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1

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit states that an income taxpayer that makes a qualified investment in a new integrated coal gasification power plant or in the expansion of an existing...

2

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accessed May 2008 from www.sce.com 9. The California BiomassCollaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Coal gasification power plant and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an integrated coal gasification power plant, a humidifier is provided for transferring as vapor, from the aqueous blowdown liquid into relatively dry air, both (I) at least a portion of the water contained in the aqueous liquid and (II) at least a portion of the volatile hydrocarbons therein. The resulting humidified air is advantageously employed as at least a portion of the hot air and water vapor included in the blast gas supplied via a boost compressor to the gasifier.

Woodmansee, Donald E. (Schenectady, NY)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification » How Coal Gasification » How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work The heart of a gasification-based system is the gasifier. A gasifier converts hydrocarbon feedstock into gaseous components by applying heat under pressure in the presence of steam. A gasifier differs from a combustor in that the amount of air or oxygen available inside the gasifier is carefully controlled so that only a relatively small portion of the fuel burns completely. This "partial oxidation" process provides the heat. Rather than burning, most of the carbon-containing feedstock is chemically broken apart by the gasifier's heat and pressure, setting into motion chemical reactions that produce "syngas." Syngas is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide, but can include

6

Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETLs Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Gasification Plant Databases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Plant Databases Welcome to the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory's Gasification Plant Databases Within these...

9

Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant Revision 2, March 2012 DOE/NETL-2012/1551 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

11

Plasma-enhanced gasification of low-grade coals for compact power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high temperature of a steam torch ensures an efficient gasification of low-grade coals, which is comparable to that of high-grade coals. Therefore, the coal gasification system energized by microwaves can serve as a moderately sized power plant due to its compact and lightweight design. This plasma power plant of low-grade coals would be useful in rural or sparsely populated areas without access to a national power grid.

Uhm, Han S. [Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, 447-1 Wolgye-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yong C.; Shin, Dong H.; Lee, Bong J. [Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Mauldin, SC); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

13

Power plants with topping gas turbines and coal gasification planning of new plants and upgrading of existing plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on existing and new power plants improved environmentally and economically by integrating gas turbines in the plant process. The rate of additional firing has an influence on the overall plant efficiency. The influence of the additional firing of natural gas-fired power plants is compared to that of power plants with integrated coal gasification. The differences are explained. The result of the examination lead to recommendations for the design of new plants and for upgrading of existing plants. The advantages of topping gas turbines are shown by examples of new power plants and upgraded plants.

Schoedel, J.; Mertens, K. (ABB Kraftwerke AG, Mannheim (DE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 11 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Drost, K.; Antoniak, Z.; Brown, D.; Somasundaram, S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Materials Guidelines for Gasification Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report distills and condenses EPRI's knowledge of materials performance in numerous pilot and commercial-scale gasifiers into guidelines for the application and expected performance of materials in key parts of gasification-combined-cycle power plants.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

19

CoalFleet RD&D Augmentation Plan for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced, clean coal technologies such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) offer societies around the world the promise of efficient, affordable power generation at markedly reduced levels of emissions8212including "greenhouse gases" linked to global climate change8212relative to today's current fleet of coal-fired power plants. To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of IGCC and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiati...

2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

20

Integrated gasification-combined-cycle power plants - Performance and cost estimates  

SciTech Connect

Several studies of Integrated Gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants have indicated that these plants have the potential for providing performance and cost improvements over conventional coal-fired steam power plants with flue gas desulfurization. Generally, IGCC power plants have a higher energy-conversion efficiency, require less water, conform with existing environmental standards at lower cost, and are expected to convert coal to electricity at lower costs than coal-fired steam plants. This study compares estimated costs and performance of various IGCC plant design configurations. A second-law analysis identifies the real energy waste in each design configuration. In addition, a thermoeconomic analysis reveals the potential for reducing the cost of electricity generated by an IGCC power plant.

Tsatsaronis, G.; Tawfik, T.; Lin, L. (Tennessee State Univ., Nashville (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Comparison of intergrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants with current and advanced gas turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two recent conceptual design studies examined ''grass roots'' integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) plants for the Albany Station site of Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation. One of these studies was based on the Texaco Gasifier and the other was developed around the British Gas Co.-Lurgi slagging gasifier. Both gasifiers were operated in the ''oxygen-blown'' mode, producing medium Btu fuel gas. The studies also evaluated plant performance with both current and advanced gas turbines. Coalto-busbar efficiencies of approximately 35 percent were calculated for Texaco IGCC plants using current technology gas turbines. Efficiencies of approximately 39 percent were obtained for the same plant when using advanced technology gas turbines.

Banda, B.M.; Evans, T.F.; McCone, A.I.; Westisik, J.H.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Shell-based gasification-combined-cycle power plant evaluations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a detailed engineering and economic evaluation of shell-based integrated gasification - combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants. Two complete nominal 1000 MW capacity Shell-based grass roots IGCC plant designs and cost estimates were prepared. The following conclusions were made: Shell-based IGCC plants firing Illinois coal and employing current technology gas turbines (2000/sup 0/F firing temperature) have the potential to be cost competitive with conventional coal-fired steam plants with FGD. Shell-based IGCC plants firing Texas lignite have the potential to generate power at costs that are competitive with those based on firing high rank coal. Shell-based IGCC plants firing Illinois No. 6 coal have equivalent performance and costs similar to Texaco-based IGCC systems.

Hartman, J.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8. Southern California Edison, Renewable Power Purchase andSouthern California Edison (SCE) has one such program forSouthern California Edison provides a feed-in tariff rate

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Improving heat capture for power generation in coal gasification plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the steam cycle design to maximize power generation is demonstrated using pinch analysis targeting techniques. Previous work models the steam pressure level in composite curves based on its saturation temperature ...

Botros, Barbara Brenda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

CoalFleet User Design Basis Specification for Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Duke Edwardsport integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant started up in 2012, and Mississippi Powers Kemper County IGCC plant is in construction. The capital cost of these initial commercial scale IGCC plants is high. The industry needs specifications that encourage greater standardization in IGCC design in order to bring down the investment cost for the next generation of plants. Standardization also supports repeatable, reliable performance and reduces the time and cost ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

CoalFleet RD&D augmentation plan for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants  

SciTech Connect

To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiative, which facilitates collaborative research by more than 50 organizations from around the world representing power generators, equipment suppliers and engineering design and construction firms, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others. This group advised EPRI as it evaluated more than 120 coal-gasification-related research projects worldwide to identify gaps or critical-path activities where additional resources and expertise could hasten the market introduction of IGCC advances. The resulting 'IGCC RD&D Augmentation Plan' describes such opportunities and how they could be addressed, for both IGCC plants to be built in the near term (by 2012-15) and over the longer term (2015-25), when demand for new electric generating capacity is expected to soar. For the near term, EPRI recommends 19 projects that could reduce the levelized cost-of-electricity for IGCC to the level of today's conventional pulverized-coal power plants with supercritical steam conditions and state-of-the-art environmental controls. For the long term, EPRI's recommended projects could reduce the levelized cost of an IGCC plant capturing 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from the carbon in coal (for safe storage away from the atmosphere) to the level of today's IGCC plants without CO{sub 2} capture. EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program is also preparing a companion RD&D augmentation plan for advanced-combustion-based (i.e., non-gasification) clean coal technologies (Report 1013221). 7 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs., 4 apps.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Gas turbine effects on integrated-gasification-combined-cycle power plant operations  

SciTech Connect

This study used detailed thermodynamic modeling procedures to assess the influence of different gas turbine characteristics and steam cycle conditions on the design and off-design performance of integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants. IGCC plant simulation models for a base case plant with Texaco gasifiers and both radiant and convective syngas coolers were developed, and three different types of gas turbines were evaluated as well as non-reheat and reheat steam systems. Results indicated that improving the gas turbine heat rate significantly improves the heat rate of the IGCC power plant. In addition results indicated that using a reheat steam system with current gas turbines improves IGCC performance, though as gas turbine efficiency increases, the impact of using a reheat steam system decreases. Increasing gas turbine temperatures from 1985{degree}F to 2500{degree}F was also found to have the potential to reduce overall IGCC system heat rates by approximately 700 BTU/kWh. The methodologies and models developed for this work are extremely useful tools for investigating the impact of specific gas turbine and steam cycle conditions on the overall performance of IGCC power plants. Moreover, they can assist utilities during the preliminary engineering phase of an IGCC project in evaluating the cost effectiveness of using specific gas turbines and steam cycles in the overall plant design. 45 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

Eustis, F.H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). High Temperature Gasdynamics Lab.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants  

SciTech Connect

There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Pioneering Gasification Plants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification » Pioneering Gasification » Pioneering Gasification Plants Pioneering Gasification Plants In the 1800s, lamplighters made their rounds in the streets of many of America's largest cities lighting street lights fueled by "town gas," frequently the product of early forms of coal gasification. Gasification of fuel also provided fuel for steel mills, and toward the end of the 19th Century, electric power. These early gasifiers were called "gas producers," and the gas that they generated was called "producer gas." During the early 20th Century, improvements in the availability of petroleum and natural gas products, along with the extension of the infrastructure associated with these products, led to their widespread use, which replaced coal-based producer gas in the energy market.

31

EMERY BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emery Recycling Corporation (now Emery Energy Company, LLC) evaluated the technical and economical feasibility of the Emery Biomass Gasification Power System (EBGPS). The gasifier technology is owned and being developed by Emery. The Emery Gasifier for this project was an oxygen-blown, pressurized, non-slagging gasification process that novelly integrates both fixed-bed and entrained-flow gasification processes into a single vessel. This unique internal geometry of the gasifier vessel will allow for tar and oil destruction within the gasifier. Additionally, the use of novel syngas cleaning processes using sorbents is proposed with the potential to displace traditional amine-based and other syngas cleaning processes. The work scope within this project included: one-dimensional gasifier modeling, overall plant process modeling (ASPEN), feedstock assessment, additional analyses on the proposed syngas cleaning process, plant cost estimating, and, market analysis to determine overall feasibility and applicability of the technology for further development and commercial deployment opportunities. Additionally, the project included the development of a detailed technology development roadmap necessary to commercialize the Emery Gasification technology. Process modeling was used to evaluate both combined cycle and solid oxide fuel cell power configurations. Ten (10) cases were evaluated in an ASPEN model wherein nine (9) cases were IGCC configurations with fuel-to-electricity efficiencies ranging from 38-42% and one (1) case was an IGFC solid oxide case where 53.5% overall plant efficiency was projected. The cost of electricity was determined to be very competitive at scales from 35-71 MWe. Market analysis of feedstock availability showed numerous market opportunities for commercial deployment of the technology with modular capabilities for various plant sizes based on feedstock availability and power demand.

Benjamin Phillips; Scott Hassett; Harry Gatley

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

32

Environmental assessment of the atlas bio-energy waste wood fluidized bed gasification power plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Atlas Bio-Energy Corporation is proposing to develop and operate a 3 MW power plant in Brooklyn, New York that will produce electricity by gasification of waste wood and combustion of the produced low-Btu gas in a conventional package steam boiler coupled to a steam-electric generator. The objectives of this project were to assist Atlas in addressing the environmental permit requirements for the proposed power plant and to evaluate the environmental and economic impacts of the project compared to more conventional small power plants. The project`s goal was to help promote the commercialization of biomass gasification as an environmentally acceptable and economically attractive alternative to conventional wood combustion. The specific components of this research included: (1) Development of a permitting strategy plan; (2) Characterization of New York City waste wood; (3) Characterization of fluidized bed gasifier/boiler emissions; (4) Performance of an environmental impact analysis; (5) Preparation of an economic evaluation; and (6) Discussion of operational and maintenance concerns. The project is being performed in two phases. Phase I, which is the subject of this report, involves the environmental permitting and environmental/economic assessment of the project. Pending NYSERDA participation, Phase II will include development and implementation of a demonstration program to evaluate the environmental and economic impacts of the full-scale gasification project.

Holzman, M.I.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Higgins coal gasification/repowering study: feasibility study for alternate fuels. [Higgins power plant, Pinellar County, Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1978, FPC determined that repowering the existing 138 MW Higgins power plant would provide the most economical means for meeting immediate additional power requirements. The use of an integrated coal gasification combined cycle power plant offered the opportunity to revive the Higgins repowering concept without potential Fuel Use Act restrictions. The existing Higgins power plant is located at the north end of Tampa Bay on Booth Point, near the City of Oldsmar in Pinellas County, Florida. The basis for this feasibility study is to prepare a preliminary facility design for repowering the existing Higgins plant steam turbine generators utilizing coal gasification combined cycle (CGCC) technology to produce an additional 300 MW of power. The repowering is to be accomplished by integrating British Gas/Lurgi slagging gasifiers with combined cycle equipment consisting of new combustion turbines and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and the existing steam turbines. The proposed CGCC facility has been designed for daily cyclic duty. However, since it was anticipated that the heat rate would be lower than at other existing FPC units, the CGCC facility has also been designed with base load operation capabilities.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Investigation of an integrated switchgrass gasification/fuel cell power plant. Final report for Phase 1 of the Chariton Valley Biomass Power Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Chariton Valley Biomass Power Project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy Biomass Power Program, has the goal of converting switchgrass grown on marginal farmland in southern Iowa into electric power. Two energy conversion options are under evaluation: co-firing switchgrass with coal in an existing utility boiler and gasification of switchgrass for use in a carbonate fuel cell. This paper describes the second option under investigation. The gasification study includes both experimental testing in a pilot-scale gasifier and computer simulation of carbonate fuel cell performance when operated on gas derived from switchgrass. Options for comprehensive system integration between a carbonate fuel cell and the gasification system are being evaluated. Use of waste heat from the carbonate fuel cell to maximize overall integrated plant efficiency is being examined. Existing fuel cell power plant design elements will be used, as appropriate, in the integration of the gasifier and fuel cell power plant to minimize cost complexity and risk. The gasification experiments are being performed by Iowa State University and the fuel cell evaluations are being performed by Energy Research Corporation.

Brown, R.C.; Smeenk, J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Steinfeld, G. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

Combined compressed air storage-low BTU coal gasification power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical generating power plant includes a Compressed Air Energy Storage System (CAES) fueled with low BTU coal gas generated in a continuously operating high pressure coal gasifier system. This system is used in coordination with a continuously operating main power generating plant to store excess power generated during off-peak hours from the power generating plant, and to return the stored energy as peak power to the power generating plant when needed. The excess coal gas which is produced by the coal gasifier during off-peak hours is stored in a coal gas reservoir. During peak hours the stored coal gas is combined with the output of the coal gasifier to fuel the gas turbines and ultimately supply electrical power to the base power plant.

Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL); Sather, Norman F. (Naperville, IL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions,

37

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions, water discharges, and solid

38

Gasification Plant Cost and Performance Optimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing effort of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to investigate the feasibility of gasification on a broader level, Nexant, Inc. was contracted to perform a comprehensive study to provide a set of gasification alternatives for consideration by the DOE. Nexant completed the first two tasks (Tasks 1 and 2) of the ''Gasification Plant Cost and Performance Optimization Study'' for the DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in 2003. These tasks evaluated the use of the E-GAS{trademark} gasification technology (now owned by ConocoPhillips) for the production of power either alone or with polygeneration of industrial grade steam, fuel gas, hydrocarbon liquids, or hydrogen. NETL expanded this effort in Task 3 to evaluate Gas Technology Institute's (GTI) fluidized bed U-GAS{reg_sign} gasifier. The Task 3 study had three main objectives. The first was to examine the application of the gasifier at an industrial application in upstate New York using a Southeastern Ohio coal. The second was to investigate the GTI gasifier in a stand-alone lignite-fueled IGCC power plant application, sited in North Dakota. The final goal was to train NETL personnel in the methods of process design and systems analysis. These objectives were divided into five subtasks. Subtasks 3.2 through 3.4 covered the technical analyses for the different design cases. Subtask 3.1 covered management activities, and Subtask 3.5 covered reporting. Conceptual designs were developed for several coal gasification facilities based on the fluidized bed U-GAS{reg_sign} gasifier. Subtask 3.2 developed two base case designs for industrial combined heat and power facilities using Southeastern Ohio coal that will be located at an upstate New York location. One base case design used an air-blown gasifier, and the other used an oxygen-blown gasifier in order to evaluate their relative economics. Subtask 3.3 developed an advanced design for an air-blown gasification combined heat and power facility based on the Subtask 3.2 design. The air-blown case was chosen since it was less costly and had a better return on investment than the oxygen-blown gasifier case. Under appropriate conditions, this study showed a combined heat and power air-blown gasification facility could be an attractive option for upgrading or expanding the utilities area of industrial facilities. Subtask 3.4 developed a base case design for a large lignite-fueled IGCC power plant that uses the advanced GE 7FB combustion turbine to be located at a generic North Dakota site. This plant uses low-level waste heat to dry the lignite that otherwise would be rejected to the atmosphere. Although this base case plant design is economically attractive, further enhancements should be investigated. Furthermore, since this is an oxygen-blown facility, it has the potential for capture and sequestration of CO{sub 2}. The third objective for Task 3 was accomplished by having NETL personnel working closely with Nexant and Gas Technology Institute personnel during execution of this project. Technology development will be the key to the long-term commercialization of gasification technologies. This will be important to the integration of this environmentally superior solid fuel technology into the existing mix of power plants and industrial facilities. As a result of this study, several areas have been identified in which research and development will further advance gasification technology. Such areas include improved system availability, development of warm-gas clean up technologies, and improved subsystem designs.

Samuel Tam; Alan Nizamoff; Sheldon Kramer; Scott Olson; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts; David Stopek; Robert Zabransky; Jeffrey Hoffmann; Erik Shuster; Nelson Zhan

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Integrating Coal Gasification into a Rotary Kiln Electric Furnace Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal gasification is a potential alternative to conventional coal or natural gas- fired power plants ... Fundamentals of Spark-Plasma Sintering: Net-Shaping and Size Effects ... Investigation on a Microwave High-Temperature Air Heat Exchanger.

40

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this series of design and estimating efforts was to start from the as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project and to develop optimized designs for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC power and coproduction projects. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This unoptimized plant has a thermal efficiency of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW. This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal and coke-fueled power plants. This side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, showed their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a multiple train coal-fueled IGCC powerplant, also based on the Subtaks 1.3 cases. The Subtask 1.6 four gasification train plant has a thermal efficiency of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency of 45.4% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,096 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to coproduce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. As gasification technology matures, SCOHS and other improvements identified in this study will lead to further cost reductions and efficiency improvements.

Samuel S. Tam

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Steady-state simulation and optimization of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are a promising technology option for power generation with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in view of their efficiency and environmental advantages over conventional coal utilization technologies. This paper presents a three-phase, top-down, optimization-based approach for designing an IGCC plant with precombustion CO2 capture in a process simulator environment. In the first design phase, important global design decisions are made on the basis of plant-wide optimization studies with the aim of increasing IGCC thermal efficiency and thereby making better use of coal resources and reducing CO2 emissions. For the design of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture, the optimal combination of the extent of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion in the water-gas shift (WGS) reactors and the extent of CO2 capture in the SELEXOL process, using dimethylether of polyethylene glycol as the solvent, is determined in the first phase. In the second design phase, the impact of local design decisions is explored considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first phase as additional constraints. Two decisions are made focusing on the SELEXOL and Claus unit. In the third design phase, the operating conditions are optimized considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first and second phases as additional constraints. The operational flexibility of the plant must be taken into account before taking final design decisions. Two studies on the operational flexibility of the WGS reactors and one study focusing on the operational flexibility of the sour water stripper (SWS) are presented. At the end of the first iteration, after executing all the phases once, the net plant efficiency (HHV basis) increases to 34.1% compared to 32.5% in a previously published study (DOE/NETL-2007/1281; National Energy Technology Laboratory, 2007). The study shows that the three-phase, top-down design approach presented is very useful and effective in a process simulator environment for improving efficiency and flexibility of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture. In addition, the study identifies a number of key design variables that has strong impact on the efficiency of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

NETL: Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Coal and Power Systems Gasification Systems Gasifier Optimization & Plant Supporting Systems Feed Systems Feed Systems Gasifier Optimization & Plant Supporting...

43

2007 gasification technologies conference papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sessions covered: gasification industry roundtable; the gasification market in China; gasification for power generation; the gasification challenge: carbon capture and use storage; industrial and polygeneration applications; gasification advantage in refinery applications; addressing plant performance; reliability and availability; gasification's contribution to supplementing gaseous and liquid fuels supplies; biomass gasification for fuel and power markets; and advances in technology-research and development

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Coal Gasification for Power Generation, 3. edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered include: an overview of Coal Generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; a description of gasification technology including processes and systems; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; a discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; an evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; a discussion of IGCC project development options; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and, a detailed description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

UPDATE ON GASIFICATION TESTING AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama was established in 1995 to lead the United States ' effort to develop cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable, coal-based power plant technologies. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key components of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power

Senior Engineer; Pannalal Vimalchand; Roxann Leonard; Robert C. Lambrecht

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project developed optimized designs and cost estimates for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC coproduction projects that produced hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and hydrocarbon liquid fuel precursors in addition to power. The as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project was the starting point for this study that was performed by Bechtel, Global Energy and Nexant under Department of Energy contract DE-AC26-99FT40342. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This non-optimized plant has a thermal efficiency to power of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW.1 This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal- and coke-fueled IGCC power plants. A side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, shows their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a four-train coal-fueled IGCC power plant, also based on the Subtask 1.3 cases. This plant has a thermal efficiency to power of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency to power of 44.5% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,116 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to co-produce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. Subtask 2.1 developed a petroleum coke IGCC power plant with the coproduction of liquid fuel precursors from the Subtask 1.3 Next Plant by eliminating the export steam and hydrogen production and replacing it with a Fischer-Tropsch hydrocarbon synthesis facility that produced 4,125 bpd of liquid fuel precursors. By maximizing liquids production at the expense of power generation, Subtask 2.2 developed an optimized design that produces 10,450 bpd of liquid fuel precursors and 617 MW of export power from 5,417 tpd of dry petroleum coke. With 27 $/MW-hr power and 30 $/bbl liquids, the Subtask 2.2 plant can have a return on investment of 18%. Subtask 2.3 converted the Subtask 1.6 four-train coal fueled IGCC power plant

Sheldon Kramer

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed optimized designs and cost estimates for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC coproduction projects that produced hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and hydrocarbon liquid fuel precursors in addition to power. The as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project was the starting point for this study that was performed by Bechtel, Global Energy and Nexant under Department of Energy contract DE-AC26-99FT40342. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This non-optimized plant has a thermal efficiency to power of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW.1 This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal- and coke-fueled IGCC power plants. A side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, shows their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a four-train coal-fueled IGCC power plant, also based on the Subtask 1.3 cases. This plant has a thermal efficiency to power of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency to power of 44.5% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,116 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to co-produce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. Subtask 2.1 developed a petroleum coke IGCC power plant with the coproduction of liquid fuel precursors from the Subtask 1.3 Next Plant by eliminating the export steam and hydrogen production and replacing it with a Fischer-Tropsch hydrocarbon synthesis facility that produced 4,125 bpd of liquid fuel precursors. By maximizing liquids production at the expense of power generation, Subtask 2.2 developed an optimized design that produces 10,450 bpd of liquid fuel precursors and 617 MW of export power from 5,417 tpd of dry petroleum coke. With 27 $/MW-hr power and 30 $/bbl liquids, the Subtask 2.2 plant can have a return on investment of 18%. Subtask 2.3 converted the Subtask 1.6 four-train coal fueled IGCC power plant

Sheldon Kramer

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

NETL: Gasification - National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Gasification National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility National Carbon Capture Center Participants The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. The PSDF now houses the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to address the nation's need for cost-effective, commercially viable CO2 capture options for flue gas from pulverized coal power plants and syngas from coal gasification power plants. The NCCC focuses national efforts on reducing greenhouse gas emissions through technological innovation, and serve as a neutral test center for emerging carbon capture technologies. PSDF-NCCC Background

49

Optimum Design of Coal Gasification Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with the optimum design of heat recovery systems using the Texaco Coal Gasification Process (TCGP). TCGP uses an entrained type gasifier and produces hot gases at approximately 2500oF with high heat flux. This heat is removed by using a combination of radiant/convective waste heat boiler or by direct water quench before processing of the raw gas. The selection of an optimum heat recovery system is a function of the product slate, overall economics, and the technical risks associated with the heat recovery equipment. An extensive use of heat recovery equipment is not necessarily more economical than a simpler system with modest thermal efficiency. A full heat recovery mode consisting of radiant and convective boilers along with economizers is recommended for Coal Gasification Combined Cycle to maximize energy efficiency. A water quench mode is suggested for hydrogen production because of the need to adjust the H2O/CO ratio for shift conversion. A partial heat-recovery mode is recommended for power/methanol co-production plant. These heat recovery systems are discussed in detail along with the economics associated with each system.

Pohani, B. P.; Ray, H. P.; Wen, H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Economics of Phased Gasification-Combined-Cycle Plants: Utility Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phased gasification-combined-cycle power plants can help utilities match load growth and respond to changes in demand and fuel prices. After evaluating the economic merits of phased additions, seven utilities considered the technology a viable option for electricity generation in the 1990s.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the following discussion considers a comparison of coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and pulverized coal (PC) power plants, representing a balanced...

52

Recovery, transport, and disposal of CO{sub 2} from an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit CO{sub 2} emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation, a process that reduces CO{sub 2} production and is amenable to CO{sub 2} capture. This paper presents a comparison of energy systems that encompass fuel supply, an IGCC system, CO{sub 2} recovery using commercial technologies, CO{sub 2} transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering in geological reservoirs. The intent is to evaluate the energy efficiency impacts of controlling CO{sub 2} in such a system, and to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an equivalent CO{sub 2} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. The value used for the equivalent CO{sub 2} budget is 1 kg CO{sub 2}/kWh. The base case for the comparison is a 458-MW IGCC system using an air-blown Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No.6 bituminous coal, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, transportation, and preparation of the coal and limestone result in a net electric power production of 448 MW with a 0.872 kg/kWh CO{sub 2} release rate. For comparison, the gasifier output was taken through a water-gas shift to convert CO to CO{sub 2}, and processed in a Selexol unit to recover CO{sub 2} prior to the combustion turbine. A 500-km pipeline then took the CO{sub 2} to geological sequestering. The net electric power production was 383 MW with a 0.218 kg/kWh CO{sub 2} release rate.

Livengood, C.D.; Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Background Gasification Background Challenges for Gasification The widespread market penetration of gasification continues to face some challenges. Over the years, gasification challenges related to gasifier and supporting unit availability, operability, and maintainability have been addressed with substantial success, and new implementations of gasification will continue to improve in this area. At present, perhaps the most significant remaining challenge is the relatively high capital costs of gasification plants, particularly given the low capital investment required for NGCC-based power production combined with low natural gas prices currently being experienced in the domestic market. Accordingly, technology that can decrease capital costs of gasification systems and plant supporting systems will be most important towards further deployment of gasification.

54

NETL: Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brochures Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Brochures The Gasification Technology brochures are as follows: Gasification Plant Databases (Aug 2013) Gasification Systems...

55

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

56

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology: IGCC.integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants (output. Integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants are

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS) and the Parallel Computing toolbox from Mathworks. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Dynamic simulation and load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Load-following control of future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture is expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. To study control performance during load following, a plant-wide dynamic simulation of a coal-fed IGCC plant with CO{sub 2} capture has been developed. The slurry-fed gasifier is a single-stage, downward-fired, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow type with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC). The syngas from the outlet of the RSC goes to a scrubber followed by a two-stage sour shift process with inter-stage cooling. The acid gas removal (AGR) process is a dual-stage physical solvent-based process for selective removal of H{sub 2}S in the first stage and CO{sub 2} in the second stage. Sulfur is recovered using a Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. The recovered CO{sub 2} is compressed by a split-shaft multistage compressor and sent for sequestration after being treated in an absorber with triethylene glycol for dehydration. The clean syngas is sent to two advanced F-class gas turbines (GTs) partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit. A subcritical steam cycle is used for heat recovery steam generation. A treatment unit for the sour water strips off the acid gases for utilization in the Claus unit. The steady-state model developed in Aspen Plus is converted to an Aspen Plus Dynamics simulation and integrated with MATLAB for control studies. The results from the plant-wide dynamic model are compared qualitatively with the data from a commercial plant having different configuration, operating condition, and feed quality than what has been considered in this work. For load-following control, the GT-lead with gasifier-follow control strategy is considered. A modified proportionalintegralderivative (PID) control is considered for the syngas pressure control. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate while load-following, a linear model predictive controller (LMPC) is implemented in MATLAB. A combined process and disturbance model is identified by considering a number of model forms and choosing the final model based on an information-theoretic criterion. The performance of the LMPC is found to be superior to the conventional PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

Bhattacharyya, D,; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Evaluation of a Dow-Based Gasification-Combined-Cycle Plant Using Low-Rank Coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This feasibility study developed performance and cost data for two different Dow-based gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plants, designed to fire either Texas lignite or Wyoming subbituminous coals at a Gulf Coast location. It demonstrated the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of these plants for generating power from low-rank coals.

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

60

Rigorous Kinetic Modeling, Optimization, and Operability Studies of a Modified Claus Unit for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant with CO{sub 2} Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and the ability to recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Because of these criteria, modifications to the conventional process are often required, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant, such as rapid change in the feed flow rates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but they are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified, and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was devised so as to determine which set of linearly independent reactions would best describe the product distributions from available plant data. Various approaches are taken to derive the kinetic rate expressions, which are either missing in the open literature or found to be inconsistent. A set of plant data is used for optimal estimation of the kinetic parameters. The final model agrees well with the published plant data. Using the developed kinetics models of the Claus reaction furnace, WHB, and catalytic stages, two optimization studies are carried out. The first study shows that there exists an optimal steam pressure generated in the WHB that balances hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In the second study, it is shown that an optimal H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio exists that balances single-pass conversion, hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In addition, an operability study has been carried out to examine the operating envelope in which both the H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio and the adiabatic flame temperature can be controlled in the face of disturbances typical for the operation of an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Impact of CO{sub 2} capture on the Claus process has also been discussed.

Jones, Dustin; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Turton, Richard; Zitney, Stephen E

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

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61

Rigorous Kinetic Modeling and Optimization Study of a Modified Claus Unit for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant with CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and the ability to recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Because of these criteria, modifications to the conventional process are often required, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant, such as rapid change in the feed flow rates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but they are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified, and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was devised so as to determine which set of linearly independent reactions would best describe the product distributions from available plant data. Various approaches are taken to derive the kinetic rate expressions, which are either missing in the open literature or found to be inconsistent. A set of plant data is used for optimal estimation of the kinetic parameters. The final model agrees well with the published plant data. Using the developed kinetics models of the Claus reaction furnace, WHB, and catalytic stages, two optimization studies are carried out. The first study shows that there exists an optimal steam pressure generated in the WHB that balances hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In the second study, it is shown that an optimal H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio exists that balances single-pass conversion, hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In addition, an operability study has been carried out to examine the operating envelope in which both the H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio and the adiabatic flame temperature can be controlled in the face of disturbances typical for the operation of an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Impact of CO{sub 2} capture on the Claus process has also been discussed.

Jones, Dustin; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Turton, Richard; Zitney, Stephen E.

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

62

Modeling and optimization of a modified claus process as part of an integrted gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Due to these criteria, modifications are often required to the conventional process, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO2 capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant such as rapid change in the feed flowrates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was devised so as to determine which set of linearly independent reactions would best describe the product distributions from available plant data. Various approaches are taken to derive the kinetic rate expressions which are either missing in the open literature or found to be inconsistent. A set of plant data is used for optimal estimation of the kinetic parameters. The final model agrees well with the published plant data. Using the developed kinetics models of the Claus reaction furnace, WHB, and catalytic stages, two optimization studies are carried out. The first study shows that there exists an optimal steam pressure generated in the WHB that balances hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In the second study, it is shown that an optimal H2S/SO2 ratio exists that balances single-pass conversion, hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In addition, an operability study has been carried out to examine the operating envelope in which both H2S/SO2 ratio and adiabatic flame temperature can be controlled in the face of disturbances typical for the operation of an IGCC power plant with CO2 capture. Impact of CO2 capture on the Claus process has also been discussed.

Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Gasification | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification Gasification Gasification The Wabash River Clean Coal Power Plant The Wabash River Clean Coal Power Plant Gasification Technology R&D Coal gasification offers one of the most versatile and clean ways to convert coal into electricity, hydrogen, and other valuable energy products. Coal gasification electric power plants are now operating commercially in the United States and in other nations, and many experts predict that coal gasification will be at the heart of future generations of clean coal technology plants. Rather than burning coal directly, gasification (a thermo-chemical process) breaks down coal - or virtually any carbon-based feedstock - into its basic chemical constituents. In a modern gasifier, coal is typically exposed to steam and carefully controlled amounts of air or oxygen under high

64

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY - Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY August 2005 Revised May 2007 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Gasification...

65

Technology qualification for IGCC power plant with CO2 Capture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Summary:This thesis presents the technology qualification plan for the integrated gasification combined cycle power plant (IGCC) with carbon dioxide capture based on DNV recommendations. (more)

Baig, Yasir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Demonstration plant for pressurized gasification of biomass feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project to design, construct, and operate a pressurized biomass gasification plant in Hawaii will begin in 1991. Negotiations are underway with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) which is co-funding the project with the state of Hawaii and industry. The gasifier is a scale-up of the pressurized fluidized-bed RENUGAS process developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT). The project team consists of Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR), Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii, Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company (HC S), The Ralph M. Parsons Company, and IGT. The gasifier will be designed for 70 tons per day of sugarcane fiber (bagasse) and will be located at the Paia factory of HC S on the island of Maui. In addition to bagasse, other feedstocks such as wood, biomass wastes, and refuse-derived-fuel may be evaluated. The demonstration plant will ultimately supply part of the process energy needs for the sugar factory. The operation and testing phase will provide process information for both air- and oxygen-blown gasification, and at both low and high pressures. The process will be evaluated for both fuel gas and synthesis gas production, and for electrical power production with advanced power generation schemes. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Trenka, A.R. (Pacific International Center for High Technology Research, Honolulu, HI (United States)); Kinoshita, C.M.; Takahashi, P.K.; Phillips, V.D. (Hawaii Natural Energy Inst., Honolulu, HI (United States)); Caldwell, C. (Parsons (Ralph M.) Co., Pasadena, CA (United States)); Kwok, R. (Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Co., HI (United States)); Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P. (Institute of Gas Technology

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Gasification Systems Projects & Performers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Systems Projects & Performers Gasification Systems - Key Technologies Feed Systems Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Syngas...

68

BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated system that exceeds the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal of 40% (HHV) efficiency at emission levels well below the DOE suggested limits; and (5) An advanced biofueled power system whose levelized cost of electricity can be competitive with other new power system alternatives.

David Liscinsky

2002-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

69

Southern Company Services' study of a Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW)-based gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plant  

SciTech Connect

A site-specific evaluation of an integrated-gasification-combined- cycle (IGCC) unit was conducted by Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS) to determine the effect of such a plant would have on electricity cost, load response, and fuel flexibility on the Southern electric system (SES). The design of the Plant Wansley IGCC plant in this study was configured to utilize three oxygen-blown Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW) gasifiers integrated with two General Electric (GE) MS7001F combustion turbines. The nominal 400-MW IGCC plant was based on a nonphased construction schedule, with an operational start date in the year 2007. Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal was the base coal used in the study. Alabama lignite was also investigated as a potential low-cost feedstock for the IGCC plant, but was found to be higher in cost that the Illinois No. 6 coal when shipped to the Wansley site. The performance and cost results for the nominal 400-MW plant were used in an economic assessment that compared the replacement of a 777-MW pulverized-coal-fired unit with 777-MW of IGCC capacity based on the Southern electric system's expansion plans of installing 777-MW of baseload capacity in the year 2007. The economic analysis indicated that the IGCC plant was competitive compared to a baseload pulverized-coal-fired unit. Capital costs of the IGCC unit were approximately the same as a comparably sized pulverized-coal-fired plant, but the IGCC plant had a lower production cost due to its lower heat rate. 10 refs., 34 figs., 18 tabs.

Gallaspy, D.T.; Johnson, T.W.; Sears, R.E. (Southern Co. Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Coal gasification for power generation. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect

The report gives an overview of the opportunities for coal gasification in the power generation industry. It provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered in the report include: An overview of coal generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; A description of gasification technology including processes and systems; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; A discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; An evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; A discussion of IGCC project development options; A discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; Profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and A description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Technology Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Gasification Technologies contacts Gary J. stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Ronald Breault Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4486 ronald.breault@netl.doe.gov Herbert E. andrus, Jr. Principal Investigator ALSTOM Power 2000 Day Hill Rd. Windsor, CT 06095 860-285-4770 herbert.e.andrus@power.alstom.com Hybrid Combustion-GasifiCation CHemiCal loopinG Coal power teCHnoloGy development Description Gasification technologies can provide a stable, affordable energy supply for the nation, while also providing high efficiencies and near zero pollutants. With coal

72

Gasification Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home...

73

NETL: 2010 World Gasification Database Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > 2010 World Gasification Database Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > 2010 World Gasification Database Gasification Systems 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database Archive DOE/NETL 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database Worldwide Gasification Database Analysis The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.

74

Evaluation of gasification and gas cleanup processes for use in molten carbonate fuel cell power plants. Final report. [Contains lists and evaluations of coal gasification and fuel gas desulfurization processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report satisfies the requirements for DOE Contract AC21-81MC16220 to: List coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems suitable for supplying fuel to molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) in industrial and utility power plants; extensively characterize those coal gas cleanup systems rejected by DOE's MCFC contractors for their power plant systems by virtue of the resources required for those systems to be commercially developed; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC tolerance for particulates on the anode (fuel gas) side of the MCFC; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC anode side tolerance for chemical species, including sulfides, halogens, and trace heavy metals; choose from the candidate gasifier/cleanup systems those most suitable for MCFC-based power plants; choose a reference wet cleanup system; provide parametric analyses of the coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems when integrated into a power plant incorporating MCFC units with suitable gas expansion turbines, steam turbines, heat exchangers, and heat recovery steam generators, using the Westinghouse proprietary AHEAD computer model; provide efficiency, investment, cost of electricity, operability, and environmental effect rankings of the system; and provide a final report incorporating the results of all of the above tasks. Section 7 of this final report provides general conclusions.

Jablonski, G.; Hamm, J.R.; Alvin, M.A.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Patel, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant public design report. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

This Public Design Report provides, in a single document, available nonproprietary design information for the Great Plains Gasification Project, the first commercial coal gasification facility in the United States. In addition to the design aspects, the history of the project, the organization of the plant owners, and the role of the Department of Energy are briefly discussed. Plant capital and operating costs are also presented. An overview of the mine and plant operations is presented and is followed by detailed nonproprietary descriptions of the individual process units, plant systems, and products. Narrative process descriptions, simplified process flow diagrams, input/output stream data, operating conditions, catalyst and chemical requirements, and utility requirements are given for each unit. The process units are described as they were planned by July 1984. Any modification or alteration that occurred after that date will be the subject of a followup work. Plant startup provisions, environmental considerations and control, monitoring and safety considerations are also addressed for each operating unit. The report is published in two volumes. Volume I contains: (1) introduction; (2) overview of project (plant and mine, plant facilities, Basin Electric Antelope Valley Station); and (3) plant process data (coal, oxygen and steam, gasification and gas processing). 53 refs., 80 figs., 36 tabs.

Miller, W.R.; Belt, R.J.; Honea, F.I.; Ness, H.M.; Lang, R.A.; Berty, T.E.; Delany, R.C.; Mako, P.F.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined-cycle (GMS) power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined cycle (GMS) refers to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems in which coal gasification is used to supply a clean fuel (free of mineral matter and sulfur) for combustion in an MHD electrical power plant. Advantages of a clean-fuel system include the elimination of mineral matter or slag from all components other than the coal gasifier and gas cleanup system; reduced wear and corrosion on components; and increased seed recovery resulting from reduced exposure of seed to mineral matter or slag. Efficiencies in some specific GMS power plants are shown to be higher than for a comparably sized coal-burning MHD power plant. The use of energy from the MHD exhaust gas to gasify coal (rather than the typical approach of burning part of the coal) results in these higher efficiencies.

Lytle, J.M.; Marchant, D.D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the technoeconomic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002.

Unknown

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE POWER & GASIFICATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE POWER & GASIFICATION CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE POWER & GASIFICATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER SUBCONTRACT QZ001 UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-99FT40675; W(A)-03-001, CH-1127 The Petitioner, ChevronTexaco Worldwide Power & Gasification (ChevronTexaco) is a subcontractor to Research Triangle Institute (RTI) under the subject cost plus fixed fee agreement for the performance of work entitled, Novel Technologies for Gaseous Containment Control. The purpose of the agreement is to prove the feasibility of synthesis gas clean up techniques, including the warm synthesis gas process based on the RVS-1 sorbent developed by the Department of Energy and RTI and, for reverse selective membrane technology developed by Dupont and Air Liquide, Membrane Dupont Air Liquide (MEDAL) and RTI.

79

Great plains coal gasification plant: Technical lessons learned report  

SciTech Connect

In a first of a kind, grass roots plant of the complexity of the Great Plains Gasification Plant the lessons learned are numerous and encompass a wide range of items. This report documents the lessons learned from all phases of the project from preliminary design through the most recent operation of the plant. Based on these lessons learned, suggestions are made for changes and/or process improvements to future synfuel plants. In addition, recommendations are made for research and development in selected areas. 46 refs., 31 figs., 33 tabs.

Delaney, R.C.; Mako, P.F.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Advanced Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Gasification Carbon feedstock gasification is a promising pathway for high-efficiency, low-pollutant power generation and chemical production. The inability, however, to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC22  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC22, the first test campaign using a high moisture lignite from Mississippi as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC22 was conducted from March 24 to April 17, 2007. The gasification process was operated for 543 hours, increasing the total gasification operation at the PSDF to over 10,000 hours. The PSDF gasification process was operated in air-blown mode with a total of about 1,080 tons of coal. Coal feeder operation was challenging due to the high as-received moisture content of the lignite, but adjustments to the feeder operating parameters reduced the frequency of coal feeder trips. Gasifier operation was stable, and carbon conversions as high as 98.9 percent were demonstrated. Operation of the PCD and other support equipment such as the recycle gas compressor and ash removal systems operated reliably.

Southern Company Services

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant Public Design Report. Volume II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Public Design Report provides, in a single document, available nonproprietary design information for the Great Plains Gasification Project, the first commercial coal gasification facility in the United States. In addition to the design aspects, the history of the project, the organization of the plant owners, and the role of the Department of Energy are briefly discussed. Plant capital and operating costs are also presented. An overview of the mine and plant operations is presented and is followed by detailed nonproprietary descriptions of the individual process units, plant systems, and products. Narrative process descriptions, simplified process flow diagrams, input/output stream data, operating conditions, catalyst and chemical requirements, and utility requirements are given for each unit. The process units are described as they were planned by July 1984. Any modification or alteration that occurred after that date will be the subject of a followup work. Plant startup provisions, environmental considerations and control, monitoring and safety considerations are also addressed for each operating unit. The report is published in two volumes. Volume II contains: (1) plant process data (sulfur recovery, main flare - area 8300, liquid processing, ash handling and solids disposal, other systems); (2) plant startup procedure and schedule; (3) plant and employee safety; (4) GPGP cost data; and (5) references. 53 refs., 46 figs., 38 tabs.

Miller, W.R.; Belt, R.J.; Honea, F.I.; Ness, H.M.; Lang, R.A.; Berty, T.E.; Delany, R.C.; Mako, P.F.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NETL: Gasification - Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants General Electric Company Project Number: FE0007859 Project Description General Electric Company (GE) is studying the feasibility of improving plant availability and reducing total installed costs in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. GE is evaluating the IGCC technology effects of total installed cost and availability through deployment of a multi-faceted approach in technology evaluation, constructability, and design methodology. Eastman Chemical Company will be supporting the GE effort on certain technologies by providing consulting on the evaluations and technology transfer phases of the project. The end result is aimed at reducing the time to technological maturity and enabling plants to reach higher values of availability in a shorter period of time and at a lower installed cost.

84

Design optimization of IGCC power plants  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants have the potential for providing performance and cost improvements over conventional coal-fired steam power plants with flue-gas desulfurization. The major design options for IGCC power plants include the following: oxygen-blown versus air-blown gasification processes; entrained-flow, fluidized-bed, or fixed-bed gasifier; coal-slurry feed versus coal-dry feed; hot versus cold fuel-gas cleanup; gas turbine alternatives; and, design alternatives for the Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG). This paper summarizes some results from these studies. The advanced thermoelectric techniques used at Tennessee Technological University (TTU) are very powerful tools for evaluating and optimizing IGCC power plants.

Tsatsaronis, G.; Lin, L.; Pisa, J.; Tawfik, T. (Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

NETL: Gasification Archived Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > Reference Shelf > Archived Projects Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > Reference Shelf > Archived Projects Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Archived Projects Archived Projects | Active Projects | All NETL Fact Sheets Feed Systems Reaction-Driven Ion Transport Membranes Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Coal/Biomass Gasification at Colorado School of Mines Co-Production of Electricity and Hydrogen Using a Novel Iron-Based Catalyst Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity via Catalytic Coal Gasification Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Technology Development

86

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Commercial plant feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

In order to determine the viability of any Liquids from Coal (LFC) commercial venture, TEK-KOL and its partner, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), have put together a technical and economic feasibility study for a commercial-size LFC Plant located at Zeigler Coal Holding Company`s North Rochelle Mine site. This resulting document, the ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Plant: Commercial Plant Feasibility Study, includes basic plant design, capital estimates, market assessment for coproducts, operating cost assessments, and overall financial evaluation for a generic Powder River Basin based plant. This document and format closely resembles a typical Phase II study as assembled by the TEK-KOL Partnership to evaluate potential sites for LFC commercial facilities around the world.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Improving process performances in coal gasification for power and synfuel production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is aimed at developing process alternatives of conventional coal gasification. A number of possibilities are presented, simulated, and discussed in order to improve the process performances, to avoid the use of pure oxygen, and to reduce the overall CO{sub 2} emissions. The different process configurations considered include both power production, by means of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant, and synfuel production, by means of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The basic idea is to thermally couple a gasifier, fed with coal and steam, and a combustor where coal is burnt with air, thus overcoming the need of expensive pure oxygen as a feedstock. As a result, no or little nitrogen is present in the syngas produced by the gasifier; the required heat is transferred by using an inert solid as the carrier, which is circulated between the two modules. First, a thermodynamic study of the dual-bed gasification is carried out. Then a dual-bed gasification process is simulated by Aspen Plus, and the efficiency and overall CO{sub 2} emissions of the process are calculated and compared with a conventional gasification with oxygen. Eventually, the scheme with two reactors (gasifier-combustor) is coupled with an IGCC process. The simulation of this plant is compared with that of a conventional IGCC, where the gasifier is fed by high purity oxygen. According to the newly proposed configuration, the global plant efficiency increases by 27.9% and the CO{sub 2} emissions decrease by 21.8%, with respect to the performances of a conventional IGCC process. 29 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

M. Sudiro; A. Bertucco; F. Ruggeri; M. Fontana [University of Padova, Milan (Italy). Italy and Foster Wheeler Italiana Spa

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC18  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details Test Campaign TC18 of the PSDF gasification process. Test campaign TC18 began on June 23, 2005, and ended on August 22, 2005, with the gasifier train accumulating 1,342 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Some of the testing conducted included commissioning of a new recycle syngas compressor for gasifier aeration, evaluation of PCD filter elements and failsafes, testing of gas cleanup technologies, and further evaluation of solids handling equipment. At the conclusion of TC18, the PSDF gasification process had been operated for more than 7,750 hours.

Southern Company Services

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Power Gasification Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process Jeff Seabright Arthur Lee Richard Weissman, PhD. Texaco Inc. White Plains, New York Presented at: First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 Washington D.C. ABSTRACT Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is a commercially proven clean coal technology that offers significant environmental and economic benefits today, including decreased air and solids emissions. It also offers the potential to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. Coal IGCC provides electric utilities strategic options in meeting today's growing demand for energy products (electricity, fuel, chemicals) while protecting public health and the environment and providing a pathway to zero emissions coal-based power generation.

90

Performance modelling and simulated availability of shell gasification and carbon recovery unit of urea plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper deals with the performance modelling and simulated availability of shell gasification and carbon recovery unit of urea plant. The fertilizer plant comprises of various units viz. shell gasification and carbon recovery, desulphurisation, ... Keywords: modelling, performance evaluation and maintenance strategies, steady state availability

Sunand Kumar; Sanjeev Kumar; P. C. Tewari

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2: CO2 Capture: Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs CO2: CO2 Capture: Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs Specific Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs from CO2 Capture In foregoing discussion, results of NETL's comprehensive study comparing the performance and cost of various fossil fuel-based power generation technologies with and without CO2 capture were reviewed. Of particular interest in that study was the companion set of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) designs, using GE's gasification technology, which can be used to illustrate the design changes needed for CO2 capture. Current Technology - IGCC Plant Design Figure 1 shows a simplified block flow diagram (BFD) of a market-ready IGCC design without CO2 capture. As shown, the IGCC plant consists of the following processing islands, of which a more detailed description of each can be found in the cited NETL referenced report: 1

92

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC25  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC25, the second test campaign using a high moisture lignite coal from the Red Hills mine in Mississippi as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC25 was conducted from July 4, 2008, through August 12, 2008. During TC25, the PSDF gasification process operated for 742 hours in air-blown gasification mode. Operation with the Mississippi lignite was significantly improved in TC25 compared to the previous test (TC22) with this fuel due to the addition of a fluid bed coal dryer. The new dryer was installed to dry coals with very high moisture contents for reliable coal feeding. The TC25 test campaign demonstrated steady operation with high carbon conversion and optimized performance of the coal handling and gasifier systems. Operation during TC25 provided the opportunity for further testing of instrumentation enhancements, hot gas filter materials, and advanced syngas cleanup technologies. The PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane with syngas from the Transport Gasifier.

Southern Company Services

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC24  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC24, the first test campaign using a bituminous coal as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC24 was conducted from February 16, 2008, through March 19, 2008. The PSDF gasification process operated for about 230 hours in air-blown gasification mode with about 225 tons of Utah bituminous coal feed. Operational challenges in gasifier operation were related to particle agglomeration, a large percentage of oversize coal particles, low overall gasifier solids collection efficiency, and refractory degradation in the gasifier solids collection unit. The carbon conversion and syngas heating values varied widely, with low values obtained during periods of low gasifier operating temperature. Despite the operating difficulties, several periods of steady state operation were achieved, which provided useful data for future testing. TC24 operation afforded the opportunity for testing of various types of technologies, including dry coal feeding with a developmental feeder, the Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) feeder; evaluating a new hot gas filter element media configuration; and enhancing syngas cleanup with water-gas shift catalysts. During TC24, the PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane.

Southern Company Services

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Mercury Fate in IGCC Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants are an alternative to conventional pulverized coal boilers. In an IGCC facility, coal or other feedstocks are converted to synthetic gas (syngas) at high temperature and pressure. The syngas can be used to produce electrical power in a combined cycle combustion turbine. One of the advantages of IGCC technology is that contaminants can be removed from the syngas prior to combustion, reducing the volume of gas that must be treated and leading to lo...

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT--DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power and Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement with the USDOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co--product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases: Phase 1 is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase 2 is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase 3 updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase 2, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report is WMPI's third quarterly technical progress report. It covers the period performance from October 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001.

John W. Rich

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Power plant  

SciTech Connect

A two stroke internal combustion engine is described that has at least one cylinder within which a piston reciprocates. The engine is joined to a gearbox which includes a ring gear. A pair of gears having diameters half that of the ring gear move within the latter. At least one of the pair of gears is connected to a piston by a pin extending between the piston and the periphery of said gear. An additional pair of gears are fixed to respective ones of the first-mentioned gear pair and are operatively joined to a pinion to which a drive shaft is secured. A turbine and filter arrangement is positioned on the side of the engine opposite the gearbox whereby exhaust gases from the engine are directed to the turbine to develop power at an output drive shaft joined to the turbine and to filter pollutants from the gases.

Finn, H.I. Jr.

1978-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

97

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(kWh) to 8.25 centskWh. Chemical Solvents Diagram Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture for Gasification Application Pre-combustion CO2 capture related to a gasification plant is...

98

Gasification Technology Status -- December 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 5 years, several major power companies have been developing and conducting detailed design studies of commercial-sized coal-based integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) and pulverized coal (PC) projects. Integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) plants can meet very stringent emissions targets, including those for mercury and CO2. This report covers current IGCC designs being offered and reviews the commercial status of gasification technologies, potential improvements, and lesso...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

99

EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and 642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY SUMMARY This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE's proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

100

EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY...

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101

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The DOE/WMPI Cooperative Agreement was modified on May 2003 to expand the project team to include Shell Global Solutions, U.S. and Uhde GmbH as the engineering contractor. The addition of Shell and Uhde strengthen both the technical capability and financing ability of the project. Uhde, as the prime EPC contractor, has the responsibility to develop a LSTK (lump sum turnkey) engineering design package for the EECP leading to the eventual detailed engineering, construction and operation of the proposed concept. Major technical activities during the reporting period include: (1) finalizing contractual agreements between DOE, Uhde and other technology providers, focusing on intellectual-property-right issues, (2) Uhde's preparation of a LSTK project execution plan and other project engineering procedural documents, and (3) Uhde's preliminary project technical concept assessment and trade-off evaluations.

John W. Rich

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Alaska coal gasification feasibility studies - Healy coal-to-liquids plant  

SciTech Connect

The Alaska Coal Gasification Feasibility Study entailed a two-phase analysis of the prospects for greater use of Alaska's abundant coal resources in industrial applications. Phase 1, Beluga Coal Gasification Feasibility Study (Report DOE/NETL 2006/1248) assessed the feasibility of using gasification technology to convert the Agrium fertilizer plant in Nikiski, Alaska, from natural gas to coal feedstock. The Phase 1 analysis evaluated coals from the Beluga field near Anchorage and from the Usibelli Coal Mine near Healy, both of which are low in sulfur and high in moisture. This study expands the results of Phase 1 by evaluating a similar sized gasification facility at the Usibelli Coal mine to supply Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquids to central Alaska. The plant considered in this study is small (14,640 barrels per day, bbl/d) compared to the recommended commercial size of 50,000 bbl/d for coal-to-liquid plants. The coal supply requirements for the Phase 1 analysis, four million tons per year, were assumed for the Phase 2 analysis to match the probable capacity of the Usibelli mining operations. Alaska refineries are of sufficient size to use all of the product, eliminating the need for F-T exports out of the state. The plant could produce marketable by-products such as sulfur as well as electric power. Slag would be used as backfill at the mine site and CO{sub 2} could be vented, captured or used for enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The unexpected curtailment of oil production from Prudhoe Bay in August 2006 highlighted the dependency of Alaskan refineries (with the exception of the Tesoro facility in Nikiski) on Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude. If the flow of oil from the North Slope declines, these refineries may not be able to meet the in-state needs for diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel. Additional reliable sources of essential fuel products would be beneficial. 36 refs., 14 figs., 29 tabs., 3 apps.

Lawrence Van Bibber; Charles Thomas; Robert Chaney [Research & Development Solutions, LLC (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Sunrise II Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sunrise Power Company, LLC (Sunrise), has planned the modification of an existing power plant project to increase its generation capacity by 265 megawatts by 2003. The initial...

104

DOE Science Showcase - Energy Plants of the Future | OSTI, US...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Press Release DOE-Sponsored IGCC Project in Texas Takes Important Step Forward, Fossil Energy Techline Gasification Technology R&D How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work...

105

New baseload power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a listing of 221 baseload power plant units currently in the planning stage. The list shows the plant owner, capacity, fuel, engineering firm, constructor, major equipment suppliers (steam generator, turbogenerator, and flue gas desulfurization system), partner, and date the plant is to be online. This data is a result of a survey by the journal of power plant owners.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Houston Lighting and Power Company's evaluation of coal gasification coproduction energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to reduce the cost of electricity from Integral ed Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants, the Electric Power Research Institute has embarked on a program to evaluate and potentially demonstrate a coal gasification-based coproduction energy facility. Houston Lighting Power Company (HL P) responded with a proposal in its ongoing effort to study emerging technologies for electricity production. HL P recognized the opportunities available to them in coproduction because of their close proximity to the world's largest petrochemical complex located on the Houston Ship Channel. Coparticipant utilities with HL P were Central and South West Services and TU Electric. Two sites were selected for study, a Houston Ship Channel site, utilizing barge-delivered Illinois No. 6 coal blended with petroleum coke, and to satisfy C SWS and TU needs, a central Texas site utilizing Texas lignite. Stone Webster Engineering and InterFact, Inc. were engineers and consulting partners in the study.Eight cases were developed to cover the various possibilities for coproduction. Four cases involved utilizing Texas lignite and four cases involved utilizing Illinois No. 6 as fuel blended with petroleum coke. The eight cases are described. Each of the cases utilized the Shell coal gasification process and were evaluated for either base load operation using two G.E. 7F gas turbines and a spare gasifier for chemicals production or for cyclic operationusing four G.E. 7EA gas turbines and no spare gasifier. The sum of the coproducts produced over all eight cases were electricity, methanol, ammonia, and urea, depending on location and economics.

Kern, E.E.; Havemann, S.D.; Chmielewski, R.G. (Houston Lighting and Power Co., TX (United States)); Baumann, P. (InterFact, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Goelzer, A.R.; Karayel, R.; Keady, G.S.; Chernoff, B. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Houston, TX (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power: Typical IGCC Configuration Power: Typical IGCC Configuration Major Commercial Examples of IGCC Plants While there are many coal gasification plants in the world co-producing electricity, chemicals and/or steam, the following are four notable, commercial-size IGCC plants currently in operation solely for producing electricity from coal and/or coke. Tampa Electric, Polk County 250 MW GE Gasifier Wabash, West Terre Haute 265 MW CoP E-Gas(tm) Gasifier Nuon, Buggenum 250 MW Shell Gasifier Elcogas, Puertollano 300 MW Prenflo Gasifier All of the plants began operation prior to 2000 and employ high temperature entrained-flow gasification technology. GE (formerly Texaco-Chevron) and ConocoPhillips (CoP) are slurry feed gasifiers, while Shell and Prenflo are dry feed gasifiers. None of these plants currently capture carbon dioxide (CO2). A simplified process flow diagram of the 250-MW Tampa Electric IGCC plant is shown in Figure 1 to illustrate the overall arrangement of an operating commercial scale IGCC plant. The Tampa Electric plant is equipped with both radiant and convective coolers for heat recovery, generating high pressure (HP) steam.

109

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage in Coal to Electrical Applications Usage in Coal to Electrical Applications The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) application of gasification offers some water-saving advantages over other technologies for producing electricity from coal. Regions with limited water resources, typical of many parts of the western United States, could conserve resources by meeting increasing electricity demand with IGCC generation. Many of these areas have good coal resources and a need for new generating capacity. Water use in a thermoelectric power plant is described by two separate terms: water withdrawal and water consumption. Water withdrawal is the amount of water taken into the plant from an outside source. Water consumption refers to the portion of the withdrawn water that is not returned directly to the outside source - for example, water lost to evaporative cooling.

110

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced CO2 Capture Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is demonstrating the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low-rank coals. The...

111

Extractors manual for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Data Base System: Major Plants Data Base  

SciTech Connect

National concern over the depletion of conventional energy sources has prompted industry to evaluate coal gasification as an alternative source of energy. One approach being evaluated is gasifying coal in a gasifier and feeding the fuel gas to a combined-cycle power plant. This system is called an Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power plant. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is also encouraging the development of new technologies by sponsoring research and development (R and D) projects in IGCC. In order to make data generated from these projects available to government and private sector personnel, the IGCC Data System has been established. A technology-specific data system consists of data that are stored for that technology in each of the specialized data bases that make up the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) data system. The IGCC Data System consists of data stored in the Major Plants Data Base (MPDB) and the Test Data Data Base (TDDB). To capture the results of government-sponsored IGCC research programs, documents have been written for the MPDB and TDDB to specify the data that contractors need to report and the procedures for reporting them. The IGCC documents identify and define the data that need to be reported for IGCC projects so that the data entered into the TDDB and MPDB will meet the needs of the users of the IGCC Data System. This document addresses what information is needed and how it must be formatted so that it can be entered into the MPDB for IGCC. The data that are most relevant to potential IGCC Data System users have been divided into four categories: project tracking needs; economic/commercialization needs; critical performance needs; and modeling and R and D needs. 4 figs., 28 tabs.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

NETL: News Release - Coal Gasification Plant Returns $79 Million to DOE in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2006 2, 2006 Coal Gasification Plant Returns $79 Million to DOE in Revenue-Sharing Gas Sales Plant Currently Supplies Carbon Dioxide for DOE Sequestration Project Washington, DC -A coal gasification plant purchased from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1988 recently paid millions of dollars to DOE as part of a revenue sharing agreement and continues to be an integral part of a Department project to sequester millions of tons of carbon dioxide while doubling an oil field's recovery rate. MORE INFO Learn more about the Great Plains Synfuels Plant The Dakota Gasification Company (DGC), which purchased the Great Plains Synfuels Plant near Beulah, N.D., recently announced the payment of more than $79 million to DOE as part of a revenue-sharing agreement signed in

113

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a t echnoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Development of a plant-wide dynamic model of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this presentation, development of a plant-wide dynamic model of an advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture will be discussed. The IGCC reference plant generates 640 MWe of net power using Illinois No.6 coal as the feed. The plant includes an entrained, downflow, General Electric Energy (GEE) gasifier with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC), a two-stage water gas shift (WGS) conversion process, and two advanced 'F' class combustion turbines partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit (ASU). A subcritical steam cycle is considered for heat recovery steam generation. Syngas is selectively cleaned by a SELEXOL acid gas removal (AGR) process. Sulfur is recovered using a two-train Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. A multistage intercooled compressor is used for compressing CO2 to the pressure required for sequestration. Using Illinois No.6 coal, the reference plant generates 640 MWe of net power. The plant-wide steady-state and dynamic IGCC simulations have been generated using the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} and Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign} process simulators, respectively. The model is generated based on the Case 2 IGCC configuration detailed in the study available in the NETL website1. The GEE gasifier is represented with a restricted equilibrium reactor model where the temperature approach to equilibrium for individual reactions can be modified based on the experimental data. In this radiant-only configuration, the syngas from the Radiant Syngas Cooler (RSC) is quenched in a scrubber. The blackwater from the scrubber bottom is further cleaned in the blackwater treatment plant. The cleaned water is returned back to the scrubber and also used for slurry preparation. The acid gas from the sour water stripper (SWS) is sent to the Claus plant. The syngas from the scrubber passes through a sour shift process. The WGS reactors are modeled as adiabatic plug flow reactors with rigorous kinetics based on the mid-life activity of the shift-catalyst. The SELEXOL unit consists of the H2S and CO2 absorbers that are designed to meet the stringent environmental limits and requirements of other associated units. The model also considers the stripper for recovering H2S that is sent as a feed to a split-flow Claus unit. The tail gas from the Claus unit is recycled to the SELEXOL unit. The cleaned syngas is sent to the GE 7FB gas turbine. This turbine is modeled as per published data in the literature. Diluent N2 is used from the elevated-pressure ASU for reducing the NOx formation. The heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is modeled by considering generation of high-pressure, intermediate-pressure, and low-pressure steam. All of the vessels, reactors, heat exchangers, and the columns have been sized. The basic IGCC process control structure has been synthesized by standard guidelines and existing practices. The steady-state simulation is solved in sequential-modular mode in Aspen Plus{reg_sign} and consists of more than 300 unit operations, 33 design specs, and 16 calculator blocks. The equation-oriented dynamic simulation consists of more than 100,000 equations solved using a multi-step Gear's integrator in Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign}. The challenges faced in solving the dynamic model and key transient results from this dynamic model will also be discussed.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Gasification … Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, Clearwater, Florida, June 5 to 9, 2011 Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, Clearwater, Florida, June 5 to 9, 2011 Gasification Technologies Advances for Future Energy Plants Jenny B. Tennant Technology Manager - Gasification 2 Gasification Program Goal "Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness" Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy November 2010 The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards 3 Oxygen Membrane - APCI - 25% capital cost reduction - 5.0% COE reduction Warm Gas Cleaning - RTI in combination with H 2 /CO 2 Membrane - Eltron - 2.9 % pt efficiency increase - 12% COE decrease Oxygen CO 2 H 2 rich stream Water Gas Shift*

117

NETL: Gasification Systems - High Temperature Syngas Cleanup...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

construct the project and sequester the CO2. The Polk Power Station, an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, will supply a portion of its coal-derived syngas...

118

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

runs a very active Carbon Storage Program as a companion strategic activity to gasification, under the Coal and Power Systems Program. Also, see the Carbon Sequestration...

119

Gasification … Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

th th Annual International Colloquium on Environmentally Preferred Advanced Power Generation, Costa Mesa, CA, February 7, 2012 An Overview of U.S. DOE's Gasification Systems Program Jenny B. Tennant Technology Manager - Gasification 2 Gasification Program Goal "Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness" Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy November 2010 The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards 3 U.S. Coal Resources Low rank: lignite and sub-bituminous coal - About 50% of the U.S. coal reserves - Nearly 50% of U.S. coal production - Lower sulfur Bituminous coal

120

NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

1963-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Peat-Gasification Pilot-Plant Program. Final report, April 9, 1980-March 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was twofold: (1) to modify an existing pilot plant and (2) to operate the pilot plant with peat to produce substitute natural gas (SNG). Activities included the design, procurement, and installation of peat drying, grinding, screening, and lockhopper feed systems. Equipment installed for the program complements the existing pilot plant facility. After shakedown of the new feed preparation equipment (drying, screening, and crushing) was successfully completed, the first integrated pilot plant test was conducted in April 1981 to provide solids flow data and operating experience with the new PEATGAS gasifier configuration. Three gasification tests were subsequently conducted using the existing slurry feed system. The lockhopper feed system, capable of providing a continuous, measured flow of 1 to 4 tons of dry feed at pressures up to 500 psig, was then successfully integrated with the gasifier. Two gasification tests were conducted, expanding the data to more economical operating conditions. The operation of the PEATGAS pilot plant has confirmed that peat is an excellent raw material for SNG production. Peat conversions over 90% were consistently achieved at moderate gasification temperatures and at sinter-free conditions. A large data base was established for Minnesota peat at pressure 1.0. The technical feasibility of the PEATGAS process has been successfully demonstrated. However, an economic assessment of the peat gasification process indicates that the cost of the peat feedstock delivered to a plant site has a significant effect on the cost of the product SNG. 28 figures, 36 tables.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT--DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the technoeconomic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. Phase I Task 6 activities of Preliminary Site Analysis were documented and reported as a separate Topical Report on February 2003. Most of the other technical activities were on hold pending on DOE's announcement of the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) awards. WMPI was awarded one of the CCPI projects in late January 2003 to engineer, construct and operate a first-of-kind gasification/liquefaction facility in the U.S. as a continued effort for the current WMPI EECP engineering feasibility study. Since then, project technical activities were focused on: (1) planning/revising the existing EECP work scope for transition into CCPI, and (2) ''jump starting'' all environmentally related work in pursue of NEPA and PA DEP permitting approval.

John W. Rich

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

New baseload power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a tabulation of the results of this magazines survey of current plans for new baseload power plants. The table lists the unit name, capacity, fuel, engineering firm, constructor, suppliers for steam generator, turbine generator and flue gas desulfurization equipment, date due on-line, and any non-utility participants. The table includes fossil-fuel plants, nuclear plants, geothermal, biomass and hydroelectric plants.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Theoretical investigation of selected trace elements in coal gasification plants. Final report Mar 78-Nov 79  

SciTech Connect

The report gives results of a theoretical investigation of the disposition of five volatile trace elements (arsenic, boron, lead, selenium, and mercury) in SNG-producing coal gasification plants. Three coal gasification processes (dry-bottom Lurgi, Koppers-Totzek, and HYGAS) were investigated to examine the possible effects of gasifier operation conditions on the speciation of the volatile trace elements. Results of this investigation suggest that none of the trace elements considered in this study will be present in the product SNG from a coal gasification plant, but will be removed from the fuel gas by various unit operations. Results also suggest that speciation of these volatile trace elements is not significantly affected by gasifier conditions.

Hill, A.H.; Anderson, G.L.; Fleming, D.K.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Biomass waste gasification - Can be the two stage process suitable for tar reduction and power generation?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of one stage (co-current) and two stage gasification of wood pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Original arrangement with grate-less reactor and upward moving bed of the pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two stage gasification leads to drastic reduction of tar content in gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One stage gasification produces gas with higher LHV at lower overall ER. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Content of ammonia in gas is lower in two stage moving bed gasification. - Abstract: A pilot scale gasification unit with novel co-current, updraft arrangement in the first stage and counter-current downdraft in the second stage was developed and exploited for studying effects of two stage gasification in comparison with one stage gasification of biomass (wood pellets) on fuel gas composition and attainable gas purity. Significant producer gas parameters (gas composition, heating value, content of tar compounds, content of inorganic gas impurities) were compared for the two stage and the one stage method of the gasification arrangement with only the upward moving bed (co-current updraft). The main novel features of the gasifier conception include grate-less reactor, upward moving bed of biomass particles (e.g. pellets) by means of a screw elevator with changeable rotational speed and gradual expanding diameter of the cylindrical reactor in the part above the upper end of the screw. The gasifier concept and arrangement are considered convenient for thermal power range 100-350 kW{sub th}. The second stage of the gasifier served mainly for tar compounds destruction/reforming by increased temperature (around 950 Degree-Sign C) and for gasification reaction of the fuel gas with char. The second stage used additional combustion of the fuel gas by preheated secondary air for attaining higher temperature and faster gasification of the remaining char from the first stage. The measurements of gas composition and tar compound contents confirmed superiority of the two stage gasification system, drastic decrease of aromatic compounds with two and higher number of benzene rings by 1-2 orders. On the other hand the two stage gasification (with overall ER = 0.71) led to substantial reduction of gas heating value (LHV = 3.15 MJ/Nm{sup 3}), elevation of gas volume and increase of nitrogen content in fuel gas. The increased temperature (>950 Degree-Sign C) at the entrance to the char bed caused also substantial decrease of ammonia content in fuel gas. The char with higher content of ash leaving the second stage presented only few mass% of the inlet biomass stream.

Sulc, Jindrich; Stojdl, Jiri; Richter, Miroslav; Popelka, Jan [Faculty of the Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, Kralova Vysina 7, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Svoboda, Karel, E-mail: svoboda@icpf.cas.cz [Faculty of the Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, Kralova Vysina 7, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the ASCR, v.v.i., Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Smetana, Jiri; Vacek, Jiri [D.S.K. Ltd., Ujezdecek - Dukla 264, 415 01 Teplice I (Czech Republic); Skoblja, Siarhei; Buryan, Petr [Dept. of Gas, Coke and Air protection, Institute of Chemical Technol., Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Gasification world database 2007. Current industry status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on trends and drivers affecting the growth of the gasification industry is provided based on information in the USDOE NETL world gasification database (available on the www.netl.doe.gov website). Sectors cover syngas production in 2007, growth planned through 2010, recent industry changes, and beyond 2010 - strong growth anticipated in the United States. A list of gasification-based power plant projects, coal-to-liquid projects and coal-to-SNG projects under consideration in the USA is given.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gasifier Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Program Gasification Systems Program Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products more easily with gasification-based technologies compared to conventional combustion of solid feedstocks. Gasification can generate clean power, and by adding steam to the syngas and performing water-gas-shift to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2), additional hydrogen can be produced. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for enhanced oil recovery (see Gasification Systems Program Research and Development Areas figure). In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Furthermore, polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies.

128

Phased Construction of Natural Gas Combined-Cycle Plants with Coal Gasification and CO2 Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a brief review of technologies and key issues involved in a phased construction approach for a low-emission integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) plant where carbon dioxide (CO2) removal for use or sequestration can be added at a later date.

2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE November 9, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A database just released by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documents the worldwide growth of gasification, the expected technology of choice for future coal-based plants that produce power, fuels, and/or chemicals with near-zero emissions. The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database, a comprehensive collection of gasification plant data, describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas

130

Cost and performance analysis of biomass-based integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To make a significant contribution to the power mix in the United States biomass power systems must be competitive on a cost and efficiency basis. We describe the cost and performance of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. The economic viability and efficiency performance of the IGCC generation technology appear to be quite attractive.

Craig, K. R.; Mann, M. K.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Power Plant Closure Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations that are planning to decommission an aged power plant face a host of issues that must be addressed and many tasks that must be properly executed in order to ensure a successful closure of the facility.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

NETL: Gasification - National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier Optimization Main Area Gasifier Optimization Main Area National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Southern Company Services, Inc. Project Number: FE0000749 Project Description The objective of this project is to develop technologies under realistic conditions that will reduce the cost of advanced coal-fueled power plants with CO2 capture. This technology development will include the design, procurement, construction, installation, and operation of a flexible facility for the testing of processes for pre-combustion CO2 capture, post-combustion CO2 capture and oxy-combustion. Components and systems that are appropriate for inclusion in the detailed test plan will be identified in collaboration with NETL. In addition to evaluating DOE sponsored projects; projects from industry, universities, and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) will be evaluated to assist in accomplishing the project objectives.

133

NETL: Power Plant Improvement Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPII Major Demonstrations Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) The Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) was established in October 2000 to further the commercial-scale...

134

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY - Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY August 2005 Revised May 2007 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Gasification Technology Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Project Manager: James R. Longanbach Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Norma J. Kuehn Ronald L. Schoff Vladimir Vaysman Jay S. White Power Plant Water Usage and Loss Study i August 2005 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...................................................................................................................... I LIST OF TABLES.............................................................................................................................III

135

Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant January 19, 2012 - 5:00pm Addthis Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon dioxide produced are among the technologies being used in the Texas Clean Energy Project. | Photo courtesy of llnlphotos. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon

136

Transient studies of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

Next-generation coal-fired power plants need to consider the option for CO2 capture as stringent governmental mandates are expected to be issued in near future. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are more efficient than the conventional coal combustion processes when the option for CO2 capture is considered. However, no IGCC plant with CO2 capture currently exists in the world. Therefore, it is important to consider the operability and controllability issues of such a plant before it is commercially built. To facilitate this objective, a detailed plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture has been developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign}. The plant considers a General Electric Energy (GEE)-type downflow radiant-only gasifier followed by a quench section. A two-stage water gas shift (WGS) reaction is considered for conversion of CO to CO2. A two-stage acid gas removal (AGR) process based on a physical solvent is simulated for selective capture of H2S and CO2. Compression of the captured CO2 for sequestration, an oxy-Claus process for removal of H2S and NH3, black water treatment, and the sour water treatment are also modeled. The tail gas from the Claus unit is recycled to the SELEXOL unit. The clean syngas from the AGR process is sent to a gas turbine followed by a heat recovery steam generator. This turbine is modeled as per published data in the literature. Diluent N2 is used from the elevated-pressure ASU for reducing the NOx formation. The heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is modeled by considering generation of high-pressure, intermediate-pressure, and low-pressure steam. All of the vessels, reactors, heat exchangers, and the columns have been sized. The basic IGCC process control structure has been synthesized by standard guidelines and existing practices. The steady state results are validated with data from a commercial gasifier. In the future grid-connected system, the plant should satisfy the environmental targets and quality of the feed to other sections, wherever applicable, without violating the operating constraints, and without sacrificing the efficiency. However, it was found that the emission of acid gases may far exceed the environmental targets and the overshoot of some of the key variables may be unacceptable under transient operation while following the load. A number of operational strategies and control configurations is explored for achieving these stringent requirements. The transient response of the plant is also studied by perturbing a number of key inputs.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Evaluation of 450-MWe BGL GCC Power Plants Fueled With Pittsburgh No. 8 Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed design and cost estimates have been developed for conventionally and highly integrated 450-MWe, British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plants employing two General Electric (GE) MS-7001F gas turbines and fueled with Pittsburgh No. 8 coal. The plants have attractive heat rates and capital costs that are competitive with conventional coal-based power technology.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evaluation of a 510-MWe Destec GCC Power Plant Fueled with Illinois No. 6 Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed design and cost estimate has been developed for a 510-MWe, conventionally integrated, Destec gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plant employing two General Electric (GE) MS-7001F gas turbines and fueled with Illinois no. 6 coal. The plant has an attractive heat rate and a capital cost that is competitive with conventional coal-based power technology.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

139

Coal gasification players, projects, prospects  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been running refineries and chemical plants for decades. Power applications have dotted the globe. Two major IGCC demonstration plants operating in the United States since the mid-1900s have helped set the stage for prime time, which is now approaching. Two major reference plant designs are in the wings and at least two major US utilities are poised to build their own IGCC power plants. 2 figs.

Blankinship, S.

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

NETL: Gasification - Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants General Electric Company Project Number: FE0007859 Project Description General...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NETL: Gasification Systems - Studies to Improve Plant Availability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost Project No.: DE-FE0007859 General Electric Company (GE) is studying the feasibility of improving plant...

142

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

143

Tampa Electric Company Polk Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plant Carbon Capture Retrofit Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Industry Technology Demonstration Program on Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with carbon capture and storage (CCS), an engineering study was conducted to evaluate the cost and performance impacts of various CCS schemes at the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station. The portion of the work presented here was funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) IGCC with CCS demonstration program collaborative and focuses on novel CO2 capture and purification systems integrated...

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

NETL: Gasification Systems - Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and storage (CCS) for future coal-based power plants, and in a CCS integrated gasification plant, relatively pure, high pressure CO2 stream(s) will be available within the...

145

Comparative study of effluents and their control from four dry ash Lurgi gasification plants  

SciTech Connect

The four coal gasification plants reviewed are the ones proposed by the El Paso Natural Gas Company, the WESCO Gasification Company in New Mexico, the Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America, and the ANG Coal Gasification Company in North Dakota. This study was undertaken in order to review the nature and the amounts of the effluent emitted into the environment, to determine the cost of controlling undesirable effluents, to review water treatment facilities and pollution control technologies, to discover the projected capital and operating costs for the plants, and to identify control technology research needs. The fixed capital investment and the direct operating costs for equipment to control emission of potentially harmful effluents, such as H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/, hydrocarbons, coal dust, particulates, ashes, sludges, COS, CS/sub 2/, CO, and H/sub 2/ were estimated according to the design information provided by the gasification companies. The reuse water treatment systems were reviewed. The work has revealed that the weakest portions of the designs rest in water reuse and sulfur control technology. In the authors' judgements, there is a good probability that existing technology can be utilized to meet the zero liquid discharge and existing gaseous emission requirements for the proposed gasification facilities with minimal upset. However, the technology for internal water reuse is not well established, and these streams can be expected to have characteristics other than those projected. Stretford and Claus technology for sulfur removal exists and, in our judgement, has a good probability of meeting existing guidelines and regulations. Some operating data are available for high CO/sub 2/, low H/sub 2/S, streams; these data are not available in the literature at this time. Recommendations for research have been made.

Somerville, M.H.; Elder, J.L.; Baria, D.N.; Hung, Y.T.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for New Hydrogen Power Plant | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for New Hydrogen Power Plant DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for New Hydrogen Power Plant DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for New Hydrogen Power Plant November 6, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has signed a cooperative agreement with Hydrogen Energy California LLC (HECA) to build and demonstrate a hydrogen-powered electric generating facility, complete with carbon capture and storage, in Kern County, Calif. The new plant is a step toward commercialization of a clean technology that enables use of our country's vast fossil energy resources while addressing the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. HECA, which is owned by Hydrogen Energy International, BP Alternative Energy, and Rio Tinto, plans to construct an advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant that will produce power by

147

Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

A brief general description is given of a geothermal resource. Geothermal exploration in the Takinoue area is reviewed. Geothermal drilling procedures are described. The history of the development at the Takinoue area (the Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant), and the geothermal fluid characteristics are discussed. The technical specifications of the Kakkonda facility are shown. Photographs and drawings of the facility are included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

149

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

150

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

151

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

152

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

153

Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

154

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

155

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

156

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

157

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

158

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

159

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

160

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

162

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

163

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

164

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

165

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

166

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

167

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

168

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

169

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

170

Advanced Coal Power Plant Model (ACCPM) Version 1.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the purchase of a license for the appropriate SimTech IPSEpro modules and library, users can quickly generate performance and capital cost estimates of new, advanced coal power plants. The application allows users to screen integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies prior to engaging in more extensive studies of their preferred choice. Such screening activities generally require sophisticated software and qualified staff to run the models, which takes time and significant investment....

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Coal-Fired Power Plant with Zero Atmospheric Emissions  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the thermodynamic analysis of a coal-based zero-atmospheric emissions electric power plant. The approach involves an oxygen-blown coal gasification unit. The resulting synthetic gas (syngas) is combusted with oxygen in a gas generator to produce the working fluid for the turbines. The combustion produces a gas mixture composed almost entirely of steam and carbon dioxide. These gases drive multiple turbines to produce electricity. The turbine discharge gases pass to a condenser where water is captured. A stream of carbon dioxide then results that can be used for enhanced oil recovery, or for sequestration. This analysis is based on a 400 MW electric power generating plant that uses turbines that are currently under development by a U.S. turbine manufacturer. The power plant has a net thermal efficiency of 42.6%. This efficiency is based on the lower heating value of the coal, and includes the energy necessary for coal gasification, air separation and for carbon dioxide separation and sequestration. The paper also presents an analysis of the cost of electricity (COE) and the cost of conditioning carbon dioxide for sequestration for the 400 MW power plant. Electricity cost is compared for three different gasification processes (Texaco, Shell, and Koppers-Totzek) and two types of coals (Illinois No.6 and Wyodak). Cost of electricity ranges from 5.16 {cents}/kWhr to 5.42 {cents}/kWhr, indicating that the cost of electricity varies by 5% for the three gasification processes considered and the two coal types used.

Martinez-Frias, J; Aceves, S M; Smith, J R; Brandt, H

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

172

Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

173

IMPROVEMENTS IN POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A power plant for nuclear reactors is designed for improved cycle efficiency. In addition to the usual heat exchanger for heat transfer from gaseous reactor coolant to water for vaporization, a second heat exchanger is provided between the first heat exchanger and a point betwveen the intermediate- pressure and low-pressure turbine stages. In this way, interstage reheating of the steam is obtained without passage of the steam back to the first heat exchanger. (D.L.C.) Research Reactors

Peters, M.C.

1961-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

174

NEUTRONIC REACTOR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a nuclear reactor power plant incorporating an air-cooled, beryllium oxide-moderated, pebble bed reactor. According to the invention means are provided for circulating a flow of air through tubes in the reactor to a turbine and for directing a sidestream of the circu1ating air through the pebble bed to remove fission products therefrom as well as assist in cooling the reactor. (AEC)

Metcalf, H.E.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

175

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Saguargo Solar Power Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Developer Solargenix Location Red Rock, Arizona Coordinates 32.54795°, -111.292887° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.54795,"lon":-111.292887,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

176

An evaluaton of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 2, Sensitivity studies and appendixes: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute contracted with Bechtel Group, Inc., to provide an evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD). A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The study confirms that the Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. In addition, coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from combustion and gasification of coal an equilibriumHolysh, M. 2005. Coke Gasification: Advanced technology forfrom a Coal-Fired Gasification Plant. Final Report, December

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

NETL: Power Plant Improvement Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Performance Summaries Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) Project Performance Summaries Project Performance Summaries are written after project completion. These...

179

NETL: News Release - World Gasification Database Now Available...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9, 2010 World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE Database Consolidates World's Gasification Plant Information, Illustrates Growth of Gasification Industry Washington,...

180

LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates December 14, 2011 Mike Dunne LLNL #12;NIf-1111-23714.ppt LIFE power plant 2 #12;LIFE delivery timescale NIf-1111-23714.ppt 3 #12;Timely delivery is enabled near-term, NIF based, NIC-derivative fusion performance § 3 allows small, thin Fresnel lenses ­ enables

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Great Plains coal gasification project - historical overview and progress  

SciTech Connect

The first commercial scale coal gasification plant in the US is nearing completion in North Dakota. The plant shares the site and other facilities with the Basin Electric Power Station. The gasification plant will draw its power directly from the Basin substation and Basin will receive coal fines from the gasification plant. (Coal fines cannot be gasified in the Lurgi units.) Planning, loan guarantee commitments, scheduling of construction, labor relations, and current situation are all briefly discussed. A table of project statistics is included.

Deeths, W.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A LUNAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A concept of a nuclear power plant to be assembled on earth and operated on the moon is presented. The two principal design objectives are reliability and high specific power. Wherever there is an incompatibility between these two objectives, the decision favors reliability. The design is based on the premise that the power plant must be designed on the basis of current technology and with a minimum amount of research and development. The principal components consist of a fast reactor in a direct cycle with a mercury-vapor turbine. The high- frequency generator, hydrogen compressor for the generator cooling system, mercury-recirculating pump, and condensate pump are on an extension of the turbine shaft. Ths mercury vapor is condensed and the hydrogen cooled in wing radiators. The reactor is of a construction quite similar to EBR-I Mark IlI for which there is a large amount of operating experience. The radiator is a vertical tube-and-fin type built in concentric cylindrical sections of increseing diameter. The curved headers are connected by swivel joints so that, upon arrival, the radiator can be quickly unfolded from the compact cylindrical package it formed during transportation. (auth)

Armstrong, R.H.; Carter, J.C.; Hummel, H.H.; Janicke, M.J.; Marchaterre, J.F.

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

184

NETL: Gasifipedia - What is Gasification?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Background Gasification Background Drivers for Gasification Technology The need for low-cost power produced in an environmentally sound way is certain, even if the future of regulations limiting the emission and/or encouraging the capture of CO2, and the price and availability of natural gas and oil are not. Gasification is not only capable of efficiently producing electric power, but a wide range of liquids and/or high-value chemicals (including diesel and gasoline for transportation) can be produced from cleaned syngas, providing the flexibility to capitalize on a range of dynamic changes to either domestic energy markets or global economic conditions. Polygeneration-plants that produce multiple products-is uniquely possible with gasification technologies. Continued advances in gasification-based technology will enable the conversion of our nation's abundant coal reserves into energy resources (power and liquid fuels), chemicals, and fertilizers needed to displace the use of imported oil and, thereby, help mitigate its high price and security supply concerns and to support U.S. economic competitiveness with unprecedented environmental performance.

185

NETL: Gasification Systems - Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) Project No.: DE-FC21-90MC25140 Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) Project ID: DE-FC21-90MC25140 NETL Contact: Morgan Mosser (304) 285-4723 Organization: Southern Company Services, Inc. - Birmingham, AL Project Timeline: Start: 09/14/1990 End: 01/31/2009 Power Systems Development Facility The objectives of the work at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) are two-fold; development of the Transport Gasifier for a wide range of US coals from high sodium lignite to Midwestern bituminous and provide a test platform to test various critical components that are likely to appear in future advanced coal-based power facilities producing power and fuels such as hydrogen with zero emissions. With regard to the development of the

186

Kansas refinery starts up coke gasification unit  

SciTech Connect

Texaco Refining and Marketing Inc. has started up a gasification unit at its El Dorado, Kan., refinery. The unit gasifies delayed coke and other refinery waste products. This is the first refinery to install a coke-fueled gasification unit for power generation. Start-up of the $80-million gasification-based power plant was completed in mid-June. The gasifier produces syngas which, along with natural gas, fuels a combustion turbine. The turbine produces virtually 100% of the refinery`s electricity needs and enough heat to generate 40% of its steam requirements.

Rhodes, A.K.

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

2009 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Engineering Economic Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2009 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Design Considerations for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture (1015690) contains engineering and economic evaluations of state-of-the-art integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant designs available for near-term deployment. The study assessed the expected performance and costs of coal-fed IGCC power plants before and after retrofit for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. The study evaluated paired ca...

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process Catalytic Coal Gasification Process for the Production of Methane-Rich Syngas Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Production of Methane-Rich Syngas from Fuels Using Multi-functional Catalyst/Capture Agent." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Reducing pollution emitted by coal and waste power plants in an economically viable manner and building power plants that co-generate fuels and chemicals during times of low electricity demand are pressing goals for the energy industry. One way to achieve these goals in an economically viable manner is through the use of a catalytic gasifier that

190

Gasification Technology Status September 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concern over the continued availability of natural gas at competitive prices has led many power companies to initiate studies and projects on clean coal technologies as a strategic hedge against over-reliance on natural gas alone to provide future power needs. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants can meet very stringent emissions targets, including those for mercury and carbon dioxide (CO2). Several years of commercial operation have been accumulated on coal based IGCC plants in the Unite...

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

191

Estimates of the value of carbon dioxide from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a framework and methodology for estimating the value of carbon dioxide produced by the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant. The petroleum industry could use this CO/sub 2/ as a solvent for enhanced oil recovery. The value of CO/sub 2/ is found to be a function of the geological characteristics of the petroleum reservoirs being flooded, the cost of transporting the CO/sub 2/, and the presence or absence of competitors selling CO/sub 2/. Carbon dioxide demand curves for oil fields in Montana and North Dakota are developed for various economic conditions, and sensitivity analyses are performed. 22 refs., 4 figs., 21 tabs.

Wolsky, A.M.; Nelson, S.H.; Jankowski, D.J.

1985-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

192

Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

193

Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes several approaches to reduce the costs and enhance the performance of geothermal power generation plants. Electricity supply planners, research program managers, and engineers evaluating geothermal power plant additions or modifications can use this report to compare today's geothermal power systems to several near- and long-term future options.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

195

Analysis of pipe failure for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rupture of a carbon steel elbow in the methanation area of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant resulted in a fire and plant shutdown. The failure was investigated by personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ANG Associates, the plant operators. These studies consisted of an on-site inspection and extensive laboratory examination that included optical metallography, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray diffraction, chemical analyses, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). It was concluded that operation of a heat exchanger under off-specification conditions contributed to higher than design temperatures, lower than design pressures, and higher than design concentrations of carbon dioxide and water in the exit line from a condensate separator. Together, these conditions produced high levels of carbonic acid and higher than design velocities resulting in severe corrosion of the carbon steel. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Keiser, J.R.; Mayotte, J.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Dias, O.C. (Amoco Research Center, Naperville, IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Economic feasibility study of a wood gasification-based methanol plant: A subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an economic feasibility study for a wood-gasification-based methanol plant. The objectives were to evaluate the current commercial potential of a small-scale, wood-fed methanol plant using the SERI oxygen-blown, pressurized, down-draft gasifier technology and to identify areas requiring further R and D. The gasifier gas composition and material balance were based on a computer model of the SERI gasifier since acceptable test data were not available. The estimated capital cost was based on the Nth plant constructed. Given the small size and commercial nature of most of the equipment, N was assumed to be between 5 and 10. Only large discrepancies in gasifier output would result in significant charges in capital costs. 47 figs., 55 tabs.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

ATOMIC POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to neutronic reactor power plants and discloses a design of a reactor utilizing a mixture of discrete units of a fissionable material, such as uranium carbide, a neutron moderator material, such as graphite, to carry out the chain reaction. A liquid metal, such as bismuth, is used as the coolant and is placed in the reactor chamber with the fissionable and moderator material so that it is boiled by the heat of the reaction, the boiling liquid and vapors passing up through the interstices between the discrete units. The vapor and flue gases coming off the top of the chamber are passed through heat exchangers, to produce steam, for example, and thence through condensers, the condensed coolant being returned to the chamber by gravity and the non- condensible gases being carried off through a stack at the top of the structure.

Daniels, F.

1957-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Evaluation of cooling tower and wastewater treatment operations at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide a technical assessment of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant Wastewater Treatment System. This Scope of Work consisted of five primary tasks described as follows: Task 1 - Determine the quantity of hydantoins in the stripped gas liquor (SGL), their precursors, and the kinetics of their formation in condensed liquor for the Great Plains Gasification Associates (GPGA) gasification facility. The University of North Dakota Energy Research Center (UNDERC) has measured a high concentration of hydantoins in the gas liquor from their slagging gasifier. UNDERC has tested the use of SGL in a pilot cooling tower and they witnessed some adverse effects in the cooling tower and heat exchanger systems. Task 2 - Investigate the adverse Department of Energy (DOE) findings at UNDERC with regard to corrosion, foaming, biological and organic fouling, chemical attack on concrete and organic emissions resulting from the use of SGL in a pilot plant cooling tower. Task 3 - Validate the heat load on the cooling tower for both summer and winter operation and determine the adequacy of the surge pond to store the maximum predicted amount of excess water accumulated during winter operation. Task 4 - Assess potential fouling, foaming and organic carry-over problems associated with operability of the multiple-effect evaporator and develop recommendations on possible alternate use of evaporator condensate to alleviate possible problems in disposing of excess wastewater. Task 5 - Provide DOE with recommendations on the wastewater treatment backup design and test program already committed to by GPGA. This paper presents Fluor's findings regarding the five primary tasks. 12 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Lang, R.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1, Unit 2","1,705","13,994",100.0,"Calvert Cliffs Nuclear PP Inc" "1 Plant 2...

200

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

2010 Worldwide Gasification Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers. [Copied from http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/coalpower/gasification/worlddatabase/index.html

202

Development of Virtual Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virtual Power Plants We are working in the emerging intersection between information, computation, and complexity Applications * Design * Environmental modeling * Controls with...

203

Research Addressing Power Plant Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Power Plant Water Management to Minimize Water Use while Providing Reliable Electricity Generation Water and Energy 2 Water and Energy are inextricably linked. Because...

204

MEASUREMENT OF POWER PLANT EXHAUST ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... by tracking propagation of acoustic plane waves in a ... of the robustness of plane wave propagation to ... for GHG monitoring in power plant stacks and ...

205

Fossil Energy Power Plant Desk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Power Plant Desk Reference Revision 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity October 18, 2011 DOENETL-20111516 Preliminary - Do Not Cite or Quote Fossil...

206

Biomass Gasification Technology Commercialization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable cost and performance data on biomass gasification technology is scarce because of limited experience with utility-scale gasification projects and the reluctance of vendors to share proprietary information. The lack of this information is a major obstacle to the implementation of biomass gasification-based power projects in the U.S. market. To address this problem, this report presents four case studies for bioenergy projects involving biomass gasification technologies: A utility-scale indirect c...

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses Test Campaign TC11 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). Test run TC11 began on April 7, 2003, with startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until April 18, 2003, when a gasifier upset forced the termination of the test run. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,650 and 1,800 F at pressures from 160 to 200 psig during air-blown operations and around 135 psig during enriched-air operations. Due to a restriction in the oxygen-fed lower mixing zone (LMZ), the majority of the test run featured air-blown operations.

Southern Company Services

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Analysis of pipe failure at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The rupture of a carbon steel elbow in the methanation area of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant resulted in a fire and plant shutdown. Failure studies consisted of an on-site inspection and an extensive laboratory examination that included light metallography, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, chemical analyses, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. It was concluded that operation of a heat exchanger under off-specification conditions contributed to higher than design temperatures, lower than design pressures, and higher than design concentrations of carbon dioxide and water in the exit line from a condensate separator. Together, these conditions produced high levels of carbonic acid and higher than design velocities resulting in severe corrosion of the carbon steel.

Keiser, J.R.; Mayotte, J.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dias, O.C. (Amoco Oil Co., Texas City, TX (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC07  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses Test Campaign TC07 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC07. Prior to TC07, the Transport Reactor was modified to allow operations as an oxygen-blown gasifier. Test Run TC07 was started on December 11, 2001, and the sand circulation tests (TC07A) were completed on December 14, 2001. The coal-feed tests (TC07B-D) were started on January 17, 2002 and completed on April 5, 2002. Due to operational difficulties with the reactor, the unit was taken offline several times. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,700 and 1,780 F at pressures from 200 to 240 psig. In TC07, 679 hours of solid circulation and 442 hours of coal feed, 398 hours with PRB coal and 44 hours with coal from the Calumet mine, and 33 hours of coke breeze feed were attained. Reactor operations were problematic due to instrumentation problems in the LMZ resulting in much higher than desired operating temperatures in the reactor. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable and the modifications to the lower part of the gasifier performed well while testing the gasifier with PRB coal feed.

Southern Company Services

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

210

Uniform power plant identification system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the seventies in the Federal Republic of Germany a uniform power plant identification system (Kraftwerks-Kennzeichen-System, KKS) was developed and introduced. It allows to keep the identification by all engineering disciplines from planning to waste management for any type of power plant. The paper explains the historical development, the structure and the application of this system.

Christiansen, W. (RWE Energie AG, Hauptverwaltung, Essen (DE)); Pannenbacker, K. (GABO mbH, Erlangen (DE)); Popp, H. (Siemens AG, Bereich Anlagentechnik, Erlangen (DE)); Seltmann, A. (ABB Kraftwerke AG, Mannheim (DE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Process designs and cost estimates for a medium Btu gasification plant using a wood feedstock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasification plant to effect the conversion of wood to medium-Btu gas has been designed. The Purox gasifier and associated equipment were selected as a prototype, since this system is nearer to commercialization than others considered. The object was to determine the cost of those processing steps common to all gasification schemes and to identify specific research areas. A detailed flowsheet and mass-balance are presented. Capital investment statements for three plant sizes (400, 800, 1,600 oven-dry tons per day) are included along with manufacturing costs for each of these plants at three feedstock prices: $10, $20, $30 per green ton (or $20, $40, $60 per dry ton). The design incorporates a front-end handling system, package cryogenic oxygen plant, the Purox gasifier, a gas-cleaning train consisting of a spray scrubber, ionizing wet scrubber, and condenser, and a wastewater treatment facility including a cooling tower and a package activated sludge unit. Cost figures for package units were obtained from suppliers and used for the oxygen and wastewater treatment plants. The gasifier is fed with wood chips at 20% moisture (wet basis). For each pound of wood, 0.32 lb of oxygen are required, and 1.11 lb of gas are produced. The heating value of the gas product is 300 Btu/scf. For each Btu of energy input (feed + process energy) to the plant, 0.91 Btu exists with the product gas. Total capital investments required for the plants considered are $9, $15, and $24 million (1978) respectively. In each case, the oxygen plant represents about 50% of the total investment. For feedstock prices from $10 to $30 per green ton ($1.11 to $3.33 per MM Btu), break-even costs of fuel gas range from $3 to $7 per MM Btu. At $30/ton, the feedstock cost represents approximately 72% of the total product cost for the largest plant size; at $10/ton, it represents only 47% of product cost.

Desrosiers, R. E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Evaluation of Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Plants with CO2 Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report presents initial results of an ongoing study of the potential cost of electricity (COE) produced in both conventional and innovative fossil fueled power plants that incorporate carbon dioxide (CO2) removal for subsequent sequestration or use. The baseline cases are natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) and ultra-supercritical pulverized coal (PC) plants, with and without post combustion CO2 removal, and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants, with and without pre-combustion ...

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

NETL Water and Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Power Plants Review Water and Power Plants Review A review meeting was held on June 20, 2006 of the NETL Water and Power Plants research program at the Pittsburgh NETL site. Thomas Feeley, Technology Manager for the Innovations for Existing Plants Program, gave background information and an overview of the Innovations for Existing Plants Water Program. Ongoing/Ending Projects Alternative Water Sources Michael DiFilippo, a consultant for EPRI, presented results from the project "Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities". John Rodgers, from Clemson University, presented results from the project "An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation".

214

NETL: Clean Coal Power Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural Gas Resources Contacts Coal & Power Systems Major Demonstrations Innovations for Existing Plants Gasification...

215

Progress in carbon dioxide capture and separation research for gasification-based power generation point sources  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the present work is to investigate novel approaches, materials, and molecules for the abatement of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the pre-combustion stage of gasification-based power generation point sources. The capture/separation step for CO2 from large point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the Office of Research and Development of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the present research is focused on the capture/separation of carbon dioxide from fuel gas (precombustion gas) from processes such as the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process. For such applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical sorption, chemical sorption with solid sorbents, and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, processes based on dry, regenerable sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

Pennline, H.; Luebke, D.; Jones, K.; Myers, C.; Morsi, B.; Heintz, Y.; Ilconich, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

2012 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Research and Development Roadmap - PUBLIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second generation of integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants is now being built or planned following nearly two decades of commercial demonstration at multiple units. State-of-the-art IGCC plants have efficiencies equivalent to that of pulverized coal power plants while exhibiting equal or superior environmental performance and lower water usage. Pre-combustion CO2 capture technology is commercially available and has been demonstrated in several gasification plants, ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen Oxygen Commercial Technologies for Oxygen Production Gasification processes require an oxidant, most commonly oxygen; less frequently air or just steam may suffice as the gasification agent depending on the process. Oxygen-blown systems have the advantage of minimizing the size of the gasification reactor and its auxiliary process systems. However, the oxygen for the process must be separated from the atmosphere. Commercial large-scale air separation plants are based on cryogenic distillation technology, capable of supplying oxygen at high purity1 and pressure. This technology is well understood, having been in practice for over 75 years. Cryogenic air separation is recognized for its reliability, and it can be designed for high capacity (up to 5,000 tons per day).

218

Development of a Segregated Municipal Solid Waste Gasification System for Electrical Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasification technologies are expected to play a key role in the future of solid waste management since the conversion of municipal and industrial solid wastes to a gaseous fuel significantly increases its value. Municipal solid waste (MSW) gasification for electrical power generation was conducted in a fluidized bed gasifier and the feasibility of using a control system was evaluated to facilitate its management and operation. The performance of an engine using the gas produced was evaluated. A procedure was also tested to upgrade the quality of the gas and optimize its production. The devices installed and automated control system developed was able to achieve and maintain the set conditions for optimum gasification. The most important parameters of reaction temperature and equivalence ratio were fully controlled. Gas production went at a rate of 4.00 kg min-1 with a yield of 2.78 m3 kg-1 of fuel and a heating value (HV) of 7.94 MJ Nm-3. Within the set limits of the tests, the highest production of synthesis gas and the net heating value of 8.97 MJ Nm-3 resulted from gasification at 725C and ER of 0.25 which was very close to the predicted value of 7.47 MJ Nm-3. This was not affected by temperature but significantly affected by the equivalence ratio. The overall engine-generator efficiency at 7.5 kW electrical power load was lower at 19.81% for gasoline fueled engine compared to 35.27% for synthesis gas. The pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system increased the net heating value of the product gas by an average of 38% gas over that of inlet gas. There were no traces of carbon dioxide in the product gas indicating that it had been completely adsorbed by the system. MSW showed relatively lower fouling and slagging tendencies than cotton gin trash (CGT) and dairy manure (DM). This was further supported by the compressive strength measurements of the ash of MSW, CGT and DM and the EDS elemental analysis of the MSW ash.

Maglinao, Amado Latayan

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a giv

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant start-up and modification report. [Lurgi Process  

SciTech Connect

This report will help in designing future coal conversion plants by documenting the areas which need additional research to obtain more reliable process data, more careful planning and equipment selection. The scope of this report is to: describe the problem with the particular process or item of equipment; identify the modification that was implemented to correct the problem; evaluate the impacts of the modification; and document the cost of the modification. Contents include the following: (1) process modifications (coal, oxygen and steam, gasification and gas processing, sulfur recovery, flare system, liquid processing, ash handling and solids disposal, other systems); (2) start-up schedule; (3) SNG production; (4) environmental data; and (5) cost data.

Miller, W.R.; Honea, F.I.; Lang, R.A.; Berty, T.E.; Delaney, R.C.; Hospodarec, R.W.; Mako, P.F.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Testing Kentucky Coal to Set Design Criteria for a Lurgi Gasification Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tri-State Synfuels Company, in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Kentucky, undertook a comprehensive coal testing program to support the development of an indirect coal liquefaction project. One of the major elements of the program was a commercial scale gasification test with Kentucky 9 coal in a Lurgi Mark IV dry-bottom gasifier at the Sasol One Plant in Sasolburg, Republic of South Africa, in 1981. The test was conducted to confirm the operability of the Lurgi process on Western Kentucky coal, and to establish the design bases for the TriState Synfuels Project. Other elements of the overall program with Kentucky 9 coal included coal selection, coal characterization, stockpile weatherability, corrosion testing, by-product characterization, and wastewater treatability. The results from this testing program formed the basis for recommendations concerning technical and environmental design criteria and permit applications.

Roeger, A., III; Jones, J. E., Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed, accomplishments and conclusion obtained from the project entitled ''Novel Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation in Gasification Processes in Vision 21 Energy Plants'' under the United States Department of Energy Contract DE-FC26-01NT40973. ITN Energy Systems was the prime contractor. Team members included: the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory; Nexant Consulting; Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair. The objective of the program was to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The separation technology module is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The program developed and evaluated composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules were fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed Ion Conducting Ceramic Membrane (ICCM) approach, including system integration issues, were also assessed. This resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of integration schemes of ICCM hydrogen separation technology within Vision 21 fossil fuel plants. Several results and conclusion were obtained during this program. In the area of materials synthesis, novel pyrochlore-based proton conductors were identified, synthesized and characterized. They exhibited conductivity as high as 0.03 S/cm at 900 C. Long-term stability under CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} atmospheres was also demonstrated. In the area of membrane fabrication by plasma spray processing, the initial results showed that the pyrochlore materials could be processed in a spray torch. Although leak-tight membranes were obtained, cracking, most likely due to differences in thermal expansion, remained a problem. More modeling and experimental work can be used to solve this problem. Finally the techno-economic analyses showed that the ITN ICCM approach for separating H{sub 2} is comparable to conventional pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology in efficiency and economics. Enhanced membrane flux and lower operating temperatures may make the ICCM approach superior to PSA.

Michael Schwartz

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Owners of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Asbury power plant, Asbury, Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Asbury power plant in rural southwest Missouri is off the beaten path in more ways than one. Three years ago, Empire District Electric Co., the plant's owner/operator, began mixing pieces of discarded tires into its coal fuel supply. Each ensuing year, without compromising local air quality, the plant has rid the area of millions of tires that otherwise would have ended up in a landfill. For demonstrating that a blight can be made right, Asbury is one of Power's 2005 top plants. 2 figs., 1 tab.

Wicker, K.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

227

Turbine power plant system  

SciTech Connect

A turbine power plant system consisting of three sub-systems; a gas turbine sub-system, an exhaust turbine sub-system, and a steam turbine sub-system. The three turbine sub-systems use one external fuel source which is used to drive the turbine of the gas turbine sub-system. Hot exhaust fluid from the gas turbine sub-system is used to drive the turbines of the exhaust turbine sub-system and heat energy from the combustion chamber of the gas turbine sub-system is used to drive the turbine of the steam turbine sub-system. Each sub-system has a generator. In the gas turbine sub-system, air flows through several compressors and a combustion chamber and drives the gas turbine. In the exhaust turbine sub-system, hot exhaust fluid from the gas turbine sub-system flows into the second passageway arrangement of first and fourth heat exchangers and thus transfering the heat energy to the first passageway arrangement of the first and fourth heat exchangers which are connected to the inlets of first and second turbines, thus driving them. Each turbine has its own closed loop fluid cycle which consists of the turbine and three heat exchangers and which uses a fluid which boils at low temperatures. A cooler is connected to a corresponding compressor which forms another closed loop system and is used to cool the exhaust fluid from each of the two above mentioned turbines. In the steam turbine sub-system, hot fluid is used to drive the steam turbine and then it flows through a fluid duct, to a first compressor, the first fluid passageway arrangement of first and second heat exchangers, the second passageway of the first heat exchanger, the combustion chamber of the gas turbine where it receives heat energy, and then finally to the inlet of the steam turbine, all in one closed loop fluid cycle. A cooler is connected to the second passageway of the second heat exchanger in a closed loop fluid cycle, which is used to cool the turbine exhaust.

Papastavros, D.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

228

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifipedia > Feedstock Flexibility > Refinery Streams Gasifipedia > Feedstock Flexibility > Refinery Streams Gasifipedia Coal: Feedstock Flexibility Refinery Streams Gasification is a known method for converting petroleum coke (petcoke) and other refinery waste streams and residuals (vacuum residual, visbreaker tar, and deasphalter pitch) into power, steam and hydrogen for use in the production of cleaner transportation fuels. The main requirement for a gasification feedstock is that it contains both hydrogen and carbon. Below is a table that shows the specifications for a typical refinery feedstock. Specifications for a typical refinery feedstock A number of factors have increased the interest in gasification applications in petroleum refinery operations: Coking capacity has increased with the shift to heavier, more sour crude oils being supplied to the refiners.

229

NETL: Gasification Systems Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shelf Shelf Gasification Systems Reference Shelf TABLE OF CONTENTS Brochures Conferences and Workshops Gasification Systems Projects National Map Gasification Systems Projects and Performers Gasification Systems Project Portfolio Gasifipedia Multi-phase Flow with Interphase eXchange (MFIX) Patents Program Presentations Project Information Projects Summary Table by State Solicitations Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Technical Presentations & Papers Technology Readiness Assessment (Comprehensive Report | Overview Report) Video, Images & Photos Gasification Plant Databases CD Icon Request Gasification Technologies Information on a CD. Gasification RSS Feed Subscribe to the Gasification RSS Feed to follow website updates. LinkedIn DOE Gasification Program Group Subscribe to the LinkedIn DOE Gasification Program group for more information and discussion.

230

Gasification Technology Status: August 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical report covers the lessons learned from the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that are now accumulating commercial operating experience. The current gasification experience includes coal, petroleum residuals, biomass, and wastes.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

231

Nuclear power plant design analysis  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning the engineering aspects of the design of commercial nuclear power plants is presented. Topics discussed include: electric utility economics; nuclear plant cconomics; thermal-transport systems and core design; nuclear analysis methods; safcty requirements; fuel-system analysis; dcsign considerations; and optimization approaches. (DCC)

Sesonske, A.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Biomass Gasification Syngas Cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published report 1023994, Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Biomass Gasification, prepared by CH2M HILL Engineers, Inc. (CH2M HILL). It provided a global overview of commercially available biomass gasification technologies that can be used for power production in the 25- to 50-MWe range. The report provided detailed descriptions of biomass gasification technologies, typical operational parameters, emissions information, and ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

Hydrometallurgical recovery of germanium from coal gasification fly ash: pilot plant scale evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, a hydrometallurgical method for the selective recovery of germanium from fly ash (FA) has been tested at pilot plant scale. The pilot plant flowsheet comprised a first stage of water leaching of FA, and a subsequent selective recovery of the germanium from the leachate by solvent extraction method. The solvent extraction method was based on Ge complexation with catechol in an aqueous solution followed by the extraction of the Ge-catechol complex (Ge(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}){sub 3}{sup 2-}) with an extracting organic reagent (trioctylamine) diluted in an organic solvent (kerosene), followed by the subsequent stripping of the organic extract. The process has been tested on a FA generated in an integrated gasification with combined cycle (IGCC) process. The paper describes the designed 5 kg/h pilot plant and the tests performed on it. Under the operational conditions tested, approximately 50% of germanium could be recovered from FA after a water extraction at room temperature. Regarding the solvent extraction method, the best operational conditions for obtaining a concentrated germanium-bearing solution practically free of impurities were as follows: extraction time equal to 20 min; aqueous phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5; stripping with 1 M NaOH, stripping time equal to 30 min, and stripping phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5. 95% of germanium were recovered from water leachates using those conditions.

Arroyo, F.; Fernandez-Pereira, C.; Olivares, J.; Coca, P. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day high-Btu SNG from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report describes results on feedstock characterization. 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day of high-Btu Natural Gas from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation fuel jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions, thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report discusses the suitability of the tar oil stream. 5 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Troubleshooting power plant controls  

SciTech Connect

Using an example from an 80 MW cogeneration plant working at near capacity on a hot day, the paper illustrates the steps involved in troubleshooting a maintenance problem. It discusses identification of the problem, the planning involved in the identification of the problem, development of proof of an hypothesis, human factors, implementing effective solutions, and determination of the root cause.

Alley, S.D. [ANNA, Inc., Annapolis, MD (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Program on Technology Innovation: Tampa Electric Company Polk Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plant Carbon Capture Retrofit Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Industry Technology Demonstration Program on Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with carbon capture and storage (CCS), an engineering study was conducted to evaluate the cost and performance impacts of various CCS schemes at the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station. The portion of the work presented here was funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Innovation Program and focuses on a comparison of chemical and physical solvent-based CO2 capture systems i...

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Power Quality Aspects in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Although many operational aspects affect wind power plant operation, this paper focuses on power quality. Because a wind power plant is connected to the grid, it is very important to understand the sources of disturbances that affect the power quality.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Chacon, J.; Romanowitz, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

ALARA at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle at nuclear power plants presents a continuing challenge for health physicists at utility corporate and plant levels, for plant designers, and for regulatory agencies. The relatively large collective doses at some plants are being addressed though a variety of dose reduction techniques. It is planned that this report will include material on historical aspects, management, valuation of dose reduction, quantitative and qualitative aspects of optimization, design, operational considerations, and training. The status of this work is summarized in this report. 30 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Baum, J.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

State estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) plant as part of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate estimation of process state variables not only can increase the effectiveness and reliability of process measurement technology, but can also enhance plant efficiency, improve control system performance, and increase plant availability. Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO2 capture will have to satisfy stricter operational and environmental constraints. To operate the IGCC plant without violating stringent environmental emission standards requires accurate estimation of the relevant process state variables, outputs, and disturbances. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured at all, while some of them can be measured, but with low precision, low reliability, or low signal-to-noise ratio. As a result, accurate estimation of the process variables is of great importance to avoid the inherent difficulties associated with the inaccuracy of the data. Motivated by this, the current paper focuses on the state estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) process as part of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture. This process has extensive heat and mass integration and therefore is very suitable for testing the efficiency of the designed estimators in the presence of complex interactions between process variables. The traditional Kalman filter (KF) (Kalman, 1960) algorithm has been used as a state estimator which resembles that of a predictor-corrector algorithm for solving numerical problems. In traditional KF implementation, good guesses for the process noise covariance matrix (Q) and the measurement noise covariance matrix (R) are required to obtain satisfactory filter performance. However, in the real world, these matrices are unknown and it is difficult to generate good guesses for them. In this paper, use of an adaptive KF will be presented that adapts Q and R at every time step of the algorithm. Results show that very accurate estimations of the desired process states, outputs or disturbances can be achieved by using the adaptive KF.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Avestar® - Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator. The IGCC simulator builds on and reaches beyond existing combined-cycle and conventional-coal power plant simulators to combine--for the first time--a Gasification with CO2 Capture process simulator with a Combined-Cycle power simulator together in a single dynamic simulation framework. The AVESTAR® center IGCC courses provide unique, comprehensive training on all aspects of an IGCC plant, illustrating the high-efficiency aspects of the gasifier, gas turbine, and steam turbine integration. IGCC Operator training station HMI display for overview of IGCC Plant - Train A Reference:

242

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable energy incentives, and feed-in tariffs areEnergy Credits (REC) and Carbon Credits, contracting for a Feed in TariffTariff is an incentive structure to encourage the adoption of renewable energy

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

referred to as a directly heated gasifier. In contrast, theuses an indirectly heated gasifier. Two reactors are used: acirculates between the gasifier and combustion reactors,

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of production credits, renewable energy incentives, andand production rate. Due to the current market uncertainty for Renewable EnergyProduction Credits/Incentives The federal government has long standing incentives supporting renewable energy,

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

NETL: Gasification Systems and Industry Analyses Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyses Studies Analyses Studies Gasification Systems Reference Shelf – Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Table of Contents Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Power Plants Studies Gasification Systems Program's Systems and Industry Analyses Studies DOE/NETL possesses strong systems analysis and policy-support capabilities. Systems analysis in support of the Gasification Systems Program consists of conducting various energy analyses that provide input to decisions on issues such as national plans and programs, resource use, environmental and energy security policies, technology options for research and development programs, and paths to deployment of energy technology. Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Power Plants Studies The Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Power Plants studies establish up-to-date estimates for the cost and performance of combustion and gasification based power plants as well as options for co-generating synthetic natural gas and fuels, all with and without carbon dioxide capture and storage. Several ranks of coal are being assessed in process configurations that are based on technology that could be constructed today such that the plant could be operational in the 2010 - 2015 timeframe. The analyses were performed on a consistent technical and economic basis that accurately reflects current market conditions.

246

Financing Solar Thermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been build following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply stated, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised i n debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects from the financier's perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies.

Price, H. W.; Kistner, R.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Zero-order trace element distribution model for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant: Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US DOE is developing a series for models of environmental systems. Both zero-order and detailed models are being developed. Detailed models are based on fundamental engineering principles and the use of detailed physical and chemical property data; reliance on empirical relationships and correlations is minimized. The key advantage of detailed models is their predictive capabilities and utility in performing valid comparative analyses. An important prerequisite to the development of detailed models in the availability of representative, long-term process and environmental data. These data are needed both to develop the models as well as to validate them. Zero-order models are less rigorous and have less predictive capability than detailed models since they are based on empirical estimates and simple correlations. However, they can be developed relatively quickly and are significantly less expensive to develop and use compared to detailed models. Zero-order models are useful in identifying potential environmental or control technology problems. As such, they can help direct future research and development efforts. They can provide useful information when comprehensive data are unavailable for detailed modeling, and can be used as a screening tool to identify process alternatives which appear to warrant more detailed modeling. This report describes a zero-order trace element distribution model for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant located near Beulah, North Dakota. The model estimates how trace elements entering the plant in the feed coal are distributed to the plant's process and waste streams. Elements that may be introduced to the plant's waste streams from sorbents and/or catalysts (e.g., Vanadium in makeup Stretford solution) are not considered in the model. 13 refs.

Thomas, W.C.; Page, G.C.; Magee, R.A.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fiberglass plastics in power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiberglass reinforced plastics (FRPs) are replacing metal in FGDs, stacks, tanks, cooling towers, piping and other plant components. The article documents the use of FRP in power plants since the 1970s. The largest volume of FRP in North American power plants is for stack liners and ductwork. Absorber vessel shells and internal components comprise the third largest use. The most common FRP absorber vessels are known as jet bubbling reactors (JBRs). One of the largest JBRs at a plant on the Ohio River removes 99% of sulphur dioxide from high sulphur coal flue gas. FRPs last twice as long as wood structures when used for cooling towers and require less maintenance. 1 tab., 2 photos.

Kelley, D. [Ashland Performance Materials (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Capture Retrofit Options: Duke Edwardsport Integrated-Gasification Combined-Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a project supported by Duke Energy using tailored collaboration funds to study the potential impact to plant performance of retrofitted carbon dioxide (CO2) capture on the Duke Edwardsport integrated-gasificationcombined-cycle (IGCC) plant. The Duke Edwardsport IGCC plant is under construction and scheduled to begin operation in September 2012. Details on the project have been published in a 2010 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report, Duke Edwardsport Gener...

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

Power plant | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power plant Power plant Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Date Released January 26th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated June 07th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords eGrid eGRID2007 EIA Electricity emissions epa Power plant Data application/zip icon eGRID2007_Version1-1.zip (zip, 18.7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Work of the U.S. Federal Government. Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

251

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioning Conditioning Sulfur Recovery and Tail Gas Treating Sulfur is a component of coal and other gasification feed stocks. Sulfur compounds need to be removed in most gasification applications due to environmental regulations or to avoid catalyst poisoning. Whether it is electricity, liquid fuels, or some other product being output, sulfur emissions are regulated, and sulfur removal is important for this reason, along with the prevention of downstream component fouling. In addition to these constraints, recovering saleable sulfur is an important economic benefit for a gasification plant. To illustrate the previous point, in 2011 8.1 million tons of elemental sulfur was produced, with the majority of this coming from petroleum refining, natural gas processing and coking plants. Total shipments were valued at $1.6 billion, with the average mine or plant price of $200 per ton, up from $70.48 in 2010. The United States currently imports sulfur (36% of consumption, mostly from Canada), meaning the market can support more domestic sulfur production.

252

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Separation Techniques for Gasification-based Power Generation Point Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (post-combustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle or IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, dry, regenerable processes based on sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Jones, K.L.; Morsi, B.I. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Heintz, Y.J. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Ilconich, J.B. (Parsons)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Geothermal Power Plants in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine small experimental geothermal power plants are now operating at six sites in the People's Republic of China. These range in capacity from 50 kW to 3MW, and include plants of the flash-steam and binary type. All except two units utilize geofluids at temperatures lower than 100 C. The working fluids for the binary plants include normal- and iso-butane, ethyl chloride, and Freon. The first geothermal plant came on-line in 1970, the most recent ones in 1979. Figure 1 shows the location of the plants. Major cities are also shown for reference. Table 1 contains a listing of the plants and some pertinent characteristics. The total installed capacity is 5,186 kW, of which 4,386 kW is from flash-steam units. In the report, they given an example of the results of exploratory surveys, and show system diagrams, technical specifications, and test results for several of the power plants.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Power Plant Baghouse Survey 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As particulate emission regulations become more stringent, the use of baghouses (also known as fabric filters) for particulate control on coal-fired boilers in the power generation industry has increased significantly in the past several years. With the potential for Maximum Achievable Control Technology requirements for air toxics being considered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, power plants may be required to add sorbents to control mercury, trace metals and acid gases, further increasing ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A database just released by the U.S. Department of Energy documents the worldwide growth of gasification, the expected technology of choice for future coal-based plants that produce power, fuels, and/or chemicals with near-zero emissions.

256

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Processors Management Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors entered into a cooperative agreement with the USDOE to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US that produces ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP will emphasize on reclaiming and gasifying low-cost coal waste and/or its mixture as the primary feedstocks. The project consists of three phases. Phase I objectives include conceptual development, technical assessment, feasibility design and economic evaluation of a Greenfield commercial co-production plant and a site specific demonstration EECP to be located adjacent to the existing WMPI Gilberton Power Station. There is very little foreseen design differences between the Greenfield commercial coproduction plant versus the EECP plant other than: The greenfield commercial plant will be a stand alone FT/power co-production plant, potentially larger in capacity to take full advantage of economy of scale, and to be located in either western Pennsylvania, West Virginia or Ohio, using bituminous coal waste (gob) and Pennsylvania No.8 coal or other comparable coal as the feedstock; The EECP plant, on the other hand, will be a nominal 5000 bpd plant, fully integrated into the Gilbertson Power Company's Cogeneration Plant to take advantage of the existing infrastructure to reduce cost and minimize project risk. The Gilberton EECP plant will be designed to use eastern Pennsylvania anthracite coal waste and/or its mixture as feedstock.

Unknown

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects ..-.. --__- _".-.-l--_--l -_._ _- --- ~~~. . ..~ CONTENTS Page - - I NTRODUCTI ON 1 Purpose 1 Docket Contents 1 Exhibit I: Summary of Activities at Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania I-l Exhibit II: Documents Supporting the Certification of Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania iii II-1 . . .- .__.^ I ^_... _.-__^-____-. - CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

258

Dynamic Simulation and Training for IGCC Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is emerging as the technology of choice for providing clean, low-cost electricity for the next generation of coal-fired power plants and will play a central role in the development of high-efficiency, zero-emissions power plants such as FutureGen. Several major utilities and developers recently announced plans to build IGCC plants and other major utilities are evaluating IGCCs suitability for base-load capacity additions. This recent surge of attention to IGCC power generation is creating a growing demand for experience with the analysis, operation, and control of commercial-scale IGCC plants. To meet this need, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has launched a project to develop a generic, full-scope, IGCC dynamic plant simulator for use in establishing a state-of-the-art simulator training center at West Virginia Universitys (WVU) National Research Center for Coal and Energy (NRCCE). The IGCC Dynamic Simulator & Training (DS&T) Center will be established under the auspices of the Collaboratory for Process & Dynamic Systems Modeling (Collaboratory) organized between NETL, WVU, the University of Pittsburgh, and Carnegie Mellon University.

Erbes, M.R. (Enginomix, LLC); Zitney, S.E

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

260

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Michael Schwartz

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Michael Schwartz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Michael Schwartz

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

None

1986-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

264

Gasification Technology Status--December 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past four years, several major power companies have been conducting detailed design studies of commercial-sized coal based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pulverized Coal (PC) plants. Concern over the continued availability of natural gas at competitive prices has led many power companies to seriously consider clean coal technologies as a strategic hedge against over reliance on natural gas alone to provide future power needs. This report covers the IGCC designs currently offer...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

265

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Closely Aligned Programs Gasification Systems Technologies Closely Aligned Programs The Department of Energy's (DOE) Gasification Systems is conducted under the Clean Coal Research...

266

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Gasification Current Calendar of Events Below are events that are specifically related to Gasification. Also visit the NETL Events page to learn about other events....

267

Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

269

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

270

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

271

Wabash River coal gasification repowering project: Public design report  

SciTech Connect

The Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project (the Project), conceived in October of 1990 and selected by the US Department of Energy as a Clean Coal IV demonstration project in September 1991, is expected to begin commercial operations in August of 1995. The Participants, Destec Energy, Inc., (Destec) of Houston, Texas and PSI Energy, Inc., (PSI) of Plainfield, Indiana, formed the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture (the JV) to participate in the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program by demonstrating the coal gasification repowering of an existing 1950`s vintage generating unit affected by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The Participants, acting through the JV, signed the Cooperative Agreement with the DOE in July 1992. The Participants jointly developed, and separately designed, constructed, own, and will operate an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (CGCC) power plant using Destec`s coal gasification technology to repower Unit {number_sign}1 at PSI`s Wabash River Generating Station located in Terre Haute, Indiana. PSI is responsible for the new power generation facilities and modification of the existing unit, while Destec is responsible for the coal gasification plant. The Project demonstrates integration of the pre-existing steam turbine generator, auxiliaries, and coal handling facilities with a new combustion turbine generator/heat recovery steam generator tandem and the coal gasification facilities.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Internal combustion electric power hybrid power plant  

SciTech Connect

An internal combustion-electric motor hybrid power plant for an automotive vehicle is disclosed. The power plant includes an internal combustion engine and a direct current electric motor generator which are connected to a drive shaft for the vehicle. A clutch mechanism is provided to connect the internal combustion engine, the direct current electric motor generator and the drive shaft for selectively engaging and disengaging the drive shaft with the internal combustion engine and the motor generator. A storage battery is electrically connected to the motor generator to supply current to and receive current therefrom. Thermoelectric semi-conductors are arranged to be heated by the waste heat of the internal combustion engine. These thermoelectric semi-conductors are electrically connected to the battery to supply current thereto. The thermoelectric semi-conductors are mounted in contact with the outer surfaces of the exhaust pipe of the internal combustion engine and also with the outer surfaces of the cylinder walls of the engine.

Cummings, T.A.

1979-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

273

World electric power plants database  

SciTech Connect

This global database provides records for 104,000 generating units in over 220 countries. These units include installed and projected facilities, central stations and distributed plants operated by utilities, independent power companies and commercial and self-generators. Each record includes information on: geographic location and operating company; technology, fuel and boiler; generator manufacturers; steam conditions; unit capacity and age; turbine/engine; architect/engineer and constructor; and pollution control equipment. The database is issued quarterly.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

WABASH RIVER COAL GASIFICATION REPOWERING PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The close of 1999 marked the completion of the Demonstration Period of the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project. This Final Report summarizes the engineering and construction phases and details the learning experiences from the first four years of commercial operation that made up the Demonstration Period under Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-92MC29310. This 262 MWe project is a joint venture of Global Energy Inc. (Global acquired Destec Energy's gasification assets from Dynegy in 1999) and PSI Energy, a part of Cinergy Corp. The Joint Venture was formed to participate in the Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program and to demonstrate coal gasification repowering of an existing generating unit impacted by the Clean Air Act Amendments. The participants jointly developed, separately designed, constructed, own, and are now operating an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant, using Global Energy's E-Gas{trademark} technology (E-Gas{trademark} is the name given to the former Destec technology developed by Dow, Destec, and Dynegy). The E-Gas{trademark} process is integrated with a new General Electric 7FA combustion turbine generator and a heat recovery steam generator in the repowering of a 1950's-vintage Westinghouse steam turbine generator using some pre-existing coal handling facilities, interconnections, and other auxiliaries. The gasification facility utilizes local high sulfur coals (up to 5.9% sulfur) and produces synthetic gas (syngas), sulfur and slag by-products. The Project has the distinction of being the largest single train coal gasification combined-cycle plant in the Western Hemisphere and is the cleanest coal-fired plant of any type in the world. The Project was the first of the CCT integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) projects to achieve commercial operation.

Unknown

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Steam Reheat in Nuclear Power Plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work, reheating steam from a commercial nuclear power plant is explored in order to increase efficiency and power output. A thermal source in (more)

Marotta, Paul John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Power Plant Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal(Redirected from Power Plant) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (19) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine which is connected to a generator to produce electricity. The type of energy conversion technology that is used depends on whether the resource is predominantly water or steam, the temperature of the resource, and the

277

Energeticals power plant engineering | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energeticals power plant engineering Energeticals power plant engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name energeticals power plant engineering Place München, Bavaria, Germany Zip 81371 Sector Biomass, Geothermal energy Product Planning, design, installation and operation of turnkey plants for heat and electricity generation in the field of solid Biomass, deep and shallow geothermal energy and water power. References energeticals power plant engineering[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. energeticals power plant engineering is a company located in München, Bavaria, Germany . References ↑ "[ energeticals power plant engineering]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Energeticals_power_plant_engineering&oldid=344770

278

Modeling water use at thermoelectric power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The withdrawal and consumption of water at thermoelectric power plants affects regional ecology and supply security of both water and electricity. The existing field data on US power plant water use, however, is of limited ...

Rutberg, Michael J. (Michael Jacob)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Power Plants: Scientists...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plants: Scientists Use X-ray Laser to Probe Engines of Photosynthesis By Glenn Roberts Jr. June 6, 2012 The molecular power plants that carry out photosynthesis are at the...

280

UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal power plants larger than 50 megawatts (MW) are required to obtain a California Energy Commission UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS: INFORMING A PROGRAM TO STUDY Landing Power Plant (at center). Image from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library. #12

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Coal-Fired Power Plants New Coal-Fired Power Plants (data update 1/13/2012) January 13, 2012 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Strategic Energy Analysis & Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants This report is intended to provide an overview of proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under development. This report may not represent all possible plants under consideration but is intended to illustrate the potential that exists for installation of new coal-fired power plants. Additional perspective has been added for non-coal-fired generation additions in the U.S. and coal-fired power plant activity in China. Experience has shown that public announcements of power plant developments do not provide an accurate representation of eventually

282

Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency Investments to Power Plants J. Koorney, A.H.Efficiency Investments to Power Plants Jonathan Koorney,Pollution, and Avoid Power Plant Construction. Testimony

Koomey, J.G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Coal gasification-based integrated coproduction energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

Coal gasification has been a technological reality for over a half century, being first used in great detail in Europe as an alternative to petroleum. Several projects in the US in the last decade have led to the commercial demonstration and verification of the coal gasification process. This paper reports that, in an effort to reduce the cost of electricity from an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plant, the Electric Power Research Institute embarked in a program to research, evaluate and potentially demonstrate a coal gasification-based integrated coproduction energy facility, and release an RFP in mid 1990 as Phase I of that program. Houston Lighting and Power Company responded with a proposal in its ongoing effort to study emerging technologies for electricity production. HL and P recognized the opportunities available to them in coproduction because of their close proximity to the world's largest petrochemical complex located on the Houston Ship Channel.

Baumann, P.D. (InterFact, Inc., Dallas, TX (US)); Epstein, M. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Kern, E.E. (Houston Lighting and Power Co., TX (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

NETL: Gasification - Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Background and Project Benefits Program Background and Project Benefits Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. With gasification-based technologies, pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products. Gasification can generate clean power by adding steam to the syngas in a water-gas-shift reactor to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2) and to produce additional hydrogen. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for EOR. In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies. The Gasification Systems program is developing technologies in three key areas to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of producing syngas: (1) Feed Systems, (2) Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems, and (3) Syngas Processing Systems.

285

NETL: Gasification - Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Background and Project Benefits Program Background and Project Benefits Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. With gasification-based technologies, pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products. Gasification can generate clean power by adding steam to the syngas in a water-gas-shift reactor to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2) and to produce additional hydrogen. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for EOR. In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies. The Gasification Systems program is developing technologies in three key areas to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of producing syngas: (1) Feed Systems, (2) Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems, and (3) Syngas Processing Systems.

286

Power Plant Baghouse Survey 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The requirement to reduce stack particulate matter (PM) emissions is one of the key challenges for coal-fired power plants, in light of the proposed Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) ruling for hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on March 16, 2011. The proposed MACT ruling may require that total PM, including condensable and filterable PM, be maintained at 0.03 lb/MMBtu. A final HAPs ruling is expected in December 2011. As particulate emission reg...

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

287

Evaluation of the Stretford Unit at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report gives the results of an evaluation of the design and operational characteristics of the Stretford Sulfur Recovery Unit installed in the Great Plains Gasification Project, Beulah, North Dakota. The report contains discussion of the H/sub 2/S removal capability of the unit, the potential of solids deposition and the expected solution losses. 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Lang, R.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flash Steam Power Plant Flash Steam Power Plant (Redirected from Flash Steam Power Plants) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Flash Steam Power Plants General List of Flash Steam Plants Flash Steam power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Flash steam plants are the most common type of geothermal power generation plants in operation in the world today. Fluid at temperatures greater than 360°F (182°C) is pumped under high pressure into a tank at the surface held at a much lower pressure, causing some of the fluid to rapidly vaporize, or "flash." The vapor then drives a turbine, which drives a generator. If any liquid remains in the tank, it can be flashed again in a second tank to extract even more energy.[1] Facility Name Owner Capacity (MW) Facility

289

Coal Power Plant Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Plant Database Power Plant Database Jump to: navigation, search Name Coal Power Plant Database Data Format Excel Spreadsheet, Excel Pivot Table, Access Database Geographic Scope United States TODO: Import actual dataset contents into OpenEI The Coal Power Plant Database (CPPDB) is a dataset which "consolidates large quantities of information on coal-fired power plants in a single location."[1] It is produced by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). External links 2007 Edition Excel Spreadsheet Excel Pivot Table Access Database User's Manual (PDF) References ↑ "User's Manual: Coal Power Plant Database" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Coal_Power_Plant_Database&oldid=273301" Categories: Datasets Articles with outstanding TODO tasks

290

2012 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Research and Development Roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundThe second generation of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants is now being built or planned following nearly two decades of commercial demonstration at multiple units. State-of-the-art IGCC plants have efficiencies equivalent to that of pulverized coal power plants while exhibiting equal or superior environmental performance and lower water usage. Precombustion CO2 capture technology is commercially available and has been ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

Evaluation of Cascaded Humidified Advanced Turbine (CHAT) Power Plant Options for TVA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel CHAT plants offer very high efficiency with superior cycling load capabilities. They integrate with gasification for significantly reduced capital cost.

1997-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

292

Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

Purvis, James W.

1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

293

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Binary Cycle Power Plant Binary Cycle Power Plant (Redirected from Binary Cycle Power Plants) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators.

294

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Binary Cycle Power Plant Binary Cycle Power Plant (Redirected from Binary) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators. Binary cycle power plants are closed-loop systems and virtually nothing

295

Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant utilizing wood waste products as a fuel has been designed. This plant will yield a 50% efficiency improvement compared to conventional wood-fueled steam power plants. The power plant features an externally-fired gas turbine combined cycle system that obtains its heat input from a high temperature, high pressure ceramic air heater burning wood waste products as a fuel. This paper presents the results of the design study including the cycle evaluation and a description of the major components of the power plant. The cycle configuration is based on maximum fuel efficiency with minimum capital equipment risk. The cycle discussion includes design point performance of the power plant. The design represents a significant step forward in wood-fueled power plants.

Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Dirty kilowatts: America's most polluting power plants  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, the US EPA tracked more than 1,400 fossil-fired power plants of varying sizes through its Acid Rain Program. This report ranks each of the 378 largest plants (generating at least 2 million megawatt-hours in 2006) for which both the most recent EPA emissions data and Energy Information Administration (EIA) electric generation data are available. The report ranks each plant based on emission rates, or pounds of pollutant for each megawatt-hour (or million megawatt-hours, in the case of mercury) the plant produced. It ranks the top fifty power plants polluters for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, and mercury. A complete listing of all 378 plants is included as Appendix A. Appendix B contains overheads of an NETL presentation: Tracking new coal-fired power plants - coal's resurgence in electric power generation, 24 January 2007. The 12 states with the heaviest concentrations of the dirtiest power plants, in terms of total tons of carbon dioxide emitted, are: Texas (five, including two of the top 10 dirtiest plants); Pennsylvania (four); Indiana (four, including two of the top 10 dirtiest plants); Alabama (three); Georgia (three, including two of the top three dirtiest plants); North Carolina (three); Ohio (three); West Virginia (three); Wyoming (two); Florida (two); Kentucky (two); and New Mexico (two). Carbon dioxide emissions from power plants are now at roughly 2.5 billion tons per year. Power plants are responsible for about 30%-40% of all man-made CO{sub 2} emissions in the USA. Power plants, especially those that burn coal, are by far the largest single contributor of SO{sub 2} pollution in the United States. Power plant mercury emissions remain steady as compared to previous years. A searchable database ranking 378 U.S. power plants on carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and mercury pollution is available online at http://www.dirtykilowatts.org. 22 refs., 8 tabs., 2 apps.

NONE

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Biomass Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of gasification technology to convert biomass to electric power has increased substantially over the last 10 years. Many new projects, using a wide range of gasification technologies, have been developed and become operational. Some of the key driving factors for biomass gasification-to-power facilities include:Abundant local supplies of biomass, at low or no cost, for use as a feedstock for gasification-to-power facilities.Federal and state tax credits ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

298

Power Plant Optimization Demonstration Projects Cover Photos:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 SEPTEMBER 2007 5 SEPTEMBER 2007 Power Plant Optimization Demonstration Projects Cover Photos: * Top left: Coal Creek Station * Top right: Big Bend Power Station * Bottom left: Baldwin Energy Complex * Bottom right: Limestone Power Plant A report on four projects conducted under separate cooperative agreements between the U.S. Department of Energy and: * Great River Energy * Tampa Electric Company * Pegasus Technologies * NeuCo. , Inc.  Power Plant Optimization Demonstration Projects Executive Summary .......................................................................................4 Background: Power Plant Optimization ......................................................5 Lignite Fuel Enhancement Project ...............................................................8

299

RESULTS OF THE TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR A NOVEL BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED POWER GENERATION SYSTEM FOR THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2001, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) entered into Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41108 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for an Agenda 2020 project to develop an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system for near-term deployment in the Forest Products Industry (FPI). The advanced power system combines three advanced components, including biomass gasification, 3-stage stoker-fired combustion for biomass conversion, and externally recuperated gas turbines (ERGTs) for power generation. The primary performance goals for the advanced power system are to provide increased self-generated power production for the mill and to increase wastewood utilization while decreasing fossil fuel use. Additional goals are to reduce boiler NOx and CO{sub 2} emissions. The current study was conducted to determine the technical and economic feasibility of an Advanced Power Generation System capable of meeting these goals so that a capital investment decision can be made regarding its implementation at a paper mill demonstration site in DeRidder, LA. Preliminary designs and cost estimates were developed for all major equipment, boiler modifications and balance of plant requirements including all utilities required for the project. A three-step implementation plan was developed to reduce technology risk. The plant design was found to meet the primary objectives of the project for increased bark utilization, decreased fossil fuel use, and increased self-generated power in the mill. Bark utilization for the modified plant is significantly higher (90-130%) than current operation compared to the 50% design goal. For equivalent steam production, the total gas usage for the fully implemented plant is 29% lower than current operation. While the current average steam production from No.2 Boiler is about 213,000 lb/h, the total steam production from the modified plant is 379,000 lb/h. This steam production increase will be accomplished at a grate heat release rate (GHRR) equal to the original boiler design. Boiler efficiencies (cogeneration-steam plus air) is increased from the original design value of 70% to 78.9% due to a combination of improved burnout, operation with lower excess air, and drier fuel. For the fully implemented plant, the thermal efficiency of fuel to electricity conversion is 79.8% in the cogeneration mode, 5% above the design goal. Finally, self-generated electricity will be increased from the 10.8 MW currently attributable to No.2 Boiler to 46.7MW, an increase of 332%. Environmental benefits derived from the system include a reduction in NOx emissions from the boiler of about 30-50% (90-130 tons/year) through syngas reburning, improved carbon burnout and lower excess air. This does not count NOx reduction that may be associated with replacement of purchased electricity. The project would reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the generation of electricity to meet the mill's power requirements, including 50,000 tons/yr from a net reduction in gas usage in the mill and an additional 410,000 tons/yr reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions due to a 34 MW reduction of purchased electricity. The total CO{sub 2} reduction amounts to about 33% of the CO{sub 2} currently generated to meet the mills electricity requirement. The overall conclusion of the study is that while significant engineering challenges are presented by the proposed system, they can be met with operationally acceptable and cost effective solutions. The benefits of the system can be realized in an economic manner, with a simple payback period on the order of 6 years. The results of the study are applicable to many paper mills in the U.S. firing woodwastes and other solid fuels for steam and power production.

Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Sunil Ghose; Jim Patel

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Balance of Plant Corrosion Issues in Aging Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... number of times, can be used to forecast the most probable number of leaks. ... Conditions for Long Term Operation of Nuclear Power Plants in Sweden.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Control system for cogenerative power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a distributed control system for the realization of cogenerative supply of electricity and heat and, in given case, for their combination with waste heat recovery, particularly in combined (gas-steam) cycle industrial power plants. ... Keywords: cogenerative gas power plant, control of distributed parameter systems, distribution management system, electric power systems, optimization, process control, real time systems, simulation

Florin Hartescu

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Wind Power Plant Monitoring Project Annual Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intermittent nature of the wind resource, together with short-term power fluctuations, are the two principal issues facing a utility with wind power plants in its power grid. To mitigate these issues, utilities, wind power plant developers, and operators need to understand the nature of wind power fluctuations and how they affect the electrical power system, as well as to analyze ancillary service requirements with real wind power plant output data. To provide the necessary data, NREL conducted a study to collect at least 2 years of long-term, high-frequency (1-hertz [Hz]) data from several medium- to large-scale wind power plants with different wind resources, terrain features, and turbine types. Researchers then analyzed the data for power fluctuations, frequency distribution of wind power (by deriving a probability distribution function of wind power plant output variations), spatial and temporal diversity of wind power, and wind power capacity credit issues. Results of these analyses can provide data on the potential effects of wind power plants on power system regulation.

Wan, Y.

2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Public Service Commission of Wisconsin

304

Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of TMDLs on Impacts of TMDLs on Coal-Fired Power Plants April 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1408 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The

305

Efficiency combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of operating a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: flowing exhaust gas from a combustion turbine through a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG); flowing feed water through an economizer section of the HRSG at a flow rate and providing heated feed water; flowing a first portion of the heated feed water through an evaporator section of the HRSG and producing saturated steam at a production rate, the flow rate of the feed water through the economizer section being greater than required to sustain the production rate of steam in the evaporator section; flowing fuel for the turbine through a heat exchanger; and, flowing a second portion of the heated feed water provided by the economizer section through the heat exchanger then to an inlet of the economizer section, thereby heating the fuel flowing through the heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Meyers, G.A.; Baldwin, T.S.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

306

Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flash Steam Power Plant Flash Steam Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Flash Steam Power Plants General List of Flash Steam Plants Flash Steam power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Flash steam plants are the most common type of geothermal power generation plants in operation in the world today. Fluid at temperatures greater than 360°F (182°C) is pumped under high pressure into a tank at the surface held at a much lower pressure, causing some of the fluid to rapidly vaporize, or "flash." The vapor then drives a turbine, which drives a generator. If any liquid remains in the tank, it can be flashed again in a second tank to extract even more energy.[1] Facility Name Owner Capacity (MW) Facility Type Commercial Online Date Geothermal Area

307

The parabolic trough power plants Andasol 1 to 3 The largest solar power plants in the world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The parabolic trough power plants Andasol 1 to 3 The largest solar power plants in the world and solar-thermal power plants The first parabolic trough power plants in Europe ­ the world's largest solar

Laughlin, Robert B.

308

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

309

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Dry Steam) (Redirected from Dry Steam) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

310

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (20) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine

312

Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Solar Power Plant Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Solana Generating Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status Under Construction Developer Abengoa Solar Location Gila Bend, Arizona Coordinates 32.916163°, -112.968727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.916163,"lon":-112.968727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

313

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification April 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. Washington, DC - Gasification. It's a versatile technology that uses coal to produce power, chemicals, and fuels. Inherently low in air emissions, solid byproducts, and wastewater, commercial gasification plants have proven capable of exceeding the most stringent regulations for air- and solids-emissions. However, capital and operational costs have prohibited the widespread adoption of gasification, especially for power

314

Materials in Nuclear Power Plant Construction - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

139th Annual Meeting & Exhibition. February 14 - 18, 2010, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington USA. Materials in Nuclear Power. Plant ...

315

NETL: Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPII Map Clean Coal Demonstrations Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) Project Location Map Place mouse cursor over state for and select the project you are interested in....

316

Increasing Power Plant Efficiency: Lignite Fuel Enhancement ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increasing Power Plant Efficiency: Lignite Fuel Enhancement (Completed March 31, 2010) Project Description The objectives of this project are to demonstrate a unique system for...

317

Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

Lester M. Waganer

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

318

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Organizational learning at nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Power Plant Advisory Panel on Organizational Learning provides channels of communications between the management and organization research projects of the MIT International Program for Enhanced Nuclear Power ...

Carroll, John S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

TS Power Plant, Eureka County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Not all coal-fired power plants are constructed by investor-owned utilities or independent power producers selling to wholesale markets. When Newmont Mining Corp. recognised that local power supplies were inadequate and too expensive to meet long-term electricity needs for its major gold- and copper-mining operations in northern Nevada, it built its own generation. What is more, Newmont's privately owned 200-MW net coal-fired plant features power plant technologies that will surely become industry standards. Newmont's investment in power and technology is also golden: the capital cost will be paid back in about eight years. 4 figs.

Peltier, R. [DTE Energy Services (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants: 2012 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this report is to provide an update of historical and current trends in geothermal power plant technology, extending the previous Next Generation Geothermal Power Plant (NGGPP) report originally developed by EPRI in 1996.BackgroundIn its 1996 study, EPRI evaluated a number of technologies with the potential to lower the cost of geothermal power production or to expand cost effective power production to lower temperature resources, thus opening ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

322

A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the tenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a computational workbench for simulating the performance of Vision 21 Power Plant Systems. Within the last quarter, good progress has been made on all aspects of the project. Calculations for a full Vision 21 plant configuration have been performed for two gasifier types. An improved process model for simulating entrained flow gasifiers has been implemented into the workbench. Model development has focused on: a pre-processor module to compute global gasification parameters from standard fuel properties and intrinsic rate information; a membrane based water gas shift; and reactors to oxidize fuel cell exhaust gas. The data visualization capabilities of the workbench have been extended by implementing the VTK visualization software that supports advanced visualization methods, including inexpensive Virtual Reality techniques. The ease-of-use, functionality and plug-and-play features of the workbench were highlighted through demonstrations of the workbench at a DOE sponsored coal utilization conference. A white paper has been completed that contains recommendations on the use of component architectures, model interface protocols and software frameworks for developing a Vision 21 plant simulator.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Connie Senior; Zumao Chen; Temi Linjewile; Adel Sarofim; Bene Risio

2003-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

323

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The subMW hybrid DFC/T power plant facility was upgraded with a Capstone C60 microturbine and a state-of-the-art full size fuel cell stack. The integration of the larger microturbine extended the capability of the hybrid power plant to operate at high power ratings with a single gas turbine without the need for supplementary air. The objectives of this phase of subMW hybrid power plant tests are to support the development of process and control and to provide the insight for the design of the packaged subMW hybrid demonstration units. The development of the ultra high efficiency multi-MW power plants was focused on the design of 40 MW power plants with efficiencies approaching 75% (LHV of natural gas). The design efforts included thermodynamic cycle analysis of key gas turbine parameters such as compression ratio.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

324

Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Deming Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer New Solar Ventures/ Solar Torx 50/50 Location New Mexico Coordinates 34.9727305°, -105.0323635° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9727305,"lon":-105.0323635,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

325

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Prescott Airport Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer APS Location Prescott, Arizona Coordinates 34.5400242°, -112.4685025° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.5400242,"lon":-112.4685025,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

326

Integration of Ion Transport Membrane Technology with Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI, in conjunction with Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (AP), has reviewed the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process, whereby coal (or some other hydrocarbon such as petroleum coke or heavy oil) is broken down into its constituent volatile and nonvolatile components through the process of oxidative-pyrolysis. Combustible synthetic gas created in the process can be used in a traditional combined cycle. IGCC is particularly appealing for its potentially higher efficiencies compared ...

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

ASPEN physical property evaluation for Great Plains simulation. Great Plains ASPEN model development. [Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the steps taken to evaluate the pure component properties in the ASPEN data bank for those compounds required to simulate the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant where the compounds are also available in the DIPPR (Design Institute for Physical Property Data) data bank. DIPPR is a cooperative effort of industry, institutes and federal agencies interested in the compilation, measurement and evaluation of physical property data for industrially important compounds. It has been found that the ASPEN data bank is for the most part reliable, its main problem being lack of documentation. In the few instances where values were found to be either missing or to be unacceptable, recommended constants or equation parameters are presented in this report along with associated literature citations. In the cases where temperature dependent data were regressed to obtain new equation parameters, the detailed methods employed are also presented.

Millman, M.C.

1983-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

328

Arrangement for hydroelectric power plants  

SciTech Connect

Hydroelectric power plant contains a flow tube for the water, an inlet tube leading to the flow tube and a discharge tube leading from the flow tube. In the flow tube a turbine is arranged to be driven by the flowing water and which via a drive shaft drives an electric generator. Accentuated sub-divisioning as between mechanical unit and portions of an installation nature is provided. The turbine and generator are located in the direct vicinity of each other and together with the drive shaft form a unit which in its entirety is situate in the flow tube and arranged to be traversed by flowing water. The unit is so arranged that the turbine can be in contact with the water flow while the generator has a watertight enclosure into which the drive shaft extends through a watertight bushing. Furthermore an electric cable for transmitting the electricity produced is connected. The installation components, the said tubes, are made from prefabricated concrete components. The flow tube is essentially vertical and exhibits a support for the unit and, at its upper end, an aperture through which the unit can be lowered.

Osterberg, T.V.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

329

Power Plant Practices to Ensure Cable Operability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Installation practices as well as environmental conditions affect the operability of electrical cables in power plants. This report evaluates operability criteria for nuclear power plant cables, good practices for cable installation, and cable maintenance and surveillance. As a reference source for utility practices, this report suggests potential improvements that could benefit the industry.

1992-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

330

Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

Wiltsee, G.

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

FUSION POWER PLANTS GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and coolant. Lithium eutectic compounds such as lithium-lead (Li17Pb83), aqueous solutions of lithium salts groups have an aver- sion to large power plants in their back yards. As a whole, improved power plants for a burning fusion plasma (Meade, 1996). The next large ex- perimental device is ITER (Baker, 1996) which

Najmabadi, Farrokh

332

Power Transformer Application for Wind Plant Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind power plants use power transformers to step plant output from the medium voltage of the collector system to the HV or EHV transmission system voltage. This paper discusses the application of these transformers with regard to the selection of winding configuration, MVA rating, impedance, loss evaluation, on-load tapchanger requirements, and redundancy.

Behnke, M. R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Bloethe, W.G. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Bradt, M. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Brooks, C. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Camm, E H [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Dilling, W. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Goltz, B. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Li, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Niemira, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Nuckles, K. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Patino, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Reza, M [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Richardson, B. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Samaan, N. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Schoene, Jens [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Smith, Travis M [ORNL; Snyder, Isabelle B [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Walling, R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Zahalka, G. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Comparative study of effluents and their control from four dry ash Lurgi gasification plants. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

Any gasification facility generates three classes of waste: solid, liquid, and gaseous. All three classes were investigated in some depth and are discussed. Liquid wastes are controlled in the sense that there are none. There are no waste water streams from any of the facilities with the exception of ANG's deep well which will be used for brine disposal. All of the water is either treated for reuse or evaporated. There is little published data concerning the characteristics of water reuse treatment systems for coal gasification facilities. There is a high probability that the existing technology can be used to meet the zero discharge requirement and provide water for reuse. Gaseous emissions are under tight state standards in New Mexico and federal standards and guidelines in North Dakota. Controlled substances are NO/sub x/, non-methane hydrocarbons (HC), COS, SO/sub 2/, CO, and particulates. Hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon-monoxide emissions guidelines and standards (both federal and state) are somewhat easier to meet than the sulfur standards. Solids wastes and sludges are, at this time, uncontrolled. There is, however, significant research being conducted to establish the probable impact of solid waste disposal and to establish techniques to minimize the potential impact.

Somerville, M.H.; Elder, J.L.; Baria, D.N.; Hung, Y.T.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station Unit 1, Unit 2","1,773","14,239",34.0,"Nine Mile Point Nuclear Sta LLC" "R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1",581,"4,948",11.8,"R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC" "4 Plants

335

Residential Solar Thermal Power Plant  

Solar power is a renewable source of energy that involves no fossil fuel combustion, and releases no greenhouse gases. In the past, solar power has not been ...

336

Wind Power Plant SCADA and Controls  

SciTech Connect

Modern Wind Power Plants (WPPs) contain a variety of intelligent electronic devices (IEDs), Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) and communication systems. This paper discusses the issues related to a typical WPP's SCADA and Control. Presentation topics are: (1) Wind Turbine Controls; (2) Wind Plant SCADA, OEM SCADA Solutions, Third-Party SCADA Solutions; (3) Wind Plant Control; and (4) Security and Reliability Compliance.

Badrzadeh, Babak [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Castillo, Nestor [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Bradt, M. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Janakiraman, R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Kennedy, R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Klein, S. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Smith, Travis M [ORNL; Vargas, L. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Combined power plants -- Past, present, and future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The early history of combined power plants is described, together with the birth of the CCGT plant (the combined cycle gas turbine). Sustained CCGT development in the 1970s and 1980s, based on sound thermodynamic considerations, is outlined. Finally more recent developments and future prospects for the combined gas turbine/steam turbine combined plant are discussed.

Horlock, J.H. [Whittle Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Power Quality Investigation of a Manufacturing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study summarizes the findings and results of a power quality (PQ) audit performed at a manufacturing plant to harden the plant processes to external PQ disturbances. Recommendations were made by EPRI and implemented by the manufacturer. The result was a significant improvement in immunity of the plant processes to voltage sags.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Subtask 4.2 - Coal Gasification Short Course  

SciTech Connect

Major utilities, independent power producers, and petroleum and chemical companies are intent on developing a fleet of gasification plants primarily because of high natural gas prices and the implementation of state carbon standards, with federal standards looming. Currently, many projects are being proposed to utilize gasification technologies to produce a synthesis gas or fuel gas stream for the production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, chemicals, and electricity. Financing these projects is challenging because of the complexity, diverse nature of gasification technologies, and the risk associated with certain applications of the technology. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has developed a gasification short course that is designed to provide technical personnel with a broad understanding of gasification technologies and issues, thus mitigating the real or perceived risk associated with the technology. Based on a review of research literature, tutorial presentations, and Web sites on gasification, a short course presentation was prepared. The presentation, consisting of about 500 PowerPoint slides, provides at least 7 hours of instruction tailored to an audience's interests and needs. The initial short course is scheduled to be presented September 9 and 10, 2009, in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

Kevin Galbreath

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Thermal spray applications for power plant components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plants usually are located near water and many are in salt water environments. Corrosion occurring in these environments is a problem often solved with thermal spray coatings. The use of thermal spray aluminum and zinc in three power plants for various components is reviewed. Special emphasis is on the cooling tower at the Seabrook, New Hampshire plant. A guide to selection of the coating and process also is given.

Sampson, E.R.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DIRECT FUEL/CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

DIRECT FUEL/CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture R&D Capture R&D DOE/NETL's pre-combustion CO2 control technology portfolio of R&D projects is examining various CO2 capture technologies, and supports identification of developmental pathways linking advanced fossil fuel conversion and CO2 capture. The Program's CO2 capture activity is being conducted in close coordination with that of advanced, higher-efficiency power generation and fossil fuel conversion technologies such as gasification. Links to the projects can be found here. Finally, an exhaustive and periodically updated report on CO2 capture R&D sponsored by NETL is available: DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update (also referred to as the CO2 Handbook). Carbon Dioxide CO2 Capture Commercial CO2 Uses & Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery

344

Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update, September 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue: Quarterly Summary Ongoing U.S. Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects News Items on Operating IGCC Plants U.S. IGCC Project Updates International IGCC Project Updates International Gasification Projects for Chemicals Biomass and Waste Gasification Projects Coal to SNG Coal to Liquids (CTL) Gas to Liquids (GTL) Underground Coal Gasification (U...

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Gasification Users Association - Technology Status - December 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the worldwide market and technology status of gasification technologies. The market for gasification technologies is primarily in China where national policy has established a major coal-to-chemicals industry and plans to add major plants for coal-to-substitute natural gas (SNG) and coal-to-liquid transportation fuels in the next five-year plan. Gasification is also being deployed to some extent in other Asian countries (for example, Korea and India) and elsewhere. Gasification tech...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Gasification Users Association Newsletter: June 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasification Users Group (GUA) Update is published quarterly and provides information on gasification projects in development and in construction, along with a summary of new integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)/ gasification technology developments. The following articles are featured in this issue of the GUA Update: Quarterly Summary Ongoing U.S. Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects News Items on Operating IGCC Plants U.S. IGCC Project Updates Inte...

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

347

Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update, September 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasification UsersAssociation (GUA) Update is published quarterly and provides information on gasification projects in development and in construction, along with a summary of new integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)/ gasification technology developments. The following articles are featured in this issue of the GUA Update:Quarterly SummaryOngoing U.S. Energy Program UpdatesNews Items on Operating IGCC PlantsU.S. ...

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report is described the work effort to develop and demonstrate a software framework to support advanced process simulations to evaluate the performance of advanced power systems. Integrated into the framework are a broad range of models, analysis tools, and visualization methods that can be used for the plant evaluation. The framework provides a tightly integrated problem-solving environment, with plug-and-play functionality, and includes a hierarchy of models, ranging from fast running process models to detailed reacting CFD models. The framework places no inherent limitations on the type of physics that can be modeled, numerical techniques, or programming languages used to implement the equipment models, or the type or amount of data that can be exchanged between models. Tools are provided to analyze simulation results at multiple levels of detail, ranging from simple tabular outputs to advanced solution visualization methods. All models and tools communicate in a seamless manner. The framework can be coupled to other software frameworks that provide different modeling capabilities. Three software frameworks were developed during the course of the project. The first framework focused on simulating the performance of the DOE Low Emissions Boiler System Proof of Concept facility, an advanced pulverized-coal combustion-based power plant. The second framework targeted simulating the performance of an Integrated coal Gasification Combined Cycle - Fuel Cell Turbine (IGCC-FCT) plant configuration. The coal gasifier models included both CFD and process models for the commercially dominant systems. Interfacing models to the framework was performed using VES-Open, and tests were performed to demonstrate interfacing CAPE-Open compliant models to the framework. The IGCC-FCT framework was subsequently extended to support Virtual Engineering concepts in which plant configurations can be constructed and interrogated in a three-dimensional, user-centered, interactive, immersive environment. The Virtual Engineering Framework (VEF), in effect a prototype framework, was developed through close collaboration with NETL supported research teams from Iowa State University Virtual Reality Applications Center (ISU-VRAC) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). The VEF is open source, compatible across systems ranging from inexpensive desktop PCs to large-scale, immersive facilities and provides support for heterogeneous distributed computing of plant simulations. The ability to compute plant economics through an interface that coupled the CMU IECM tool to the VEF was demonstrated, and the ability to couple the VEF to Aspen Plus, a commercial flowsheet modeling tool, was demonstrated. Models were interfaced to the framework using VES-Open. Tests were performed for interfacing CAPE-Open-compliant models to the framework. Where available, the developed models and plant simulations have been benchmarked against data from the open literature. The VEF has been installed at NETL. The VEF provides simulation capabilities not available in commercial simulation tools. It provides DOE engineers, scientists, and decision makers with a flexible and extensible simulation system that can be used to reduce the time, technical risk, and cost to develop the next generation of advanced, coal-fired power systems that will have low emissions and high efficiency. Furthermore, the VEF provides a common simulation system that NETL can use to help manage Advanced Power Systems Research projects, including both combustion- and gasification-based technologies.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

349

Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

Basu, Prabir [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Labbe, Pierre [Electricity of France (EDF)] [Electricity of France (EDF); Naus, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Desalination Study of Florida Power & Light Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a project sponsored jointly by EPRI and Florida Power & Light (FPL) to determine the viability of converting existing power plants to large-scale, dual-purpose cogeneration of power and fresh water from desalination. Of four desalination processes studied, reverse osmosis offered the lowest product water cost.

1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

351

Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry has entered into a voluntary initiative to implement groundwater monitoring programs at all nuclear power plant sites. This EPRI guideline provides essential technical guidance to nuclear power utilities on the necessary elements of a sound groundwater protection program.

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

352

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators. Binary cycle power plants are closed-loop systems and virtually nothing (except water vapor) is emitted to the atmosphere. Resources below 400°F

353

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. The operation of sub-MW hybrid Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant test facility with a Capstone C60 microturbine was initiated in March 2003. The inclusion of the C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in previous tests using a 30kW microturbine. The design of multi-MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, was initiated. A new concept was developed based on clusters of One-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. System analyses were performed, including systems for near-term deployment and power plants with long-term ultra high efficiency objectives. Preliminary assessment of the fuel cell cluster concept, including power plant layout for a 14MW power plant, was performed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the progress in development of Direct Fuel Cell/Turbine. (DFC/T.) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha sub-MW DFC/T power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. Following these proof-of-concept tests, a stand-alone test of the microturbine verified the turbine power output expectations at an elevated (representative of the packaged unit condition) turbine inlet temperature. Preliminary design of the packaged sub-MW alpha DFC/T unit has been completed and procurement activity has been initiated. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant has also been prepared. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output/fuel utilization capabilities are also being evaluated.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

355

Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes the progress in development of Direct Fuel Cell/Turbine. (DFC/T.) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha sub-MW DFC/T power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. Following these proof-of-concept tests, a stand-alone test of the microturbine verified the turbine power output expectations at an elevated (representative of the packaged unit condition) turbine inlet temperature. Preliminary design of the packaged sub-MW alpha DFC/T unit has been completed and procurement activity has been initiated. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant has also been prepared. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output/fuel utilization capabilities are also being evaluated.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

356

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. The operation of sub-MW hybrid Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant test facility with a Capstone C60 microturbine was initiated in March 2003. The inclusion of the C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in previous tests using a 30kW microturbine. The design of multi-MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, was initiated. A new concept was developed based on clusters of One-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. System analyses were performed, including systems for near-term deployment and power plants with long-term ultra high efficiency objectives. Preliminary assessment of the fuel cell cluster concept, including power plant layout for a 14MW power plant, was performed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

A Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO 2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants Edward S. Rubin (rubin@cmu.edu; 412-268-5897) Anand B. Rao (abr@andrew.cmu.edu; 412-268-5605) Michael B. Berkenpas (mikeb@cmu.edu; 412-268-1088) Carnegie Mellon University EPP Department, Baker Hall 128A Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract As part of DOE/NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program, we are developing an integrated, multi-pollutant modeling framework to evaluate the costs and performance of alternative carbon capture and sequestration technologies for fossil-fueled power plants. The model calculates emissions, costs, and efficiency on a systematic basis at the level of an individual plant or facility. Both new and existing facilities can be modeled, including coal-based or natural gas-based combustion or gasification systems using air or oxygen.

358

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: AlternativesSupplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility Waste Streams Gasification can be applied to a variety of waste streams, of which municipal solid waste (MSW)...

359

Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2} separation, and also syngas production from coal with the calcium sulfide (CaS)/calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) loop utilizing the PDU facility. The results of Phase I were reported in Reference 1, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase I Report' The objective for Phase II was to develop the carbonate loop--lime (CaO)/calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) loop, integrate it with the gasification loop from Phase I, and ultimately demonstrate the feasibility of hydrogen production from the combined loops. The results of this program were reported in Reference 3, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase II Report'. The objective of Phase III is to operate the pilot plant to obtain enough engineering information to design a prototype of the commercial Chemical Looping concept. The activities include modifications to the Phase II Chemical Looping PDU, solids transportation studies, control and instrumentation studies and additional cold flow modeling. The deliverable is a report making recommendations for preliminary design guidelines for the prototype plant, results from the pilot plant testing and an update of the commercial plant economic estimates.

Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

A computer code, titled GEOCOST, has been developed at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, to rapidly and systematically calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. A description of the cost models in GEOCOST for the geothermal power plants is given here. Plant cost models include the flashed steam and binary systems. The data sources are described, along with the cost data correlations, resulting equations, and uncertainties. Comparison among GEOCOST plant cost estimates and recent A-E estimates are presented. The models are intended to predict plant costs for second and third generation units, rather than the more expensive first-of-a-kind units.

Cohn, P.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Gasification, polygeneration capture interest of refiners  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are moving into the mainstream of international refining. Such plants can turn refinery dregs into the whitest of all products--sparkling electricity--plus hydrogen and synthesis gas. Hydrogen is an indispensable element for cleaning up and improving modern fuels, while syngas is the feedstock for important finished petrochemicals and intermediaries. The status and potential of gasification technologies and projects were covered in a 3 day conference early in October in San Francisco. What made this conference different from others on the subject in the past was recognition that oil and natural gas producers and the international refining industry are becoming major power producers without government subsidies. Such projects can pass the scrutiny of lenders and the test of commerciality. They are not targeted simply for electricity, but also for production of hydrogen, steam, and petrochemical feedstock. The process objective for projects now far exceeds simple cogeneration. It`s now trigeneration, even polygeneration.

Aalund, L.R.

1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

362

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This slideshow presentation begins by outlining US energy challenges, particularly with respect to power generation capacity and clean energy plant operations. It goes on to describe the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR{sup TM}). Its mission and goals are given, followed by an overview of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} capture. The Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS) and 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS) are then presented. Facilities, training, education, and R&D are covered, followed by future simulators and directions.

Provost, G,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation begins with a description of U.S. Energy Challenges, particularly Power Generation Capacity and Clean Energy Plant Operations. It goes on to describe the missions and goals of the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTARTM). It moves on to the subject of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} Capture, particularly a Process/Project Overview, Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS), 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS), Facilities, Training, Education, and R&D, and Future Simulators/Directions

Provost, G,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2mo Callaway Unit 1 1,190 8,996 100.0 Union Electric Co 1 Plant 1 Reactor Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

365

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2ct Millstone Unit 2, Unit 3 2,103 16,750 100.0 Dominion Nuclear Conn Inc 1 Plant 2 Reactors Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent ...

366

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2ar Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1, Unit 2 1,835 15,023 100.0 Entergy Arkansas Inc 1 Plant 2 Reactors Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of ...

367

Power Plant Wastewater Treatment Technology Review Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing power plant water management options means screening an increasing number of wastewater treatment technologies. This report provides engineers with detailed information on treatment process performance, economics, and applications to complete rapid, yet meaningful, technology screening evaluations.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Atmospheric considerations for central receiver power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study of the effects of atmospheric attenuation, turbulent scattering, and the use of cooling towers on the performance of solar thermal central receiver power plants.

Henderson, R.G.; Pitter, R.L.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Brawley Power Plant Abandoned | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abandoned Abandoned Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Brawley Power Plant Abandoned Abstract N/A Authors California Division of Oil, Gas and and Geothermal Resources Published Journal Geothermal Hot Line, 1985 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Brawley Power Plant Abandoned Citation California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources. 1985. Brawley Power Plant Abandoned. Geothermal Hot Line. 15(2):76-77. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Brawley_Power_Plant_Abandoned&oldid=682727" Categories: References Uncited References Geothermal References What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

370

NETL: Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Sources Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs) Where is the coal in the United States? Coal Across the U.S. The U.S. contains coal resources in various places. The coal occurs...

371

Existing Coal-fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Vulnerabilities for Existing Coal-fired Power Plants August 2010 DOENETL-20101429 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the...

372

PV Power Plants Conference USA 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The 4th PV Power Plants conference will cover relevant topics for successful project development and sustainable business. This year's event will have an additional focus on certain distributed...

373

Parabolic Trough Solar Thermal Electric Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although many solar technologies have been demonstrated, parabolic trough solar thermal electric power plant technology represents one of the major renewable energy success stories of the last two decades.

Not Available

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Quality control during construction of power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper traces the background and examines the necessity for a program to control quality during the construction phase of a power plant. It also attempts to point out considerations for making these programs cost effective.

Hartstern, R.F.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Region 8: 1977 power plant summary  

SciTech Connect

This document provides summary information on power generation facilities located in the U.S. EPA, Region VIII states of Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming. When available, plant specific information is presented.

Parker, G.E.; Boulter, G.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1/2, 2004 Experience curves for power plant emission controlcoal-fired electric power plants. In particular, we focus on2004) Experience curves for power plant emission control

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. , The Central Reciever Power Plant: An Environmental,of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of Storage

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F. Baldwin.a central solar thermal power plant. A variety of heliostatSTORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F. Baldwin.

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The ImpactGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageVessel Design on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I)

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageDesign on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I) II (I

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Advanced Cooling Options for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative power plant cooling systems exist that offer significant opportunity for reducing the amount of water used in power plant cooling. These systems include direct dry cooling using air-cooled condensers, indirect dry cooling using air-cooled heat exchangers paired with water-cooled surface condensers, and a variety of hybrid systems incorporating both dry and wet cooling elements. The water savings afforded by the use of these systems, however, comes at a price in the form of more expensive ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1988  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1988 presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1988. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

1989-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

383

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gasifier Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Optimization Small-Scale Coal-biomass to Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal...

384

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IGCC CO2 capture is pre-combustion based, using selective Selexol technology. PC and NGCC power plant CO2 capture designs are post-combustion, using amine absorption. Performance...

385

Nuclear Power Plant NDE Challenges Past, Present, and Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operating fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants was built to fossil plant standards (of workmanship

S. R. Doctor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

OUT Success Stories: Solar Trough Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Electric Generating System (SEGS) plants use parabolic-trough solar collectors to capture the sun's energy and convert it to heat. The SEGS plants range in capacity from 13.8 to 80 MW, and they were constructed to meet Southern California Edison Company's periods of peak power demand.

Jones, J.

2000-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

387

Parabolic Trough Organic Rankine Cycle Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Arizona Public Service (APS) is required to generate a portion of its electricity from solar resources in order to satisfy its obligation under the Arizona Environmental Portfolio Standard (EPS). In recent years, APS has installed and operates over 4.5 MWe of fixed, tracking, and concentrating photovoltaic systems to help meet the solar portion of this obligation and to develop an understanding of which solar technologies provide the best cost and performance to meet utility needs. During FY04, APS began construction of a 1-MWe parabolic trough concentrating solar power plant. This plant represents the first parabolic trough plant to begin construction since 1991. The plant will also be the first commercial deployment of the Solargenix parabolic trough collector technology developed under contract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The plant will use an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power plant, provided by Ormat. The ORC power plant is much simpler than a conventional steam Rankine cycle power plant and allows unattended operation of the facility.

Canada, S.; Cohen, G.; Cable, R.; Brosseau, D.; Price, H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Assessment of instrumentation needs for advanced coal power plant applications: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to identify contaminants, identify instrumentation needs, assess available instrumentation and identify instruments that should be developed for controlling and monitoring gas streams encountered in the following power plants: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion, and Gasification Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell. Emphasis was placed on hot gas cleanup system gas stream analysis, and included process control, research and environmental monitoring needs. Commercial process analyzers, typical of those currently used for process control purposes, were reviewed for the purpose of indicating commercial status. No instrument selection guidelines were found which were capable of replacing user interaction with the process analyzer vendors. This study leads to the following conclusions: available process analyzers for coal-derived gas cleanup applications satisfy current power system process control and regulatory requirements, but they are troublesome to maintain; commercial gas conditioning systems and in situ analyzers continue to be unavailable for hot gas cleanup applications; many research-oriented gas stream characterization and toxicity assessment needs can not be met by commercially available process analyzers; and greater emphasis should be placed on instrumentation and control system planning for future power plant applications. Analyzers for specific compounds are not recommended other than those needed for current process control purposes. Instead, some generally useful on-line laser-based and inductively coupled plasma methods are recommended for further development because of their potential for use in present hot gas cleanup research and future optimization, component protection and regulation compliance activities. 48 refs., 21 figs., 26 tabs.

Nelson, E.T.; Fischer, W.H.; Lipka, J.V.; Rutkowski, M.D.; Zaharchuk, R.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

NREL: Technology Transfer - First Hybrid CSP-Coal Power Plant ...  

First Hybrid CSP-Coal Power Plant is Fired Up in Colorado July 23, 2010. On June 30, Xcel Energy began operating an experimental power plant near ...

390

Pages that link to "Coal Power Plant Database" | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coal Power Plant Database" Coal Power Plant Database Jump to: navigation, search What...

391

Changes related to "Coal Power Plant Database" | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal Power Plant Database" Coal Power Plant Database Jump to: navigation, search This is...

392

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis...

393

Miniature Hydroelectric Power Plant : EnergySmart School Inventors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Miniature Hydroelectric Power Plant EnergySmart School Inventors EnergySmart School Inventors Miniature Hydroelectric Power Plant Michael Torrey Inventor: Michael Torrey The...

394

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Electricity Advisory Committee Technology Development Electricity Policy Coordination and...

395

Zhangbei Guotou Wind Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zhangbei Guotou Wind Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Zhangbei Guotou Wind Power Plant Place Beijing Municipality, China Zip 100037 Sector Wind energy Product A company...

396

Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana) Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana) Eligibility Construction InstallerContractor MunicipalPublic Utility Rural Electric...

397

Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant  

SciTech Connect

In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the AVESTAR Center is poised to develop a workforce well-prepared to operate and control commercial-scale gasification-based power plants capable of 90% pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture and compression, as well as low sulfur, mercury, and NOx emissions. With additional support from the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), the Center will educate and train engineering students and researchers by providing hands-on 'learning by operating' experience The AVESTAR Center also offers unique collaborative R&D opportunities in high-fidelity dynamic modeling, advanced process control, real-time optimization, and virtual plant simulation. Objectives and goals are aimed at safe and effective management of power generation systems for optimal efficiency, while protecting the environment. To add another dimension of realism to the AVESTAR experience, NETL will introduce an immersive training system with innovative three-dimensional virtual reality technology. Wearing a stereoscopic headset or eyewear, trainees will enter an interactive virtual environment that will allow them to move freely throughout the simulated 3-D facility to study and learn various aspects of IGCC plant operation, control, and safety. Such combined operator and immersive training systems go beyond traditional simulation and include more realistic scenarios, improved communication, and collaboration among co-workers.

Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFICIENCY INVESTMENTS TO POWER PLANTS: APPLICATIONS TOEFFICIENCY INVESTMENTS TO POWER PLANTS: APPLICATIONS TOEfficiency Investments to Power Plants: Applications to

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Power Plant Electrical Reference Series, Volume 2: Power Transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive and practical guide to electric power apparatus and electrical phenomena provides an up-to-date source book for power plant managers, engineers, and operating personnel. Aiding in the recognition and prevention of potential problems, the 16-volume guide can help utilities save staff time and reduce operating expenses.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Nuclear power plant construction activity 1987  

SciTech Connect

This annual report published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) presents data on nuclear power plant construction activity. The previous report, Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1986, included data for units that, as of December 31, 1986, were (1) in the construction pipeline, (2) canceled, or (3) commercial operation as of December 31, 1986. The data in this report, which were collected on Form EIA-254, ''Semiannual Report on Status of Reactor Construction,'' update the data in the previous report to be current as of December 31, 1987. Three types of information are included: plant characteristics and ownership; construction costs; and construction schedules and milestone dates.

1988-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Aspects of thermal power plant automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal electric power plant is a set of facilities/equipment interconnected, designed to produce electricity or heat and power, by converting chemical energy of a fuel. This paper analyze the energy production stations, both turbine and steam generator ... Keywords: modeling and simulation, the Ovation System

Marius-Constantin Popescu; Nikos Mastorakis

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTE TO EDITORS: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received two reports from its independent Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. The attached reports, in the form of letters, comment on a proposed amendment to the NRC's rule on license renewal for nuclear power plants and a proposed revision to the decommissioning rule for nuclear power reactors. Attachments:

T. S. Kress

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A Power Plant for the Home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of energy in American homes is still being developed for better efficiency. The idea of having a power plant in your home's basement instead is a consideration. Combined heat and power (CHP) systems can utilize up to 90 percent of a fossil fuel's ...

P. P. Predd

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Steam-injected gas turbines uneconomical with coal gasification equipment  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Electric Power Research Institute conducted a series of engineering and economic studies to assess the possibility of substituting steam-injected gas (STIG) turbines for the gas turbines currently proposed for use in British Gas Corporation (BGC)/Lurgi coal gasification-combined cycle plants. The study sought to determine whether steam-injected gas turbines and intercooled steam-injected gas turbines, as proposed by General Electric would be economically competitive with conventional gas and steam turbines when integrated with coal gasification equipment. The results are tabulated in the paper.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project activities were focused on the design and construction the sub-scale hybrid Direct Fuel Cell/turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plant and modification of a Capstone Simple Cycle Model 330 microturbine. The power plant design work included preparation of system flow sheet and performing computer simulations based on conservation of mass and energy. The results of the simulation analyses were utilized to prepare data sheets and specifications for balance-of-plant equipment. Process flow diagram (PFD) and piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&ID) were also completed. The steady state simulation results were used to develop design information for modifying the control functions, and for sizing the heat exchangers required for recuperating the waste heat from the power plant. Line and valve sizes for the interconnecting pipes between the microturbine and the heat recuperators were also identified.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2003-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

406

Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

Peter Pryfogle

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a computational workbench for simulating the performance of Vision 21 Power Plant Systems. Within the last quarter, good progress has been made on the development of our IGCC workbench. Preliminary CFD simulations for single stage and two stage ''generic'' gasifiers using firing conditions based on the Vision 21 reference configuration have been performed. Work is continuing on implementing an advanced slagging model into the CFD based gasifier model. An investigation into published gasification kinetics has highlighted a wide variance in predicted performance due to the choice of kinetic parameters. A plan has been outlined for developing the reactor models required to simulate the heat transfer and gas clean up equipment downstream of the gasifier. Three models that utilize the CCA software protocol have been integrated into a version of the IGCC workbench. Tests of a CCA implementation of our CFD code into the workbench demonstrated that the CCA CFD module can execute on a geographically remote PC (linked via the Internet) in a manner that is transparent to the user. Software tools to create ''walk-through'' visualizations of the flow field within a gasifier have been demonstrated.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Power Plant Dams (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Plant Dams (Kansas) Power Plant Dams (Kansas) Power Plant Dams (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Kansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Health and Environment This act states the provisions for erection and maintenance of dams. When any person, corporation or city may be desirous of erecting and maintaining a milldam or dam for generating power across any watercourse, the party so desiring to do the same may run the stream over the land of any other person by ditching or otherwise, and he, she or it may obtain the right to erect and maintain said dam and keep up and maintain the necessary ditches

409

Embrittlement of Power Plant Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plant operators seek to adopt approaches that can minimize costs, prevent forced outages, and maximize safety and reliability. Rigorous life assessment methodologies have been developed over the years and are commonly employed to determine component integrity and life. Such assessments examine key operational characteristics including: elevated temperature exposure, cycling operation, loading, environmental exposure, etc., to determine remaining life. Many of these characteristics can have a ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

410

AVESTAR® - Training - Gasification Process Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Process Operations Gasification Process Operations This course is designed as a familiarization course to increase understanding of the gasification with CO2 capture process. During the training, participants will startup and shutdown the simulated unit in an integrated manner and will be exposed to simple and complex unit malfunctions in the control room and in the field. Course objectives are as follows: Introduce trainees to gasification and CO2 capture process systems and major components and how they dynamically interact Familiarize trainees with the Human Machine Interface (HMI) and plant control and how safe and efficient operation of the unit can be affected by plant problems Provide the trainees with hands-on operating experiences in plant operations using the HMI

411

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2mi Donald C Cook Unit 1, Unit 2 2,069 15,646 52.8 Indiana Michigan Power Co Fermi Unit 2 1,085 7,738 26.1 Detroit Edison Co Palisades Unit 1 793 ...

412

Plant Support Engineering: Elastomer Handbook for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On a daily basis, engineers and maintenance personnel make judgments regarding the capabilities, degradation, and longevity of elastomeric material and its compatibility with other materials. Although most applications of elastomers in nuclear power plants are not unique to the industry, there is an extra emphasis in certain applications with regard to reliability, quality, and resistance to nuclear-plant-specific environments. Existing resources on elastomers are extensive, but they are not tailored to ...

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

413

Coal Fleet Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC Permitting) Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance to owners of planned Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants in order to assist them in permitting these advanced coal power generation facilities. The CoalFleet IGCC Permitting Guidelines summarize U.S. federal requirements for obtaining air, water, and solid waste permits for a generic IGCC facility, as described in the CoalFleet User Design Basis Specification (UDBS). The report presents characteristics of IGCC emissions that must be considered in the p...

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure1:WestBiofuelsBiomassGasificationtoPowerprocesswillutilize gasificationtechnologyprovidedbyis pioneeringthegasificationtechnologythathasbeen

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Projected thermodynamic efficiencies of fusion power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Estimated thermal efficiencies of proposed fusion power plant concepts are compared to the efficiencies of nonfusion power plants. Present trends in electrical power generation are also discussed. The fusion reactor system designs will have about the same thermal efficiencies as present day power plants using steam if these designs require the collection of thermal energy at the blanket and the transfer of that energy to a heat exchanger or boiler using the current technology. Two general methods should be pursued for increasing the thermal efficiencies of fusion power plants and thereby reducing the amount of waste heat. Methods should be developed for increasing the temperatures of the reactor coolants since the maximum attainable thermal efficiency of systems using coolants can be increased only by increasing the coolant temperatures. Second, advanced power recovery systems such as potassium topping turbines, MHD, and direct conversion should be developed since such systems avoid the limits on steam systems due to excessive operating pressures at high temperatures. Direct conversion is particularly attractive because it avoids the theoretical Carnot limit on thermal efficiency when heat is converted to electrical energy.

McKinnon, M.A.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization Hydrogen: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization Weyburn Project The Great Plains Synfuels Plant (GPSP) has had the ability to capture CO2 through the Rectisol process for sequestration or sale as a byproduct. However, no viable market was found for the CO2 in the early years of operation, and the captured CO2 was simply discharged to the atmosphere. This changed in 2000, when the GPSP began selling CO2 emissions, becoming one of the first commercial coal facilities to have its CO2 sequestered. The program had begun in 1997, when EnCana (formerly PanCanadian Resources) sought a solution to declining production in their Weyburn Oil Fields. Dakota Gasification Company, owners of the GPSP, and EnCana made an agreement to sell CO2 for use in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). DGC installed two large CO2 compressors and began shipping 105 million standard cubic feet per day of compressed CO2 (60% of the total CO2 produced at the plant) through a 205 mile pipeline from Beulah, North Dakota, to the Weyburn Oil Fields, located in Saskatchewan, Canada, for EOR. The pipeline was constructed and operated by a BEPC subsidiary. The CO2, about 95.5% pure and very dry, is injected into the mature fields where it has doubled the oil recovery rate of the field. In 2006, a third compressor was installed and an additional agreement was reached with Apache Canada Ltd. to supply CO2 for EOR to their nearby oilfields. The three compressors increased CO2 delivery to 160 million standard cubic feet (MMSCF; or 8,000 tonnes) per day. Through 2007, over 12 million tons of CO2 had been sold, and over the current expected lifetime of the program, an anticipated 20 million tons of CO2 will be stored.

417

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifiers and Impact of Coal Rank and Coal Properties The available commercial gasification technologies are often optimized for a particular rank of coal or coal properties, and in some cases, certain ranks of coal might be unsuitable for utilization in a given gasification technology. On the other hand, there is considerable flexibility in most of the common gasifiers; this is highlighted by the following table, which provides an overview of the level of experience for the various commercially available gasifiers by manufacturer for each coal type. This experience will only continue to expand as more gasification facilities come online and more demonstrations are completed. SOLID FUEL GASIFICATION EXPERIENCE1 High Ash Coals

418

Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION SYSTEMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREFACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United...

419

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Options CO2 Capture Technology Options All gasification-based conversion processes require removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S; an acid gas) from the synthesis gas (syngas)...

420

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Gas Shift & Hydrogen Production Slag High-temperatureWarm Sygas Cleanup & DOE R&D Other DOE R&D Supporting Syngas Cleanup Technology Emissions Advantages of Gasification...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Benchmarking Biomass Gasification Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification Technologies for Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals and Hydrogen Production Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Jared P. Ciferno John J. Marano June 2002 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to express their appreciation to all individuals who contributed to the successful completion of this project and the preparation of this report. This includes Dr. Phillip Goldberg of the U.S. DOE, Dr. Howard McIlvried of SAIC, and Ms. Pamela Spath of NREL who provided data used in the analysis and peer review. Financial support for this project was cost shared between the Gasification Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Biomass Power Program within the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

422

power plant | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plant plant Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 12 November, 2012 - 09:17 Legal Reviews are Underway BHFS Legal review permitting power plant roadmap transmission The legal review of the Regulatory Roadmap flowcharts and supporting content is well underway and will continue for the next several months with our legal team at [www.bhfs.com Brownstein Hyatt Farber and Schreck]. The BHFS has been meeting with the NREL roadmap team during weekly 2-3 hour meetings to provide comments and suggestions on each flowchart at the federal and state levels. They have had some fantastic recommendations for updates - particularly for Sections 7 and 8 of the roadmap, pertaining to the permitting of power plants and transmission lines. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load)

423

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this reporting period, a milestone was achieved by commencement of testing and operation of the sub-scale hybrid direct fuel cell/turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plant. The operation was initiated subsequent to the completion of the construction of the balance-of-plant (BOP) and implementation of process and control tests of the BOP for the subscale DFC/T hybrid system. The construction efforts consisted of finishing the power plant insulation and completion of the plant instrumentation including the wiring and tubing required for process measurement and control. The preparation work also included the development of procedures for facility shake down, conditioning and load testing of the fuel cell, integration of the microturbine, and fuel cell/gas turbine load tests. At conclusion of the construction, the process and control (PAC) tests of BOP, including the microturbine, were initiated.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Catawba Unit 1, Unit 2","2,258","18,964",36.5,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "H B Robinson Unit 2",724,"3,594",6.9,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "Oconee Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","2,538","20,943",40.3,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "V C Summer Unit 1",966,"8,487",16.3,"South Carolina Electric&Gas Co" "4 Plants 7 Reactors","6,486","51,988",100.0

425

Third International Conference on Improved Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This international conference reviewed advances in materials, components, and designs for coal-fired power plants. Also showcased were results from the EPRI improved power plant project, similar collaborative European projects, and new power plants in Japan. The proceedings' 54 papers contribute to an improved international understanding of advanced coal-fired power plant technology.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dry-Cooling Tower Power-Generation Subsystem Summary AnGas-Circulation Subsystem The Power-Generation Subsystem Theinsulating plant piping. power-generation heat exchangers.

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Blythe Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blythe Solar Power Plant Blythe Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Blythe Solar Power Plant Facility Blythe Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer First Solar Location Blythe, California Coordinates 33.6172329°, -114.5891744° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.6172329,"lon":-114.5891744,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

428

Stateline Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stateline Solar Power Plant Stateline Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Stateline Solar Power Plant Facility Stateline Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer First Solar Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

429

Plant Support Engineering: Guidance for Planned Replacement of Large Power Transformers at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities continue to pursue license renewal applications and power uprates, and these initiatives are being undertaken on an aging fleet of nuclear plants. Many plants are facing the necessity of replacing large power transformers to support these initiatives. However, industry expertise to support such activities has diminished since the days of plant construction8212there are fewer qualified vendors and equipment manufacturers, materials and standards might have changed, and licensees are typically no...

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

430

GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the re