Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit states that an income taxpayer that makes a qualified investment in a new integrated coal gasification power plant or in the expansion of an existing...

2

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification » How Coal Gasification » How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work The heart of a gasification-based system is the gasifier. A gasifier converts hydrocarbon feedstock into gaseous components by applying heat under pressure in the presence of steam. A gasifier differs from a combustor in that the amount of air or oxygen available inside the gasifier is carefully controlled so that only a relatively small portion of the fuel burns completely. This "partial oxidation" process provides the heat. Rather than burning, most of the carbon-containing feedstock is chemically broken apart by the gasifier's heat and pressure, setting into motion chemical reactions that produce "syngas." Syngas is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide, but can include

4

Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Gasification Plant Databases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Plant Databases News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan...

6

Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETLs Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Studies of the thermal circuit of an advanced integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results obtained from a study of the thermal circuit of a combined-cycle plant with coal gasification are presented, and ... of producer gas and calculated values of the combined-cycle power plant efficiency ...

D. G. Grigoruk; A. V. Turkin

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant Revision 2, March 2012 DOE/NETL-2012/1551 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

10

Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Mauldin, SC); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

11

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

green waste for use in a biomass gasification process togasification method to process some of the 1.4 million tons of wastegasification / power generation model, accessed April 2008 from http://biomass.ucdavis.edu/calculator.html 10. California Integrated Waste

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

An update technology for integrated biomass gasification combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A discussion is presented on the technical analysis of a 6.4 MWe integrated biomass gasification combined cycle (IBGCC) plant. It features three numbers ... producing 5.85 MW electrical power in open cycle and 55...

Paritosh Bhattacharya; Suman Dey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant  

SciTech Connect

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant  

SciTech Connect

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Co-gasification of coalpetcoke and biomass in the Puertollano IGCC power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle plants (IGCC) are efficient power generation systems with low pollutants emissions. Moreover, the entrained flow gasifier of IGCC plants allows the combined use of other lower cost fuels (biomass and waste) together with coal. Co-firing with biomass is beneficial for the reduction of CO2 emissions of fossil source. In this paper the results of co-gasification tests with two types of biomass deriving from agricultural residues, namely 2% and 4% by weight of olive husk and grape seed meal, in the 335MWeISO IGCC power plant of ELCOGAS in Puertollano (Spain) are reported. No significant change in the composition of both the raw syngas and the clean syngas was observed. Furthermore, a process simulation model of the IGCC plant of Puertollano was developed and validated with available industrial data. The model was used to assess the technical and economic feasibility of the process co-fired with higher biomass contents up to 60% by weight. The results indicate that a 54% decrease of fossil CO2 emissions implies an energy penalty (a loss of net power) of about 20% while does not cause significant change of the net efficiency of the plant. The mitigation cost (the additional cost of electricity per avoided ton of CO2) is significantly dependent on the price of the biomass cost compared to the price of the fossil fuel.

Daniele Sofia; Pilar Coca Llano; Aristide Giuliano; Mariola Iborra Hernndez; Francisco Garca Pea; Diego Barletta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Improving heat capture for power generation in coal gasification plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the steam cycle design to maximize power generation is demonstrated using pinch analysis targeting techniques. Previous work models the steam pressure level in composite curves based on its saturation temperature ...

Botros, Barbara Brenda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

CoalFleet RD&D augmentation plan for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants  

SciTech Connect

To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiative, which facilitates collaborative research by more than 50 organizations from around the world representing power generators, equipment suppliers and engineering design and construction firms, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others. This group advised EPRI as it evaluated more than 120 coal-gasification-related research projects worldwide to identify gaps or critical-path activities where additional resources and expertise could hasten the market introduction of IGCC advances. The resulting 'IGCC RD&D Augmentation Plan' describes such opportunities and how they could be addressed, for both IGCC plants to be built in the near term (by 2012-15) and over the longer term (2015-25), when demand for new electric generating capacity is expected to soar. For the near term, EPRI recommends 19 projects that could reduce the levelized cost-of-electricity for IGCC to the level of today's conventional pulverized-coal power plants with supercritical steam conditions and state-of-the-art environmental controls. For the long term, EPRI's recommended projects could reduce the levelized cost of an IGCC plant capturing 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from the carbon in coal (for safe storage away from the atmosphere) to the level of today's IGCC plants without CO{sub 2} capture. EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program is also preparing a companion RD&D augmentation plan for advanced-combustion-based (i.e., non-gasification) clean coal technologies (Report 1013221). 7 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs., 4 apps.

NONE

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Is Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle with Carbon Capture-Storage the Solution for Conventional Coal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Management Field Project Is Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle with Carbon Capture-Storage the Solution for Conventional Coal Power Plants By Manish Kundi Fall Semester, 2011 An EMGT Field Project report... 2.4 Environmental Aspects-Emissions 23 3.0 Procedure & Methodology 3.1 Working technology Conventional Coal Plants 30 3.2 Working technology IGCC Power Plants 32 3.3 Carbon Capture and Storage 35 3...

Kundi, Manish

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

19

Gasification of selected woody plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article contains laboratory data comparing the rate of gasification of five types of woody plantsbeech, ... oak, willow, poplar and rose. The gasification rate was determined thermogravimetrically. Carbon di...

Buryan Petr

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Evaluation of Calcium Looping as Carbon Capture Option for Combustion and Gasification Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Power generation is one of the industrial sectors with major contribution to greenhouse gas emissions (especially CO2). For climate change mitigation, a special attention is given to the reduction of CO2 emissions by applying capture and storage techniques in which CO2 is captured from energy-intensive processes and then stored in suitable safe geologic locations. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies are expected to play a significant role in the coming decades for curbing the greenhouse gas emissions and to ensure a sustainable development of power generation and other energy-intensive industrial sectors (e.g. cement, metallurgy, petro-chemical etc.). Among various carbon capture options, chemical looping systems are very promising options for intrinsically capture CO2 with lower cost and energy penalties. This paper evaluates calcium looping process as a promising carbon capture option to be applied in the most important coal- based power generation technologies. Combustion technology (Pulverized Fuel - PF) operated in both sub-critical and super- critical steam conditions were evaluated. Also, the gasification technology using an oxygen-blown entrained-flow gasifier was evaluated. As benchmark options, the same power generation technologies were evaluated without CCS. The power plant case studies investigated in the paper produces around 545 560 MW net power with at least 90% carbon capture rate. The modeling and simulation of the whole power generation schemes produced the input data for quantitative technical and environmental evaluations of power plants with carbon capture (similar power plant concept without CCS was used as reference for comparison). Mass and energy integration tools were used to assess the integration aspects of calcium looping unit into the whole power plant design, to optimize the overall efficiency and to evaluate the main sources of energy penalty for carbon capture.

Calin-Cristian Cormos; Letitia Petrescu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Gasification Plant Databases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coal gasification projects throughout the world. These databases track proposed gasification projects with approximate outputs greater than 100 megawatts electricity...

22

Pioneering Gasification Plants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification » Pioneering Gasification » Pioneering Gasification Plants Pioneering Gasification Plants In the 1800s, lamplighters made their rounds in the streets of many of America's largest cities lighting street lights fueled by "town gas," frequently the product of early forms of coal gasification. Gasification of fuel also provided fuel for steel mills, and toward the end of the 19th Century, electric power. These early gasifiers were called "gas producers," and the gas that they generated was called "producer gas." During the early 20th Century, improvements in the availability of petroleum and natural gas products, along with the extension of the infrastructure associated with these products, led to their widespread use, which replaced coal-based producer gas in the energy market.

23

EMERY BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Emery Recycling Corporation (now Emery Energy Company, LLC) evaluated the technical and economical feasibility of the Emery Biomass Gasification Power System (EBGPS). The gasifier technology is owned and being developed by Emery. The Emery Gasifier for this project was an oxygen-blown, pressurized, non-slagging gasification process that novelly integrates both fixed-bed and entrained-flow gasification processes into a single vessel. This unique internal geometry of the gasifier vessel will allow for tar and oil destruction within the gasifier. Additionally, the use of novel syngas cleaning processes using sorbents is proposed with the potential to displace traditional amine-based and other syngas cleaning processes. The work scope within this project included: one-dimensional gasifier modeling, overall plant process modeling (ASPEN), feedstock assessment, additional analyses on the proposed syngas cleaning process, plant cost estimating, and, market analysis to determine overall feasibility and applicability of the technology for further development and commercial deployment opportunities. Additionally, the project included the development of a detailed technology development roadmap necessary to commercialize the Emery Gasification technology. Process modeling was used to evaluate both combined cycle and solid oxide fuel cell power configurations. Ten (10) cases were evaluated in an ASPEN model wherein nine (9) cases were IGCC configurations with fuel-to-electricity efficiencies ranging from 38-42% and one (1) case was an IGFC solid oxide case where 53.5% overall plant efficiency was projected. The cost of electricity was determined to be very competitive at scales from 35-71 MWe. Market analysis of feedstock availability showed numerous market opportunities for commercial deployment of the technology with modular capabilities for various plant sizes based on feedstock availability and power demand.

Benjamin Phillips; Scott Hassett; Harry Gatley

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

24

Environmental assessment of the atlas bio-energy waste wood fluidized bed gasification power plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Atlas Bio-Energy Corporation is proposing to develop and operate a 3 MW power plant in Brooklyn, New York that will produce electricity by gasification of waste wood and combustion of the produced low-Btu gas in a conventional package steam boiler coupled to a steam-electric generator. The objectives of this project were to assist Atlas in addressing the environmental permit requirements for the proposed power plant and to evaluate the environmental and economic impacts of the project compared to more conventional small power plants. The project`s goal was to help promote the commercialization of biomass gasification as an environmentally acceptable and economically attractive alternative to conventional wood combustion. The specific components of this research included: (1) Development of a permitting strategy plan; (2) Characterization of New York City waste wood; (3) Characterization of fluidized bed gasifier/boiler emissions; (4) Performance of an environmental impact analysis; (5) Preparation of an economic evaluation; and (6) Discussion of operational and maintenance concerns. The project is being performed in two phases. Phase I, which is the subject of this report, involves the environmental permitting and environmental/economic assessment of the project. Pending NYSERDA participation, Phase II will include development and implementation of a demonstration program to evaluate the environmental and economic impacts of the full-scale gasification project.

Holzman, M.I.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions,

26

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions, water discharges, and solid

27

Modeling of a Biomass Gasification CHP Plant: Influence of Various Parameters on Energetic and Exergetic Efficiencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling of a Biomass Gasification CHP Plant: Influence of Various Parameters on Energetic and Exergetic Efficiencies ... This paper presents a theoretical assessment of energy, exergy, and syngas cleaning performances in a biomass gasification combined heat and power (CHP) plant with varying operating parameters. ... The analysis is carried out using a detailed model of a biomass gasification CHP plant developed with Aspen Plus. ...

Jessica Franois; Guillain Mauviel; Michel Feidt; Caroline Rogaume; Yann Rogaume; Olivier Mirgaux; Fabrice Patisson; Anthony Dufour

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

28

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this series of design and estimating efforts was to start from the as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project and to develop optimized designs for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC power and coproduction projects. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This unoptimized plant has a thermal efficiency of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW. This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal and coke-fueled power plants. This side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, showed their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a multiple train coal-fueled IGCC powerplant, also based on the Subtaks 1.3 cases. The Subtask 1.6 four gasification train plant has a thermal efficiency of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency of 45.4% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,096 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to coproduce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. As gasification technology matures, SCOHS and other improvements identified in this study will lead to further cost reductions and efficiency improvements.

Samuel S. Tam

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

2007 gasification technologies conference papers  

SciTech Connect

Sessions covered: gasification industry roundtable; the gasification market in China; gasification for power generation; the gasification challenge: carbon capture and use storage; industrial and polygeneration applications; gasification advantage in refinery applications; addressing plant performance; reliability and availability; gasification's contribution to supplementing gaseous and liquid fuels supplies; biomass gasification for fuel and power markets; and advances in technology-research and development

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Coal Gasification for Power Generation, 3. edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered include: an overview of Coal Generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; a description of gasification technology including processes and systems; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; a discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; an evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; a discussion of IGCC project development options; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and, a detailed description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

NONE

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Design of advanced fossil-fuel systems (DAFFS): a study of three developing technologies for coal-fired, base-load electric power generation. Integrated coal gasification/combined cycle power plant with Texaco gasification process  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are to present the facility description, plant layouts and additional information which define the conceptual engineering design, and performance and cost estimates for the Texaco Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. Following the introductory comments, the results of the Texaco IGCC power plant study are summarized in Section 2. In Section 3, a description of plant systems and facilities is provided. Section 4 includes pertinent performance information and assessments of availability, natural resource requirements and environmental impact. Estimates of capital costs, operation and maintenance costs and cost of electricity are presented in Section 5. A Bechtel Group, Inc. assessment and comments on the designs provided by Burns and Roe-Humphreys and Glasgow Synthetic Fuel, Inc. are included in Section 6. The design and cost estimate reports which were prepared by BRHG for those items within their scope of responsibility are included as Appendices A and B, respectively. Appendix C is an equipment list for items within the BGI scope. The design and cost estimate classifications chart referenced in Section 5 is included as Appendix D. 8 references, 17 figures, 15 tables.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Design of advanced fossil-fuel systems (DAFFS): a study of three developing technologies for coal-fired, base-load electric power generation. Integrated coal-gasification/combined power plant with BGC/Lurgi gasification process  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are to present the facility description, plant layouts and additional information which define the conceptual engineering design, and performance and cost estimates for the BGC/Lurgi Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. Following the introductory comments, the results of the British Gas Corporation (BGC)/Lurgi IGCC power plant study are summarized in Section 2. In Secion 3, a description of plant systems and facilities is provided. Section 4 includes pertinent performance information and assessments of availability, natural resource requirements and environmental impact. Estimates of capital costs, operating and maintenance costs and cost of electricity are presented in Section 5. A Bechtel Group Inc. (BGI) assessment and comments on the designs provided by Burns and Roe-Humphreys and Glasgow Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (BRHG) are included in Section 6. The design and cost estimate reports which were prepared by BRHG for those items within their scope of responsibility are included as Appendices A and B, respectively. Apendix C is an equipment list for items within the BGI scope. The design and cost estimate classifications chart referenced in Section 5 is included as Appendix D. 8 references, 18 figures, 5 tables.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Power generation plants with carbon capture and storage: A techno-economic comparison between coal combustion and gasification technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Worldwide energy production requirements could not be fully satisfied by nuclear and renewables sources. Therefore a sustainable use of fossil fuels (coal in particular) will be required for several decades. In this scenario, carbon capture and storage (CCS) represents a key solution to control the global warming reducing carbon dioxide emissions. The integration between CCS technologies and power generation plants currently needs a demonstration at commercial scale to reduce both technological risks and high capital and operating cost. This paper compares, from the technical and economic points of view, the performance of three coal-fired power generation technologies: (i) ultra-supercritical (USC) plant equipped with a conventional flue gas treatment (CGT) process, (ii) USC plant equipped with SNOX technology for a combined removal of sulphur and nitrogen oxides and (iii) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant based on a slurry-feed entrained-flow gasifier. Each technology was analysed in its configurations without and with CO2 capture, referring to a commercial-scale of 1000MWth. Technical assessment was carried out by using simulation models implemented through Aspen Plus and Gate-Cycle tools, whereas economic assessment was performed through a properly developed simulation model. USC equipped with CGT systems shows an overall efficiency (43.7%) comparable to IGCC (43.9%), whereas introduction of SNOX technology increases USC efficiency up to 44.8%. Being the CCS energy penalties significantly higher for USC (about 10.5% points vs. about 8.5 for IGCC), the IGCC with CCS is more efficient (35.3%) than the corresponding CO2-free USC (34.2% for the SNOX-based configuration). Whereas, for the case study, USC is most profitable than IGCC (with a net present value, NPV, of 190M vs. 54M) for a conventional configuration, CO2-free IGCC shows a higher NPV (?673M) than USC (?711M). In any cases, the NPV of all the CO2-free configurations is strongly negative: this means that, with the current market conditions, the introduction of a CCS system cannot be economically justified without a significant incentive.

Vittorio Tola; Alberto Pettinau

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

NETL: Gasification - National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Gasification National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility National Carbon Capture Center Participants The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. The PSDF now houses the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to address the nation's need for cost-effective, commercially viable CO2 capture options for flue gas from pulverized coal power plants and syngas from coal gasification power plants. The NCCC focuses national efforts on reducing greenhouse gas emissions through technological innovation, and serve as a neutral test center for emerging carbon capture technologies. PSDF-NCCC Background

35

Power Plant Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

Tingley, Joseph V.

36

Economic evaluations of coal-based combustion and gasification power plants with post-combustion CO2 capture using calcium looping cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal-based power generation sector is facing important changes to implement energy efficient carbon capture technologies to comply with emission reduction targets for transition to low carbon economy. This paper assesses CaL (Calcium Looping) as one of the innovative carbon capture options able to deliver low energy and cost penalties. The work evaluates how the integration of post-combustion calcium looping influences the economics of power plants providing up-dated techno-economic indicators. Coal-based combustion plants operated in both sub- and super-critical steam conditions were evaluated, as well as coal gasification plant using an oxygen-blown entrained-flow gasifier. As benchmark options used to quantify the carbon capture energy and cost penalties, the same power generation technologies were evaluated without CCS (Carbon capture and storage). The power plant concepts investigated in the paper generates around 545560MW net power with at least 90% carbon capture rate. Introduction of CaL technology for CO2 capture results in a 2442% increase of specific capital investment, the O&M costs are increasing with 2430% and the electricity cost with 3948% (all compared to non-CCS cases). As the techno-economic results suggest, CaL has good application potential in combustion-based power generation.

Calin-Cristian Cormos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Background Gasification Background Challenges for Gasification The widespread market penetration of gasification continues to face some challenges. Over the years, gasification challenges related to gasifier and supporting unit availability, operability, and maintainability have been addressed with substantial success, and new implementations of gasification will continue to improve in this area. At present, perhaps the most significant remaining challenge is the relatively high capital costs of gasification plants, particularly given the low capital investment required for NGCC-based power production combined with low natural gas prices currently being experienced in the domestic market. Accordingly, technology that can decrease capital costs of gasification systems and plant supporting systems will be most important towards further deployment of gasification.

38

Pioneering Gasification Plants | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

lighting street lights fueled by "town gas," frequently the product of early forms of coal gasification. Gasification of fuel also provided fuel for steel mills, and toward the...

39

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

40

Application of the integrated gasification combined cycle technology and BGL gasification design for power generation  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology promises to be the power generation technology of choice in the late 1990s and beyond. Based on the principle that almost any fuel can be burned more cleanly and efficiently if first turned into a gas, an IGCC plant extracts more electricity from a ton of coal by burning it as a gas in a turbine rather than as a solid in a boiler. Accordingly, coal gasification is the process of converting coal to a clean-burning synthetic gas. IGCC technology is the integration of the coal-gasification plant with a conventional combined-cycle plant to produce electricity. The benefits of this technology merger are many and result in a highly efficient and environmentally superior energy production facility. The lGCC technology holds significant implications for Asia-Pacific countries and for other parts of the world. High-growth regions require additional baseload capacity. Current low prices for natural gas and minimal emissions that result from its use for power generation favor its selection as the fuel source for new power generation capacity. However, fluctuations in fuel price and fuel availability are undermining the industry`s confidence in planning future capacity based upon gas-fueled generation. With the world`s vast coal reserves, there is a continuing effort to provide coal-fueled power generation technologies that use coal cleanly and efficiently. The lGCC technology accomplishes this objective. This chapter provides a summary of the status of lGCC technology and lGCC projects known to date. It also will present a technical overview of the British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) technology, one of the leading and most promising coal gasifier designs.

Edmonds, R.F. Jr.; Hulkowich, G.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology: IGCC.integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants (output. Integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants are

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Dynamic simulation and load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect

Load-following control of future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture is expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. To study control performance during load following, a plant-wide dynamic simulation of a coal-fed IGCC plant with CO{sub 2} capture has been developed. The slurry-fed gasifier is a single-stage, downward-fired, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow type with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC). The syngas from the outlet of the RSC goes to a scrubber followed by a two-stage sour shift process with inter-stage cooling. The acid gas removal (AGR) process is a dual-stage physical solvent-based process for selective removal of H{sub 2}S in the first stage and CO{sub 2} in the second stage. Sulfur is recovered using a Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. The recovered CO{sub 2} is compressed by a split-shaft multistage compressor and sent for sequestration after being treated in an absorber with triethylene glycol for dehydration. The clean syngas is sent to two advanced F-class gas turbines (GTs) partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit. A subcritical steam cycle is used for heat recovery steam generation. A treatment unit for the sour water strips off the acid gases for utilization in the Claus unit. The steady-state model developed in Aspen Plus is converted to an Aspen Plus Dynamics simulation and integrated with MATLAB for control studies. The results from the plant-wide dynamic model are compared qualitatively with the data from a commercial plant having different configuration, operating condition, and feed quality than what has been considered in this work. For load-following control, the GT-lead with gasifier-follow control strategy is considered. A modified proportionalintegralderivative (PID) control is considered for the syngas pressure control. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate while load-following, a linear model predictive controller (LMPC) is implemented in MATLAB. A combined process and disturbance model is identified by considering a number of model forms and choosing the final model based on an information-theoretic criterion. The performance of the LMPC is found to be superior to the conventional PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

Bhattacharyya, D,; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS) and the Parallel Computing toolbox from Mathworks. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Coal gasification development intensifies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal gasification development intensifies ... Three almost simultaneous developments in coal gasification, although widely divergent in purpose and geography, rapidly are accelerating the technology's movement into an era of commercial exploitation. ... A plant to be built in the California desert will be the first commercialsize coal gasification power plant in the U.S. In West Germany, synthesis gas from a coal gasification demonstration plant is now being used as a chemical feedstock, preliminary to scaleup of the process to commercial size. ...

1980-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

45

Gasification | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification Gasification Gasification The Wabash River Clean Coal Power Plant The Wabash River Clean Coal Power Plant Gasification Technology R&D Coal gasification offers one of the most versatile and clean ways to convert coal into electricity, hydrogen, and other valuable energy products. Coal gasification electric power plants are now operating commercially in the United States and in other nations, and many experts predict that coal gasification will be at the heart of future generations of clean coal technology plants. Rather than burning coal directly, gasification (a thermo-chemical process) breaks down coal - or virtually any carbon-based feedstock - into its basic chemical constituents. In a modern gasifier, coal is typically exposed to steam and carefully controlled amounts of air or oxygen under high

46

Conceptual design of a black liquor gasification pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

In July 1985, Champion International completed a study of kraft black liquor gasification and use of the product gases in a combined cycle cogeneration system based on gas turbines. That study indicated that gasification had high potential as an alternative to recovery boiler technology and offered many advantages. This paper describes the design of the plant, the construction of the pilot plant, and finally presents data from operation of the plant.

Kelleher, E. G.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Configurations of the Mercury 50 Recuperated Gas-Turbine-Based Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Heat and Power (BIGCHP) Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, several original configurations of the cogeneration system based on different gasification technologies and Mercury 50 recuperated gas turbine are proposed and examined theoretically. ... (14) Another key problem of the successful commercialization of the technology is the commercial availability of reliable and efficient gas turbines (GTs) modified for syngas operation. ... In particular, the paper presents current development status and design challenges being addressed by Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. for large industrial engines (>200 MW) and by Solar Turbines for smaller engines (Turbine Systems (ATS) program. ...

Jacek Kalina

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

Coal gasification for power generation. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect

The report gives an overview of the opportunities for coal gasification in the power generation industry. It provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered in the report include: An overview of coal generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; A description of gasification technology including processes and systems; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; A discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; An evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; A discussion of IGCC project development options; A discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; Profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and A description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

NONE

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Coal-Fuelled Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined cycle power plant, when used as a generic ... which converts heat into mechanical energy in a combined gas and steam turbine process. Combined cycle processes with coal gasification or coal combustion .....

Dr. Hartmut Spliethoff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

NETL: 2010 World Gasification Database Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > 2010 World Gasification Database Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > 2010 World Gasification Database Gasification Systems 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database Archive DOE/NETL 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database Worldwide Gasification Database Analysis The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.

51

Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Technology Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Gasification Technologies contacts Gary J. stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Ronald Breault Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4486 ronald.breault@netl.doe.gov Herbert E. andrus, Jr. Principal Investigator ALSTOM Power 2000 Day Hill Rd. Windsor, CT 06095 860-285-4770 herbert.e.andrus@power.alstom.com Hybrid Combustion-GasifiCation CHemiCal loopinG Coal power teCHnoloGy development Description Gasification technologies can provide a stable, affordable energy supply for the nation, while also providing high efficiencies and near zero pollutants. With coal

52

Chemical-looping combustion in combination with integrated coal gasification -- A way to avoid CO{sub 2} emission from coal fired power plants without a significant decrease in net power efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Observation of the increased concentration of carbon dioxide, CO{sub 2}, in the atmosphere and the thereto suspected connected global warming effect has made prevention of CO{sub 2} emission from power plants an important field of research. Today, most fuels used in thermal power plants are fossil fuels like oil, coal or natural gas which upon combustion gives rise to a net release of CO{sub 2}. To avoid this emission, different gas separation techniques like membrane separation and absorption have been suggested to separate CO{sub 2} from the other exhaust gases before the exhaust is released into the atmosphere. This separation is, however, estimated to be rather costly due to the large volume of dilute gas that needs to be treated and the energy consumed in the separation process. In chemical-looping combustion (CLC), CO{sub 2} and the other combustion products are already separated in the combustion process. This is because fuel and air never enter the same reactor. Instead of oxidizing the fuel with oxygen from the combustion air, the fuel is oxidized by an oxygen carrier, that is, an oxygen containing compound, for instance a metal oxide. Chemical-looping combustion is also thought to result in a higher fuel energy conversion efficiency. It is possible to recover some of the heat from the exhaust within the CLC system. In this paper, estimations of the performance of a chemical-looping combustion combined cycle system with integrated coal gasification and NiO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} as an oxygen carrier is compared to the performance of a similarly simulated conventional IGCC-system. Calculations show that the systems reach about the same net power efficiencies but then the chemical-looping systems have an added advantage of CO{sub 2} separation.

Anheden, M.; Svedberg, G. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Optimum Design of Coal Gasification Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with the optimum design of heat recovery systems using the Texaco Coal Gasification Process (TCGP). TCGP uses an entrained type gasifier and produces hot gases at approximately 2500oF with high heat flux. This heat is removed...

Pohani, B. P.; Ray, H. P.; Wen, H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Based on Pressurized Fluidized Bed Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enviropower Inc. has developed a modern power plant concept based on an integrated pressurized fluidized bed gasification and gas turbine combined cycle (IGCC)....

Kari Salo; J. G. Patel

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined-cycle (GMS) power generation  

SciTech Connect

The coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined cycle (GMS) refers to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems in which coal gasification is used to supply a clean fuel (free of mineral matter and sulfur) for combustion in an MHD electrical power plant. Advantages of a clean-fuel system include the elimination of mineral matter or slag from all components other than the coal gasifier and gas cleanup system; reduced wear and corrosion on components; and increased seed recovery resulting from reduced exposure of seed to mineral matter or slag. Efficiencies in some specific GMS power plants are shown to be higher than for a comparably sized coal-burning MHD power plant. The use of energy from the MHD exhaust gas to gasify coal (rather than the typical approach of burning part of the coal) results in these higher efficiencies.

Lytle, J.M.; Marchant, D.D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE POWER & GASIFICATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE POWER & GASIFICATION CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE POWER & GASIFICATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER SUBCONTRACT QZ001 UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-99FT40675; W(A)-03-001, CH-1127 The Petitioner, ChevronTexaco Worldwide Power & Gasification (ChevronTexaco) is a subcontractor to Research Triangle Institute (RTI) under the subject cost plus fixed fee agreement for the performance of work entitled, Novel Technologies for Gaseous Containment Control. The purpose of the agreement is to prove the feasibility of synthesis gas clean up techniques, including the warm synthesis gas process based on the RVS-1 sorbent developed by the Department of Energy and RTI and, for reverse selective membrane technology developed by Dupont and Air Liquide, Membrane Dupont Air Liquide (MEDAL) and RTI.

57

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the technoeconomic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002.

Unknown

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Cost of energy analysis of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with respect to CO2 capture ratio under climate change scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the cost of energy (COE) analysis of an integrated gasification...2...capture ratio under the climate change scenarios. To obtain process data for a COE analysis, simulation mod...

Kyungtae Park; Dongil Shin; Gibaek Lee

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

NETL: Gasification Archived Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > Reference Shelf > Archived Projects Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > Reference Shelf > Archived Projects Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Archived Projects Archived Projects | Active Projects | All NETL Fact Sheets Feed Systems Reaction-Driven Ion Transport Membranes Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Coal/Biomass Gasification at Colorado School of Mines Co-Production of Electricity and Hydrogen Using a Novel Iron-Based Catalyst Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity via Catalytic Coal Gasification Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Technology Development

60

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC20  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coal. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of the first demonstration of the Transport Gasifier following significant modifications of the gasifier configuration. This demonstration took place during test campaign TC20, occurring from August 8 to September 23, 2006. The modifications proved successful in increasing gasifier residence time and particulate collection efficiency, two parameters critical in broadening of the fuel operating envelope and advancing gasification technology. The gasification process operated for over 870 hours, providing the opportunity for additional testing of various gasification technologies, such as PCD failsafe evaluation and sensor development.

Southern Company Services

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC16  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR (formerly Kellogg Brown & Root) Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report discusses Test Campaign TC16 of the PSDF gasification process. TC16 began on July 14, 2004, lasting until August 24, 2004, for a total of 835 hours of gasification operation. The test campaign consisted of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal and high sodium lignite from the North Dakota Freedom mine. The highest gasifier operating temperature mostly varied from 1,760 to 1,850 F with PRB and 1,500 to 1,600 F with lignite. Typically, during PRB operations, the gasifier exit pressure was maintained between 215 and 225 psig using air as the gasification oxidant and between 145 and 190 psig while using oxygen as the oxidant. With lignite, the gasifier operated only in air-blown mode, and the gasifier outlet pressure ranged from 150 to 160 psig.

Southern Company Services

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

62

Pilot-Plant Gasification of Olive Stone: a Technical Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of pilot-plant gasification tests carried out at atmospheric pressure and temperatures within the range of 700?820 C in order to assess the technical viability of gasifying untreated olive stone, also called orujillo, a byproduct of the olive oil industry that comprises both olive stone and pulp. ... Atmospheric air gasification of biomass/waste in a bubbling-fluidized-bed (BFB) reactor is an attractive simple process to convert a solid material to a gaseous fuel. ... Their different characteristics (mainly volatile and ash content) affect the plant operation because of the energy content and the ash fusibility, but both types were gasified efficiently and the problems found were similar. ...

A. Gmez-Barea; R. Arjona; P. Ollero

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

NETL: Gasification - Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants General Electric Company Project Number: FE0007859 Project Description General Electric Company (GE) is studying the feasibility of improving plant availability and reducing total installed costs in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. GE is evaluating the IGCC technology effects of total installed cost and availability through deployment of a multi-faceted approach in technology evaluation, constructability, and design methodology. Eastman Chemical Company will be supporting the GE effort on certain technologies by providing consulting on the evaluations and technology transfer phases of the project. The end result is aimed at reducing the time to technological maturity and enabling plants to reach higher values of availability in a shorter period of time and at a lower installed cost.

64

NETL: Coal Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Gasification Systems News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan...

65

Gasification Systems Project Portfolio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2014 Gasification Systems Project Portfolio News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International...

66

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC14  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details test campaign TC14 of the PSDF gasification process. TC14 began on February 16, 2004, and lasted until February 28, 2004, accumulating 214 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. The gasifier operating temperatures varied from 1760 to 1810 F at pressures from 188 to 212 psig during steady air blown operations and approximately 160 psig during oxygen blown operations.

Southern Company Services

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Improving process performances in coal gasification for power and synfuel production  

SciTech Connect

This paper is aimed at developing process alternatives of conventional coal gasification. A number of possibilities are presented, simulated, and discussed in order to improve the process performances, to avoid the use of pure oxygen, and to reduce the overall CO{sub 2} emissions. The different process configurations considered include both power production, by means of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant, and synfuel production, by means of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The basic idea is to thermally couple a gasifier, fed with coal and steam, and a combustor where coal is burnt with air, thus overcoming the need of expensive pure oxygen as a feedstock. As a result, no or little nitrogen is present in the syngas produced by the gasifier; the required heat is transferred by using an inert solid as the carrier, which is circulated between the two modules. First, a thermodynamic study of the dual-bed gasification is carried out. Then a dual-bed gasification process is simulated by Aspen Plus, and the efficiency and overall CO{sub 2} emissions of the process are calculated and compared with a conventional gasification with oxygen. Eventually, the scheme with two reactors (gasifier-combustor) is coupled with an IGCC process. The simulation of this plant is compared with that of a conventional IGCC, where the gasifier is fed by high purity oxygen. According to the newly proposed configuration, the global plant efficiency increases by 27.9% and the CO{sub 2} emissions decrease by 21.8%, with respect to the performances of a conventional IGCC process. 29 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

M. Sudiro; A. Bertucco; F. Ruggeri; M. Fontana [University of Padova, Milan (Italy). Italy and Foster Wheeler Italiana Spa

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Incineration versus gasification: A comparison in waste to energy plants  

SciTech Connect

Waste thermodestruction has obvious advantages; nevertheless, it encounters problems not very easy to solve, such as those related to gas cleaning and to restricting standards for emission control. One important aspect is the possibility of heat recovery with production of valuable energy such as electric energy. A new technology, at least as far as its application to waste disposal (mainly municipal waste) is concerned, is represented by gasification. It becomes interesting to establish a comparison between this new technology and the traditional one. This comparison does not appear, however, to be very simple, since for gasification only few documented experiments can be found, and these are often difficult to relate to a common evaluation factor. The present paper describes the state of the art of the traditional technology in the thermodestruction field to define a comparison basis. Then, a general discussion is given for the gasification technology, emphasizing different possible solutions to allow for a quantitative evaluation. At last the various aspects of the problem (related to plant, environment, energy, economics, etc.) are specifically compared for the purpose of finding elements which allow for a quantitative evaluation or for emphasizing parameters useful for a final choice.

Ghezzi, U.; Pasini, S.; Ferri, L.D.A. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC18  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details Test Campaign TC18 of the PSDF gasification process. Test campaign TC18 began on June 23, 2005, and ended on August 22, 2005, with the gasifier train accumulating 1,342 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Some of the testing conducted included commissioning of a new recycle syngas compressor for gasifier aeration, evaluation of PCD filter elements and failsafes, testing of gas cleanup technologies, and further evaluation of solids handling equipment. At the conclusion of TC18, the PSDF gasification process had been operated for more than 7,750 hours.

Southern Company Services

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC17  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR (formerly Kellogg Brown & Root) Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results gasification operation with Illinois Basin bituminous coal in PSDF test campaign TC17. The test campaign was completed from October 25, 2004, to November 18, 2004. System startup and initial operation was accomplished with Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal, and then the system was transitioned to Illinois Basin coal operation. The major objective for this test was to evaluate the PSDF gasification process operational stability and performance using the Illinois Basin coal. The Transport Gasifier train was operated for 92 hours using PRB coal and for 221 hours using Illinois Basin coal.

Southern Company Services

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Power Gasification Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process Jeff Seabright Arthur Lee Richard Weissman, PhD. Texaco Inc. White Plains, New York Presented at: First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 Washington D.C. ABSTRACT Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is a commercially proven clean coal technology that offers significant environmental and economic benefits today, including decreased air and solids emissions. It also offers the potential to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. Coal IGCC provides electric utilities strategic options in meeting today's growing demand for energy products (electricity, fuel, chemicals) while protecting public health and the environment and providing a pathway to zero emissions coal-based power generation.

72

Coal Gasification for Electric Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...iv) high plant availability...petro-leum and natural gas and the installation...inefficient, low-pressure, low-capacity...atmospheric pressure. It is comnmercially...its low-pressure operation...synthesis gas produced...extremely high temperatures...synthetic natural gas (SNG...

Dwain F. Spencer; Michael J. Gluckman; Seymour B. Alpert

1982-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

73

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2: CO2 Capture: Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs CO2: CO2 Capture: Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs Specific Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs from CO2 Capture In foregoing discussion, results of NETL's comprehensive study comparing the performance and cost of various fossil fuel-based power generation technologies with and without CO2 capture were reviewed. Of particular interest in that study was the companion set of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) designs, using GE's gasification technology, which can be used to illustrate the design changes needed for CO2 capture. Current Technology - IGCC Plant Design Figure 1 shows a simplified block flow diagram (BFD) of a market-ready IGCC design without CO2 capture. As shown, the IGCC plant consists of the following processing islands, of which a more detailed description of each can be found in the cited NETL referenced report: 1

74

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC24  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC24, the first test campaign using a bituminous coal as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC24 was conducted from February 16, 2008, through March 19, 2008. The PSDF gasification process operated for about 230 hours in air-blown gasification mode with about 225 tons of Utah bituminous coal feed. Operational challenges in gasifier operation were related to particle agglomeration, a large percentage of oversize coal particles, low overall gasifier solids collection efficiency, and refractory degradation in the gasifier solids collection unit. The carbon conversion and syngas heating values varied widely, with low values obtained during periods of low gasifier operating temperature. Despite the operating difficulties, several periods of steady state operation were achieved, which provided useful data for future testing. TC24 operation afforded the opportunity for testing of various types of technologies, including dry coal feeding with a developmental feeder, the Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) feeder; evaluating a new hot gas filter element media configuration; and enhancing syngas cleanup with water-gas shift catalysts. During TC24, the PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane.

Southern Company Services

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT--DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power and Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement with the USDOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co--product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases: Phase 1 is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase 2 is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase 3 updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase 2, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report is WMPI's third quarterly technical progress report. It covers the period performance from October 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001.

John W. Rich

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Technical analysis of advanced wastewater-treatment systems for coal-gasification plants  

SciTech Connect

This analysis of advanced wastewater treatment systems for coal gasification plants highlights the three coal gasification demonstration plants proposed by the US Department of Energy: The Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant, the Illinois Coal Gasification Group Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant, and the CONOCO Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant. Technical risks exist for coal gasification wastewater treatment systems, in general, and for the three DOE demonstration plants (as designed), in particular, because of key data gaps. The quantities and compositions of coal gasification wastewaters are not well known; the treatability of coal gasification wastewaters by various technologies has not been adequately studied; the dynamic interactions of sequential wastewater treatment processes and upstream wastewater sources has not been tested at demonstration scale. This report identifies key data gaps and recommends that demonstration-size and commercial-size plants be used for coal gasification wastewater treatment data base development. While certain advanced treatment technologies can benefit from additional bench-scale studies, bench-scale and pilot plant scale operations are not representative of commercial-size facility operation. It is recommended that coal gasification demonstration plants, and other commercial-size facilities that generate similar wastewaters, be used to test advanced wastewater treatment technologies during operation by using sidestreams or collected wastewater samples in addition to the plant's own primary treatment system. Advanced wastewater treatment processes are needed to degrade refractory organics and to concentrate and remove dissolved solids to allow for wastewater reuse. Further study of reverse osmosis, evaporation, electrodialysis, ozonation, activated carbon, and ultrafiltration should take place at bench-scale.

Not Available

1981-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and 642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY SUMMARY This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE's proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

78

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The DOE/WMPI Cooperative Agreement was modified on May 2003 to expand the project team to include Shell Global Solutions, U.S. and Uhde GmbH as the engineering contractor. The addition of Shell and Uhde strengthen both the technical capability and financing ability of the project. Uhde, as the prime EPC contractor, has the responsibility to develop a LSTK (lump sum turnkey) engineering design package for the EECP leading to the eventual detailed engineering, construction and operation of the proposed concept. Major technical activities during the reporting period include: (1) finalizing contractual agreements between DOE, Uhde and other technology providers, focusing on intellectual-property-right issues, (2) Uhde's preparation of a LSTK project execution plan and other project engineering procedural documents, and (3) Uhde's preliminary project technical concept assessment and trade-off evaluations.

John W. Rich

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power: Typical IGCC Configuration Power: Typical IGCC Configuration Major Commercial Examples of IGCC Plants While there are many coal gasification plants in the world co-producing electricity, chemicals and/or steam, the following are four notable, commercial-size IGCC plants currently in operation solely for producing electricity from coal and/or coke. Tampa Electric, Polk County 250 MW GE Gasifier Wabash, West Terre Haute 265 MW CoP E-Gas(tm) Gasifier Nuon, Buggenum 250 MW Shell Gasifier Elcogas, Puertollano 300 MW Prenflo Gasifier All of the plants began operation prior to 2000 and employ high temperature entrained-flow gasification technology. GE (formerly Texaco-Chevron) and ConocoPhillips (CoP) are slurry feed gasifiers, while Shell and Prenflo are dry feed gasifiers. None of these plants currently capture carbon dioxide (CO2). A simplified process flow diagram of the 250-MW Tampa Electric IGCC plant is shown in Figure 1 to illustrate the overall arrangement of an operating commercial scale IGCC plant. The Tampa Electric plant is equipped with both radiant and convective coolers for heat recovery, generating high pressure (HP) steam.

80

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage in Coal to Electrical Applications Usage in Coal to Electrical Applications The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) application of gasification offers some water-saving advantages over other technologies for producing electricity from coal. Regions with limited water resources, typical of many parts of the western United States, could conserve resources by meeting increasing electricity demand with IGCC generation. Many of these areas have good coal resources and a need for new generating capacity. Water use in a thermoelectric power plant is described by two separate terms: water withdrawal and water consumption. Water withdrawal is the amount of water taken into the plant from an outside source. Water consumption refers to the portion of the withdrawn water that is not returned directly to the outside source - for example, water lost to evaporative cooling.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NETL: News Release - Coal Gasification Plant Returns $79 Million to DOE in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2006 2, 2006 Coal Gasification Plant Returns $79 Million to DOE in Revenue-Sharing Gas Sales Plant Currently Supplies Carbon Dioxide for DOE Sequestration Project Washington, DC -A coal gasification plant purchased from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1988 recently paid millions of dollars to DOE as part of a revenue sharing agreement and continues to be an integral part of a Department project to sequester millions of tons of carbon dioxide while doubling an oil field's recovery rate. MORE INFO Learn more about the Great Plains Synfuels Plant The Dakota Gasification Company (DGC), which purchased the Great Plains Synfuels Plant near Beulah, N.D., recently announced the payment of more than $79 million to DOE as part of a revenue-sharing agreement signed in

82

Gasification … Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, Clearwater, Florida, June 5 to 9, 2011 Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, Clearwater, Florida, June 5 to 9, 2011 Gasification Technologies Advances for Future Energy Plants Jenny B. Tennant Technology Manager - Gasification 2 Gasification Program Goal "Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness" Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy November 2010 The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards 3 Oxygen Membrane - APCI - 25% capital cost reduction - 5.0% COE reduction Warm Gas Cleaning - RTI in combination with H 2 /CO 2 Membrane - Eltron - 2.9 % pt efficiency increase - 12% COE decrease Oxygen CO 2 H 2 rich stream Water Gas Shift*

83

Gasification … Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

th th Annual International Colloquium on Environmentally Preferred Advanced Power Generation, Costa Mesa, CA, February 7, 2012 An Overview of U.S. DOE's Gasification Systems Program Jenny B. Tennant Technology Manager - Gasification 2 Gasification Program Goal "Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness" Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy November 2010 The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards 3 U.S. Coal Resources Low rank: lignite and sub-bituminous coal - About 50% of the U.S. coal reserves - Nearly 50% of U.S. coal production - Lower sulfur Bituminous coal

84

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

SciTech Connect

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT-DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors entered into a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase 1 is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase 2 is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase 3 updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase 2, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002.

Unknown

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC08  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses Test Campaign TC08 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier in air- and oxygen-blown modes during TC08. Test Run TC08 was started on June 9, 2002 and completed on June 29. Both gasifier and PCD operations were stable during the test run with a stable baseline pressure drop. The oxygen feed supply system worked well and the transition from air to oxygen blown was smooth. The gasifier temperature was varied between 1,710 and 1,770 F at pressures from 125 to 240 psig. The gasifier operates at lower pressure during oxygen-blown mode due to the supply pressure of the oxygen system. In TC08, 476 hours of solid circulation and 364 hours of coal feed were attained with 153 hours of pure oxygen feed. The gasifier and PCD operations were stable in both enriched air and 100 percent oxygen blown modes. The oxygen concentration was slowly increased during the first transition to full oxygen-blown operations. Subsequent transitions from air to oxygen blown could be completed in less than 15 minutes. Oxygen-blown operations produced the highest synthesis gas heating value to date, with a projected synthesis gas heating value averaging 175 Btu/scf. Carbon conversions averaged 93 percent, slightly lower than carbon conversions achieved during air-blown gasification.

Southern Company Services

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Techno-economic assessment of pulverized coal boilers and IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current studies on power plant technologies suggest that Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are an effective and economic CO2 capture technology pathway. In addition, the system in conventi...

Y. Huang; S. Rezvani; D. McIlveen-Wright

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Gasification world database 2007. Current industry status  

SciTech Connect

Information on trends and drivers affecting the growth of the gasification industry is provided based on information in the USDOE NETL world gasification database (available on the www.netl.doe.gov website). Sectors cover syngas production in 2007, growth planned through 2010, recent industry changes, and beyond 2010 - strong growth anticipated in the United States. A list of gasification-based power plant projects, coal-to-liquid projects and coal-to-SNG projects under consideration in the USA is given.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gasifier Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Program Gasification Systems Program Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products more easily with gasification-based technologies compared to conventional combustion of solid feedstocks. Gasification can generate clean power, and by adding steam to the syngas and performing water-gas-shift to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2), additional hydrogen can be produced. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for enhanced oil recovery (see Gasification Systems Program Research and Development Areas figure). In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Furthermore, polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies.

91

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE November 9, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A database just released by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documents the worldwide growth of gasification, the expected technology of choice for future coal-based plants that produce power, fuels, and/or chemicals with near-zero emissions. The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database, a comprehensive collection of gasification plant data, describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas

92

Biomass waste gasification - Can be the two stage process suitable for tar reduction and power generation?  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of one stage (co-current) and two stage gasification of wood pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Original arrangement with grate-less reactor and upward moving bed of the pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two stage gasification leads to drastic reduction of tar content in gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One stage gasification produces gas with higher LHV at lower overall ER. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Content of ammonia in gas is lower in two stage moving bed gasification. - Abstract: A pilot scale gasification unit with novel co-current, updraft arrangement in the first stage and counter-current downdraft in the second stage was developed and exploited for studying effects of two stage gasification in comparison with one stage gasification of biomass (wood pellets) on fuel gas composition and attainable gas purity. Significant producer gas parameters (gas composition, heating value, content of tar compounds, content of inorganic gas impurities) were compared for the two stage and the one stage method of the gasification arrangement with only the upward moving bed (co-current updraft). The main novel features of the gasifier conception include grate-less reactor, upward moving bed of biomass particles (e.g. pellets) by means of a screw elevator with changeable rotational speed and gradual expanding diameter of the cylindrical reactor in the part above the upper end of the screw. The gasifier concept and arrangement are considered convenient for thermal power range 100-350 kW{sub th}. The second stage of the gasifier served mainly for tar compounds destruction/reforming by increased temperature (around 950 Degree-Sign C) and for gasification reaction of the fuel gas with char. The second stage used additional combustion of the fuel gas by preheated secondary air for attaining higher temperature and faster gasification of the remaining char from the first stage. The measurements of gas composition and tar compound contents confirmed superiority of the two stage gasification system, drastic decrease of aromatic compounds with two and higher number of benzene rings by 1-2 orders. On the other hand the two stage gasification (with overall ER = 0.71) led to substantial reduction of gas heating value (LHV = 3.15 MJ/Nm{sup 3}), elevation of gas volume and increase of nitrogen content in fuel gas. The increased temperature (>950 Degree-Sign C) at the entrance to the char bed caused also substantial decrease of ammonia content in fuel gas. The char with higher content of ash leaving the second stage presented only few mass% of the inlet biomass stream.

Sulc, Jindrich; Stojdl, Jiri; Richter, Miroslav; Popelka, Jan [Faculty of the Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, Kralova Vysina 7, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Svoboda, Karel, E-mail: svoboda@icpf.cas.cz [Faculty of the Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, Kralova Vysina 7, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the ASCR, v.v.i., Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Smetana, Jiri; Vacek, Jiri [D.S.K. Ltd., Ujezdecek - Dukla 264, 415 01 Teplice I (Czech Republic); Skoblja, Siarhei; Buryan, Petr [Dept. of Gas, Coke and Air protection, Institute of Chemical Technol., Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

10January 1998 Small-Scale Gasification-Based Biomass Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, gasified biomass canbe usedto power internal combustion engines(ICEs), gasturbines, and fuel cells, all. Historical Perspective on Biomass-Gasifier/Internal Combustion Engine (BiG/ICE) Systems Gasified wood10January 1998 I Small-Scale Gasification-Based Biomass Power Generation Eric D. Larson Centerfor

94

Electric Power Generation Systems | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Data Baseline Studies Quality Guidelines (QGESS) About Energy Analysis Coal gasification-based power plants Coal combustion-based power plants Natural gas-fueled power...

95

Gasification Systems Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan Project Portfolio Project...

96

Gasification Systems Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan Project...

97

NETL: Gasification - National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier Optimization Main Area Gasifier Optimization Main Area National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Southern Company Services, Inc. Project Number: FE0000749 Project Description The objective of this project is to develop technologies under realistic conditions that will reduce the cost of advanced coal-fueled power plants with CO2 capture. This technology development will include the design, procurement, construction, installation, and operation of a flexible facility for the testing of processes for pre-combustion CO2 capture, post-combustion CO2 capture and oxy-combustion. Components and systems that are appropriate for inclusion in the detailed test plan will be identified in collaboration with NETL. In addition to evaluating DOE sponsored projects; projects from industry, universities, and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) will be evaluated to assist in accomplishing the project objectives.

98

Chapter 3 - Coal-fired Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal provides around 40% of the worlds electricity, more than any other source. Most modern coal-fired power stations burn pulverized coal in a boiler to raise steam for a steam turbine. High efficiency is achieved by using supercritical boilers made of advanced alloys that produce high steam temperatures, and large, high-efficiency steam turbines. Alternative types of coal-fired power plants include fluidized bed boilers that can burn a variety of poor fuels, as well as coal gasifiers that allow coal to be turned into a combustible gas that can be burned in a gas turbine. Emissions from coal plants include sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and trace metals, all of which must be controlled. Capturing carbon dioxide from a coal plant is also under consideration. This can be achieved using post-combustion capture, a pre-combustion gasification process, or by burning coal in oxygen instead of air.

Paul Breeze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Biomass Gasification-Based Syngas Production for a Conventional Oxo Synthesis PlantProcess Modeling, Integration Opportunities, and Thermodynamic Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass Gasification-Based Syngas Production for a Conventional Oxo Synthesis PlantProcess Modeling, Integration Opportunities, and Thermodynamic Performance ... A small amount of steam (0.4 ktony1) is used to control the burner temperature. ...

Maria Arvidsson; Matteo Morandin; Simon Harvey

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY - Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY August 2005 Revised May 2007 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Gasification Technology Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Project Manager: James R. Longanbach Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Norma J. Kuehn Ronald L. Schoff Vladimir Vaysman Jay S. White Power Plant Water Usage and Loss Study i August 2005 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...................................................................................................................... I LIST OF TABLES.............................................................................................................................III

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant January 19, 2012 - 5:00pm Addthis Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon dioxide produced are among the technologies being used in the Texas Clean Energy Project. | Photo courtesy of llnlphotos. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon

102

Dynamic modeling of IGCC power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants are an effective option to reduce emissions and implement carbon-dioxide sequestration. The combination of a very complex fuel-processing plant and a combined cycle power station leads to challenging problems as far as dynamic operation is concerned. Dynamic performance is extremely relevant because recent developments in the electricity market push toward an ever more flexible and varying operation of power plants. A dynamic model of the entire system and models of its sub-systems are indispensable tools in order to perform computer simulations aimed at process and control design. This paper presents the development of the lumped-parameters dynamic model of an entrained-flow gasifier, with special emphasis on the modeling approach. The model is implemented into software by means of the Modelica language and validated by comparison with one set of data related to the steady operation of the gasifier of the Buggenum power station in the Netherlands. Furthermore, in order to demonstrate the potential of the proposed modeling approach and the use of simulation for control design purposes, a complete model of an exemplary IGCC power plant, including its control system, has been developed, by re-using existing models of combined cycle plant components; the results of a load dispatch ramp simulation are presented and shortly discussed.

F. Casella; P. Colonna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

2010 Worldwide Gasification Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.

104

Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

105

NETL: Gasifipedia - What is Gasification?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Background Gasification Background Drivers for Gasification Technology The need for low-cost power produced in an environmentally sound way is certain, even if the future of regulations limiting the emission and/or encouraging the capture of CO2, and the price and availability of natural gas and oil are not. Gasification is not only capable of efficiently producing electric power, but a wide range of liquids and/or high-value chemicals (including diesel and gasoline for transportation) can be produced from cleaned syngas, providing the flexibility to capitalize on a range of dynamic changes to either domestic energy markets or global economic conditions. Polygeneration-plants that produce multiple products-is uniquely possible with gasification technologies. Continued advances in gasification-based technology will enable the conversion of our nation's abundant coal reserves into energy resources (power and liquid fuels), chemicals, and fertilizers needed to displace the use of imported oil and, thereby, help mitigate its high price and security supply concerns and to support U.S. economic competitiveness with unprecedented environmental performance.

106

DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for New Hydrogen Power Plant | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for New Hydrogen Power Plant DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for New Hydrogen Power Plant DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for New Hydrogen Power Plant November 6, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has signed a cooperative agreement with Hydrogen Energy California LLC (HECA) to build and demonstrate a hydrogen-powered electric generating facility, complete with carbon capture and storage, in Kern County, Calif. The new plant is a step toward commercialization of a clean technology that enables use of our country's vast fossil energy resources while addressing the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. HECA, which is owned by Hydrogen Energy International, BP Alternative Energy, and Rio Tinto, plans to construct an advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant that will produce power by

107

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

108

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from combustion and gasification of coal an equilibriumHolysh, M. 2005. Coke Gasification: Advanced technology forfrom a Coal-Fired Gasification Plant. Final Report, December

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process Catalytic Coal Gasification Process for the Production of Methane-Rich Syngas Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Production of Methane-Rich Syngas from Fuels Using Multi-functional Catalyst/Capture Agent." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Reducing pollution emitted by coal and waste power plants in an economically viable manner and building power plants that co-generate fuels and chemicals during times of low electricity demand are pressing goals for the energy industry. One way to achieve these goals in an economically viable manner is through the use of a catalytic gasifier that

110

Filter system cost comparison for integrated gasification combined cycle and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion power systems  

SciTech Connect

To assess the relative cost of components and sub-systems for a hot gas particulate cleanup system a cost comparison between the filter systems for two advanced coal-based power plants was conducted. Assessing component and sub-system costs permits the most beneficial areas for product improvement to be identified. The results from this study are presented. The filter system is based on a Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filter Concept which is designed to operate with ceramic candle filters. The Foster Wheeler second Generation 453 MWe (net) Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) and the KRW 458 MWe (net) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants are used for the comparison. The comparison presents the general differences of the two power plants and the process related filtration conditions for PFBC and IGCC systems. The results present the conceptual designs for the PFBC and IGCC filter systems as well as a cost summary comparison. The cost summary comparison includes the total plant cost, the fixed operating and maintenance cost, the variable operating and maintenance cost and the effect on the cost of electricity for the two filter systems. The most beneficial areas for product improvement are identified.

Dennis, R.A.; McDaniel, H.M. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center; Buchanan, T.; Chen, H.; Harbaugh, L.B.; Klett, M.; Zaharchuk, R. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Reading, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation  

SciTech Connect

Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

112

NETL: Gasification Systems - Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) Project No.: DE-FC21-90MC25140 Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) Project ID: DE-FC21-90MC25140 NETL Contact: Morgan Mosser (304) 285-4723 Organization: Southern Company Services, Inc. - Birmingham, AL Project Timeline: Start: 09/14/1990 End: 01/31/2009 Power Systems Development Facility The objectives of the work at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) are two-fold; development of the Transport Gasifier for a wide range of US coals from high sodium lignite to Midwestern bituminous and provide a test platform to test various critical components that are likely to appear in future advanced coal-based power facilities producing power and fuels such as hydrogen with zero emissions. With regard to the development of the

113

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OITs Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the waste water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the waste water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

Boyd, Tonya

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

116

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

117

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

118

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

119

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

120

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

122

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

123

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

124

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

125

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

126

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

127

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

128

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

129

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

130

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

131

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

132

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

133

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

134

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

135

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

136

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

137

Economic feasibility study of a wood gasification-based methanol plant: A subcontract report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an economic feasibility study for a wood-gasification-based methanol plant. The objectives were to evaluate the current commercial potential of a small-scale, wood-fed methanol plant using the SERI oxygen-blown, pressurized, down-draft gasifier technology and to identify areas requiring further R and D. The gasifier gas composition and material balance were based on a computer model of the SERI gasifier since acceptable test data were not available. The estimated capital cost was based on the Nth plant constructed. Given the small size and commercial nature of most of the equipment, N was assumed to be between 5 and 10. Only large discrepancies in gasifier output would result in significant charges in capital costs. 47 figs., 55 tabs.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Saguargo Solar Power Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Developer Solargenix Location Red Rock, Arizona Coordinates 32.54795°, -111.292887° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.54795,"lon":-111.292887,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

139

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC11  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses Test Campaign TC11 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). Test run TC11 began on April 7, 2003, with startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until April 18, 2003, when a gasifier upset forced the termination of the test run. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,650 and 1,800 F at pressures from 160 to 200 psig during air-blown operations and around 135 psig during enriched-air operations. Due to a restriction in the oxygen-fed lower mixing zone (LMZ), the majority of the test run featured air-blown operations.

Southern Company Services

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC09  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses Test Campaign TC09 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC09 in air- and oxygen-blown modes. Test Run TC09 was started on September 3, 2002, and completed on September 26, 2002. Both gasifier and PCD operations were stable during the test run, with a stable baseline pressure drop. The oxygen feed supply system worked well and the transition from air to oxygen was smooth. The gasifier temperature varied between 1,725 and 1,825 F at pressures from 125 to 270 psig. The gasifier operates at lower pressure during oxygen-blown mode due to the supply pressure of the oxygen system. In TC09, 414 hours of solid circulation and over 300 hours of coal feed were attained with almost 80 hours of pure oxygen feed.

Southern Company Services

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Integration Strategy of Gasification Technology:? A Gateway to Future Refining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The historical evidence of the operation of a coal gasification plant goes as far back in time as 1878.1 The United State's first power plant based on coal gasification technology was installed in 1980.2 The concept of gasification has begun to attract much attention from the refining industry because of stringent environmental regulations on transportation fuel, slashing demands for fuel oils, and uncertainty in the availability of good crude oils. ... Therefore, it is a challenging task for refining industries to economically integrate gasification technology, and this is the major theme of the paper. ... Gasification is superior to many of the available power production and waste disposal technologies by addressing various issues together regarding environmental emissions, maintaining quality of refining products, and waste management. ...

Jhuma Sadhukhan; X. X. Zhu

2002-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

142

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen Oxygen Commercial Technologies for Oxygen Production Gasification processes require an oxidant, most commonly oxygen; less frequently air or just steam may suffice as the gasification agent depending on the process. Oxygen-blown systems have the advantage of minimizing the size of the gasification reactor and its auxiliary process systems. However, the oxygen for the process must be separated from the atmosphere. Commercial large-scale air separation plants are based on cryogenic distillation technology, capable of supplying oxygen at high purity1 and pressure. This technology is well understood, having been in practice for over 75 years. Cryogenic air separation is recognized for its reliability, and it can be designed for high capacity (up to 5,000 tons per day).

143

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC10  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses Test Campaign TC10 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC10 in air- (mainly for transitions and problematic operations) and oxygen-blown mode. Test Run TC10 was started on November 16, 2002, and completed on December 18, 2002. During oxygen-blown operations, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,825 F at pressures from 150 to 180 psig. After initial adjustments were made to reduce the feed rate, operations with the new fluidized coal feeder were stable with about half of the total coalfeed rate through the new feeder. However, the new fluidized-bed coal feeder proved to be difficult to control at low feed rates. Later the coal mills and original coal feeder experienced difficulties due to a high moisture content in the coal from heavy rains. Additional operational difficulties were experienced when several of the pressure sensing taps in the gasifier plugged. As the run progressed, modifications to the mills (to address processing the wet coal) resulted in a much larger feed size. This eventually resulted in the accumulation of large particles in the circulating solids causing operational instabilities in the standpipe and loop seal. Despite problems with the coal mills, coal feeder, pressure tap nozzles and the standpipe, the gasifier did experience short periods of stability during oxygenblown operations. During these periods, the syngas quality was high. During TC10, the gasifier gasified over 609 tons of Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and accumulated a total of 416 hours of coal feed, over 293 hours of which were in oxygen-blown operation. No sorbent was used during the run.

Southern Company Services

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifipedia > Feedstock Flexibility > Refinery Streams Gasifipedia > Feedstock Flexibility > Refinery Streams Gasifipedia Coal: Feedstock Flexibility Refinery Streams Gasification is a known method for converting petroleum coke (petcoke) and other refinery waste streams and residuals (vacuum residual, visbreaker tar, and deasphalter pitch) into power, steam and hydrogen for use in the production of cleaner transportation fuels. The main requirement for a gasification feedstock is that it contains both hydrogen and carbon. Below is a table that shows the specifications for a typical refinery feedstock. Specifications for a typical refinery feedstock A number of factors have increased the interest in gasification applications in petroleum refinery operations: Coking capacity has increased with the shift to heavier, more sour crude oils being supplied to the refiners.

145

NETL: Gasification Systems Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shelf Shelf Gasification Systems Reference Shelf TABLE OF CONTENTS Brochures Conferences and Workshops Gasification Systems Projects National Map Gasification Systems Projects and Performers Gasification Systems Project Portfolio Gasifipedia Multi-phase Flow with Interphase eXchange (MFIX) Patents Program Presentations Project Information Projects Summary Table by State Solicitations Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Technical Presentations & Papers Technology Readiness Assessment (Comprehensive Report | Overview Report) Video, Images & Photos Gasification Plant Databases CD Icon Request Gasification Technologies Information on a CD. Gasification RSS Feed Subscribe to the Gasification RSS Feed to follow website updates. LinkedIn DOE Gasification Program Group Subscribe to the LinkedIn DOE Gasification Program group for more information and discussion.

146

Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies  

SciTech Connect

Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies  

SciTech Connect

Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

148

Assessment of modular IGCC plants based on entrained flow coal gasification supplemental studies  

SciTech Connect

In a previous study (1), Foster Wheeler made an assessment of modular IGCC power systems employing Texaco entrained flow gasification of Illinois No. 6 coal. In that study, five case studies were developed in order to compare the relative performance and economics of air vs. oxygen blown gasification and high temperature vs. low temperature gas cleanup. As a supplemental study, two additional IGCC design cases were developed as alternate to the original Case 2 and Case 3 configurations. The objective of the Case 2 alternate study was to assess the potential of zinc titanate in place of zinc ferrite. Compared to zinc ferrite, the zinc titanate system offered the following potential advantages: Does not require steam conditioning of the feed gas to avoid carbon formation; does not require reductive regeneration and the corresponding use of fuel gas; operates at higher temperature, about 1350{degree}F; and has a longer projected sorbent life. The objective of the alternate Case 3 study was to determine the economic impact of producing sulfuric acid, instead of elemental sulfur, as the by-product from high temperature desulfurization using zinc ferrite. Sulfur recovery as by-product sulfuric acid therefore offered the potential for reducing both the capital and operating costs. 6 refs., 5 figs., 15 tabs.

Fu, R.K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Kemaliye Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kemaliye Geothermal Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Kemaliye Geothermal Power Plant Project Location Information...

150

The Complete Gasification of Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... plant designed by C. B. Tully, and operated at Bedford, for the complete gasification of coal. Altogether, since 1919, about two hundred such plants have been erected ...

J. S. G. THOMAS

1923-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

151

Integration of renewable energy in microgrids coordinated with demand response resources: Economic evaluation of a biomass gasification plant by Homer Simulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper deals with how demand response can contribute to the better integration of renewable energy resources such as wind power, solar, small hydro, biomass and CHP. In particular, an economic evaluation performed by means of the micro-power optimization model HOMER Energy has been done, considering a micro-grid supplied by a biomass gasification power plant, operating isolated to the grid and in comparison with other generation technologies. Different scenarios have been simulated considering variations in the power production of the gasified biomass generator and different solutions to guarantee the balance generation/consumption are analyzed, demonstrating as using demand response resources is much more profitable than producing this energy by other conventional technologies by using fossil fuels.

Lina Montuori; Manuel Alczar-Ortega; Carlos lvarez-Bel; Alex Domijan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the work performed, accomplishments and conclusion obtained from the project entitled ''Novel Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation in Gasification Processes in Vision 21 Energy Plants'' under the United States Department of Energy Contract DE-FC26-01NT40973. ITN Energy Systems was the prime contractor. Team members included: the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory; Nexant Consulting; Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair. The objective of the program was to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The separation technology module is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The program developed and evaluated composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules were fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed Ion Conducting Ceramic Membrane (ICCM) approach, including system integration issues, were also assessed. This resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of integration schemes of ICCM hydrogen separation technology within Vision 21 fossil fuel plants. Several results and conclusion were obtained during this program. In the area of materials synthesis, novel pyrochlore-based proton conductors were identified, synthesized and characterized. They exhibited conductivity as high as 0.03 S/cm at 900 C. Long-term stability under CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} atmospheres was also demonstrated. In the area of membrane fabrication by plasma spray processing, the initial results showed that the pyrochlore materials could be processed in a spray torch. Although leak-tight membranes were obtained, cracking, most likely due to differences in thermal expansion, remained a problem. More modeling and experimental work can be used to solve this problem. Finally the techno-economic analyses showed that the ITN ICCM approach for separating H{sub 2} is comparable to conventional pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology in efficiency and economics. Enhanced membrane flux and lower operating temperatures may make the ICCM approach superior to PSA.

Michael Schwartz

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

154

A Texas project illustrates the benefits of integrated gasification  

SciTech Connect

Gasification can be an attractive option for converting a variety of petroleum feedstocks to chemicals. Natural gas is commonly sued to produce acetic acid, isocyanates, plastics, and fibers. But low-cost, bottom-of-the-barrel feeds, such as vacuum resid, petroleum coke, and asphaltenes, also can be used. In any case, gasification products include synthesis gas, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, steam, carbon dioxide, and power. The more a gasification facility is integrated with utilities and other non-core operations of a production complex, the more economical the products are for all consumers. The paper discusses gasification of natural gas, light hydrocarbons (ethane, propanes, and butanes), and heavy hydrocarbons (distillates, heavy residues, asphalts, coals, petroleum coke). The paper then describes a Texas City Gasification Project, which gasifies methane to produce carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and alcohol. The plant is integrated with a cogeneration plant. Economics are discussed.

Philcox, J. [Praxair Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Fenner, G.W. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1997-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Thermal Solar Power Plants Experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In parallel with rising interest in solar power generation, several solar thermal facilities of different configuration and size were ... were designed as modest-size experimental or prototype solar power plants ...

W. Grasse; H. P. Hertlein; C.-J. Winter; G. W. Braun

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Avestar® - Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator. The IGCC simulator builds on and reaches beyond existing combined-cycle and conventional-coal power plant simulators to combine--for the first time--a Gasification with CO2 Capture process simulator with a Combined-Cycle power simulator together in a single dynamic simulation framework. The AVESTAR® center IGCC courses provide unique, comprehensive training on all aspects of an IGCC plant, illustrating the high-efficiency aspects of the gasifier, gas turbine, and steam turbine integration. IGCC Operator training station HMI display for overview of IGCC Plant - Train A Reference:

157

NETL: Gasification Systems and Industry Analyses Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyses Studies Analyses Studies Gasification Systems Reference Shelf – Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Table of Contents Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Power Plants Studies Gasification Systems Program's Systems and Industry Analyses Studies DOE/NETL possesses strong systems analysis and policy-support capabilities. Systems analysis in support of the Gasification Systems Program consists of conducting various energy analyses that provide input to decisions on issues such as national plans and programs, resource use, environmental and energy security policies, technology options for research and development programs, and paths to deployment of energy technology. Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Power Plants Studies The Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Power Plants studies establish up-to-date estimates for the cost and performance of combustion and gasification based power plants as well as options for co-generating synthetic natural gas and fuels, all with and without carbon dioxide capture and storage. Several ranks of coal are being assessed in process configurations that are based on technology that could be constructed today such that the plant could be operational in the 2010 - 2015 timeframe. The analyses were performed on a consistent technical and economic basis that accurately reflects current market conditions.

158

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioning Conditioning Sulfur Recovery and Tail Gas Treating Sulfur is a component of coal and other gasification feed stocks. Sulfur compounds need to be removed in most gasification applications due to environmental regulations or to avoid catalyst poisoning. Whether it is electricity, liquid fuels, or some other product being output, sulfur emissions are regulated, and sulfur removal is important for this reason, along with the prevention of downstream component fouling. In addition to these constraints, recovering saleable sulfur is an important economic benefit for a gasification plant. To illustrate the previous point, in 2011 8.1 million tons of elemental sulfur was produced, with the majority of this coming from petroleum refining, natural gas processing and coking plants. Total shipments were valued at $1.6 billion, with the average mine or plant price of $200 per ton, up from $70.48 in 2010. The United States currently imports sulfur (36% of consumption, mostly from Canada), meaning the market can support more domestic sulfur production.

159

Geothermal electric power plant status  

SciTech Connect

A status summary of the activity for the 44 proposed geothermal electric power plants in the United States as of March 31, 1981 is presented, as well as the power on-line electric plants to date. The information comes from the Department of Energy Geothermal Progress Monitor System (DOE, 1981).

Murphy, M.; Entingh, D.J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

NETL Water and Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Power Plants Review Water and Power Plants Review A review meeting was held on June 20, 2006 of the NETL Water and Power Plants research program at the Pittsburgh NETL site. Thomas Feeley, Technology Manager for the Innovations for Existing Plants Program, gave background information and an overview of the Innovations for Existing Plants Water Program. Ongoing/Ending Projects Alternative Water Sources Michael DiFilippo, a consultant for EPRI, presented results from the project "Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities". John Rodgers, from Clemson University, presented results from the project "An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation".

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

THERMODYNAMIC MODELLING OF BIOMASS INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE (BIGCC) POWER GENERATION SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An attractive and practicable possibility of biomass utilization for energy production is gasification integrated with a combined cycle. This technology seems to have the possibility (more)

Desta, Melaku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A database just released by the U.S. Department of Energy documents the worldwide growth of gasification, the expected technology of choice for future coal-based plants that produce power, fuels, and/or chemicals with near-zero emissions.

163

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production Credit 6. Feed-in Tariff Wikipedia: The Freeen.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feed-in_Tariff] 7. Governor of theenergy incentives, and feed-in tariffs are addressed as

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of production credits, renewable energy incentives, andand production rate. Due to the current market uncertainty for Renewable EnergyProduction Credits/Incentives The federal government has long standing incentives supporting renewable energy,

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

referred to as a directly heated gasifier. In contrast, theuses an indirectly heated gasifier. Two reactors are used: acirculates between the gasifier and combustion reactors,

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

station. In all cases waste heat sales are a criticalequipment to capture waste heat from the engine exhaust.including capturing waste heat for export, an additional $

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Assessing thermal energy storage technologies of concentrating solar plants for the direct coupling with chemical processes. The case of solar-driven biomass gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Dynamic simulation, design improvements and control issues in solar power plants might compete with special considerations on energy storing techniques. In order to provide the stability in production of power or chemical commodities in spite of discontinuity in the source of energy, i.e., sun, overall concerns in the details of solar power plant, competition and comparison of common storing technologies should be taken into account to ensure the effectiveness and continuity of the supply. This research activity is aimed at extending the study from the power generation purpose to the solar-supplied chemical commodities production, highlighting the limitations of certain well-established thermal energy storage techniques when concentrating solar is directly coupled with chemical processes. The (intrinsically dynamic and closed-loop) simulation of solar power plants and direct thermal energy storage technologies is performed for the direct thermal energy storage technologies and, only for the case of thermocline, it is coupled with computational fluid-dynamic (CFD) studies for the proper assessment of molten salt and steam temperature trends. To investigate benefits/restrictions of the storage technologies, the solar steam generation is integrated with the gasification of biomasses for syngas production. Also, first-principles dynamic model for the biomass gasifier is provided.

Flavio Manenti; Andres R. Leon-Garzon; Zohreh Ravaghi-Ardebili; Carlo Pirola

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Separation Techniques for Gasification-based Power Generation Point Sources  

SciTech Connect

The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (post-combustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle or IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, dry, regenerable processes based on sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Jones, K.L.; Morsi, B.I. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Heintz, Y.J. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Ilconich, J.B. (Parsons)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Owners of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

171

Behavior of Inorganic Matter in a Dual Fluidized Steam Gasification Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The principle of DFB steam gasification is based on the separation of the endothermic gasification process and the external heat supply from a separate combustion chamber. ... The precoat material described in Table 8 shows a typical composition of the natural mineral dolomite, whose main components are calcium and magnesium oxide, with a high ignition loss at 1050 C, when the carbonates are released. ... On the basis of a dual fluidized bed system, steam gasification of biomass is coupled with in situ CO2 absorption to enhance the formation of hydrogen. ...

Friedrich Kirnbauer; Markus Koch; Reinhard Koch; Christian Aichernig; Hermann Hofbauer

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

172

Technoeconomic Analysis and Life Cycle Assessment of an Integrated Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A biomass gasification combined-cycle power plant, consisting of a low pressure......Economic analyses were then performed to determine the levelized cost of electricity. The economic viability and efficiency of...

M. K. Mann; P. L. Spath

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench water from a slagging, fixed-bed coal-gasification pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

This study is part of an effort to assess the efficiency of activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot-plant quench waters. A sample of raw-gas quench water was obtained from the Grand Forks Energy and Technology Center's pilot plant, which employs the slagging, fixed-bed gasification process. The quench water generated in the processing of Indian Head lignite was pretreated to reduce ammonia and alkalinity, and then diluted and subjected to long-term biological treatment, followed by detailed characterization and analysis of organic constituents. The pretreated (influent) and treated (effluent) samples were extracted using a methylene chloride, pH-fractionation method to obtain acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Over 99% of the total extractable and chromatographable organic material in the influent acid fraction was composed of phenol and alkylated phenols. Biological treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Major components of the influent base fraction were alkylated pyridines, anilines, aminopyrroles, imidazoles and/or pyrazoles, diazines, and quinolines. Removal efficiency of these compounds ranged between 90 and 100%. The influent neutral fraction was composed mainly of cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, naphthalene, indole, acetophenone, and benzonitrile. Alkylated benzenes were generally absent. Removal efficiencies of these compounds were generally very good, except for certain alkylated cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes. Results are compared with those of a similar study on HYGAS coal-gasification quench water.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS...

175

DSM Power Plant in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

India is facing acute energy shortage that is likely to affect its economic development. There are severe supply side constraints in term of coal and gas shortages that are likely to continue in the near future. Hence, in its current focus to solving the energy shortage problem and sustaining the development trajectory, the country should aim at a balance between supply side and demand side measures. Energy Efficiency in end use is increasingly gaining importance as one of the most cost effective options for achieving short to medium term energy savings. India has initiated the National Mission for Enhanced Energy Efficiency under National Action Plan for Climate Change which addresses various aspects of energy efficiency such as technology, financing, fiscal incentive and also creation of energy efficiency as a market instrument. However, even though energy efficiency has substantial scope in the Indian subcontinent, the market for energy efficiency has been limited. This paper discusses the concept of mega Demand Side Management projects as a DSM Power Plant. A DSM Power Plant acts as an umbrella with multiple energy efficiency schemes under its ambit aimed at transforming energy efficiency into a business by providing a push to the scale of operation as well as financial sustenance to energy efficiency projects. This paper expounds on the various aspects of DSM Power Plant in terms of its policy and institutional mechanism for the large scale implementation of energy efficiency in India. This paper provides an illustration of the concept of DSM Power Plant model through a case study in one of the states (Rajasthan) of India. Further, a comparative analysis of the cost of generation from DSM Power Plant and a representative conventional power plant (CPP) in Rajasthan has been undertaken and the DSM Power Plant comes out to be a more cost effective option. The concept of DSM Power Plant will not only address the issue of energy shortages but will also help the financially thwarted utilities to reduce their revenue deficit in the near future.

Saurabh Gupta; Tanushree Bhattacharya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Novel Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation in Gasification Processes in Vision 21 Energy Plants  

SciTech Connect

ITN Energy Systems, Inc. (ITN) and its partners, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, LLC and Praxair, Inc. are developing composite membranes for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is pursuing a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into module fabrication designs; combining functionally-graded materials, monolithic module concept and thermal spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows for the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing techniques with low costs. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, are being assessed. This will result in an evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed ICCM hydrogen separation approach for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of such plants. Of particular importance is that the proposed technology also results in a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows for the facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Schwartz, Michael

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

177

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Michael Schwartz

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Michael Schwartz

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Michael Schwartz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Tuzla Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tuzla Geothermal Power Plant Facility Power Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Ayvacik, Canakkale Coordinates 39.553940696342, 26.161228192504 Loading...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Okeanskaya Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Information Facility Type Single Flash Owner Ministry of Natural Resources of Russia Commercial Online Date 2007 Power Plant Data Type of Plant Number of Generating Units...

182

Mendeleevskaya Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Information Facility Type Single Flash Owner Ministry of Natural Resources of Russia Commercial Online Date 2007 Power Plant Data Type of Plant Number of Generating Units...

183

Power plant | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power plant Power plant Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Date Released January 26th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated June 07th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords eGrid eGRID2007 EIA Electricity emissions epa Power plant Data application/zip icon eGRID2007_Version1-1.zip (zip, 18.7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Work of the U.S. Federal Government. Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

184

Researching power plant water recovery  

SciTech Connect

A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

NONE

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

NETL: Gasification - Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Background and Project Benefits Program Background and Project Benefits Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. With gasification-based technologies, pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products. Gasification can generate clean power by adding steam to the syngas in a water-gas-shift reactor to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2) and to produce additional hydrogen. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for EOR. In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies. The Gasification Systems program is developing technologies in three key areas to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of producing syngas: (1) Feed Systems, (2) Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems, and (3) Syngas Processing Systems.

186

NETL: Gasification - Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Background and Project Benefits Program Background and Project Benefits Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. With gasification-based technologies, pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products. Gasification can generate clean power by adding steam to the syngas in a water-gas-shift reactor to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2) and to produce additional hydrogen. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for EOR. In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies. The Gasification Systems program is developing technologies in three key areas to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of producing syngas: (1) Feed Systems, (2) Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems, and (3) Syngas Processing Systems.

187

Solar thermionic power plant (II)  

SciTech Connect

It has been shown that the geometric configuration of a central receiver solar electric power plant (SEPP) can be optimized for the high power density and concentration required for the operation of a thermionic converter. The working period of a Thermionic Diode Converter constructed on the top of a SEPP in Riyadh area is found to be 5 to 6 hours per day in winter and 6 to 8 hours in summer. 17 refs.

Abou-Elfotouh, F.; Almassary, M.; Fatmi, H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant ... A natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with capacity of about 430 MW integrated to a chemical solvent absorber/stripping capture plant is investigated. ... The natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) is an advanced power generation technology that improves the fuel efficiency of natural gas. ...

Mehdi Karimi; Magne Hillestad; Hallvard F. Svendsen

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

189

A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect

This is the seventh Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a computational workbench for simulating the performance of Vision 21 Power Plant Systems. Within the last quarter, good progress has been made on the development of the IGCC workbench. A series of parametric CFD simulations for single stage and two stage generic gasifier configurations have been performed. An advanced flowing slag model has been implemented into the CFD based gasifier model. A literature review has been performed on published gasification kinetics. Reactor models have been developed and implemented into the workbench for the majority of the heat exchangers, gas clean up system and power generation system for the Vision 21 reference configuration. Modifications to the software infrastructure of the workbench have been commenced to allow interfacing to the workbench reactor models that utilize the CAPE{_}Open software interface protocol.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Connie Senior; Adel Sarofim; Bene Risio

2002-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

190

17 - Fluidized bed gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The chapter describes the state-of-the-art of fluidized bed gasification of solid fuels, starting from the key role played by hydrodynamics, and its strong correlation with physical and chemical phenomena of the process and operating performance parameters of the reactor. The possible configurations of fluidized bed gasification plants are also assessed, and an analysis of the main methods for syngas cleaning is reported. Finally, the chapter describes some of the most interesting commercial experiences. The analysis indicates that the gasification of biomass and also of municipal and industrial solid wastes appear to be the most interesting sectors for the industrial development and utilization of fluidized bed gasifiers.

U. Arena

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects ..-.. --__- _".-.-l--_--l -_._ _- --- ~~~. . ..~ CONTENTS Page - - I NTRODUCTI ON 1 Purpose 1 Docket Contents 1 Exhibit I: Summary of Activities at Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania I-l Exhibit II: Documents Supporting the Certification of Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania iii II-1 . . .- .__.^ I ^_... _.-__^-____-. - CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

192

Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdel-Aal, Radwan E. - Computer Engineering Department, King Fahd University of...

193

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

194

Coal gasification power generation, and product market study. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This Western Research Institute (WRI) project was part of a WRI Energy Resource Utilization Program to stimulate pilot-scale improved technologies projects to add value to coal resources in the Rocky Mountain region. The intent of this program is to assess the application potential of emerging technologies to western resources. The focus of this project is on a coal resource near the Wyoming/Colorado border, in Colorado. Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company operates a coal mine in Jackson County, Colorado. The coal produces 10,500 Btu/lb and has very low sulfur and ash contents. Kerr Coal Company is seeking advanced technology for alternate uses for this coal. This project was to have included a significant cost-share from the Kerr Coal Company ownership for a market survey of potential products and technical alternatives to be studied in the Rocky Mountain Region. The Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company and WRI originally proposed this work on a cost reimbursable basis. The total cost of the project was priced at $117,035. The Kerr Coal Company had scheduled at least $60,000.00 to be spent on market research for the project that never developed because of product market changes for the company. WRI and Kerr explored potential markets and new technologies for this resource. The first phase of this project as a preliminary study had studied fuel and nonfuel technical alternatives. Through related projects conducted at WRI, resource utilization was studied to find high-value materials that can be targeted for fuel and nonfuel use and eventually include other low-sulfur coals in the Rocky Mountain region. The six-month project work was spread over about a three-year period to observe, measure, and confirm over time-any trends in technology development that would lead to economic benefits in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming from coal gasification and power generation.

Sheesley, D.; King, S.B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

None

1986-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

196

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into Municipal Solid Waste Gasification for PowerAthermalwastegasificationpowergenerationfacilityMunicipalSolidWasteGasificationforPowerGeneration.

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

198

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

199

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

200

Matsukawa Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information Name Matsukawa Geothermal Power Plant Facility ower Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Iwate, Japan Coordinates 39.980897288029,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification April 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. Washington, DC - Gasification. It's a versatile technology that uses coal to produce power, chemicals, and fuels. Inherently low in air emissions, solid byproducts, and wastewater, commercial gasification plants have proven capable of exceeding the most stringent regulations for air- and solids-emissions. However, capital and operational costs have prohibited the widespread adoption of gasification, especially for power

202

World electric power plants database  

SciTech Connect

This global database provides records for 104,000 generating units in over 220 countries. These units include installed and projected facilities, central stations and distributed plants operated by utilities, independent power companies and commercial and self-generators. Each record includes information on: geographic location and operating company; technology, fuel and boiler; generator manufacturers; steam conditions; unit capacity and age; turbine/engine; architect/engineer and constructor; and pollution control equipment. The database is issued quarterly.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Power Plant Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal(Redirected from Power Plant) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (19) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine which is connected to a generator to produce electricity. The type of energy conversion technology that is used depends on whether the resource is predominantly water or steam, the temperature of the resource, and the

204

Energeticals power plant engineering | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energeticals power plant engineering Energeticals power plant engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name energeticals power plant engineering Place München, Bavaria, Germany Zip 81371 Sector Biomass, Geothermal energy Product Planning, design, installation and operation of turnkey plants for heat and electricity generation in the field of solid Biomass, deep and shallow geothermal energy and water power. References energeticals power plant engineering[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. energeticals power plant engineering is a company located in München, Bavaria, Germany . References ↑ "[ energeticals power plant engineering]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Energeticals_power_plant_engineering&oldid=344770

205

Specialized Materials and Fluids and Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Specialized Materials and Fluids and Power Plants.

206

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Integration of coal utilization and environmental control in integrated gasification combined cycle systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integration of coal utilization and environmental control in integrated gasification combined cycle systems ... The Cost of Carbon Capture and Storage for Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plants ... The Cost of Carbon Capture and Storage for Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plants ...

H. Christopher Frey; Edward S. Rubin

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Coal-Fired Power Plants New Coal-Fired Power Plants (data update 1/13/2012) January 13, 2012 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Strategic Energy Analysis & Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants This report is intended to provide an overview of proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under development. This report may not represent all possible plants under consideration but is intended to illustrate the potential that exists for installation of new coal-fired power plants. Additional perspective has been added for non-coal-fired generation additions in the U.S. and coal-fired power plant activity in China. Experience has shown that public announcements of power plant developments do not provide an accurate representation of eventually

209

Would Tondu power plant trade health for jobs? From the August 28, 2005, issue of the South Bend Tribune  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Disease Control as "public-health hazards," old coal gasification plants are now monitored as hazardous-waste Corp. coal gasification plant proposed for New Carlisle. It would bring both electricity and 70 new times that amount. St. Joseph County receives even more. Could using Tondu's gasification technology

Shrader-Frechette, Kristin

210

Guadalupe Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Guadalupe Power Plant Biomass Facility Facility Guadalupe Power Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

211

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture R&D Capture R&D DOE/NETL's pre-combustion CO2 control technology portfolio of R&D projects is examining various CO2 capture technologies, and supports identification of developmental pathways linking advanced fossil fuel conversion and CO2 capture. The Program's CO2 capture activity is being conducted in close coordination with that of advanced, higher-efficiency power generation and fossil fuel conversion technologies such as gasification. Links to the projects can be found here. Finally, an exhaustive and periodically updated report on CO2 capture R&D sponsored by NETL is available: DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update (also referred to as the CO2 Handbook). Carbon Dioxide CO2 Capture Commercial CO2 Uses & Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery

212

Subtask 4.2 - Coal Gasification Short Course  

SciTech Connect

Major utilities, independent power producers, and petroleum and chemical companies are intent on developing a fleet of gasification plants primarily because of high natural gas prices and the implementation of state carbon standards, with federal standards looming. Currently, many projects are being proposed to utilize gasification technologies to produce a synthesis gas or fuel gas stream for the production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, chemicals, and electricity. Financing these projects is challenging because of the complexity, diverse nature of gasification technologies, and the risk associated with certain applications of the technology. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has developed a gasification short course that is designed to provide technical personnel with a broad understanding of gasification technologies and issues, thus mitigating the real or perceived risk associated with the technology. Based on a review of research literature, tutorial presentations, and Web sites on gasification, a short course presentation was prepared. The presentation, consisting of about 500 PowerPoint slides, provides at least 7 hours of instruction tailored to an audience's interests and needs. The initial short course is scheduled to be presented September 9 and 10, 2009, in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

Kevin Galbreath

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

213

Experimental and economic study of a gasification plant fuelled with olive industry wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Spain is the first olive oil maker worldwide. Yearly, the olive oil industry generates large amounts of by-products: olive pomace, tree pruning, pits, leaves and branches. This work presents the experimental and feasibility study of a pilot plant for the conversion of olive tree pruning and olive pits into electrical and thermal power. The pilot plant is composed of a downdraft gasifier, gas cooling-cleaning stage and spark ignition engine with a modified carburetor. The experimental results showed satisfactory cold gas efficiency (in the range of 70.775.5%) and good lower calorific value of the producer gas for both raw materials (4.8 and 5.4MJkg?1). Moreover, the plant achieved acceptable values for the electric and CHP efficiency: 15% and almost 50%, respectively. Finally, the investment achieved reasonable profitability index with a payback period of 56years. As a result, the energy recovery potential from the olive industry wastes may represent a good opportunity to promote distributed generation systems.

David Vera; Francisco Jurado; Nikolaos K. Margaritis; Panagiotis Grammelis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Nuclear power pros and cons: A comparative analysis of radioactive emissions from nuclear power plants and thermal power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of the public data statistics of recent years on pollution and emissions from nuclear power plants (NPPs) and thermal power plants...

V. A. Gordienko; S. N. Brykin; R. E. Kuzin

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flash Steam Power Plant Flash Steam Power Plant (Redirected from Flash Steam Power Plants) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Flash Steam Power Plants General List of Flash Steam Plants Flash Steam power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Flash steam plants are the most common type of geothermal power generation plants in operation in the world today. Fluid at temperatures greater than 360°F (182°C) is pumped under high pressure into a tank at the surface held at a much lower pressure, causing some of the fluid to rapidly vaporize, or "flash." The vapor then drives a turbine, which drives a generator. If any liquid remains in the tank, it can be flashed again in a second tank to extract even more energy.[1] Facility Name Owner Capacity (MW) Facility

216

Integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) demonstration test  

SciTech Connect

As concern about the environment generates interest in ultra-clean energy plants, fuel cell power plants can respond to the challenge. Fuel cells convert hydrocarbon fuels to electricity at efficiencies exceeding conventional heat engine technologies while generating extremely low emissions. Emissions of SOx and NOx are expected to be well below current and anticipated future standards. Nitrogen oxides, a product of combustion, will be extremely low in this power plant because power is produced electrochemically rather than by combustion. Due to its higher efficiencies, a fuel cell power plant also produces less carbon dioxide. Fuel cells in combination with coal gasification, are an efficient and environmentally acceptable means to utilize the abundant coal reserves both in the US and around the world. To demonstrate this technology, FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), is planning to build and test a 2-MW Fuel Cell Power Plant for operation on coal derived gas. This power plant is based on Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{trademark}) technology and will be part of a Clean Coal V IGCC project supported by the US DOE. A British Gas Lurgi (BGL) slagging fixed-bed gasification system with cold gas clean up is planned as part of a 400 MW IGCC power plant to provide a fuel gas slip stream to the fuel cell. The IGFC power plant will be built by Kentucky Pioneer Energy, A subsidiary of Global Energy, in Clark County, KY. This demonstration will result in the world's largest fuel cell power plant operating on coal derived gas. The objective of this test is to demonstrate fuel cell operation on coal derived gas at a commercial scale and to verify the efficiency and environmental benefits.

Steinfeld, G.; Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Sanderson, R.; Abens, S.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Coal Power Plant Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Plant Database Power Plant Database Jump to: navigation, search Name Coal Power Plant Database Data Format Excel Spreadsheet, Excel Pivot Table, Access Database Geographic Scope United States TODO: Import actual dataset contents into OpenEI The Coal Power Plant Database (CPPDB) is a dataset which "consolidates large quantities of information on coal-fired power plants in a single location."[1] It is produced by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). External links 2007 Edition Excel Spreadsheet Excel Pivot Table Access Database User's Manual (PDF) References ↑ "User's Manual: Coal Power Plant Database" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Coal_Power_Plant_Database&oldid=273301" Categories: Datasets Articles with outstanding TODO tasks

218

Coal Gasification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's Office of Fossil Energy supports activities to advance coal-to-hydrogen technologies, specifically via the process of coal gasification with sequestration. DOE anticipates that coal...

219

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plant Solar Power Ideal Gas Turbine Topping Braytonwill require higher parasitic power for gas circulation. Theefficiency of a solar power plant with gas-turbine topping

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported ... RESULTS of a first step taken toward determining the feasibility of the underground gasification of coal were reported recently to the Interstate Oil Compact Commission by Milton H. Fies, manager of coal operations for the Alabama Power Co. ...

1947-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Power Plant Analyser -- A computer code for power plant operation studies  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes Power Plant Analyser (PPA), a computer code for power plant dynamic and steady-state performance analysis. Power Plant Analyser simulates fossil power plant systems, such as drum-type, once-through, gas turbine, and combined cycle plants in a user-friendly manner. It provides a convenient tool for power engineers to understand the complex and interrelated thermodynamic processes and operating characteristics of the plant. It can also be used for conceptual training of power plant operators, and as a test bed for control and operating strategies.

Lu, S.; Hogg, B.W. [Queen`s Univ. of Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering] [Queen`s Univ. of Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Binary Cycle Power Plant Binary Cycle Power Plant (Redirected from Binary Cycle Power Plants) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators.

223

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Binary Cycle Power Plant Binary Cycle Power Plant (Redirected from Binary) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators. Binary cycle power plants are closed-loop systems and virtually nothing

224

Power Plant Optimization Demonstration Projects Cover Photos:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 SEPTEMBER 2007 5 SEPTEMBER 2007 Power Plant Optimization Demonstration Projects Cover Photos: * Top left: Coal Creek Station * Top right: Big Bend Power Station * Bottom left: Baldwin Energy Complex * Bottom right: Limestone Power Plant A report on four projects conducted under separate cooperative agreements between the U.S. Department of Energy and: * Great River Energy * Tampa Electric Company * Pegasus Technologies * NeuCo. , Inc.  Power Plant Optimization Demonstration Projects Executive Summary .......................................................................................4 Background: Power Plant Optimization ......................................................5 Lignite Fuel Enhancement Project ...............................................................8

225

Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect

For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2} separation, and also syngas production from coal with the calcium sulfide (CaS)/calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) loop utilizing the PDU facility. The results of Phase I were reported in Reference 1, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase I Report' The objective for Phase II was to develop the carbonate loop--lime (CaO)/calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) loop, integrate it with the gasification loop from Phase I, and ultimately demonstrate the feasibility of hydrogen production from the combined loops. The results of this program were reported in Reference 3, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase II Report'. The objective of Phase III is to operate the pilot plant to obtain enough engineering information to design a prototype of the commercial Chemical Looping concept. The activities include modifications to the Phase II Chemical Looping PDU, solids transportation studies, control and instrumentation studies and additional cold flow modeling. The deliverable is a report making recommendations for preliminary design guidelines for the prototype plant, results from the pilot plant testing and an update of the commercial plant economic estimates.

Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

Turkerler Alasehir Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turkerler Alasehir Geothermal Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Turkerler Alasehir Geothermal Power Plant Project...

227

Miravalles V Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Miravalles V Geothermal Power Plant Project Location Information Coordinates...

228

Turbine Drive Gas Generator for Zero Emission Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The Vision 21 Program seeks technology development that can reduce energy costs, reduce or eliminate atmospheric pollutants from power plants, provide choices of alternative fuels, and increase the efficiency of generating systems. Clean Energy Systems is developing a gas generator to replace the traditional boiler in steam driven power systems. The gas generator offers the prospects of lower electrical costs, pollution free plant operations, choices of alternative fuels, and eventual net plant efficiencies in excess of 60% with sequestration of carbon dioxide. The technology underlying the gas generator has been developed in the aerospace industry over the past 30 years and is mature in aerospace applications, but it is as yet unused in the power industry. This project modifies and repackages aerospace gas generator technology for power generation applications. The purposes of this project are: (1) design a 10 MW gas generator and ancillary hardware, (2) fabricate the gas generator and supporting equipment, (3) test the gas generator using methane as fuel, (4) submit a final report describing the project and test results. The principal test objectives are: (1) define start-up, shut down and post shutdown control sequences for safe, efficient operation; (2) demonstrate the production of turbine drive gas comprising steam and carbon dioxide in the temperature range 1500 F to 3000 F, at a nominal pressure of 1500 psia; (3) measure and verify the constituents of the drive gas; and (4) examine the critical hardware components for indications of life limitations. The 21 month program is in its 13th month. Design work is completed and fabrication is in process. The gas generator igniter is a torch igniter with sparkplug, which is currently under-going hot fire testing. Fabrication of the injector and body of the gas generator is expected to be completed by year-end, and testing of the full gas generator will begin in early 2002. Several months of testing are anticipated. When demonstrated, this gas generator will be the prototype for use in demonstration power plants planned to be built in Antioch, California and in southern California during 2002. In these plants the gas generator will demonstrate durability and its operational RAM characteristics. In 2003, it is expected that the gas generator will be employed in new operating plants primarily in clean air non-attainment areas, and in possible locations to provide large quantities of high quality carbon dioxide for use in enhanced oil recovery or coal bed methane recovery. Coupled with an emission free coal gasification system, the CES gas generator would enable the operation of high efficiency, non-polluting coal-fueled power plants.

Doyle, Stephen E.; Anderson, Roger E.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Public Service Commission of Wisconsin

230

Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flash Steam Power Plant Flash Steam Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Flash Steam Power Plants General List of Flash Steam Plants Flash Steam power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Flash steam plants are the most common type of geothermal power generation plants in operation in the world today. Fluid at temperatures greater than 360°F (182°C) is pumped under high pressure into a tank at the surface held at a much lower pressure, causing some of the fluid to rapidly vaporize, or "flash." The vapor then drives a turbine, which drives a generator. If any liquid remains in the tank, it can be flashed again in a second tank to extract even more energy.[1] Facility Name Owner Capacity (MW) Facility Type Commercial Online Date Geothermal Area

231

Monitoring power plant fireside corrosion using corrosion probes  

SciTech Connect

The ability to monitor the corrosion degradation of key components in fossil fuel power plants is of utmost importance for Futuregen and ultra-supercritical power plants. Fireside corrosion occurs in the high temperature sections of energy production facilities due to a number of factors: ash deposition, coal composition, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others. Problems occur when equipment designed for either oxidizing or reducing conditions is exposed to alternating oxidizing and reducing conditions. This can happen especially near the burners. The use of low NOx burners is becoming more commonplace and can produce reducing environments that accelerate corrosion. One method of addressing corrosion of these surfaces is the use of corrosion probes to monitor when process changes cause corrosive conditions. In such a case, corrosion rate could become a process control variable that directs the operation of a coal combustion or coal gasification system. Alternatively, corrosion probes could be used to provide an indication of total metal damage and thus a tool to schedule planned maintenance outages.

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

233

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Dry Steam) (Redirected from Dry Steam) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

234

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (20) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine

236

Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of TMDLs on Impacts of TMDLs on Coal-Fired Power Plants April 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1408 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The

237

Efficiency combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of operating a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: flowing exhaust gas from a combustion turbine through a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG); flowing feed water through an economizer section of the HRSG at a flow rate and providing heated feed water; flowing a first portion of the heated feed water through an evaporator section of the HRSG and producing saturated steam at a production rate, the flow rate of the feed water through the economizer section being greater than required to sustain the production rate of steam in the evaporator section; flowing fuel for the turbine through a heat exchanger; and, flowing a second portion of the heated feed water provided by the economizer section through the heat exchanger then to an inlet of the economizer section, thereby heating the fuel flowing through the heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Meyers, G.A.; Baldwin, T.S.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

238

Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Solar Power Plant Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Solana Generating Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status Under Construction Developer Abengoa Solar Location Gila Bend, Arizona Coordinates 32.916163°, -112.968727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.916163,"lon":-112.968727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

239

A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect

This is the tenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a computational workbench for simulating the performance of Vision 21 Power Plant Systems. Within the last quarter, good progress has been made on all aspects of the project. Calculations for a full Vision 21 plant configuration have been performed for two gasifier types. An improved process model for simulating entrained flow gasifiers has been implemented into the workbench. Model development has focused on: a pre-processor module to compute global gasification parameters from standard fuel properties and intrinsic rate information; a membrane based water gas shift; and reactors to oxidize fuel cell exhaust gas. The data visualization capabilities of the workbench have been extended by implementing the VTK visualization software that supports advanced visualization methods, including inexpensive Virtual Reality techniques. The ease-of-use, functionality and plug-and-play features of the workbench were highlighted through demonstrations of the workbench at a DOE sponsored coal utilization conference. A white paper has been completed that contains recommendations on the use of component architectures, model interface protocols and software frameworks for developing a Vision 21 plant simulator.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Connie Senior; Zumao Chen; Temi Linjewile; Adel Sarofim; Bene Risio

2003-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

240

Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability  

SciTech Connect

Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

Lester M. Waganer

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 8, 2010 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Systems Analyses and Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants This report is intended to...

242

Uenotai Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facility Power Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Akita, Japan Coordinates 39.001204660867, 140.60390925355 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

243

Wave Power Plant Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powered Compressed Air Stations This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWavePowerPlantInc&oldid76915...

244

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench waters from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot plants  

SciTech Connect

Studies were initiated to assess the efficiency of bench-scale, activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from coal-gasification process effluents. Samples of pilot-plant, raw-gas quench waters were obtained from the HYGAS process of the Institute of Gas Technology and from the slagging, fixed-bed (SFB) process of the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center. The types of coal employed were Bituminous Illinois No. 6 for the HYGAS and Indian Head lignite for the SFB process. These pilot-plant quench waters, while not strictly representative of commercial condensates, were considered useful to evaluate the efficiency of biological oxidation for the removal of organics. Biological-reactor influent and effluent samples were extracted using a methylene chloride pH-fractionation method into acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. Influent acid fractions of both HYGAS and SFB condensates showed that nearly 99% of extractable and chromatographable organic material comprised phenol and alkylated phenols. Activated-sludge treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Removal efficiency of base-fraction organics was generally good, except for certain alkylated pyridines. Removal of neutral-fraction organics was also good, except for certain alkylated benzenes, certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and certain cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes, especially at low influent concentrations.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the solid waste residues during combustion or gasificationcoal gasification stage in IGCC plants results in a waste

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Deming Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer New Solar Ventures/ Solar Torx 50/50 Location New Mexico Coordinates 34.9727305°, -105.0323635° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9727305,"lon":-105.0323635,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

247

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Prescott Airport Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer APS Location Prescott, Arizona Coordinates 34.5400242°, -112.4685025° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.5400242,"lon":-112.4685025,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

248

AVESTAR® - Training - Gasification Process Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Process Operations Gasification Process Operations This course is designed as a familiarization course to increase understanding of the gasification with CO2 capture process. During the training, participants will startup and shutdown the simulated unit in an integrated manner and will be exposed to simple and complex unit malfunctions in the control room and in the field. Course objectives are as follows: Introduce trainees to gasification and CO2 capture process systems and major components and how they dynamically interact Familiarize trainees with the Human Machine Interface (HMI) and plant control and how safe and efficient operation of the unit can be affected by plant problems Provide the trainees with hands-on operating experiences in plant operations using the HMI

249

Aluto-Langano Geotermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System - Ethiopian Rift Valley Plant Information Facility Type Binary Cycle Power Plant, ORC Owner Ethiopian Electric Power Corporation Developer Ethiopian Electric Power...

250

Coal gasification 2006: roadmap to commercialization  

SciTech Connect

Surging oil and gas prices, combined with supply security and environmental concerns, are prompting power generators and industrial firms to further develop coal gasification technologies. Coal gasification, the process of breaking down coal into its constituent chemical components prior to combustion, will permit the US to more effectively utilize its enormous, low cost coal reserves. The process facilitates lower environmental impact power generation and is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to traditional generation techniques. The study is designed to inform the reader as to this rapidly evolving technology, its market penetration prospects and likely development. Contents include: Clear explanations of different coal gasification technologies; Emissions and efficiency comparisons with other fuels and technologies; Examples of US and global gasification projects - successes and failures; Commercial development and forecast data; Gasification projects by syngas output; Recommendations for greater market penetration and commercialization; Current and projected gasification technology market shares; and Recent developments including proposals for underground gasification process. 1 app.

NONE

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect

In this report is described the work effort to develop and demonstrate a software framework to support advanced process simulations to evaluate the performance of advanced power systems. Integrated into the framework are a broad range of models, analysis tools, and visualization methods that can be used for the plant evaluation. The framework provides a tightly integrated problem-solving environment, with plug-and-play functionality, and includes a hierarchy of models, ranging from fast running process models to detailed reacting CFD models. The framework places no inherent limitations on the type of physics that can be modeled, numerical techniques, or programming languages used to implement the equipment models, or the type or amount of data that can be exchanged between models. Tools are provided to analyze simulation results at multiple levels of detail, ranging from simple tabular outputs to advanced solution visualization methods. All models and tools communicate in a seamless manner. The framework can be coupled to other software frameworks that provide different modeling capabilities. Three software frameworks were developed during the course of the project. The first framework focused on simulating the performance of the DOE Low Emissions Boiler System Proof of Concept facility, an advanced pulverized-coal combustion-based power plant. The second framework targeted simulating the performance of an Integrated coal Gasification Combined Cycle - Fuel Cell Turbine (IGCC-FCT) plant configuration. The coal gasifier models included both CFD and process models for the commercially dominant systems. Interfacing models to the framework was performed using VES-Open, and tests were performed to demonstrate interfacing CAPE-Open compliant models to the framework. The IGCC-FCT framework was subsequently extended to support Virtual Engineering concepts in which plant configurations can be constructed and interrogated in a three-dimensional, user-centered, interactive, immersive environment. The Virtual Engineering Framework (VEF), in effect a prototype framework, was developed through close collaboration with NETL supported research teams from Iowa State University Virtual Reality Applications Center (ISU-VRAC) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). The VEF is open source, compatible across systems ranging from inexpensive desktop PCs to large-scale, immersive facilities and provides support for heterogeneous distributed computing of plant simulations. The ability to compute plant economics through an interface that coupled the CMU IECM tool to the VEF was demonstrated, and the ability to couple the VEF to Aspen Plus, a commercial flowsheet modeling tool, was demonstrated. Models were interfaced to the framework using VES-Open. Tests were performed for interfacing CAPE-Open-compliant models to the framework. Where available, the developed models and plant simulations have been benchmarked against data from the open literature. The VEF has been installed at NETL. The VEF provides simulation capabilities not available in commercial simulation tools. It provides DOE engineers, scientists, and decision makers with a flexible and extensible simulation system that can be used to reduce the time, technical risk, and cost to develop the next generation of advanced, coal-fired power systems that will have low emissions and high efficiency. Furthermore, the VEF provides a common simulation system that NETL can use to help manage Advanced Power Systems Research projects, including both combustion- and gasification-based technologies.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

252

Gasification Systems 2013 Project Selections  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy in 2013 selected ten projects that will focus on reducing the cost of gasification with carbon capture for producing electric power, fuels, and chemicals. The projects will...

253

Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

Wiltsee, G.

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

254

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plant Solar Power Ideal Gas Turbine Topping Braytonefficiency of a solar power plant with gas-turbine toppingfor a solar power plant with Brayton-cycle gas turbine

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifiers and Impact of Coal Rank and Coal Properties The available commercial gasification technologies are often optimized for a particular rank of coal or coal properties, and in some cases, certain ranks of coal might be unsuitable for utilization in a given gasification technology. On the other hand, there is considerable flexibility in most of the common gasifiers; this is highlighted by the following table, which provides an overview of the level of experience for the various commercially available gasifiers by manufacturer for each coal type. This experience will only continue to expand as more gasification facilities come online and more demonstrations are completed. SOLID FUEL GASIFICATION EXPERIENCE1 High Ash Coals

256

A Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO 2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants Edward S. Rubin (rubin@cmu.edu; 412-268-5897) Anand B. Rao (abr@andrew.cmu.edu; 412-268-5605) Michael B. Berkenpas (mikeb@cmu.edu; 412-268-1088) Carnegie Mellon University EPP Department, Baker Hall 128A Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract As part of DOE/NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program, we are developing an integrated, multi-pollutant modeling framework to evaluate the costs and performance of alternative carbon capture and sequestration technologies for fossil-fueled power plants. The model calculates emissions, costs, and efficiency on a systematic basis at the level of an individual plant or facility. Both new and existing facilities can be modeled, including coal-based or natural gas-based combustion or gasification systems using air or oxygen.

257

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station Unit 1, Unit 2","1,773","14,239",34.0,"Nine Mile Point Nuclear Sta LLC" "R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1",581,"4,948",11.8,"R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC" "4 Plants

258

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization Hydrogen: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization Weyburn Project The Great Plains Synfuels Plant (GPSP) has had the ability to capture CO2 through the Rectisol process for sequestration or sale as a byproduct. However, no viable market was found for the CO2 in the early years of operation, and the captured CO2 was simply discharged to the atmosphere. This changed in 2000, when the GPSP began selling CO2 emissions, becoming one of the first commercial coal facilities to have its CO2 sequestered. The program had begun in 1997, when EnCana (formerly PanCanadian Resources) sought a solution to declining production in their Weyburn Oil Fields. Dakota Gasification Company, owners of the GPSP, and EnCana made an agreement to sell CO2 for use in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). DGC installed two large CO2 compressors and began shipping 105 million standard cubic feet per day of compressed CO2 (60% of the total CO2 produced at the plant) through a 205 mile pipeline from Beulah, North Dakota, to the Weyburn Oil Fields, located in Saskatchewan, Canada, for EOR. The pipeline was constructed and operated by a BEPC subsidiary. The CO2, about 95.5% pure and very dry, is injected into the mature fields where it has doubled the oil recovery rate of the field. In 2006, a third compressor was installed and an additional agreement was reached with Apache Canada Ltd. to supply CO2 for EOR to their nearby oilfields. The three compressors increased CO2 delivery to 160 million standard cubic feet (MMSCF; or 8,000 tonnes) per day. Through 2007, over 12 million tons of CO2 had been sold, and over the current expected lifetime of the program, an anticipated 20 million tons of CO2 will be stored.

259

A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a computational workbench for simulating the performance of Vision 21 Power Plant Systems. Within the last quarter, our efforts have become focused on developing an improved workbench for simulating a gasifier based Vision 21 energyplex. To provide for interoperability of models developed under Vision 21 and other DOE programs, discussions have been held with DOE and other organizations developing plant simulator tools to review the possibility of establishing a common software interface or protocol to use when developing component models. A component model that employs the CCA protocol has successfully been interfaced to our CCA enabled workbench. To investigate the software protocol issue, DOE has selected a gasifier based Vision 21 energyplex configuration for use in testing and evaluating the impacts of different software interface methods. A Memo of Understanding with the Cooperative Research Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development (CCSD) in Australia has been completed that will enable collaborative research efforts on gasification issues. Preliminary results have been obtained for a CFD model of a pilot scale, entrained flow gasifier. A paper was presented at the Vision 21 Program Review Meeting at NETL (Morgantown) that summarized our accomplishments for Year One and plans for Year Two and Year Three.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Benchmarking Biomass Gasification Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification Technologies for Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals and Hydrogen Production Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Jared P. Ciferno John J. Marano June 2002 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to express their appreciation to all individuals who contributed to the successful completion of this project and the preparation of this report. This includes Dr. Phillip Goldberg of the U.S. DOE, Dr. Howard McIlvried of SAIC, and Ms. Pamela Spath of NREL who provided data used in the analysis and peer review. Financial support for this project was cost shared between the Gasification Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Biomass Power Program within the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

This presentation begins with a description of U.S. Energy Challenges, particularly Power Generation Capacity and Clean Energy Plant Operations. It goes on to describe the missions and goals of the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTARTM). It moves on to the subject of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} Capture, particularly a Process/Project Overview, Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS), 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS), Facilities, Training, Education, and R&D, and Future Simulators/Directions

Provost, G,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

This slideshow presentation begins by outlining US energy challenges, particularly with respect to power generation capacity and clean energy plant operations. It goes on to describe the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR{sup TM}). Its mission and goals are given, followed by an overview of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} capture. The Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS) and 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS) are then presented. Facilities, training, education, and R&D are covered, followed by future simulators and directions.

Provost, G,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

SciTech Connect

A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Current Gasification Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification » Current Gasification » Current Gasification Research Current Gasification Research Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Carbon Capture Center provides first-class facilities to test carbon capture technologies. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Carbon Capture Center provides first-class facilities to test carbon capture technologies. With coal gasification now in modern commercial-scale applications, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy has turned its attention to future gasification concepts that offer significant improvements in efficiency, fuel flexibility, economics and environmental sustainability. Fuel flexibility is especially important. Tomorrow's gasification plants conceivably could process a wide variety of low-cost feedstocks, handling

265

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure1:WestBiofuelsBiomassGasificationtoPowerprocesswillutilize gasificationtechnologyprovidedbyis pioneeringthegasificationtechnologythathasbeen

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of natural gas fired power generation, which will provideof natural gas fired power generation, which will providepower generation for example Stalins gasification campaign that turned coal fired plants in European Russia into gas

Wengle, Susanne Alice

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators. Binary cycle power plants are closed-loop systems and virtually nothing (except water vapor) is emitted to the atmosphere. Resources below 400°F

268

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate- Ammonium Bicarbonate Process Description Current commercial processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from conventional power plants are expensive and energy intensive. The objective of this project is to reduce the cost associated with the capture of CO 2 from coal based gasification processes, which convert coal and other carbon based feedstocks to synthesis gas.

269

Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant  

SciTech Connect

In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the AVESTAR Center is poised to develop a workforce well-prepared to operate and control commercial-scale gasification-based power plants capable of 90% pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture and compression, as well as low sulfur, mercury, and NOx emissions. With additional support from the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), the Center will educate and train engineering students and researchers by providing hands-on 'learning by operating' experience The AVESTAR Center also offers unique collaborative R&D opportunities in high-fidelity dynamic modeling, advanced process control, real-time optimization, and virtual plant simulation. Objectives and goals are aimed at safe and effective management of power generation systems for optimal efficiency, while protecting the environment. To add another dimension of realism to the AVESTAR experience, NETL will introduce an immersive training system with innovative three-dimensional virtual reality technology. Wearing a stereoscopic headset or eyewear, trainees will enter an interactive virtual environment that will allow them to move freely throughout the simulated 3-D facility to study and learn various aspects of IGCC plant operation, control, and safety. Such combined operator and immersive training systems go beyond traditional simulation and include more realistic scenarios, improved communication, and collaboration among co-workers.

Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Desalination study of Florida Power and Light power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a project to determine the viability of converting existing power plants to large scale, dual-purpose cogeneration of power and fresh water from desalination. The work involved evaluating suitable desalination technologies, developing utility based dual-product economic methods, screening FPL plant and desalination system combinations for promising candidates, and performing three case studies in greater detail to illustrate the viability of producing water at a utility power plant. The study was motivated by the fact that certain synergisms can be obtained by combining or co-locating power and desalination plants at a common site. Economic synergisms are obtained from better use of available energy, sharing common facilities and sharing staff. In addition, environmental synergisms are achieved by using existing industrial sites, common intake/outfalls, and combining thermal with brine effluents to obtain neutral buoyance and achieve more rapid dispersion.

Labar, M.P.; Loh, G.T.; Schleicher, R.W.; Sinha, A.K. (General Atomics International Services Corp., San Diego, CA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: Alternatives/Supplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility Coal: Alternatives/Supplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility As important as coal is as a primary gasification feedstock, gasification technology offers the important ability to take a wide range of feedstocks and process them into syngas, from which a similarly diverse number of end products are possible. Gasifiers have been developed to suit all different ranks of coal, and other fossil fuels, petcoke and refinery streams, biomass including agricultural waste, and industrial and municipal waste. The flexibility stems from the ability of gasification to take any carbon and hydrogen containing feedstock and then thermochemically break down the feedstock to a gas containing simple compounds which are easy to process into several marketable products.

272

Brawley Power Plant Abandoned | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abandoned Abandoned Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Brawley Power Plant Abandoned Abstract N/A Authors California Division of Oil, Gas and and Geothermal Resources Published Journal Geothermal Hot Line, 1985 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Brawley Power Plant Abandoned Citation California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources. 1985. Brawley Power Plant Abandoned. Geothermal Hot Line. 15(2):76-77. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Brawley_Power_Plant_Abandoned&oldid=682727" Categories: References Uncited References Geothermal References What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

273

Cost Analysis of Solar Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The factors influencing the desirability of solar power plants (SPPs), and of SPP investment decisions, will be discussed in this chapter. The numerical details presented axe based, as far as possible, on actu...

H. P. Hertlein; H. Klaiss; J. Nitsch

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Geothermal Power Plants Meeting Clean Air Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Geothermal power plants can meet the most stringent clean air standards. They emit little carbon dioxide, very low amounts of sulfur dioxide, and no nitrogen oxides. See Charts 1, 2, and 3 below.

275

Beta Dosimetry at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......function of gamma dose and energy of the beta rays. Measurements...radiation and effective beta energy obtained in the working environment at nuclear power plants during the shut-down...decommissioning. The effective beta energy is most frequently between......

P. Carn; M. Lieskovsky

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Cabell on Nuclear Energy Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cabell on Nuclear Energy Power Plants ... IN EXPLAINING the function of his research group t o the new works superintendent of a nuclear power plant at a mining and reduction installation in the Alaskan mountains, Dr. Blank, of the United Nations Inspection and Research Laboratories, said, "We can't inspect what we don't know. ... In order to know what you're doing, we have to know more about atomic energy than you domore than anybody does. ...

1947-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

277

Chapter 5 - Environmental Impact of Black Liquor Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental impact of black liquor gasification (BLG) is discussed. Biofuels from a BLG process excel in terms of well-to-wheel carbon dioxide emission reduction and energy efficiency. Forest biorefinery utilizing gasification (in a black liquor gasification combined cycle (BLGCC) configuration) rather than a Tomlinson boiler is predicted to produce significantly fewer pollutant emissions due to the intrinsic characteristics of the BLGCC technology. Syngas cleanup conditioning removes a considerable amount of contaminants and gas turbine combustion is more efficient and complete than boiler combustion. Also, there could be reductions in pollutant emissions and hazardous wastes resulting from cleaner production of chemicals and fuels that are now manufactured using fossil energy resources. Production of power, fuels, chemicals, and other products from biomass resources creates a net zero generation of carbon dioxide as plants are renewable carbon sinks. BLG whether conducted at high or low temperatures is still superior to the current recovery boiler combustion technology. Implementation of IGCC power plants will cause net savings in cooling water requirements and net reductions in wastewater discharges. The most significant environmental impact caused by BLG will occur in air emissions. The overall reduction of Total reduced sulphur (TRS) gases using gasification technology will also reduce odor, which will improve public acceptance of pulp and paper mills, particularly in populated areas.

Pratima Bajpai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Parabolic Trough Organic Rankine Cycle Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Arizona Public Service (APS) is required to generate a portion of its electricity from solar resources in order to satisfy its obligation under the Arizona Environmental Portfolio Standard (EPS). In recent years, APS has installed and operates over 4.5 MWe of fixed, tracking, and concentrating photovoltaic systems to help meet the solar portion of this obligation and to develop an understanding of which solar technologies provide the best cost and performance to meet utility needs. During FY04, APS began construction of a 1-MWe parabolic trough concentrating solar power plant. This plant represents the first parabolic trough plant to begin construction since 1991. The plant will also be the first commercial deployment of the Solargenix parabolic trough collector technology developed under contract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The plant will use an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power plant, provided by Ormat. The ORC power plant is much simpler than a conventional steam Rankine cycle power plant and allows unattended operation of the facility.

Canada, S.; Cohen, G.; Cable, R.; Brosseau, D.; Price, H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a computational workbench for simulating the performance of Vision 21 Power Plant Systems. Within the last quarter, good progress has been made on the development of our IGCC workbench. Preliminary CFD simulations for single stage and two stage ''generic'' gasifiers using firing conditions based on the Vision 21 reference configuration have been performed. Work is continuing on implementing an advanced slagging model into the CFD based gasifier model. An investigation into published gasification kinetics has highlighted a wide variance in predicted performance due to the choice of kinetic parameters. A plan has been outlined for developing the reactor models required to simulate the heat transfer and gas clean up equipment downstream of the gasifier. Three models that utilize the CCA software protocol have been integrated into a version of the IGCC workbench. Tests of a CCA implementation of our CFD code into the workbench demonstrated that the CCA CFD module can execute on a geographically remote PC (linked via the Internet) in a manner that is transparent to the user. Software tools to create ''walk-through'' visualizations of the flow field within a gasifier have been demonstrated.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Sensible- Heat Storage Solar Power Plant with Sulfurof the Solar Power Plant Storage-Vessel Design, . . . . .System for Chemical Storage of Solar Energy. UC Berkeley,

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Dora-3 Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information Name Dora-3 Geothermal Power Plant Facility Power Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Coordinates 37.875046144284, 28.102602480794 Loading...

282

Zhangbei Guotou Wind Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zhangbei Guotou Wind Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhangbei Guotou Wind Power Plant Place: Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100037 Sector: Wind energy Product: A...

283

MHK Technologies/Yongsoo Wave Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yongsoo Wave Power Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Yongsoo Wave Power Plant.jpg Technology Profile Technology Type Click...

284

World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California February 19, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Ivanpah,...

285

RAPID/Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for compensation. Geothermal Power Plant in Federal Bureau of Land Management Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Geothermal Power Plant in New Mexico None NA Every person...

286

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis...

287

Saradambika Power Plant Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saradambika Power Plant Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Saradambika Power Plant Pvt. Ltd Place: Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip: 500082 Sector: Biomass Product:...

288

Modelling power output at nuclear power plant by neural networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose two different neural network (NN) approaches for industrial process signal forecasting. Real data is available for this research from boiling water reactor type nuclear power reactors. NNs are widely used for time series prediction, ... Keywords: evaluation methods, model input selection, neural networks, nuclear power plant, one-step ahead prediction

Jaakko Talonen; Miki Sirola; Eimontas Augilius

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

FUSION POWER PLANTS GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FUSION POWER PLANTS ­ GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES Farrokh Najmabadi Dept. of Electrical & Computer Eng. and Fusion Energy Research Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 619-534-7869 (619-534-7716, Fax) ABSTRACT Fusion is one of a few future power sources with the poten

Najmabadi, Farrokh

290

Evolution of Nuclear Power Plant Design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... research is expensive, and applied research and development on atomic energy is so expensive that expenditure should be justified either by the needs of defence or by the expectation of a ... per cent) have risen, and this rise reacts against nuclear power with its high capital cost. The result of these changes is that nuclear power from the plants which ...

CHRISTOPHER HINTON

1960-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

Video camera use at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

A survey of US nuclear power plants was conducted to evaluate video camera use in plant operations, and determine equipment used and the benefits realized. Basic closed circuit television camera (CCTV) systems are described and video camera operation principles are reviewed. Plant approaches for implementing video camera use are discussed, as are equipment selection issues such as setting task objectives, radiation effects on cameras, and the use of disposal cameras. Specific plant applications are presented and the video equipment used is described. The benefits of video camera use --- mainly reduced radiation exposure and increased productivity --- are discussed and quantified. 15 refs., 6 figs.

Estabrook, M.L.; Langan, M.O.; Owen, D.E. (ENCORE Technical Resources, Inc., Middletown, PA (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Power Plant Dams (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Plant Dams (Kansas) Power Plant Dams (Kansas) Power Plant Dams (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Kansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Health and Environment This act states the provisions for erection and maintenance of dams. When any person, corporation or city may be desirous of erecting and maintaining a milldam or dam for generating power across any watercourse, the party so desiring to do the same may run the stream over the land of any other person by ditching or otherwise, and he, she or it may obtain the right to erect and maintain said dam and keep up and maintain the necessary ditches

293

NETL: Gasification Project Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Project Information Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Project Information Active Projects | Archived Projects | All NETL Fact Sheets Feed Systems A Cost-Effective Oxygen Separation System Based on Open Gradient Magnetic Field by Polymer Beads [SC0010151] Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications [FE0012065] Dry Solids Pump Coal Feed Technology [FE0012062] Coal-CO2 Slurry Feeding System for Pressurized Gasifiers [FE0012500] National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility [FE0000749] Modification of the Developmental Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) Feeder [NT0000749] Recovery Act: Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems [DE-FC26-98FT40343]

294

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in IGCC Projects in IGCC Projects The Great Plains Synfuels Plant has long been gasifying coal to produce synthetic natural gas and ammonia, and capturing CO2 which is pipelined to Canada for EOR in the Weyburn oil field. Several new IGCC-based projects in the United States will be greatly expanding the scope of CO2 capture and use/storage. Kemper County Energy Facility Mississippi Power's Kemper County facility is in late stages of construction. It will be a lignite-fuel IGCC plant, generating a net 524 MW of power from syngas, while capturing over 65% of CO2 generated. The CO2 will be sent by pipeline to depleted oil fields in Mississippi for enhanced oil recovery operations. Hydrogen Energy California (HECA) Project HECA will be a 300MW net, coal and petroleum coke-fueled IGCC polygeneration plant (producing hydrogen for both power generation and fertilizer manufacture). Ninety percent of the CO2 produced will be captured and transported to Elk Hills Oil Field for EOR, enabling recovery of 5 million additional barrels of domestic oil per year.

295

Entrainment Coal Gasification Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Entrainment Coal Gasification Modeling ... Equivalent Reactor Network Model for Simulating the Air Gasification of Polyethylene in a Conical Spouted Bed Gasifier ... Equivalent Reactor Network Model for Simulating the Air Gasification of Polyethylene in a Conical Spouted Bed Gasifier ...

C. Y. Wen; T. Z. Chaung

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Development of a Segregated Municipal Solid Waste Gasification System for Electrical Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The overall engine-generator efficiency at 7.5 kW electrical power load was lower at 19.81% for gasoline fueled engine compared to 35.27% for synthesis gas. The pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system increased the net heating value of the product gas...

Maglinao, Amado Latayan

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

297

Microsoft PowerPoint - 100727 UTC Power final.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Review Program Review 11 th Annual SECA Workshop Pittsburgh, PA 27 July 2010 27 July 2010 David Brengel - Project Manager 1 SECA Objectives * Reduce SOFC-based electrical power generation system cost to ≤ $400/kWe (2002 dollars) for a >100MW Integrated Gasification ≤ $400/kWe (2002 dollars) for a >100MW Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) power plant, exclusive of coal gasification and CO 2 separation subsystem costs * Achieve an overall IGFC power plant efficiency of ≥50%, from coal (HHV) to AC power (inclusive of coal gasification and carbon separation processes) * Reduce the release of CO 2 to the environment in an IGFC power plant to ≤ 10% of the carbon in the coal feedstock * Increase SOFC stack reliability to achieve a design life of >40,000 hours

298

The Evolution of Nuclear Power Plant Design: Synopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 April 1961 research-article The Evolution of Nuclear Power Plant Design: Synopsis Christopher Hinton

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Fossil Power Plant Applications of Expert Systems: An EPRI Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the role of expert systems in the electric power industry, with particular emphasis on six fossil power plant applications currently under development by the Electric Power Research Institute....

Divakaruni, S. M.

300

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F.CENTRAL RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE progressCorporation, RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE I,

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

power plant | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plant plant Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 12 November, 2012 - 09:17 Legal Reviews are Underway BHFS Legal review permitting power plant roadmap transmission The legal review of the Regulatory Roadmap flowcharts and supporting content is well underway and will continue for the next several months with our legal team at [www.bhfs.com Brownstein Hyatt Farber and Schreck]. The BHFS has been meeting with the NREL roadmap team during weekly 2-3 hour meetings to provide comments and suggestions on each flowchart at the federal and state levels. They have had some fantastic recommendations for updates - particularly for Sections 7 and 8 of the roadmap, pertaining to the permitting of power plants and transmission lines. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load)

302

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Catawba Unit 1, Unit 2","2,258","18,964",36.5,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "H B Robinson Unit 2",724,"3,594",6.9,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "Oconee Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","2,538","20,943",40.3,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "V C Summer Unit 1",966,"8,487",16.3,"South Carolina Electric&Gas Co" "4 Plants 7 Reactors","6,486","51,988",100.0

303

Stateline Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stateline Solar Power Plant Stateline Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Stateline Solar Power Plant Facility Stateline Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer First Solar Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

304

Blythe Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blythe Solar Power Plant Blythe Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Blythe Solar Power Plant Facility Blythe Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer First Solar Location Blythe, California Coordinates 33.6172329°, -114.5891744° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.6172329,"lon":-114.5891744,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

305

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Power Plant System Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parabolic Trough Power Plant System Technology Parabolic Trough Power Plant System Technology A parabolic trough solar power plant uses a large field of collectors to supply thermal energy to a conventional power plant. Because they use conventional power cycles, parabolic trough power plants can be hybridized-other fuels can be used to back up the solar power. Like all power cycles, trough power plants also need a cooling system to transfer waste heat to the environment. Parabolic trough power plant technologies include: Direct steam generation Fossil-fired (hybrid) backup Operation and maintenance Power cycles Steam Rankine Organic Rankine Combined Wet and dry cooling Power Cycles A photo of an aerial view of a power plant in the middle of a solar field with rows and rows of parabolic troughs tracking. The cooling towers can be seen with the water plume rising into the air. The white water tanks can be seen in the background.

306

MHD power plant instrumentation and control  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has awarded a contract to the MHD Development Corporation (MDC) to develop instrumentation and control requirements and strategies for commercial MHD power plants. MDC subcontracted MSE to do the technical development required. MSE is being assisted by Montana State University (MSU) for the topping cycle development. A computer model of a stand-alone MHD/steam plant is being constructed. The plant is based on the plant design set forth in the MDC proposal to the Federal Clean Coal Technology 5 solicitation. It consists of an MHD topping plant, a Heat Recovery Seed Recovery (HRSR) plant, and a steam turbo-generator. The model is based on the computer code used for a study of the Corette plant retrofitted with an MHD plant. Additional control strategies, based on MHD testing results and current steam bottoming plant control data, will be incorporated. A model will be devised and implemented for automatic control of the plant. Requirements regarding instrumentation and actuators will be documented. Instrumentation and actuators that are not commercially available will be identified. The role and desired characteristics of an expert system in the automated control scheme is being investigated. Start-up and shutdown procedures will be studied and load change dynamic performance will be evaluated. System response to abnormal topping cycle and off-design system operation will be investigated. This includes use of MHD topping cycle models which couple gasdynamic and electrical behavior for the study of controlling of the MHD topping cycle. A curvefitter, which uses cubic Hermitian spline interpolation functions in as many as five dimensions, allows much more accurate reproduction of nonlinear, multidimensional functions. This project will be the first to investigate plant dynamics and control using as many as seven independent variables or control inputs to the MHD topping cycle.

Lofftus, D.; Rudberg, D. [MSE Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Johnson, R.; Hammerstrom, D. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION SYSTEMS GASIFICATION SYSTEMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREFACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

308

Report on Hawaii geothermal power plant project  

SciTech Connect

The Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project is the first power plant in the State of Hawaii to be powered by geothermal energy. This plant, which is located in the Puna District on the Island of Hawaii, produces three (3) megawatts of electricity utilizing the steam phase from the geothermal well. This project represents the climax of the geophysical research efforts going on for two decades in the Hawaiian Islands which resulted in the discovery of a significant reservoir of geothermal energy which could be put to practical use. In 1978 the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the State of Hawaii, entered into negotiations to design and build a power plant. The purpose and objective of this plant was to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing and operating a geothermal power plant located in a remote volcanically active area. A contract was signed in mid 1978 between the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii (RCUH) and the Department of Energy (DOE). To date, the DOE has provided 8.3 million dollars with the State of Hawaii and others contributing 2.1 million dollars. The cost of the project exceeded its original estimates by approximately 25%. These increases in cost were principally contributed to the higher cost for construction than was originally estimated. Second, the cost of procuring the various pieces of equipment exceed their estimates by 10 to 20 percent, and third, the engineering dollar per man hour rose 20 to 25 percent.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Gasification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Gasification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Slim Holes for Small Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal research study at Sandia National Laboratories has conducted a program in slimhole drilling research since 1992. Although our original interest focused on slim holes as an exploration method, it has also become apparent that they have substantial potential for driving small-scale, off-grid power plants. This paper summarizes Sandia's slim-hole research program, describes technology used in a ''typical'' slimhole drilling project, presents an evaluation of using slim holes for small power plants, and lists some of the research topics that deserve further investigation.

Finger, John T.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

312

Energy recovery from solid waste fuels using advanced gasification technology  

SciTech Connect

Since the mid-1980s, TPS Termiska Processer AB has been working on the development of an atmospheric-pressure gasification process. A major aim at the start of this work was the generation of fuel gas from indigenous fuels to Sweden (i.e. biomass). As the economic climate changed and awareness of the damage to the environment caused by the use of fossil fuels in power generation equipment increased, the aim of the development work at TPS was changed to applying the process to heat and power generation from feedstocks such as biomass and solid wastes. Compared with modern waste incineration with heat recovery, the gasification process will permit an increase in electricity output of up to 50%. The gasification process being developed is based on an atmospheric-pressure circulating fluidized bed gasifier coupled to a tar-cracking vessel. The gas produced from this process is then cooled and cleaned in conventional equipment. The energy-rich gas produced is clean enough to be fired in a gas boiler without requiring extensive flue gas cleaning, as is normally required in conventional waste incineration plants. Producing clean fuel gas in this manner, which facilitates the use of efficient gas-fired boilers, means that overall plant electrical efficiencies of close to 30% can be achieved. TPS has performed a considerable amount of pilot plant testing on waste fuels in their gasification/gas cleaning pilot plant in Sweden. Two gasifiers of TPS design have been in operation in Greve-in-Chianti, italy since 1992. This plant processes 200 tonnes of RDF (refuse-derived fuel) per day.

Morris, M.; Waldheim, L. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)] [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Strategies in tower solar power plant optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method for optimizing a central receiver solar thermal electric power plant is studied. We parametrize the plant design as a function of eleven design variables and reduce the problem of finding optimal designs to the numerical problem of finding the minimum of a function of several variables. This minimization problem is attacked with different algorithms both local and global in nature. We find that all algorithms find the same minimum of the objective function. The performance of each of the algorithms and the resulting designs are studied for two typical cases. We describe a method to evaluate the impact of design variables in the plant performance. This method will tell us what variables are key to the optimal plant design and which ones are less important. This information can be used to further improve the plant design and to accelerate the optimization procedure.

Ramos, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biomass Integrated Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power Systems Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power Systems Project Summary Full Title: Cost and Performance Analysis of Biomass-Based Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (BIGCC) Power Systems Project ID: 106 Principal Investigator: Margaret Mann Brief Description: This project examines the cost and performance potential of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems--high-pressure air blown, low-pressure air blown, and low-pressure indirectly heated. Purpose Examine the cost and performance potential of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems - a high pressure air-blown, a low pressure indirectly heated, and a low pressure air-blown. Performer Principal Investigator: Margaret Mann

315

NETL: Gasification Systems - Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry for Feeding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low-Rank Coal to Gasifiers Project Number: DE-FE0007977 There is increased interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) for future coal-based power plants, and in a CCS integrated gasification plant, relatively pure, high pressure CO2 stream(s) will be available within the power plant. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) aims to help reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CCS by using a portion of the high purity CO2 product stream as the carrier fluid to feed low rank coal (LRC) into the gasifier. EPRI proposes to confirm the potential advantages of LRC/liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) slurries by: Conducting plant-wide technical and economic simulations.

316

Automation of hydroelectric power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes how the author's company has been automating its hydroelectric generating plants. The early automations were achieved with a relay-type supervisory control system, relay logic, dc tachometer, and a pneumatic gate-position controller. While this system allowed the units to be started and stopped from a remote location, they were operated at an output that was preset by the pneumatic control at the generating site. The supervisory control system at the site provided such information as unit status, generator breaker status, and a binary coded decimal (BCD) value of the pond level. The generating units are started by energizing an on-site relay that sets the pneumatic gate controller to a preset value above the synchronous speed of the hydroelectric generator. The pneumatic controller then opens the water-wheel wicket gates to the preset startup position. As the hydroelectric generator starts to turn, the machine-mounted dc tachometer produces a voltage. At a dc voltage equivalent to synchronous speed, the generator main breaker closes, and a contact from the main breaker starts a field-delay timer. Within a few seconds, the field breaker closes. Once the cycle is complete, a relay changes the pneumatic setpoint to a preset operating point of about 8/10 wicket gate opening.

Grasser, H.S. (Consolidated Papers, Inc., Wisconsin Rapids, WI (US))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Clean Fuels from Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...been operated as a "pure" gasifier but to supply power gas for...was the air-blown Winkler gasifier pro-ducing power gas at Leuna...fines, additional gasification medium (air or oxygen-steam) is...partial pressure of steam in a gasifier blown with oxygen and steam...

Arthur M. Squires

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

318

Analysis of Membrane and Adsorbent Processes for Warm Syngas Cleanup in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power with CO2 Capture and Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of Membrane and Adsorbent Processes for Warm Syngas Cleanup in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power with CO2 Capture and Sequestration ... The clean syngas is diluted with N2 from the ASU and enters the gas turbine burner. ... The amount of N2 diluent to be added is determined by the requirement of maintaining the appropriate lower heating value of the syngas feeding into the gas turbine burner to achieve sufficiently low NOx emissions (1535 ppmv at 15% O2)(36) and to keep the temperature of the gas low enough to avoid blade failure. ...

David J. Couling; Kshitij Prakash; William H. Green

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced power plants Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plants Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced power plants...

320

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic power plant Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plant Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atomic power plant...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced power plant Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plant Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced power plant...

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic power plants Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plants Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atomic power plants...

323

A study on ultra heavy oil gasification technology  

SciTech Connect

Raising the thermal efficiency of a thermal power plant is an important issue from viewpoints of effective energy utilization and environmental protection. In view of raising the thermal efficiency, a gas turbine combined cycle power generation is considered to be very effective. The thermal efficiency of the latest LNG combined cycle power plant has been raised by more than 50%. On the other hand, the diversification of fuels to ensure supply stability is also an important issue, particularly in Japan where natural resources are scarce. Because of excellent handling characteristics petroleum and LNG which produces clean combustion are used in many sectors, and so the demand for such fuels is expected to grow. However, the availability of such fuels is limited, and supplies will be exhausted in the near future. The development of a highly efficient and environment-friendly gas turbine combined cycle using ultra heavy oil such as Orimulsion{trademark} (trademark of BITOR) is thus a significant step towards resolving these two issues. Chubu Electric Power Co, Inc., the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) conducted a collaboration from 1994 to 1998 with the objective of developing an ultra heavy oil integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Construction of the ultra heavy oil gasification testing facility (fuel capacity:2.4t/d) was completed in 1995, and Orimulsion{trademark} gasification tests were carried out in 1995 and 1996. In 1997, the hot dedusting facility with ceramic filter and the water scrubber used as a preprocessor of a wet desulfurization process were installed. Gasification and clean up the syngs tests were carried out on Orimulsion{trademark}, Asmulsion{trademark} (trademark of Nisseki Mitsubishi K.K.), and residue oil in 1997 and 1998. The results of the collaboration effort are described below.

Kidoguchi, Kazuhiro; Ashizawa, Masami; Taki, Masato; Ishimura, Masato; Takeno, Keiji

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load Southern Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

325

ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM ENTRAINMENT IMPACTS Prepared For: California, Center for Ocean Health, Long Marine Lab GREGOR CAILLIET, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories DAVID MAYER be obvious that large studies like these require the coordinated work of many people. We would first like

326

Abrasion and Erosion testing of Materials used in Power Production...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and exhaust gas can erode a boiler's heat exchange tubes 4-8 . In coal gasification power plants, the heat exchanger tubes can experience corrosion due to H 2 S and HCl in...

327

EIS-0383: Southern Company's Orlando Gasification Project, Orlando, FL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to provide cost-shared funding for construction, design, and operation of a new gasification plant in Orlando, Florida.

328

Development of a dynamic simulator for a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with post-combustion carbon capture  

SciTech Connect

The AVESTAR Center located at the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory and West Virginia University is a world-class research and training environment dedicated to using dynamic process simulation as a tool for advancing the safe, efficient and reliable operation of clean energy plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The AVESTAR Center was launched with a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion carbon capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator offers full-scope Operator Training Simulator (OTS) Human Machine Interface (HMI) graphics for realistic, real-time control room operation and is integrated with a 3D virtual Immersive Training Simulator (ITS), thus allowing joint control room and field operator training. The IGCC OTS/ITS solution combines a gasification with CO{sub 2} capture process simulator with a combined cycle power simulator into a single high-performance dynamic simulation framework. This presentation will describe progress on the development of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) dynamic simulator based on the syngas-fired combined cycle portion of AVESTARs IGCC dynamic simulator. The 574 MW gross NGCC power plant design consisting of two advanced F-class gas turbines, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and a steam turbine in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration will be reviewed. Plans for integrating a post-combustion carbon capture system will also be discussed.

Liese, E.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

DOE Science Showcase - Energy Plants of the Future | OSTI, US Dept of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Science Showcase - Energy Plants of the Future DOE Science Showcase - Energy Plants of the Future Advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants Advanced IGCC is a flexible technology for generating low-cost electricity while meeting all future environment requirements Secretary Chu Announces $14 Million for Six New Projects to Advance IGCC Technology DOE Press Release DOE-Sponsored IGCC Project in Texas Takes Important Step Forward, Fossil Energy Techline Gasification Technology R&D How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database Follow NETL Gasification IGCC Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org Visit the Science Showcase homepage. OSTI Homepage Mobile Gallery Subscribe to RSS OSTI Blog Get Widgets Get Alert Services

330

Wind Power Plant Voltage Stability Evaluation: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Voltage stability refers to the ability of a power system to maintain steady voltages at all buses in the system after being subjected to a disturbance from a given initial operating condition. Voltage stability depends on a power system's ability to maintain and/or restore equilibrium between load demand and supply. Instability that may result occurs in the form of a progressive fall or rise of voltages of some buses. Possible outcomes of voltage instability are the loss of load in an area or tripped transmission lines and other elements by their protective systems, which may lead to cascading outages. The loss of synchronism of some generators may result from these outages or from operating conditions that violate a synchronous generator's field current limit, or in the case of variable speed wind turbine generator, the current limits of power switches. This paper investigates the impact of wind power plants on power system voltage stability by using synchrophasor measurements.

Muljadi, E.; Zhang, Y. C.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Mohave Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mohave Solar Power Plant Mohave Solar Power Plant Facility Mojave Solar Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status Under Construction Owner Mojave Solar LLC, Developer Abengoa Solar, Mohave Sun LLC Location Mohave County, Arizona Coordinates 35.017264°, -117.316607° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.017264,"lon":-117.316607,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

332

SELFMONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SELF­MONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION) Aldo and identification are extremely important activities for the safety of a nuclear power plant. In particular inside huge and complex production plants. 1 INTRODUCTION Safety in nuclear power plants requires

333

Configuration management in nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Configuration management (CM) is the process of identifying and documenting the characteristics of a facility's structures, systems and components of a facility, and of ensuring that changes to these characteristics are properly developed, assessed, approved, issued, implemented, verified, recorded and incorporated into the facility documentation. The need for a CM system is a result of the long term operation of any nuclear power plant. The main challenges are caused particularly by ageing plant technology, plant modifications, the application of new safety and operational requirements, and in general by human factors arising from migration of plant personnel and possible human failures. The IAEA Incident Reporting System (IRS) shows that on average 25% of recorded events could be caused by configuration errors or deficiencies. CM processes correctly applied ensure that the construction, operation, maintenance and testing of a physical facility are in accordance with design requirements as expressed in the d...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Sustainability in the power plant choice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

International literature presents several studies on the economics of power plants based on cash flows. However there are sustainability factors (e.g., environmental and social aspects, etc.) able to heavily bear on the sustainability of certain investments. This paper lists and quantifies these factors and ranks under different scenarios the following technologies: hydro, coal, oil, gas and nuclear. Then an overall multi-attribute model, based on the quality function deployment approach, delivers a weight for each factor, dividing its impact in the three different sustainability dimensions: economic, environmental and social. Finally the factor weights and their performances are coupled to obtain an overall ranking. The results show that hydroelectric plants are usually the best solution. Coal and nuclear could be a good choice even if each type of plant has its strengths and weaknesses. On the contrary, the oil and gas-fired plants are always the worst choice.

Giorgio Locatelli; Mauro Mancini

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Enhanced IGCC regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control strategies for improving power ramp rates  

SciTech Connect

As part of ongoing R&D activities at the National Energy Technology Laboratorys (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training & Research (AVESTAR) Center, this paper highlights strategies for enhancing low-level regulatory control and system-wide coordinated control strategies implemented in a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture. The underlying IGCC plant dynamic model contains 20 major process areas, each of which is tightly integrated with the rest of the power plant, making individual functionally-independent processes prone to routine disturbances. Single-loop feedback control although adequate to meet the primary control objective for most processes, does not take into account in advance the effect of these disturbances, making the entire power plant undergo large offshoots and/or oscillations before the feedback action has an opportunity to impact control performance. In this paper, controller enhancements ranging from retuning feedback control loops, multiplicative feed-forward control and other control techniques such as split-range control, feedback trim and dynamic compensation, applicable on various subsections of the integrated IGCC plant, have been highlighted and improvements in control responses have been given. Compared to using classical feedback-based control structure, the enhanced IGCC regulatory control architecture reduces plant settling time and peak offshoots, achieves faster disturbance rejection, and promotes higher power ramp-rates. In addition, improvements in IGCC coordinated plant-wide control strategies for Gasifier-Lead, GT-Lead and Plantwide operation modes have been proposed and their responses compared. The paper is concluded with a brief discussion on the potential IGCC controller improvements resulting from using advanced process control, including model predictive control (MPC), as a supervisory control layer.

Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

337

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2003-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

338

Ahuachapan Geothermal Power Plant, El Salvador  

SciTech Connect

The Ahuachapan geothermal power plant has been the subject of several recent reports and papers (1-7). This article is a condensation of the author's earlier writings (5-7), and incorporates new information on the geothermal activities in El Salvador obtained recently through a telephone conversation with Ing. R. Caceres of the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (C.E.L.) who has been engaged in the design and engineering of the newest unit at Ahuachapan. El Salvador is the first of the Central American countries to construct and operate a geothermal electric generating station. Exploration began in the mid-1960's at the geothermal field near Ahuachapan in western El Salvador. The first power unit, a separated-steam or so-called ''single-flash'' plant, was started up in June 1975, and was followed a year later by an identical unit. In July 1980, the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (C.E.L.) will complete the installation of a third unit, a dual-pressure (or ''double-flash'') unit rated at 35 MW. The full Ahuachapan plant will then constitute about 20% of the total installed electric generating capacity of the country. During 1977, the first two units generated nearly one-third of all the electricity produced in El Salvador. C.E.L. is actively pursuing several other promising sites for additional geothermal plants. There is the possibility that eventually geothermal energy will contribute about 450 MW of electric generating capacity. In any event it appears that by 1985 El Salvador should be able to meet its domestic needs for electricity by means of its indigenous geothermal and hydroelectric power plants, thus eliminating any dependence on imported petroleum for power generation.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain-term solution (e.g.,are long-term solution (e.g., solar power and wind power (solar power and wind power Heavy user of fossil fuels:Heavy user of fossil fuels: Electric power industryElectric power industry

Nagurney, Anna

340

Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Prototype for CO{sub 2} Capture from Existing Pulverized Coal-Fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Alstoms Limestone Chemical Looping (LCL) process has the potential to capture CO{sub 2} from new and existing coal-fired power plants while maintaining high plant power generation efficiency. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion- gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology. This process could also be potentially configured as a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas or hydrogen for various applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. The targets set for this technology is to capture over 90% of the total carbon in the coal at cost of electricity which is less than 20% greater than Conventional PC or CFB units. Previous work with bench scale test and a 65 kWt Process Development Unit Development (PDU) has validated the chemistry required for the chemical looping process and provided for the investigation of the solids transport mechanisms and design requirements. The objective of this project is to continue development of the combustion option of chemical looping (LCL-C) by designing, building and testing a 3 MWt prototype facility. The prototype includes all of the equipment that is required to operate the chemical looping plant in a fully integrated manner with all major systems in service. Data from the design, construction, and testing will be used to characterize environmental performance, identify and address technical risks, reassess commercial plant economics, and develop design information for a demonstration plant planned to follow the proposed Prototype. A cold flow model of the prototype will be used to predict operating conditions for the prototype and help in operator training. Operation of the prototype will provide operator experience with this new technology and performance data of the LCL-C process, which will be applied to the commercial design and economics and plan for a future demonstration plant.

Andrus, Herbert; Chiu, John; Edberg, Carl; Thibeault, Paul; Turek, David

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Acid Gas Removal (AGR) Acid gases produced in gasification processes mainly consist of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon dioxide (CO2). Syngas exiting the particulate removal and gas conditioning systems, typically near ambient temperature at 100°F, needs to be cleaned of the sulfur-bearing acid gases to meet either environmental emissions regulations, or to protect downstream catalysts for chemical processing applications. For integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) applications, environmental regulations require that the sulfur content of the product syngas be reduced to less than 30 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in order to meet the stack gas emission target of less than 4 ppmv sulfur dioxide (SO2)1. In IGCC applications, where selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is required to lower NOx emissions to less than 10 ppmv, syngas sulfur content may have to be lowered to 10 to 20 ppmv in order to prevent ammonium bisulfate fouling of the heat recovery steam generator's (HRSG) cold end tubes. For fuels production or chemical production, the downstream synthesis catalyst sulfur tolerance dictates the sulfur removal level, which can be less than 0.1 ppmv.

342

Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separation Separation Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Gas separation unit operations represent major cost elements in gasification plants. The gas separation technology being supported in the DOE program promises significant reduction in cost of electricity, improved thermal efficiency, and superior environmental performance. Gasification-based energy conversion systems rely on two gas separation processes: (1) separation of oxygen from air for feed to oxygen-blown gasifiers; and (2) post-gasification separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide following (or along with) the shifting of gas composition when carbon dioxide capture is required or hydrogen is the desired product. Research efforts include development of advanced gas separation

344

NETL: Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOx Sources NOx Sources Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs) Causes of greenhouse gases, Including NOx What is NOx? Environmental Impacts NOx Sources Reduction Efforts Several greenhouse gases, including NOx, are increasing due to human activities in the following areas: Burning of fossil fuel (for example, coal-fired power plants), Logging (mainly contributes to carbon monoxide), Agriculture processes, Use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) in holon fire suppression and refrigeration The chart below shows the three major gases contributing to greenhouse gas emissions along with their source by sector. Annual Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Sector Note: This figure was created and copyrighted by Robert A. Rohde from published data and is part of the Global Warming Art project. This image is an original work created for Global Warming Art Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this image under either:

345

Clean Power Plan: Reducing Carbon Pollution From Existing Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency Improvements Efficiency improvements Co-firing or switching to natural gas Coal retirements Retrofit CCS (e.g.,WA Parish in Texas) 2. Use lower-emitting power sources more Dispatch changes to existing natural gas combined cycle (CC) Dispatch... that are high emitting. Energy conservation programs. Retrofitting units with partial CCS. Use of certain biomass. Efficiency improvements at higher- emitting plants.* Market-based trading programs. Building new renewables. Dispatch changes. Co...

Bremer,K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: Coal Ranks Coal: Coal Ranks CLICK ON GRAPHIC TO ENLARGE This figure shows the locations and type for all of the coal deposits in the U.S. This figure shows the locations and type for all of the coal deposits in the U.S.2 Coal Types The four main types, or ranks, of coal are: Lignite - Sometimes called "brown coal," lignite is the youngest of the coal types, and has the lowest energy content, containing between 25 and 35 percent carbon. Lignite usually has not been subjected to the extreme temperatures and pressures typical of the higher energy content coal types. It is crumbly, has a high moisture content, and is typically burned in power plants for electrical production. About 20 lignite mines produce about 7 percent of total US produced coal, mostly in Texas and

347

Advanced pulverized-coal power plants: A U.S. export opportunity  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an overview of Low Emission Boiler System (LEBS) power generation systems and its potential for generating power worldwide. Based on the fuel availability, power requirements, and environmental regulations, countries have been identified that need to build advanced, clean, efficient, and economical power generation, systems. It is predicted that ``more electrical generation capacity will be built over the next 25 years than was built in the previous century``. For example, China and India alone, with less than 10% of today`s demand, plan to build what would amount to a quarter of the world`s new capacity. For the near- to mid-term, the LEBS program of Combustion 2000 has the promise to fill some of the needs of the international coal-fired power generation market. The high efficiency of LEBS, coupled with the use of advanced, proven technologies and low emissions, make it a strong candidate for export to those areas whose need for additional power is greatest. LEBS is a highly advanced version of conventional coal-based power plants that have been utilized throughout the world for decades. LEBS employs proven technologies and doesn`t require gasification and/or an unconventional combustion environment (e.g., fluidized bed). LEBS is viewed by the utility industry as technically acceptable and commercially feasible.

Ruth, L.A. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Ramezan, M.; Izsak, M.S. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Running dry at the power plant  

SciTech Connect

In the future, competition for water will require electricity generators in the United States to address conservation of fresh water. There are a number of avenues to consider. One is to use dry-cooling and dry-scrubbing technologies. Another is to find innovative ways to recycle water within the power plant itself. A third is to find and use alternative sources of water, including wastewater supplies from municipalities, agricultural runoff, blackish groundwater, or seawater. Dry technologies are usually more capital intensive and typically exact a penalty in terms of plant performance, which in turn raises the cost of power generation. On the other hand, if the cost of water increases in response to greater demand, the cost differences between dry and wet technologies will be reduced. EPRI has a substantial R & D programme evaluating new water-conserving power plant technologies, improving dry and hybrid cooling technologies, reducing water losses in cooling towers, using degraded water sources and developing resource assessment and management decision support tools. 5 refs., 10 figs.

Barker, B.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Aspects Regarding Design of Wind Power Plants Foundation System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the past years wind power plants projects have become very important all over ... must be calculated for dynamic loads, especially wind charge. The article present the particularities of the wind power plants

Vasile Farcas; Nicoleta Ilies

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Self Certifications Title II of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (FUA), as amended...

351

1 INTRODUCTION In Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) systems, effective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 INTRODUCTION In Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) systems, effective prediction methods are sought for Nuclear Power Plant Failure Scenarios Using an Ensemble-based Approach J. Liu & V. Vitelli Chair

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

352

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provide solar power plant energy storage for a reasonablefor Chemical Storage of Solar Energy. UC Berkeley, M.S.for a solar power plant without energy storage for nighttime

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A study of a commercial MHD power plant scheme  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to an investigation of one of the possible process flow diagrams of MHD electrical power plants. The structure of MHD electrical power plants, the interrelation between the ... theoretical a...

S. A. Pashkov; E. V. Shishkov

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Unusual Condition Mining for Risk Management of Hydroelectric Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kyushu Electric Power Co.,Inc. collects different sensor data and weather information to maintain the safety of hydroelectric power plants while the plants are running. In this paper, we consider that the abnormal condition sign may be unusual condition. ...

Takashi Onoda; Norihiko Ito; Hironobu Yamasaki

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for concentrating solar-thermal energy use a large number ofBoth solar power plants absorb thermal energy in high-of a solar power plant that converts thermal energy into

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

How a Geothermal Power Plant Works (Simple) | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Works (Simple) Most power plants-whether fueled by coal, gas, nuclear power, or geothermal energy-have one feature in common: they convert heat to electricity. Heat from...

357

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cecil. E. A. , Research on Dry-Type Cooling _T_o_w_e_r~s~f~oTower Type Wet-Cooled Power Plant Solar-Power Plant Dry-Cool

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Clean Fuels from Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...appreciably larger sizes than coal to other...they grew to a size to fall upon an...air-blown Winkler gasifier pro-ducing power...additional gasification medium (air or oxygen-steam...provide "pure" gasifier Test revamp Develop larger sizes Develop pressure...

Arthur M. Squires

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

359

Loan Guarantee Recipient Awarded Power Plant of the Year  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, a DOE loan guarantee recipient, won 2014 Plant of the Year from POWER Magazine.

360

Geothermal Power Plants Meeting Water Quality and Conservation Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. geothermal power plants can easily meet federal, state, and local water quality and conservation standards.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, the world’s largest concentrating solar power plant, officially opened on February 13.

362

Modeling mercury in power plant plumes  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of speciated mercury (Hg) downwind of coal-fired power plants suggest that the Hg{sup II}/(Hg{sup 0} + Hg{sup II}) ratio decreases significantly between the point of emission and the downwind ground-level measurement site, but that the SO{sub 2}/(Hg{sup 0} + Hg{sup II}) ratio is conserved. The authors simulated nine power plant plume events with the Reactive & Optics Model of Emissions (ROME), a reactive plume model that includes a comprehensive treatment of plume dispersion, transformation, and deposition. The model simulations fail to reproduce such a depletion in Hg{sup II}. A sensitivity study of the impact of the Hg{sup II} dry deposition velocity shows that a difference in dry deposition alone cannot explain the disparity. Similarly, a sensitivity study of the impact of cloud chemistry on results shows that the effect of clouds on Hg chemistry has only minimal impact. Possible explanations include Hg{sup II} reduction to Hg{sup 0} in the plume, rapid reduction of Hg{sup II} to Hg{sup 0} on ground surfaces, and/or an overestimation of the Hg{sup II} fraction in the power plant emissions. The authors propose that a chemical reaction not included in current models of atmospheric mercury reduces Hg{sup II} to Hg{sup 0} in coal-fired power plant plumes. The incorporation of two possible reduction pathways for Hg{sup II} shows better agreement between the model simulations and the ambient measurements. These potential Hg{sup II} to Hg{sup 0} reactions need to be studied in the laboratory to investigate this hypothesis. Because the speciation of Hg has a significant effect on Hg deposition, models of the fate and transport of atmospheric Hg may need to be modified to account for the reduction of Hg{sup II} in coal-fired power plant plumes if such a reaction is confirmed in further experimental investigations. 31 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Kristen Lohman; Christian Seigneur; Eric Edgerton; John Jansen [Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Partner Test Sites Major Partner Test Sites Gasification Systems Technologies - Major Partner Test Sites Major Partner Test Sites Once a technology is ready to be tested at pilot or commercial scale, the cost of building a test facility becomes significant -- often beyond the funding provided for any one project. It then becomes critical to test the technology at a pre-existing facility willing to test experimental technologies. Not surprisingly, most commercial facilities are hesitant to interfere with their operations to experiment, but others, with a view towards the future, welcome promising technologies. Below is a list of major partner test sites that actively host DOE supported research activities. Many of the test sites were built with DOE support, but many were not. Some are commercial, and were designed to perform experimental work. All play an important role in developing technologies with minimal expense to the project, and to the U.S. taxpayer.

364

Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis ¨Ozge I¸slegen Graduate School excellent research assistance. #12;Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis Abstract: For fossil fuel power plants to be built in the future, carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer

Silver, Whendee

365

Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants Pascal Richter Center for Computational · Optimization of solar tower power plants 1/20 #12;Introduction ­ Solar tower power plants Solar tower PS10 (11 MW) in Andalusia, Spain · Solar tower with receiver · Heliostat field with self-aligning mirrors

Ábrahám, Erika

366

Hybrid Modeling and Control of a Hydroelectric Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid Modeling and Control of a Hydroelectric Power Plant Giancarlo Ferrari-Trecate, Domenico,mignone,castagnoli,morari}@aut.ee.ethz.ch Abstract In this work we present the model of a hydroelectric power plant in the framework of Mixed Logic with a model predictive control scheme. 1 Introduction The outflow control for hydroelectric power plants

Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

367

Analysis of Biomass/Coal Co-Gasification for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems with Carbon Capture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In recent years, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology (IGCC) has become more common in clean coal power operations with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). (more)

Long, Henry A, III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NETL, USDA design coal-stabilized biomass gasification unit  

SciTech Connect

Coal, poultry litter, contaminated corn, rice hulls, moldly hay, manure sludge - these are representative materials that could be tested as fuel feedstocks in a hybrid gasification/combustion concept studied in a recent US Department of Energy (DOE) design project. DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) collaborated to develop a design concept of a power system that incorporates Hybrid Biomass Gasification. This system would explore the use of a wide range of biomass and agricultural waste products as gasifier feedstocks. The plant, if built, would supply one-third of electrical and steam heating needs at the USDA's Beltsville (Maryland) Agricultural Research Center. 1 fig., 1 photo.

NONE

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 Fig. 1.2. Solar power plant operation [Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications AMaterials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

Roshandell, Melina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

District Cooling Using Central Tower Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract During the operation of solar power towers there are occasions, commonly in the summer season, where some of the heliostats have to stop focusing at the central receiver, located at the top of the tower, because the maximum temperature that the receiver can withstand has been reached. The highest demands of cooling for air conditioning take place at these same occasions. In the present paper, we have analyzed the possibility of focusing the exceeding heliostats to the receiver increasing the mass flow rate of the heat transfer fluid over the nominal value and using the extra heat as a source of an absorption chiller. The chilled water would be used to cool buildings and offices, using a district cooling network. Using the extra heat of the solar power tower plant would greatly reduce the electricity usage. In this work we have analyzed the case of a circular field of heliostats focusing at a circular receiver, such as the case of Gemasolar plant. We have quantified the thermal power that can be obtained from the unused heliostats, the cooling capacity of the absorption system as well as the heat losses through the insulated pipes that distribute the chilled water to the buildings of the network.

C. Marugn-Cruz; S. Snchez-Delgado; M.R. Rodrguez-Snchez; M. Venegas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power plant interface engineering  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of EPRI Research Project 2466-10. The objective of this project was to identify the preliminary interface requirements and characteristics for a coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic retrofit power plant located at the Scholz Generating Station, Sneads, Florida. An initial building arrangement has been developed and incorporated into the plot plan of the Scholz Generating Station. An MHD process flow diagram was generated and integrated with the existing plant process flow diagram. The electrical interface schematic for the MHD system was also developed. A preliminary list of process flow, electrical, and physical interfaces was produced and the respective interface requirements defined. The existing facilities were inspected and the necessary modifications imposed by the MHD system have been identified. 6 refs., 24 figs., 11 tabs.

Van Bibber, L.E.; Wiseman, D.A. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Advanced Energy Systems Div.); Cuchens, J.W. (Southern Electric International, Birmingham, AL (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

(Nuclear power plant control and instrumentation technology)  

SciTech Connect

While on vacation, the traveler attended the European Nuclear Conference in Lyon, France. This trip was part of an outside activity approved by DOE. The traveler is a consultant to Loyola College, serving as chairman of a panel to assess the state of the art in the controls and instrumentation technology in the European nuclear community. This study is being conducted by Loyola College under subcontract to the National Science Foundation. The traveler was surprised by the level of automation claimed (by the company Siemens AG KWU) to be present in the German Konvoi nuclear power plants. The claim was that this was done to improve the safety of the plant by keeping the operator out of the loop'' for the first 30 minutes of some transients or accidents.

White, J.D.

1990-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

373

CFD analysis for solar chimney power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solar chimney power plants are investigated numerically using ANSYS Fluent and an in-house developed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code. Analytical scaling laws are verified by considering a large range of scales with tower heights between 1m (sub-scale laboratory model) and 1000m (largest envisioned plant). A model with approximately 6m tower height is currently under construction at the University of Arizona. Detailed time-dependent high-resolution simulations of the flow in the collector and chimney of the model provide detailed insight into the fluid dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms. Both transversal and longitudinal convection rolls are identified in the collector, indicating the presence of a RayleighBnardPoiseuille instability. Local separation is observed near the chimney inflow. The flow inside the chimney is fully turbulent.

Hermann F. Fasel; Fanlong Meng; Ehsan Shams; Andreas Gross

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Advanced electric power generation systems use a coal gasifier to convert coal to a gas rich in fuels such as H{sub 2} and CO. The gas stream contains impurities such as H{sub 2}S and HCl, which attack metal components of the coal gas train, causing plant downtime and increasing the cost of power generation. Corrosion-resistant coatings would improve plant availability and decrease maintenance costs, thus allowing the environmentally superior integrated gasification combined cycle plants to be more competitive with standard power-generation technologies. A startup meeting was held at the National Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA site on July 28, 2003. SRI staff described the technical approach of the project.

Gopala N. Krishnan

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Relative Movements for Design of Commodities in Nuclear Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Relative Movements for Design of Commodities in Nuclear Power Plants Javad Moslemian, Vice President, Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent & Lundy LLC Nezar Abraham, Senior Associate II, Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent & Lundy LLC

376

Development of Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Partial Gasification Module (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the July 1-September 30, 2002 time period.

A. Robertson

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the October 1--December 31, 2002 time period.

Unknown

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the April 1--June 30, 2003 time period.

Archie Robertson

2003-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

379

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the July 1--September 30, 2003 time period.

Archie Robertson

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

380

Development of Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Partial Gasification Module (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the October 1 - December 31, 2003 time period.

A. Robertson

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the April 1--June 30, 2002 time period.

Archie Robertson

2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

Single stage rankine and cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

The specification describes a Rankine cycle power plant of the single stage type energized by gasified freon, the latter being derived from freon in the liquid state in a boiler provided in the form of a radio frequency heating cell adapted at low energy input to effect a rapid change of state from liquid freon at a given temperature and pressure to gaseous freon of relatively large volume, thereby to drive a Rankine cycle type of engine recognized in the prior art as a steam engine type of engine of the piston or turbine type.

Closs, J.J.

1981-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

383

Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM Description Researchers inthe@tamu.edu Skid-mounted gasifier: 1.8 tons-per-day pilot unit Gasification of cotton gin trash The new Texas A

384

Gasification: redefining clean energy  

SciTech Connect

This booklet gives a comprehensive overview of how gasification is redefining clean energy, now and in the future. It informs the general public about gasification in a straight-forward, non-technical manner.

NONE

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Current Gasification Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

With coal gasification now in modern commercial-scale applications, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy has turned its attention to future gasification concepts that offer...

386

Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

clean clean Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications US Department of Energy/ Office of Naval Research Shipboard Fuel Cell Workshop Washington, DC March 29, 2011 FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. *FuelCell Energy, Inc. *Renewable and Liquid Fuels Experience *HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack for Shipboard APU *Solid Oxide Experience and Applications DOE-ONR Workshop FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. FuelCell Energy, Inc. * Premier developer of fuel cell technology - founded in 1969 * Over 50 power installations in North America, Europe, and Asia * Industrial, commercial, utility

387

NSR and the Power Plant Improvement Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOURCE REVIEW (NSR) and the CLEAN COAL SOURCE REVIEW (NSR) and the CLEAN COAL POWER INITIATIVE (CCPI) Summary Changes which result in increases in emissions of air pollutants from existing industrial facilities, such as power plants, can invoke stringent and costly new regulations. However, it is not the intent of such requirements to present a barrier to the installation of environmentally beneficial pollution control projects, or to projects demonstrating new methods to burn coal cleanly under the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program. Special provisions are included in the Clean Air Act and its implementing regulations to address potential exemptions of such projects from new source review regulations. This paper provides a general review of those provisions, and encourages project managers to

388

Gasification and co-gasification of biomass wastes: Effect of the biomass origin and the gasifier operating conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air gasification of different biomass fuels, including forestry (pinus pinaster pruning) and agricultural (grapevine and olive tree pruning) wastes as well as industry wastes (sawdust and marc of grape), has been carried out in a circulating flow gasifier in order to evaluate the potential of using these types of biomass in the same equipment, thus providing higher operation flexibility and minimizing the effect of seasonal fuel supply variations. The potential of using biomass as an additional supporting fuel in coal fuelled power plants has also been evaluated through tests involving mixtures of biomass and coalcoke, the coke being a typical waste of oil companies. The effect of the main gasifier operating conditions, such as the relative biomass/air ratio and the reaction temperature, has been analysed to establish the conditions allowing higher gasification efficiency, carbon conversion and/or fuel constituents (CO, H2 and CH4) concentration and production. Results of the work encourage the combined use of the different biomass fuels without significant modifications in the installation, although agricultural wastes (grapevine and olive pruning) could to lead to more efficient gasification processes. These latter wastes appear as interesting fuels to generate a producer gas to be used in internal combustion engines or gas turbines (high gasification efficiency and gas yield), while sawdust could be a very adequate fuel to produce a H2-rich gas (with interest for fuel cells) due to its highest reactivity. The influence of the reaction temperature on the gasification characteristics was not as significant as that of the biomass/air ratio, although the H2 concentration increased with increasing temperature.

Magn Lapuerta; Juan J. Hernndez; Amparo Pazo; Julio Lpez

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Power System Frequency Control Characteristics as a Function of Nuclear Power Plant Participation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the participation of nuclear power plants in electric power system increases then they have to be ... take an increasing part in the frequency and power control of the power system. However there are specifi...

Z. Domachowski

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Tribology in coal-fired power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Material wear and degradation is of great importance to the economy of South Africa especially within the mining, agriculture, manufacturing and power generation fields. It has been found that unexpected and high rates of fly-ash erosion occur at certain sections of power plants, this is particularly evident at the Majuba power station. The loss of small amounts of material due to erosion can be enough to cause serious damage and significantly reduce the working lifetime of, for, e.g. hopper liners. This study investigated the long-term solid particle erosion of a range of oxide and nitride-fired SiC-based ceramics and alumina with the aim of reducing erosive wear damage in power plants. This entailed carrying out experimental tests on an in-house built erosion testing machine that simulate the problems encountered in the industry. The target materials were eroded with 125180?m silica sand at shallow and high impact angles. The surface wear characteristics were studied using both light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained indicate that the erosion rates of the materials remain fairly constant from the onset. It was found that prolonged exposure to erosion results in the progressive removal of the matrix and subsequent loss of unsupported SiC particulates. The fact that the particles were relatively small did not have a significant effect on the erosion rate. This would explain the observed constant rates of erosion for longer periods. These behaviours can be further explained in terms of the composition and mechanical properties of the erodents and target ceramics.

D.O. Moumakwa; K. Marcus

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A stochastic model for the daily coordination of pumped storage hydro plants and wind power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a stochastic model for the daily operation scheduling of a generation system including pumped storage hydro plants and wind power plants, where the uncertainty is represented by the hourly wind power p...

Maria Teresa Vespucci; Francesca Maggioni

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Kinetics Of Carbon Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kinetics Of Carbon Gasification ... The steamcarbon reaction, which is the essential reaction of the gasification processes of carbon-based feed stocks (e.g., coal and biomass), produces synthesis gas (H2 + CO), a synthetically flexible, environmentally benign energy source. ... Coal Gasification in CO2 and Steam:? Development of a Steam Injection Facility for High-Pressure Wire-Mesh Reactors ...

C. W. Zielke; Everett. Gorin

1957-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Optimal Endogenous Carbon Taxes Electric Power Supply Chains with Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Endogenous Carbon Taxes for Electric Power Supply Chains with Power Plants Anna Nagurney for the determination of optimal carbon taxes applied to electric power plants in the con- text of electric power supply portion of such policy inter- ventions directed at the electric power industry. The general framework

Nagurney, Anna

394

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

395

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), and up to 5500 psi with emphasis upon 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally-acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national perspective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Alternative off-site power supply improves nuclear power plant safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A reliable power system is important for safe operation of the nuclear power plants. The station blackout event is of great importance for nuclear power plant safety. This event is caused by the loss of all alternating current power supply to the safety and non-safety buses of the nuclear power plant. In this study an independent electrical connection between a pumped-storage hydro power plant and a nuclear power plant is assumed as a standpoint for safety and reliability analysis. The pumped-storage hydro power plant is considered as an alternative power supply. The connection with conventional accumulation type of hydro power plant is analysed in addition. The objective of this paper is to investigate the improvement of nuclear power plant safety resulting from the consideration of the alternative power supplies. The safety of the nuclear power plant is analysed through the core damage frequency, a risk measure assess by the probabilistic safety assessment. The presented method upgrades the probabilistic safety assessment from its common traditional use in sense that it considers non-plant sited systems. The obtained results show significant decrease of the core damage frequency, indicating improvement of nuclear safety if hydro power plant is introduced as an alternative off-site power source.

Blae Gjorgiev; Andrija Volkanovski; Duko Kan?ev; Marko ?epin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Impact of Wind Power Plants on Voltage and Transient Stability of Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

A standard three-machine, nine-bus wind power system is studied and augmented by a radially connected wind power plant that contains 22 wind turbine generators.

Muljadi, E.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Pai, M. A.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Off-Design Performance of Power Plants: An Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that of a normal natural gas-fired combined-cycle...for operation in the natural gas-fired combined-cycle...inlet flow around the high-pressure section of the turbine...when converting from natural gas firing to IGCC opera-tion...

M. R. ERBES; J. N. PHILLIPS; M. S. JOHNSON; J. PAFFENBARGER; M. GLUCKMAN; R. H. EUSTIS

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Kinetic mechanism of dimethyl ether production process using syngas from integrated gasification combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a 1-step synthesis gas-to-dimethyl ether process, synthesis gas is converted into dimethyl ether (DME) in a single reactor. Three reactions are involved in this process: methanol synthesis, methanol dehydra...

Hee-Woo Park; Jin-Kuk Ha; Euy Soo Lee

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Power/desal plant evolves to meet changing needs  

SciTech Connect

This article reviews the design and operation of a dual purpose power/desalination plant in the Virgin Islands. The topics of the article include a description of the original plant design and operation, combined-cycle integration with existing power/desalination plant, system design, operating experience and incorporation of the St. Croix design at St. Thomas.

Atkins, T.E.; Rothgeb, G.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Development of Foster Wheeler's Vision 21 Partial Gasification Module  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded Foster Wheeler Development Corporation a contract to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The unique aspect of the process is that it utilizes a pressurized circulating fluidized bed partial gasifier and does not attempt to consume the coal in a single step. To convert all the coal to syngas in a single step requires extremely high temperatures ({approx} 2500 to 2800F) that melt and vaporize the coal and essentially drive all coal ash contaminants into the syngas. Since these contaminants can be corrosive to power generating equipment, the syngas must be cooled to near room temperature to enable a series of chemical processes to clean the syngas. Foster Wheeler's process operates at much lower temperatures that control/minimize the release of contaminants; this eliminates/minimizes the need for the expensive, complicated syngas heat exchangers and chemical cleanup systems typical of high temperature gasification. By performing the gasification in a circulating bed, a significant amount of syngas can still be produced despite the reduced temperature and the circulating bed allows easy scale up to large size plants. Rather than air, it can also operate with oxygen to facilitate sequestration of stack gas carbon dioxide gases for a 100% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building block that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This paper describes the test program and pilot plant that will be used to develop the PGM.

Robertson, A.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

404

Electromagnetic Compatibility in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) has long been a key element of qualification for mission critical instrumentation and control (I&C) systems used by the U.S. military. The potential for disruption of safety-related I&C systems by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), or power surges is also an issue of concern for the nuclear industry. Experimental investigations of the potential vulnerability of advanced safety systems to EMI/RFI, coupled with studies of reported events at nuclear power plants (NPPs) that are attributed to EMI/RFI, confirm the safety significance of EMC for both analog and digital technology. As a result, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in the development of the technical basis for guidance that addresses EMC for safety-related I&C systems in NPPs. This research has involved the identification of engineering practices to minimize the potential impact of EMI/RFI and power surges and an evaluation of the ambient electromagnetic environment at NPPs to tailor those practices for use by the nuclear industry. Recommendations for EMC guidance have been derived from these research findings and are summarized in this paper.

Ewing, P.D.; Kercel, S.W.; Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T.

1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

405

EA-1642-S1: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOEs proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

406

Oscillation Damping: A Comparison of Wind and Photovoltaic Power Plant Capabilities: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This work compares and contrasts strategies for providing oscillation damping services from wind power plants and photovoltaic power plants.

Singh, M.; Allen, A.; Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

UNSUPERVISED CLUSTERING FOR FAULT DIAGNOSIS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 UNSUPERVISED CLUSTERING FOR FAULT DIAGNOSIS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi1 on transients originated by different faults in the pressurizer of a nuclear power reactor. Key Words: Fault of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) [Cheon et al., 1993; Kim et al., 1996; Reifman, 1997; Zio et al., 2006a; Zio

Boyer, Edmond

408

Corrosion Investigations at Masned Combined Heat and Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrosion Investigations at Masnedø Combined Heat and Power Plant Part VI Melanie Montgomery AT MASNED? COMBINED HEAT AND POWER PLANT PART VI CONTENTS 1. Introduction Department for Manufacturing Engineering Technical University of Denmark Asger Karlsson Energi E2 Power

409

NETL: Gasification - Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Recovery Act: Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Project Number: FC26-98FT40343 Project Description Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. is developing, scaling-up, and demonstrating a novel air separation technology for large-scale production of oxygen (O2) at costs that are approximately one-third lower than conventional cryogenic plants. An Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen plant co-produces power and oxygen. A phased technology RD&D effort is underway to demonstrate all necessary technical and economic requirements for scale-up and industrial commercialization. The ITM Oxygen production technology is a radically different approach to producing high-quality tonnage oxygen and to enhance the performance of integrated gasification combined cycle and other advanced power generation systems. Instead of cooling air to cryogenic temperatures, oxygen is extracted from air at temperatures synergistic with power production operations. Process engineering and economic evaluations of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants comparing ITM Oxygen with a state-of-the-art cryogenic air separation unit are aimed to show that the installed capital cost of the air separation unit and the installed capital of IGCC facility are significantly lower compared to conventional technologies, while improving power plant output and efficiency. The use of low-cost oxygen in combustion processes would provide cost-effective emission reduction and carbon management opportunities. ITM Oxygen is an enabling module for future plants for producing coal derived shifted synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen [H2] and carbon dioxide [CO2]) ultimately for producing clean energy and fuels. Oxygen-intensive industries such as steel, glass, non-ferrous metallurgy, refineries, and pulp and paper may also realize cost and productivity benefits as a result of employing ITM Oxygen.

410

NETL: Gasification - Systems and Industry Analyses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E&P Technologies Gas Hydrates T&D and Refining Contacts E&P Technologies Gas Hydrates T&D and Refining Contacts Coal & Power Systems Major Demonstrations Innovations for Existing Plants Gasification Turbines Fuel Cells FutureGen Advanced Research Contacts Industrial Capture & Storage Carbon Sequestration Program Overview Core R&D Infrastructure Global Collaborations FAQs Reference Shelf Contacts Hydrogen & Clean Fuels Hydrogen-from-Coal RD&D Contacts ENERGY ANALYSIS About Us Search Products Contacts SMART GRID ANALYSIS BASELINE STUDIES NETL-RUA About NETL-RUA Research Technology Transfer Business Development Education News & Events Contacts Members Only Access TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER Available Technologies How to Partner Outreach Contacts SOLICITATIONS & BUSINESS Solicitations & Funding Opps. Related Links & Forms CDP/Financial Asst. Resources Unsolicited Proposals Available NETL Property Business Alert Notification IRS Tax Credit Program NETL Business Contacts

411

Coal Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell System Study  

SciTech Connect

This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by gasified coal. System concepts that integrate a coal gasifier with a SOFC, a gas turbine, and a steam turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 200 MW. Two alternative integration configurations were selected with projected system efficiency of over 53% on a HHV basis, or about 10 percentage points higher than that of the state-of-the-art Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The initial cost of both selected configurations was found to be comparable with the IGCC system costs at approximately $1700/kW. An absorption-based CO2 isolation scheme was developed, and its penalty on the system performance and cost was estimated to be less approximately 2.7% and $370/kW. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

Chellappa Balan; Debashis Dey; Sukru-Alper Eker; Max Peter; Pavel Sokolov; Greg Wotzak

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production plants, and steam methane reforming (SMR) systemsproduction via steam methane reforming, (e) power plant FGD

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Unsupervised neural network for forecasting alarms in hydroelectric power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power plant management relies on monitoring many signals that represent the technical parameters of the real plant. The use of neural networks (NN) is a novel approach that can help to produce decisions when i...

P. Isasi-Viuela; J. M. Molina-Lpez

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Risk-informed incident management for nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decision making as a part of nuclear power plant operations is a critical, but common, task. Plant management is forced to make decisions that may have safety and economic consequences. Formal decision theory offers the ...

Smith, Curtis Lee, 1966-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Plant Experience Naval Applications Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications Presented at the DOE-DOD Shipboard APU Workshop on March 29, 2011. apu20118wolak.pdf More...

416

Fuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels Fuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels Presentation by Frank Wolak, Fuel Cell Energy, at the Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop...

417

North Brawley Power Plant Asset Impairment Analysis | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Brawley Power Plant Asset Impairment Analysis North Brawley Power Plant Asset Impairment Analysis Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: North Brawley Power Plant Asset Impairment Analysis Author Giza Singer Even Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for North Brawley Power Plant Asset Impairment Analysis Citation Giza Singer Even. North Brawley Power Plant Asset Impairment Analysis [Internet]. [updated 2012;cited 2012]. Available from: http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1296445/000119312512118396/d316623dex991.htm Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=North_Brawley_Power_Plant_Asset_Impairment_Analysis&oldid=682476" Categories: References

418

Florida Electrical Power Plant Siting Act (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrical Power Plant Siting Act (Florida) Electrical Power Plant Siting Act (Florida) Florida Electrical Power Plant Siting Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Solar Program Info State Florida Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection The Power Plant Siting Act (PPSA) is the state's centralized process for licensing large power plants. One license-a certification- replaces local and state permits. Local governments and state agencies within whose jurisdiction the power plant is to be built participate in the process. For

419

Investment Decisions for Baseload Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investment Decisions for Investment Decisions for Baseload Power Plants January 29, 2010 402/012910 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United

420

SUPERCRITICAL STEAM CYCLE FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Revolutionary improvement of the nuclear plant safety and economy with light water reactors can be reached with the application of micro-fuel elements (MFE) directly cooled by a supercritical pressure light-water coolant-moderator. There are considerable advantages of the MFE as compared with the traditional fuel rods, such as: Using supercritical and superheated steam considerably increases the thermal efficiency of the Rankine cycle up to 44-45%. Strong negative coolant and void reactivity coefficients with a very short thermal delay time allow the reactor to shutdown quickly in the event of a reactivity or power excursion. Core melting and the creation of corium during severe accidents are impossible. The heat transfer surface area is larger by several orders of magnitude due to the small spherical dimensions of the MFE. The larger heat exchange surface significantly simplifies residual heat removal by natural convection and radiation from the core to a subsequent passive system of heat removal.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V.; Talbert, Robert J.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Filippov, Gennady A.; Bogojavlensky, Roald G.; Grishanin, Evgeny I.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Power plant report (EIA-759), current (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of Form EIA-759, formerly FPC-4, Power Plant Report, is to collect data necessary to fulfill regulatory responsibility; ensure power reliability; and measure fuel consumption and power production. The data diskette contains data collected by the survey. Specific ownership code, prime mover code, fuel code, company code, plant name, current capacity, fuel name, old capacity, effective date - month/year, status, multistate code, current year, generation, consumption, stocks, electric plant code, and NERC code are included.

NONE

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Benchmarking Variable Cost Performance in an Industrial Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and deploy a tool that can help plants benchmark operating performance. This paper introduces a benchmarking methodology designed to meet this need. The "Energy Conversion Index" (ECn ratios the "value" of utilities exported from the power plant... Index" (ECl) methodology ratios the ''value'' of utilities exported from the power plant to the actual cost of the fuel and . electricity required to produce them, generating a single number or "index." ECI is a powerful technique because...

Kane, J. F.; Bailey, W. F.

423

From the first nuclear power plant to fourth-generation nuclear power installations [on the 60th anniversary of the Worlds First nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful commissioning in the 1954 of the Worlds First nuclear power plant constructed at the Institute for Physics ... center for training Soviet and foreign specialists on nuclear power plants, the personnel...

V. I. Rachkov; S. G. Kalyakin; O. F. Kukharchuk; Yu. I. Orlov

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Materials of Gasification  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

None

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

NEPA Process for Geothermal Power Plants in the Deschutes National...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: NEPA Process for Geothermal Power Plants in the Deschutes National Forest EIS at Newberry...

426

The Chena Hot Springs 400kw Geothermal Power Plant: Experience...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

efficiency requiresincreased power plant equipment size (turbine, condenser,pump and boiler) that can ordinarily become cost prohibitive.One of the main goals for the Chena...

427

Virtual Power Plant Simulation and Control Scheme Design.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Virtual Power Plant (VPP) is a concept that aggregate Distributed Energy Resources (DER) together, aims to overcome the capacity limits of single DER and (more)

Chen, Zhenwei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Water generator replaces bottled water in nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WaterPure International Incorporated of Doylestown, Pennsylvania, USA, has announced that it has placed its atmospheric water generator (AWG) inside a selected nuclear power plant.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

430

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

431

Sensitivity analysis for the outages of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2012 ... Abstract: Nuclear power plants must be regularly shut down in order to perform refueling and maintenance operations. The scheduling of the...

Kengy Barty

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

Parabolic Trough Solar Thermal Electric Power Plants (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides an overview of the potential for parabolic trough solar thermal electric power plants, especially in the Southwestern U.S.

Not Available

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Insights for Quantitative Risk Assessment of Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditional techniques of risk analysis have been fitted for the application to combined cycle power plants and the results of several...

Gabriele Ballocco; Andrea Carpignano

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Sandia National Laboratories: character-izing solar-power-plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

character-izing solar-power-plant output variability Sandia PV Team Publishes Book Chapter On January 21, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Modeling & Analysis,...

435

How a Geothermal Power Plant Works (Simple) - Text Version |...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Lines Deliver Electricity Electrical current from the generator is sent to a step-up transformer outside the power plant. Voltage is increased in the transformer and electrical...

436

North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant Project Overview | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Overview Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant Project Overview Author PCL Construction...

437

Construction Underway on First Geothermal Power Plant in New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson and Raser Technologies, Inc. announced in late August that construction has begun on the first commercial geothermal power plant in New Mexico.

438

Geothermal Power Plants Minimizing Solid Waste and Recovering Minerals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Although many geothermal power plants generate no appreciable solid waste, the unique characteristics of some geothermal fluids require special attention to handle entrained solid byproducts.

439

Heat Exchanger Design for Solar Gas-Turbine Power Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The aim of this project is to select appropriate heat exchangers out of available gas-gas heat exchangers for used in a proposed power plant. (more)

Yakah, Noah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Rock bed thermal storage for concentrating solar power plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Concentrating solar power plants are a promising means of generating electricity. However, they are dependent on the sun as a source of energy, (more)

Allen, Kenneth Guy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BulkTransmissionPower Plant < RAPID | BulkTransmission Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA RAPID Toolkit About Bulk...

442

Suginoi Hotel Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facility Power Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Beppu, Japan Coordinates 33.283191762234, 131.47605371632 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

443

Optimal Placement of Wind Power Plants for Delivery Loss Minimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter we investigate how to minimize power delivery losses in the distribution system on ... We show that strategically placing and utilizing new wind power plants can lead to significant loss reduction...

Masoud Honarvar Nazari

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Can New Nuclear Power Plants be Project Financed?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper considers the prospects for financing a wave of new nuclear power plants (NPP) using project financing, which is used widely in large capital intensive infrastructure investments, including the power and gas sectors, but has...

Taylor, Simon

445

Salton Sea Power Plant Recognized as Most Innovative Geothermal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The first power plant to be built in the Salton Sea area in 20 years was recognized in December by Power Engineering magazine as the most innovative geothermal project of the year.

446

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design. Propofied Solar Cooling Tower Type Wet-Cooled Powerdry-cooling tower was used in the proposed solar power plantTower Power-Generation Subsystem Summary An Overall Summary of the Proposed Solar

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Feasibility study of a solar chimney power plant in Jordan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A solar chimney power plant system is theoretically designed for ... by mathematical software. The actual values of solar irradiation in Jordan are used in the ... simulation to predict the power output of the solar

Aiman Al Alawin; Omar Badran; Ahmad Awad; Yaser Abdelhadi

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

MHK Technologies/Morild Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morild Power Plant Morild Power Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Morild Power Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/MORILD Demonstration Plant Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Morild power plant is a floating, moored construction based on the same principle as horizontal axis wind turbines. The plant has 4 two-blade underwater turbines and can utilize the energy potential in tidal and ocean currents. The 4 turbines transmit power via hydraulic transmission to 2 synchronous generators. Can be pitched 180 degrees to utilize energy in both directions. A cable from the transformer on the prototype to shore transfers energy.

449

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioning: Sulfur Recovery and Tail Gas Treating Conditioning: Sulfur Recovery and Tail Gas Treating Sulfuric Acid The option to recover sulfur in the form of sulfuric acid is practiced at Tampa Electric's IGCC demonstration plant, given the local demand for sulfuric acid for fertilizer manufacture in this area of Florida. Figure 1 shows a simplified flow of the Tampa Electric IGCC sulfuric acid plant. The sulfuric acid plant receives the H2S from the AGR unit and H2S and ammonia from the water stripper. The gas streams are then burned in a decomposition furnace, where the H2S produces primarily SO2 with trace amounts of SO3, sulfuric acid and elemental sulfur and the ammonia is converted to N2 and water. The decomposition furnace exit gas is cooled from about 1,950°F to 650°F in a waste heat boiler to produce medium pressure steam for in plant use. The gas is then further cooled and dried. This step produces a 'weak acid' waste stream which needs to be neutralized before discharging into the cooling pond. The SO2 and oxygen (from either air or an air separation plant) then react over a vanadium based catalyst bed in a converter according to the reaction;

450

Materials for Ultra-Supercritical Steam Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Steam Power Plants Background The first ultra-supercritical (USC) steam plants in the U.S. were designed, constructed, and operated in the late 1950s. The higher operating temperatures and pressures in USC plants were designed to increase the efficiency of steam plants. However, materials performance problems forced the reduction of steam temperatures in these plants, and discouraged further developmental efforts on low heat-rate units.

451

GRR/Section 7-CA-b - State Plant Commissioning Process, Small Power Plant  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-CA-b - State Plant Commissioning Process, Small Power Plant 7-CA-b - State Plant Commissioning Process, Small Power Plant Exception < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-CA-b - State Plant Commissioning Process, Small Power Plant Exception 07CABPlantCommissioningProcessSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Energy Commission Regulations & Policies California Code of Regulations, Title 20 - Public Utilities and Energy Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07CABPlantCommissioningProcessSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

452

Secretary Chu Visits Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant Secretary Chu Visits Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant February 15, 2012 - 3:54pm Addthis Secretary Chu traveled to Waynesboro, Georgia, to visit the Vogtle nuclear power plant, the site of what will be the first new nuclear reactors to be built in the United States in three decades. | Image credit: Southern Company. Secretary Chu traveled to Waynesboro, Georgia, to visit the Vogtle nuclear power plant, the site of what will be the first new nuclear reactors to be built in the United States in three decades. | Image credit: Southern Company. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Just over 60 years ago, scientists in Arco, Idaho, successfully used nuclear energy to power four light bulbs, laying the foundation for U.S.

453

Power Plant Research and Siting Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Plant Research and Siting Program (Maryland) Power Plant Research and Siting Program (Maryland) Power Plant Research and Siting Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources The Power Plant Research and Siting Act of 1971 established the Power Plant Research Program (PPRP) to evaluate electric generation issues in the state and recommend responsible, long-term solutions. The program manages a consolidated review of all issues related to power generation in Maryland: it reviews applications, evaluates impacts, and recommends conditions for

454

Catalytic steam gasification of coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalytic steam gasification of coals ... SteamCoal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture ... SteamCoal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture ...

P. Pereira; G. A. Somorjai; H. Heinemann

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 5. Recovery of benzene/benzene plus phenol from the Great Pplains Gasification Plant crude phenol stream. Interim report, September 1987-February 1988  

SciTech Connect

In September 1986, the Fuels Branch of the Aero Propulsion Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, began an investigation of the potential for production of jet fuels from the liquid by-product streams produced by the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant located in Buelah, North Dakota. Funding was provided to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to administer the experimental portion of this effort. This report details the program with Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., a subcontractor to Burns and Roe Services Corporation, who, as a subcontractor to DOE, investigated the potential of producing benzene or benzene plus phenol from the crude phenol stream.

Harris, E.C.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Dynamic Model: H2S Absorption/Stripping, Water?Gas Shift Reactors, and CO2 Absorption/Stripping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Dynamic Model: H2S Absorption/Stripping, Water?Gas Shift Reactors, and CO2 Absorption/Stripping ... Future chemical plants may be required to have much higher flexibility and agility than existing process facilities in order to be able to handle new hybrid combinations of power and chemical units. ...

Patrick J. Robinson; William L. Luyben

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

457

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West September 24, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis A new report released today by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examines the potential impacts of increasing wind and solar power generation on the operators of coal and gas plants in the West. To accommodate higher amounts of wind and solar power on the electric grid, utilities must ramp down and ramp up or stop and start conventional generators more frequently to provide reliable power for their customers - a practice called cycling. Grid operators typically cycle power plants to accommodate fluctuations in

458

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. Under this contract a series of pilot plant tests are being conducted to ascertain PGM performance with a variety of fuels. The performance and economics of a PGM based plant designed for the co-production of hydrogen and electricity will also be determined. This report describes the work performed during the April-June 30, 2004 time period.

Archie Robertson

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

The suitability of coal gasification in India's energy sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), an advanced coal-based power generation technology, may be an important technology to help India meet its future power needs. It has the potential to provide higher generating ...

Simpson, Lori Allison

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Biothermal gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect

The BIOTHERMGAS Process is described for conversion of biomass, organic residues, and peat to substitute natural gas (SNG). This new process, under development at IGT, combines biological and thermal processes for total conversion of a broad variety of organic feeds (regardless of water or nutrient content). The process employs thermal gasification for conversion of refractory digester residues. Ammonia and other inorganic nutrients are recycled from the thermal process effluent to the bioconversion unit. Biomethanation and catalytic methanation are presented as alternative processes for methanation of thermal conversion product gases. Waste heat from the thermal component is used to supply the digester heat requirements of the bioconversion component. The results of a preliminary systems analysis of three possible applications of this process are presented: (1) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with catalytic methanation; (2) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with biomethanation; and (3) 1000 ton/day municipal solid waste (MSW) sewage sludge plant with biomethanation. The results indicate that for these examples, performance is superior to that expected for biological or thermal processes used separately. The results of laboratory studies presented suggest that effective conversion of thermal product gases can be accomplished by biomethanation.

Chynoweth, D.P.; Srivastava, V.J.; Henry, M.P.; Tarman, P.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Baca geothermal demonstration project. Power plant detail design document  

SciTech Connect

This Baca Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant document presents the design criteria and detail design for power plant equipment and systems, as well as discussing the rationale used to arrive at the design. Where applicable, results of in-house evaluations of alternatives are presented.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

curve approach supplements with load shape information the data contained in a supply curve of conservedLBL-27286 Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants Jonathan to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants Jonathan Koomey, Arthur H. Rosenfeld, and Ashok Gadgil

463

2007 gasification technologies workshop papers  

SciTech Connect

Topics covered in this workshop are fundamentals of gasification, carbon capture, reviews of financial and regulatory incentives, coal to liquids, and focus on gasification in the Western US.