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1

Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

Judith A. Kieffer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Mauldin, SC); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

4

Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

5

CoalFleet RD&D augmentation plan for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiative, which facilitates collaborative research by more than 50 organizations from around the world representing power generators, equipment suppliers and engineering design and construction firms, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others. This group advised EPRI as it evaluated more than 120 coal-gasification-related research projects worldwide to identify gaps or critical-path activities where additional resources and expertise could hasten the market introduction of IGCC advances. The resulting 'IGCC RD&D Augmentation Plan' describes such opportunities and how they could be addressed, for both IGCC plants to be built in the near term (by 2012-15) and over the longer term (2015-25), when demand for new electric generating capacity is expected to soar. For the near term, EPRI recommends 19 projects that could reduce the levelized cost-of-electricity for IGCC to the level of today's conventional pulverized-coal power plants with supercritical steam conditions and state-of-the-art environmental controls. For the long term, EPRI's recommended projects could reduce the levelized cost of an IGCC plant capturing 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from the carbon in coal (for safe storage away from the atmosphere) to the level of today's IGCC plants without CO{sub 2} capture. EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program is also preparing a companion RD&D augmentation plan for advanced-combustion-based (i.e., non-gasification) clean coal technologies (Report 1013221). 7 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs., 4 apps.

NONE

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Air-blown Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle demonstration project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean Power Cogeneration, Inc. (CPC) has requested financial assistance from DOE for the design construction, and operation of a normal 1270 ton-per-day (120-MWe), air-blown integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) demonstration plant. The demonstration plant would produce both power for the utility grid and steam for a nearby industrial user. The objective of the proposed project is to demonstrate air-blown, fixed-bed Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology. The integrated performance to be demonstrated will involve all the subsystems in the air-blown IGCC system to include coal feeding; a pressurized air-blown, fixed-bed gasifier capable of utilizing caking coal; a hot gas conditioning systems for removing sulfur compounds, particulates, and other contaminants as necessary to meet environmental and combustion turbine fuel requirements; a conventional combustion turbine appropriately modified to utilize low-Btu coal gas as fuel; a briquetting system for improved coal feed performance; the heat recovery steam generation system appropriately modified to accept a NO{sub x} reduction system such as the selective catalytic reduction process; the steam cycle; the IGCC control systems; and the balance of plant. The base feed stock for the project is an Illinois Basin bituminous high-sulfur coal, which is a moderately caking coal. 5 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Is Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle with Carbon Capture-Storage the Solution for Conventional Coal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Nuclear Power Plants ? Solar Power Plants ? Wind Power Plants ? Geothermal Power Plants 1.2.2 Based on the Function Performed Three main types of power plants are categorized according to the functions they perform. These are called “base load..., Temperature and Efficiency for PC Technologies. Reprinted from Hermine Nalbandian 2009. Energia – Center for Applied Energy Research With the extensive favorable experience in Europe, Japan and Korea using supercritical (SC) steam cycles over the past...

Kundi, Manish

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

EIS-0409: Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Mississippi  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to provide funding for the Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project in Kemper County, Mississippi to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a project proposed by Southern Power Company, through its affiliate Mississippi Power Company, which has been selected by DOE for consideration under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) program.

9

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop and evaluate novel sorbents for the Siemens Westinghouse Power Company's (SWPC's) ''Ultra-Clean Gas Cleaning Process'' for reducing to near-zero levels the sulfur- and chlorine-containing gas emissions and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) caused by fuel bound constituents found in carbonaceous materials, which are processed in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technologies.

Javad Abbasian

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has selected six integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports the CCT program, and addresses long-term improvements in support of IGCC technology. This overview briefly describes the CCT projects and the supporting RD&D activities.

Ness, H.M.; Reuther, R.B.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Integrated supercritical water gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems for improved performance and reduced operating costs in existing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A revolutionary hydrothermal heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is being developed to produce clean fuels for gas turbines from slurries and emulsions of opportunity fuels. Water can be above 80% by weight and solids below 20%, including coal fines, coal water fuels, biomass, composted municipal refuse, sewage sludge and bitumen/Orimulsion. The patented HRSG tubes use a commercial method of particle scrubbing to improve heat transfer and prevent corrosion and deposition on heat transfer surfaces. A continuous-flow pilot plant is planned to test the HRSG over a wide range of operating conditions, including the supercritical conditions of water, above 221 bar (3,205 psia) and 374 C (705 F). Bench scale data shows, that supercritical water gasification below 580 C (1,076 F) and low residence time without catalysts or an oxidizer can produce a char product that can contain carbon up to the amount of fixed carbon in the proximate analysis of the solids in the feed. This char can be burned with coal in an existing combustion system to provide the heat required for gasification. The new HRSG tubes can be retrofitted into existing power plant boilers for repowering of existing plants for improved performance and reduced costs. A special condensing turbine allows final low-temperature cleaning and maintains quality and combustibility of the fuel vapor for modern gas turbine in the new Vapor Transmission Cycle (VTC). Increased power output and efficiency can be provided for existing plants, while reducing fuel costs. A preliminary computer-based process simulation model has been prepared that includes material and energy balances that simulate commercial-scale operations of the VTC on sewage sludge and coal. Results predict over 40% HHV thermal efficiency to electric power from sewage sludge at more than 83% water by weight. The system appears to become autothermal (no supplemental fuel required) at about 35% fixed carbon in the feed. Thus, bituminous and lignite coal slurries could be gasified at less than 25% coal and more than 75% water. Preliminary life cycle cost analyses indicate that disposal fees for sewage sludge improve operating economics over fuel that must be purchased, the cost and schedule advantages of natural gas-fired combined cycle systems are preserved. Sensitivity analyses show that increasing capital costs by 50% can be offset by an increase in sewage sludge disposal fees of $10/metric ton.

Tolman, R.; Parkinson, W.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Dynamic simulation and load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Load-following control of future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture is expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. To study control performance during load following, a plant-wide dynamic simulation of a coal-fed IGCC plant with CO{sub 2} capture has been developed. The slurry-fed gasifier is a single-stage, downward-fired, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow type with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC). The syngas from the outlet of the RSC goes to a scrubber followed by a two-stage sour shift process with inter-stage cooling. The acid gas removal (AGR) process is a dual-stage physical solvent-based process for selective removal of H{sub 2}S in the first stage and CO{sub 2} in the second stage. Sulfur is recovered using a Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. The recovered CO{sub 2} is compressed by a split-shaft multistage compressor and sent for sequestration after being treated in an absorber with triethylene glycol for dehydration. The clean syngas is sent to two advanced “F”-class gas turbines (GTs) partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit. A subcritical steam cycle is used for heat recovery steam generation. A treatment unit for the sour water strips off the acid gases for utilization in the Claus unit. The steady-state model developed in Aspen Plus® is converted to an Aspen Plus Dynamics® simulation and integrated with MATLAB® for control studies. The results from the plant-wide dynamic model are compared qualitatively with the data from a commercial plant having different configuration, operating condition, and feed quality than what has been considered in this work. For load-following control, the GT-lead with gasifier-follow control strategy is considered. A modified proportional–integral–derivative (PID) control is considered for the syngas pressure control. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate while load-following, a linear model predictive controller (LMPC) is implemented in MATLAB®. A combined process and disturbance model is identified by considering a number of model forms and choosing the final model based on an information-theoretic criterion. The performance of the LMPC is found to be superior to the conventional PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

Bhattacharyya, D,; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics® (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB® environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water treatment/instrument air, and power conditioning/controls were built and shipped to the site. The two fuel cell modules, each rated at 1 MW on natural gas, were fabricated by FuelCell Energy in its Torrington, CT manufacturing facility. The fuel cell modules were conditioned and tested at FuelCell Energy in Danbury and shipped to the site. Installation of the power plant and connection to all required utilities and syngas was completed. Pre-operation checkout of the entire power plant was conducted and the plant was ready to operate in July 2004. However, fuel gas (natural gas or syngas) was not available at the WREL site due to technical difficulties with the gasifier and other issues. The fuel cell power plant was therefore not operated, and subsequently removed by October of 2005. The WREL fuel cell site was restored to the satisfaction of WREL. FuelCell Energy continues to market carbonate fuel cells for natural gas and digester gas applications. A fuel cell/turbine hybrid is being developed and tested that provides higher efficiency with potential to reach the DOE goal of 60% HHV on coal gas. A system study was conducted for a 40 MW direct fuel cell/turbine hybrid (DFC/T) with potential for future coal gas applications. In addition, FCE is developing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power plants with Versa Power Systems (VPS) as part of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program and has an on-going program for co-production of hydrogen. Future development in these technologies can lead to future coal gas fuel cell applications.

FuelCell Energy

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

16

Gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop engineering evaluations of technologies for the capture, use, and disposal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This project emphasizes CO{sub 2}-capture technologies combined with integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. Complementary evaluations address CO{sub 2} transportation, CO{sub 2} use, and options for the long-term sequestering of unused CO{sub 2}. Commercially available CO{sub 2}-capture technology is providing a performance and economic baseline against which to compare innovative technologies. The intent is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps, in addition to process design capital and operating costs. The value used for the {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget is 1 kg of CO{sub 2} per kilowatt-hour (electric). The base case is a 458-MW IGCC system that uses an air-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal feed, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production of 454 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.835 kg/kWhe. Two additional life-cycle energy balances for emerging technologies were considered: (1) high-temperature CO{sub 2} separation with calcium- or magnesium-based sorbents, and (2) ambient-temperature facilitated-transport polymer membranes for acid-gas removal.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.R.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Economic Rationale for Safety Investment in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Gas Turbine Membrane Reactor Modules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Rationale for Safety Investment in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Gas Turbine Membrane Reactor Modules Reyyan Koc, Nikolaos K. Kazantzis, William J. Nuttall and Yi Hua Ma May 2012 CWPE 1226... & EPRG 1211 www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EP RG W OR KI NG P AP ER Abstract Economic Rationale for Safety Investment in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Gas Turbine Membrane Reactor Modules EPRG Working Paper 1211 Cambridge...

Koc, Reyyan; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K.; Nuttall, William J.; Ma, Yi Hua

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

18

Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

19

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Analysis of Biomass/Coal Co-Gasification for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems with Carbon Capture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In recent years, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology (IGCC) has become more common in clean coal power operations with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS).… (more)

Long, Henry A, III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle System Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle Carolina State University ABSTRACT Gasification is a globally emerging technology in commercial markets for the conversion of a variety of feedstocks, including coal, heavy residue oil, biomass, solid waste, and others

Frey, H. Christopher

22

Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities in the US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE)`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports the commercialization of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems. This overview briefly describes the supporting RD&D activities and the IGCC projects selected for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program.

Ness, H.M.; Brdar, R.D.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D)program that supports the CCT program, and addresses long-term improvements in support of IGCC technology. This overview briefly describes the CCT projects and the supporting RD&D activities.

Ness, H.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development efforts have been underway for decades to replace dry-gas cleaning technology with humid-gas cleaning technology that would maintain the water vapor content in the raw gas by conducting cleaning at sufficiently high temperature to avoid water vapor condensation and would thus significantly simplify the plant and improve its thermal efficiency. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. conducted a program with the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) to develop a Novel Gas Cleaning process that uses a new type of gas-sorbent contactor, the ''filter-reactor''. The Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning process described and evaluated here is in its early stages of development and this evaluation is classified as conceptual. The commercial evaluations have been coupled with integrated Process Development Unit testing performed at a GTI coal gasifier test facility to demonstrate, at sub-scale the process performance capabilities. The commercial evaluations and Process Development Unit test results are presented in Volumes 1 and 2 of this report, respectively. Two gas cleaning applications with significantly differing gas cleaning requirements were considered in the evaluation: IGCC power generation, and Methanol Synthesis with electric power co-production. For the IGCC power generation application, two sets of gas cleaning requirements were applied, one representing the most stringent ''current'' gas cleaning requirements, and a second set representing possible, very stringent ''future'' gas cleaning requirements. Current gas cleaning requirements were used for Methanol Synthesis in the evaluation because these cleaning requirements represent the most stringent of cleaning requirements and the most challenging for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning process. The scope of the evaluation for each application was: (1) Select the configuration for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning Process, the arrangement of the individual gas cleaning stages, and the probable operating conditions of the gas cleaning stages to conceptually satisfy the gas cleaning requirements; (2) Estimate process material & energy balances for the major plant sections and for each gas cleaning stage; (3) Conceptually size and specify the major gas cleaning process equipment; (4) Determine the resulting overall performance of the application; and (5) Estimate the investment cost and operating cost for each application. Analogous evaluation steps were applied for each application using conventional gas cleaning technology, and comparison was made to extract the potential benefits, issues, and development needs of the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning technology. The gas cleaning process and related gas conditioning steps were also required to meet specifications that address plant environmental emissions, the protection of the gas turbine and other Power Island components, and the protection of the methanol synthesis reactor. Detailed material & energy balances for the gas cleaning applications, coupled with preliminary thermodynamic modeling and laboratory testing of candidate sorbents, identified the probable sorbent types that should be used, their needed operating conditions in each stage, and their required levels of performance. The study showed that Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning technology can be configured to address and conceptually meet all of the gas cleaning requirements for IGCC, and that it can potentially overcome several of the conventional IGCC power plant availability issues, resulting in improved power plant thermal efficiency and cost. For IGCC application, Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning yields 6% greater generating capacity and 2.3 percentage-points greater efficiency under the Current Standards case, and more than 9% generating capacity increase and 3.6 percentage-points higher efficiency in the Future Standards case. While the conceptual equipment costs are estimated to be only slightly lower for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning processes than for the conventional processes, the improved power plant capacity results in the potentia

Dennis A. Horazak; Richard A. Newby; Eugene E. Smeltzer; Rachid B. Slimane; P. Vann Bush; James L. Aderhold Jr; Bruce G. Bryan

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Application of the integrated gasification combined cycle technology and BGL gasification design for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology promises to be the power generation technology of choice in the late 1990s and beyond. Based on the principle that almost any fuel can be burned more cleanly and efficiently if first turned into a gas, an IGCC plant extracts more electricity from a ton of coal by burning it as a gas in a turbine rather than as a solid in a boiler. Accordingly, coal gasification is the process of converting coal to a clean-burning synthetic gas. IGCC technology is the integration of the coal-gasification plant with a conventional combined-cycle plant to produce electricity. The benefits of this technology merger are many and result in a highly efficient and environmentally superior energy production facility. The lGCC technology holds significant implications for Asia-Pacific countries and for other parts of the world. High-growth regions require additional baseload capacity. Current low prices for natural gas and minimal emissions that result from its use for power generation favor its selection as the fuel source for new power generation capacity. However, fluctuations in fuel price and fuel availability are undermining the industry`s confidence in planning future capacity based upon gas-fueled generation. With the world`s vast coal reserves, there is a continuing effort to provide coal-fueled power generation technologies that use coal cleanly and efficiently. The lGCC technology accomplishes this objective. This chapter provides a summary of the status of lGCC technology and lGCC projects known to date. It also will present a technical overview of the British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) technology, one of the leading and most promising coal gasifier designs.

Edmonds, R.F. Jr.; Hulkowich, G.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Availability analysis of an integrated gasification-combined cycle: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) contracted with ARINC Research Corporation to perform availability assessments of an integrated coal gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) design. The objective of the study was to quantify the availability impact associated with several design and operating options specified by EPRI. In addition, several scheduled maintenance options for the IGCC plant were evaluated. The IGCC plant addressed in this analysis employs many modular design features that give the plant high equivalent availability through redundancy. The study focused on evaluating and quantifying the expected changes in unit capability, equivalent availability, and heat rate associated with various design alternatives. The findings of the baseline case studies are as follows: (1) The Baseline IGCC design using four gasifiers with 11.2% spare gasification capacity and three combustion turbine/HRSGs sets will have an expected equivalent availability of 86.18% and an average heat rate of 9002 Btu/kWh. (2) The Baseline with Supplemental Firing design using four gasifiers with the 11.2% spare gasification capacity being used to produce supplemental steam and with three combustion turbine HRSG sets will have an expected equivalent availability of 85.64% and an average heat rate of 9147 Btu/kWh. (3) The Baseline with Natural Gas Backup design using four gasifiers and three combustion turbine/HRSG sets with supplemental natural gas backup will have an expected equivalent availability of 91.53% with an average heat rate of 8981 Btu/kWh and a coal-to-natural gas fuel mixture of 23:1. 49 figs., 66 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project: Clean Coal Technology Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On February 22, 1988, DOE issued Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Number-DE-PS01-88FE61530 for Round II of the CCT Program. The purpose of the PON was to solicit proposals to conduct cost-shared ICCT projects to demonstrate technologies that are capable of being commercialized in the 1990s, that are more cost-effective than current technologies, and that are capable of achieving significant reduction of SO[sub 2] and/or NO[sub x] emissions from existing coal burning facilities, particularly those that contribute to transboundary and interstate pollution. The Combustion Engineering (C-E) Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Repowering Project was one of 16 proposals selected by DOE for negotiation of cost-shared federal funding support from among the 55 proposals that were received in response to the PON. The ICCT Program has developed a three-level strategy for complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that is consistent with the President's Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508) and the DOE guidelines for compliance with NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The strategy includes the consideration of programmatic and project-specific environmental impacts during and subsequent to the reject selection process.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The U.S. Department of Energy`s integrated gasification combined cycle research, development and demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, coal has played a major role as a fuel source for power generation both domestically and abroad. Despite increasingly stringent environmental constraints and affordable natural gas, coal will remain one of the primary fuels for producing electricity. This is due to its abundance throughout the world, low price, ease of transport an export, decreasing capital cost for coal-based systems, and the need to maintain fuel diversity. Recognizing the role coal will continue to play, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is working in partnership with industry to develop ways to use this abundant fuel resource in a manner that is more economical, more efficient and environmentally superior to conventional means to burn coal. The most promising of these technologies is integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. Although IGCC systems offer many advantages, there are still several hurdles that must be overcome before the technology achieves widespread commercial acceptance. The major hurdles to commercialization include reducing capital and operating costs, reducing technical risk, demonstrating environmental and technical performance at commercial scale, and demonstrating system reliability and operability. Overcoming these hurdles, as well as continued progress in improving system efficiency, are the goals of the DOE IGCC research, development and demonstrate (RD and D) program. This paper provides an overview of this integrated RD and D program and describes fundamental areas of technology development, key research projects and their related demonstration scale activities.

Brdar, R.D.; Cicero, D.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

CPC air-blown integrated gasification combined cycle project. Quarterly report, October--December 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall project cost and schedule. The combustion turbine commercial operation date is scheduled for 7/1/95 with the combined cycle commercial operation date of 7/1/96. A two year demonstration period will commence after IGCC commercial operation. Details of costs on a total project and DOE Envelope basis along with detailed schedule components were covered. Major cost variances to date were discussed. The major variances this year relate to contracts which were anticipated to be finalized mid 1992 but which are not executed. These include GEESI, the ASU and key vessels. Some of these contracts are almost in place and others are scheduled for the first quarter 1993. Numerous project specifications, process flow diagrams, piping and instrument diagrams and other drawings have been reviewed and approved as part of the preliminary engineering process.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The United States of America and the People`s Republic of China experts report on integrated gasification combined-cycle technology (IGCC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report written by the leading US and Chinese experts in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, intended for high level decision makers, may greatly accelerate the development of an IGCC demonstration project in the People`s Republic of China (PRC). The potential market for IGCC systems in China and the competitiveness of IGCC technology with other clean coal options for China have been analyzed in the report. Such information will be useful not only to the Chinese government but also to US vendors and companies. The goal of this report is to analyze the energy supply structure of China, China`s energy and environmental protection demand, and the potential market in China in order to make a justified and reasonable assessment on feasibility of the transfer of US Clean Coal Technologies to China. The Expert Report was developed and written by the joint US/PRC IGCC experts and will be presented to the State Planning Commission (SPC) by the President of the CAS to ensure consideration of the importance of IGCC for future PRC power production.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

"Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World9, 2014 International PetroleumFuel Oil8Status of technologies

34

Evaluation of air toxic emissions from advanced and conventional coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the air toxics measurements at three advanced power systems and a base case conventional fossil fuel power plant. The four plants tested include a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, integrated gasification combined cycle, circulating fluidized bed combustor, and a conventional coal-fired plant.

Chu, P.; Epstein, M. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Gould, L. [Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Botros, P. [Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(say, a trip) and such factors are not fully captured in this dataset. 9. Older combined cycle units were a step change in lower operating costs due to cycling...

36

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced combined cycle Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cycle (IGCC) Initiative Summary: ACTION TEAM PROGRESS REPORT Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Initiative Date... and Costs of Coal-Based Integrated Gasification...

37

EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThis EISStatement |This EIS evaluates thein(HECA)Cycle and

38

Development of a dynamic simulator for a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with post-combustion carbon capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AVESTAR Center located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and West Virginia University is a world-class research and training environment dedicated to using dynamic process simulation as a tool for advancing the safe, efficient and reliable operation of clean energy plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The AVESTAR Center was launched with a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion carbon capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator offers full-scope Operator Training Simulator (OTS) Human Machine Interface (HMI) graphics for realistic, real-time control room operation and is integrated with a 3D virtual Immersive Training Simulator (ITS), thus allowing joint control room and field operator training. The IGCC OTS/ITS solution combines a “gasification with CO{sub 2} capture” process simulator with a “combined cycle” power simulator into a single high-performance dynamic simulation framework. This presentation will describe progress on the development of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) dynamic simulator based on the syngas-fired combined cycle portion of AVESTAR’s IGCC dynamic simulator. The 574 MW gross NGCC power plant design consisting of two advanced F-class gas turbines, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and a steam turbine in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration will be reviewed. Plans for integrating a post-combustion carbon capture system will also be discussed.

Liese, E.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Summary report: Trace substance emissions from a coal-fired gasification plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) sponsored field sampling and analyses to characterize emissions of trace substances from LGTI`s integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant at Plaquemine, Louisiana. The results indicate that emissions from the LGTI facility were quite low, often in the ppb levels, and comparable to a well-controlled pulverized coal-fired power plant.

Williams, A.; Wetherold, B.; Maxwell, D.

1996-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

40

Simulation and optimization of hot syngas separation processes in integrated gasification combined cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IGCC with CO2 capture offers an exciting approach for cleanly using abundant coal reserves of the world to generate electricity. The present state-of-the-art synthesis gas (syngas) cleanup technologies in IGCC involve ...

Prakash, Kshitij

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EIS-0429: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Indiana Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Rockport, IN  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a coal-to-substitute natural gas facility proposed to be built in Rockport, IN by Indiana Gasification. The facility would utilize Illinois Basin coal. Other products would be marketable sulfuric acid, argon, and electric power.

42

EIS-0428: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Mississippi Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Moss Point, Mississippi  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a petroleum coke-to-substitute natural gas facility proposed to be built by Mississippi Gasification. The facility would be designed to produce 120 million standard cubic feet of gas per day. Other products would be marketable sulfuric acid, carbon dioxide, argon, and electric power.

43

EIS-0318: Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project, Trapp, Kentucky (Clark County)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to provide cost-shared financial support for The Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project, an electrical power station demonstrating use of a Clean Coal Technology in Clark County, Kentucky.

44

EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for the construction and operation of Hydrogen Energy California's LLC project, which would produce and sell electricity, carbon dioxide and fertilizer. DOE selected this project for an award of financial assistance through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative program.

45

Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Accelerating progress toward operational excellence of fossil energy plants with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address challenges in attaining operational excellence for clean energy plants, the National Energy Technology Laboratory has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTARTM). The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real-time, high-fidelity dynamic simulators with operator training systems and 3D virtual immersive training systems into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. This paper will highlight the AVESTAR Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant (IGCC) with carbon dioxide capture.

Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Turton, R. Bhattacharyya, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Chasing megawatts in combined cycle plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combined cycle owners do not have to accept that combined cycle performance must degrade over time. Through low cost testing using existing instrumentation, a method is presented to identify causes for lost generation. A 500 MW combined cycle plant, with two STAG 207EA units, had lost 17 MW since initial operation, and found that: Gas side fouling on A four HRSG`s accounted for 8 MW of the total loss LP steam turbine efficiency was below design on one unit, contributing 3 MW Condenser air removal was poor on both units, a loss of an additional 2 MW Compressor and turbine section efficiency losses on 2 of 4 GT`s cost over 4 MW The test also revealed that the other two GT`s, both cooling towers, and one of the two steam turbines, were performing at or near design. Thus far 3 MW has been recovered, with planning underway for recovery of another 3 MW. The remaining 11 MW, though not immediately recoverable, will be the focus of planning for the next major outage. This simple method can be used at any combined cycle using existing instrumentation, with minimal intrusion on daily operations. The use of redundant measurements and uncertainty analysis assures valid and useful results.

Koch, J. [Power Plant Performance Specialist, Lansdowne, PA (United States); DeGeeter, S. [Ocean State Power, Harrisville, RI (United States); Haynes, C.J. [New England Power Co., Somerset, MA (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as synthetic crude gasification combined cycle powerstand-alone integrated gasification combined cycle powertransmission integrated gasification, combined cycle power

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass FacilityOregon:Great EscapeBinary Cycle Power Plant

50

AVESTAR Center: Dynamic simulation-based collaboration toward achieving opertional excellence for IGCC plants with crbon capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address challenges in attaining operational excellence for clean energy plants, the National Energy Technology Laboratory has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR(TM)). The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real-time, high-fidelity dynamic simulators with operator training systems and 3D virtual immersive training systems into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. This paper will highlight the AVESTAR Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant (IGCC) with carbon dioxide capture.

Zitney, Strphen E. [U.S. DOE; Liese, Eric A. [U.S. DOE; Mahapatra, Priyadarshi [URS; Turton, Richard [WVU; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu [WVU; Provost, Graham [Fossil Consulting Services

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Proceedings: Sixth International Conference on Fossil Plant Cycle Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purity of boiler water, feedwater, and steam is central to ensuring component availability and reliability in fossil-fired plants. These conference proceedings address the state of the art in fossil plant and combined cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) cycle chemistry as well as international practices for control of corrosion and water preparation and purification.

None

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid combined cycle power plant is described including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production. 1 figure.

Bharathan, D.; Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid combined cycle power plant including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production.

Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Williams, Thomas A. (Arvada, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation begins with a description of U.S. Energy Challenges, particularly Power Generation Capacity and Clean Energy Plant Operations. It goes on to describe the missions and goals of the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTARTM). It moves on to the subject of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} Capture, particularly a Process/Project Overview, Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS), 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS), Facilities, Training, Education, and R&D, and Future Simulators/Directions

Provost, G,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slideshow presentation begins by outlining US energy challenges, particularly with respect to power generation capacity and clean energy plant operations. It goes on to describe the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR{sup TM}). Its mission and goals are given, followed by an overview of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} capture. The Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS) and 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS) are then presented. Facilities, training, education, and R&D are covered, followed by future simulators and directions.

Provost, G,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Impact of coal quality and gasifier technology on IGCC performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

02139, USA Abstract Integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants withpre Plus and combined with GTPRO, mass and energy balances were computed. Two gasification technologies quality, efficiency Introduction Integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) has emerged

57

Effective Renewable Energy Policy: Leave It to the States?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solid waste, or coal integrated gasification combined cycle.integrated gasification combined cycle technologies, waste

Weissman, Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Life-cycle assessment of wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprints analysis of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. In previous research, the issue of global warming is often related ...

Dong, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Mesaba next-generation IGCC plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through a US Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement awarded in June 2006, MEP-I LLC plans to demonstrate a next generation integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generating plant, the Mesaba Energy Project. The 606-MWe plant (the first of two similarly sized plants envisioned by project sponsors) will feature next-generation ConocoPhillips E-Gas{trademark} technology first tested on the DOE-funded Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering project. Mesaba will benefit from recommendations of an industry panel applying the Value Improving Practices process to Wabash cost and performance results. The project will be twice the size of Wabash, while demonstrating better efficient, reliability and pollutant control. The $2.16 billion project ($36 million federal cost share) will be located in the Iron Range region north of Duluth, Minnesota. Mesaba is one of four projects selected under Round II of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. 1 fig.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Cheng Cycle Brings Flexibility to Steam Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Based upon an estimated steam load between 5,000 and 50,000 Ibjhr and an electrical load of approximately 1500 KW, the Engineering Department examined several energy optimization systems for this site. It was determined that a modified gas turbine... within the borders allows exact tracking of desired electrical and thermal outputs. The Allison engine used in the Cheng Cycle system was selected for its proved performance and its ample surge margin which permits stable steam injection...

Keller, D. C.; Bynum, D.; Kosla, L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass FacilityOregon:Great EscapeBinary Cycle Power

62

Use and recovery of ammonia in power plant cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents some practical and theoretical aspects of the use of ammonia in power plant water/steam cycles. The plants considered are fully automated units with once-through boilers, which operate under complex conditions and are subject to frequent starts and load changes. The boilers are chemically conditioned with combined oxygen ammonia treatment and the condensate polishing plant is only operated during start-up, in the event of a condenser leak or to remove excess ammonia. The paper also covers the recovery of ammonia from the condensate polishing plant waste regenerants and reuse for conditioning the feedwater. In particular, the paper deals with the following points: theoretical analysis of the chemical equilibrium of ammonia and carbon dioxide in water, including calculation of the concentrations from the parameters normally measured, such as conductivities and pH; equipment for monitoring and controlling the amount of ammonia fed to the water/steam cycle, including the optimum positioning of the sampling and feed-points, the parameters suitable for feed control and their temperature dependence; the partial pressure and distribution coefficient of ammonia; the consumption and losses of ammonia through the water/steam cycle during operation; the recovery of ammonia from condensate polishing plant waste regenerants by steam stripping. The paper should be of interest to both planning engineers and plant operators.

Pflug, H.D.; Bettenworth, H.J.; Syring, H.A. [Preussen Elektra AG, Hanover (Germany)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant (10) to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine (22) fluid inlet state which is substantially in the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line (46).

Pope, William L. (Walnut Creek, CA); Pines, Howard S. (El Cerrito, CA); Doyle, Padraic A. (Oakland, CA); Silvester, Lenard F. (Richmond, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle ( IGCC)coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)will be integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) (Same

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant design duty cycle. Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document defines the Plant Design Duty Cycle (PCDC) for the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The duty cycle is a set of events and their design number of occurrences over the life of the plant for which the MHTGR plant shall be designed to ensure that the plant meets all the top-level requirements. The duty cycle is representative of the types of events to be expected in multiple reactor module-turbine plant configurations of the MHTGR. A synopsis of each PDDC event is presented to provide an overview of the plant response and consequence. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Chan, T.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Proceedings: 7th International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purity of boiler water, feedwater, and steam is central to ensuring component availability and reliability in fossil-fired plants. These proceedings of EPRI's Seventh International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil Plants address the state of the art in fossil plant and combined cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) cycle chemistry as well as international practices for corrosion control and water preparation and purification.

None

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Cycle Configurations for a PBMR Steam and Electricity Production Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is an advanced helium-cooled, graphite moderated High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) that is capable of multiple missions. The petrochemical industry requires the use of high temperature steam and electricity for their processes. Currently coal or natural gas is utilised for the generation of high temperature steam and electricity, which under-utilises natural resources and in the process emits CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere. This paper provides an overview of the PBMR product development path and discusses how steam production forms part of the future possibilities of the PBMR technology. Suitable cycle configurations for both process steam and electricity generation as required by petrochemical plants are discussed. (authors)

Matzner, Dieter; Kriel, Willem; Correia, Michael; Greyvenstein, Renee [PBMR - Pty - Ltd, Lake Buena Vista Building, 1267 Gordon Hood Avenue, Centurion, PO Box 9396, Centurion 0046 (South Africa)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Coal-fired open cycle magnetohydrodynamic power plant emissions and energy efficiences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is a review of projected emissions and energy efficiencies of coal-fired open cycle MHD power plants. Ideally one

Gruhl, Jim

69

The Power to Reduce CO2 Emissions: the Full Portfolio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy- efficient CO 2 capture for pulverized coal and integrated gasification combined cycle plants. Both nuclear and advanced coal with CCS technologies are...

70

Investigation of combined-cycle steam-plant problems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation and maintenance of gas turbine combined-cycle steam generators is reviewed. Feedwater cycles and auxiliary equipment are also discussed, and the results of on-site discussions with operating and maintenance personnel are presented. Actual problems encountered are delineated, and recommendations are given for improving operation of existing plants, for design of new plants, and for future research and development.

Crutchfield, H.C.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power L-CAT).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Power Systems L-CAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates levelized production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (using either imported (LNGCC) or domestic natural gas (NGCC)), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind. All of the fossil fuel technologies also include an option for including carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. The fossil fuel options are based on detailed life cycle analysis reports conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). For each of these technologies, NETL's detailed LCAs include consideration of five stages associated with energy production: raw material acquisition (RMA), raw material transport (RMT), energy conversion facility (ECF), product transportation and distribution (PT&D), and end user electricity consumption. The goal of the NETL studies is to compare existing and future fossil fuel technology options using a cradle-to-grave analysis. The NETL reports consider constant dollar levelized cost of delivered electricity, total plant costs, greenhouse gas emissions, criteria air pollutants, mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3) emissions, water withdrawal and consumption, and land use (acreage).

Andruski, Joel; Drennen, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

73

Pilot plant used to develop load and pressure controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Viewed from the perspective of the power-generation mixture in Japan, nuclear power plants will continue to be operated to meet the base load. Meanwhile, integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants will be required to serve as thermal power plants to cover the middle load, as is the case with conventional thermal power plants. In terms of operational performance, therefore, IGCC power plants will need to have a capability of following a wide range of load demand at high speed. For this purpose, a load and pressure controller was developed and tested during the operational research on a 200 tons/day entrained flow IGCC pilot plant at the Nakoso Power Station by the Engineering Research Association for IGCC Power Systems (IGC Association). This article reports on the development of the load and pressure controller and the results of the control test carried out to check the load follow capability of the pilot plant, while touching upon the simulation study also being conducted.

Nagata, Kazue; Yamada, Toshihiro; Hiza, Tomoyuki

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of clean energy plants and DYNSIM OTS / EyeSim ITS integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Power-Point presentation with notes starts with a brief overview of US energy challenging, particularly as regards power generation capacity and clean energy plant operations. It then goes on to present Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR{trademark}) beginning with a statement of its missions and goals, then moves to the subject of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} Capture, first providing a brief overview of the process, then moving on to Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS) and 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS). The presentation continues to describe AVESTAR center facilities, locations, and training systems and to look at future directions for virtual energy simulation.

Provost, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Financing Capture Ready Coal-Fired Power Plants in China by Issuing Capture Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) LHV (Low Heating Value) Local EPA (Local Environment Protection Administration in China) MLR (Ministry of Land Electricity Regulatory Commission in China) Solar PV Power (Solar Photovoltaic Power) Std Dev (Standard

Aickelin, Uwe

76

Electric power generating plant having direct-coupled steam and compressed-air cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

Drost, M.K.

1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

Electric power generating plant having direct coupled steam and compressed air cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

Drost, Monte K. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Combined-cycle gas and steam turbine power plants. 2. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

First published in 1991, this book is the leading reference on technical and economic factors of combined-cycle applications now leading the trend toward merchant plants and the peaking power needed in newly deregulated markets around the world, this long-awaited second edition is more important than ever. In it, Kehlhofer -- an internationally recognized authority in the field of new combined-cycle power plants -- and his co-authors widen the scope and detail found in the first edition. Included are tips on system layout, details on controls and automation, and operating instructions. Loaded with case studies, reference tables, and more than 150 figures, this text offers solid advice on system layout, controls and automation, and operating and maintenance instructions. The author provides real-world examples to apply to one`s own applications. The contents include: Introduction; The electricity market; Thermodynamic principles of combined-cycle plants; Combined-cycle concepts; Applications of combined-cycle; Components; Control and automation; Operating and part load behavior; Environmental considerations; Developmental trends; Typical combined-cycle plants already built; Conclusion; Appendices; Conversions; Calculation of the operating performance of combined-cycle installations; Definitions of terms and symbols; Bibliography; and Index.

Kehlhofer, R.; Bachmann, R.; Nielson, H.; Warner, J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Raft River binary-cycle geothermal pilot power plant final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and performance of a 5-MW(e) binary-cycle pilot power plant that used a moderate-temperature hydrothermal resource, with isobutane as a working fluid, are examined. Operating problems experienced and solutions found are discussed and recommendations are made for improvements to future power plant designs. The plant and individual systems are analyzed for design specification versus actual performance figures.

Bliem, C.J.; Walrath, L.F.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Design and operation of a geopressurized-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geopressured-geothermal resources can contribute significantly to the national electricity supply once technical and economic obstacles are overcome. Power plant performance under the harsh conditions of a geopressured resource was unproven, so a demonstration power plant was built and operated on the Pleasant Bayou geopressured resource in Texas. This one megawatt facility provided valuable data over a range of operating conditions. This power plant was a first-of-a-kind demonstration of the hybrid cycle concept. A hybrid cycle was used to take advantage of the fact that geopressured resources contain energy in more than one form -- hot water and natural gas. Studies have shown that hybrid cycles can yield thirty percent more power than stand-alone geothermal and fossil fuel power plants operating on the same resource. In the hybrid cycle at Pleasant Bayou, gas was burned in engines to generate electricity directly. Exhaust heat from the engines was then combined with heat from the brine to generate additional electricity in a binary cycle. Heat from the gas engine was available at high temperature, thus improving the efficiency of the binary portion of the hybrid cycle. Design power output was achieved, and 3445 MWh of power were sold to the local utility over the course of the test. Plant availability was 97.5% and the capacity factor was over 80% for the extended run at maximum power production. The hybrid cycle power plant demonstrated that there are no technical obstacles to electricity generation at Pleasant Bayou. 14 refs., 38 figs., 16 tabs.

Campbell, R.G.; Hattar, M.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Thermodynamics -2 A cogeneration plant (plant which provides both electricity and thermal energy) executes a cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamics - 2 A cogeneration plant (plant which provides both electricity and thermal energy] Determine the rate of heat addition in the steam generator. Now consider an ideal, reversible cogeneration 1 2 3 45 6 Cogeneration Plant Boundary #12;

Virginia Tech

82

Implications of Near-Term Coal Power Plant Retirement for SO2 and NOX and Life Cycle GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implications of Near-Term Coal Power Plant Retirement for SO2 and NOX and Life Cycle GHG Emissions emissions in the U.S. will likely result in coal plant retirement in the near-term. Life cycle assessment for electricity generation, by comparing systems that consist of individual natural gas and coal power plants

Jaramillo, Paulina

83

Novel Power Cycle for Combined-Cycle Systems and Utility Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wi th the Wes t inghouse SOlD gas turb ',ne, but also compared to combined-cycle sys terns wi th the advanced gas turbi ie 700lF of General Electric, despite qhe fact that the efficiency of the 7001.F gas turbine per se is higher than...

Kalina, A. L.

84

VOC Emission Control with the Brayton Cycle Pilot Plant Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mobile pilot plant capable of removing VOC emissions from exhaust air streams was cooperatively funded by SCE, EPRI, 3M, and NUCON. Valuable information about the process and the recovery operation has been gained by performing tests at a number...

Enneking, J. C.

85

Mechanisms of plant species impacts on ecosystem nitrogen cycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, this microbial nitrogen loop is driven by plant-supplied carbon and provides a strong negative feedback through by an increase in the relative nitrogen content in decomposing litter and a much lower carbon-to-nitrogen ratio by a microbial nitrogen loop. Nitrogen is released from the soil organic matter and incorporated into microbial

Minnesota, University of

86

Increased efficiency of topping cycle PCFB power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) power plants offer the power industry significantly increased efficiencies with reduced costs of electricity and lower emissions. When topping combustion is incorporated in the plant, these advantages are enhanced. In the plant, coal is fed to a pressurized carbonizer that produces a low-Btu fuel gas and char. After passing through a cyclone and ceramic barrier filter to remove gas-entrained particulates and a packed bed of emathelite pellets to remove alkali vapors. the fuel gas is burned in a topping combustor to produce the energy required to drive a gas turbine. The gas turbine drives a generator combustor, and a fluidized bed heat exchanger (FBHE). The carbonizer char is burned in the PCFB and the exhaust gas passes through its own cyclone, ceramic barrier filter, and alkali getter and supports combustion of the fuel gas in the topping combustor. Steam generated in a heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) downstream of the gas turbine and in the FBHE associated with the PCFB drives the steam turbine generator that furnishes the balance of electric power delivered by the plant.

Robertson, A.; Domeracki, W.; Horazak, D. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

PFB coal fired combined cycle development program: commercial plant economic analysis (Task 1. 6)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this program are to evaluate the Coal Fired Combined Cycle (CFCC) power plant conceptual design and to conduct supporting development programs for pressurized fluidized bed technology advancement in combustion/steam generator, gas turbine and hot gas cleanup technologies. The Coal-Fired Combined Cycle is the unique power plant concept developed under the leadership of the General Electric Company to provide a direct coal-burning gas turbine and steam turbine combined-cycle power plant. The advantages of the combined cycle for higher efficiency and the potential of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor improvements in emissions could offer a new and attractive option to the electric utility industry. The CFCC approach provides for cooling the fluid bed combustor through the use of steam tubes in the bed which supply a steam turbine generator. The partially cooled combustion gases drive a gas turbine generator after passing through a hot gas cleanup train. The Conceptual CFCC Commercial Plant has been defined in Report No. Fe-2357-28. This design, being conceptual in nature, has not been improved through the formal cost reduction iteration/design program. An economic analysis of this baseline plant is provided in this report. The General Electric Company believes that the combustion of coal by the pressurized fluidized bed process is one of the most effective and efficient means for the utilization of coal with respect to both environmental considerations and the cost of electricity.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Operating experience of single cylinder steam turbine with 40 inch last blade applied for combined cycle plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inquiries and orders for combined cycle plant have increased recently because of the better efficiency of combined cycle plant in comparison with the usual fossil fuel power plant. The typical features of the steam turbine for combined cycle plant are the lower inlet steam conditions and the more driving steam flow quantity compared with the steam turbine for usual fossil fuel plants. This paper introduces the design and results of operation about 122 MW single cylinder steam turbine. Furthermore, the results of periodical overhaul inspection carried out after one year`s commercial operation is also presented.

Kishimoto, Masaru; Yamamoto, Tetsuya [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Yokota, Hiroshi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagasaki (Northern Mariana Islands); Umaya, Masahide [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants. [US DOE Patent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine fluid inlet state which is substantially on the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line.

Pope, W.L.; Pines, H.S.; Doyle, P.A.; Silvester, L.F.

1980-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

Altheim geothermal Plant for electricity production by Organic Rankine Cycle turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the plan of the town Altheim in Upper Austria to produce electricity by an Organic Rankine Cycle-turbogenerator in the field of utilization of low temperatured thermal water. The aim of the project is to improve the technical and economic situation of the geothermal plant.

Pernecker, Gerhard; Ruhland, Johannes

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

91

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

USA National Phenology Network: Plant and Animal Life-Cycle Data Related to Climate Change  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Phenology refers to recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, such as leafing and flowering, maturation of agricultural plants, emergence of insects, and migration of birds. It is also the study of these recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, especially their timing and relationships with weather and climate. Phenology affects nearly all aspects of the environment, including the abundance and diversity of organisms, their interactions with one another, their functions in food webs, and their seasonable behavior, and global-scale cycles of water, carbon, and other chemical elements. Phenology records can help us understand plant and animal responses to climate change; it is a key indicator. The USA-NPN brings together citizen scientists, government agencies, non-profit groups, educators, and students of all ages to monitor the impacts of climate change on plants and animals in the United States. The network harnesses the power of people and the Internet to collect and share information, providing researchers with far more data than they could collect alone.[Extracts copied from the USA-NPN home page and from http://www.usanpn.org/about].

93

Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective is to identify and assess advanced improvements to the Brayton Cycle (such as but not limited to firing temperature, pressure ratio, combustion techniques, intercooling, fuel or combustion air augmentation, enhanced blade cooling schemes) that will lead to significant performance improvements in coal based power systems. This assessment is conducted in the context of conceptual design studies (systems studies) that advance state-of-art Brayton cycles and result in coal based efficiencies equivalent to 65% + on natural gas basis (LHV), or approximately an 8% reduction in heat rate of an IGCC plant utilizing the H class steam cooled gas turbine. H class gas turbines are commercially offered by General Electric and Mitsubishi for natural gas based combined cycle applications with 60% efficiency (LHV) and it is expected that such machine will be offered for syngas applications within the next 10 years. The studies are being sufficiently detailed so that third parties will be able to validate portions or all of the studies. The designs and system studies are based on plants for near zero emissions (including CO{sub 2}). Also included in this program is the performance evaluation of other advanced technologies such as advanced compression concepts and the fuel cell based combined cycle. The objective of the fuel cell based combined cycle task is to identify the desired performance characteristics and design basis for a gas turbine that will be integrated with an SOFC in Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) applications. The goal is the conceptualization of near zero emission (including CO{sub 2} capture) integrated gasification power plants producing electricity as the principle product. The capability of such plants to coproduce H{sub 2} is qualitatively addressed. Since a total systems solution is critical to establishing a plant configuration worthy of a comprehensive market interest, a baseline IGCC plant scheme is developed and used to study how alternative process schemes and power cycles might be used and integrated to achieve higher systems efficiency. To achieve these design results, the total systems approach is taken requiring creative integration of the various process units within the plant. Advanced gas turbine based cycles for Integrated gasification Combined cycle (IGCC) applications are identified by a screening analysis and the more promising cycles recommended for detailed systems analysis. In the case of the IGFC task, the main objective is met by developing a steady-state simulation of the entire plant and then using dynamic simulations of the hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)/Gas Turbine sub-system to investigate the turbo-machinery performance. From these investigations the desired performance characteristics and a basis for design of turbo-machinery for use in a fuel cell gas turbine power block is developed.

A.D. Rao; D.J. Francuz; J.D. Maclay; J. Brouwer; A. Verma; M. Li; G.S. Samuelsen

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To eliminate the harmful effects of greenhouse gases, especially that of CO2, future coalfired power plants need to consider the option for CO2 capture. The loss in efficiency for CO2 capture is less in an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant compared to other conventional coal combustion processes. However, no IGCC plant with CO2 capture currently exists in the world. Therefore, it is important to consider the operability and controllability issues of such a plant before it is commercially built. With this objective in mind, a detailed plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture has been developed. The plant considers a General Electric Energy (GEE)-type downflow radiant-only gasifier followed by a quench section. A two-stage water gas shift (WGS) reaction is considered for conversion of about 96 mol% of CO to CO2. A two-stage acid gas removal (AGR) process based on a physical solvent is simulated for selective capture of H2S and CO2. The clean syngas is sent to a gas turbine (GT) followed by a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The steady state results are validated with data from a commercial gasifier. A 5 % ramp increase in the flowrate of coal is introduced to study the system dynamics. To control the conversion of CO at a desired level in the WGS reactors, the steam/CO ratio is manipulated. This strategy is found to be efficient for this operating condition. In the absence of an efficient control strategy in the AGR process, the environmental emissions exceeded the limits by a great extent.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Optimization of waste heat recovery boiler of a combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the details of a procedure developed for optimization of a waste heat recovery boiler (WHRB) of a combined cycle power plant (CCPP) using the program for performance prediction of a typical CCPP, details of which have been presented elsewhere (Seyedan et al., 1994). In order to illustrate the procedure, the optimum design of a WHRB for a typical CCPP (employing dual-pressure bottoming cycle) built by a prominent Indian company, has been carried out. The present design of a WHRB is taken as the base design and the newer designs generated by this procedure are compared with it to assess the extent of cost reduction possible.

Seyedan, B.; Dhar, P.L.; Gaur, R.R. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Bindra, G.S. [Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd., New Delhi (India)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Effect of Gas Turbine Exhaust Temperature, Stack Temperature and Ambient Temperature on Overall Efficiency of Combine Cycle Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract—The gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature play a very important role during the predication of the performance of combine cycle power plant. This paper covers parametric analysis of effects of gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature on the overall efficiency of combine cycle power plant keeping the gas turbine efficiency as well as steam turbine efficiency constant. The results shows that out of three variables i.e. turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature, the most dominating factor of increasing the overall efficiency of the combine cycle power plant is the stack temperature.

unknown authors

97

Economic development through biomass system integration. Volumes 2--4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report documents a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners.

DeLong, M.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired gasification plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Fine Particulate Control/Air Toxics Program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been performing comprehensive assessments of toxic substance emissions from coal-fired electric utility units. An objective of this program is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in evaluating hazardous air pollutant emissions as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has also performed comprehensive assessments of emissions from many power plants and provided the information to the EPA. The DOE program was implemented in two. Phase 1 involved the characterization of eight utility units, with options to sample additional units in Phase 2. Radian was one of five contractors selected to perform these toxic emission assessments.Radian`s Phase 1 test site was at southern Company Service`s Plant Yates, Unit 1, which, as part of the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program, was demonstrating the CT-121 flue gas desulfurization technology. A commercial-scale prototype integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) power plant was selected by DOE for Phase 2 testing. Funding for the Phase 2 effort was provided by DOE, with assistance from EPRI and the host site, the Louisiana Gasification Technology, Inc. (LGTI) project This document presents the results of that effort.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Control system design for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture in IGCC power plants while loading-following  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Load-following requirements for future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with precombustion CO{sub 2} capture are expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. In this work, loadfollowing studies are performed using a comprehensive dynamic model of an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture developed in Aspen Engineering Suite (AES). Considering multiple single-loop controllers for power demand load following, the preferred IGCC control strategy from the perspective of a power producer is gas turbine (GT) lead with gasifier follow. In this strategy, the GT controls the load by manipulating its firing rate while the slurry feed flow to the gasifier is manipulated to control the syngas pressure at the GT inlet. The syngas pressure control is an integrating process with significant time delay mainly because of the large piping and equipment volumes between the gasifier and the GT inlet. A modified proportional–integral–derivative (PID) control is considered for IGCC syngas pressure control. The desired CO{sub 2} capture rate must be maintained while the IGCC plant follows the load. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate, the control performance of PID control is compared with linear model predictive control (LMPC). The results show that the LMPC outperforms PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Life Cycle Assessment of the MBT plant in Ano Liossia, Athens, Greece  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the operation of an MBT plant in Greece based on LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compare four different MBT operating scenarios (among them and with landfilling). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Even the current operation of the MBT plant is preferable to landfilling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Utilization of the MBT compost and metals generates the most environmental gains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal exploitation of RDF improves further the environmental performance of the plant. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is the application of Life Cycle Assessment to the operation of the MBT facility of Ano Liossia in the region of Attica in Greece. The region of Attica is home to almost half the population of Greece and the management of its waste is a major issue. In order to explicitly analyze the operation of the MBT plant, five scenarios were generated. Actual operation data of the MBT plant for the year 2008 were provided by the region of Attica and the LCA modeling was performed via the SimaPro 5.1 software while impact assessment was performed utilizing the Eco-indicator'99 method. The results of our analysis indicate that even the current operation of the MBT plant is preferable to landfilling. Among the scenarios of MBT operation, the one with complete utilization of the MBT outputs, i.e. compost, RDF, ferrous and non-ferrous metals, is the one that generates the most environmental gains. Our analysis indicates that the exploitation of RDF via incineration is the key factor towards improving the environmental performance of the MBT plant. Our findings provide a quantitative understanding of the MBT plant. Interpretation of results showed that proper operation of the modern waste management systems can lead to substantial reduction of environmental impacts and savings of resources.

Abeliotis, Konstadinos, E-mail: kabeli@hua.gr [Department of Home Economics and Ecology, Harokopio University, Athens (Greece); Kalogeropoulos, Alexandros [Department of Home Economics and Ecology, Harokopio University, Athens (Greece); Lasaridi, Katia [Department of Geography, Harokopio University, Athens (Greece)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ECONOMICS AND FEASIBILITY OF RANKINE CYCLE IMPROVEMENTS FOR COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), American Electric Company (AEP) and Parsons Energy and Chemical Group to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating coal fired steam power plants, known as Rankine Cycles, equipped with three different combustion systems: Pulverized Coal (PC), Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB), and Circulating Moving Bed (CMB{trademark}). Five steam cycles utilizing a wide range of steam conditions were used with these combustion systems. The motivation for this study was to establish through engineering analysis, the most cost-effective performance potential available through improvement in the Rankine Cycle steam conditions and combustion systems while at the same time ensuring that the most stringent emission performance based on CURC (Coal Utilization Research Council) 2010 targets are met: > 98% sulfur removal; < 0.05 lbm/MM-Btu NO{sub x}; < 0.01 lbm/MM-Btu Particulate Matter; and > 90% Hg removal. The final report discusses the results of a coal fired steam power plant project, which is comprised of two parts. The main part of the study is the analysis of ten (10) Greenfield steam power plants employing three different coal combustion technologies: Pulverized Coal (PC), Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB), and Circulating Moving Bed (CMB{trademark}) integrated with five different steam cycles. The study explores the technical feasibility, thermal performance, environmental performance, and economic viability of ten power plants that could be deployed currently, in the near, intermediate, and long-term time frame. For the five steam cycles, main steam temperatures vary from 1,000 F to 1,292 F and pressures from 2,400 psi to 5,075 psi. Reheat steam temperatures vary from 1,000 F to 1,328 F. The number of feedwater heaters varies from 7 to 9 and the associated feedwater temperature varies from 500 F to 626 F. The main part of the study therefore determines the steam cycle parameters and combustion technology that would yield the lowest cost of electricity (COE) for the next generation of coal-fired steam power plants. The second part of the study (Repowering) explores the means of upgrading the efficiency and output of an older existing coal fired steam power plant. There are currently more than 1,400 coal-fired units in operation in the United States generating about 54 percent of the electricity consumed. Many of these are modern units are clean and efficient. Additionally, there are many older units in excellent condition and still in service that could benefit from this repowering technology. The study evaluates the technical feasibility, thermal performance, and economic viability of this repowering concept.

Richard E. Waryasz; Gregory N. Liljedahl

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

102

PERGAMON Carbon 38 (2000) 17671774 High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation process. Part I of this series of papers treatment, Gasification; C. Adsorption 1. Introduction gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation

Cal, Mark P.

103

Assessment of instrumentation needs for advanced coal power plant applications: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to identify contaminants, identify instrumentation needs, assess available instrumentation and identify instruments that should be developed for controlling and monitoring gas streams encountered in the following power plants: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion, and Gasification Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell. Emphasis was placed on hot gas cleanup system gas stream analysis, and included process control, research and environmental monitoring needs. Commercial process analyzers, typical of those currently used for process control purposes, were reviewed for the purpose of indicating commercial status. No instrument selection guidelines were found which were capable of replacing user interaction with the process analyzer vendors. This study leads to the following conclusions: available process analyzers for coal-derived gas cleanup applications satisfy current power system process control and regulatory requirements, but they are troublesome to maintain; commercial gas conditioning systems and in situ analyzers continue to be unavailable for hot gas cleanup applications; many research-oriented gas stream characterization and toxicity assessment needs can not be met by commercially available process analyzers; and greater emphasis should be placed on instrumentation and control system planning for future power plant applications. Analyzers for specific compounds are not recommended other than those needed for current process control purposes. Instead, some generally useful on-line laser-based and inductively coupled plasma methods are recommended for further development because of their potential for use in present hot gas cleanup research and future optimization, component protection and regulation compliance activities. 48 refs., 21 figs., 26 tabs.

Nelson, E.T.; Fischer, W.H.; Lipka, J.V.; Rutkowski, M.D.; Zaharchuk, R.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Load-following control of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a decentralized control strategy is considered for load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture without flaring the syngas. The control strategy considered is gas turbine (GT) lead with gasifier follow. In this strategy, the GT controls the power load by manipulating its firing rate while the slurry feed flow to the gasifier is manipulated to control the syngas pressure at the GT inlet. However, the syngas pressure control is an integrating process with significant timedelay. In this work, a modified proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control is considered for syngas pressure control given that conventional PID controllers show poor control performance for integrating processes with large time delays. The conventional PID control is augmented with an internal feedback loop. The P-controller used in this internal loop converts the integrating process to an open-loop stable process. The resulting secondorder plus time delay model uses a PID controller where the tuning parameters are found by minimizing the integral time-weighted absolute error (ITAE) for disturbance rejection. A plant model with single integrator and time delay is identified by a P-control method. When a ramp change is introduced in the set-point of the load controller, the performance of both the load and pressure controllers with the modified PID control strategy is found to be superior to that using a traditional PID controller. Key

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Thermoeconomic design optimization of a KRW-based IGCC power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discussed the cost and efficiency optimization of an integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant design and the effects of important design options and parameters. Advanced thermoeconomic techniques were used to evaluate and optimize a given IGCC concept which uses Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, air-blown KRW coal gasifiers, a hot gas cleanup system, and GE MS7001F gas turbines. Three optimal design concepts are presented and discussed in the report. Two of the concepts are characterized by minimum cost of electricity at two different values of the steam high pressure. The third concept represents the thermodynamic optimum. This study identified several differences between the original design and the design of the optimized cases. Compared with the original concept, significant annual savings are achieved in the cost optimal cases. Comparisons were made between results obtained using both the old and the new performance data for the MS7001F gas turbine. This report discusses the effects of gasification temperature, steam high pressure, coal moisture, and various design options on the overall plant efficiency and cost of electricity. Cost sensitivity studies were conducted and recommendations for future studies were made.

Tsatsaronis, G.; Lin, L.; Pisa, J.; Tawfik, T. (Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Center for Electric Power)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Thermoeconomic design optimization of a KRW-based IGCC power plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discussed the cost and efficiency optimization of an integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant design and the effects of important design options and parameters. Advanced thermoeconomic techniques were used to evaluate and optimize a given IGCC concept which uses Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, air-blown KRW coal gasifiers, a hot gas cleanup system, and GE MS7001F gas turbines. Three optimal design concepts are presented and discussed in the report. Two of the concepts are characterized by minimum cost of electricity at two different values of the steam high pressure. The third concept represents the thermodynamic optimum. This study identified several differences between the original design and the design of the optimized cases. Compared with the original concept, significant annual savings are achieved in the cost optimal cases. Comparisons were made between results obtained using both the old and the new performance data for the MS7001F gas turbine. This report discusses the effects of gasification temperature, steam high pressure, coal moisture, and various design options on the overall plant efficiency and cost of electricity. Cost sensitivity studies were conducted and recommendations for future studies were made.

Tsatsaronis, G.; Lin, L.; Pisa, J.; Tawfik, T. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Center for Electric Power

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Clean coal reference plants: Atmospheric CFB. Topical report, Task 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of full-scale facilities. The goal of the program is to provide the US energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient and environmentally responsive coal-using technologies. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has the responsibility for monitoring the CCT Projects within certain technology categories, which correspond to the center`s areas of technology development, including atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated gasification combined cycle, mild gasification, and industrial applications. A measure of success in the CCT program will be the commercial acceptance of the new technologies being demonstrated. The dissemination of project information to potential users is being accomplished by producing a series of reference plant designs which will provide the users a basis for the selection of technologies applicable to their future energy requirements. As a part of DOE`s monitoring and evaluation of the CCT Projects, Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C) has been contracted to assist in this effort by producing the design of a commercial size Reference Plant, utilizing technologies developed in the CCT Program. This report, the first in a series, describes the design of a 400 MW electric power plant, utilizing an atmospheric pressure, circulating fluidized bed combustor (ACFB) similar to the one which was demonstrated at Colorado-Ute`s Nucla station, funded in Round 1 of the CCT Program. The intent of the reference plant design effort was to portray a commercial power plant with attributes considered important to the utility industry. The logical choice for the ACFB combustor was Pyropower since they supplied the ACFB for the Nucla Project.

Rubow, L.N.; Harvey, L.E.; Buchanan, T.L.; Carpenter, R.G.; Hyre, M.R.; Zaharchuk, R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

A dynamic process model of a natural gas combined cycle -- Model development with startup and shutdown simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research in dynamic process simulation for integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC) with carbon capture has been ongoing at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), culminating in a full operator training simulator (OTS) and immersive training simulator (ITS) for use in both operator training and research. A derivative work of the IGCC dynamic simulator has been a modification of the combined cycle section to more closely represent a typical natural gas fired combined cycle (NGCC). This paper describes the NGCC dynamic process model and highlights some of the simulator’s current capabilities through a particular startup and shutdown scenario.

Liese, Eric [U.S. DOE; Zitney, Stephen E. [U.S. DOE

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task ‘Air-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systems’. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of recuperation, the use of turbine reheat, and the non-consumptive use of EGS make-up water to supplement heat rejection

Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Research | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and will cost around 60tonne to capture CO2 generated by an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. The goal of DOE's research efforts is to reducethis cost to...

112

DOE Launches World-Class Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A new training center developed to teach personnel how to operate clean integrated gasification combined cycle power plants is now up and running with help from the U.S. Department of Energy.

113

Evaluation of sorbents for the cleanup of coal-derived synthesis gas at elevated temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with carbon dioxide capture is a promising technology to produce electricity from coal at a higher efficiency than with traditional subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plants. ...

Couling, David Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Investigation of adsorbent-based warm carbon dioxide capture technology for IGCC system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated gasification combined cycle with CO? capture and sequestration (IGCC-CCS) emerges as one of the most promising technologies for reducing CO? emission from coal power plant without reducing thermal efficiency ...

Liu, Zan, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Enhanced IGCC regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control strategies for improving power ramp rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of ongoing R&D activities at the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training & Research (AVESTAR™) Center, this paper highlights strategies for enhancing low-level regulatory control and system-wide coordinated control strategies implemented in a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture. The underlying IGCC plant dynamic model contains 20 major process areas, each of which is tightly integrated with the rest of the power plant, making individual functionally-independent processes prone to routine disturbances. Single-loop feedback control although adequate to meet the primary control objective for most processes, does not take into account in advance the effect of these disturbances, making the entire power plant undergo large offshoots and/or oscillations before the feedback action has an opportunity to impact control performance. In this paper, controller enhancements ranging from retuning feedback control loops, multiplicative feed-forward control and other control techniques such as split-range control, feedback trim and dynamic compensation, applicable on various subsections of the integrated IGCC plant, have been highlighted and improvements in control responses have been given. Compared to using classical feedback-based control structure, the enhanced IGCC regulatory control architecture reduces plant settling time and peak offshoots, achieves faster disturbance rejection, and promotes higher power ramp-rates. In addition, improvements in IGCC coordinated plant-wide control strategies for “Gasifier-Lead”, “GT-Lead” and “Plantwide” operation modes have been proposed and their responses compared. The paper is concluded with a brief discussion on the potential IGCC controller improvements resulting from using advanced process control, including model predictive control (MPC), as a supervisory control layer.

Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The advanced PFB process: Pilot plant results and design studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The plant being developed is a hybrid of two technologies; it incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a vessel called the carbonizer and the combustion of the resultant char residue in a circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustor (CPFBC). In this plant, coal is fed to a pressurized carbonizer that produces a low-Btu fuel gas and char. After passing through a cyclone and a ceramic barrier filter to remove gas-entrained particulates, the fuel gas is burned in a topping combustor to produce the energy required to drive a gas turbine. The gas turbine drives a generator and a compressor that feeds air to the carbonizer, a CPFBC, and a fluidized bed heat exchanger (FBHE). The carbonizer char is burned in the CPFBC with high excess air. The vitiated air from the CPFBC supports combustion of the fuel gas in the gas turbine topping combustor. Steam generated in a heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) downstream of the gas turbine and in the FBHE associated with the CPFBC drives the steam turbine generator that furnishes the balance of electric power delivered by the plant. The low-Btu gas is produced in the carbonizer by pyrolysis/mild devolatilization of coal in a fluidized bed reactor. Because this unit operates at temperatures much lower than gasifiers currently under development, it also produces a char residue. Left untreated, the fuel gas will contain hydrogen sulfide and sulfur-containing tar/light oil vapors; therefore, lime-based sorbents are injected into the carbonizer to catalytically enhance tar cracking and to capture sulfur as calcium sulfide. Sulfur is captured in situ, and the raw fuel gas is fired hot. Thus the expensive, complex, fuel gas heat exchangers and the chemical or sulfur-capturing bed cleanup systems that are part of the coal gasification combined-cycle plants now being developed are eliminated.

Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Domeracki, W. [Westinghouse Power Generation Business Group, Orlando, FL (United States); Horazak, D. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Green Hills, PA (United States); Newby, R. [Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rehmat, A. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago IL (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Microalgae Production from Power Plant Flue Gas: Environmental Implications on a Life Cycle Basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power-plant flue gas can serve as a source of CO{sub 2} for microalgae cultivation, and the algae can be cofired with coal. This life cycle assessment (LCA) compared the environmental impacts of electricity production via coal firing versus coal/algae cofiring. The LCA results demonstrated lower net values for the algae cofiring scenario for the following using the direct injection process (in which the flue gas is directly transported to the algae ponds): SOx, NOx, particulates, carbon dioxide, methane, and fossil energy consumption. Carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons emissions were statistically unchanged. Lower values for the algae cofiring scenario, when compared to the burning scenario, were observed for greenhouse potential and air acidification potential. However, impact assessment for depletion of natural resources and eutrophication potential showed much higher values. This LCA gives us an overall picture of impacts across different environmental boundaries, and hence, can help in the decision-making process for implementation of the algae scenario.

Kadam, K. L.

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

118

Nexant Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Systems Analysis; Task 2: Comparison of Wet and Dry Rankine Cycle Heat Rejection, 20 January 2005 - 31 December 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., regarding a system analysis comparing solar parabolic trough plants with wet and dry rankine cycle heat rejection.

Kelly, B.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Design of organic Rankine cycles for conversion of waste heat in a polygeneration plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic Rankine cycles provide an alternative to traditional steam Rankine cycles for the conversion of low grade heat sources, where steam cycles are known to be less efficient and more expensive. This work examines organic ...

DiGenova, Kevin (Kevin J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Plant Cell, Vol. 4, 1531-1538, December 1992 O 1992American Society of Plant Physiologists Alfalfa Cyclins: Differential Expression during the Cell Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alfalfa Cyclins: Differential Expression during the Cell Cycle and in Plant Organs Heribert Hirt,' Mhtyhs cyclins. We have recently isolatedacdc2 gene from alfalfa. Here, we report the isolation of two cyclin genes, cycMs7 and cycMs2, from alfalfa. The cycMs2 gene shows highest similarity to type 6 cyclins

Hirt, Heribert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Plant Cell, Vol. 8, 417-428, March 1996 O 1996 American Society of Plant Physiologists Developmental and Cell Cycle Regulation of Alfalfa nucMsl,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developmental and Cell Cycle Regulation of Alfalfa nucMsl, a Plant Homolog of the Yeast Nsrl and Mammalian, Austria We report here the isolation and characterizationof the nucMs7 alfalfa cDNA, whose predicted amino specifically recognized a 95-kD nucleolar protein in alfalfa cells that changed its localization in a cell

Hirt, Heribert

122

High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermo-economic model has been built and validated for prediction of project economics of Enhanced Geothermal Projects. The thermo-economic model calculates and iteratively optimizes the LCOE (levelized cost of electricity) for a prospective EGS (Enhanced Geothermal) site. It takes into account the local subsurface temperature gradient, the cost of drilling and reservoir creation, stimulation and power plant configuration. It calculates and optimizes the power plant configuration vs. well depth. Thus outputs from the model include optimal well depth and power plant configuration for the lowest LCOE. The main focus of this final report was to experimentally validate the thermodynamic properties that formed the basis of the thermo-economic model built in Phase 2, and thus build confidence that the predictions of the model could be used reliably for process downselection and preliminary design at a given set of geothermal (and/or waste heat) boundary conditions. The fluid and cycle downselected was based on a new proprietary fluid from a vendor in a supercritical ORC cycle at a resource condition of 200?C inlet temperature. The team devised and executed a series of experiments to prove the suitability of the new fluid in realistic ORC cycle conditions. Furthermore, the team performed a preliminary design study for a MW-scale turbo expander that would be used for a supercritical ORC cycle with this new fluid. The following summarizes the main findings in the investigative campaign that was undertaken: 1. Chemical compatibility of the new fluid with common seal/gasket/Oring materials was found to be problematic. Neoprene, Viton, and silicone materials were found to be incompatible, suffering chemical decomposition, swelling and/or compression set issues. Of the materials tested, only TEFLON was found to be compatible under actual ORC temperature and pressure conditions. 2. Thermal stability of the new fluid at 200?C and 40 bar was found to be acceptable after 399 hours of exposure?only 3% of the initial charge degraded into by products. The main degradation products being an isomer and a dimer. 3. In a comparative experiment between R245fa and the new fluid under subcritical conditions, it was found that the new fluid operated at 1 bar lower than R245fa for the same power output, which was also predicted in the Aspen HSYSY model. As a drop-in replacement fluid for R245fa, this new fluid was found to be at least as good as R245fa in terms of performance and stability. Further optimization of the subcritical cycle may lead to a significant improvement in performance for the new fluid. 4. For supercritical conditions, the experiment found a good match between the measured and model predicted state point property data and duties from the energy balance. The largest percent differences occurred with densities and evaporator duty (see Figure 78). It is therefore reasonable to conclude that the state point model was experimentally validated with a realistic ORC system. 5. The team also undertook a preliminary turbo-expander design study for a supercritical ORC cycle with the new working fluid. Variants of radial and axial turbo expander geometries went through preliminary design and rough costing. It was found that at 15MWe or higher power rating, a multi-stage axial turbine is most suitable providing the best performance and cost. However, at lower power ratings in the 5MWe range, the expander technology to be chosen depends on the application of the power block. For EGS power blocks, it is most optimal to use multi-stage axial machines. In conclusion, the predictions of the LCOE model that showed a supercritical cycle based on the new fluid to be most advantageous for geothermal power production at a resource temperature of ~ 200C have been experimentally validated. It was found that the cycle based on the new fluid is lower in LCOE and higher in net power output (for the same boundary conditions). The project, therefore has found a new optimal configuration for low temperature geothermal power production in the form of a su

Zia, Jalal [GE Global Research; Sevincer, Edip; Chen, Huijuan; Hardy, Ajilli; Wickersham, Paul; Kalra, Chiranjeev; Laursen, Anna Lis; Vandeputte, Thomas

2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

123

Advanced regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control strategies for IGCC targeted towards improving power ramp-rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of ongoing R&D activities at the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training & Research (AVESTAR™) Center, this paper highlights strategies for enhancing low-level regulatory control and system-wide coordinated control strategies implemented in a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture. The underlying IGCC plant dynamic model contains 20 major process areas, each of which is tightly integrated with the rest of the power plant, making individual functionally-independent processes prone to routine disturbances. Single-loop feedback control although adequate to meet the primary control objective for most processes, does not take into account in advance the effect of these disturbances, making the entire power plant undergo large offshoots and/or oscillations before the feedback action has an opportunity to impact control performance. In this paper, controller enhancements ranging from retuning feedback control loops, multiplicative feed-forward control and other control techniques such as split-range control, feedback trim and dynamic compensation, applicable on various subsections of the integrated IGCC plant, have been highlighted and improvements in control responses have been given. Compared to using classical feedback-based control structure, the enhanced IGCC regulatory control architecture reduces plant settling time and peak offshoots, achieves faster disturbance rejection, and promotes higher power ramp-rates. In addition, improvements in IGCC coordinated plant-wide control strategies for “Gasifier-Lead”, “GT-Lead” and “Plantwide” operation modes have been proposed and their responses compared. The paper is concluded with a brief discussion on the potential IGCC controller improvements resulting from using advanced process control, including model predictive control (MPC), as a supervisory control layer.

Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

PFB coal fired combined cycle development program. Commercial plant requirements definition update (Task 1. 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coal Fired Combined Cycle (CFCC) power system thermodynamic cycle is illustrated schematically. Pressurized air supplied at the discharge of gas turbine compressors is ducted to the pressure vessel of pressurized, fluidized-bed, combustor-steam generator modules. The air is introduced in parallel to the beds, entering through distribution grids beneath each bed. Steam generation tubes are buried within the beds and are also arranged as membrane tube walls enclosing the four sides. Crushed coal (1/4 inch x 0) is pneumatically fed at locations just above the air inlet grids at the bottom of each bed. Dolomite is similarly fed to the individual beds. The coal is burned at a temperature below the ash fusion point. Sulfur is removed in the fluid beds through reaction of the SO/sub 2/ with CaCO/sub 3/ and O/sub 2/ to form solid CaSO/sub 4/ and CO/sub 2/ gas. The combustion gases leave the beds at a temperature in the range of 1400/sup 0/F to 1750/sup 0/F, depending upon the plant load fraction, and combustion heat is also transferred from the bed to the steam generation tubes. For the PFB combustor at full load, approximately 39% of the heating value of the coal appears i the exhaust gas, 57% appears in the steam, and 4% is apportioned among various losses. The steam circuitry is the supercritical once-through type. Steam is generated at 3500 psi and 1000/sup 0/F and is reheated to 1000/sup 0/F after expansion through the high pressure section of the steam turbine. The exhaust gases from the fluidized beds, which entrain a high percentage of the coal ash as well as dolomite fines, are ducted to conventional cyclones and then to electrocyclones before being admitted to the gas turbine.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

A methodology to estimate greenhouse gases emissions in Life Cycle Inventories of wastewater treatment plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is to present the Direct Emissions Estimation Model (DEEM), a model for the estimation of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emissions from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This model is consistent with non-specific but widely used models such as AS/AD and ASM no. 1 and presents the benefits of simplicity and application over a common WWTP simulation platform, BioWin Registered-Sign , making it suitable for Life Cycle Assessment and Carbon Footprint studies. Its application in a Spanish WWTP indicates direct N{sub 2}O emissions to be 8 times larger than those associated with electricity use and thus relevant for LCA. CO{sub 2} emissions can be of similar importance to electricity-associated ones provided that 20% of them are of non-biogenic origin. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A model has been developed for the estimation of GHG emissions in WWTP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model was consistent with both ASM no. 1 and AS/AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sub 2}O emissions are 8 times more relevant than the one associated with electricity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions are as important as electricity if 20% of it is non-biogenic.

Rodriguez-Garcia, G., E-mail: gonzalo.rodriguez.garcia@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Hospido, A., E-mail: almudena.hospido@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bagley, D.M., E-mail: bagley@uwyo.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Wyoming, 82072 Laramie, WY (United States); Moreira, M.T., E-mail: maite.moreira@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Feijoo, G., E-mail: gumersindo.feijoo@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: Find optimized working fluid/advanced cycle combination for EGS applications.

128

What should the government do to encourage technical change in the energy sector?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and storage; (4) clean coal technologies, such as the Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle; and (5

Deutch, John

129

Optimization and Comparison of Direct and Indirect Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Plant Cycles for Nuclear Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550 C and 750 C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550 C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550 C versus 850 C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of both a direct and indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The direct supercritical CO2 cycle transferred heat directly from a 600 MWt reactor to the supercritical CO2 working fluid supplied to the turbine generator at approximately 20 MPa. The indirect supercritical CO2 cycle assumed a helium-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), operating at a primary system pressure of approximately 7.0 MPa, delivered heat through an intermediate heat exchanger to the secondary indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle, again operating at a pressure of about 20 MPa. For both the direct and indirect cycles, sensitivity calculations were performed for reactor outlet temperature between 550 C and 850 C. The UniSim models used realistic component parameters and operating conditions to model the complete reactor and power conversion systems. CO2 properties were evaluated, and the operating ranges of the cycles were adjusted to take advantage of the rapidly changing properties of CO2 near the critical point. The results of the analyses showed that, for the direct supercritical CO2 power cycle, thermal efficiencies in the range of 40 to 50% can be achieved. For the indirect supercritical CO2 power cycle, thermal efficiencies were approximately 10% lower than those obtained for the direct cycle over the same reactor outlet temperature range.

Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

Puga, J. Nicolas

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

System study of an MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. HTGL report No. 134  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle system has been designed specifically for applications where the availability of cooling water is very limited. The base case systems which were studied consisted of an MHD plant with a gas turbine bottoming plant, and required no cooling water. The gas turbine plant uses only air as its working fluid and receives its energy input from the MHD exhaust gases by means of metal tube heat exchangers. In addition to the base case systems, vapor cycle variation systems were considered which included the addition of a vapor cycle bottoming plant to improve the thermal efficiency. These systems required a small amount of cooling water. The MHD/gas turbine systems were modeled with sufficient detail, using realistic component specifications and costs, so that the thermal and economic performance of the system could be accurately determined. Three cases of MHD/gas turbine systems were studied, with Case I being similar to an MHD/steam system so that a direct comparison of the performances could be made, with Case II being representative of a second generation MHD system, and with Case III considering oxygen enrichment for early commercial applications. The systems are nominally 800 MW/sub e/ to 1000 MW/sub e/ in size. The results show that the MHD/gas turbine system has very good thermal and economic performances while requiring either little or no cooling water. Compared to the MHD/steam system which has a cooling tower heat load of 720 MW, the Base Case I MHD/gas turbine system has a heat rate which is 13% higher and a cost of electricity which is only 7% higher while requiring no cooling water. Case II results show that an improved performance can be expected from second generation MHD/gas turbine systems. Case III results show that an oxygen enriched MHD/gas turbine system may be attractive for early commercial applications in dry regions of the country.

Annen, K.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

MULTIPARAMETER OPTIMIZATION STUDIES ON GEOTHERMAL ENERGY CYCLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Practical Cycles for Geothermal Power Plants." GeneralDesign and Optimize Geothermal Power Cycles." Presented atof Practical Cycles for Geothermal Power Plants." General

Pope, W.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

THE TRANSPOSED CRITICAL TEMPERATURE RANKINE THERMODYNAMIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Program for Geothermal Power Plant Cycles,'*for a Rankine Cycle Geothermal Power Plant," Proceedings,Design and Optimize Geothermal Power Cycles," presented at

Pope, William L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles For High Efficiency Zero Emission Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate goal of this program is to identify the power block cycle conditions and/or configurations which could increase the overall thermal efficiency of the Baseline IGCC by about 8% on a relative basis (i.e., 8% on a heat rate basis). This document presents the cycle conditions and/or the configurations for evaluation in an initial screening analysis. These cycle conditions and/or configurations for investigation in the screening analysis are identified by literature searches and brain storming sessions. The screening analysis in turn narrows down the number of promising cases for detailed analysis.

A. D. Rao; J. Francuz; A. Verma; G. S. Samuelsen

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

Investigation of plant control strategies for the supercritical C0{sub 2}Brayton cycle for a sodium-cooled fast reactor using the plant dynamics code.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a control strategy for the supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the investigation of alternate control strategies for a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) nuclear power plant incorporating a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle power converter. The SFR assumed is the 400 MWe (1000 MWt) ABR-1000 preconceptual design incorporating metallic fuel. Three alternative idealized schemes for controlling the reactor side of the plant in combination with the existing automatic control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle are explored using the ANL Plant Dynamics Code together with the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) Analysis Code System coupled together using the iterative coupling formulation previously developed and implemented into the Plant Dynamics Code. The first option assumes that the reactor side can be ideally controlled through movement of control rods and changing the speeds of both the primary and intermediate coolant system sodium pumps such that the intermediate sodium flow rate and inlet temperature to the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger (RHX) remain unvarying while the intermediate sodium outlet temperature changes as the load demand from the electric grid changes and the S-CO{sub 2} cycle conditions adjust according to the S-CO{sub 2} cycle control strategy. For this option, the reactor plant follows an assumed change in load demand from 100 to 0 % nominal at 5 % reduction per minute in a suitable fashion. The second option allows the reactor core power and primary and intermediate coolant system sodium pump flow rates to change autonomously in response to the strong reactivity feedbacks of the metallic fueled core and assumed constant pump torques representing unchanging output from the pump electric motors. The plant behavior to the assumed load demand reduction is surprising close to that calculated for the first option. The only negative result observed is a slight increase in the intermediate inlet sodium temperatures by about 10 C. This temperature rise could presumably be precluded or significantly reduced through fine adjustment of the control rods and pump motors. The third option assumes that the reactor core power and primary and intermediate system flow rates are ideally reduced linearly in a programmed fashion that instantaneously matches the prescribed load demand. The calculated behavior of this idealized case reveals a number of difficulties because the control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle overcools the reactor potentially resulting in the calculation of sodium bulk freezing and the onset of sodium boiling. The results show that autonomous SFR operation may be viable for the particular assumed load change transient and deserves further investigation for other transients and postulated accidents.

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

137

An air-Brayton nuclear-hydrogen combined-cycle peak-and base-load electric plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor and hydrogen produced by the high-temperature reactor to meet base-load and peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, air is compressed; flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C; and exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The heat, via an intermediate heat-transport loop, is provided by a high-temperature reactor. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, after nuclear heating of the compressed air, hydrogen is injected into the combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. This process increases the plant efficiency and power output. Hydrogen is produced at night by electrolysis or other methods using energy from the nuclear reactor and is stored until needed. Therefore, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the hydrogen and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the grid.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

AVESTAR Center for Operational Excellence of Electricity Generation Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address industry challenges in attaining operational excellence for electricity generation plants, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM). This presentation will highlight the AVESTARTM Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of high-efficiency, near-zero-emission electricity generation plants. The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real-time, high-fidelity dynamic simulators with full-scope operator training systems (OTSs) and 3D virtual immersive training systems (ITSs) into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. AVESTAR’s initial offering combines--for the first time--a “gasification with CO2 capture” process simulator with a “combined-cycle” power simulator together in a single OTS/ITS solution for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option for power generation, especially when capturing and storing CO2 is necessary to satisfy emission targets. The AVESTAR training program offers a variety of courses that merge classroom learning, simulator-based OTS learning in a control-room operations environment, and immersive learning in the interactive 3D virtual plant environment or ITS. All of the courses introduce trainees to base-load plant operation, control, startups, and shutdowns. Advanced courses require participants to become familiar with coordinated control, fuel switching, power-demand load shedding, and load following, as well as to problem solve equipment and process malfunctions. Designed to ensure work force development, training is offered for control room and plant field operators, as well as engineers and managers. Such comprehensive simulator-based instruction allows for realistic training without compromising worker, equipment, and environmental safety. It also better prepares operators and engineers to manage the plant closer to economic constraints while minimizing or avoiding the impact of any potentially harmful, wasteful, or inefficient events. The AVESTAR Center is also used to augment graduate and undergraduate engineering education in the areas of process simulation, dynamics, control, and safety. Students and researchers gain hands-on simulator-based training experience and learn how the commercial-scale power plants respond dynamically to changes in manipulated inputs, such as coal feed flow rate and power demand. Students also analyze how the regulatory control system impacts power plant performance and stability. In addition, students practice start-up, shutdown, and malfunction scenarios. The 3D virtual ITSs are used for plant familiarization, walk-through, equipment animations, and safety scenarios. To further leverage the AVESTAR facilities and simulators, NETL and its university partners are pursuing an innovative and collaborative R&D program. In the area of process control, AVESTAR researchers are developing enhanced strategies for regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control, including gasifier and gas turbine lead, as well as advanced process control using model predictive control (MPC) techniques. Other AVESTAR R&D focus areas include high-fidelity equipment modeling using partial differential equations, dynamic reduced order modeling, optimal sensor placement, 3D virtual plant simulation, and modern grid. NETL and its partners plan to continue building the AVESTAR portfolio of dynamic simulators, immersive training systems, and advanced research capabilities to satisfy industry’s growing need for training and experience with the operation and control of clean energy plants. Future dynamic simulators under development include natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) and supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC) plants with post-combustion CO2 capture. These dynamic simulators are targeted for us

Zitney, Stephen

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

139

Exergy method of power plant systems analysis and its application to a pressurized fluidized bed coal-fired combined-cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis surveys the concepts of exergy and extends the exergy method of analysis from the standpoint of its applications to the power plant systems. After a brief historical review of exergy concepts, the general exergy equation is derived from the combined equation of First and Second Law, and it is shown that any special case of exergy equation is a simplified form of the general exergy equation. The mathematical method for the exergy analysis of a steady-state, steady-flow system, analogous to that of the First Law, is given. The exergy losses in a power plant are discussed. Then in order to examine these losses, the Second Law performance of major processes of combustion, compression, heat transfer, mixing and throttling have been analyzed analytically, and the exergy efficiencies are defined that accurately assess the thermodynamic performance of the corresponding processes. The methods for computation of exergy loss and exergy efficiency are given and simplified for practical cases of the corresponding processes. Analytical methods for evaluating the exergy of coal, pure substances (air and water), and combustion gases are presented and the energy-exergy tables for corresponding working substances are constructed. Finally, a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis, with emphasis on the Second Law (exergy) consideration, of an actual coal-fired, combined-cycle (CFCC) power plant, being designed by the General Electric Company, is carried out and suggestions are made as to what (and where), if any, improvement might be made in the design.

Ghamarian, A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Nitrogen cycling, plant biomass, and carbon dioxide evolution in a subsurface flow wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to ascertain the fate of nitrogen in a constructed wetland and the rate of bioremediation as indicated by carbon dioxide evolution. Research included a study of nitrogen uptake by plants and nitrification. A tracer isotope of nitrogen,¹?N, was used to follow...

Lane, Jeffrey J

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles For High Efficiency Zero Emission Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Table 1 shows that the systems efficiency, coal (HHV) to power, is 35%. Table 2 summarizes the auxiliary power consumption within the plant. Thermoflex was used to simulate the power block and Aspen Plus the balance of plant. The overall block flow diagram is presented in Figure A1.3-1 and the key unit process flow diagrams are shown in subsequent figures. Stream data are given in Table A1.3-1. Equipment function specifications are provided in Tables A1.3-2 through 17. The overall plant scheme consists of a cryogenic air separation unit supplying 95% purity O{sub 2} to GE type high pressure (HP) total quench gasifiers. The raw gas after scrubbing is treated in a sour shift unit to react the CO with H{sub 2}O to form H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. The gas is further treated to remove Hg in a sulfided activated carbon bed. The syngas is desulfurized and decarbonized in a Selexol acid gas removal unit and the decarbonized syngas after humidification and preheat is fired in GE 7H type steam cooled gas turbines. Intermediate pressure (IP) N{sub 2} from the ASU is also supplied to the combustors of the gas turbines as additional diluent for NOx control. A portion of the air required by the ASU is extracted from the gas turbines. The plant consists of the following major process units: (1) Air Separation Unit (ASU); (2) Gasification Unit; (3) CO Shift/Low Temperature Gas Cooling (LTGC) Unit; (4) Acid Gas Removal Unit (AGR) Unit; (5) Fuel Gas Humidification Unit; (6) Carbon Dioxide Compression/Dehydration Unit; (7) Claus Sulfur Recovery/Tail Gas Treating Unit (SRU/TGTU); and (8) Power Block.

A. D. Rao; J. Francuz; H. Liao; A. Verma; G. S. Samuelsen

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Steam Oxidation of Fossil Power Plant Materials: Collaborative Research to Enable Advanced Steam Power Cycles  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Research into improved materials systems and associated manufacturing and reliability issues is a major part of initiatives to produce cleaner and cheaper energy systems in the UK and the USA. Under the auspices of a Memorandum of Understanding on Energy R&D, a work programme concerned with steam oxidation has been conducted. The focus was on the generation of definitive information regarding the oxidation behaviour in steam of current and developmental ferritic steels, austenitic steels, and nickelbased alloys required to enable advanced steam power cycles. The results were intended to provide a basis for quantifying the rate of metal loss expected under advanced steam cycle conditions, as well as understanding of the evolution of oxide scale morphologies with time and temperature to identify features that could influence scale exfoliation characteristics. This understanding and acquired data were used to develop and validate models of oxide growth and loss by exfoliation. This paper provides an overview of the activity and highlights a selection of the results coming from the programme.

A. T. Fry; I. G Wright; N. J Simms; B. McGhee; G. R. Holcomb

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

143

Contribution of Clinch River Breeder Reactor plant design and development to the LMFBR fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes how the CRBRP development and CRBRP focus of the LMFBR base technology program have led to advances in the state of the art in physics, thermal-hydraulics, structural analysis, core restraint, seismic analysis, and analysis of hypothetical core-disruptive accident energetics, all of which have been incorporated through disciplined engineering into the final CRBRP design. The total development in the US of fuels and materials, the analytical advances made on CRBRP design, and the incorporation of the latest experimental results into that design have put the US technology in general and the CRBRP design in particular at the forefront of technology. This has placed the US in a position to develop the most favorable LMFBR fuel cycle.

Riley, D.R.; Dickson, P.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Combined cycle power plant of SVZ Schwarze Pumpe GmbH operating experience gained with low calorific value fuel resulting from gasification processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supported by experience gained over many years, Schwarze Pumpe GmbH (SVZ), the secondary raw material recycling centre, operates autothermal compression-type gasification plants with oxygen according to the fixed-bed and the entrained flow process, in which apart from lignite as the fuel to be gasified, residues containing C/H of varying consistency are gasified in an environmentally friendly manner. The purified gas acquired after scrubbing, partial conversion and desulfurization is mainly used as a synthesis gas for methanol synthesis and thus provided with a material use. For covering auxiliary requirements in electrical and process power, a combined-cycle power plant is operated, the main fuel of which is a low calorific value dual-process gas, primarily consisting of purified and purge gas. The volumes of purified and purge gases available to the combined-cycle power plant from the SVZ process equipment and their grades cannot be influenced by the combined-cycle power plant. It is shown that from a targeted modification of the dual-process gas temperature the Wobbe Index of dual-process gases with considerably varying parameters (calorific value, density) can be brought into the range required for running the gas turbine. Furthermore what is also shown is the operating strategy and control concept by which the combined-cycle power plant can maintain the pressure in the SVZ purified gas system and thus ultimately the gasification reactor operating pressure.

Kotschenreuther, H.; Hauptmann, W.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic power plant with CO.sub.2 recycling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of converting the chemical energy of fossil fuel to electrical and mechanical energy with a MHD generator. The fossil fuel is mixed with preheated oxygen and carbon dioxide and a conducting seed of potassium carbonate to form a combustive and electrically conductive mixture which is burned in a combustion chamber. The burned combustion mixture is passed through a MHD generator to generate electrical energy. The burned combustion mixture is passed through a diffuser to restore the mixture approximately to atmospheric pressure, leaving a spent combustion mixture which is used to heat oxygen from an air separation plant and recycled carbon dioxide for combustion in a high temperature oxygen preheater and for heating water/steam for producing superheated steam. Relatively pure carbon dioxide is separated from the spent combustion mixture for further purification or for exhaust, while the remainder of the carbon dioxide is recycled from the spent combustion mixture to a carbon dioxide purification plant for removal of water and any nitrous oxides present, leaving a greater than 98% pure carbon dioxide. A portion of the greater then 98% pure carbon dioxide stream is recovered and the remainder is recycled to combine with the oxygen for preheating and combination with the fossil fuel to form a combustion mixture.

Berry, Gregory F. (Naperville, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 16 (2013) 129144 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a coal-fed Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant. Net emissions were further reduced to 0 Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) plant, and 0.39 ± 0.03 t/bbl (63.3 ± 4.4 g/MJ) when using livestock manure

Jaramillo, Paulina

147

1 Copyright 2012 by ASME Proceedings of ASME Turbo Expo 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycles for three interesting coal fired, gasification based, plants with CO2 capture: a Fischer Tropsch synthesis processes with once-through reactor (CTL-OT-CCS), and an integrated gasification combined cycle systems typically comprise a Heat Recovery Steam Cycle (HRSC) fed with waste heat from gas turbines and

148

Virtually simulating the next generation of clean energy technologies: NETL's AVESTAR Center is dedicated to the safe, reliable and efficient operation of advanced energy plants with carbon capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Imagine using a real-time virtual simulator to learn to fly a space shuttle or rebuild your car's transmission without touching a piece of equipment or getting your hands dirty. Now, apply this concept to learning how to operate and control a state-of-the-art, electricity-producing power plant capable of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture. That's what the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center (www.netl.doe.gov/avestar) is designed to do. Established as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to advance new clean energy technology for power generation, the AVESTAR Center focuses primarily on providing simulation-based training for process engineers and energy plant operators, starting with the deployment of a first-of-a-kind operator training simulator for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Based on Invensys Operations Management's SimSci-Esscor DYNSIM software, the high-fidelity dynamic simulator provides realistic training on IGCC plant operations, including normal and faulted operations, as well as plant start-up, shutdown and power demand load changes. The highly flexible simulator also allows for testing of different types of fuel sources, such as petcoke and biomass, as well as co-firing fuel mixtures. The IGCC dynamic simulator is available at AVESTAR's two locations, NETL (Figure 1) and West Virginia University's National Research Center for Coal and Energy (www.nrcce.wvu.edu), both in Morgantown, W.Va. By offering a comprehensive IGCC training program, AVESTAR aims to develop a workforce well prepared to operate, control and manage commercial-scale gasification-based power plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The facility and simulator at West Virginia University promotes NETL's outreach mission by offering hands-on simulator training and education to researchers and university students.

Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Results of heat tests of the TGE-435 main boiler in the PGU-190/220 combined-cycle plant of the Tyumen' TETs-2 cogeneration plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Special features of operation of a boiler operating as a combined-cycle plant and having its own furnace and burner unit are descried. The flow of flue gases on the boiler is increased due to feeding of exhaust gases of the GTU into the furnace, which intensifies the convective heat exchange. In addition, it is not necessary to preheat air in the convective heating surfaces (the boiler has no air preheater). The convective heating surfaces of the boiler are used for heating the feed water, thus replacing the regeneration extractions of the steam turbine (HPP are absent in the circuit) and partially replacing the preheating of condensate (the LPP in the circuit of the unit are combined with preheaters of delivery water). Regeneration of the steam turbine is primarily used for the district cogeneration heating purposes. The furnace and burner unit of the exhaust-heat boiler (which is a new engineering solution for the given project) ensures utilization of not only the heat of the exhaust gases of the GTU but also of their excess volume, because the latter contains up to 15% oxygen that oxidizes the combustion process in the boiler. Thus, the gas temperature at the inlet to the boiler amounts to 580{sup o}C at an excess air factor a = 3.50; at the outlet these parameters are utilized to T{sub out} = 139{sup o}C and a{sub out} = 1.17. The proportions of the GTU/boiler loads that can actually be organized at the generating unit (and have been checked by testing) are presented and the proportions of loads recommended for the most efficient operation of the boiler are determined. The performance characteristics of the boiler are presented for various proportions of GTU/boiler loads. The operating conditions of the superheater and of the convective trailing heating surfaces are presented as well as the ecological parameters of the generating unit.

A.V. Kurochkin; A.L. Kovalenko; V.G. Kozlov; A.I. Krivobok [Engineering Center of the Ural Power Industry (Russian Federation)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Development of the ANL plant dynamics code and control strategies for the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle and code validation with data from the Sandia small-scale supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle test loop.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in the ongoing development of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Plant Dynamics Code (PDC), the ongoing investigation and development of control strategies, and the analysis of system transient behavior for supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycles. Several code modifications have been introduced during FY2011 to extend the range of applicability of the PDC and to improve its calculational stability and speed. A new and innovative approach was developed to couple the Plant Dynamics Code for S-CO{sub 2} cycle calculations with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Liquid Metal Reactor Code System calculations for the transient system level behavior on the reactor side of a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) or Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). The new code system allows use of the full capabilities of both codes such that whole-plant transients can now be simulated without additional user interaction. Several other code modifications, including the introduction of compressor surge control, a new approach for determining the solution time step for efficient computational speed, an updated treatment of S-CO{sub 2} cycle flow mergers and splits, a modified enthalpy equation to improve the treatment of negative flow, and a revised solution of the reactor heat exchanger (RHX) equations coupling the S-CO{sub 2} cycle to the reactor, were introduced to the PDC in FY2011. All of these modifications have improved the code computational stability and computational speed, while not significantly affecting the results of transient calculations. The improved PDC was used to continue the investigation of S-CO{sub 2} cycle control and transient behavior. The coupled PDC-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code capability was used to study the dynamic characteristics of a S-CO{sub 2} cycle coupled to a SFR plant. Cycle control was investigated in terms of the ability of the cycle to respond to a linear reduction in the electrical grid demand from 100% to 0% at a rate of 5%/minute. It was determined that utilization of turbine throttling control below 50% load improves the cycle efficiency significantly. Consequently, the cycle control strategy has been updated to include turbine throttle valve control. The new control strategy still relies on inventory control in the 50%-90% load range and turbine bypass for fine and fast generator output adjustments, but it now also includes turbine throttling control in the 0%-50% load range. In an attempt to investigate the feasibility of using the S-CO{sub 2} cycle for normal decay heat removal from the reactor, the cycle control study was extended beyond the investigation of normal load following. It was shown that such operation is possible with the extension of the inventory and the turbine throttling controls. However, the cycle operation in this range is calculated to be so inefficient that energy would need to be supplied from the electrical grid assuming that the generator could be capable of being operated in a motoring mode with an input electrical energy from the grid having a magnitude of about 20% of the nominal plant output electrical power level in order to maintain circulation of the CO{sub 2} in the cycle. The work on investigation of cycle operation at low power level will be continued in the future. In addition to the cycle control study, the coupled PDC-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code system was also used to simulate thermal transients in the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger. Several possible conditions with the potential to introduce significant changes to the heat exchanger temperatures were identified and simulated. The conditions range from reactor scram and primary sodium pump failure or intermediate sodium pump failure on the reactor side to pipe breaks and valve malfunctions on the S-CO{sub 2} side. It was found that the maximum possible rate of the heat exchanger wall temperature change for the particular heat exchanger design assumed is limited to {+-}7 C/s for less than 10 seconds. Modeling in the Plant Dynamics Code has been compared with available data from the Sandia Natio

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

An Overview of Coal based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Overview of Coal based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Technology September 2005. LFEE 2005-002 WP #12;#12;Table of Contents 1 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC.......................................................................... 17 2.1 Gasification

152

Energy Procedia 37 (2013) 2212 2223 1876-6102 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge MA 02139, USA Abstract Gasification-based plants with coal-CO2 slurry feed. An Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture is used here as a potential and/or peer-review under responsibility of GHGT Keywords: coal; CO2; slurry; gasification; feed

153

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge MA 02139, USA Abstract Gasification-based plants with coal-CO2 and lignite. An Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture is used here and/or peer-review under responsibility of GHGT Keywords: coal; CO2; slurry; gasification; feed

154

Geothermal power plant R and D: an analysis of cost-performance tradeoffs and the Heber Binary-Cycle Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of advancements in power plant designs for use at geothermal resources in the low to moderate (300 to 400F) temperature range is reported. In 3 case studies, the benefits of R and D to achieve these advancements are evaluated in terms of expected increases in installed geothermal generating capacity over the next 2 decades. A parametric sensitivity study is discussed which analyzes differential power development for combinations of power plant efficiency and capitol cost. Affordable tradeoffs between plant performance and capital costs are illustrated. The independent review and analysis of the expected costs of construction, operation and maintenance of the Heber Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Demonstration Plant are described. Included in this assessment is an analysis of each of the major cost components of the project, including (1) construction cost, (2) well field development costs, (3) fluid purchase costs, and (4) well field and power plant operation and maintenance costs. The total cost of power generated from the Heber Plant (in terms of mills per kWh) is then compared to the cost of power from alternative fossil-fueled base load units. Also evaluated are the provisions of both: (a) the Cooperative Agreement between the federal government and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG and E); and (b) the Geothermal Heat Sales Contract with Union Oil Company.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Worldwide construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper lists major construction projects in worldwide processing and pipelining, showing capacities, contractors, estimated costs, and time of construction. The lists are divided into refineries, petrochemical plants, sulfur recovery units, gas processing plants, pipelines, and related fuel facilities. This last classification includes cogeneration plants, coal liquefaction and gasification plants, biomass power plants, geothermal power plants, integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plants, and a coal briquetting plant.

Williamson, M.

1994-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

156

INTEGRATED PYROLYSIS COMBINED CYCLE BIOMASS POWER SYSTEM CONCEPT DEFINITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced power systems based on integrated gasification/combined cycles (IGCC) are often presented as a solution to the present shortcomings of biomass as fuel. Although IGCC has been technically demonstrated at full scale, it has not been adopted for commercial power generation. Part of the reason for this situation is the continuing low price for coal. However, another significant barrier to IGCC is the high level of integration of this technology: the gas output from the gasifier must be perfectly matched to the energy demand of the gas turbine cycle. We are developing an alternative to IGCC for biomass power: the integrated (fast) pyrolysis/ combined cycle (IPCC). In this system solid biomass is converted into liquid rather than gaseous fuel. This liquid fuel, called bio-oil, is a mixture of oxygenated organic compounds and water that serves as fuel for a gas turbine topping cycle. Waste heat from the gas turbine provides thermal energy to the steam turbine bottoming cycle. Advantages of the biomass-fueled IPCC system include: combined cycle efficiency exceeding 37 percent efficiency for a system as small as 7.6 MW{sub e}; absence of high pressure thermal reactors; decoupling of fuel processing and power generation; and opportunities for recovering value-added products from the bio-oil. This report provides a technical overview of the system including pyrolyzer design, fuel clean-up strategies, pyrolysate condenser design, opportunities for recovering pyrolysis byproducts, gas turbine cycle design, and Rankine steam cycle. The report also reviews the potential biomass fuel supply in Iowa, provide and economic analysis, and present a summery of benefits from the proposed system.

Eric Sandvig; Gary Walling; Robert C. Brown; Ryan Pletka; Desmond Radlein; Warren Johnson

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the AVESTAR Center is poised to develop a workforce well-prepared to operate and control commercial-scale gasification-based power plants capable of 90% pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture and compression, as well as low sulfur, mercury, and NOx emissions. With additional support from the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), the Center will educate and train engineering students and researchers by providing hands-on 'learning by operating' experience The AVESTAR Center also offers unique collaborative R&D opportunities in high-fidelity dynamic modeling, advanced process control, real-time optimization, and virtual plant simulation. Objectives and goals are aimed at safe and effective management of power generation systems for optimal efficiency, while protecting the environment. To add another dimension of realism to the AVESTAR experience, NETL will introduce an immersive training system with innovative three-dimensional virtual reality technology. Wearing a stereoscopic headset or eyewear, trainees will enter an interactive virtual environment that will allow them to move freely throughout the simulated 3-D facility to study and learn various aspects of IGCC plant operation, control, and safety. Such combined operator and immersive training systems go beyond traditional simulation and include more realistic scenarios, improved communication, and collaboration among co-workers.

Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasifiction combined sycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics® (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB® environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Dynamic modeling and control strategies for a micro-CSP plant with thermal storage powered by the Organic Rankine cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems are gaining ground as a means of effectively providing sustainable energy. Coupling small-scale ORCs powered by scroll expander- generators with solar thermal collectors and storage can ...

Ireland, Melissa Kara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Impact of Advanced Turbine Systems on coal-based power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advanced power-generation products currently under development in our program show great promise for ultimate commercial use. Four of these products are referred to in this paper: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), Externally Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC), and Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC). Three of these products, IGCC, PFBC, and EFCC, rely on advanced gas turbines as a key enabling technology and the foundation for efficiencies in the range of 52 to 55 percent. DOE is funding the development of advanced gas turbines in the newly instituted Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program, one of DOE`s highest priority natural gas initiatives. The turbines, which will have natural gas efficiencies of 60 percent, are being evaluated for coal gas compatibility as part of that program.

Bechtel, T.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report is described the work effort to develop and demonstrate a software framework to support advanced process simulations to evaluate the performance of advanced power systems. Integrated into the framework are a broad range of models, analysis tools, and visualization methods that can be used for the plant evaluation. The framework provides a tightly integrated problem-solving environment, with plug-and-play functionality, and includes a hierarchy of models, ranging from fast running process models to detailed reacting CFD models. The framework places no inherent limitations on the type of physics that can be modeled, numerical techniques, or programming languages used to implement the equipment models, or the type or amount of data that can be exchanged between models. Tools are provided to analyze simulation results at multiple levels of detail, ranging from simple tabular outputs to advanced solution visualization methods. All models and tools communicate in a seamless manner. The framework can be coupled to other software frameworks that provide different modeling capabilities. Three software frameworks were developed during the course of the project. The first framework focused on simulating the performance of the DOE Low Emissions Boiler System Proof of Concept facility, an advanced pulverized-coal combustion-based power plant. The second framework targeted simulating the performance of an Integrated coal Gasification Combined Cycle - Fuel Cell Turbine (IGCC-FCT) plant configuration. The coal gasifier models included both CFD and process models for the commercially dominant systems. Interfacing models to the framework was performed using VES-Open, and tests were performed to demonstrate interfacing CAPE-Open compliant models to the framework. The IGCC-FCT framework was subsequently extended to support Virtual Engineering concepts in which plant configurations can be constructed and interrogated in a three-dimensional, user-centered, interactive, immersive environment. The Virtual Engineering Framework (VEF), in effect a prototype framework, was developed through close collaboration with NETL supported research teams from Iowa State University Virtual Reality Applications Center (ISU-VRAC) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). The VEF is open source, compatible across systems ranging from inexpensive desktop PCs to large-scale, immersive facilities and provides support for heterogeneous distributed computing of plant simulations. The ability to compute plant economics through an interface that coupled the CMU IECM tool to the VEF was demonstrated, and the ability to couple the VEF to Aspen Plus, a commercial flowsheet modeling tool, was demonstrated. Models were interfaced to the framework using VES-Open. Tests were performed for interfacing CAPE-Open-compliant models to the framework. Where available, the developed models and plant simulations have been benchmarked against data from the open literature. The VEF has been installed at NETL. The VEF provides simulation capabilities not available in commercial simulation tools. It provides DOE engineers, scientists, and decision makers with a flexible and extensible simulation system that can be used to reduce the time, technical risk, and cost to develop the next generation of advanced, coal-fired power systems that will have low emissions and high efficiency. Furthermore, the VEF provides a common simulation system that NETL can use to help manage Advanced Power Systems Research projects, including both combustion- and gasification-based technologies.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

162

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE BRAYTON CYCLE FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER PLANTS R. Schleicher A. R. Raffray C. P. Wong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the risk associated with oil lubricated bearings.2 Interest in nuclear CCGTs was revived in the 1990s effectiveness and cycle fractional pressure loss. The compression ratio is also important because for fusion because due to non-competitive economics, mainly attributed to the lack of high effectiveness recuperators

Raffray, A. René

163

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE BRAYTON CYCLE FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER PLANTS R. Schleicher A. R. Raffray C. P. Wong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the risk associated with oil lubricated bearings. 2 Interest in nuclear CCGTs was revived in the 1990s effectiveness and cycle fractional pressure loss. The compression ratio is also important because for fusion because due to non-competitive economics, mainly attributed to the lack of high effectiveness recuperators

California at San Diego, University of

164

Optimal control system design of an acid gas removal unit for an IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture should be operated optimally in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. To achieve this goal, a systematic approach is taken in this work to design the control system of a selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for a commercial-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The control system design is performed in two stages with the objective of minimizing the auxiliary power while satisfying operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. In the first stage of the control system design, a top-down analysis is used to analyze degrees of freedom, define an operational objective, identify important disturbances and operational/environmental constraints, and select the control variables. With the degrees of freedom, the process is optimized with relation to the operational objective at nominal operation as well as under the disturbances identified. Operational and environmental constraints active at all operations are chosen as control variables. From the results of the optimization studies, self-optimizing control variables are identified for further examination. Several methods are explored in this work for the selection of these self-optimizing control variables. Modifications made to the existing methods will be discussed in this presentation. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for control variables and due to the complexity of the underlying optimization problem, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. The second stage is a bottom-up design of the control layers used for the operation of the process. First, the regulatory control layer is designed followed by the supervisory control layer. Finally, an optimization layer is designed. In this paper, the proposed two-stage control system design approach is applied to the AGR unit for an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Aspen Plus Dynamics® is used to develop the dynamic AGR process model while MATLAB is used to perform the control system design and for implementation of model predictive control (MPC).

Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is defined as the ash derived from thermal power plants using clean-coal technologies such as SO2 Control of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201. 4 Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute Systems, NOx Control Technology, Fluidized Bed Combustion, and Gasification Combined Cycle for reducing

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

167

International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 6 (2012) 6976 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Pre-combustion CO2 capture Shifted syngas Chrysotile Steam-assisted carbonation Magnesium hydride a b to decarbonize shifted syngas in integrated gasification combined cycle plants was examined in this work from in a basket reactor using model (H2O/H2/CO2) shifted syngas where CO2 uptakes were measured after 1 h

168

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. LFEE 2005-002 Report #12;#12;i ABSTRACT Investments in three coal-fired power generation technologiesCarbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis May 2005 MIT LFEE 2005 environment. The technologies evaluated are pulverized coal (PC), integrated coal gasification combined cycle

169

Proportionalintegral-plus (PIP) control of the ALSTOM gasifier problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

469 Proportional­integral-plus (PIP) control of the ALSTOM gasifier problem C J Taylor, A P Mc the gasifier system of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. In particular of the gasifier is found to yield good control of the bench- mark, meeting most of the specified performance

Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

170

Storing carbon dioxide in saline formations : analyzing extracted water treatment and use for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to address the potential to scale up of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration in the United States saline formations, an assessment model is being developed using a national database and modeling tool. This tool builds upon the existing NatCarb database as well as supplemental geological information to address scale up potential for carbon dioxide storage within these formations. The focus of the assessment model is to specifically address the question, 'Where are opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use for existing and expanding power plants, and what are the economic impacts of these systems relative to traditional power systems?' Initial findings indicate that approximately less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data points meet the working criteria for combined CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water treatment systems. The initial results of the analysis indicate that less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data may meet the working depth, salinity and formation intersecting criteria. These results were taken from examining updated NatCarb data. This finding, while just an initial result, suggests that the combined use of saline formations for CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use may be limited by the selection criteria chosen. A second preliminary finding of the analysis suggests that some of the necessary data required for this analysis is not present in all of the NatCarb records. This type of analysis represents the beginning of the larger, in depth study for all existing coal and natural gas power plants and saline formations in the U.S. for the purpose of potential CO{sub 2} storage and water reuse for supplemental cooling. Additionally, this allows for potential policy insight when understanding the difficult nature of combined potential institutional (regulatory) and physical (engineered geological sequestration and extracted water system) constraints across the United States. Finally, a representative scenario for a 1,800 MW subcritical coal fired power plant (amongst other types including supercritical coal, integrated gasification combined cycle, natural gas turbine and natural gas combined cycle) can look to existing and new carbon capture, transportation, compression and sequestration technologies along with a suite of extracting and treating technologies for water to assess the system's overall physical and economic viability. Thus, this particular plant, with 90% capture, will reduce the net emissions of CO{sub 2} (original less the amount of energy and hence CO{sub 2} emissions required to power the carbon capture water treatment systems) less than 90%, and its water demands will increase by approximately 50%. These systems may increase the plant's LCOE by approximately 50% or more. This representative example suggests that scaling up these CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies to many plants throughout the country could increase the water demands substantially at the regional, and possibly national level. These scenarios for all power plants and saline formations throughout U.S. can incorporate new information as it becomes available for potential new plant build out planning.

Dwyer, Brian P.; Heath, Jason E.; Borns, David James; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse D.; McNemar, Andrea; Krumhansl, James Lee; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Implications of near-term coal power plant retirement for SO2 and NOX, and life cycle GHG emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prices of electricity production Plant type Unit Price Nuclear ($/MWh) 16.51 Wind ($/MWh) 201 Hydro Top SO2 100 430 95 440 100 430 Top NOX 105 350 100 380 105 345 Small, inefficient 125 410 125 405 125) Manitoba Hydro Manitoba Hydro Undertaking # 57 http://www.pub.gov.mb.ca/exhibits/mh-83.pdf. (5) Sotkiewicz

Jaramillo, Paulina

172

Solid-Fueled Pressurized Chemical Looping with Flue-Gas Turbine Combined Cycle for Improved Plant Efficiency and CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to report the final result of techno-economic analysis for the proposed 550MWe integrated pressurized chemical looping combustion combined cycle process. An Aspen Plus based model is delivered in this report along with the results from three sensitivity scenarios including the operating pressure, excess air ratio and oxygen carrier performance. A process flow diagram and detailed stream table for the base case are also provided with the overall plant energy balance, carbon balance, sulfur balance and water balance. The approach to the process and key component simulation are explained. The economic analysis (OPEX and CAPX) on four study cases via DOE NETL Reference Case 12 are presented and explained.

Liu, Kunlei; Chen, Liangyong; Zhang, Yi; Richburg, Lisa; Simpson, James; White, Jay; Rossi, Gianalfredo

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Cycle isolation monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C. [Santee Copper, Moncks Corner, SC (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air bottoming cycle Black liquor gasification combined cycleCEPI, 2001), and that use continues to grow. Black liquorgasification: Black liquor is the residue from chemical

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Electricity Market Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Advanced Coal - Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Advanced Coal with carbon sequestration OilGas Steam - OilGas Steam Turbine Combined Cycle - Conventional...

176

La Spezia power plant: Conversion of units 1 and 2 to combined cycle with modification of steam turbines from cross compound to tandem compound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Units 1 and 2 of ENEL's La Spezia power plant, rated 310 and 325 MW respectively, are going to be converted to combined cycle. This project will be accomplished by integrating components such as gas turbines and HRSGs with some of the existing components, particularly the steam turbines, which are of the cross compound type. Since the total power of each converted unit has to be kept at 335 MW because of permitting limitations, the power delivered by the steam turbine will be limited to about 115 MW. For this reason a study was carried out to verify the possibility of having only one shaft and modifying the turbine to tandem compound. As additional investments are required for this modification, a balance was performed that also took into account the incremental heat rate and, on the other hand, the benefits from decreased maintenance and increased availability and reliability calculated for the expected useful life. The result of this balance was in favor of the modification, and a decision was taken accordingly. The turbine modification will involve replacing the whole HP section with a new combined HP-IP section while retaining the corresponding LP rotor and cylinder and making the needed changes in the valve arrangements and piping. Work on the site began in the spring of 1997 by dismantling the existing boiler so as to have the space needed to install the GTs and HRSGs. The first synchronization of the converted unit 1 is scheduled for November 1999

Magneschi, P.; Gabiccini, S.; Bracaloni, N.; Fiaschi, C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Sustainable development with clean coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the opportunities available with clean coal technologies. Applications include new power plants, retrofitting and repowering of existing power plants, steelmaking, cement making, paper manufacturing, cogeneration facilities, and district heating plants. An appendix describes the clean coal technologies. These include coal preparation (physical cleaning, low-rank upgrading, bituminous coal preparation); combustion technologies (fluidized-bed combustion and NOx control); post-combustion cleaning (particulate control, sulfur dioxide control, nitrogen oxide control); and conversion with the integrated gasification combined cycle.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Economic development through biomass system integration: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners. Chapters describe alfalfa basics, production risks, production economics, transportation and storage, processing, products, market analysis, business analysis, environmental impact, and policy issues. 69 figs., 63 tabs.

DeLong, M.M. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Sawdust Pyrolysis and Petroleum Coke CO2 Gasification at High Heating Rates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Clean and efficient electricity can be generated using an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC). Although IGCC is typically used with coal, it can also be… (more)

Lewis, Aaron D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

EIS-0429: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Indiana Integrated...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

9: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Indiana Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Rockport, IN EIS-0429: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Indiana Integrated...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIS-0428: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Mississippi...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Mississippi Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Moss Point, Mississippi EIS-0428: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Mississippi...

182

EIS-0409: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) Project, Mississippi Notice of Availability for the Draft...

183

EIS-0409: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) Project, Kemper County, Mississippi Kemper County Integrated...

184

Probabilistic Modeling and Evaluation of the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of Texaco Gasifier-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Systems Using ASPEN Prepared by: H. Christopher Frey Naveen................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Overview of Gasification Systems.............................................................. 2 1.1.1 Gasification

Frey, H. Christopher

185

EIS-0444: Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP), Ector County, Texas...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Clean Energy, LLC for the proposed Texas Clean Energy Project. The Project would use coal-based integrated gasification combined-cycle technology to generate electricity and...

186

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and power via biomass gasification. Biomass and Bioenergyrenewables Integrated coal gasification combined cycle withLubricants Waxes Naptha Gasification Ethane, Benzene, and

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

EIS-0382: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for the design and one-year operational demonstration of a coal-based, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric generating facility on the Iron Range of northern...

188

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and power via biomass gasification. Biomass and Bioenergyrenewables Integrated coal gasification combined cycle withLubricants Waxes Naptha Gasification Ethane, Benzene, and

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Clean coal technology using process integration : a focus on the IGCC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is the most environmentally friendly coal-fired power generation technology that offers near zero green house gas emissions. This… (more)

Madzivhandila, Vhutshilo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

EIS-0431: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Involvement Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Kern County, CA DOE is publishing this Amended...

191

EIS-0431: Extension of Public Comment Period | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Comment Period Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, CA The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published...

192

EIS-0431: DOE Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Impact Statement Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Kern County, CA DOE announces the availability...

193

EIS-0431: Extension of public comment period; Notice of public...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Correction Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, CA On Monday, August 26, 2013, DOE published a...

194

Regenerative Heater Optimization for Steam Turbo-Generation Cycles of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants with a Comparison of Two Concepts for the Westinghouse International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent of this study is to discuss some of the many factors involved in the development of the design and layout of a steam turbo-generation unit as part of a modular Generation IV nuclear power plant. Of the many factors involved in the design and layout, this research will cover feed water system layout and optimization issues. The research is arranged in hopes that it can be generalized to any Generation IV system which uses a steam powered turbo-generation unit. The research is done using the ORCENT-II heat balance codes and the Salisbury methodology to be reviewed herein. The Salisbury methodology is used on an original cycle design by Famiani for the Westinghouse IRIS and the effects due to parameter variation are studied. The vital parameters of the Salisbury methodology are the incremental heater surface capital cost (S) in $/ft{sup 2}, the value of incremental power (I) in $/kW, and the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) in Btu/ft{sup 2}-degrees Fahrenheit-hr. Each is varied in order to determine the effects on the cycles overall heat rate, output, as well as, the heater surface areas. The effects of each are shown. Then the methodology is then used to compare the optimized original Famiani design consisting of seven regenerative feedwater heaters with an optimized new cycle concept, INRC8, containing four regenerative heaters. The results are shown. It can be seen that a trade between the complexity of the seven stage regenerative Famiani cycle and the simplicity of the INRC8 cycle can be made. It is desired that this methodology can be used to show the ability to evaluate modularity through the value of size a complexity of the system as well as the performance. It also shows the effectiveness of the Salisbury methodology in the optimization of regenerative cycles for such an evaluation.

Williams, W.C.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Brayton Cycle 1 Open GasTurbine Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation. High thermal efficiencies up to 44%. Suitable for combined cycles (with steam power plantM. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Brayton Cycle 1 Open GasTurbine Cycle Fig.1: Schematic for an open gas-turbine cycle. Working Principal Fresh air enters the compressor at ambient temperature where its pressure

Bahrami, Majid

196

Cell cycle nucleic acids, polypeptides and uses thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides isolated nucleic acids and their encoded proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation. The invention further provides recombinant expression cassettes, host cells, transgenic plants, and antibody compositions. The present invention provides methods and compositions relating to altering cell cycle protein content, cell cycle progression, cell number and/or composition of plants.

Gordon-Kamm, William J. (Urbandale, IA); Lowe, Keith S. (Johnston, IA); Larkins, Brian A. (Tucson, AZ); Dilkes, Brian R. (Tucson, AZ); Sun, Yuejin (Westfield, IN)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

197

M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Carnot Cycle 1 Power Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adiabatically through the turbine and work is developed. The steam temperature decreases from TH to TL 2-3: Two represent the net work of the idealized cycle. Remember that an ideal power cycle does not involve any a simple vapor power plant. Fig. 2-2: Carnot vapor cycle. 1-2: The steam exiting the boiler expands

Bahrami, Majid

198

Cycle cover with short cycles Nicole Immorlica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Given a graph and a subset of marked elements (nodes, edges, or some combination thereof), a cycleCycle cover with short cycles Nicole Immorlica£ Mohammad Mahdian£ Vahab S. Mirrokni£ Abstract Cycle for variants of cycle covering problems which bound the size and/or length of the covering cycles

Immorlica, Nicole

199

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

200

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

actinides du cycle: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Management Strategy when Implemented over a Limited Timeframe Part II: Thorium Fuel Cycle University of Cambridge - Dspace Summary: "utilises"the"same"plant"as"an"A...

202

Development of a plant dynamics computer code for analysis of a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy converter coupled to a natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

STAR-LM is a lead-cooled pool-type fast reactor concept operating under natural circulation of the coolant. The reactor core power is 400 MWt. The open-lattice core consists of fuel pins attached to the core support plate, (the does not consist of removable fuel assemblies). The coolant flows outside of the fuel pins. The fuel is transuranic nitride, fabricated from reprocessed LWR spent fuel. The cladding material is HT-9 stainless steel; the steady-state peak cladding temperature is 650 C. The coolant is single-phase liquid lead under atmospheric pressure; the core inlet and outlet temperatures are 438 C and 578 C, respectively. (The Pb coolant freezing and boiling temperatures are 327 C and 1749 C, respectively). The coolant is contained inside of a reactor vessel. The vessel material is Type 316 stainless steel. The reactor is autonomous meaning that the reactor power is self-regulated based on inherent reactivity feedbacks and no external power control (through control rods) is utilized. The shutdown (scram) control rods are used for startup and shutdown and to stop the fission reaction in case of an emergency. The heat from the reactor is transferred to the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle in in-reactor heat exchangers (IRHX) located inside the reactor vessel. The IRHXs are shell-and-tube type heat exchangers with lead flowing downwards on the shell side and CO{sub 2} flowing upwards on the tube side. No intermediate circuit is utilized. The guard vessel surrounds the reactor vessel to contain the coolant, in the very unlikely event of reactor vessel failure. The Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) implementing the natural circulation of air flowing upwards over the guard vessel is used to cool the reactor, in the case of loss of normal heat removal through the IRHXs. The RVACS is always in operation. The gap between the vessels is filled with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) to enhance the heat removal by air by significantly reducing the thermal resistance of a gas-filled gap.

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

203

Extension of the supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle to low reactor power operation: investigations using the coupled anl plant dynamics code-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 liquid metal reactor code system.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made on the development of a control strategy for the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle enabling removal of power from an autonomous load following Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) down to decay heat levels such that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be used to cool the reactor until decay heat can be removed by the normal shutdown heat removal system or a passive decay heat removal system such as Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) loops with DRACS in-vessel heat exchangers. This capability of the new control strategy eliminates the need for use of a separate shutdown heat removal system which might also use supercritical CO{sub 2}. It has been found that this capability can be achieved by introducing a new control mechanism involving shaft speed control for the common shaft joining the turbine and two compressors following reduction of the load demand from the electrical grid to zero. Following disconnection of the generator from the electrical grid, heat is removed from the intermediate sodium circuit through the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger, the turbine solely drives the two compressors, and heat is rejected from the cycle through the CO{sub 2}-to-water cooler. To investigate the effectiveness of shaft speed control, calculations are carried out using the coupled Plant Dynamics Code-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code for a linear load reduction transient for a 1000 MWt metallic-fueled SFR with autonomous load following. No deliberate motion of control rods or adjustment of sodium pump speeds is assumed to take place. It is assumed that the S-CO{sub 2} turbomachinery shaft speed linearly decreases from 100 to 20% nominal following reduction of grid load to zero. The reactor power is calculated to autonomously decrease down to 3% nominal providing a lengthy window in time for the switchover to the normal shutdown heat removal system or for a passive decay heat removal system to become effective. However, the calculations reveal that the compressor conditions are calculated to approach surge such that the need for a surge control system for each compressor is identified. Thus, it is demonstrated that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can operate in the initial decay heat removal mode even with autonomous reactor control. Because external power is not needed to drive the compressors, the results show that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be used for initial decay heat removal for a lengthy interval in time in the absence of any off-site electrical power. The turbine provides sufficient power to drive the compressors. Combined with autonomous reactor control, this represents a significant safety advantage of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle by maintaining removal of the reactor power until the core decay heat falls to levels well below those for which the passive decay heat removal system is designed. The new control strategy is an alternative to a split-shaft layout involving separate power and compressor turbines which had previously been identified as a promising approach enabling heat removal from a SFR at low power levels. The current results indicate that the split-shaft configuration does not provide any significant benefits for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle over the current single-shaft layout with shaft speed control. It has been demonstrated that when connected to the grid the single-shaft cycle can effectively follow the load over the entire range. No compressor speed variation is needed while power is delivered to the grid. When the system is disconnected from the grid, the shaft speed can be changed as effectively as it would be with the split-shaft arrangement. In the split-shaft configuration, zero generator power means disconnection of the power turbine, such that the resulting system will be almost identical to the single-shaft arrangement. Without this advantage of the split-shaft configuration, the economic benefits of the single-shaft arrangement, provided by just one turbine and lower losses at the design point, are more important to the overall cycle performance. Therefore, the single-shaft

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed absorption cross-section behavior. Consequently, if NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;Demazière

Demazière, Christophe

205

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. Consequently, if*E-mail: demaz@nephy.chalmers.se NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;high-burnup fuel

Pázsit, Imre

206

Combined cycle meets Thailand's growing power demands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes how an ample supply of natural gas led the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to choose gas-fired combustion turbines. Thailand's rapid industrialization, which began in the late 1980's, placed a great strain on the country's electricity supply system. The demand for electricity grew at an astonishing 14% annually. To deal with diminishing reserve capacity margins, the EGAT announced, in 1988, a power development program emphasizing gas-fired combined cycle power plants. Plans included six 320-MW combined cycle blocks at three sites, and an additional 600-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant at Bang Pakong. As electricity demand continued to increase, EGAT expanded its plans to include two additional 320-MW combined cycle blocks, a 600-MW combined cycle block, and a 650-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant. All are currently in various stages of design and construction.

Sheets, B.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Takabut, K. (Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Portland General Electric ~f Portland, Oregon was sponsored to perform the design study with project management provided by F. W. Braun Engineers of Hillsboro, Oregon. rpe Fern Engineering Division of Thomassen U.S. of Bourne, Massachusetts provided... the gas turbin~, process evaluation and control support. Hauge International of Portland, Maine provided tre design input for the ceramic heat exchanger. 782 ESL-IE-84-04-136 Proceedings from the Sixth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference...

Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: Energy ResourcesJersey: EnergyBerthoud,BiodieselRapids isBillMT) JumpBinary

209

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 STORAGE AND SINK ENHANCEMENT OPTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for CO{sub 2} storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO{sub 2} in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MW{sub e} integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study were combined with the storage costs from this study to allow comparison among capture and storage approaches as well as sink enhancements.

Bert Bock; Richard Rhudy; Howard Herzog; Michael Klett; John Davison; Danial G. De La Torre Ugarte; Dale Simbeck

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Cycle Track Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle Track Lessons Learned #12;Presentation Overview · Bicycling trends · Cycle track lessons learned · What is a "Cycle track"? · Essential design elements of cycle tracks Separation Width Crossing driveways & low-volume streets Signalized intersections #12;Trend in kilometers cycled per year

Bertini, Robert L.

211

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Power Plant Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

Tingley, Joseph V.

213

Gasification Plant Cost and Performance Optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing effort of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to investigate the feasibility of gasification on a broader level, Nexant, Inc. was contracted to perform a comprehensive study to provide a set of gasification alternatives for consideration by the DOE. Nexant completed the first two tasks (Tasks 1 and 2) of the ''Gasification Plant Cost and Performance Optimization Study'' for the DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in 2003. These tasks evaluated the use of the E-GAS{trademark} gasification technology (now owned by ConocoPhillips) for the production of power either alone or with polygeneration of industrial grade steam, fuel gas, hydrocarbon liquids, or hydrogen. NETL expanded this effort in Task 3 to evaluate Gas Technology Institute's (GTI) fluidized bed U-GAS{reg_sign} gasifier. The Task 3 study had three main objectives. The first was to examine the application of the gasifier at an industrial application in upstate New York using a Southeastern Ohio coal. The second was to investigate the GTI gasifier in a stand-alone lignite-fueled IGCC power plant application, sited in North Dakota. The final goal was to train NETL personnel in the methods of process design and systems analysis. These objectives were divided into five subtasks. Subtasks 3.2 through 3.4 covered the technical analyses for the different design cases. Subtask 3.1 covered management activities, and Subtask 3.5 covered reporting. Conceptual designs were developed for several coal gasification facilities based on the fluidized bed U-GAS{reg_sign} gasifier. Subtask 3.2 developed two base case designs for industrial combined heat and power facilities using Southeastern Ohio coal that will be located at an upstate New York location. One base case design used an air-blown gasifier, and the other used an oxygen-blown gasifier in order to evaluate their relative economics. Subtask 3.3 developed an advanced design for an air-blown gasification combined heat and power facility based on the Subtask 3.2 design. The air-blown case was chosen since it was less costly and had a better return on investment than the oxygen-blown gasifier case. Under appropriate conditions, this study showed a combined heat and power air-blown gasification facility could be an attractive option for upgrading or expanding the utilities area of industrial facilities. Subtask 3.4 developed a base case design for a large lignite-fueled IGCC power plant that uses the advanced GE 7FB combustion turbine to be located at a generic North Dakota site. This plant uses low-level waste heat to dry the lignite that otherwise would be rejected to the atmosphere. Although this base case plant design is economically attractive, further enhancements should be investigated. Furthermore, since this is an oxygen-blown facility, it has the potential for capture and sequestration of CO{sub 2}. The third objective for Task 3 was accomplished by having NETL personnel working closely with Nexant and Gas Technology Institute personnel during execution of this project. Technology development will be the key to the long-term commercialization of gasification technologies. This will be important to the integration of this environmentally superior solid fuel technology into the existing mix of power plants and industrial facilities. As a result of this study, several areas have been identified in which research and development will further advance gasification technology. Such areas include improved system availability, development of warm-gas clean up technologies, and improved subsystem designs.

Samuel Tam; Alan Nizamoff; Sheldon Kramer; Scott Olson; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts; David Stopek; Robert Zabransky; Jeffrey Hoffmann; Erik Shuster; Nelson Zhan

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Low chemical concentrating steam generating cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A steam cycle for a nuclear power plant having two optional modes of operation. A once-through mode of operation uses direct feed of coolant water to an evaporator avoiding excessive chemical concentration buildup. A recirculation mode of operation uses a recirculation loop to direct a portion of flow from the evaporator back through the evaporator to effectively increase evaporator flow.

Mangus, James D. (Greensburg, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Nutrient Management Module No. 3 Nitrogen Cycling,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, it is important to first understand the various transformations that N undergoes within the soil. Nitrogen Cycling to be the sum of ammonium and nitrate, although urea, a type of organic N, may also be plant available. Nitrogen a fraction) by dry yield (in lb/ac). It's useful to compare actual uptake rates to N fertilizer rates

Lawrence, Rick L.

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric water cycle Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle power plant's water demand is to meet... cooling water makeup requirements. Cooling towers reject heat from a power ... Source: California Energy Commission Collection:...

217

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems for Industrial Waste Heat Recovery. c DanielCycle for Cement Kiln Waste Heat Recovery Power Plants. ”and high temperature waste heat reclamation and solar

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Edgeworth cycles revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some gasoline markets exhibit remarkable price cycles, where price spikes are followed by a series of small price declines: a pattern consistent with a model of Edgeworth cycles described by Maskin and Tirole. We extend ...

Doyle, Joseph J.

219

Photovoltaics Life Cycle Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Photovoltaics Life Cycle Analysis Vasilis Fthenakis Center of Life Cycle Analysis Earth & Environmental Engineering Department Columbia University and National Photovoltaic (PV) EHS Research Center (air, water, solid) M, Q E PV array Photovoltaic modules Balance of System (BOS) (Inverters

220

Microsoft Word - 341-03-01_QGESS_FOAKtoNOAK_Rev8_20130813.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that learning will occur. For example, the ConocoPhillips E- Gas integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system to be installed as part of the Excelsior project is a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fundamental studies in hydrogen-rich combustion : instability mechanisms and dynamic mode selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen-rich alternative fuels are likely to play a significant role in future power generation systems. The emergence of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) as one of the favored technologies for incorporating ...

Speth, Raymond L., 1981-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Methodology for technology evaluation under uncertainty and its application in advanced coal gasification processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has attracted interest as a cleaner alternative to conventional coal-fired power generation processes. While a number of pilot projects have been launched to ...

Gong, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The suitability of coal gasification in India's energy sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), an advanced coal-based power generation technology, may be an important technology to help India meet its future power needs. It has the potential to provide higher generating ...

Simpson, Lori Allison

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hydrogen Energy Technology Geoff Dutton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) Pyrolysis Water electrolysis Reversible fuel cell Hydrogen Hydrogen-fuelled internal combustion engines Hydrogen-fuelled turbines Fuel cells Hydrogen systems Overall expensive. Intermediate paths, employing hydrogen derived from fossil fuel sources, are already used

Watson, Andrew

225

mathematics single cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

47 mathematics education single cycle master's study programme #12;48 single cycle master's study program in Mathematics Education #12;49 single cycle master's study program in Mathematics Education MATHEMATICS EDUCATION The program is in tune with the principles of the Bologna Declaration. · Academic title

Â?umer, Slobodan

226

Industrial Plant Objectives and Cogeneration System Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEAT 15% 48% BOILER CONOENSER ASSOC. LOSSES LOSSES FIG. 2 - FUEL UTILIZATION EFFECTIVENESS The three types of topping cogeneration cycles usually encountered in industrial practice are steam turbine, gas turbine, and combined cycles... more power than that avail able due to plant he t demands may provide an economically viable option. Gas Turbine and Combined Cycles Gas turbine cycles provide the opportunity to generate a larger power output per unit of heat 39~ required...

Kovacik, J. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Cycle to Cycle Manufacturing Process Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most manufacturing processes produce parts that can only be correctly measured after the process cycle has been completed. Even if in-process measurement and control is possible, it is often too expensive or complex to ...

Hardt, David E.

228

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project. Topical report, July 1992--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project (WRCGRP, or Wabash Project) is a joint venture of Destec Energy, Inc. of Houston, Texas and PSI Energy, Inc. of Plainfield, Indiana, who will jointly repower an existing 1950 vintage coal-fired steam generating plant with coal gasification combined cycle technology. The Project is located in West Terre Haute, Indiana at PSI`s existing Wabash River Generating Station. The Project will process locally-mined Indiana high-sulfur coal to produce 262 megawatts of electricity. PSI and Destec are participating in the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program to demonstrate coal gasification repowering of an existing generating unit affected by the Clean Air Act Amendments. As a Clean Coal Round IV selection, the project will demonstrate integration of an existing PSI steam turbine generator and auxiliaries, a new combustion turbine generator, heat recovery steam generator tandem, and a coal gasification facility to achieve improved efficiency, reduced emissions, and reduced installation costs. Upon completion in 1995, the Project will not only represent the largest coal gasification combined cycle power plant in the United States, but will also emit lower emissions than other high sulfur coal-fired power plants and will result in a heat rate improvement of approximately 20% over the existing plant configuration. As of the end of December 1993, construction work is approximately 20% complete for the gasification portion of the Project and 25% complete for the power generation portion.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Design for, and Evaluation of Life Cycle Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?. DESIGN FOR, AND EVALUATION OF LIFE CYCLE PERFORMANCE David J. Ahner Eldon W. Hall GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK ABSTRACT EQUIPMENT DEGRADATION Project evaluation necessarily requires performance estimates over..., operating procedures, equipment availabilities, etc. This paper discusses the general nature, and the ther mal interaction of power plant components as individual equipment degradation occurs, describing overall plant performance trends and quant...

Ahner, D. J.; Hall, E. W.

230

Environmental life cycle assessment as a decision making tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Bi-objective optimization to consider environmental and economic metrics · Steam and Power Plant and Heijungs (2002). Handbook on Life Cycle Assessment. Kluwer Academic Publ. #12;PASI 2011 Potential #12;PASI 2011 Steam and power plant #12;PASI 2011 Steam and power demands #12;Martínez P. and Eliceche

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

231

Stirling-cycle refrigerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Stirling-cycle refrigerator comprises a plurality of Stirling-cycle refrigerator units each having a displacer defining an expansion chamber, a piston defining a compression chamber, and a circuit including a heater and a cooler and interconnecting the expansion chamber and the compression chamber, and a heat exchanger shared by the circuits and disposed between the coolers and the heaters for effecting heat exchange between working gases in the circuits. The heat exchanger may comprise a countercurrent heat exchanger, and the Stirling-cycle refrigerator units are operated in cycles which are 180/sup 0/ out of phase with each other.

Nakamura, K.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

232

Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Green, H.J. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)); Guenther, P.R. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Cavitation Fatigue. Embolism and Refilling Cycles Can Weaken the Cavitation Resistance of Xylem1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cavitation Fatigue. Embolism and Refilling Cycles Can Weaken the Cavitation Resistance of Xylem1Culloh Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 Although cavitation and refilling cycles could be common in plants, it is unknown whether these cycles weaken the cavitation resistance

Stiller, Volker

234

Advanced thermochemical hydrogen cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to contribute to the development of practical thermochemical cycles for the production of hydrogen from water. Specific goals are: investigate and evaluate the technical and economic viability of thermochemical cycles as an advanced technology for producing hydrogen from water; investigate and evaluate the engineering principles involved in interfacing individual thermochemical cycles with the different thermal energy sources (high temperature fission, solar, and fusion); and conduct a continuing research and development effort to evaluate the use of solid sulfates, oxides and other compounds as potentially advanced cycles and as alternates to H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ based cycles. Basic thermochemistry studies have been completed for two different steps in the decomposition of bismuth sulfate. Two different bismuth sulfate cycles have been defined for different sulfuric acid strengths. The eventual best cycle will depend on energy required to form sulfuric acid at different concentrations. A solids decomposition facility has been constructed and practical studies of solid decompositions are being conducted. The facility includes a rotary kiln system and a dual-particle fluidized bed system. Evaluation of different types of cycles for coupling with different heat sources is continuing.

Hollabaugh, C.M.; Bowman, M.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Life Cycle Cost Estimate  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

236

MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project is to design and construct prototypical hardware for an integrated MHD topping cycle, and conduct long duration proof-of-concept tests of integrated system at the US DOE Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The results of the long duration tests will augment the existing engineering design data base on MHD power train reliability, availability, maintainability, and performance, and will serve as a basis for scaling up the topping cycle design to the next level of development, an early commercial scale power plant retrofit. The components of the MHD power train to be designed, fabricated, and tested include: A slagging coal combustor with a rated capacity of 50 MW thermal input, capable of operation with an Eastern (Illinois {number sign}6) or Western (Montana Rosebud) coal, a segmented supersonic nozzle, a supersonic MHD channel capable of generating at least 1.5 MW of electrical power, a segmented supersonic diffuser section to interface the channel with existing facility quench and exhaust systems, a complete set of current control circuits for local diagonal current control along the channel, and a set of current consolidation circuits to interface the channel with the existing facility inverter.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Proceedings: 2003 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings of the 2003 EPRI Life Cycle Management Workshop provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and value in a market-driven industry. The proceedings summarize the results of applying life cycle management at several plants.

None

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Malone cycle refrigerator development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the progress made in demonstrating a Malone Cycle Refrigerator/Freezer. The Malone cycle is similar to the Stirling cycle but uses a supercritical fluid in place of real gas. In the approach, solid-metal diaphragms are used to seal and sweep the working volumes against the high working fluid pressures required in Malone cycle machines. This feature eliminates the friction and leakage that accounted for nearly half the losses in the best piston-defined Malone cycle machines built to date. The authors successfully built a Malone cycle refrigerator that: (1) used CO{sub 2} as the working fluid, (2) operated at pressures up to 19.3 Mpa (2,800 psi), (3) achieved a cold end metal temperatures of {minus}29 C ({minus}20 F), and (4) produced over 400 Watts of cooling at near ambient temperatures. The critical diaphragm components operated flawlessly throughout characterization and performance testing, supporting the conclusion of high reliability based on analysis of fatigue date and actual strain measurements.

Shimko, M.A.; Crowley, C.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Establishing a foundational understanding of the microbial and ecosystem factors that control carbon...

240

Helium process cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Helium process cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

242

Supercritical carbon dioxide cycle control analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work carried out during FY 2008 on further investigation of control strategies for supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle energy converters. The main focus of the present work has been on investigation of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle control and behavior under conditions not covered by previous work. An important scenario which has not been previously calculated involves cycle operation for a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) following a reactor scram event and the transition to the primary coolant natural circulation and decay heat removal. The Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Plant Dynamics Code has been applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of the 96 MWe (250 MWt) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle following scram. The timescale for the primary sodium flowrate to coast down and the transition to natural circulation to occur was calculated with the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 computer code and found to be about 400 seconds. It is assumed that after this time, decay heat is removed by the normal ABTR shutdown heat removal system incorporating a dedicated shutdown heat removal S-CO{sub 2} pump and cooler. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code configured for the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) was utilized to model the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle with a decaying liquid metal coolant flow to the Pb-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchangers and temperatures reflecting the decaying core power and heat removal by the cycle. The results obtained in this manner are approximate but indicative of the cycle transient performance. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code calculations show that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can operate for about 400 seconds following the reactor scram driven by the thermal energy stored in the reactor structures and coolant such that heat removal from the reactor exceeds the decay heat generation. Based on the results, requirements for the shutdown heat removal system may be defined. In particular, the peak heat removal capacity of the shutdown heat removal loop may be specified to be 1.1 % of the nominal reactor power. An investigation of the oscillating cycle behavior calculated by the ANL Plant Dynamics Code under specific conditions has been carried out. It has been found that the calculation of unstable operation of the cycle during power reduction to 0 % may be attributed to the modeling of main compressor operation. The most probable reason for such instabilities is the limit of applicability of the currently used one-dimensional compressor performance subroutines which are based on empirical loss coefficients. A development of more detailed compressor design and performance models is required and is recommended for future work in order to better investigate and possibly eliminate the calculated instabilities. Also, as part of such model development, more reliable surge criteria should be developed for compressor operation close to the critical point. It is expected that more detailed compressor models will be developed as a part of validation of the Plant Dynamics Code through model comparison with the experiment data generated in the small S-CO{sub 2} loops being constructed at Barber-Nichols Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Although such a comparison activity had been planned to be initiated in FY 2008, data from the SNL compression loop currently in operation at Barber Nichols Inc. has not yet become available by the due date of this report. To enable the transient S-CO{sub 2} cycle investigations to be carried out, the ANL Plant Dynamics Code for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle was further developed and improved. The improvements include further optimization and tuning of the control mechanisms as well as an adaptation of the code for reactor systems other than the Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). Since the focus of the ANL work on S-CO{sub 2} cycle development for the majority of the current year has been on the applicability of the cycle to SFRs, work has started on modification of the ANL Plant Dynamics Code to allow

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

243

MHD power plant instrumentation and control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has awarded a contract to the MHD Development Corporation (MDC) to develop instrumentation and control requirements and strategies for commercial MHD power plants. MDC subcontracted MSE to do the technical development required. MSE is being assisted by Montana State University (MSU) for the topping cycle development. A computer model of a stand-alone MHD/steam plant is being constructed. The plant is based on the plant design set forth in the MDC proposal to the Federal Clean Coal Technology 5 solicitation. It consists of an MHD topping plant, a Heat Recovery Seed Recovery (HRSR) plant, and a steam turbo-generator. The model is based on the computer code used for a study of the Corette plant retrofitted with an MHD plant. Additional control strategies, based on MHD testing results and current steam bottoming plant control data, will be incorporated. A model will be devised and implemented for automatic control of the plant. Requirements regarding instrumentation and actuators will be documented. Instrumentation and actuators that are not commercially available will be identified. The role and desired characteristics of an expert system in the automated control scheme is being investigated. Start-up and shutdown procedures will be studied and load change dynamic performance will be evaluated. System response to abnormal topping cycle and off-design system operation will be investigated. This includes use of MHD topping cycle models which couple gasdynamic and electrical behavior for the study of controlling of the MHD topping cycle. A curvefitter, which uses cubic Hermitian spline interpolation functions in as many as five dimensions, allows much more accurate reproduction of nonlinear, multidimensional functions. This project will be the first to investigate plant dynamics and control using as many as seven independent variables or control inputs to the MHD topping cycle.

Lofftus, D.; Rudberg, D. [MSE Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Johnson, R.; Hammerstrom, D. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Systemic Signalling in Plant Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

develop continuously throughout their life cycle, constantly initiating new or- gans. They doSystemic Signalling in Plant Development David Jackson, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring to the production of systemic signals that control the development of distant organs and tissues. Introduction

Jackson, David

245

Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of .sup.3 He in a single phase .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He solution. The .sup.3 He in superfluid .sup.4 He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid .sup.3 He at an initial concentration in superfluid .sup.4 He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of .sup.4 He while restricting passage of .sup.3 He. The .sup.3 He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K.

Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Kotsubo, Vincent Y. (La Canada, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of [sup 3]He in a single phase [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He solution. The [sup 3]He in superfluid [sup 4]He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid [sup 3]He at an initial concentration in superfluid [sup 4]He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of [sup 4]He while restricting passage of [sup 3]He. The [sup 3]He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K. 12 figs.

Swift, G.W.; Kotsubo, V.Y.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

247

MODELLING AND CONTROL OF CO-GENERATION POWER PLANTS UNDER CONSIDERATION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING AND CONTROL OF CO-GENERATION POWER PLANTS UNDER CONSIDERATION OF LIFETIME CONSUMPTION of a combined cycle power plant under consideration of the real cost of lifetime usage is accomplished behavior of a combined cycle power plant. In order to model both the continuous/discrete dynamics

Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

248

Understanding the petrochemical cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presentation will examine the nature of the supply, demand and profitability cycles that appear to be endemic in the petrochemical industry. The focus will be on the underlying factors that cause cyclicality. Data for ethylene and first line derivatives will be used both to provide quantitative illustrations of the magnitude of the cyclical effects and to give an improved perspective on the forces that drive cylicality. We will also examine to what extent cycle timing may be predictable, and present some scenario based projections.

Sedriks, W. [SRI Consulting, Melno Park, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Advanced binary geothermal power plants: Limits of performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Heat Cycle Research Program is investigating potential improvements to power cycles utilizing moderate temperature geothermal resources to produce electrical power. Investigations have specifically examined Rankine cycle binary power systems. Binary Rankine cycles are more efficient than the flash steam cycles at moderate resource temperature, achieving a higher net brine effectiveness. At resource conditions similar to those at the Heber binary plant, it has been shown that mixtures of saturated hydrocarbons (alkanes) or halogenated hydrocarbons operating in a supercritical Rankine cycle gave improved performance over Rankine cycles with the pure working fluids executing single or dual boiling cycles or supercritical cycles. Recently, other types of cycles have been proposed for binary geothermal service. This report explores the feasible limits on efficiency of a plant given practical limits on equipment performance and discusses the methods used in these advanced concept plants to achieve the maximum possible efficiency. (Here feasible is intended to mean reasonably achievable and not cost-effective.) No direct economic analysis has been made because of the sensitivity of economic results to site specific input. The limit of performance of three advanced plants were considered in this report. The performance predictions were taken from the developers of each concept. The advanced plants considered appear to be approaching the feasible limit of performance. Ultimately, the plant designer must weigh the advantages and disadvantages of the the different cycles to find the best plant for a given service. In addition, this report presents a standard of comparison of the work which has been done in the Heat Cycle Research Program and in the industrial sector by Exergy, Inc. and Polythermal Technologies. 18 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Molybdenum nutrition of the cotton plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that plants receiving molybdenum exhibited a greater capacity to c?nvert accumulated inorganic phosphorus into ?rgani? phosphorus than those lacking the element. Spencer (?0) pointed out that malybdate is a powerful competitive inhibitor of the acid..., Molybdenum cycle in the soil..................... Representative 30-day-?ld c?tt?n plants ?f the plus and minus molybdenum series* Plants in the right hand beaker are in minus molybdenum s?luti?n. . . . Figure 3* Alcohol s?luble amino acids in leaves...

Amin, Jagdish V.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

GENERAL CIRCULATION Energy Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process. PE is useful for global energy balance. Solar radiant energy does not reach the Earth equally everywhere. On average, the tropics receive and absorb far more solar energy annually than the polar regionsGENERAL CIRCULATION Contents Energy Cycle Mean Characteristics Momentum Budget Overview Energy

Grotjahn, Richard

252

CLASS DESCRIPTIONS CYCLING SERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will utilize concepts from the 50-minute cycling class while going the distance to optimal health. Whether you're an avid cyclist, triathlete, or desire a longer class for a greater challenge, join us for this 75-minute AN URBANATHLETE Are you registered to compete in an adventure race like the Men's Health Urbanathlon, Warrior Dash

Pittendrigh, Barry

253

Life cycle assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a technical, data-based and holistic approach to define and subsequently reduce the environmental burdens associated with a product, process, or activity by identifying and quantifying energy and material usage and waste discharges, assessing the impact of those wastes on the environment, and evaluating and implementing opportunities to effect environmental improvements. The assessment includes the entire life-cycle of the product, process or activity encompassing extraction and processing of raw materials, manufacturing, transportation and distribution, use/reuse, recycling and final disposal. LCA is a useful tool for evaluating the environmental consequences of a product, process, or activity, however, current applications of LCA have not been performed in consistent or easily understood ways. This inconsistency has caused increased criticism of LCA. The EPA recognized the need to develop an LCA framework which could be used to provide consistent use across the board. Also, additional research is needed to enhance the understanding about the steps in the performance of an LCA and its appropriate usage. This paper will present the research activities of the EPA leading toward the development of an acceptable method for conducting LCA`s. This research has resulted in the development of two guidance manuals. The first manual is intended to be a practical guide to conducting and interpreting the life-cycle inventory. A nine-step approach to performing a comprehensive inventory is presented along with the general issues to be addressed. The second manual addresses life-cycle design.

Curran, M.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Combined Cycle Combustion Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Cycle Combustion Turbines Steven Simmons February 27 2014 1 #12;CCCT Today's Discussion 1 Meeting Pricing of 4 advanced units using information from Gas Turbine World Other cost estimates from E E3 EIA Gas Turbine World California Energy Commission Date 2010 Oct 2012, Dec 2013 Apr 2013 2013 Apr

255

Answering Key Fuel Cycle Questions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) program has both “outcome” and “process” goals because it must address both waste already accumulating as well as completing the fuel cycle in connection with advanced nuclear power plant concepts. The outcome objectives are waste geological repository capacity and cost, energy security and sustainability, proliferation resistance, fuel cycle economics, and safety. The process objectives are readiness to proceed and adaptability and robustness in the face of uncertainties. A classic decision-making approach to such a multi-attribute problem would be to weight individual quantified criteria and calculate an overall figure of merit. This is inappropriate for several reasons. First, the goals are not independent. Second, the importance of different goals varies among stakeholders. Third, the importance of different goals is likely to vary with time, especially the “energy future.” Fourth, some key considerations are not easily or meaningfully quantifiable at present. Instead, at this point, we have developed 16 questions the AFCI program should answer and suggest an approach of determining for each whether relevant options improve meeting each of the program goals. We find that it is not always clear which option is best for a specific question and specific goal; this helps identify key issues for future work. In general, we suggest attempting to create as many win-win decisions (options that are attractive or neutral to most goals) as possible. Thus, to help clarify why the program is exploring the options it is, and to set the stage for future narrowing of options, we have developed 16 questions, as follows: · What are the AFCI program goals? · Which potential waste disposition approaches do we plan for? · What are the major separations, transmutation, and fuel options? · How do we address proliferation resistance? · Which potential energy futures do we plan for? · What potential external triggers do we plan for? · Should we separate uranium? · If we separate uranium, should we recycle it, store it or dispose of it? · Is it practical to plan to fabricate and handle “hot” fuel? · Which transuranic elements (TRU) should be separated and transmuted? · Of those TRU separated, which should be transmuted together? · Should we separate and/or transmute Cs and Sr isotopes that dominate near-term repository heating? · Should we separate and/or transmute very long-lived Tc and I isotopes? · Which separation technology? · What mix of transmutation technologies? · What fuel technology best supports the above decisions?

Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; J. Stephen Herring; David E. Shropshire; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fuel Cycle System Analysis Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Handbook aims to improve understanding and communication regarding nuclear fuel cycle options. It is intended to assist DOE, Campaign Managers, and other presenters prepare presentations and reports. When looking for information, check here. The Handbook generally includes few details of how calculations were performed, which can be found by consulting references provided to the reader. The Handbook emphasizes results in the form of graphics and diagrams, with only enough text to explain the graphic, to ensure that the messages associated with the graphic is clear, and to explain key assumptions and methods that cause the graphed results. Some of the material is new and is not found in previous reports, for example: (1) Section 3 has system-level mass flow diagrams for 0-tier (once-through), 1-tier (UOX to CR=0.50 fast reactor), and 2-tier (UOX to MOX-Pu to CR=0.50 fast reactor) scenarios - at both static and dynamic equilibrium. (2) To help inform fast reactor transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio and uranium supply behavior, section 5 provides the sustainable fast reactor growth rate as a function of TRU conversion ratio. (3) To help clarify the difference in recycling Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, and all-TRU, section 5 provides mass fraction, gamma, and neutron emission for those four cases for MOX, heterogeneous LWR IMF (assemblies mixing IMF and UOX pins), and a CR=0.50 fast reactor. There are data for the first 10 LWR recycle passes and equilibrium. (4) Section 6 provides information on the cycle length, planned and unplanned outages, and TRU enrichment as a function of fast reactor TRU conversion ratio, as well as the dilution of TRU feedstock by uranium in making fast reactor fuel. (The recovered uranium is considered to be more pure than recovered TRU.) The latter parameter impacts the required TRU impurity limits specified by the Fuels Campaign. (5) Section 7 provides flows for an 800-tonne UOX separation plant. (6) To complement 'tornado' economic uncertainty diagrams, which show at a glance combined uncertainty information, section 9.2 has a new set of simpler graphs that show the impact on fuel cycle costs for once through, 1-tier, and 2-tier scenarios as a function of key input parameters.

Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Dirk Gombert; Edward A. Hoffman; Gretchen E. Matthern; Kent A. Williams

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Developer Installed Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-installed treatment plants. These treatment plants are more commonly known as package wastewater treatment plants. 1

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

High efficiency Brayton cycles using LNG  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modified, closed-loop Brayton cycle power conversion system that uses liquefied natural gas as the cold heat sink media. When combined with a helium gas cooled nuclear reactor, achievable efficiency can approach 68 76% (as compared to 35% for conventional steam cycle power cooled by air or water). A superheater heat exchanger can be used to exchange heat from a side-stream of hot helium gas split-off from the primary helium coolant loop to post-heat vaporized natural gas exiting from low and high-pressure coolers. The superheater raises the exit temperature of the natural gas to close to room temperature, which makes the gas more attractive to sell on the open market. An additional benefit is significantly reduced costs of a LNG revaporization plant, since the nuclear reactor provides the heat for vaporization instead of burning a portion of the LNG to provide the heat.

Morrow, Charles W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Carbon Dioxide Gas Turbine Direct Cycle with Partial Condensation for Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A carbon dioxide gas turbine power generation system with a partial condensation cycle has been proposed for thermal and fast nuclear reactors, in which compression is done partly in the liquid phase and partly in the gas phase. This cycle achieves higher cycle efficiency than a He direct cycle mainly due to reduced compressor work of the liquid phase and of the carbon dioxide real gas effect, especially in the vicinity of the critical point. If this cycle is applied to a thermal reactor, efficiency of this cycle is about 55% at a reactor outlet temperature of 900 deg. C and pressure of 12.5 MPa, which is higher by about 10% than a typical helium direct gas turbine cycle plant (PBMR) at 900 deg. C and 8.4 MPa; this cycle also provides comparable cycle efficiency at the moderate core outlet temperature of 600 deg. C with that of the helium cycle at 900 deg. C. If this cycle is applied to a fast reactor, it is anticipated to be an alternative to liquid metal cooled fast reactors that can provide slightly higher cycle efficiency at the same core outlet temperature; it would eliminate safety problems, simplify the heat transport system and simplify plant maintenance. A passive decay heat removal system is realized by connecting a liquid carbon dioxide storage tank with the reactor vessel and by supplying carbon dioxide gasified from the tank to the core in case of depressurization event. (authors)

Yasuyoshi Kato; Takeshi Nitawaki; Yoshio Yoshizawa [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Automatic Control Strategy Development for the Supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle for LFR Autonomous Load Following  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is a promising advanced alternative to the Rankine saturated steam cycle and ideal gas Brayton cycle for the energy converters of specific reactor concepts belonging to the U.S. Department of Energy Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. A new plant dynamics analysis computer code has been developed for simulation of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle coupled to an autonomous Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). The plant dynamics code was used to develop an automatic control strategy for the whole plant in response to changes in the demand from the electrical grid. The specific features of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle that result in limitations on the control range and speed of specific control mechanisms are discussed. Calculations of whole-plant responses to plant operational transients involving step and continuous changes in grid demand are demonstrated. (authors)

Moisseytsev, Anton; Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Performance improvement options for the supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is under development at Argonne National Laboratory as an advanced power conversion technology for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) as well as other Generation IV advanced reactors as an alternative to the traditional Rankine steam cycle. For SFRs, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle eliminates the need to consider sodium-water reactions in the licensing and safety evaluation, reduces the capital cost of the SFR plant, and increases the SFR plant efficiency. Even though the S-CO{sub 2} cycle has been under development for some time and optimal sets of operating parameters have been determined, those earlier development and optimization studies have largely been directed at applications to other systems such as gas-cooled reactors which have higher operating temperatures than SFRs. In addition, little analysis has been carried out to investigate cycle configurations deviating from the selected 'recompression' S-CO{sub 2} cycle configuration. In this work, several possible ways to improve S-CO{sub 2} cycle performance for SFR applications have been identified and analyzed. One set of options incorporates optimization approaches investigated previously, such as variations in the maximum and minimum cycle pressure and minimum cycle temperature, as well as a tradeoff between the component sizes and the cycle performance. In addition, the present investigation also covers options which have received little or no attention in the previous studies. Specific options include a 'multiple-recompression' cycle configuration, intercooling and reheating, as well as liquid-phase CO{sub 2} compression (pumping) either by CO{sub 2} condensation or by a direct transition from the supercritical to the liquid phase. Some of the options considered did not improve the cycle efficiency as could be anticipated beforehand. Those options include: a double recompression cycle, intercooling between the compressor stages, and reheating between the turbine stages. Analyses carried out as part of the current investigation confirm the possibilities of improving the cycle efficiency that have been identified in previous investigations. The options in this group include: increasing the heat exchanger and turbomachinery sizes, raising of the cycle high end pressure (although the improvement potential of this option is very limited), and optimization of the low end temperature and/or pressure to operate as close to the (pseudo) critical point as possible. Analyses carried out for the present investigation show that significant cycle performance improvement can sometimes be realized if the cycle operates below the critical temperature at its low end. Such operation, however, requires the availability of a heat sink with a temperature lower than 30 C for which applicability of this configuration is dependent upon the climate conditions where the plant is constructed (i.e., potential performance improvements are site specific). Overall, it is shown that the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle efficiency can potentially be increased to 45 %, if a low temperature heat sink is available and incorporation of larger components (e.g.., heat exchangers or turbomachinery) having greater component efficiencies does not significantly increase the overall plant cost.

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

262

Flexible Coal: Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty-first century power systems, with higher penetration levels of low-carbon energy, smart grids, and other emerging technologies, will favor resources that have low marginal costs and provide system flexibility (e.g., the ability to cycle on and off to follow changes in variable renewable energy plant output). Questions remain about both the fate of coal plants in this scenario and whether they can cost-effectively continue to operate if they cycle routinely. The experience from the CGS plant demonstrates that coal plants can become flexible resources. This flexibility - namely the ability to cycle on and off and run at lower output (below 40% of capacity) - requires limited hardware modifications but extensive modifications to operational practice. Cycling does damage the plant and impact its life expectancy compared to baseload operations. Nevertheless, strategic modifications, proactive inspections and training programs, among other operational changes to accommodate cycling, can minimize the extent of damage and optimize the cost of maintenance. CGS's cycling, but not necessarily the associated price tag, is replicable. Context - namely, power market opportunities and composition of the generation fleet - will help determine for other coal plants the optimal balance between the level of cycling-related forced outages and the level of capital investment required to minimize those outages. Replicating CGS's experience elsewhere will likely require a higher acceptance of forced outages than regulators and plant operators are accustomed to; however, an increase in strategic maintenance can minimize the impact on outage rates.

Cochran, J.; Lew, D.; Kumar, N.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

S and H Cycle Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our thirst for energy is increasing at an astounding rate. World population growth is estimated to increase by 40% (to 8.5 billion) by 2050, with annual electrical energy usage estimated increase by 100% (to 25 terawatt-hours). We must find new means and fuels as well as significantly improve the efficiency of current power plants to accommodate this growing electrical energy demand. This demand is also growing in the field of space flight. Present energy and propulsion systems are limited in the amount of power (energy) that can be generated by today's technology. This limits the distance that can be safely traveled by manned and un-manned space systems. Space flight is primarily governed by two factors: time and energy. Increasing energy of space propulsion systems will decrease flight time or allow reaching farther out into space safely for manned exploration of our solar system. For example, a round trip manned mission to Mars would take about 400 days with a NERVA type thermal nuclear rocket. To reduce the 400 days to 80 days would require an increase of energy by a factor of five. We need to develop space propulsion systems with much greater energy capability than we have today to satisfy the expansion of space exploration. The S and H Cycle nuclear engine provides a revolutionary technological approach that can contribute significantly toward solving the World electrical energy and the space travel energy requirements. (authors)

Strobl, William C. [2906 Via Pepita, Carlsbad, Ca. 92009 (United States); Holland, Joe P. [10671 Jasper Ave., Redlands, Ca. 92374 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Rankine bottoming cycle safety analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vector Engineering Inc. conducted a safety and hazards analysis of three Rankine Bottoming Cycle Systems in public utility applications: a Thermo Electron system using Fluorinal-85 (a mixture of 85 mole % trifluoroethanol and 15 mole % water) as the working fluid; a Sundstrand system using toluene as the working fluid; and a Mechanical Technology system using steam and Freon-II as the working fluids. The properties of the working fluids considered are flammability, toxicity, and degradation, and the risks to both plant workers and the community at large are analyzed.

Lewandowski, G.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hybrid power cycle studies were conducted to identify a high efficiency, economically competitive system. A hybrid power cycle which generates power at an LHV efficiency > 70% was identified that includes an atmospheric pressure direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle. In this cycle, natural gas fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming fuel. The mixed gas then flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell which generates about 70% of the power. The portion of the anode exhaust which is not recycled is burned and heat transferred through a heat exchanger (HX) to the compressed air from a gas turbine. The heated compressed air is then heated further in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 15% of the power. Half the exhaust from the turbine provides air for the anode exhaust burner. All of the turbine exhaust eventually flows through the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the cathodes flows to a steam system (heat recovery steam generator, staged steam turbine generating 15% of the cycle power). Simulation of a 200 MW plant with a hybrid power cycle had an LHV efficiency of 72.6%. Power output and efficiency are insensitive to ambient temperature, compared to a gas turbine combined cycle; NOx emissions are 75% lower. Estimated cost of electricity for 200 MW is 46 mills/kWh, which is competitive with combined cycle where fuel cost is > $5.8/MMBTU. Key requirement is HX; in the 200 MW plant studies, a HX operating at 1094 C using high temperature HX technology currently under development by METC for coal gassifiers was assumed. A study of a near term (20 MW) high efficiency direct carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle has also been completed.

Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Sanderson, R.A. [Sanderson (Robert) and Associates, Wethersfield, CT (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power Over the last thirty years, moreMineLand Rehabilitation · PowerGeneration · System/PlantOperation andMaintenance · AuxiliaryNaturalGas Combustion · Coal-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. These LCAs have yielded wide-ranging results. Variation could

267

Stirling cycle engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a Stirling cycle engine having a plurality of working gas charges separated by pistons reciprocating in cylinders, the total gas content is minimized and the mean pressure equalization among the serial cylinders is improved by using two piston rings axially spaced at least as much as the piston stroke and by providing a duct in the cylinder wall opening in the space between the two piston rings and leading to a source of minimum or maximum working gas pressure.

Lundholm, Gunnar (Lund, SE)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

E-Print Network 3.0 - activation cycle coordinated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plant and are responsible... mechanism by which CDK activity is regu- lated during the cell cycle is by the periodic synthesis... -type cyclin CycD3 and inhibits CDK activity...

269

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Closed- Brayton-Cycle Solar Power Towers," ASME Journal ofNaF-NaBF4) cooled solar power tower plant is presented;high temperature solar power tower designs to date.

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Feasibility Study of a Multi-Purpose Computer Program for Optimizing Heat Rates in Power Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of currently available commercial codes which evaluate the thermal performance of turbine cycles in power plants is presented. The analytical basis, capabilities, and possible applications of these codes are described. A survey of some user...

Menuchin, Y.; Singh, K. P.; Hirota, N.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Estimates for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Plants · 2007: Rubin, et al., Energy utilities again looking to natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants for new or replacement capacity

272

HEURISTIC SEARCH FOR HAMILTON CYCLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by combining it with the remaining cycles. The following is the description of the main part of the algorithmHEURISTIC SEARCH FOR HAMILTON CYCLES IN CUBIC GRAPHS Janez ALES, Bojan MOHAR and Tomaz PISANSKI. A successful heuristic algorithm for nding Hamilton cycles in cubic graphs is described. Several graphs from

Mohar, Bojan

273

Edinburgh Research Explorer Money Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edinburgh Research Explorer Money Cycles Citation for published version: Clausen, A & Strub, C 2014 'Money Cycles' Edinburgh School of Economics Discussion Paper Series. Link: Link to publication record date: 11. Dec. 2014 #12;Edinburgh School of Economics Discussion Paper Series Number 249 Money Cycles

Millar, Andrew J.

274

Solar High Temperature Water-Splitting Cycle with Quantum Boost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sulfur family chemical cycle having ammonia as the working fluid and reagent was developed as a cost-effective and efficient hydrogen production technology based on a solar thermochemical water-splitting cycle. The sulfur ammonia (SA) cycle is a renewable and sustainable process that is unique in that it is an all-fluid cycle (i.e., with no solids handling). It uses a moderate temperature solar plant with the solar receiver operating at 800°C. All electricity needed is generated internally from recovered heat. The plant would operate continuously with low cost storage and it is a good potential solar thermochemical hydrogen production cycle for reaching the DOE cost goals. Two approaches were considered for the hydrogen production step of the SA cycle: (1) photocatalytic, and (2) electrolytic oxidation of ammonium sulfite to ammonium sulfate in aqueous solutions. Also, two sub-cycles were evaluated for the oxygen evolution side of the SA cycle: (1) zinc sulfate/zinc oxide, and (2) potassium sulfate/potassium pyrosulfate. The laboratory testing and optimization of all the process steps for each version of the SA cycle were proven in the laboratory or have been fully demonstrated by others, but further optimization is still possible and needed. The solar configuration evolved to a 50 MW(thermal) central receiver system with a North heliostat field, a cavity receiver, and NaCl molten salt storage to allow continuous operation. The H2A economic model was used to optimize and trade-off SA cycle configurations. Parametric studies of chemical plant performance have indicated process efficiencies of ~20%. Although the current process efficiency is technically acceptable, an increased efficiency is needed if the DOE cost targets are to be reached. There are two interrelated areas in which there is the potential for significant efficiency improvements: electrolysis cell voltage and excessive water vaporization. Methods to significantly reduce water evaporation are proposed for future activities. Electrolysis membranes that permit higher temperatures and lower voltages are attainable. The oxygen half cycle will need further development and improvement.

Taylor, Robin [SAIC] [SAIC; Davenport, Roger [SAIC] [SAIC; Talbot, Jan [UCSD] [UCSD; Herz, Richard [UCSD] [UCSD; Genders, David [Electrosynthesis Co.] [Electrosynthesis Co.; Symons, Peter [Electrosynthesis Co.] [Electrosynthesis Co.; Brown, Lloyd [TChemE] [TChemE

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

275

Simulation and optimization of cogeneration power plant operation using an Energy Optimization Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The operation of a combined cycle cogeneration power plant system is complicated because of the complex interactions among components as well as the dynamic nature of the system. Studies of plant operation through experiments in such a sensitive...

Zhou, Jijun

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case of vertical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Water Treatment Plant (Renou, 2006) and wastewater sanitation systems (Doka, 2007). ApplicationLife Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case The article presents the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to a complete sanitation system including

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

277

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

life-cycle energy requirements (e total ) and global warmingtotal life-cycle global warming impacts. Chapter 3 Life-cycle Energy and Global

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Quantum thermodynamic cooling cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum-mechanical and thermodynamic properties of a 3-level molecular cooling cycle are derived. An inadequacy of earlier models is rectified in accounting for the spontaneous emission and absorption associated with the coupling to the coherent driving field via an environmental reservoir. This additional coupling need not be dissipative, and can provide a thermal driving force - the quantum analog of classical absorption chillers. The dependence of the maximum attainable cooling rate on temperature, at ultra-low temperatures, is determined and shown to respect the recently-established fundamental bound based on the second and third laws of thermodynamics.

Palao, J P; Gordon, J M; Palao, Jose P.; Kosloff, Ronnie; Gordon, Jeffrey M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Quantum thermodynamic cooling cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum-mechanical and thermodynamic properties of a 3-level molecular cooling cycle are derived. An inadequacy of earlier models is rectified in accounting for the spontaneous emission and absorption associated with the coupling to the coherent driving field via an environmental reservoir. This additional coupling need not be dissipative, and can provide a thermal driving force - the quantum analog of classical absorption chillers. The dependence of the maximum attainable cooling rate on temperature, at ultra-low temperatures, is determined and shown to respect the recently-established fundamental bound based on the second and third laws of thermodynamics.

Jose P. Palao; Ronnie Kosloff; Jeffrey M. Gordon

2001-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

280

Beowawe Binary Bottoming Cycle  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: ScopeDepartment ofEnergyBeowawe Binary Bottoming Cycle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Simulation of an Industrial Rankine Cycle Cogeneration Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sophisticated designs of thermal systems may be evaluated, quickly and inexpensively, with the support of computer based system simulation techniques; i.e. CAD for thermal systems. Furthermore, the response of a thermal system to predicted periodic...

Carattie, G.; Wepfer, W. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Design of a 465 MW Combined Cycle Cogeneration Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STEAM TUR8JNE GENERAIOR ELECTRICAl, POWER OUIPUI GAS TURBINE GENERAIORS ~==3:=:J PROCESS CONDENSATE TOIAl fUEl 90 MillION BBl./'l'R NEI ELECTRICAl GENERATION 46$.000 KW LOSSES Sl,\\OF JUHINPUI NfTHEAT . 10 PROCESS 43% EFFICIENT... energy efficiency within this operating envelope, the following design .features are incorporated: extraction-induction-condensing steam turbine modulating inlet guide vanes on the gas turbine~ supplementary firing on two boilers steam augmentation...

Leffler, D. W.

284

Optimum Heat Power Cycles for Process Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric power cogeneration is compared with direct mechanical drives emphasizing the technical aspects having the greatest impact on energy economics. Both steam and gas turbine applications are discussed and practical methods of developing...

Waterland, A. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

The Kalina cycle and similar cycles for geothermal power production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a brief discussion of the mechanics of the Kalina cycle and ideas to extend the concept to other somewhat different cycles. A modified cycle which has a potential heat rejection advantage but little or no performance improvement is discussed. Then, the results of the application of the Kalina cycle and the modified cycle to a geothermal application (360/degree/F resource) are discussed. The results are compared with published results for the Kalina cycle with high temperature sources and estimates about performance at the geothermal temperatures. Finally, the conclusions of this scoping work are given along with recommendations of the direction of future work in this area. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Bliem, C.J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Kouchoul cycle implication in the Tailer engine cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author presents here the study of the Tailer engine modified cycle using the concept of load transfer for the Kouchoul cycle. Theoretical equations and numerical simulation of the Tailer engine modified cycle implicating the Kouchoul cycle are developed. The Tailer engine modified cycle can be improved by approaching cycles of spark plug engines by the addition of a phase of cooling of gases to the bottom dead center (bdc). This is possible only by putting a reservoir of cooled gas in communication with the cylinder to the bottom dead center. So as not to complicate the kinematic of the engine, the communication between cylinder and cooled reservoir is executed by some holes of 1 mm distributed on the whole periphery of the cylinder at the bdc.

Arques, P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development: Task 4.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Topical Report presents the results of Task 4 of the Westinghouse ATS Program. The purpose of Task 4 is to determine the technical development needs for conversion of the gas-fired ATS (GFATS). Two closely related, advanced, coal-based power plant technologies have been selected for consideration as the CFATS -- air-blown, coal gasification with hot gas cleaning incorporated into an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), and the Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) combined cycle. These are described and their estimated performance and emissions in the CFATS are reported. A development program for the CFATS is described that focuses on major commercialization issues. These issues are in the areas of combustion, flow distribution, structural analysis, and materials selection.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Life Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are shown. Keywords- Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); Life Cycleindustry, and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is emerging as a

Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David; Krishnan, Nikhil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

(NREL) at www.nrel.govpublications. Executive Summary Many binary-cycle geothermal power plants use air as the heat rejection medium. An air-cooled condenser (ACC) system is...

290

The Hybrid Sulfur Cycle for Nuclear Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two Sulfur-based cycles--the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) and the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS)--have emerged as the leading thermochemical water-splitting processes for producing hydrogen utilizing the heat from advanced nuclear reactors. Numerous international efforts have been underway for several years to develop the SI Cycle, but development of the HyS Cycle has lagged. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background, current status, recent development results, and the future potential for this thermochemical process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology since 2004 to evaluate and to conduct research and development for the HyS Cycle. Process design studies and flowsheet optimization have shown that an overall plant efficiency (based on nuclear heat converted to hydrogen product, higher heating value basis) of over 50% is possible with this cycle. Economic studies indicate that a nuclear hydrogen plant based on this process can be economically competitive, assuming that the key component, the sulfur dioxide-depolarized electrolyzer, can be successfully developed. SRNL has recently demonstrated the use of a proton-exchange-membrane electrochemical cell to perform this function, thus holding promise for economical and efficient hydrogen production.

Summers, William A.; Gorensek, Maximilian B.; Buckner, Melvin R.

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

291

Open cycle thermoacoustics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new type of thermodynamic device combining a thermodynamic cycle with the externally applied steady flow of an open thermodynamic process is discussed and experimentally demonstrated. The gas flowing through this device can be heated or cooled in a series of semi-open cyclic steps. The combination of open and cyclic flows makes possible the elimination of some or all of the heat exchangers (with their associated irreversibility). Heat is directly exchanged with the process fluid as it flows through the device when operating as a refrigerator, producing a staging effect that tends to increase First Law thermodynamic efficiency. An open-flow thermoacoustic refrigerator was built to demonstrate this concept. Several approaches are presented that describe the physical characteristics of this device. Tests have been conducted on this refrigerator with good agreement with a proposed theory.

Reid, Robert Stowers

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Stirling cycle rotary engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Stirling cycle rotary engine for producing mechanical energy from heat generated by a heat source external to the engine, the engine including: an engine housing having an interior toroidal cavity with a central housing axis for receiving a working gas, the engine housing further having a cool as inlet port, a compressed gas outlet port, a heated compressed gas inlet port, and a hot exhaust gas outlet port at least three rotors each fixedly mounted to a respective rotor shaft and independently rotatable within the toroidal cavity about the central axis; each of the rotors including a pair of rotor blocks spaced radially on diametrically opposing sides of the respective rotor shaft, each rotor block having a radially fixed curva-linear outer surface for sealed rotational engagement with the engine housing.

Chandler, J.A.

1988-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

293

Advanced regenerative absorption refrigeration cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multi-effect regenerative absorption cycles which provide a high coefficient of performance (COP) at relatively high input temperatures. An absorber-coupled double-effect regenerative cycle (ADR cycle) (10) is provided having a single-effect absorption cycle (SEA cycle) (11) as a topping subcycle and a single-effect regenerative absorption cycle (1R cycle) (12) as a bottoming subcycle. The SEA cycle (11) includes a boiler (13), a condenser (21), an expansion device (28), an evaporator (31), and an absorber (40), all operatively connected together. The 1R cycle (12) includes a multistage boiler (48), a multi-stage resorber (51), a multisection regenerator (49) and also uses the condenser (21), expansion device (28) and evaporator (31) of the SEA topping subcycle (11), all operatively connected together. External heat is applied to the SEA boiler (13) for operation up to about 500 degrees F., with most of the high pressure vapor going to the condenser (21) and evaporator (31) being generated by the regenerator (49). The substantially adiabatic and isothermal functioning of the SER subcycle (12) provides a high COP. For higher input temperatures of up to 700 degrees F., another SEA cycle (111) is used as a topping subcycle, with the absorber (140) of the topping subcycle being heat coupled to the boiler (13) of an ADR cycle (10). The 1R cycle (12) itself is an improvement in that all resorber stages (50b-f) have a portion of their output pumped to boiling conduits (71a-f) through the regenerator (49), which conduits are connected to and at the same pressure as the highest pressure stage (48a) of the 1R multistage boiler (48).

Dao, Kim (14 Nace Ave., Piedmont, CA 94611)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

New Clean Coal Cycle Optimized Using Pinch Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEW CLEAN COAL CYCLE OPTIMIZED USING PINCH TECHNOLOGY A. P. ROSSITER, Linnhoff March I 0'00 ' nc., Houston, TX J. J. NNELL, The M. W. Kellogg Company, Houston, TX High thermal efficiency and low levels of environmental emissions...~en incorporated in the present des1gn, some of them could be of use in later generations of the process. CONCLUSIONS The hybrid cycle is a very promising new clean coal power plant technology. Its benefits include: ? Very low NO and SOx emission levels...

Rossiter, A. P.; O'Donnell, J. J.

295

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

296

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

Virtuous Cycle Cycles of activity and software projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inspection #12;Programming Cycle - single bug Selected Bug Shared Code Fix Bug Continuous Integration ~8 cycle cvscheck compilation style checking testing javadocs documentation jumble quality of unit testing #12;NetValue Development cvscheck - Source Code Control and Build Shared Centralized Automatic

Pfahringer, Bernhard

298

Plants & Animals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We sample many plants and animals, including wild and domestic crops, game animals, fish, and food products from animals, as well as...

299

Turbocharged PFBC Power Plant Technical and Economic Assessments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TURBOCHARGED PFBC POWER PLANT TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC ASSESSMENTS DELBERT M. LEPPKE Senior Technical Manager Fluor Daniel Chicago, Illinois Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) boilers are receiving considerable attention by the utility... are presented for comparison. The frequency of maintenance can be affected by the cycle conditions selected for the PFBC unit. Two approaches are under consideration for development a turbocharged cycle and a combined cycle. Each can use easentially...

Leppke, D.

300

Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the GREET model shows that fossil thermal plants have fossil energy use and GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output about one order of magnitude higher than renewable power systems, including geothermal power.

Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Control system options and strategies for supercritical CO2 cycles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton Cycle is a promising alternative to Rankine steam cycle and recuperated gas Brayton cycle energy converters for use with Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs), Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors (LFRs), as well as other advanced reactor concepts. The S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle offers higher plant efficiencies than Rankine or recuperated gas Brayton cycles operating at the same liquid metal reactor core outlet temperatures as well as reduced costs or size of key components especially the turbomachinery. A new Plant Dynamics Computer Code has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory for simulation of a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter coupled to an autonomous load following liquid metal-cooled fast reactor. The Plant Dynamics code has been applied to investigate the effectiveness of a control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle for the STAR-LM 181 MWe (400 MWt) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor. The strategy, which involves a combination of control mechanisms, is found to be effective for controlling the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle over the complete operating range from 0 to 100 % load for a representative set of transient load changes. While the system dynamic analysis of control strategy performance for STARLM is carried out for a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter incorporating an axial flow turbine and compressors, investigations of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle have identified benefits from the use of centrifugal compressors which offer a wider operating range, greater stability near the critical point, and potentially further cost reductions due to fewer stages than axial flow compressors. Models have been developed at Argonne for the conceptual design and performance analysis of centrifugal compressors for use in the SCO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle. Steady state calculations demonstrate the wider operating range of centrifugal compressors versus axial compressors installed in a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle as well as the benefits in expanding the range over which individual control mechanisms are effective for cycle control. However, a combination of mechanisms is still required for control of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle between 0 and 100 % load. An effort is underway to partially validate the Argonne models and codes by means of comparison with data from tests carried out using the small-scale Sandia Brayton Loop (SBL) recuperated gas closed Brayton cycle facility. The centrifugal compressor model has been compared with data from the SBL operating with nitrogen gas and good agreement is obtained between calculations and the measured data for the compressor outlet pressure versus flow rate, although it is necessary to assume values for certain model parameters which require information about the configuration or dimensions of the compressor components that is unavailable. Unfortunately, the compressor efficiency cannot be compared with experiment data due to the lack of outlet temperature data. A radial inflow turbine model has been developed to enable further comparison of calculations with data from the SBL which incorporates both a radial inflow turbine as well as a radial compressor. Preliminary calculations of pressure ratio and efficiency versus flow rate have been carried out using the radial inflow turbine model.

Moisseytsev, A.; Kulesza, K. P.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Oregon State Univ.

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

302

Tap cogen-plant steam for process, NO[sub x] control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the Monsanto's Indian Orchard plant gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility in Springfield, Massachusetts. The topics of the article include project configuration, the thermodynamic cycle, fuel selection, electrical distribution system, plant control, and air pollution control of NO[sub X], SO[sub 2], CO, particulates, non-methane hydrocarbons, opacity and ammonia.

Engel, W.J.; Haviland, R.W.; Devine, D.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Benefits and concerns of a closed nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power can play an important role in our energy future, contributing to increasing electricity demand while at the same time decreasing carbon dioxide emissions. However, the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States today is unsustainable. As stated in the 1982 Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for disposing of spent nuclear fuel generated by commercial nuclear power plants operating in a “once-through” fuel cycle in the deep geologic repository located at Yucca Mountain. However, unyielding political opposition to the site has hindered the commissioning process to the extant that the current administration has recently declared the unsuitability of the Yucca Mountain site. In light of this the DOE is exploring other options, including closing the fuel cycle through recycling and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The possibility of closing the fuel cycle is receiving special attention because of its ability to minimize the final high level waste (HLW) package as well as recover additional energy value from the original fuel. The technology is, however, still very controversial because of the increased cost and proliferation risk it can present. To lend perspective on the closed fuel cycle alternative, this presents the arguments for and against closing the fuel cycle with respect to sustainability, proliferation risk, commercial viability, waste management, and energy security.

Widder, Sarah H.

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

Life Cycle Asset Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

(The following directives are deleted or consolidated into this Order and shall be phased out as noted in Paragraph 2: DOE 1332.1A; DOE 4010.1A; DOE 4300.1C; DOE 4320.1B; DOE 4320.2A; DOE 4330.4B; DOE 4330.5; DOE 4540.1C; DOE 4700.1). This Order supersedes specific project management provisions within DOE O 430.1A, LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT. The specific paragraphs canceled by this Order are 6e(7); 7a(3); 7b(11) and (14); 7c(4),(6),(7),(11), and (16); 7d(4) and (8); 7e(3),(10), and (17); Attachment 1, Definitions (item 30 - Line Item Project, item 42 - Project, item 48 - Strategic System); and Attachment 2, Contractor Requirements Document (paragraph 1d regarding a project management system). The remainder of DOE O 430.1A remains in effect. Cancels DOE O 430.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.3.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

305

Orbital Resonance and Solar Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of planetary moves, encoded in DE406 ephemerides. We show resonance cycles between most planets in Solar System, of differing quality. The most precise resonance - between Earth and Venus, which not only stabilizes orbits of both planets, locks planet Venus rotation in tidal locking, but also affects the Sun: This resonance group (E+V) also influences Sunspot cycles - the position of syzygy between Earth and Venus, when the barycenter of the resonance group most closely approaches the Sun and stops for some time, relative to Jupiter planet, well matches the Sunspot cycle of 11 years, not only for the last 400 years of measured Sunspot cycles, but also in 1000 years of historical record of "severe winters". We show, how cycles in angular momentum of Earth and Venus planets match with the Sunspot cycle and how the main cycle in angular momentum of the whole Solar system (854-year cycle of Jupiter/Saturn) matches with climatologic data, assumed to show connection with Solar output power and insolation. We show the possible connections between E+V events and Solar global p-Mode frequency changes. We futher show angular momentum tables and charts for individual planets, as encoded in DE405 and DE406 ephemerides. We show, that inner planets orbit on heliocentric trajectories whereas outer planets orbit on barycentric trajectories.

P. A. Semi

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

306

Extreme Financial cycles$ B. Candelonb,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extreme Financial cycles$ B. Candelonb, , G. Gauliera , C. Hurlinb aUniversity Maastricht proposes a new approach to date extreme financial cycles. Elabo- rating on recent methods in extreme value theory, it elaborates an extension of the famous calculus rule to detect extreme peaks and troughs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

307

MULTIPARAMETER OPTIMIZATION STUDIES ON GEOTHERMAL ENERGY CYCLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Plants." General Electric Company, Corporate ResearchPower Plants." General Electric Company, Corporate Research

Pope, W.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency {ge}20%; Steam turbine outlet quality {ge}90%; and Pumping power {le}2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump and pipes were modeled with realistic assumptions using the PEACE module of Thermoflex. A three-dimensional layout of the plant was also generated with the SolidEdge software. The results of the engineering design are as follows: (i) The cycle achieves a net thermal efficiency of 24.13% with 350/460 C reactor inlet/outlet temperatures, {approx}250 bar reactor pressure and 0.75 bar condenser pressure. The steam quality at the turbine outlet is 90% and the total electric consumption of the pumps is about 2500 kWe at nominal conditions. (ii) The overall size of the plant is attractively compact and can be further reduced if a printed-circuit-heat-exchanger (vs shell-and-tube) design is used for the feedwater heater, which is currently the largest component by far. Finally, an analysis of the plant performance at off-nominal conditions has revealed good robustness of the design in handling large changes of thermal power and seawater temperature.

BD Middleton; J Buongiorno

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

Cycle Evaluations of Reversible Chemical Reactions for Solar Thermochemical Energy Storage in Support of Concentrating Solar Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production and storage of thermochemical energy is a possible route to increase capacity factors and reduce the Levelized Cost of Electricity from concentrated solar power generation systems. In this paper, we present the results of cycle evaluations for various thermochemical cycles, including a well-documented ammonia closed-cycle along with open- and closed-cycle versions of hydrocarbon chemical reactions. Among the available reversible hydrocarbon chemical reactions, catalytic reforming-methanation cycles are considered; specifically, various methane-steam reforming cycles are compared to the ammonia cycle. In some cases, the production of an intermediate chemical, methanol, is also included with some benefit being realized. The best case, based on overall power generation efficiency and overall plant capacity factor, was found to be an open cycle including methane-steam reforming, using concentrated solar energy to increase the chemical energy content of the reacting stream, followed by combustion to generate heat for the heat engine.

Krishnan, Shankar; Palo, Daniel R.; Wegeng, Robert S.

2010-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

310

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A dynamic fuel cycle analysis for a heterogeneous thorium-DUPIC recycle in CANDU reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A heterogeneous thorium fuel recycle scenario in a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor has been analyzed by the dynamic analysis method. The thorium recycling is performed through a dry process which has a strong proliferation resistance. In the fuel cycle model, the existing nuclear power plant construction plan was considered up to 2016, while the nuclear demand growth rate from the year 2016 was assumed to be 0%. In this analysis, the spent fuel inventory as well as the amount of plutonium, minor actinides, and fission products of a multiple thorium recycling fuel cycle were estimated and compared to those of the once-through fuel cycle. The analysis results have shown that the heterogeneous thorium fuel cycle can be constructed through the dry process technology. It is also shown that the heterogeneous thorium fuel cycle can reduce the spent fuel inventory and save on the natural uranium resources when compared with the once-through cycle. (authors)

Jeong, C. J.; Park, C. J.; Choi, H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., P.O. Box 150, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Development of the Hybrid Sulfur Thermochemical Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of hydrogen via the thermochemical splitting of water is being considered as a primary means for utilizing the heat from advanced nuclear reactors to provide fuel for a hydrogen economy. The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process is one of the baseline candidates identified by the U.S. Department of Energy [1] for this purpose. The HyS Process is a two-step hybrid thermochemical cycle that only involves sulfur, oxygen and hydrogen compounds. Recent work has resulted in an improved process design with a calculated overall thermal efficiency (nuclear heat to hydrogen, higher heating value basis) approaching 50%. Economic analyses indicate that a nuclear hydrogen plant employing the HyS Process in conjunction with an advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactor system can produce hydrogen at competitive prices. Experimental work has begun on the sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer, the major developmental component in the cycle. Proof-of-concept tests have established proton-exchange-membrane cells (a state-of-the-art technology) as a viable approach for conducting this reaction. This is expected to lead to more efficient and economical cell designs than were previously available. Considerable development and scale-up issues remain to be resolved, but the development of a viable commercial-scale HyS Process should be feasible in time to meet the commercialization schedule for Generation IV gas-cooled nuclear reactors.

Summers, William A.; Steimke, John L

2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

313

Clean coal technologies in electric power generation: a brief overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper talks about the future clean coal technologies in electric power generation, including pulverized coal (e.g., advanced supercritical and ultra-supercritical cycles and fluidized-bed combustion), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), and CO{sub 2} capture technologies. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

Janos Beer; Karen Obenshain [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), MA (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

315

Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

Sullivan, John

316

Case studies on recent fossil-fired plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article summarises the findings of case studies on fossil-fired power plants carried out by the IEA Clean Coal Centre for the IEA at the request of world leaders at the Gleneagles G8 Summit in July 2005. The studies compared the cost, efficiency and emissions of eight recently constructed coal-fired plants using pulverized coal combustion with subcritical, supercritical or ultra-supercritical steam turbine cycles. Also included was a review of IGCC developments. A case study of a natural gas combined-cycle plant was included for comparison. The full report has been published by the IEA. 1 tab.

Henderson, C. [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Optimization of Air Conditioning Cycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a 3-ton residential air conditioner are then presented to intuitively understand the effect of expansion valve and evaporator fan cycling in a real system. A real time optimization method is explored and the feasibility, recommendations for a...

Seshadri, Swarooph

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

318

American business cycles and innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economists have long studied innovation and its effects on business cycles. Economist Joseph Alois Schumpeter (1883-1950) was the first economist to thoroughly discuss these ideas in his Theorie der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung, published in 1911...

Hood, Michael

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

319

Life Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reichl, H. “Life cycle inventory analysis and identificationAllen, D.T. ; “Life cycle inventory development for waferLife Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip Sarah Boyd and David

Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David; Krishnan, Nikhil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

yield. A hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) model is used;more accurate life-cycle assessment (LCA) of electronicthe purposes of life-cycle assessment (LCA). While it may be

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Production cost and air emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind penetration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production cost and air emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind penetration David Luke Oates, and SO2 emissions as well as for the profitability of coal plants, as calculated by our dispatch model

Jaramillo, Paulina

322

Conceptual design of a black liquor gasification pilot plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In July 1985, Champion International completed a study of kraft black liquor gasification and use of the product gases in a combined cycle cogeneration system based on gas turbines. That study indicated that gasification had high potential as an alternative to recovery boiler technology and offered many advantages. This paper describes the design of the plant, the construction of the pilot plant, and finally presents data from operation of the plant.

Kelleher, E. G.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Coupling fuel cycles with repositories: how repository institutional choices may impact fuel cycle design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The historical repository siting strategy in the United States has been a top-down approach driven by federal government decision making but it has been a failure. This policy has led to dispatching fuel cycle facilities in different states. The U.S. government is now considering an alternative repository siting strategy based on voluntary agreements with state governments. If that occurs, state governments become key decision makers. They have different priorities. Those priorities may change the characteristics of the repository and the fuel cycle. State government priorities, when considering hosting a repository, are safety, financial incentives and jobs. It follows that states will demand that a repository be the center of the back end of the fuel cycle as a condition of hosting it. For example, states will push for collocation of transportation services, safeguards training, and navy/private SNF (Spent Nuclear Fuel) inspection at the repository site. Such activities would more than double local employment relative to what was planned for the Yucca Mountain-type repository. States may demand (1) the right to take future title of the SNF so if recycle became economic the reprocessing plant would be built at the repository site and (2) the right of a certain fraction of the repository capacity for foreign SNF. That would open the future option of leasing of fuel to foreign utilities with disposal of the SNF in the repository but with the state-government condition that the front-end fuel-cycle enrichment and fuel fabrication facilities be located in that state.

Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 24-207A Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Miller, W.F. [Texas A.M. University System, MS 3133 College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fixed bed testing of durable, steam resistant zinc oxide containing sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is currently developing Integrated Gasification combined Cycle (IGCC) systems for electrical power generation. It has been predicted that IGCC plants with hot gas cleanup will be superior to conventional pulverized coal-fired power plants in overall plant efficiency and environmental performance. Development of a suitable regenerable sorbent is a major barrier issue in the hot gas cleanup program for IGCC systems. This has been a challenging problem during the last 20 years, since many of the sorbents developed in the program could not retain their reactivity and physical integrity during repeated cycles of sulfidation and regeneration reactions. Two promising sorbents and (METC6), which were capable of sustaining their reactivity and physical integrity during repeated sulfidation/regeneration cycles, have been developed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) during the past year. These sorbents were tested (sulfided) both in low-pressure (260 kPa/37.7 psia) and high-pressure (1034 kPa/150 psia) fixed-bed reactors at 538{degrees}C (1000{degrees}F) with simulated KRW coal gas. High-pressure testing was continued for 20 cycles with steam regeneration. There were no appreciable changes in sulfidation capacity of the sorbents during the 20-cycle testing. The crush strength of the sorbent actually improved after 20 cycles and there were no indications of spalling or any other physical deterioration of the sorbents. In testing to date, these sorbents exhibit better overall sulfur capture performance than the conventional sorbents.

Siriwardane, R.V.; Grimm, U.; Poston, J. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Monaco, S.J. [EG& G dTechnical Services of West Virginia, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Development of ceramic composite hot-gas filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel type of hot-gas filter based on a ceramic fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix was developed and extended to fullsize, 60-mm OD by 1.5-meter-long, candle filters. A commercially viable process for producing the filters was developed, and the filters are undergoing testing and demonstration throughout the world for applications in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants. Development activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the 3M Company, and testing at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (STC) are presented. Demonstration tests at the Tidd PFBC are underway. Issues identified during the testing and demonstration phases of the development are discussed. Resolution of the issues and the status of commercialization of the filters are described.

Judkins, R.R.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Smith, R.G.; Fischer, E.M.; Eaton, J.H.; Weaver, B.L.; Kahnke, J.L.; Pysher, D.J. [3M Co., St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Coal Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell System Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by gasified coal. System concepts that integrate a coal gasifier with a SOFC, a gas turbine, and a steam turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 200 MW. Two alternative integration configurations were selected with projected system efficiency of over 53% on a HHV basis, or about 10 percentage points higher than that of the state-of-the-art Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The initial cost of both selected configurations was found to be comparable with the IGCC system costs at approximately $1700/kW. An absorption-based CO2 isolation scheme was developed, and its penalty on the system performance and cost was estimated to be less approximately 2.7% and $370/kW. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

Chellappa Balan; Debashis Dey; Sukru-Alper Eker; Max Peter; Pavel Sokolov; Greg Wotzak

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

EIS-0215: Pinon Pine Power Project, Tracy Station, NV  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this statement to assess the environmental and human health issues associated with the Pinon Pine Power Project, a proposed demonstration project that would be cost-shared by DOE and the Sierra Pacific Power Company (SPPCo.) under DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program. The proposed Federal action is for DOE to provide cost-shared funding support for the construction and operation of the Pinon Pine Power Project, a coal-fired power generating facility, which would be a nominal, 800-ton-per-day (104 megawatt (MW) gross generation) air-blown, Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle plant proposed by SPPCo. at its Tracy Power Station near Reno, Nevada.

328

Comparative Assessment of Coal-and Natural Gas-fired Power Plants under a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative Assessment of Coal- and Natural Gas-fired Power Plants under a CO2 Emission Performance standard (EPS) for pulverized coal (PC) and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants; · Evaluate% · Natural Gas-fired Power Plant: Adv. 7F Gas Turbine Capacity Factor 75% · Cost Basis: 2007$, constant 7

329

Alternative water sources: Desalination model provides life-cycle costs of facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Story by Danielle Supercinski tx H2O | pg. 8 Alternative water sourcees Desalination model provides life-cycle costs of facility platform and design standards as DESAL ECONOMICS?, but created to analyze con- ventional surface water treatment... to determine the economic and financial life-cycle costs of building and operating four water treatment facilities in South Texas. One facility was the Southmost Regional Water Authority Regional Desalination Plant near Brownsville. Sturdi- vant said...

Supercinski, Danielle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Flexible Coal: An Example Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty-first century power systems, with higher penetration levels of low-carbon energy, smart grids, and other emerging technologies, will favor resources that have low marginal costs and provide system flexibility (e.g., the ability to cycle on and off to follow changes in variable renewable energy plant output). Questions remain about both the fate of coal plants in this scenario and whether they can cost-effectively continue to operate if they cycle routinely. The experience from the CGS plant demonstrates that coal plants can become flexible resources. This flexibility - namely the ability to cycle on and off and run at lower output (below 40% of capacity) - requires limited hardware modifications but extensive modifications to operational practice. Cycling does damage the plant and impact its life expectancy compared to baseload operations. Nevertheless, strategic modifications, proactive inspections and training programs, among other operational changes to accommodate cycling, can minimize the extent of damage and optimize the cost of maintenance. CGS's cycling, but not necessarily the associated price tag, is replicable. Context - namely, power market opportunities and composition of the generation fleet - will help determine for other coal plants the optimal balance between the level of cycling-related forced outages and the level of capital investment required to minimize those outages. Replicating CGS's experience elsewhere will likely require a higher acceptance of forced outages than regulators and plant operators are accustomed to; however, an increase in strategic maintenance can minimize the impact on outage rates.

Cochran, J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Flexible Coal: An Example Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty-first century power systems, with higher penetration levels of low-carbon energy, smart grids, and other emerging technologies, will favor resources that have low marginal costs and provide system flexibility (e.g., the ability to cycle on and off to follow changes in variable renewable energy plant output). Questions remain about both the fate of coal plants in this scenario and whether they can cost-effectively continue to operate if they cycle routinely. The experience from the CGS plant demonstrates that coal plants can become flexible resources. This flexibility - namely the ability to cycle on and off and run at lower output (below 40% of capacity) - requires limited hardware modifications but extensive modifications to operational practice. Cycling does damage the plant and impact its life expectancy compared to baseload operations. Nevertheless, strategic modifications, proactive inspections and training programs, among other operational changes to accommodate cycling, can minimize the extent of damage and optimize the cost of maintenance. CGS's cycling, but not necessarily the associated price tag, is replicable. Context - namely, power market opportunities and composition of the generation fleet - will help determine for other coal plants the optimal balance between the level of cycling-related forced outages and the level of capital investment required to minimize those outages. Replicating CGS's experience elsewhere will likely require a higher acceptance of forced outages than regulators and plant operators are accustomed to; however, an increase in strategic maintenance can minimize the impact on outage rates.

Cochran, J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

IGCC repowering project clean coal II project public design report. Annual report, October 1992--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) is participating in a $270 million coal gasification combined cycle repowering project that was designed to provide a nominal 60 MW of electricity to City, Water, Light and Power (CWL&P) in Springfield, Illinois. The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system consists of CE`s air-blown entrained flow two-stage gasifier; an advanced hot gas cleanup system; a combustion turbine adapted to use low-BTU gas; and all necessary coal handling equipment, The project is currently completing the second budget period of five. The major activities to date are: (1) Establishment of a design, cost, and schedule for the project; (2) Establishment of financial commitments; (3) Acquire design and modeling data; (4) Establishment of an approved for design (AFD) engineering package; (5) Development of a detailed cost estimate; (6) Resolution of project business issues; (7) CWL&P renewal and replacement activities; and (8) Application for environmental air permits. A Project Management Plan was generated, The conceptual design of the plant was completed and a cost and schedule baseline for the project was established in Budget Period One. This information was used to establish AFD Process Flow Diagrams, Piping and Instrument Diagrams, Equipment Data Sheets, material take offs, site modification plans and other information necessary to develop a plus or minus 20% cost estimate. Environmental permitting activities were accomplished, including the Air Permit Application, completion of the National Environmental Policy Act process, and the draft Environmental Monitoring Plan. At the end of 1992 the DOE requested that Duke Engineering and Services Inc., (DESI) be used to complete the balance of plant cost estimate. DESI was retained to do this work, DESI completed the material take off estimate and included operations, maintenance, and startup in the estimate.

NONE

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The behavioral manipulation hypothesis Life cycle of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The behavioral manipulation hypothesis · No one knows how the parasite causes these Life cycle eat mostly hares · Linked cycles? Predator-Prey Cycles? · Think and then discuss: · Under the hypothesis that predators cause this cycle, what would you expect for the following when hare populations

Mitchell, Randall J.

334

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Abatement Environmental impactLife-cycle Environmental Impacts . . . . . . . LCA of

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Bagdad Plant  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06Hot-Humid- EngineB2Bagdad Plant 585 Silicon

336

Simple ocean carbon cycle models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic evaluation has been conducted of the potential for advanced nuclear fuel cycle strategies and options to address the issues ascribed to the use of nuclear power. Issues included nuclear waste management, proliferation risk, safety, security, economics and affordability, and sustainability. The two basic strategies, once-through and recycle, and the range of possibilities within each strategy, are considered for all aspects of the fuel cycle including options for nuclear material irradiation, separations if needed, and disposal. Options range from incremental changes to today’s implementation to revolutionary concepts that would require the development of advanced nuclear technologies.

Roald Wigeland; Temitope Taiwo; Michael Todosow; William Halsey; Jess Gehin

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part I. Cycling performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part I. Cycling performance P of Sony 18650 Li-ion cells increases with increase in temperature. After 800 cycles, the cells cycled the capacity fade of commercial Li-ion cells cycled at high temperatures. We choose Sony 18650 cells with Li

Popov, Branko N.

339

Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNews & Blog »Physics PhysicsWeek »Plant

340

Single-cycle nonlinear optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

g l e - C y c l e Nonlinear Optics E. G o u l i e l m a k iSingle-Cycle Nonlinear Optics E. Goulielmakis *, M.D-85748 Garching. Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley

Goulielmakis, E.; Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nuclear Systems Enhanced Performance Program, Maintenance Cycle Extension in Advanced Light Water Reactor Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A renewed interest in new nuclear power generation in the US has spurred interest in developing advanced reactors with features which will address the public's concerns regarding nuclear generation. However, it is economic performance which will dictate whether any new orders for these plants will materialize. Economic performance is, to a great extent, improved by maximizing the time that the plant is on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Indeed, the strategy for the advanced light water reactor plant IRIS (International Reactor, Innovative and Secure) is to utilize an eight year operating cycle. This report describes a formalized strategy to address, during the design phase, the maintenance-related barriers to an extended operating cycle. The top-level objective of this investigation was to develop a methodology for injecting component and system maintainability issues into the reactor plant design process to overcome these barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the IRIS design. The first step in meeting the top-level objective was to determine the types of operating cycle length barriers that the IRIS design team is likely to face. Evaluation of previously identified regulatory and investment protection surveillance program barriers preventing a candidate operating PWR from achieving an extended (48 month) cycle was conducted in the context of the IRIS design. From this analysis, 54 known IRIS operating cycle length barriers were identified. The resolution methodology was applied to each of these barriers to generate design solution alternatives for consideration in the IRIS design. The methodology developed has been demonstrated to narrow the design space to feasible design solutions which enable a desired operating cycle length, yet is general enough to have broad applicability. Feedback from the IRIS design team indicates that the proposed solutions to the investigated operating cycle length barriers are both feasible and consistent with sound design practice.

Professor Neill Todreas

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Modeling the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of existing nuclear fuel cycle systems analysis codes was performed to determine if any existing codes meet technical and functional requirements defined for a U.S. national program supporting the global and domestic assessment, development and deployment of nuclear energy systems. The program would be implemented using an interconnected architecture of different codes ranging from the fuel cycle analysis code, which is the subject of the review, to fundamental physical and mechanistic codes. Four main functions are defined for the code: (1) the ability to characterize and deploy individual fuel cycle facilities and reactors in a simulation, while discretely tracking material movements, (2) the capability to perform an uncertainty analysis for each element of the fuel cycle and an aggregate uncertainty analysis, (3) the inclusion of an optimization engine able to optimize simultaneously across multiple objective functions, and (4) open and accessible code software and documentation to aid in collaboration between multiple entities and facilitate software updates. Existing codes, categorized as annualized or discrete fuel tracking codes, were assessed according to the four functions and associated requirements. These codes were developed by various government, education and industrial entities to fulfill particular needs. In some cases, decisions were made during code development to limit the level of detail included in a code to ease its use or to focus on certain aspects of a fuel cycle to address specific questions. The review revealed that while no two of the codes are identical, they all perform many of the same basic functions. No code was able to perform defined function 2 or several requirements of functions 1 and 3. Based on this review, it was concluded that the functions and requirements will be met only with development of a new code, referred to as GENIUS.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar; Christopher A. Juchau

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

New geothermal power plants in Azores and Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two geothermal power plants were recently completed. One is 3 MW unit in Azores and another is 15 MW unit in Kenya. Both plants have very simple construction. For Azores, a packaged portable turbine generator is adopted to save the cost and installation term. 15 MW Olkaria plant which is adopted single flash cycle has produced first electricity by the geothermal energy in Africa. This turbine generator has been installed on a steel foundation. Special site conditions have been taken into consideration and both plants are successfully running with certification of the suitable design concept.

Tahara, M.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Prediction of future fifteen solar cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the previous study (Hiremath 2006a), the solar cycle is modeled as a forced and damped harmonic oscillator and from all the 22 cycles (1755-1996), long-term amplitudes, frequencies, phases and decay factor are obtained. Using these physical parameters of the previous 22 solar cycles and by an {\\em autoregressive model}, we predict the amplitude and period of the future fifteen solar cycles. Predicted amplitude of the present solar cycle (23) matches very well with the observations. The period of the present cycle is found to be 11.73 years. With these encouraging results, we also predict the profiles of future 15 solar cycles. Important predictions are : (i) the period and amplitude of the cycle 24 are 9.34 years and 110 ($\\pm 11$), (ii) the period and amplitude of the cycle 25 are 12.49 years and 110 ($\\pm$ 11), (iii) during the cycles 26 (2030-2042 AD), 27 (2042-2054 AD), 34 (2118-2127 AD), 37 (2152-2163 AD) and 38 (2163-2176 AD), the sun might experience a very high sunspot activity, (iv) the sun might also experience a very low (around 60) sunspot activity during cycle 31 (2089-2100 AD) and, (v) length of the solar cycles vary from 8.65 yrs for the cycle 33 to maximum of 13.07 yrs for the cycle 35.

K. M. Hiremath

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

345

Process integrated modelling for steelmaking Life Cycle Inventory analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During recent years, strict environmental regulations have been implemented by governments for the steelmaking industry in order to reduce their environmental impact. In the frame of the ULCOS project, we have developed a new methodological framework which combines the process integrated modelling approach with Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method in order to carry out the Life Cycle Inventory of steelmaking. In the current paper, this new concept has been applied to the sinter plant which is the most polluting steelmaking process. It has been shown that this approach is a powerful tool to make the collection of data easier, to save time and to provide reliable information concerning the environmental diagnostic of the steelmaking processes.

Iosif, Ana-Maria [Arcelor Research, Voie Romaine, BP30320, Maizieres-les-Metz, 57283 (France)], E-mail: ana-maria.iosif@arcelormittal.com; Hanrot, Francois [Arcelor Research, Voie Romaine, BP30320, Maizieres-les-Metz, 57283 (France)], E-mail: francois.hanrot@arcelormittal.com; Ablitzer, Denis [LSG2M, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex (France)], E-mail: denis.ablitzer@mines.inpl-nancy.fr

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Multi-cycle boiling water reactor fuel cycle optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work a new computer code, BWROPT (Boiling Water Reactor Optimization), is presented. BWROPT uses the Parallel Simulated Annealing (PSA) algorithm to solve the out-of-core optimization problem coupled with an in-core optimization that determines the optimum fuel loading pattern. However it uses a Haling power profile for the depletion instead of optimizing the operating strategy. The result of this optimization is the optimum new fuel inventory and the core loading pattern for the first cycle considered in the optimization. Several changes were made to the optimization algorithm with respect to other nuclear fuel cycle optimization codes that use PSA. Instead of using constant sampling probabilities for the solution perturbation types throughout the optimization as is usually done in PSA optimizations the sampling probabilities are varied to get a better solution and/or decrease runtime. The new fuel types available for use can be sorted into an array based on any number of parameters so that each parameter can be incremented or decremented, which allows for more precise fuel type selection compared to random sampling. Also, the results are sorted by the new fuel inventory of the first cycle for ease of comparing alternative solutions. (authors)

Ottinger, K.; Maldonado, G.I. [University of Tennessee, 311 Pasqua Engineering Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under three nuclear supply scenarios. Two of these scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries with free market economies (FME countries). A No New Orders scenario is presented only for the United States. These nuclear supply scenarios are described in Commercial Nuclear Power 1990: Prospects for the United States and the World (DOE/EIA-0438(90)). This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the FME projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2030 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2040, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case. These disaggregated projections are provided at the request of the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

Not Available

1990-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

349

Application of high temperature air heaters to advanced power generation cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent developments in ceramic composite materials open up the possibility of recuperative air heaters heating air to temperatures well above the feasible with metal tubes. A high temperature air heater (HTAH) has long been recognized as a requirement for the most efficient MHD plants in order to reach high combustor flame temperatures. The application of gas turbines in coal-fired plants of all types has been impeded because of the problems in cleaning exhaust gas sufficiently to avoid damage to the turbine. With a possibility of a HTAH, such plants may become feasible on the basis of air turbine cycles, in which air is compressed and heated in the HTAH before being applied to turbine. The heat exchanger eliminates the need for the hot gas cleanup system. The performance improvement potential of advanced cycles with HTAH application including the air turbine cycle in several variations such as the DOE program on ``Coal-Fired Air Furnace Combined Cycle...,`` variations originated by the authors, and the MHD combined cycle are presented. The status of development of ceramic air heater technology is included.

Thompson, T R [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)] [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States); Boss, W H; Chapman, J N [Tennessee Univ., Tullahoma, TN (United States). Space Inst.] [Tennessee Univ., Tullahoma, TN (United States). Space Inst.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Single-cycle nonlinear optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear optics plays a central role in the advancement of optical science and laser-based technologies. We report on the confinement of the nonlinear interaction of light with matter to a single wave cycle and demonstrate its utility for time-resolved and strong-field science. The electric field of 3.3-femtosecond, 0.72-micron laser pulses with a controlled and measured waveform ionizes atoms near the crests of the central wave cycle, with ionization being virtually switched off outside this interval. Isolated sub-100-attosecond pulses of extreme ultraviolet light (photon energy {approx} 80 electron volts), containing {approx} 0.5 nanojoule of energy, emerge from the interaction with a conversion efficiency of {approx} 10{sup -6}. These tools enable the study of the precision control of electron motion with light fields and electron-electron interactions with a resolution approaching the atomic unit of time ({approx} 24 attoseconds).

Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik; Goulielmakis, E.; Schultze, M.; Hofstetter, M.; Yakovlev, V. S.; Gagnon, J.; Uiberacker, M.; Aquila, A. L.; gullikson, E. M.; attwood, D. T.; Kienberger, R.; Krausz, F.; Kleineberg, U.

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

351

USE OF MIXTURES AS WORKING FLUIDS IN OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION CYCLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mixtures offer potential advantages over pure compounds as working fluids in ocean thermal energy conversion cycles. Power plant capital costs per unit of energy output can be reduced using mixtures because of increased thermal efficiency and/or decreased heat exchanger size requirements. Mixtures

Khan Zafar Iqbal; Kenneth E. Starling

352

Advanced CO{sub 2} Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal IGCC System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low rank coals. The plant uses an integrated CO{sub 2} scrubber/Water Gas Shift (WGS) catalyst to capture over90 percent capture of the CO{sub 2} emissions, while providing a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a similar plant with conventional cold gas cleanup system based on SelexolTM technology and 90 percent carbon capture. TDA’s system uses a high temperature physical adsorbent capable of removing CO{sub 2} above the dew point of the synthesis gas and a commercial WGS catalyst that can effectively convert CO in The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low rank coals. The plant uses an integrated CO{sub 2} scrubber/Water Gas Shift (WGS) catalyst to capture over90 percent capture of the CO{sub 2} emissions, while providing a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a similar plant with conventional cold gas cleanup system based on SelexolTM technology and 90 percent carbon capture. TDA’s system uses a high temperature physical adsorbent capable of removing CO{sub 2} above the dew point of the synthesis gas and a commercial WGS catalyst that can effectively convert CO in bituminous coal the net plant efficiency is about 2.4 percentage points higher than an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant equipped with SelexolTM to capture CO{sub 2}. We also previously completed two successful field demonstrations: one at the National Carbon Capture Center (Southern- Wilsonville, AL) in 2011, and a second demonstration in fall of 2012 at the Wabash River IGCC plant (Terra Haute, IN). In this project, we first optimized the sorbent to catalyst ratio used in the combined WGS and CO{sub 2} capture process and confirmed the technical feasibility in bench-scale experiments. In these tests, we did not observe any CO breakthrough both during adsorption and desorption steps indicating that there is complete conversion of CO to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The overall CO conversions above 90 percent were observed. The sorbent achieved a total CO{sub 2} loading of 7.82 percent wt. of which 5.68 percent is from conversion of CO into CO{sub 2}. The results of the system analysis suggest that the TDA combined shift and high temperature PSA-based Warm Gas Clean-up technology can make a substantial improvement in the IGCC plant thermal performance for a plant designed to achieve near zero emissions (including greater than 90 percent carbon capture). The capital expenses are also expected to be lower than those of Selexol. The higher net plant efficiency and lower capital and operating costs result in substantial reduction in the COE for the IGCC plant equipped with the TDA combined shift and high temperature PSA-based carbon capture system.

Alptekin, Gokhan

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

In: . Proceedings of the 91st Annual Meeting (held June 14-18 in San Diego, CA), Air and Waste Management Association, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, June 1998 (CD-ROM). 1998 H.C. Frey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas, petroleum residuals, petroleum coke, refinery wastes, and coal as inputs. In recent years 27695-7908 ABSTRACT Gasification systems, such as coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle there is currently a lack of high-value markets for low-value liquid residues and coke.(2) Integrated Gasification

Frey, H. Christopher

356

BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF DELAWARE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and an "Additional Coal Retirements" case. 2. Impact of recent NYMEX natural gas prices on Conectiv's proposal. 3 these assumptions. With additional coal retirements assumed in the region, the impact on market prices and SOS costs-term power sale from its proposed coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) project. 4. PJM

Firestone, Jeremy

357

To appear in Proceedings of the 7 International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-efficient vehicles. Introduction Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology offers the least costly,2]. But because cost-competitive H2 end-use technologies such as fuel cell vehicles will not be widely available engine vehicles, which are more energy efficient than spark-ignition engine vehicles. Compression

358

Proceedings of ASME Turbo Expo 2010 June 14-18, 2010, Glasgow, Scotland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but also the most carbon intensive. Various gasification technologies enable the conversion of coal fuels (e.g. hydrogen, natural gas, and liquid transportation fuels). Gasification also provides some costly using integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC) instead of standard pulverized coal (PC

359

CX-012042: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Recovery Act: Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 04/08/2014 Location(s): Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

360

CX-012030: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Recovery Act: Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 04/18/2014 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CX-004188: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Development of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation SystemsCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 09/27/2010Location(s): University Park, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

362

CX-004185: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Development of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation SystemsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 09/27/2010Location(s): Sparrows Point, MarylandOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

363

CX-004184: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Development of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation SystemsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 09/27/2010Location(s): Allentown, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

364

CX-004172: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Development of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation SystemsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 09/28/2010Location(s): Salt Lake City, UtahOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

365

System studies of open-cycle OTEC components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system model of open Rankine cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) was used to examine the effects of component performance and design on plant cost. Three components are examined in detail: an optional seawater deaeration subsystem, the flash evaporator, and a two-stage direct-contact condenser. Preliminary data quantifying noncondensable gas release in upcomers and a debubbler chamber were used to evaluate the effect of predeaeration (removing the dissolved gases in deaeration chambers before the seawater enters the heat exchangers) on system cost and performance. Little data on the interactions between geometry and performance of vertical spout flash evaporators operating under OTEC conditions are available; therefore, we performed independent parametric variations. For the direct-contact condenser previous numerical studies provide the basis for coupling geometry and performance. Results of these studies are useful in setting research priorities, in defining operating conditions for further seawater experiments, and in updating plant cost estimates.

Parsons, B.K.; Link, H.F.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Profit cycle dynamics by Kawika Pierson.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

My thesis consists of three essays investigating the existence, causes, and mitigation of profit cycles at an industry level. The first essay examines profit cycles by proposing that the industry-specific features of how ...

Pierson, Kawika (Kawika Paul)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Rethinking the light water reactor fuel cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The once through nuclear fuel cycle adopted by the majority of countries with operating commercial power reactors imposes a number of concerns. The radioactive waste created in the once through nuclear fuel cycle has to ...

Shwageraus, Evgeni, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Nexant Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Systems Analysis; Task 1: Preferred Plant Size, 20 January 2005 - 31 December 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rankine cycles for commercial parabolic trough solar projects range in capacity from 13.5 MWe at the Solar Electric Generating Station I (SEGS I) plant, to a maximum of 89 MWe at the SEGS VIII/IX plants. The series of SEGS projects showed a consistent reduction in the levelized energy cost due to a combination of improvements in collector field technology and economies of scale in both the Rankine cycle and the operation and maintenance costs. Nonetheless, the question of the optimum Rankine cycle capacity remains an open issue. The capacities of the SEGS VIII/IX plants were limited by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act requirements to a maximum net output of 80 MWe. Further improvements in the Rankine cycle efficiency, and economies of scale in both the capital and the operating cost, should be available at larger plant sizes. An analysis was conducted to determine the effect of Rankine cycle capacities greater than 80 MWe on the levelized energy cost. The study was conducted through the following steps: (1) Three gross cycle capacities of 88 MWe, 165 MWe, and 220 MWe were selected. (2) Three Rankine cycle models were developed using the GateCycle program. The models were based on single reheat turbine cycles, with main steam conditions of 1,450 lb{sub f}/in{sup 2} and 703 F, and reheat steam conditions of 239 lb{sub f}/in{sup 2} and 703 F. The feedwater heater system consisted of 5 closed heaters and 1 open deaerating heater. The design condenser pressure was 2.5 in. HgA. (3) The optimization function within Excelergy was used to determine the preferred solar multiple for each plant. Two cases were considered for each plant: (a) a solar-only project without thermal storage, and (b) a solar-fossil hybrid project, with 3 hours of thermal storage and a heat transport fluid heater fired by natural gas. (4) For each of the 6 cases, collector field geometries, heat transport fluid pressure losses, and heat transport pump power requirements were calculated with a field piping optimization model. (5) Annual electric energy outputs, capital costs, and annual operating costs were calculated for each case using the default methods within Excelergy, from which estimates of the levelized energy costs were developed. The plant with the lowest energy cost was considered the optimum.

Kelly, B.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Search for relationship between duration of the extended solar cycles and amplitude of sunspot cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duration of the extended solar cycles is taken into the consideration. The beginning of cycles is counted from the moment of polarity reversal of large-scale magnetic field in high latitudes, occurring in the sunspot cycle n till the minimum of the cycle n+2. The connection between cycle duration and its amplitude is established. Duration of the "latent" period of evolution of extended cycle between reversals and a minimum of the current sunspot cycle is entered. It is shown, that the latent period of cycles evolution is connected with the next sunspot cycle amplitude and can be used for the prognosis of a level and time of a sunspot maximum. The 24-th activity cycle prognosis is done. Long-term behavior of extended cycle's lengths is considered.

A. G. Tlatov

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

370

Search for relationship between duration of the extended solar cycles and amplitude of sunspot cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duration of the extended solar cycles is taken into the consideration. The beginning of cycles is counted from the moment of polarity reversal of large-scale magnetic field in high latitudes, occurring in the sunspot cycle n till the minimum of the cycle n+2. The connection between cycle duration and its amplitude is established. Duration of the "latent" period of evolution of extended cycle between reversals and a minimum of the current sunspot cycle is entered. It is shown, that the latent period of cycles evolution is connected with the next sunspot cycle amplitude and can be used for the prognosis of a level and time of a sunspot maximum. The 24-th activity cycle prognosis is done. Long-term behavior of extended cycle's lengths is considered.

Tlatov, A G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Development Plan for the Fuel Cycle Simulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Simulator (FCS) project was initiated late in FY-10 as the activity to develop a next generation fuel cycle dynamic analysis tool for achieving the Systems Analysis Campaign 'Grand Challenge.' This challenge, as documented in the Campaign Implementation Plan, is to: 'Develop a fuel cycle simulator as part of a suite of tools to support decision-making, communication, and education, that synthesizes and visually explains the multiple attributes of potential fuel cycles.'

Brent Dixon

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

D-Cycle - 4-Differential -Stroke Cycle | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebratePartners with Siemens31, 2015ofVisualizationD-Cycle -

373

SPACETELESCOPESCIENCEINSTITUTE WFPC2 Cycle 14 Calibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/chip combinations used for science in Cycle 14 + Close Out ~10% reserve 2 Placeholder for unexpected items. TOTALSPACETELESCOPESCIENCEINSTITUTE WFPC2 Cycle 14 Calibration Director's Review 8 August 2005 John Biretta 1 Cycle 14 WFPC2 Calibration Plan Overall Goals: · Monitor & maintain WFPC2 health & safety

Sirianni, Marco

374

How Minds Work The IDA Cognitive Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 How Minds Work The IDA Cognitive Cycle Stan Franklin Computer Science Division & Institute for Intelligent Systems The University of Memphis #12;HMW: The IDA Cognitive Cycle 2 Memory Systems #12;HMW: The IDA Cognitive Cycle 3 Global Workspace Theory I · The nervous system is a distributed parallel

Memphis, University of

375

Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/17/2014 1 Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Utility Scale Solar PV Steven doing recently around two key supply-side resource technologies 1. Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine #12;11/17/2014 4 Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Background Primary Components Gas-fired combustion

376

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

377

Combined-cycle solarised gas turbine with steam, organic and CO2 bottoming cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined-cycle solarised gas turbine with steam, organic and CO2 bottoming cycles John Pye, Keith of the technical feasibility a solarised combined-cycle gas turbines with a dish concentrator, with several, optimised for the new SG4 collector. This study aims to determine whether a combined-cycle gas turbine (CCGT

378

Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human Ecologicalindicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human EcologicalI explore how life-cycle assessment (LCA) results can

Humbert, Sebastien

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Sensitivity Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fuel cycle economic analysis was performed on four fuel cycles to provide a baseline for initial cost comparison using the Gen IV Economic Modeling Work Group G4 ECON spreadsheet model, Decision Programming Language software, the 2006 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis report, industry cost data, international papers, the nuclear power related cost study from MIT, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. The analysis developed and compared the fuel cycle cost component of the total cost of energy for a wide range of fuel cycles including: once through, thermal with fast recycle, continuous fast recycle, and thermal recycle.

David Shropshire; Kent Williams; J.D. Smith; Brent Boore

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Rankine cycle system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system uses a receiver with a maximum liquid working fluid level lower than the minimum liquid working fluid level of a sub-cooler of the waste heat recovery system. The receiver may have a position that is physically lower than the sub-cooler's position. A valve controls transfer of fluid between several of the components in the waste heat recovery system, especially from the receiver to the sub-cooler. The system may also have an associated control module.

Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Importance of life cycle assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) as a tool to assist the waste professional with integrated waste management. LCA can be the connection between the waste professional and designer/producer to permit the waste professional to encourage the design of products so material recovery is most efficient and markets can be better predicted. The waste professional can better monitor the involvement of the consumer in waste management by using LCA and looking upstream at how the consumer actually reacts to products and packaging. LCA can also help the waste professional better understand the waste stream.

Bridges, J.S.

1994-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

382

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

383

VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle is a very complex system that includes considerable dynamic complexity as well as detail complexity. In the nuclear power realm, there are experts and considerable research and development in nuclear fuel development, separations technology, reactor physics and waste management. What is lacking is an overall understanding of the entire nuclear fuel cycle and how the deployment of new fuel cycle technologies affects the overall performance of the fuel cycle. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing and delays in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works and can transition as technologies are changed. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model and some examples of how to use VISION.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Abdellatif M. Yacout; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; David E. Shropshire

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Plant phytotoxicity: A self-regulating pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the session on regulating sludge utilization, held at BioCycle's 19th Annual National conference on Composting and Recycling, a participant asked one of the speakers, Dr. Alan Rubin of the US EPA's Office of Water Regulations and Standards, why the plant phytotoxicity pathway should be the most limiting, especially when there is no concern about human or animal health. The question related specifically to copper being the most limiting metal concentration limit for many sludge composting and land application programs under the proposed Part 503 regulations. And the most limiting pathway for copper is Pathway 7, sludge-soil-plant phytotoxicity. Rubin responded that the regulation is supposed to protect both human health and the environment, e.g. plants and animals other than humans.

Not Available

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Economic development through biomass system integration: Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alfalfa is a well-known and widely-planted crop that offers environmental and soil conservation advantages when grown as a 4-year segment in a 7-year rotation with corn and soybeans. Alfalfa fixes nitrogen from the air, thereby enhancing soil nitrogen and decreasing the need for manufactured nitrogen fertilizer. With alfalfa yields of 4 dry tons per acre per year and the alfalfa leaf fraction sold as a high-value animal feed the remaining alfalfa stem fraction can be economically viable fuel feedstock for a gasifier combined cycle power plant. This report is a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners. The sale of an animal feed co-product and electricity both help cover the production cost of alfalfa and the feedstock processing cost, thereby requiring neither the electricity or leaf meal to carry the total cost. The power plant provides an important continous demand for the feedstock and results in continous supply of leaf product to provide a reliable supply needed for the leaf meal product.

DeLong, M.M. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Recuperative supercritical carbon dioxide cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power plant includes a closed loop, supercritical carbon dioxide system (CLS-CO.sub.2 system). The CLS-CO.sub.2 system includes a turbine-generator and a high temperature recuperator (HTR) that is arranged to receive expanded carbon dioxide from the turbine-generator. The HTR includes a plurality of heat exchangers that define respective heat exchange areas. At least two of the heat exchangers have different heat exchange areas.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Sprouse, Kenneth M; Subbaraman, Ganesan; O'Connor, George M; Johnson, Gregory A

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

387

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Powe

Pázsit, Imre

388

Ethylene insensitive plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nucleic acid and polypeptide sequences are described which relate to an EIN6 gene, a gene involved in the plant ethylene response. Plant transformation vectors and transgenic plants are described which display an altered ethylene-dependent phenotype due to altered expression of EIN6 in transformed plants.

Ecker, Joseph R. (Carlsbad, CA); Nehring, Ramlah (La Jolla, CA); McGrath, Robert B. (Philadelphia, PA)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

389

Total energy cycle energy use and emissions of electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total energy cycle analysis (TECA) of electric vehicles (EV) was recently completed. The EV energy cycle includes production and transport of fuels used in power plants to generate electricity, electricity generation, EV operation, and vehicle and battery manufacture. This paper summarizes the key assumptions and results of the EVTECA. The total energy requirements of EVS me estimated to be 24-35% lower than those of the conventional, gasoline-fueled vehicles they replace, while the reductions in total oil use are even greater: 55-85%. Greenhouse gases (GHG) are 24-37% lower with EVs. EVs reduce total emissions of several criteria air pollutants (VOC, CO, and NO{sub x}) but increase total emissions of others (SO{sub x}, TSP, and lead) over the total energy cycle. Regional emissions are generally reduced with EVs, except possibly SO{sub x}. The limitations of the EVTECA are discussed, and its results are compared with those of other evaluations of EVs. In general, many of the results (particularly the oil use, GHG, VOC, CO, SO{sub x}, and lead results) of the analysis are consistent with those of other evaluations.

Singh, M. K.

1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

390

MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Technology development life cycle processes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report and set of appendices are a collection of memoranda originally drafted in 2009 for the purpose of providing motivation and the necessary background material to support the definition and integration of engineering and management processes related to technology development. At the time there was interest and support to move from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Level One (ad hoc processes) to Level Three. As presented herein, the material begins with a survey of open literature perspectives on technology development life cycles, including published data on %E2%80%9Cwhat went wrong.%E2%80%9D The main thrust of the material presents a rational expose%CC%81 of a structured technology development life cycle that uses the scientific method as a framework, with further rigor added from adapting relevant portions of the systems engineering process. The material concludes with a discussion on the use of multiple measures to assess technology maturity, including consideration of the viewpoint of potential users.

Beck, David Franklin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Plant fatty acid hydroxylases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Split stream boilers for high-temperature/high-pressure topping steam turbine combined cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research and development work on high-temperature and high-pressure (up to 1,500 F TIT and 4,500 psia) topping steam turbines and associated steam generators for steam power plants as well as combined cycle plants is being carried forward by DOE, EPRI, and independent companies. Aeroderivative gas turbines and heavy-duty gas turbines both will require exhaust gas supplementary firing to achieve high throttle temperatures. This paper presents an analysis and examples of a split stream boiler arrangement for high-temperature and high-pressure topping steam turbine combined cycles. A portion of the gas turbine exhaust flow is run in parallel with a conventional heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). This side stream is supplementary fired opposed to the current practice of full exhaust flow firing. Chemical fuel gas recuperation can be incorporated in the side stream as an option. A significant combined cycle efficiency gain of 2 to 4 percentage points can be realized using this split stream approach. Calculations and graphs show how the DOE goal of 60 percent combined cycle efficiency burning natural gas fuel can be exceeded. The boiler concept is equally applicable to the integrated coal gas fuel combined cycle (IGCC).

Rice, I.G. [Rice (I.G.), Spring, TX (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

"Carbon Isotope Anomaly in the major Plant C1 Pool and its Biogeochemical Implications"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Jena 2005 #12;C4-cycle Higher plants Coal C4 plants -130 - 120 -110 -100 -90 -80 -70 -60 -50 -40 -30 -20 -10 0 10 13C () Crude oil Abiogenic methane Thermogenic natural gas Pedosphere Earthcrust Acetone Marine Plankton PDB standard Biomass Carbonate reduction Bacterial methane Methyl fermentation

395

Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Gas Turbine Power Plant Planning Assumptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the heat recovery steam generator powers an additional steam turbine, providing extra electricBiennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Gas Turbine Power Plant Planning Assumptions October 17, 2006 Simple- and combined-cycle gas turbine power plants fuelled by natural gas are among the bulk

396

Pathway from the National Ignition Facility to an operational LIFE power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory #12;#12;Or, less than a gram of fuel per person per year next step, after NIF, is construction of a full-scale power plant NIF-1111-23807.ppt 4 #12 delivery #12;7NIF-1111-23807.ppt #12;Principle of LIFE plant operation Heat transfer DT fuel cycle

397

Moving toward multilateral mechanisms for the fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multilateral mechanisms for the fuel cycle are seen as a potentially important way to create an industrial infrastructure that will support a renaissance and at the same time not contribute to the risk of nuclear proliferation. In this way, international nuclear fuel cycle centers for enrichment can help to provide an assurance of supply of nuclear fuel that will reduce the likelihood that individual states will pursue this sensitive technology, which can be used to produce nuclear material directly usable nuclear weapons. Multinational participation in such mechanisms can also potentially promote transparency, build confidence, and make the implementation of IAEA safeguards more effective or more efficient. At the same time, it is important to ensure that there is no dissemination of sensitive technology. The Russian Federation has taken a lead role in this area by establishing an International Uranium Enrichment Center (IUEC) for the provision of enrichment services at its uranium enrichment plant located at the Angarsk Electrolysis Chemical Complex (AECC). This paper describes how the IUEe is organized, who its members are, and the steps that it has taken both to provide an assured supply of nuclear fuel and to ensure protection of sensitive technology. It also describes the relationship between the IUEC and the IAEA and steps that remain to be taken to enhance its assurance of supply. Using the IUEC as a starting point for discussion, the paper also explores more generally the ways in which features of such fuel cycle centers with multinational participation can have an impact on safeguards arrangements, transparency, and confidence-building. Issues include possible lAEA safeguards arrangements or other links to the IAEA that might be established at such fuel cycle centers, impact of location in a nuclear weapon state, and the transition by the IAEA to State Level safeguards approaches.

Panasyuk,A.; Rosenthal,M.; Efremov, G. V.

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

398

A Coupled Quantum Otto Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the 1-d isotropic Heisenberg model of two spin-1/2 systems as a quantum heat engine. The engine undergoes a four-step Otto cycle where the two adiabatic branches involve changing the external magnetic field at a fixed value of the coupling constant. We find conditions for the engine efficiency to be higher than the uncoupled model; in particular, we find an upper bound which is tighter than the Carnot bound. A new domain of parameter values is pointed out which was not feasible in the interaction-free model. Locally, each spin seems to effect the flow of heat in a direction opposite to the global temperature gradient. This seeming contradiction to the second law can be resolved in terms of local effective temperature of the spins.

George Thomas; Ramandeep S. Johal

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

399

LARSON--MATH 556--CLASSROOM WORKSHEET 07 Hamilton Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Last name First name LARSON--MATH 556--CLASSROOM WORKSHEET 07 Hamilton Cycles An alternating-cycle. A cycle which includes every point of a graph G is called a Hamilton cycle of G. 1. Draw the complete graph K5. Find one Hamilton cycle in K5. 2. Does every complete graph have a Hamilton cycle? Explain. 3

Larson, Craig E.

400

Summary of Off-Normal Events in US Fuel Cycle Facilities for AFCI Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for facilities comprising the fission reactor fuel cycle, with the exception of reactor operations. This report includes mines, mills, conversion plants, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication plants, transportation of fuel materials between these centers, and waste storage facilities. Some of the facilities discussed are no longer operating; others continue to produce fuel for the commercial fission power plant industry. Some of the facilities discussed have been part of the military’s nuclear effort; these are included when the processes used are similar to those used for commercial nuclear power. When reading compilations of incidents and accidents, after repeated entries it is natural to form an opinion that there exists nothing but accidents. For this reason, production or throughput values are described when available. These adverse operating experiences are compiled to support the design and decisions needed for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The AFCI is to weigh options for a new fission reactor fuel cycle that is efficient, safe, and productive for US energy security.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. J. Piet; S. O. Sheetz; D. H. McGuire; W. B. Boore

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Optimal operation of simple vapour compression cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the air-conditioner (A/C). In colder regions a cycle operating in the opposite direction, the "heat pump. The coefficients of performance for a heating cycle (heat pump) and a cooling cycle (refrigerator, A/C) are defined as COPh = Qh Ws = h1 - h2 h1 - h4 and COPc = Qc Ws = h4 - h3 h1 - h4 (1.1) respectively. Heat pumps

Skogestad, Sigurd

402

Topping PCFB combustion plant with supercritical steam pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted to develop a new type of coal fired plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant, called a second generation or topping pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustion (topping PCFB) plant, offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 46 percent (HHV), with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized coal fired plants with scrubbers. The topping PCFB plant incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a carbonizer, the combustion of carbonizer char in a pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustor (PCFB), and the combustion of carbonizer fuel gas in a topping combustor to achieve gas turbine inlet temperatures of 2,300 F and higher. After completing pilot plant tests of a carbonizer, a PCFB, and a gas turbine topping combustor, all being developed for this new plant, the authors calculated a higher heating value efficiency of 46.2 percent for the plant. In that analysis, the plant operated with a conventional 2,400 psig steam cycle with 1,000 F superheat and reheat steam and a 2.5 inch mercury condenser back pressure. This paper identifies the efficiency gains that this plant will achieve by using supercritical pressure steam conditions.

Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); White, J. [Parsons Power Group Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Westinghouse advanced particle filter system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and Advanced PFBC (APFB) are being developed and demonstrated for commercial power generation application. Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful implementation of IGCC, PFBC and APFB in power generation gas turbine cycles. The objective of this work is to develop and qualify through analysis and testing a practical hot gas ceramic barrier filter system that meets the performance and operational requirements of these advanced, solid fuel power generation cycles.

Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Sanjana, Z.N.; Newby, R.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Variable pressure power cycle and control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable pressure power cycle and control system that is adjustable to a variable heat source is disclosed. The power cycle adjusts itself to the heat source so that a minimal temperature difference is maintained between the heat source fluid and the power cycle working fluid, thereby substantially matching the thermodynamic envelope of the power cycle to the thermodynamic envelope of the heat source. Adjustments are made by sensing the inlet temperature of the heat source fluid and then setting a superheated vapor temperature and pressure to achieve a minimum temperature difference between the heat source fluid and the working fluid.

Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

1984-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

405

Seeing the Forest of Secular Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

imperial cycles (The Old and Middle Kingdoms of Egypt).In the case of Egypt, the mapping thatproduced separated ancient Egypt into two adjacent imperial

Sirag, Jr., David J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

PCM energy storage during defective thermal cycling:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Incomplete thermal cycling affects storage capacities of phase change materials (PCMs). Existing PCM measuring methods are presented with their drawbacks. A new device named “the… (more)

Koekenbier, S.F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

THE TRANSPOSED CRITICAL TEMPERATURE RANKINE THERMODYNAMIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Electricity from Geothermal Energy," Brown University,Simulation of Geothermal Energy Cycles), LBL publication-Manager), Economics "Geothermal Energy Conversion and Case

Pope, William L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 5 Identify the governing phenomenology Identify the governing phenomenology Develop a first-principle based model of the...

409

Combined rankine and vapor compression cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic rankine cycle system is combined with a vapor compression cycle system with the turbine generator of the organic rankine cycle generating the power necessary to operate the motor of the refrigerant compressor. The vapor compression cycle is applied with its evaporator cooling the inlet air into a gas turbine, and the organic rankine cycle is applied to receive heat from a gas turbine exhaust to heat its boiler within one embodiment, a common condenser is used for the organic rankine cycle and the vapor compression cycle, with a common refrigerant, R-245a being circulated within both systems. In another embodiment, the turbine driven generator has a common shaft connected to the compressor to thereby eliminate the need for a separate motor to drive the compressor. In another embodiment, an organic rankine cycle system is applied to an internal combustion engine to cool the fluids thereof, and the turbo charged air is cooled first by the organic rankine cycle system and then by an air conditioner prior to passing into the intake of the engine.

Radcliff, Thomas D.; Biederman, Bruce P.; Brasz, Joost J.

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

410

Kemper County IGCC (tm) Project Preliminary Public Design Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kemper County IGCC Project is an advanced coal technology project that is being developed by Mississippi Power Company (MPC). The project is a lignite-fueled 2-on-1 Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) facility incorporating the air-blown Transport Integrated Gasification (TRIG™) technology jointly developed by Southern Company; Kellogg, Brown, and Root (KBR); and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama. The estimated nameplate capacity of the plant will be 830 MW with a peak net output capability of 582 MW. As a result of advanced emissions control equipment, the facility will produce marketable byproducts of ammonia, sulfuric acid, and carbon dioxide. 65 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) will be captured and used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR), making the Kemper County facility’s carbon emissions comparable to those of a natural-gas-fired combined cycle power plant. The commercial operation date (COD) of the Kemper County IGCC plant will be May 2014. This report describes the basic design and function of the plant as determined at the end of the Front End Engineering Design (FEED) phase of the project.

Nelson, Matt; Rush, Randall; Madden, Diane; Pinkston, Tim; Lunsford, Landon

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Technology Data for Energy Plants June 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................... 79 13 Centralised Biogas Plants

412

Plant Phenotype Characterization System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

413

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Del Mar, CA); Jin, RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO); Keith, Kevin (Three Forks, MT); Copenhaver, Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

414

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, RongGuan (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

415

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Keith, Kevin; Copenhaver, Gregory; Preuss, Daphne

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

416

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

417

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach; Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL), Zieler; Helge (Del Mar, CA), Jin; RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO), Keith; Kevin (Three Forks, MT), Copenhaver; Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC), Preuss; Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

On-Going Comparison of Advanced Fuel Cycle Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) program is addressing key issues associated with critical national needs. This paper compares the major options with these major “outcome” objectives - waste geological repository capacity and cost, energy security and sustainability, proliferation resistance, fuel cycle economics, and safety as well as “process” objectives associated with readiness to proceed and adaptability and robustness in the face of uncertainties. Working together, separation, transmutation, and fuel technologies provide complete energy systems that can improve waste management compared to the current “once-through/no separation” approach. Future work will further increase confidence in potential solutions, optimize solutions for the mixtures of objectives, and develop attractive development and deployment paths for selected options. This will allow the nation to address nearer-term issues such as avoiding the need for additional geological repositories while making nuclear energy a more sustainable energy option for the long-term. While the Generation IV Initiative is exploring multiple reactor options for future nuclear energy for both electricity generation and additional applications, the AFCI is assessing fuel cycles options for either a continuation or expansion of nuclear energy in the United States. This report compares strategies and technology options for managing the associated spent fuel. There are four major potential strategies, as follows: · The current U.S. strategy is once through: standard nuclear power plants, standard fuel burnup, direct geological disposal of spent fuel. Variants include higher burnup fuels in water-cooled power plants, once-through gas-cooled power plants, and separation (without recycling) of spent fuel to reduce the number and cost of geological waste packages. · The second strategy is thermal recycle, recycling some fuel components in thermal reactors. This strategy extends the useful life of the geologic repository, producing energy from the fissile transuranics in spent fuel while reducing plutonium. · The third strategy is thermal+fast recycle. The difference from the second strategy is that more components of spent fuel can be recycled to reduce both fissile and non-fissile transuranics, but at the cost of developing and deploying at least one fast reactor or accelerator driven system. A mix of thermal and fast reactors would implement this strategy. · The fourth strategy is pure fast recycle; fuel would not be recycled in thermal reactors, which would be phased out in favor of deploying fast spectrum power reactors.

Steven J. Piet; Ralph G. Bennett; Brent W. Dixon; J. Stephen Herring; David E. Shropshire; Mark Roth; J. D. Smith; Robert Hill; James Laidler; Kemal Pasamehmetoglu

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

OPTIMAL DESIGN AND OPERATION OF HELIUM REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS USING THE GANNI CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The constant pressure ratio process, as implemented in the floating pressure - Ganni cycle, is a new variation to prior cryogenic refrigeration and liquefaction cycle designs that allows for optimal operation and design of helium refrigeration systems. This cycle is based upon the traditional equipment used for helium refrigeration system designs, i.e., constant volume displacement compression and critical flow expansion devices. It takes advantage of the fact that for a given load, the expander sets the compressor discharge pressure and the compressor sets its own suction pressure. This cycle not only provides an essentially constant system Carnot efficiency over a wide load range, but invalidates the traditional philosophy that the (‘TS’) design condition is the optimal operating condition for a given load using the as-built hardware. As such, the Floating Pressure- Ganni Cycle is a solution to reduce the energy consumption while increasing the reliability, flexibility and stability of these systems over a wide operating range and different operating modes and is applicable to most of the existing plants. This paper explains the basic theory behind this cycle operation and contrasts it to the traditional operational philosophies presently used.

Venkatarao Ganni, Peter Knudsen

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Poisonous Plant Management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Carefully examine plants being grazed. Generally, a Significant quantity of toxic plant must be consumed to be lethaL Many times these plants are readily identified in the field by evidence of grazing. Also helpful at this time is a rumen sample... poisonous plants were most severe at heavy stocking rates, while few losses occurred at light stocking levels. Death ? losses were also directly related to kinds or combinations of livestock being grazed. When combinations of cattle, sheep and goats...

McGinty, Allan

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification-combined cycle plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fourteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1990 to January 31, 1991. Testing of the High Pressure Cooling Subsystem electrical isolator was completed. The PEEK material successfully passed the high temperature, high pressure duration tests (50 hours). The Combustion Subsystem drawings were CADAM released. The procurement process is in progress. An equipment specification and RFP were prepared for the new Low Pressure Cooling System (LPCS) and released for quotation. Work has been conducted on confirmation tests leading to final gas-side designs and studies to assist in channel fabrication.The final cathode gas-side design and the proposed gas-side designs of the anode and sidewall are presented. Anode confirmation tests and related analyses of anode wear mechanisms used in the selection of the proposed anode design are presented. Sidewall confirmation tests, which were used to select the proposed gas-side design, were conducted. The design for the full scale CDIF system was completed. A test program was initiated to investigate the practicality of using Avco current controls for current consolidation in the power takeoff (PTO) regions and to determine the cause of past current consolidation failures. Another important activity was the installation of 1A4-style coupons in the 1A1 channel. A description of the coupons and their location with 1A1 channel is presented herein.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Solar cycle changes in coronal holes and space weather cycles J. G. Luhmann,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar cycle changes in coronal holes and space weather cycles J. G. Luhmann,1 Y. Li,1 C. N. Arge,2-heliolatitude solar wind over approximately the last three solar cycles. Related key parameters like interplanetary explain solar magnetic field control of long-term interplanetary variations. In particular, the enduring

California at Berkeley, University of

423

Physics challenges for advanced fuel cycle assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced fuel cycles and associated optimized reactor designs will require substantial improvements in key research area to meet new and more challenging requirements. The present paper reviews challenges and issues in the field of reactor and fuel cycle physics. Typical examples are discussed with, in some cases, original results.

Giuseppe Palmiotti; Massimo Salvatores; Gerardo Aliberti

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

mathematics Study program cycle and type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mathematics academic study programmm 11 #12;12 #12;· Study program cycle and type: First cycle academic study program. · AAnnttiicciippaatteedd aaccaaddeemmiicc ttiittllee:: Bachelor in Mathematics ggooaallss:: The principal goal of the academic study program in Mathematics is to qualify its graduates

Â?umer, Slobodan

425

Fuel cycles for the 80's  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Papers presented at the American Nuclear Society's topical meeting on the fuel cycle are summarized. Present progress and goals in the areas of fuel fabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, accountability, and safeguards are reported. Present governmental policies which affect the fuel cycle are also discussed. Individual presentations are processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.(DMC)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Assessment 101: The Assessment Cycle, Clear and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment 101: The Assessment Cycle, Clear and Simple October 1, 2014 Kellogg West Conference Center, Pomona, CA Resource Binder #12;2014-2015 WASC Senior College and University Commission is pleased expectations. Assessment 101: The Assessment Cycle, Clear and Simple October 1, 2014. Kellogg West, Pomona, CA

Su, Xiao

427

Uncertainty Analyses of Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing technology, experimental protocols, computational methods, systems analysis software, and many other capabilities in order to advance the nuclear power infrastructure through the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFDI). Our project, is intended to facilitate will-informed decision making for the selection of fuel cycle options and facilities for development.

Laurence F. Miller; J. Preston; G. Sweder; T. Anderson; S. Janson; M. Humberstone; J. MConn; J. Clark

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

428

Plant design: Integrating Plant and Equipment Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Like power plant engineers, process plant engineers must design generating units to operate efficiently, cleanly, and profitably despite fluctuating costs for raw materials and fuels. To do so, they increasingly create virtual plants to enable evaluation of design concepts without the expense of building pilot-scale or demonstration facilities. Existing computational models describe an entire plant either as a network of simplified equipment models or as a single, very detailed equipment model. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project (Figure 5) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks to bridge the gap between models by integrating plant modeling and equipment modeling software. The goal of the effort is to provide greater insight into the performance of proposed plant designs. The software integration was done using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (Computer Aided Process Engineering–Open), or CO interface. Several demonstration cases based on operating power plants confirm the viability of this co-simulation approach.

Sloan, David (Alstrom Power); Fiveland, Woody (Alstrom Power); Zitney, S.E.; Osawe, Maxwell (Ansys, Inc.)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: software require- ments, safety analysis, formal for the digital protection systems of a nuclear power plant. When spec- ifying requirements for software and CRSA processes are described using shutdown system 2 of the Wolsong nuclear power plants as the digital

430

VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a set of complex components that work together in unison. In order to support the nuclear renaissance, it is necessary to understand the impacts of changes and timing of events in any part of the fuel cycle system. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing, and changes in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model components and some examples of how to use VISION.

Jacob Jacobson; A. M. Yacout; Gretchen Matthern; Steven Piet; David Shropshire; Tyler Schweitzer

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

General features of direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors is developed. Breeding is possible in the tight lattice core. The power output can be maximized in the fast converter reactor. The gross thermal efficiency of the high temperature reactor adopting Inconel as fuel cladding is expected to be 44.8%. The plant system is similar to the supercritical-fossil-fired power plant which adopts once-through type coolant circulation system. The volume and height of the containment are approximately half of the BWR. The basic safety principles follows those of LWRs. The reactor will solve the economic problems of LWR and LMFBR.

Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Utilizing Pressured Oxy-combustion in Conjunction with Cryogenic Compression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The team of Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI) and Thar Energy LLC (Thar) applied technology engineering and economic analysis to evaluate two advanced oxy-combustion power cycles, the Cryogenic Pressurized Oxy-combustion Cycle (CPOC), and the Supercritical Oxy-combustion Cycle. This assessment evaluated the performance and economic cost of the two proposed cycles with carbon capture, and included a technology gap analysis of the proposed technologies to determine the technology readiness level of the cycle and the cycle components. The results of the engineering and economic analysis and the technology gap analysis were used to identify the next steps along the technology development roadmap for the selected cycle. The project objectives, as outlined in the FOA, were 90% CO{sub 2} removal at no more than a 35% increase in cost of electricity (COE) as compared to a Supercritical Pulverized Coal Plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The supercritical oxy-combustion power cycle with 99% carbon capture achieves a COE of $121/MWe. This revised COE represents a 21% reduction in cost as compared to supercritical steam with 90% carbon capture ($137/MWe). However, this represents a 49% increase in the COE over supercritical steam without carbon capture ($80.95/MWe), exceeding the 35% target. The supercritical oxy-combustion cycle with 99% carbon capture achieved a 37.9% HHV plant efficiency (39.3% LHV plant efficiency), when coupling a supercritical oxy-combustion thermal loop to an indirect supercritical CO{sub 2} (sCO{sub 2}) power block. In this configuration, the power block achieved 48% thermal efficiency for turbine inlet conditions of 650°C and 290 atm. Power block efficiencies near 60% are feasible with higher turbine inlet temperatures, however a design tradeoff to limit firing temperature to 650°C was made in order to use austenitic stainless steels for the high temperature pressure vessels and piping and to minimize the need for advanced turbomachinery features such as blade cooling. The overall technical readiness of the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle is TRL 2, Technology Concept, due to the maturity level of the supercritical oxy-combustor for solid fuels, and several critical supporting components, as identified in the Technical Gap Analysis. The supercritical oxycombustor for solid fuels operating at pressures near 100 atm is a unique component of the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle. In addition to the low TRL supercritical oxy-combustor, secondary systems were identified that would require adaptation for use with the supercritical oxycombustion cycle. These secondary systems include the high pressure pulverized coal feed, high temperature cyclone, removal of post-combustion particulates from the high pressure cyclone underflow stream, and micro-channel heat exchangers tolerant of particulate loading. Bench scale testing was utilized to measure coal combustion properties at elevated pressures in a CO{sub 2} environment. This testing included coal slurry preparation, visualization of coal injection into a high pressure fluid, and modification of existing test equipment to facilitate the combustion properties testing. Additional bench scale testing evaluated the effectiveness of a rotary atomizer for injecting a coal-water slurry into a fluid with similar densities, as opposed to the typical application where the high density fluid is injected into a low density fluid. The swirl type supercritical oxy-combustor was developed from initial concept to an advanced design stage through numerical simulation using FLUENT and Chemkin to model the flow through the combustor and provide initial assessment of the coal combustion reactions in the flow path. This effort enabled the initial combustor mechanical layout, initial pressure vessel design, and the conceptual layout of a pilot scale test loop. A pilot scale demonstration of the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle is proposed as the next step in the technology development. This demonstration would advance the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle and the supercritical

Brun, Klaus; McClung, Aaron; Davis, John

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

An analysis of cost effective incentives for initial commercial deployment of advanced clean coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis evaluates the incentives necessary to introduce commercial scale Advanced Clean Coal Technologies, specifically Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (ICGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) powerplants. The incentives required to support the initial introduction of these systems are based on competitive busbar electricity costs with natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, in baseload service. A federal government price guarantee program for up to 10 Advanced Clean Coal Technology powerplants, 5 each ICGCC and PFBC systems is recommended in order to establish the commercial viability of these systems by 2010. By utilizing a decreasing incentives approach as the technologies mature (plants 1--5 of each type), and considering the additional federal government benefits of these plants versus natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, federal government net financial exposure is minimized. Annual net incentive outlays of approximately 150 million annually over a 20 year period could be necessary. Based on increased demand for Advanced Clean Coal Technologies beyond 2010, the federal government would be revenue neutral within 10 years of the incentives program completion.

Spencer, D.F. [SIMTECHE, Half Moon Bay, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

Fuel-cycle assessment of selected bioethanol production.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large amount of corn stover is available in the U.S. corn belt for the potential production of cellulosic bioethanol when the production technology becomes commercially ready. In fact, because corn stover is already available, it could serve as a starting point for producing cellulosic ethanol as a transportation fuel to help reduce the nation's demand for petroleum oil. Using the data available on the collection and transportation of corn stover and on the production of cellulosic ethanol, we have added the corn stover-to-ethanol pathway in the GREET model, a fuel-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory. We then analyzed the life-cycle energy use and emission impacts of corn stover-derived fuel ethanol for use as E85 in flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs). The analysis included fertilizer manufacturing, corn farming, farming machinery manufacturing, stover collection and transportation, ethanol production, ethanol transportation, and ethanol use in light-duty vehicles (LDVs). Energy consumption of petroleum oil and fossil energy, emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}], nitrous oxide [N{sub 2}O], and methane [CH{sub 4}]), and emissions of criteria pollutants (carbon monoxide [CO], volatile organic compounds [VOCs], nitrogen oxide [NO{sub x}], sulfur oxide [SO{sub x}], and particulate matter with diameters smaller than 10 micrometers [PM{sub 10}]) during the fuel cycle were estimated. Scenarios of ethanol from corn grain, corn stover, and other cellulosic feedstocks were then compared with petroleum reformulated gasoline (RFG). Results showed that FFVs fueled with corn stover ethanol blends offer substantial energy savings (94-95%) relative to those fueled with RFG. For each Btu of corn stover ethanol produced and used, 0.09 Btu of fossil fuel is required. The cellulosic ethanol pathway avoids 86-89% of greenhouse gas emissions. Unlike the life cycle of corn grain-based ethanol, in which the ethanol plant consumes most of the fossil fuel, farming consumes most of the fossil fuel in the life cycle of corn stover-based ethanol.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Hong, H.; Energy Systems

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Conceptual design and optimization of a 1-1/2 generation PFBC plant task 14. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economics and performance of advanced pressurized fluidized bed (PFBC) cycles developed for utility applications during the last 10 years (especially the 2nd-Generation PFBC cycle) are projected to be favorable compared to conventional pulverized coal power plants. However, the improved economics of 2nd-Generation PFBC cycles are accompanied by the perception of increased technological risk related to the pressurized carbonizer and its associated gas cleanup systems. A PFBC cycle that removed the uncertainties of the carbonizer while retaining the high efficiency and low cost of a 2nd-Generation PFBC cycle could improve the prospects for early commercialization and pave the way for the introduction of the complete 2nd-Generation PFBC cycle at some later date. One such arrangement is a PFBC cycle with natural gas topping combustion, referred to as the 1.5-Generation PFBC cycle. This cycle combines the advantages of the 2nd-Generation PFBC plant with the reduced risk associated with a gas turbine burning natural gas, and can potentially be part of a phased approach leading to the commercialization of utility 2nd-Generation PFBC cycles. The 1.5-Generation PFBC may also introduce other advantages over the more complicated 2nd-Generation PFBC system. This report describes the technical and economic evaluation of 1.5-Generation PFBC cycles for utility or industrial power generation.

White, J.S.; Witman, P.M.; Harbaugh, L.; Rubow, L.N.; Horazak, D.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Shepherdstown's "Battle of the Cedars" Alan R. Biggs, Ph.D.; Professor of Plant Pathology and Extension Specialist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fungus. West Virginia had in 1925 adopted a law similar to that of Virginia in order to preserve its-virginianae, like many rusts, is heteroecious, meaning that it spends part of its life cycle on one plant, a red their life cycle. It is important to understand that the rust does not spread from apple to apple or from

Mohaghegh, Shahab

437

Advanced Fuel Cycles Activities in IAEA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considerable scientific and technical progress in many areas of Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) has been recognized as probable answers to ever-growing issues threatening sustainability, environmental protection and non-proliferation. These recent global developments such as Russian initiative on Global Nuclear Infrastructure-International Fuel Centre and the US initiative on Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) have made advanced fuel cycles as one of the decisive influencing factor for the future growth of nuclear energy. International Atomic Energy Agency has initiated the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) with overall objective of bringing together technology holders and technology users to consider jointly the international and national actions required achieving desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. One of the interesting common features of these initiatives (INPRO, GNEP and GNI-IFC) is closed fast reactor fuel cycles and proliferation resistance. Any fuel cycle that integrate P and T into it is also known as 'Advanced Fuel Cycle' (AFC) that could achieve reduction of plutonium and Minor Actinide (MA) elements (namely Am, Np, Cm, etc.). In this regard, some Member States are also evaluating alternative concepts involving the use of thorium fuel cycle, inert-matrix fuel or coated particle fuel. Development of 'fast reactors with closed fuel cycles' would be the most essential step for implementation of P and T. The scale of realization of any AFC depends on the maturity of the development of all these elemental technologies such as recycling MA, Pu as well as reprocessed uranium. In accordance with the objectives of the Agency, the programme B entitled 'Nuclear Fuel cycle technologies and materials' initiated several activities aiming to strengthen the capabilities of interested Member States for policy making, strategic planning, technology development and implementation of safe, reliable, economically efficient, proliferation resistant, environmentally sound and secure nuclear fuel cycle programmes. The paper describes some on-going IAEA activities in the area of: MA-fuel and target, thorium fuel cycle, coated particle fuel, MA-property database, inert matrix fuels, liquid metal cooled fast reactor fuels and fuel cycles, management of reprocessed uranium and proliferation resistance in fuel cycle. (authors)

Nawada, H.P.; Ganguly, C. [Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials Section, Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, Department of Nuclear Energy, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

ALTERNATIVE FLOWSHEETS FOR THE SULFUR-IODINE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 A hydrogen economy will need significant new sources of hydrogen. Unless large-scale carbon sequestration can be economically implemented, use of hydrogen reduces greenhouse gases only if the hydrogen is produced with non-fossil energy sources. Nuclear energy is one of the limited options available. One of the promising approaches to produce large quantities of hydrogen from nuclear energy efficiently is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical water-splitting cycle, driven by high temperature heat from a helium Gas-Cooled Reactor. They have completed a study of nuclear-driven thermochemical water-splitting processes. The final task of this study was the development of a flowsheet for a prototype S-I production plant. An important element of this effort was the evaluation of alternative flowsheets and selection of the reference design.

BROWN,LC; LENTSCH,RD; BESENBRUCH,GE; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JE

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Preliminary study: isotopic safeguards techniques (IST) LMFBR fuel cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This memorandum presents the preliminary results of the effort to investigate the applicability of isotope correlation techniques (ICT), formulated for the LWR system, to the LMFBR fuel cycle. The detailed isotopic compositional changes with burnup developed for the CRBR was utilized as the reference case. This differs from the usual LMFBR design studies in that the core uranium is natural uranium rather than depleted. Nevertheless, the general isotopic behavior should not differ significantly and does allow an initial insight into the expected behavior of isotopic correlations for the LMFBR power systems such as: the U.K. PFR and reprocessing plant; the French Phenix and Superphenix; and the US reference conceptual design studies (CDS) of homogeneous and heterogeneous LMFBR systems as they are developed.

Persiani, P.J.; Kroc, T.K.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Advanced fusion MHD power conversion using the CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept for a tokamak reactor involves the use of a high-temperature Rankine cycle in combination with microwave superheaters and nonequilibrium MHD disk generators to obtain a compact, low-capital-cost power conversion system which fits almost entirely within the reactor vault. The significant savings in the balance-of-plant costs are expected to result in much lower costs of electricity than previous concepts. This paper describes the unique features of the CFAR cycle and a high- temperature blanket designed to take advantage of it as well as the predicted performance of the MHD disk generators using mercury seeded with cesium. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Hoffman, M.A.; Campbell, R.; Logan, B.G. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA); Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Supercritical CO2 direct cycle Gas Fast Reactor (SC-GFR) concept.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) direct cycle gas fast reactor (SC-GFR) concept. The SC-GFR reactor concept was developed to determine the feasibility of a right size reactor (RSR) type concept using S-CO{sub 2} as the working fluid in a direct cycle fast reactor. Scoping analyses were performed for a 200 to 400 MWth reactor and an S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. Although a significant amount of work is still required, this type of reactor concept maintains some potentially significant advantages over ideal gas-cooled systems and liquid metal-cooled systems. The analyses presented in this report show that a relatively small long-life reactor core could be developed that maintains decay heat removal by natural circulation. The concept is based largely on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) commercial power plants operated in the United Kingdom and other GFR concepts.

Wright, Steven Alan; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma (Computational Engineering Analysis, Albuquerque, NM); Al Rashdan, Ahmad (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Vernon, Milton E.; Fleming, Darryn D.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The IAEA international conference on fast reactors and related fuel cycles: highlights and main outcomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 'International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycles', which is regularly held every four years, represents the main international event dealing with fast reactors technology and related fuel cycles options. Main topics of the conference were new fast reactor concepts, design and simulation capabilities, safety of fast reactors, fast reactor fuels and innovative fuel cycles, analysis of past experience, fast reactor knowledge management. Particular emphasis was put on safety aspects, considering the current need of developing and harmonizing safety standards for fast reactors at the international level, taking also into account the lessons learned from the accident occurred at the Fukushima- Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011. Main advances in the several key areas of technological development were presented through 208 oral presentations during 41 technical sessions which shows the importance taken by fast reactors in the future of nuclear energy.

Monti, S.; Toti, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Cogeneration Plant is Designed for Total Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 1b/hr of 250-psig steam and 95,000 1b/hr of 300-psig steam to the ch10rine caustic process. The combined cycle plant configur ation shown in Figure 1 comprises: 1. Two.Genera1 Electric natural gas fired gas turbine-generators (GTG), with a size... depends on 271 ESL-IE-87-09-45 Proceedings from the Ninth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, September 16-18, 1987 two factors - ambient temperature and process steam demand. The gas turbines are operated at baseload, the HRSG...

Howell, H. D.; Vera, R. L.

445

Environmental assessmental, geothermal energy, Heber geothermal binary-cycle demonstration project: Imperial County, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale (45 MWe net) binary-cycle geothermal demonstration power plant are described using the liquid-dominated geothermal resource at Heber, Imperial County, California. The following are included in the environmental assessment: a description of the affected environment, potential environmental consequences of the proposed action, mitigation measures and monitoring plans, possible future developmental activities at the Heber anomaly, and regulations and permit requirements. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effect from CO2 emission resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels in utility power plants and the use of chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants, which is currently thought to affect depletion of the ozone layer. The ban on fluorocarbon fluids has been...LIFE CYCLE COST ANALYSIS OF WASTE HEAT OPERATED ABSORPTION COOLING SYSTEMS FOR BUILDING HVAC APPLICATIONS V. Murugavel and R. Saravanan Refrigeration and Air conditioning Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University...

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Shedding light on carbon-mineral complexation in the soil environment: impacts on C sequestration and cycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

42 Shedding light on carbon-mineral complexation in the soil environment: impacts on C sequestration and cycling Sparks, D.L. & C. Chen Department of Plant and Soil Sciences and Delaware@udel.edu) Abstract Organic matter (OM)-mineral complexation plays a critical role in soil carbon (C) stabilization

Sparks, Donald L.

448

Process system optimization for life cycle improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is an analytic tool for quantifying the environmental impacts of all processes used in converting raw materials into a final product. The LCA consists of three parts. Life cycle inventory quantifies all material and energy use, and environmental emissions for the entire product life cycle, while impact assessment evaluates actual and potential environmental and human health consequences of the activities identified in the inventory phase. Most importantly, life cycle improvement aims at reducing the risk of these consequences occurring to make the product more benign. when the LCA is performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic analysis, the total economic and environmental benefits and shortcomings of a product or process can be quantified. A methodology has been developed incorporating process performance, economics, and life cycle inventory data to synthesize process systems, which meet life cycle impact-improvement targets at least cost. The method relies on a systematic description of the product life cycle and utilizes successive Linear Programming to formulate and optimize the non-linear, constrained problem which results. The practicality and power of this approach have been demonstrated by examining options for the reduction of emissions of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} from petroleum-based fuels.

Marano, J.J.; Rogers, S.

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

EVOLVING LEG CYCLES TO PRODUCE HEXAPOD GAITS GARY B. PARKER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

movement by the servos. The best means of combining these leg cycles into a gait cycle is learnedEVOLVING LEG CYCLES TO PRODUCE HEXAPOD GAITS GARY B. PARKER Computer Science, Connecticut College by dividing the prob- lem into two parts: leg cycle learning and gait cycle learning. Servo pulses required

Parker, Gary B.

450

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S; (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated; (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass; and (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Jones, R.; Carter, J.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

451

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S. (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated. (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass. (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Carter, J.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

452

Life cycle assessment of bagasse waste management options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bagasse is mostly utilized for steam and power production for domestic sugar mills. There have been a number of alternatives that could well be applied to manage bagasse, such as pulp production, conversion to biogas and electricity production. The selection of proper alternatives depends significantly on the appropriateness of the technology both from the technical and the environmental points of view. This work proposes a simple model based on the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the environmental impacts of various alternatives for dealing with bagasse waste. The environmental aspects of concern included global warming potential, acidification potential, eutrophication potential and photochemical oxidant creation. Four waste management scenarios for bagasse were evaluated: landfilling with utilization of landfill gas, anaerobic digestion with biogas produc