstream wherein such ionizable component is capable of being transported through a dense mixed conducting oxide layer of the membrane units making up the membrane modules. For ease of construction, the membrane units may be planar.

  7. Solid friction between soft filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Andrew; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes' drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the prop...

  8. Solid friction between soft filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Ward; Feodor Hilitski; Walter Schwenger; David Welch; A. W. C. Lau; Vincenzo Vitelli; L. Mahadevan; Zvonimir Dogic

    2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes' drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  9. Perovskite solid electrolytes for SOFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have synthesized a new series of brownmillerite solid electrolyte phases Ba{sub 2}GdIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}O{sub 5} (x = 0,0.2,0.4) with the x = 0.2 phase exhibiting an unusually low E. relative to both the observed ionic conductivity in this phase and to E{sub a}s observed in similar compounds. We attribute measured ionic conductivities to a lack of available charge carriers in Ba{sub 2}GdIn{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2}O{sub 5}. However, the low E{sub a} supports the premise that brownmillerite solid electrolyte structures are suitable for supporting high ionic conductivity. Current work is focusing on enhancing the amount of charge carriers in these materials by systematically introducing disorder into the brownmillerite lattice.

  10. Clustering Fossils in Solid Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Akhshik

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In solid inflation the single field non-Gaussianity consistency condition is violated. As a result, the long tensor perturbation induces observable clustering fossils in the form of quardupole anisotropy in large scale structure power spectrum. In this work we revisit the bispectrum analysis for the scalar-scalar-scalar and tensor-scalar-scalar for the general parameter space of solid. We consider the parameter space of the model in which the level of non-Gaussianity generated is consistent with Planck constraints. Specializing to this allowed range of model parameter, we calculate the quadrupole anisotropy induced from the long tensor perturbations on the power spectrum of scalar perturbations. We argue that imprints of clustering fossil from primordial gravitational waves on large scale structures can be detected from the future galaxy surveys.

  11. Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities Arun to minimize public health and environmental impacts. Landfilling is the process by which residual solid waste is placed in a landfill. #12;Case in Supreme Court · Pathetic condition of Solid waste practices in India

  12. A Model and Numerical Framework for the Simulation of Solid-Solid Phase Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee, Sanjay

    A Model and Numerical Framework for the Simulation of Solid-Solid Phase Transformations Garrett J computational realization for the simulation of solid-solid phase transformations of the type observed in shape physical experiments and is indicative of the power of the proposed modelling methodology. In particular

  13. Core analysis workstation development and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, C.W.; Kochendarfer, R.A.; Mays, B.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering workstation utilizing a three-dimensional reactor simulator along with a series of auxiliary programs has been developed for use in predicting core reactivity and power distributions. This workstation can be used by both core analysis and core operations personnel. Expected applications are power distribution analyses, technical specification limit verification, and various types of reactivity analyses. Reactor operations personnel can quickly simulate load follow or other reactor maneuvers and, through the interactive graphics capability of the personal computer, the reactor responses, such as power distribution and control rod position, can be displayed and understood by operations personnel.

  14. Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. Perovskite solid electrolytes for SOFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected perovskite solid electrolytes incorporated into research size fuel cells have shown stability for > 4000 hours at 600{degrees}C. Perovskite lattice requirements which favor low E{sub a} for ionic conduction include (i) that the perovskite lattice possess a moderate enthalpy of formation, (ii) perovskite lattice possess large free volumes, (iii) that the lattice minimally polarizes the mobile ion and (iv) that the crystallographic saddle point r{sub c} for ionic conduction is {approx_equal} 1.

  16. Perovskite solid electrolytes for SOFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected perovskite solid electrolytes incorporated into research size fuel cells have shown stability for > 4000 hours at 600{degrees}C. Perovskite lattice requirements which favor low E{sub a} for ionic conduction include (i) that the perovskite lattice possess a moderate enthalpy of formation, (ii) perovskite lattice possess large free volumes, (iii) that the lattice minimally polarizes the mobile ion and (iv) that the crystallographic saddle point r{sub c} for ionic conduction is {approx equal} 1.

  17. Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  18. Finiteness of the Coulomb gauge QCD perturbative effective action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Andrasi; J. C. Taylor

    2015-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    At 2-loop order in the Coulomb gauge, individual Feynman graphs contributing to the effective action have energy divergences. It is proved that these cancel in suitable combinations of graphs. This has previously been shown only for transverse external fields. The calculation results in a generalization of the Christ-Lee term which was inserted into the Hamiltonian.

  19. Towards a Unified Theory of Gauge and Yukawa Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roepstorff, G; Vehns, Ch.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is suggested to combine gauge and Yukawa interactions into one expression involving the generalized Dirac operator associated with a superconnection $D+L$, $L$ being linked to the Higgs field (one doublet). We advocate a version of the Minimal Standard Model where the Higgs field gives masses to the neutrinos and a CKM matrix to the leptons.

  20. Towards a unified theory of gauge and Yukawa interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Roepstorff; Ch. Vehns

    2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It is suggested to combine gauge and Yukawa interactions into one expression involving the generalized Dirac operator associated with a superconnection $D+L$, $L$ being linked to the Higgs field (one doublet). We advocate a version of the Minimal Standard Model where the Higgs field gives masses to the neutrinos and a CKM matrix to the leptons.

  1. A note on large gauge transformations in double field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usman Naseer

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a detailed proof of the conjecture by Hohm and Zwiebach in double field theory. This result implies that their proposal for large gauge transformations in terms of the Jacobian matrix for coordinate transformations is, as required, equivalent to the standard exponential map associated with the generalized Lie derivative along a suitable parameter.

  2. Gauge cooling in complex Langevin for QCD with heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erhard Seiler; Dénes Sexty; Ion-Olimpiu Stamatescu

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ a new method, "gauge cooling", to stabilize complex Langevin simulations of QCD with heavy quarks. The results are checked against results obtained with reweigthing; we find agreement within the estimated errors. The method allows us to go to previously unaccessible high densities.

  3. Einstein equations in the null quasi-spherical gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Bartnik

    1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of the full Einstein equations in a coordinate gauge based on expanding null hypersurfaces foliated by metric 2-spheres is explored. The simple form of the resulting equations has many applications -- in the present paper we describe the structure of timelike boundary conditions; the matching problem across null hypersurfaces; and the propagation of gravitational shocks.

  4. Wilson lines and gauge invariant off-shell amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Kotko

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study matrix elements of Fourier-transformed straight infinite Wilson lines as a way to calculate gauge invariant tree-level amplitudes with off-shell gluons. The off-shell gluons are assigned "polarization vectors" which (in the Feynman gauge) are transverse to their off-shell momenta and define the direction of the corresponding Wilson line operators. The infinite Wilson lines are first regularized to prove the correctness of the method. We have implemented the method in a computer FORM program that can calculate gluonic matrix elements of Wilson line operators automatically. In addition we formulate the Feynman rules that are convenient in certain applications, e.g. proving the Ward identities. Using both the program and the Feynman rules we calculate a few examples, in particular the matrix elements corresponding to gauge invariant $g^{*}g^{*}g^{*}g$ and $g^{*}g^{*}g^{*}g^{*}g$ processes. An immediate application of the approach is in the high energy scattering, as in a special kinematic setup our results reduce to the form directly related to Lipatov's vertices. Thus the results we present can be directly transformed into Lipatov's vertices, in particular into $RRRP$ and $RRRRP$ vertices with arbitrary "orientation" of reggeized gluons. Since the formulation itself is not restricted to high-energy scattering, we also apply the method to a decomposition of an ordinary on-shell amplitude into a set of gauge invariant objects.

  5. Dark matter at the LHC: EFTs and gauge invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Nicole F; Dent, James B; Leane, Rebecca K; Weiler, Thomas J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective field theory (EFT) formulations of dark matter interactions have proven to be a convenient and popular way to quantify LHC bounds on dark matter. However, some of the non-renormalizable EFT operators considered do not respect the gauge symmetries of the Standard Model. We carefully discuss under what circumstances such operators can arise, and outline potential issues in their interpretation and application.

  6. Hamilton approach to Yang-Mills theory in Coulomb gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhardt, H; Epple, D; Feuchter, C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum wave functional of Coulomb gauge Yang-Mills theory is determined within the variational principle and used to calculate various Green functions and observables. The results show that heavy quarks are confined by a linearly rising potential and gluons cannot propagate over large distances. The 't Hooft loop shows a perimeter law and thus also indicates confinement.

  7. Observational constraints on gauge field production in axion inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meerburg, P.D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Pajer, E., E-mail: meerburg@princeton.edu, E-mail: enrico.pajer@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of axion inflation are particularly interesting since they provide a natural justification for the flatness of the potential over a super-Planckian distance, namely the approximate shift-symmetry of the inflaton. In addition, most of the observational consequences are directly related to this symmetry and hence are correlated. Large tensor modes can be accompanied by the observable effects of a the shift-symmetric coupling ?F F-tilde to a gauge field. During inflation this coupling leads to a copious production of gauge quanta and consequently a very distinct modification of the primordial curvature perturbations. In this work we compare these predictions with observations. We find that the leading constraint on the model comes from the CMB power spectrum when considering both WMAP 7-year and ACT data. The bispectrum generated by the non-Gaussian inverse-decay of the gauge field leads to a comparable but slightly weaker constraint. There is also a constraint from ?-distortion using TRIS plus COBE/FIRAS data, but it is much weaker. Finally we comment on a generalization of the model to massive gauge fields. When the mass is generated by some light Higgs field, observably large local non-Gaussianity can be produced.

  8. Force measurements in magnetic bearings using fiber optic strain gauges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymer, Stephen Geoffrey

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented here develops a new method for measuring forces in magnetic bearings. Fiber-optic strain gauges (FOSGs) mounted to the side of the magnet poles are used to detect the small levels of strain that the metal experiences...

  9. Fuzzy bags, Polyakov loop and gauge/string duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fen Zuo

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Confinement in SU($N$) gauge theory is due to the linear potential between colored objects. At short distances, the linear contribution could be considered as the quadratic correction to the leading Coulomb term. Recent lattice data show that such quadratic corrections also appear in the deconfined phase, in both the thermal quantities and the Polyakov loop. These contributions are studied systematically employing the gauge/string duality. "Confinement" in ${\\mathcal N}=4$ SU($N$) Super Yang-Mills (SYM) theory could be achieved kinematically when the theory is defined on a compact space manifold. In the large-$N$ limit, deconfinement of ${\\mathcal N}=4$ SYM on $\\mathbb{S}^3$ at strong coupling is dual to the Hawking-Page phase transition in the global Anti-de Sitter spacetime. Meantime, all the thermal quantities and the Polyakov loop achieve significant quadratic contributions. Similar results can also be obtained at weak coupling. However, when confinement is induced dynamically through the local dilaton field in the gravity-dilaton system, these contributions can not be generated consistently. This is in accordance with the fact that there is no dimension-2 gauge-invariant operator in the boundary gauge theory. Based on these results, we suspect that quadratic corrections, and also confinement, should be due to global or non-local effects in the bulk spacetime.

  10. Gauge invariance and classical dynamics of noncommutative particle theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gitman, D. M.; Kupriyanov, V. G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05508-090 (Brazil)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a model of classical noncommutative particle in an external electromagnetic field. For this model, we prove the existence of generalized gauge transformations. Classical dynamics in Hamiltonian and Lagrangian form is discussed; in particular, the motion in the constant magnetic field is studied in detail.

  11. The monopole mass in the random percolation gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietro Giudice; Ferdinando Gliozzi; Stefano Lottini

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the behaviour of the monopole at finite temperature in the (2+1)-dimensional lattice gauge theory dual to the percolation model; by exploiting the correspondences to statistical systems, we possess powerful tools to evaluate the monopole mass both above and below the critical temperature with high-precision Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Unification of Gravitation, Gauge Field and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Bing Huang

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is composed of two correlated topics: 1. unification of gravitation with gauge fields; 2. the coupling between the daor field and other fields and the origin of dark energy. After introducing the concept of ``daor field" and discussing the daor geometry, we indicate that the complex daor field has two kinds of symmetry transformations. Hence the gravitation and SU(1,3) gauge field are unified under the framework of the complex connection. We propose a first-order nonlinear coupling equation of the daor field, which includes the coupling between the daor field and SU(1,3) gauge field and the coupling between the daor field and the curvature, and from which Einstein's gravitational equation can be deduced. The cosmological observations imply that dark energy cannot be zero, and which will dominate the doom of our Universe. The real part of the daor field self-coupling equation can be regarded as Einstein's equation endowed with the cosmological constant. It shows that dark energy originates from the self-coupling of the space-time curvature, and the energy-momentum tensor is proportional to the square of coupling constant \\lambda. The dark energy density given by our scenario is in agreement with astronomical observations. Furthermore, the Newtonian gravitational constant G and the coupling constant \\epsilon of gauge field satisfy G= \\lambda^{2}\\epsilon^{2}.

  13. SU(4) harmonic superspace and supersymmetric gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Zupnik

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the harmonic-superspace formalism in the $N=4$ supersymmetry using the $SU(4)/SU(2)\\times SU(2)\\times U(1)$ harmonics which was earlier applied to the abelian gauge theory. The N=4 non-abelian constraints in a standard superspace are reformulated as the harmonic-superspace equations for two basic analytic superfields: the independent superfield strength W of a dimension 1 and the dimensionless harmonic gauge 4-prepotential V having the $U(1)$ charge 2. These constraint equations I manifestly depend on the Grassmann coordinates $\\theta$, although they are covariant under the unusual N=4 supersymmetry transformations. We analyze an alternative harmonic formalism of the supergauge theory for two unconstrained nonabelian analytic superfields W and V. The gauge-invariant action A(W,V) in this formalism contains $\\theta$ factors in each term, it is invariant under the $SU(4)$ automorphism group. In this model, the interaction of two infinite-dimensional N=4 supermultiplets with the physical and auxiliary fields arises at the level of component fields. The action A(W,V) generate analytic equations of motion II alternative to the harmonic-superspace superfield constraints I. Both sets of equations give us the equivalent equations for the physical component fields of the $N=4$ gauge supermultiplet, they connect auxiliary and physical fields of two superfields. The nonlinear effective interaction of the abelian harmonic superfield W is constructed.

  14. Entanglement entropy in SU(N) gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Velytsky

    2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The entanglement entropy of SU(N) lattice gauge theory is studied exactly in 1+1 space-time dimensions and in Migdal-Kadanoff approximation in higher dimensional space. The existence of a non-analytical behavior reminiscent of a phase transition for a characteristic size of the entangled region is demonstrated for higher dimensional theories.

  15. Three-loop free energy for pure gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, P.; Zhai, C. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the free energy density for pure non-Abelian gauge theory at high temperature and zero chemical potential. The three-loop result to [ital O]([ital g][sup 4]) is [ital F]=[ital d][sub [ital A

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced technology gauge Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 mil Kapton on each side (Dy- nasen, Inc., Goleta, CA). For shock wave studies... in ice, velocity gauges are preferable over pressure gauges because they do not have to be...

  17. Open superstring field theory I: gauge fixing, ghost structure, and propagator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroyter, Michael

    The WZW form of open superstring field theory has linearized gauge invariances associated with the BRST operator Q and the zero mode ? [subscript 0] of the picture minus-one fermionic superconformal ghost. We discuss gauge ...

  18. Nuclear forces from quenched and 2+1 flavor lattice QCD using the PACS-CS gauge configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Ishii; S. Aoki; T. Hatsuda; for PACS-CS Collaboration

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two of recent progress in lattice QCD approach to nuclear force are reported. (i) Tensor force from quenched lattice QCD: By truncating the derivative expansion of inter-nucleon potential to the strictly local terms, we obtain central force V_C(r) and tensor force V_T(r) separately from s-wave and d-wave components of Bethe-Salpeter wave function for two nucleon state with J^P=1^+. Numerical calculation is performed with quenched QCD on 32^4 lattice using the standard plaquette action at beta=5.7 with the standard Wilson quark action with kappa=0.1640, 0.1665, 0.1678. Preliminary results show that the depths of the resulting tensor force amount to 20 to 40 MeV, which is enhanced in the light quark mass region. (ii) Nuclear force from 2+1 flavor QCD with PACS-CS gauge configuration: Preliminary full QCD results are obtained by using 2+1 flavor gauge configurations generated by PACS-CS collaboration. The resulting potential has the midium range attraction of about 30 MeV similar to the preceding quenched calculations. However, the repulsive core at short distance is significantly stronger than the corresponding quenched QCD result.

  19. Incorporation of silica into baroplastic core-shell nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hewlett, Sheldon A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core-shell baroplastics are nanophase materials that exhibit pressure-induced flow at low temperatures and high pressures. Core-shell baroplastics used in this work are comprised of a low Tg poly(butyl acrylate) (PBA) core ...

  20. Improved gauge driver for the generalized harmonic Einstein system Lee Lindblom and Bela Szilagyi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindblom, Lee

    Improved gauge driver for the generalized harmonic Einstein system Lee Lindblom and Be´la Szila´gyi

  1. Solid state division progress report, period ending February 29, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is reported concerning theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; crystal growth and characterization; and isotope research materials.

  2. KSI's Cross Insulated Core Transformer Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhmeyer, Uwe [Kaiser Systems, Inc, 126 Sohier Road, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross Insulated Core Transformer (CCT) technology improves on Insulated Core Transformer (ICT) implementations. ICT systems are widely used in very high voltage, high power, power supply systems. In an ICT transformer ferrite core sections are insulated from their neighboring ferrite cores. Flux leakage is present at each of these insulated gaps. The flux loss is raised to the power of stages in the ICT design causing output voltage efficiency to taper off with increasing stages. KSI's CCT technology utilizes a patented technique to compensate the flux loss at each stage of an ICT system. Design equations to calculate the flux compensation capacitor value are presented. CCT provides corona free operation of the HV stack. KSI's CCT based High Voltage power supply systems offer high efficiency operation, high frequency switching, low stored energy and smaller size over comparable ICT systems.

  3. Magnetic core studies at LBNL and LLNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molvik, A.W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL) and DE-AC03-76SF00098 (LBNL). References Wayne Meier,Magnetic Core Studies at LBNL and LLNL A. W. Molvik a,* , A.Livermore, CA 94550, USA LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA c

  4. Transient Nature of Generalized Coulomb Gauge A Mathematical Key to Color Confinement and Mass-Gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transient Nature of Generalized Coulomb Gauge ­ A Mathematical Key to Color Confinement and Mass to avoid non-locality of the action when generalized Coulomb gauge is imposed, the implementation of the non-abelian Gauss law for infinitesimal time-period over the space of gauge potentials in path

  5. Automorphisms in Gauge Theories and the Definition of CP and P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Grimus; M. N. Rebelo

    1995-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the possibilities to define CP and parity in general gauge theories by utilizing the intimate connection of these discrete symmetries with the group of automorphisms of the gauge Lie algebra. Special emphasis is put on the scalar gauge interactions and the CP invariance of the Yukawa couplings.

  6. ESTIMATION OF SNOW ACCUMULATION IN ANTARCTICA USING AUTOMATED ACOUSTIC DEPTH GAUGE MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ESTIMATION OF SNOW ACCUMULATION IN ANTARCTICA USING AUTOMATED ACOUSTIC DEPTH GAUGE MEASUREMENTS microwave sounders, snow gauges, or radar are not feasible or not available in Antarctica at the present precipitation, remains largely unknown. Acoustic depth gauges (ADG) provide the only concrete real

  7. Influence of small scale rainfall variability on standard comparison tools between radar and rain gauge data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in revised form 18 October 2013 Accepted 8 November 2013 Rain gauges and weather radars do not measure some usual practice. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Radar­rain gauge comparison are tipping bucket rain gauges, disdrometers, weather radars and (passive or active) sensors onboard

  8. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  9. Viscosity anomaly in core-softened liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. D. Fomin; V. N. Ryzhov

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present article presents a molecular dynamics study of several anomalies of core-softened systems. It is well known that many core-softened liquids demonstrate diffusion anomaly. Usual intuition relates the diffusion coefficient to shear viscosity via Stockes-Einstein relation. However, it can break down at low temperature. In this respect it is important to see if viscosity also demonstrates anomalous behavior.

  10. Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

  11. Core-Shell Structured Magnetic Ternary Nanocubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Wang, Chong M.; Chernova, Natalya; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Yao; Bae, In-Tae; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While transition metal-doped ferrite nanoparticles constitute an important class of soft magnetic nanomaterials with spinel structures, the ability to control the shape and composition would enable a wide range of applications in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactions such as catalysis and magnetic separation of biomolecules. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of core-shell structured MnZn ferrite nanocubes synthesized in organic solvents by manipulating the reaction temperature and capping agent composition in the absence of the conventionally-used reducing agents. The core-shell structure of the highly-monodispersed nanocubes (~20 nm) are shown to consist of an Fe3O4 core and an (Mn0.5Zn0.5)(Fe0.9, Mn1.1)O4 shell. In comparison with Fe3O4 and other binary ferrite nanoparticles, the core-shell structured nanocubes were shown to display magnetic properties regulated by a combination of the core-shell composition, leading to a higher coercivity (~350 Oe) and field-cool/zero-field-cool characteristics drastically different from many regular MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique core-shell composition, the understanding of which has important implication to the exploration of this class of soft magnetic nanomaterials in many potential applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, fuel cells, and batteries.

  12. The compactness of presupernova stellar cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Woosley, S. E., E-mail: sukhbold@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success or failure of the neutrino-transport mechanism for producing a supernova in an evolved massive star is known to be sensitive not only to the mass of the iron core that collapses, but also to the density gradient in the silicon and oxygen shells surrounding that core. Here we study the systematics of a presupernova core's 'compactness' as a function of the mass of the star and the physics used in its calculation. Fine-meshed surveys of presupernova evolution are calculated for stars from 15 to 65 M {sub ?}. The metallicity and the efficiency of semiconvection and overshoot mixing are both varied and bare carbon-oxygen cores are explored as well as full hydrogenic stars. Two different codes, KEPLER and MESA, are used for the study. A complex interplay of carbon and oxygen burning, especially in shells, can cause rapid variations in the compactness for stars of very nearly the same mass. On larger scales, the distribution of compactness with main sequence mass is found to be robustly non-monotonic, implying islands of 'explodabilty,' particularly around 8-20 M {sub ?} and 25-30 M {sub ?}. The carbon-oxygen (CO) core mass of a presupernova star is a better, (though still ambiguous) discriminant of its core structure than the main sequence mass.

  13. CSAT Role-Based/Core Competency Training Program | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services Training Cybersecurity Training Warehouse DOE Training & Education CSAT Role-BasedCore Competency Training Program CSAT Role-BasedCore Competency Training...

  14. Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Synthesis of Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...

  15. Nanoscale Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell Evolution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell Evolution of Gold-Platinum Nanoparticles and Their Electrocatalytic Effect Nanoscale Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell...

  16. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Abstract: Non-toxic magnetic...

  17. Black GE based on crystalline/amorphous core/shell nanoneedle arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Fan, Zhiyong

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct growth of black Ge on low-temperature substrates, including plastics and rubber is reported. The material is based on highly dense, crystalline/amorphous core/shell Ge nanoneedle arrays with ultrasharp tips (.about.4 nm) enabled by the Ni catalyzed vapor-solid-solid growth process. Ge nanoneedle arrays exhibit remarkable optical properties. Specifically, minimal optical reflectance (<1%) is observed, even for high angles of incidence (.about.75.degree.) and for relatively short nanoneedle lengths (.about.1 .mu.m). Furthermore, the material exhibits high optical absorption efficiency with an effective band gap of .about.1 eV. The reported black Ge can have important practical implications for efficient photovoltaic and photodetector applications on nonconventional substrates.

  18. Tank 241-S-106, cores 183, 184 and 187 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final laboratory report for tank 241-S-106 push mode core segments collected between February 12, 1997 and March 21, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP), the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Safety DQO), the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) and the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO). The analytical results are included in Table 1. Six of the twenty-four subsamples submitted for the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis exceeded the notification limit of 480 Joules/g stated in the DQO. Appropriate notifications were made. Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analyses were performed on all samples that produced exotherms during the DSC analysis. All results were less than the notification limit of three weight percent TOC. No cyanide analysis was performed, per agreement with the Tank Safety Program. None of the samples submitted for Total Alpha Activity exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. Statistical evaluation of results by calculating the 95% upper confidence limit is not performed by the 222-S Laboratory and is not considered in this report. No core composites were created because there was insufficient solid material from any of the three core sampling events to generate a composite that would be representative of the tank contents.

  19. Characterization of Core Samples from a Hardened Crust Layer in Tank 4F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, M. L.

    2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste removal operations in Tank 4F are scheduled to begin in late 2005 to provide material for Sludge Batch 5. Mining/probing operations to support installation of submersible mixer pumps encountered a hard layer of material at {approx}45'' to 50'' from the bottom of the tank. Attempts at penetrating the hard layer using a manual mining tool in several different risers were not successful. A core-sampling tool was used to obtain samples of the hard crust layer in Tank 4F for characterization. Three 12'' core samples and a dip sample of the supernate near the surface of the hard layer were sent to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) results for the crystalline solids from both sample FTF-434 and FTF-435 identifies the major component of both samples as Burkeite (Na{sub 6}(CO{sub 3})(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}). All of the other data collected on the crystalline solids from the Tank 4F core samples support this conclusion. The conditions in Tank 4F for the last twenty years have been ideal for Burkeite formation. The tank has been largely undisturbed with a tank temperature consistently above 30 C, a carbonate to sulfate molar ratio in the supernate conducive to Burkeite formation, and slow evaporation of the supernate phase. Thermodynamic modeling and the results of a Burkeite solubility test confirm that a ratio of 1:1:12 for the volumes of Burkeite solids, supernate, and inhibited water will dissolve all of the Burkeite. These ratios could be used to remove the 6'' layer of Burkeite from Tank 4F with no mixing. However, the thermodynamic modeling and the solubility test neglect the sludge layer beneath the Burkeite crust in Tank 4F. Settled sludge in Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste tanks usually contains greater than 75% interstitial supernate by volume. If the supernate in the sludge layer should mix into the solution used to dissolve the Burkeite, significantly more inhibited water would be needed to dissolve the Burkeite layer. Additionally, the average thickness of the Burkeite layer across the diameter of the tank may be thicker or thinner than the 6'' assumed for modeling purposes. The 6'' thickness assumed for the Burkeite layer was based on the 6'' plug of solids found in one core sample. An average thickness greater than 6'' would increase the amount of water needed to dissolve the Burkeite.

  20. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; Gail Geiger; Kevin Keegan; John Noetzel; Larry Chick

    2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Phase I under this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with the option of piped-in water (Demonstration System A). Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from January 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003, under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks: Task 1 System Design and Integration; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5 Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6 System Fabrication; Task 7 System Testing; Task 8 Program Management; and Task 9 Stack Testing with Coal-Based Reformate.

  1. Cartan gravity, matter fields, and the gauge principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westman, Hans F., E-mail: hwestman74@gmail.com [Imperial College Theoretical Physics, Huxley Building, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Zlosnik, Tom G., E-mail: t.zlosnik@imperial.ac.uk [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-B, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravity is commonly thought of as one of the four force fields in nature. However, in standard formulations its mathematical structure is rather different from the Yang–Mills fields of particle physics that govern the electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions. This paper explores this dissonance with particular focus on how gravity couples to matter from the perspective of the Cartan-geometric formulation of gravity. There the gravitational field is represented by a pair of variables: (1) a ‘contact vector’ V{sup A} which is geometrically visualized as the contact point between the spacetime manifold and a model spacetime being ‘rolled’ on top of it, and (2) a gauge connection A{sub ?}{sup AB}, here taken to be valued in the Lie algebra of SO(2,3) or SO(1,4), which mathematically determines how much the model spacetime is rotated when rolled. By insisting on two principles, the gauge principle and polynomial simplicity, we shall show how one can reformulate matter field actions in a way that is harmonious with Cartan’s geometric construction. This yields a formulation of all matter fields in terms of first order partial differential equations. We show in detail how the standard second order formulation can be recovered. In particular, the Hodge dual, which characterizes the structure of bosonic field equations, pops up automatically. Furthermore, the energy–momentum and spin-density three-forms are naturally combined into a single object here denoted the spin-energy–momentum three-form. Finally, we highlight a peculiarity in the mathematical structure of our first-order formulation of Yang–Mills fields. This suggests a way to unify a U(1) gauge field with gravity into a SO(1,5)-valued gauge field using a natural generalization of Cartan geometry in which the larger symmetry group is spontaneously broken down to SO(1,3)×U(1). The coupling of this unified theory to matter fields and possible extensions to non-Abelian gauge fields are left as open questions. -- Highlights: •Develops Cartan gravity to include matter fields. •Coupling to gravity is done using the standard gauge prescription. •Matter actions are manifestly polynomial in all field variables. •Standard equations recovered on-shell for scalar, spinor and Yang–Mills fields. •Unification of a U(1) field with gravity based on the orthogonal group SO(1,5)

  2. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraioli, Anthony V. (Hawthorn Woods, IL)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraioli, A.V.

    1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  4. Ionization distances of multiply charged Rydberg ions approaching solid surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nedeljkovic, Lj. D.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.; Bozanic, D. K. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionization distances R{sub c}{sup I} as well as the ionization rates and eigenenergies of one-electron multiply charged Rydberg ions (core charge Z>>1, principal quantum number n>>1) approaching solid surfaces are calculated. Within the framework of a nonperturbative etalon equation method (EEM), these quantities are obtained simultaneously. The complex energy eigenvalue problem for the decaying eigenstates is solved within the critical region R{approx_equal}R{sub c}{approx_equal}R{sub c}{sup I} of the ion-surface distances R. This region is characterized by the energy terms localized in the vicinity of the top of an effective potential barrier, created between the ion and polarized solid. We take into account that the parabolic symmetry is preserved for R{approx_equal}R{sub c} and that the parabolic quantum numbers can be taken as approximate but sufficiently good quantum numbers. The parabolic rates, energies, and corresponding ionization distances are presented in relatively simple analytical forms. The ionization distances are compared with the results of a classical overbarrier model. Comparison of the obtained energies and rates with the available theoretical predictions of the coupled angular mode method shows good agreement. The use of the EEM for an estimation of the upper limit of the first neutralization distance in the subsequent neutralization cascade is briefly discussed.

  5. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cogan, S.F.; Rauh, R.D.

    1990-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counter electrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films. 4 figs.

  6. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; George, R.A.; Shockling, L.A.

    1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  7. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Shockling, Larry A. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  8. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Rauh, R. David

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  9. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cogan, Stuart F. (111 Downey St., Norwood, MA 02062); Rauh, R. David (111 Downey St., Norwood, MA 02062)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  10. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cogan, Stuart F. (Sudbury, MA); Rauh, R. David (Newton, MA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  11. Solid phase microextraction field kit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunes, Peter J.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A field kit for the collection, isolation and concentration of trace amounts of high explosives (HE), biological weapons (BW) and chemical weapons (CW) residues in air, soil, vegetation, swipe, and liquid samples. The field kit includes a number of Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) fiber and syringe assemblies in a hermetically sealed transportation container or tubes which includes a sampling port, a number of extra SPME fiber and syringe assemblies, the fiber and syringe assemblies including a protective cap for the fiber, and an extractor for the protective cap, along with other items including spare parts, protective glove, and an instruction manual, all located in an airtight container.

  12. NETL: Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReferenceAgenda Workshop AgendaGraphic of aEnergyResearchSolid

  13. Infrared divergences, mass shell singularities and gauge dependence of the dynamical fermion mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok K. Das; J. Frenkel; C. Schubert

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the behavior of the dynamical fermion mass when infrared divergences and mass shell singularities are present in a gauge theory. In particular, in the massive Schwinger model in covariant gauges we find that the pole of the fermion propagator is divergent and gauge dependent at one loop, but the leading singularities cancel in the quenched rainbow approximation. On the other hand, in physical gauges, we find that the dynamical fermion mass is finite and gauge independent at least up to one loop.

  14. All-order Finiteness of the Higgs Boson Mass in the Dynamical Gauge-Higgs Unification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yutaka Hosotani

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In the dynamical gauge-Higgs unification, it is shown that the mass of the Higgs boson (4D scalar field) in U(1) gauge theory in $M^4 \\times T^n$ ($n=1,2,3,...$) is finite to all order in perturbation theory as a consequence of the large gauge invariance. It is conjectured that the Higgs boson mass is finite in non-Abelian gauge theory in $M^4 \\times S^1$, $M^4 \\times (S^1/Z_2)$ and the Randall-Sundrum warped spacetime to all order in the rearranged perturbation theory where the large gauge invariance is maintained.

  15. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  16. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014. The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 kVA transformer passed the impulse test in KEMA high-voltage laboratories. Additional products include: nine papers published in the IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, one patent has been filed, three PhD students weresupported from beginning to graduation, five postdoctoral fellows, and three MSc students were partially supported. The electrical characteristics of our dry-type toroidal transformers are similar to those of the oil-immersed pole mounted transformers currently in use by many utilities, but toroids have higher efficiency. The no-load losses of the 50 kVA prototype are only 45 W. A standard transformer has no-load losses between 90 and 240 W. Thus, even the finest transformer built today with standard technology has double the amount of no-load losses than the prototype toroidal transformer. When the manufacturing process is prepared for mass production, the cost of a dry-type toroidal transformer would be similar to the price of an oil-filed standard design. However, because of the greatly reduced losses, the total ownership cost of a toroidal transformer could be about half of a traditional design. We got a grant from Power Bridge NY in the amount of $149,985 from June 2014 to May 2015 to continue developing the transformer with commercialization objectives. We are considering the possibility to incorporate a company to manufacture the transformers and have contacted investors. The current status of the real life testing is as follows: after several months of silence, Con Edison has re-started conversations and has shown willingness to test the transformer. Other companies, PSE&G and National Grid have recently also shown interest and we will present our product to them soon.

  17. High harmonic generation from Bloch electrons in solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mengxi; Reis, David A; Schafer, Kenneth J; Gaarde, Mette B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the generation of high harmonic radiation by Bloch electrons in a model transparent solid driven by a strong mid-infrared laser field. We solve the single-electron time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation (TDSE) using a velocity-gauge method [New J. Phys. 15, 013006 (2013)] that is numerically stable as the laser intensity and number of energy bands are increased. The resulting harmonic spectrum exhibits a primary plateau due to the coupling of the valence band to the first conduction band, with a cutoff energy that scales linearly with field strength and laser wavelength. We also find a weaker second plateau due to coupling to higher-lying conduction bands, with a cutoff that is also approximately linear in the field strength. To facilitate the analysis of the time-frequency characteristics of the emitted harmonics, we also solve the TDSE in a time-dependent basis set, the Houston states [Phys. Rev. B 33, 5494 (1986)], which allows us to separate inter-band and intra-band contributions to the time-depe...

  18. Infrared finite ghost propagator in the Feynman gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Aguilar; J. Papavassiliou

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate how to obtain from the Schwinger-Dyson equations of QCD an infrared finite ghost propagator in the Feynman gauge. The key ingredient in this construction is the longitudinal form factor of the non-perturbative gluon-ghost vertex, which, contrary to what happens in the Landau gauge, contributes non-trivially to the gap equation of the ghost. The detailed study of the corresponding vertex equation reveals that in the presence of a dynamical infrared cutoff this form factor remains finite in the limit of vanishing ghost momentum. This, in turn, allows the ghost self-energy to reach a finite value in the infrared, without having to assume any additional properties for the gluon-ghost vertex, such as the presence of massless poles. The implications of this result and possible future directions are briefly outlined.

  19. Tensor networks for Lattice Gauge Theories and Atomic Quantum Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Rico; T. Pichler; M. Dalmonte; P. Zoller; S. Montangero

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that gauge invariant quantum link models, Abelian and non-Abelian, can be exactly described in terms of tensor networks states. Quantum link models represent an ideal bridge between high-energy to cold atom physics, as they can be used in cold-atoms in optical lattices to study lattice gauge theories. In this framework, we characterize the phase diagram of a (1+1)-d quantum link version of the Schwinger model in an external classical background electric field: the quantum phase transition from a charge and parity ordered phase with non-zero electric flux to a disordered one with a net zero electric flux configuration is described by the Ising universality class.

  20. Chiral symmetry of graphene and strong coupling lattice gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasufumi Araki; Tetsuo Hatsuda

    2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We model the electrons on a monolayer graphene in terms of the compact and non-compact U(1) lattice gauge theories. The system is analyzed by the strong coupling expansion and is shown to be an insulator due to dynamical gap formation in/around the strong coupling limit. This is similar to the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in strong coupling gauge theories. The results from the compact and non-compact formulations are compared up to the next-to-leading order of the strong coupling expansion. Excitonic modes and their dispersion relations in the insulating phase are also investigated: it is found that there arises a pseudo-Nambu--Goldstone mode obeying the Gell-Mann--Oakes--Renner type formula.