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1

Avestar® - Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator. The IGCC simulator builds on and reaches beyond existing combined-cycle and conventional-coal power plant simulators to combine--for the first time--a Gasification with CO2 Capture process simulator with a Combined-Cycle power simulator together in a single dynamic simulation framework. The AVESTAR® center IGCC courses provide unique, comprehensive training on all aspects of an IGCC plant, illustrating the high-efficiency aspects of the gasifier, gas turbine, and steam turbine integration. IGCC Operator training station HMI display for overview of IGCC Plant - Train A Reference:

2

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Design Considerations for High Availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyses public domain availability data from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC) and other significant coal gasification facilities, backed up with additional data gained from interviews and discussions with plant operators. Predictions for the availability of future IGCCs are made based on the experience of the existing fleet and anticipated improvements from the implementation of lessons learned.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

3

Coal Fleet Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC Permitting) Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance to owners of planned Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants in order to assist them in permitting these advanced coal power generation facilities. The CoalFleet IGCC Permitting Guidelines summarize U.S. federal requirements for obtaining air, water, and solid waste permits for a generic IGCC facility, as described in the CoalFleet User Design Basis Specification (UDBS). The report presents characteristics of IGCC emissions that must be considered in the p...

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

4

Integrated gasification combined cycle -- A review of IGCC technology  

SciTech Connect

Over the past three decades, significant efforts have been made toward the development of cleaner and more efficient technology for power generation. Coal gasification technology received a big thrust with the concept of combined cycle power generation. The integration of coal gasification with combined cycle for power generation (IGCC) had the inherent characteristic of gas cleanup and waste minimization, which made this system environmentally preferable. Commercial-scale demonstration of a cool water plant and other studies have shown that the greenhouse gas and particulates emission from an IGCC plant is drastically lower than the recommended federal New Source Performance Standard levels. IGCC also offers a phased construction and repowering option, which allows multiple-fuel flexibility and the necessary economic viability. IGCC technology advances continue to improve efficiency and further reduce the emissions, making it the technology of the 21st century.

Joshi, M.M.; Lee, S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

2012 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Research and Development Roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundThe second generation of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants is now being built or planned following nearly two decades of commercial demonstration at multiple units. State-of-the-art IGCC plants have efficiencies equivalent to that of pulverized coal power plants while exhibiting equal or superior environmental performance and lower water usage. Precombustion CO2 capture technology is commercially available and has been ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant Revision 2, March 2012 DOE/NETL-2012/1551 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

7

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (wood waste, petroleum coke, etc.) is a clean way to produce electricity and produce or co-produce a variety of commercial products. The major challenge is cost reduction; current integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is estimated to produce power at a cost higher than that of pulverized coal combustion. However, the Gasification

8

Analysis of Biomass/Coal Co-Gasification for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems with Carbon Capture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In recent years, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology (IGCC) has become more common in clean coal power operations with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). (more)

Long, Henry A, III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

2012 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Research and Development Roadmap - PUBLIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second generation of integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants is now being built or planned following nearly two decades of commercial demonstration at multiple units. State-of-the-art IGCC plants have efficiencies equivalent to that of pulverized coal power plants while exhibiting equal or superior environmental performance and lower water usage. Pre-combustion CO2 capture technology is commercially available and has been demonstrated in several gasification plants, ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Design Considerations for CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this research were to assess the performance and costs of coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with Greenfield and retrofitted carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. The study is part of the CoalFleet Program, a collaborative research and development program that promotes deployment of advanced coal technologies, including IGCC, ultrasupercritical pulverized, oxy-fuel combustion, and supercritical circulating fluidized bed technologies. Two types of coalPittsburg...

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

CoalFleet RD&D Augmentation Plan for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced, clean coal technologies such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) offer societies around the world the promise of efficient, affordable power generation at markedly reduced levels of emissions8212including "greenhouse gases" linked to global climate change8212relative to today's current fleet of coal-fired power plants. To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of IGCC and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiati...

2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

12

CoalFleet User Design Basis Specification for Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Duke Edwardsport integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant started up in 2012, and Mississippi Powers Kemper County IGCC plant is in construction. The capital cost of these initial commercial scale IGCC plants is high. The industry needs specifications that encourage greater standardization in IGCC design in order to bring down the investment cost for the next generation of plants. Standardization also supports repeatable, reliable performance and reduces the time and cost ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

13

CoalFleet RD&D augmentation plan for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants  

SciTech Connect

To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiative, which facilitates collaborative research by more than 50 organizations from around the world representing power generators, equipment suppliers and engineering design and construction firms, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others. This group advised EPRI as it evaluated more than 120 coal-gasification-related research projects worldwide to identify gaps or critical-path activities where additional resources and expertise could hasten the market introduction of IGCC advances. The resulting 'IGCC RD&D Augmentation Plan' describes such opportunities and how they could be addressed, for both IGCC plants to be built in the near term (by 2012-15) and over the longer term (2015-25), when demand for new electric generating capacity is expected to soar. For the near term, EPRI recommends 19 projects that could reduce the levelized cost-of-electricity for IGCC to the level of today's conventional pulverized-coal power plants with supercritical steam conditions and state-of-the-art environmental controls. For the long term, EPRI's recommended projects could reduce the levelized cost of an IGCC plant capturing 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from the carbon in coal (for safe storage away from the atmosphere) to the level of today's IGCC plants without CO{sub 2} capture. EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program is also preparing a companion RD&D augmentation plan for advanced-combustion-based (i.e., non-gasification) clean coal technologies (Report 1013221). 7 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs., 4 apps.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Duke Energy's Edwardsport Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duke Energy's Edwardsport Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Station presently under construction in Knox County, Indiana. (Photos courtesy of Duke Energy.) Gasification...

15

Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

16

Transient studies of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

Next-generation coal-fired power plants need to consider the option for CO2 capture as stringent governmental mandates are expected to be issued in near future. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are more efficient than the conventional coal combustion processes when the option for CO2 capture is considered. However, no IGCC plant with CO2 capture currently exists in the world. Therefore, it is important to consider the operability and controllability issues of such a plant before it is commercially built. To facilitate this objective, a detailed plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture has been developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign}. The plant considers a General Electric Energy (GEE)-type downflow radiant-only gasifier followed by a quench section. A two-stage water gas shift (WGS) reaction is considered for conversion of CO to CO2. A two-stage acid gas removal (AGR) process based on a physical solvent is simulated for selective capture of H2S and CO2. Compression of the captured CO2 for sequestration, an oxy-Claus process for removal of H2S and NH3, black water treatment, and the sour water treatment are also modeled. The tail gas from the Claus unit is recycled to the SELEXOL unit. The clean syngas from the AGR process is sent to a gas turbine followed by a heat recovery steam generator. This turbine is modeled as per published data in the literature. Diluent N2 is used from the elevated-pressure ASU for reducing the NOx formation. The heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is modeled by considering generation of high-pressure, intermediate-pressure, and low-pressure steam. All of the vessels, reactors, heat exchangers, and the columns have been sized. The basic IGCC process control structure has been synthesized by standard guidelines and existing practices. The steady state results are validated with data from a commercial gasifier. In the future grid-connected system, the plant should satisfy the environmental targets and quality of the feed to other sections, wherever applicable, without violating the operating constraints, and without sacrificing the efficiency. However, it was found that the emission of acid gases may far exceed the environmental targets and the overshoot of some of the key variables may be unacceptable under transient operation while following the load. A number of operational strategies and control configurations is explored for achieving these stringent requirements. The transient response of the plant is also studied by perturbing a number of key inputs.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Development of a plant-wide dynamic model of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this presentation, development of a plant-wide dynamic model of an advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture will be discussed. The IGCC reference plant generates 640 MWe of net power using Illinois No.6 coal as the feed. The plant includes an entrained, downflow, General Electric Energy (GEE) gasifier with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC), a two-stage water gas shift (WGS) conversion process, and two advanced 'F' class combustion turbines partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit (ASU). A subcritical steam cycle is considered for heat recovery steam generation. Syngas is selectively cleaned by a SELEXOL acid gas removal (AGR) process. Sulfur is recovered using a two-train Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. A multistage intercooled compressor is used for compressing CO2 to the pressure required for sequestration. Using Illinois No.6 coal, the reference plant generates 640 MWe of net power. The plant-wide steady-state and dynamic IGCC simulations have been generated using the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} and Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign} process simulators, respectively. The model is generated based on the Case 2 IGCC configuration detailed in the study available in the NETL website1. The GEE gasifier is represented with a restricted equilibrium reactor model where the temperature approach to equilibrium for individual reactions can be modified based on the experimental data. In this radiant-only configuration, the syngas from the Radiant Syngas Cooler (RSC) is quenched in a scrubber. The blackwater from the scrubber bottom is further cleaned in the blackwater treatment plant. The cleaned water is returned back to the scrubber and also used for slurry preparation. The acid gas from the sour water stripper (SWS) is sent to the Claus plant. The syngas from the scrubber passes through a sour shift process. The WGS reactors are modeled as adiabatic plug flow reactors with rigorous kinetics based on the mid-life activity of the shift-catalyst. The SELEXOL unit consists of the H2S and CO2 absorbers that are designed to meet the stringent environmental limits and requirements of other associated units. The model also considers the stripper for recovering H2S that is sent as a feed to a split-flow Claus unit. The tail gas from the Claus unit is recycled to the SELEXOL unit. The cleaned syngas is sent to the GE 7FB gas turbine. This turbine is modeled as per published data in the literature. Diluent N2 is used from the elevated-pressure ASU for reducing the NOx formation. The heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is modeled by considering generation of high-pressure, intermediate-pressure, and low-pressure steam. All of the vessels, reactors, heat exchangers, and the columns have been sized. The basic IGCC process control structure has been synthesized by standard guidelines and existing practices. The steady-state simulation is solved in sequential-modular mode in Aspen Plus{reg_sign} and consists of more than 300 unit operations, 33 design specs, and 16 calculator blocks. The equation-oriented dynamic simulation consists of more than 100,000 equations solved using a multi-step Gear's integrator in Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign}. The challenges faced in solving the dynamic model and key transient results from this dynamic model will also be discussed.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Nuon Magnum Integrated-Gasification -Combined-Cycle (IGCC) Project Preliminary Design Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second pre-design specification (PDS) in a projected series for integrated-gasificationcombined-cycle (IGCC) plants, sponsored by EPRIs CoalFleet for Tomorrow program and involving more than 50 power industry companies. A PDS represents the level of nonproprietary information available at the feasibility study stage in the development of an IGCC project. This PDS is based on the design of the 1200-MWe Magnum IGCC plant, which Nuon Power Generation B.V. has proposed to build on the northern co...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

The United States of America and the People`s Republic of China experts report on integrated gasification combined-cycle technology (IGCC)  

SciTech Connect

A report written by the leading US and Chinese experts in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, intended for high level decision makers, may greatly accelerate the development of an IGCC demonstration project in the People`s Republic of China (PRC). The potential market for IGCC systems in China and the competitiveness of IGCC technology with other clean coal options for China have been analyzed in the report. Such information will be useful not only to the Chinese government but also to US vendors and companies. The goal of this report is to analyze the energy supply structure of China, China`s energy and environmental protection demand, and the potential market in China in order to make a justified and reasonable assessment on feasibility of the transfer of US Clean Coal Technologies to China. The Expert Report was developed and written by the joint US/PRC IGCC experts and will be presented to the State Planning Commission (SPC) by the President of the CAS to ensure consideration of the importance of IGCC for future PRC power production.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

2009 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Engineering Economic Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2009 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Design Considerations for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture (1015690) contains engineering and economic evaluations of state-of-the-art integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant designs available for near-term deployment. The study assessed the expected performance and costs of coal-fed IGCC power plants before and after retrofit for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. The study evaluated paired ca...

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

Judith A. Kieffer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

State estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) plant as part of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate estimation of process state variables not only can increase the effectiveness and reliability of process measurement technology, but can also enhance plant efficiency, improve control system performance, and increase plant availability. Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO2 capture will have to satisfy stricter operational and environmental constraints. To operate the IGCC plant without violating stringent environmental emission standards requires accurate estimation of the relevant process state variables, outputs, and disturbances. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured at all, while some of them can be measured, but with low precision, low reliability, or low signal-to-noise ratio. As a result, accurate estimation of the process variables is of great importance to avoid the inherent difficulties associated with the inaccuracy of the data. Motivated by this, the current paper focuses on the state estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) process as part of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture. This process has extensive heat and mass integration and therefore is very suitable for testing the efficiency of the designed estimators in the presence of complex interactions between process variables. The traditional Kalman filter (KF) (Kalman, 1960) algorithm has been used as a state estimator which resembles that of a predictor-corrector algorithm for solving numerical problems. In traditional KF implementation, good guesses for the process noise covariance matrix (Q) and the measurement noise covariance matrix (R) are required to obtain satisfactory filter performance. However, in the real world, these matrices are unknown and it is difficult to generate good guesses for them. In this paper, use of an adaptive KF will be presented that adapts Q and R at every time step of the algorithm. Results show that very accurate estimations of the desired process states, outputs or disturbances can be achieved by using the adaptive KF.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Costs of Texaco Gasifier-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are an advanced power generation concept with the flexibility to use coal, heavy oils, petroleum coke, biomass, and waste (more)

Akunuri, Naveen

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Dynamic simulation and load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Load-following control of future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture is expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. To study control performance during load following, a plant-wide dynamic simulation of a coal-fed IGCC plant with CO{sub 2} capture has been developed. The slurry-fed gasifier is a single-stage, downward-fired, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow type with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC). The syngas from the outlet of the RSC goes to a scrubber followed by a two-stage sour shift process with inter-stage cooling. The acid gas removal (AGR) process is a dual-stage physical solvent-based process for selective removal of H{sub 2}S in the first stage and CO{sub 2} in the second stage. Sulfur is recovered using a Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. The recovered CO{sub 2} is compressed by a split-shaft multistage compressor and sent for sequestration after being treated in an absorber with triethylene glycol for dehydration. The clean syngas is sent to two advanced F-class gas turbines (GTs) partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit. A subcritical steam cycle is used for heat recovery steam generation. A treatment unit for the sour water strips off the acid gases for utilization in the Claus unit. The steady-state model developed in Aspen Plus is converted to an Aspen Plus Dynamics simulation and integrated with MATLAB for control studies. The results from the plant-wide dynamic model are compared qualitatively with the data from a commercial plant having different configuration, operating condition, and feed quality than what has been considered in this work. For load-following control, the GT-lead with gasifier-follow control strategy is considered. A modified proportionalintegralderivative (PID) control is considered for the syngas pressure control. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate while load-following, a linear model predictive controller (LMPC) is implemented in MATLAB. A combined process and disturbance model is identified by considering a number of model forms and choosing the final model based on an information-theoretic criterion. The performance of the LMPC is found to be superior to the conventional PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

Bhattacharyya, D,; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS) and the Parallel Computing toolbox from Mathworks. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Rigorous Kinetic Modeling, Optimization, and Operability Studies of a Modified Claus Unit for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant with CO{sub 2} Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and the ability to recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Because of these criteria, modifications to the conventional process are often required, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant, such as rapid change in the feed flow rates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but they are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified, and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was devised so as to determine which set of linearly independent reactions would best describe the product distributions from available plant data. Various approaches are taken to derive the kinetic rate expressions, which are either missing in the open literature or found to be inconsistent. A set of plant data is used for optimal estimation of the kinetic parameters. The final model agrees well with the published plant data. Using the developed kinetics models of the Claus reaction furnace, WHB, and catalytic stages, two optimization studies are carried out. The first study shows that there exists an optimal steam pressure generated in the WHB that balances hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In the second study, it is shown that an optimal H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio exists that balances single-pass conversion, hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In addition, an operability study has been carried out to examine the operating envelope in which both the H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio and the adiabatic flame temperature can be controlled in the face of disturbances typical for the operation of an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Impact of CO{sub 2} capture on the Claus process has also been discussed.

Jones, Dustin; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Turton, Richard; Zitney, Stephen E

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Rigorous Kinetic Modeling and Optimization Study of a Modified Claus Unit for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant with CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and the ability to recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Because of these criteria, modifications to the conventional process are often required, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant, such as rapid change in the feed flow rates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but they are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified, and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was devised so as to determine which set of linearly independent reactions would best describe the product distributions from available plant data. Various approaches are taken to derive the kinetic rate expressions, which are either missing in the open literature or found to be inconsistent. A set of plant data is used for optimal estimation of the kinetic parameters. The final model agrees well with the published plant data. Using the developed kinetics models of the Claus reaction furnace, WHB, and catalytic stages, two optimization studies are carried out. The first study shows that there exists an optimal steam pressure generated in the WHB that balances hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In the second study, it is shown that an optimal H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio exists that balances single-pass conversion, hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In addition, an operability study has been carried out to examine the operating envelope in which both the H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio and the adiabatic flame temperature can be controlled in the face of disturbances typical for the operation of an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Impact of CO{sub 2} capture on the Claus process has also been discussed.

Jones, Dustin; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Turton, Richard; Zitney, Stephen E.

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

29

Modeling and optimization of a modified claus process as part of an integrted gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Due to these criteria, modifications are often required to the conventional process, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO2 capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant such as rapid change in the feed flowrates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was devised so as to determine which set of linearly independent reactions would best describe the product distributions from available plant data. Various approaches are taken to derive the kinetic rate expressions which are either missing in the open literature or found to be inconsistent. A set of plant data is used for optimal estimation of the kinetic parameters. The final model agrees well with the published plant data. Using the developed kinetics models of the Claus reaction furnace, WHB, and catalytic stages, two optimization studies are carried out. The first study shows that there exists an optimal steam pressure generated in the WHB that balances hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In the second study, it is shown that an optimal H2S/SO2 ratio exists that balances single-pass conversion, hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In addition, an operability study has been carried out to examine the operating envelope in which both H2S/SO2 ratio and adiabatic flame temperature can be controlled in the face of disturbances typical for the operation of an IGCC power plant with CO2 capture. Impact of CO2 capture on the Claus process has also been discussed.

Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has selected six integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports the CCT program, and addresses long-term improvements in support of IGCC technology. This overview briefly describes the CCT projects and the supporting RD&D activities.

Ness, H.M.; Reuther, R.B.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to develop and evaluate novel sorbents for the Siemens Westinghouse Power Company's (SWPC's) ''Ultra-Clean Gas Cleaning Process'' for reducing to near-zero levels the sulfur- and chlorine-containing gas emissions and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) caused by fuel bound constituents found in carbonaceous materials, which are processed in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technologies.

Javad Abbasian

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Cost and performance analysis of biomass-based integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To make a significant contribution to the power mix in the United States biomass power systems must be competitive on a cost and efficiency basis. We describe the cost and performance of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. The economic viability and efficiency performance of the IGCC generation technology appear to be quite attractive.

Craig, K. R.; Mann, M. K.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Combustion Engineering Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Repowering Project -- Clean Coal II Project. Annual report, November 20, 1990--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The IGCC system will consist of CE`s air-blown, entrained-flow, two-stage, pressurized coal gasifier; an advanced hot gas cleanup process; a combustion turbine adapted to use low-Btu coal gas; and all necessary coal handling equipment. The IGCC will include CE`s slogging, entrained-flow, gasifier operating in a pressurized mode and using air as the oxidant. The hot gas will be cleaned of particulate matter (char) which is recycled back to the gasifier. After particulate removal, the product gas will be cleaned of sulfur prior to burning in a gas turbine. The proposed project includes design and demonstration of two advanced hot gas cleanup processes for removal of sulfur from the product gas of the gasifier. The primary sulfur removal method features a newly developed moving-bed zinc ferrite system downstream of the gasifier. The process data from these pilot tests is expected to be sufficient for the design of a full-scale system to be used in the proposed demonstration. A second complementary process is in situ desulfurization achieved by adding limestone or dolomite directly to the coal feed. The benefit, should such an approach prove viable, is that the downstream cleanup system could be reduced in size. In this plant, the gasifier will be producing a low-Btu gas (LBG). The LBG will be used as fuel in a standard GE gas turbine to produce power. This gas turbine will have the capability to fire LBG and natural gas (for start-up). Since firing LBG uses less air than natural gas, the gas turbine air compressor will have extra capacity. This extra compressed air will be used to pressurize the gasifier and supply the air needed in the gasification process. The plant is made of three major blocks of equipment as shown in Figure 2. They are the fuel gas island which includes the gasifier and gas cleanup, gas turbine power block, and the steam turbine block which includes the steam turbine and the HRSG.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Integration of Ion Transport Membrane Technology with Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI, in conjunction with Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (AP), has reviewed the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process, whereby coal (or some other hydrocarbon such as petroleum coke or heavy oil) is broken down into its constituent volatile and nonvolatile components through the process of oxidative-pyrolysis. Combustible synthetic gas created in the process can be used in a traditional combined cycle. IGCC is particularly appealing for its potentially higher efficiencies compared ...

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

AVESTAR - Gasification Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meet Our Partners Simulators IGCC Gasification Combined Cycle NGCC SCOT Oxy-coal Shale Gas 3D Virtual IGCC Training How to Register for Training IGCC Gasification Combined...

36

Integrated gasification combined cycle overview of FETC--S program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing market conditions, brought about by utility deregulation and increased environmental regulations, have encouraged the Department of Energy/Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE/FETC) to restructure its Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) program. The program emphasis, which had focused on baseload electricity production from coal, is now expanded to more broadly address the production of a suite of energy and chemical products. The near-term market barrier for baseload power applications for conventional IGCC systems combines with increasing opportunities to process a range of low- and negative-value opportunity feedstocks. The new program is developing a broader range of technology options that will increase the versatility and the technology base for commercialization of gasification-based technologies. This new strategy supports gasification in niche markets where, due to its ability to coproduce a wide variety of commodity and premium products to meet market requirements, it is an attractive alternative. By obtaining operating experience in industrial coproduction applications today, gasification system modules can be refined and improved leading to commercial guarantees and acceptance of gasification technology as a cost-effective technology for baseload power generation and coproduction as these markets begin to open.

Stiegel, G.J.; Maxwell, R.C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Program on Technology Innovation: Drying of Low-Rank Coal with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is part of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Innovation Program to assess the potential to achieve increased process efficiency and reduced capital cost by drying low-rank coal with supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2). This study follows the EPRI report Program on Technology Innovation: Assessment of the Applicability of Drying Low-Rank Coal With Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in IGCC Plants (1016216), which concluded that this system has potential benefits with respect to...

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

Feasibility Study for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Facility at a Texas Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in integrated gasification combined-cycle technology (IGCC) has grown sharply since the passage of the Energy Policy Act in 2005. Many new projects are being planned since the AEP and Duke 600-MW IGCC plants were announced nearly two years ago. This report compares the cost and performance of IGCC with a supercritical pulverized coal plant (SCPC) based on lower-rank Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. IGCC options included 100% PRB and 50/50 PRB/petcoke cases. The addition of CO2 capture equipment al...

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities in the US  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE)`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports the commercialization of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems. This overview briefly describes the supporting RD&D activities and the IGCC projects selected for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program.

Ness, H.M.; Brdar, R.D.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D)program that supports the CCT program, and addresses long-term improvements in support of IGCC technology. This overview briefly describes the CCT projects and the supporting RD&D activities.

Ness, H.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

CoalFleet Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Research and Development Roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an update of EPRI technical report 1013219, CoalFleet RD&D Augmentation Plan for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants that was published in January 2007. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate the state of IGCC technology, gauge technology development progress made since 2007, and discuss updated estimates on the potential for advanced technologies to improve power plant performance and economics. The report consists of the following four parts: establishme...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Tampa Electric Company Polk Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plant Carbon Capture Retrofit Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Industry Technology Demonstration Program on Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with carbon capture and storage (CCS), an engineering study was conducted to evaluate the cost and performance impacts of various CCS schemes at the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station. The portion of the work presented here was funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) IGCC with CCS demonstration program collaborative and focuses on novel CO2 capture and purification systems integrated...

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Phased Construction of Natural Gas Combined-Cycle Plants with Coal Gasification and CO2 Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a brief review of technologies and key issues involved in a phased construction approach for a low-emission integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) plant where carbon dioxide (CO2) removal for use or sequestration can be added at a later date.

2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

44

Shell-based gasification-combined-cycle power plant evaluations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a detailed engineering and economic evaluation of shell-based integrated gasification - combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants. Two complete nominal 1000 MW capacity Shell-based grass roots IGCC plant designs and cost estimates were prepared. The following conclusions were made: Shell-based IGCC plants firing Illinois coal and employing current technology gas turbines (2000/sup 0/F firing temperature) have the potential to be cost competitive with conventional coal-fired steam plants with FGD. Shell-based IGCC plants firing Texas lignite have the potential to generate power at costs that are competitive with those based on firing high rank coal. Shell-based IGCC plants firing Illinois No. 6 coal have equivalent performance and costs similar to Texaco-based IGCC systems.

Hartman, J.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation. This process can reduce C0[sub 2] production because of its higher efficiency, and it is amenable to C0[sub 2] capture, because C0[sub 2] can be removed before combustion and the associated dilution with atmospheric nitrogen. This paper presents a process-design baseline that encompasses the IGCC system, C0[sub 2] transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering of C0[sub 2] in geological reservoirs.The intent of this study is to provide the C0[sub 2] budget, or an equivalent C0[sub 2]'' budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. Design capital and operating costs for the process are included in the full study but are not reported in the present paper. The value used for the equivalent C0[sub 2]'' budget will be 1 kg C0[sub 2]/kWh[sub e].

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Johnson, R.A. (USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation. This process can reduce C0[sub 2] production because of its higher efficiency, and it is amenable to C0[sub 2] capture, because C0[sub 2] can be removed before combustion and the associated dilution with atmospheric nitrogen. This paper presents a process-design baseline that encompasses the IGCC system, C0[sub 2] transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering of C0[sub 2] in geological reservoirs.The intent of this study is to provide the C0[sub 2] budget, or an equivalent C0[sub 2]'' budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. Design capital and operating costs for the process are included in the full study but are not reported in the present paper. The value used for the equivalent C0[sub 2]'' budget will be 1 kg C0[sub 2]/kWh[sub e].

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Johnson, R.A. (USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Department of Energy Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0318) Location: Clark County, Kentucky Contacts: For further information on this environmental For further information on the DOE National impact statement (EIS), call: Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, call: 1-800-432-8330 ext. 5460 1-800-472-2756 or contact: or contact: Mr. Roy Spears Ms. Carol Borgstrom

49

Extractors manual for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Data Base System: Major Plants Data Base  

SciTech Connect

National concern over the depletion of conventional energy sources has prompted industry to evaluate coal gasification as an alternative source of energy. One approach being evaluated is gasifying coal in a gasifier and feeding the fuel gas to a combined-cycle power plant. This system is called an Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power plant. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is also encouraging the development of new technologies by sponsoring research and development (R and D) projects in IGCC. In order to make data generated from these projects available to government and private sector personnel, the IGCC Data System has been established. A technology-specific data system consists of data that are stored for that technology in each of the specialized data bases that make up the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) data system. The IGCC Data System consists of data stored in the Major Plants Data Base (MPDB) and the Test Data Data Base (TDDB). To capture the results of government-sponsored IGCC research programs, documents have been written for the MPDB and TDDB to specify the data that contractors need to report and the procedures for reporting them. The IGCC documents identify and define the data that need to be reported for IGCC projects so that the data entered into the TDDB and MPDB will meet the needs of the users of the IGCC Data System. This document addresses what information is needed and how it must be formatted so that it can be entered into the MPDB for IGCC. The data that are most relevant to potential IGCC Data System users have been divided into four categories: project tracking needs; economic/commercialization needs; critical performance needs; and modeling and R and D needs. 4 figs., 28 tabs.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Extractors manual for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Data Base System: Test Data Data Base  

SciTech Connect

National concern over the depletion of conventional energy sources has prompted industry to evaluate coal gasification as an alternative source of energy. One approach being evaluated is gasifying coal in a gasifier and feeding the fuel gas to a combined-cycle power plant. This system is called an Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power plant. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is also encouraging the development of new technologies by sponsoring research and development (R and D) projects in IGCC. In order to make data generated from these projects available to government and private sector personnel, the IGCC Data System has been established. A technology-specific data system consists of data that are stored for that technology in each of the specialized data bases that make up the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) data system. The IGCC Data System consists of data stored in the Major Plants Data Base (MPDB) and the Test Data Data Base (TDDB). To capture the results of government-sponsored IGCC research programs, documents have been written for the TDDB and MPDB to specify the data that contractors need to report and the procedures for reporting them. The IGCC documents identify and define the data that need to be reported for IGCC projects so that the data entered into the TDDB and MPDB will meet the needs of the users of the IGCC Data System. This document addresses what information is needed and how it must be formatted so that it can be entered into the TDDB for IGCC. The data that are most relevant to potential IGCC Data System users have been divided into four categories: project tracking needs; economic/commercialization needs; critical performance needs; and modeling and R and D needs.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

87 Final Report: IGCC-LCA VII Prepared by: Laura Draucker Raj Bhander Barbara Bennet Tom Davis Robert Eckard William Ellis John Kauffman James Littlefield Amanda Malone Ron Munson...

52

Energy impacts of controlling carbon dioxide emissions from an integrated gasification/combined-cycle system  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results from a study of the impacts associated with CO{sub 2} recovery in integrated gasification/combined-cycle (IGCC) systems which is being conducted for the Morgantown Energy Technology Center by Argonne National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to compare, on a consistent systems-oriented basis, the energy and economic impacts of adding CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration to an IGCC system. The research reported here has emphasized commercial technologies for capturing CO{sub 2}, but ongoing work is also addressing advanced technologies under development and alternate power-system configurations that may enhance system efficiency.

Livengood, C.D.; Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Comparison of intergrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants with current and advanced gas turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two recent conceptual design studies examined ''grass roots'' integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) plants for the Albany Station site of Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation. One of these studies was based on the Texaco Gasifier and the other was developed around the British Gas Co.-Lurgi slagging gasifier. Both gasifiers were operated in the ''oxygen-blown'' mode, producing medium Btu fuel gas. The studies also evaluated plant performance with both current and advanced gas turbines. Coalto-busbar efficiencies of approximately 35 percent were calculated for Texaco IGCC plants using current technology gas turbines. Efficiencies of approximately 39 percent were obtained for the same plant when using advanced technology gas turbines.

Banda, B.M.; Evans, T.F.; McCone, A.I.; Westisik, J.H.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Integrated gasification-combined-cycle power plants - Performance and cost estimates  

SciTech Connect

Several studies of Integrated Gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants have indicated that these plants have the potential for providing performance and cost improvements over conventional coal-fired steam power plants with flue gas desulfurization. Generally, IGCC power plants have a higher energy-conversion efficiency, require less water, conform with existing environmental standards at lower cost, and are expected to convert coal to electricity at lower costs than coal-fired steam plants. This study compares estimated costs and performance of various IGCC plant design configurations. A second-law analysis identifies the real energy waste in each design configuration. In addition, a thermoeconomic analysis reveals the potential for reducing the cost of electricity generated by an IGCC power plant.

Tsatsaronis, G.; Tawfik, T.; Lin, L. (Tennessee State Univ., Nashville (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to develop engineering evaluations of technologies for the capture, use, and disposal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This project emphasizes CO{sub 2}-capture technologies combined with integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. Complementary evaluations address CO{sub 2} transportation, CO{sub 2} use, and options for the long-term sequestering of unused CO{sub 2}. Commercially available CO{sub 2}-capture technology is providing a performance and economic baseline against which to compare innovative technologies. The intent is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps, in addition to process design capital and operating costs. The value used for the {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget is 1 kg of CO{sub 2} per kilowatt-hour (electric). The base case is a 458-MW IGCC system that uses an air-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal feed, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production of 454 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.835 kg/kWhe. Two additional life-cycle energy balances for emerging technologies were considered: (1) high-temperature CO{sub 2} separation with calcium- or magnesium-based sorbents, and (2) ambient-temperature facilitated-transport polymer membranes for acid-gas removal.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.R.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Uncertainty analysis of integrated gasification combined cycle systems based on Frame 7H versus 7F gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is a promising alternative for clean generation of power and coproduction of chemicals from coal and other feedstocks. Advanced concepts for IGCC systems that incorporate state-of-the-art gas turbine systems, however, are not commercially demonstrated. Therefore, there is uncertainty regarding the future commercial-scale performance, emissions, and cost of such technologies. The Frame 7F gas turbine represents current state-of-practice, whereas the Frame 7H is the most recently introduced advanced commercial gas turbine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risks and potential payoffs of IGCC technology based on different gas turbine combined cycle designs. Models of entrained-flow gasifier-based IGCC systems with Frame 7F (IGCC-7F) and 7H gas turbine combined cycles (IGCC-7H) were developed in ASPEN Plus. An uncertainty analysis was conducted. Gasifier carbon conversion and project cost uncertainty are identified as the most important uncertain inputs with respect to system performance and cost. The uncertainties in the difference of the efficiencies and costs for the two systems are characterized. Despite uncertainty, the IGCC-7H system is robustly preferred to the IGCC-7F system. Advances in gas turbine design will improve the performance, emissions, and cost of IGCC systems. The implications of this study for decision-making regarding technology selection, research planning, and plant operation are discussed. 38 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

Yunhua Zhu; H. Christopher Frey [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Gas turbine effects on integrated-gasification-combined-cycle power plant operations  

SciTech Connect

This study used detailed thermodynamic modeling procedures to assess the influence of different gas turbine characteristics and steam cycle conditions on the design and off-design performance of integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants. IGCC plant simulation models for a base case plant with Texaco gasifiers and both radiant and convective syngas coolers were developed, and three different types of gas turbines were evaluated as well as non-reheat and reheat steam systems. Results indicated that improving the gas turbine heat rate significantly improves the heat rate of the IGCC power plant. In addition results indicated that using a reheat steam system with current gas turbines improves IGCC performance, though as gas turbine efficiency increases, the impact of using a reheat steam system decreases. Increasing gas turbine temperatures from 1985{degree}F to 2500{degree}F was also found to have the potential to reduce overall IGCC system heat rates by approximately 700 BTU/kWh. The methodologies and models developed for this work are extremely useful tools for investigating the impact of specific gas turbine and steam cycle conditions on the overall performance of IGCC power plants. Moreover, they can assist utilities during the preliminary engineering phase of an IGCC project in evaluating the cost effectiveness of using specific gas turbines and steam cycles in the overall plant design. 45 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

Eustis, F.H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). High Temperature Gasdynamics Lab.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Tampa Electric Company Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project  

SciTech Connect

The proposed project will utilize commercially available gasification technology as provided by Texaco in their licensed oxygen-blown entrained-flow gasifier. In this arrangement, coal is ground to specification and slurried in water to the desired concentration (60--70% solids) in rod mills. This coal slurry and an oxidant (95 % pure oxygen) are then mixed in the gasifier burner where the coal partially combusts, in an oxygen deficient environment, to produce syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTU/SCF (LHV) at a temperature in excess of 2500{degrees}F. The oxygen will be produced from an Air Separation Unit (ASU). The gasifier is expected to achieve greater than 95% carbon conversion in a single pass. It is currently planned for the gasifier to be a single vessel feeding into one radiant syngas cooler where the temperature will be reduced from about 2500{degrees}F to about 1300{degrees}F. After the radiant cooler, the gas will then be split into two (2) parallel convective coolers, where the temperature will be cooled further to about 900{degrees}F. One stream will go to the 50% HGCU system and the other stream to the traditional CGCU system with 100% capacity. This flow arrangement was selected to provide assurance to Tampa Electric that the IGCC capability would not be restricted due to the demonstration of the HGCU system. A traditional amine scrubber type system with conventional sulfur recovery will be used. Sulfur from the HGCU and CGCU systems will be recovered in the form of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and elemental sulfur respectively.The key components of the combined cycle are the advanced combustion.turbine (CT), heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), and steam turbine (ST), and generators. The advanced CT will be a GE 7F operating with a firing temperature of about 2300{degrees}F.

Pless, D.E.; Black, C.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Tampa Electric Company Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project  

SciTech Connect

The proposed project will utilize commercially available gasification technology as provided by Texaco in their licensed oxygen-blown entrained-flow gasifier. In this arrangement, coal is ground to specification and slurried in water to the desired concentration (60--70% solids) in rod mills. This coal slurry and an oxidant (95 % pure oxygen) are then mixed in the gasifier burner where the coal partially combusts, in an oxygen deficient environment, to produce syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTU/SCF (LHV) at a temperature in excess of 2500[degrees]F. The oxygen will be produced from an Air Separation Unit (ASU). The gasifier is expected to achieve greater than 95% carbon conversion in a single pass. It is currently planned for the gasifier to be a single vessel feeding into one radiant syngas cooler where the temperature will be reduced from about 2500[degrees]F to about 1300[degrees]F. After the radiant cooler, the gas will then be split into two (2) parallel convective coolers, where the temperature will be cooled further to about 900[degrees]F. One stream will go to the 50% HGCU system and the other stream to the traditional CGCU system with 100% capacity. This flow arrangement was selected to provide assurance to Tampa Electric that the IGCC capability would not be restricted due to the demonstration of the HGCU system. A traditional amine scrubber type system with conventional sulfur recovery will be used. Sulfur from the HGCU and CGCU systems will be recovered in the form of H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] and elemental sulfur respectively.The key components of the combined cycle are the advanced combustion.turbine (CT), heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), and steam turbine (ST), and generators. The advanced CT will be a GE 7F operating with a firing temperature of about 2300[degrees]F.

Pless, D.E.; Black, C.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

System study on partial gasification combined cycle with CO{sub 2} recovery - article no. 051801  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

S partial gasification combined cycle with CO{sub 2} recovery is proposed in this paper. Partial gasification adopts cascade conversion of the composition of coal. Active composition of coal is simply gasified, while inactive composition, that is char, is burnt in a boiler. Oxy-fuel combustion of syngas produces only CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, so the CO{sub 2} can be separated through cooling the working fluid. This decreases the amount of energy consumption to separate CO{sub 2} compared with conventional methods. The novel system integrates the above two key technologies by injecting steam from a steam turbine into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine to combine the Rankine cycle with the Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiency of this system will be higher based on the cascade utilization of energy level. Compared with the conventional integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), the compressor of the gas turbine, heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) and gasifier are substituted for a pump, reheater, and partial gasifier, so the system is simplified. Furthermore, the novel system is investigated by means of energy-utilization diagram methodology and provides a simple analysis of their economic and environmental performance. As a result, the thermal efficiency of this system may be expected to be 45%, with CO{sub 2} recovery of 41.2%, which is 1.5-3.5% higher than that of an IGCC system. At the same time, the total investment cost of the new system is about 16% lower than that of an IGCC. The comparison between the partial gasification technology and the IGCC technology is based on the two representative cases to identify the specific feature of the proposed system.

Xu, Y.J.; Jin, H.G.; Lin, R.M.; Han, W. [Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water treatment/instrument air, and power conditioning/controls were built and shipped to the site. The two fuel cell modules, each rated at 1 MW on natural gas, were fabricated by FuelCell Energy in its Torrington, CT manufacturing facility. The fuel cell modules were conditioned and tested at FuelCell Energy in Danbury and shipped to the site. Installation of the power plant and connection to all required utilities and syngas was completed. Pre-operation checkout of the entire power plant was conducted and the plant was ready to operate in July 2004. However, fuel gas (natural gas or syngas) was not available at the WREL site due to technical difficulties with the gasifier and other issues. The fuel cell power plant was therefore not operated, and subsequently removed by October of 2005. The WREL fuel cell site was restored to the satisfaction of WREL. FuelCell Energy continues to market carbonate fuel cells for natural gas and digester gas applications. A fuel cell/turbine hybrid is being developed and tested that provides higher efficiency with potential to reach the DOE goal of 60% HHV on coal gas. A system study was conducted for a 40 MW direct fuel cell/turbine hybrid (DFC/T) with potential for future coal gas applications. In addition, FCE is developing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power plants with Versa Power Systems (VPS) as part of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program and has an on-going program for co-production of hydrogen. Future development in these technologies can lead to future coal gas fuel cell applications.

FuelCell Energy

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

63

Technical Support for the Development of the U.S. Department of Energy's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Dynamic Training Sim ulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) is one technology option from the next generation of coal-fired power plants with high efficiency and near-zero emissions that has been evaluated by major utilities and developers for baseload capacity additions. The increased attention to IGCC power generation has created a growing demand for experience with the analysis, operation, and control of commercial-scale IGCC plants. To meet this need, DOEs National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has led a pr...

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

64

Integrated gasification combined cycle - a view to the future  

SciTech Connect

DOE is involved in research, development, and demonstration of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle because of a strong belief that it will result in widespread commercialization that will be of great benefit to this nation. METC`s long-range vision comprises (1) product goals that require improvements to known technical advantages, and (2) market goals that are based on expectations of market pull.

Schmidt, D.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Economics of Phased Gasification-Combined-Cycle Plants: Utility Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phased gasification-combined-cycle power plants can help utilities match load growth and respond to changes in demand and fuel prices. After evaluating the economic merits of phased additions, seven utilities considered the technology a viable option for electricity generation in the 1990s.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The role of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle in the USDOE`s Clean Coal Research, Development and Demonstration Program  

SciTech Connect

For many years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been funding research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to develop advanced power generation technologies. The goal of this activity is to catalyze the private sector to commercialize technologies that will provide reasonably priced electricity and still meet stringent environmental standards. Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are emerging as one of the more attractive candidate technologies to meet this goal. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has been assigned the responsibility for implementing IGCC projects in DOE`s Clean Coal RD&D program. The IGCC technology offers the potential for significant Improvements in environmental performance, compared to today`s coal-fired power plants. Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from IGCC systems will be less than one-tenth of existing environmental standards. Thus, the IGCC technology will make coal-based plants as clean as plants that bum natural gas.

Bajura, R.A.; Schmidt, D.K.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

68

"Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Status of technologies and components modeled by EIA" Status of technologies and components modeled by EIA" ,"Revolutionary","Evolutionary","Mature" "Pulverized Coal",,,"X" "Pulverized Coal with CCS" " - Non-CCS portion of Pulverized Coal Plant",,,"X" " - CCS","X" "Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle" " - Advanced Combustion Turbine",,"X" " - Heat Recovery Steam Generator",,,"X" " - Gasifier",,"X" " - Balance of Plant",,,"X" "Conventional Natural Gas Combined Cycle" " - Conventional Combustion Turbine",,,"X" " - Heat Recovery Steam Generator",,,"X" " - Balance of Plant",,,"X"

69

Program on Technology Innovation: Tampa Electric Company Polk Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plant Carbon Capture Retrofit Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Industry Technology Demonstration Program on Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with carbon capture and storage (CCS), an engineering study was conducted to evaluate the cost and performance impacts of various CCS schemes at the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station. The portion of the work presented here was funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Innovation Program and focuses on a comparison of chemical and physical solvent-based CO2 capture systems i...

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants  

SciTech Connect

There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

KRW oxygen-blown gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect

This project emphasizes CO{sub 2}-capture technologies combined with integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. Complementary evaluations address CO{sub 2} transportation, CO{sub 2} use, and options for the long-term sequestration of unused CO{sub 2}. The intent is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an equivalent CO{sub 2} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps, in addition to process design capital and operating costs. The base case is a 458-MW (gross generation) IGCC system that uses an oxygen-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal feed, and low-pressure glycol sulfur removal followed by Claus/SCOT treatment to produce a saleable product. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production for the entire energy cycle of 411 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.801 kg/k Whe. For comparison, in two cases, the gasifier output was taken through water-gas shift and then to low-pressure glycol H{sub 2}S recovery, followed by either low-pressure glycol or membrane CO{sub 2} recovery and then by a combustion turbine being fed a high-hydrogen-content fuel. Two additional cases employed chilled methanol for H{sub 2}S recovery and a fuel cell as the topping cycle with no shift stages. From the IGCC plant, a 500-km pipeline took the CO{sub 2} to geological sequestering. In a comparison of air-blown and oxygen-blown CO{sub 2}-release base cases, the cost of electricity for the air-blown IGCC was 56.86 mills/kWh, and the cost of oxygen-blown IGCC was 58.29 mills/kWh.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the following discussion considers a comparison of coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and pulverized coal (PC) power plants, representing a balanced...

74

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S-1 S-1 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The National Environmental Policy Act Process NEPA is a federal law that serves as the basic national charter for protection of the environment. For major federal actions that may significantly affect the quality of the environment, NEPA requires federal agencies to prepare a detailed statement that includes the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and reasonable alternatives. A fundamental objective of NEPA is to foster better decisionmaking by ensuring that high quality environmental information is available to public officials and members of the

75

Oxygen-blown gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect

This project emphasizes CO2-capture technologies combined with integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems, CO2 transportation, and options for the long-term sequestration Of CO2. The intent is to quantify the CO2 budget, or an ``equivalent CO2`` budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps, in addition to process design capital and operating costs. The base case is a 458-MW (gross generation) IGCC system that uses an oxygen-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, bituminous coal feed, and low-pressure glycol sulfur removal, followed by Claus/SCOT treatment, to produce a saleable product. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production for the entire energy cycle of 411 MW, with a CO2 release rate of 0.801 kg/kV-Whe. For comparison, in two cases, the gasifier output was taken through water-gas shift and then to low-pressure glycol H2S recovery, followed by either low-pressure glycol or membrane CO2 recovery and then by a combustion turbine being fed a high-hydrogen-content fuel. Two additional cases employed chilled methanol for H2S recovery and a fuel cell as the topping cycle, with no shift stages. From the IGCC plant, a 500-km pipeline takes the CO2 to geological sequestering. For the optimal CO2 recovery case, the net electric power production was reduced by 37.6 MW from the base case, with a CO2 release rate of 0.277 kg/kWhe (when makeup power was considered). In a comparison of air-blown and oxygen-blown CO2-release base cases, the cost of electricity for the air-blown IGCC was 56.86 mills/kWh, while the cost for oxygen-blown IGCC was 58.29 mills/kWh. For the optimal cases employing glycol CO2 recovery, there was no clear advantage; the cost for air-blown IGCC was 95.48 mills/kWh, and the cost for the oxygen-blown IGCC was slightly lower, at 94.55 mills/kWh.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Investigation of gasification chemical looping combustion combined cycle performance  

SciTech Connect

A novel combined cycle based on coal gasification and chemical looping combustion (CLC) offers a possibility of both high net power efficiency and separation of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2}. The technique involves the use of a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier, which transfers oxygen from the combustion air to the fuel, and the avoidance of direct contact between fuel and combustion air. The fuel gas is oxidized by an oxygen carrier, an oxygen-containing compound, in the fuel reactor. The oxygen carrier in this study is NiO. The reduced oxygen carrier, Ni, in the fuel reactor is regenerated by the air in the air reactor. In this way, fuel and air are never mixed, and the fuel oxidation products CO{sub 2} and water vapor leave the system undiluted by air. All that is needed to get an almost pure CO{sub 2} product is to condense the water vapor and to remove the liquid water. When the technique is combined with gas turbine and heat recovery steam generation technology, a new type of combined cycle is formed which gives a possibility of obtaining high net power efficiency and CO{sub 2} separation. The performance of the combined cycle is simulated using the ASPEN software tool in this paper. The influence of the water/coal ratio on the gasification and the influence of the CLC process parameters such as the air reactor temperature, the turbine inlet supplementary firing, and the pressure ratio of the compressor on the system performance are discussed. Results show that, assuming an air reactor temperature of 1200{sup o}C, a gasification temperature of 1100 {sup o}C, and a turbine inlet temperature after supplementary firing of 1350{sup o}C, the system has the potential to achieve a thermal efficiency of 44.4% (low heating value), and the CO{sub 2} emission is 70.1 g/(kW h), 90.1% of the CO{sub 2} captured. 22 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Wenguo Xiang; Sha Wang; Tengteng Di [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of the Ministry of Education

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/ CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE VOLUME I - CONCEPTUAL COMMERCIAL EVALUATION OPTIONAL PROGRAM FINAL REPORT September 1, 2001 - December 31, 2005 By Dennis A. Horazak (Siemens), Program Manager Richard A. Newby (Siemens) Eugene E. Smeltzer (Siemens) Rachid B. Slimane (GTI) P. Vann Bush (GTI) James L. Aderhold, Jr. (GTI) Bruce G. Bryan (GTI) December 2005 DOE Award Number: DE-AC26-99FT40674 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Siemens Power Generation, Inc. 4400 Alafaya Trail Orlando, FL 32826 & Gas Technology Institute 1700 S. Mt. Prospect Rd. Des Plaines, Illinois 60018 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government.

78

Final Report Environmental Footprints and Costs of Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, over 50 percent of electricity in the U.S. is generated from coal. Given that coal reserves in the U.S. are estimated to meet our energy needs over the next 250 years, coal is expected to continue to play a major role in the generation of electricity in this country. With dwindling supplies and high prices of natural gas and oil, a large proportion of the new power generation facilities built in the U.S. can be expected to use coal as the main fuel. The environmental impact of these facilities can only be minimized by innovations in technology that allow for efficient burning of coal, along with an increased capture of the air pollutants that are an inherent part of coal combustion. EPA considers integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) as one of the most promising technologies in reducing environmental consequences of generating electricity from coal. EPA has undertaken several initiatives to facilitate and incentivize development and deployment of this technology. This report is the result of one of these initiatives and it represents the combined efforts of a joint EPA/DOE team formed to advance the IGCC technology. The various offices within DOE that participated in the development/review of this report were the Office of Fossil Energy, including the Clean Coal Office and the National Energy Technology Laboratory.

Pulverized Coal; Technologies Foreword

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project, Clean Coal Technology Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE entered into a cooperative agreement with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) under which DOE proposes to provide cost-shared funding to design, construct, and operate an Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project to repower an existing steam turbine generator set at the Springfield (Illinois) City Water, Light and Power (CWL P) Lakeside Generating Station, while capturing 90% of the coal's sulfur and producing elemental sulfur as a salable by-product. The proposed demonstration would help determine the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed IGCC technology on a scale that would allow the utility industry to assess its applicability for repowering other coal-burning power plants. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE in compliance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The sources of information for this EA include the following: C-E's technical proposal for the project submitted to DOE in response to the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Program Opportunity Notice (PON); discussions with C-E and CWL P staff; the volume of environmental information for the project and its supplements provided by C-E; and a site visit to the proposed project site.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project, Clean Coal Technology Program. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE entered into a cooperative agreement with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) under which DOE proposes to provide cost-shared funding to design, construct, and operate an Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project to repower an existing steam turbine generator set at the Springfield (Illinois) City Water, Light and Power (CWL&P) Lakeside Generating Station, while capturing 90% of the coal`s sulfur and producing elemental sulfur as a salable by-product. The proposed demonstration would help determine the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed IGCC technology on a scale that would allow the utility industry to assess its applicability for repowering other coal-burning power plants. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE in compliance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The sources of information for this EA include the following: C-E`s technical proposal for the project submitted to DOE in response to the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Program Opportunity Notice (PON); discussions with C-E and CWL&P staff; the volume of environmental information for the project and its supplements provided by C-E; and a site visit to the proposed project site.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The potential for control of carbon dioxide emissions from integrated gasification/combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification/combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation, a process that reduces CO{sub 2} production through efficient fuel used is amenable to CO{sub 2} capture. This paper presents a comparison of energy systems that encompass fuel supply, an IGCC system, CO{sub 2} recovery using commercial technologies, CO{sub 2} transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering in geological reservoirs. The intent is to evaluate the energy-efficiency impacts of controlling CO{sub 2} in such systems and to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an to equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. The value used for the ``equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget is 1 kg/kWh CO{sub 2}. The base case for the comparison is a 457-MW IGCC system that uses an air-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, preparation, and transportation of the coal and limestone result in a net system electric power production of 454 MW with a 0.835 kg/kwh CO{sub 2} release rate. For comparison, the gasifier output is taken through a water-gas shift to convert CO to CO{sub 2} and then processed in a glycol-based absorber unit to recover CO{sub 2} Prior to the combustion turbine. A 500-km pipeline then transports the CO{sub 2} for geological sequestering. The net electric power production for the system with CO{sub 2} recovery is 381 MW with a 0.156 kg/kwh CO{sub 2} release rate.

Livengood, C.D.; Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

ACTION TEAM PROGRESS REPORT Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Subcommittee on Regulatory Innovation and Economic Incentives of the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee: Reliable, online electricity generation from multiple coal types; synthetic gas clean-up; and, capture and deployment of advanced coal technologies. FY'07 Objectives: Continue collaboration with DOE's Fossil Energy

83

Technology qualification for IGCC power plant with CO2 Capture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Summary:This thesis presents the technology qualification plan for the integrated gasification combined cycle power plant (IGCC) with carbon dioxide capture based on DNV recommendations. (more)

Baig, Yasir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The abundance of coal in the United States makes it one of our Nation's most important strategic resources in building a secure energy future. With today's prices and technology, recoverable reserves located in the United States could supply the Nation's coal consumption for approximately 250 years at current usage rates. However, if coal is to reach its full potential as an environmentally acceptable source of energy, an expanded menu of advanced clean coal technologies must be developed to provide substantially improved options both for the consumer and private industry. Before any technology can be seriously considered for commercialization, it must be demonstrated at a sufficiently large-scale to develop industry confidence in its technical and economic feasibility. The implementation of a federal technology demonstration program is the established means of accelerating the development of technology to meet national energy strategy and environmental policy goals, to reduce the risk to human health and the environment to an acceptable level, to accelerate commercialization, and to provide the incentives required for continued activity in research and development directed at providing solutions to long-range energy problems. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

N /A

2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

85

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project: Clean Coal Technology Program  

SciTech Connect

On February 22, 1988, DOE issued Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Number-DE-PS01-88FE61530 for Round II of the CCT Program. The purpose of the PON was to solicit proposals to conduct cost-shared ICCT projects to demonstrate technologies that are capable of being commercialized in the 1990s, that are more cost-effective than current technologies, and that are capable of achieving significant reduction of SO[sub 2] and/or NO[sub x] emissions from existing coal burning facilities, particularly those that contribute to transboundary and interstate pollution. The Combustion Engineering (C-E) Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Repowering Project was one of 16 proposals selected by DOE for negotiation of cost-shared federal funding support from among the 55 proposals that were received in response to the PON. The ICCT Program has developed a three-level strategy for complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that is consistent with the President's Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508) and the DOE guidelines for compliance with NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The strategy includes the consideration of programmatic and project-specific environmental impacts during and subsequent to the reject selection process.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project DEIS assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed DOE action to provide cost-shared financial support for construction and operation of an electrical power station demonstrating use of a Clean Coal Technology in Clark County, Kentucky. Under the Proposed Action, DOE would provide financial assistance, through a Cooperative Agreement with Kentucky Pioneer Energy, LLC, for design, construction, and operation of a 540 megawatt demonstration power station comprised of two synthesis gas-fired combined cycle units in Clark County, Kentucky. The station would also be comprised of a British Gas Lurgi (BGL) gasifier to produce synthesis gas from a co-feed of coal and refuse-derived fuel pellets and a high temperature molten carbonate fuel cell. The facility would be powered by the synthesis gas feed. The proposed project would consist of the following major components: (1) refuse-derived fuel pellets and coal receipt and storage facilities; (2) a gasification plant; (3) sulfur removal and recovery facilities; (4) an air separation plant; (5) a high-temperature molten carbonate fuel cell; and (6) two combined cycle generation units. The IGCC facility would be built to provide needed power capacity to central and eastern Kentucky. At a minimum, 50 percent of the high sulfur coal used would be from the Kentucky region. Two No Action Alternatives are analyzed in the DEIS. Under the No Action Alternative 1, DOE would not provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of the proposed facility and no new facility would be built. Under the No Action Alternative 2, DOE would not provide any funding and, instead of the proposed demonstration project, Kentucky Pioneer Energy, LLC, a subsidiary of Global Energy, Inc., would construct and operate, a 540 megawatt natural gas-fired power station. Evaluation of impacts on land use, socioeconomics, cultural resources, aesthetic and scenic resources, geology, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, noise, traffic and transportation, occupational and public health and safety, and environmental justice were included in the assessment.

N /A

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

An evaluaton of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 2, Sensitivity studies and appendixes: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute contracted with Bechtel Group, Inc., to provide an evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD). A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The study confirms that the Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. In addition, coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The U.S. Department of Energy`s integrated gasification combined cycle research, development and demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

Historically, coal has played a major role as a fuel source for power generation both domestically and abroad. Despite increasingly stringent environmental constraints and affordable natural gas, coal will remain one of the primary fuels for producing electricity. This is due to its abundance throughout the world, low price, ease of transport an export, decreasing capital cost for coal-based systems, and the need to maintain fuel diversity. Recognizing the role coal will continue to play, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is working in partnership with industry to develop ways to use this abundant fuel resource in a manner that is more economical, more efficient and environmentally superior to conventional means to burn coal. The most promising of these technologies is integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. Although IGCC systems offer many advantages, there are still several hurdles that must be overcome before the technology achieves widespread commercial acceptance. The major hurdles to commercialization include reducing capital and operating costs, reducing technical risk, demonstrating environmental and technical performance at commercial scale, and demonstrating system reliability and operability. Overcoming these hurdles, as well as continued progress in improving system efficiency, are the goals of the DOE IGCC research, development and demonstrate (RD and D) program. This paper provides an overview of this integrated RD and D program and describes fundamental areas of technology development, key research projects and their related demonstration scale activities.

Brdar, R.D.; Cicero, D.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development efforts have been underway for decades to replace dry-gas cleaning technology with humid-gas cleaning technology that would maintain the water vapor content in the raw gas by conducting cleaning at sufficiently high temperature to avoid water vapor condensation and would thus significantly simplify the plant and improve its thermal efficiency. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. conducted a program with the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) to develop a Novel Gas Cleaning process that uses a new type of gas-sorbent contactor, the ''filter-reactor''. The Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning process described and evaluated here is in its early stages of development and this evaluation is classified as conceptual. The commercial evaluations have been coupled with integrated Process Development Unit testing performed at a GTI coal gasifier test facility to demonstrate, at sub-scale the process performance capabilities. The commercial evaluations and Process Development Unit test results are presented in Volumes 1 and 2 of this report, respectively. Two gas cleaning applications with significantly differing gas cleaning requirements were considered in the evaluation: IGCC power generation, and Methanol Synthesis with electric power co-production. For the IGCC power generation application, two sets of gas cleaning requirements were applied, one representing the most stringent ''current'' gas cleaning requirements, and a second set representing possible, very stringent ''future'' gas cleaning requirements. Current gas cleaning requirements were used for Methanol Synthesis in the evaluation because these cleaning requirements represent the most stringent of cleaning requirements and the most challenging for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning process. The scope of the evaluation for each application was: (1) Select the configuration for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning Process, the arrangement of the individual gas cleaning stages, and the probable operating conditions of the gas cleaning stages to conceptually satisfy the gas cleaning requirements; (2) Estimate process material & energy balances for the major plant sections and for each gas cleaning stage; (3) Conceptually size and specify the major gas cleaning process equipment; (4) Determine the resulting overall performance of the application; and (5) Estimate the investment cost and operating cost for each application. Analogous evaluation steps were applied for each application using conventional gas cleaning technology, and comparison was made to extract the potential benefits, issues, and development needs of the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning technology. The gas cleaning process and related gas conditioning steps were also required to meet specifications that address plant environmental emissions, the protection of the gas turbine and other Power Island components, and the protection of the methanol synthesis reactor. Detailed material & energy balances for the gas cleaning applications, coupled with preliminary thermodynamic modeling and laboratory testing of candidate sorbents, identified the probable sorbent types that should be used, their needed operating conditions in each stage, and their required levels of performance. The study showed that Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning technology can be configured to address and conceptually meet all of the gas cleaning requirements for IGCC, and that it can potentially overcome several of the conventional IGCC power plant availability issues, resulting in improved power plant thermal efficiency and cost. For IGCC application, Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning yields 6% greater generating capacity and 2.3 percentage-points greater efficiency under the Current Standards case, and more than 9% generating capacity increase and 3.6 percentage-points higher efficiency in the Future Standards case. While the conceptual equipment costs are estimated to be only slightly lower for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning processes than for the conventional processes, the improved power plant capacity results in the potentia

Dennis A. Horazak; Richard A. Newby; Eugene E. Smeltzer; Rachid B. Slimane; P. Vann Bush; James L. Aderhold Jr; Bruce G. Bryan

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a t echnoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Design Options for Enhancing IGCC Flexible Operations Performance and Economics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the cycling experience of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants, and the characteristics of IGCC and its component technologies that can make it particularly responsive to renewables-driven, flexible operation and cycling requirements. It also identifies a number of design options for optimizing IGCC cycling performance, and economics for such requirements to nearly meet natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) ramping ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

94

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 11 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Drost, K.; Antoniak, Z.; Brown, D.; Somasundaram, S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Coalfleet IGCC Permits Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CoalFleet IGCC Permits Database presents comprehensive information on permitting requirements and permit conditions for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants in an online database format. This Technical Update is a compilation of the Database contents as of April 1, 2009.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

DOE-Sponsored IGCC Project Could Lead to Lower-Cost Carbon Capture...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

manufactured catalysts can produce both power generation increases and significant cost savings at Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, according to...

98

Steady-state simulation and optimization of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are a promising technology option for power generation with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in view of their efficiency and environmental advantages over conventional coal utilization technologies. This paper presents a three-phase, top-down, optimization-based approach for designing an IGCC plant with precombustion CO2 capture in a process simulator environment. In the first design phase, important global design decisions are made on the basis of plant-wide optimization studies with the aim of increasing IGCC thermal efficiency and thereby making better use of coal resources and reducing CO2 emissions. For the design of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture, the optimal combination of the extent of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion in the water-gas shift (WGS) reactors and the extent of CO2 capture in the SELEXOL process, using dimethylether of polyethylene glycol as the solvent, is determined in the first phase. In the second design phase, the impact of local design decisions is explored considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first phase as additional constraints. Two decisions are made focusing on the SELEXOL and Claus unit. In the third design phase, the operating conditions are optimized considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first and second phases as additional constraints. The operational flexibility of the plant must be taken into account before taking final design decisions. Two studies on the operational flexibility of the WGS reactors and one study focusing on the operational flexibility of the sour water stripper (SWS) are presented. At the end of the first iteration, after executing all the phases once, the net plant efficiency (HHV basis) increases to 34.1% compared to 32.5% in a previously published study (DOE/NETL-2007/1281; National Energy Technology Laboratory, 2007). The study shows that the three-phase, top-down design approach presented is very useful and effective in a process simulator environment for improving efficiency and flexibility of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture. In addition, the study identifies a number of key design variables that has strong impact on the efficiency of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Evaluation of a Dow-Based Gasification-Combined-Cycle Plant Using Low-Rank Coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This feasibility study developed performance and cost data for two different Dow-based gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plants, designed to fire either Texas lignite or Wyoming subbituminous coals at a Gulf Coast location. It demonstrated the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of these plants for generating power from low-rank coals.

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

100

Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Mauldin, SC); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Southern Company Services' study of a Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW)-based gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plant  

SciTech Connect

A site-specific evaluation of an integrated-gasification-combined- cycle (IGCC) unit was conducted by Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS) to determine the effect of such a plant would have on electricity cost, load response, and fuel flexibility on the Southern electric system (SES). The design of the Plant Wansley IGCC plant in this study was configured to utilize three oxygen-blown Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW) gasifiers integrated with two General Electric (GE) MS7001F combustion turbines. The nominal 400-MW IGCC plant was based on a nonphased construction schedule, with an operational start date in the year 2007. Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal was the base coal used in the study. Alabama lignite was also investigated as a potential low-cost feedstock for the IGCC plant, but was found to be higher in cost that the Illinois No. 6 coal when shipped to the Wansley site. The performance and cost results for the nominal 400-MW plant were used in an economic assessment that compared the replacement of a 777-MW pulverized-coal-fired unit with 777-MW of IGCC capacity based on the Southern electric system's expansion plans of installing 777-MW of baseload capacity in the year 2007. The economic analysis indicated that the IGCC plant was competitive compared to a baseload pulverized-coal-fired unit. Capital costs of the IGCC unit were approximately the same as a comparably sized pulverized-coal-fired plant, but the IGCC plant had a lower production cost due to its lower heat rate. 10 refs., 34 figs., 18 tabs.

Gallaspy, D.T.; Johnson, T.W.; Sears, R.E. (Southern Co. Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Recovery, transport, and disposal of CO{sub 2} from an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit CO{sub 2} emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation, a process that reduces CO{sub 2} production and is amenable to CO{sub 2} capture. This paper presents a comparison of energy systems that encompass fuel supply, an IGCC system, CO{sub 2} recovery using commercial technologies, CO{sub 2} transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering in geological reservoirs. The intent is to evaluate the energy efficiency impacts of controlling CO{sub 2} in such a system, and to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an equivalent CO{sub 2} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. The value used for the equivalent CO{sub 2} budget is 1 kg CO{sub 2}/kWh. The base case for the comparison is a 458-MW IGCC system using an air-blown Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No.6 bituminous coal, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, transportation, and preparation of the coal and limestone result in a net electric power production of 448 MW with a 0.872 kg/kWh CO{sub 2} release rate. For comparison, the gasifier output was taken through a water-gas shift to convert CO to CO{sub 2}, and processed in a Selexol unit to recover CO{sub 2} prior to the combustion turbine. A 500-km pipeline then took the CO{sub 2} to geological sequestering. The net electric power production was 383 MW with a 0.218 kg/kWh CO{sub 2} release rate.

Livengood, C.D.; Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Life-cycle CO{sub 2} emissions for air-blown gasification combined-cycle using selexol  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation. With its higher efficiency, this process can reduce CO{sub 2} production. It is also amenable to CO{sub 2} capture, because CO{sub 2} Can be removed before combustion and the associated dilution with atmospheric nitrogen. This paper presents a process-design baseline that encompasses the IGCC system, CO{sub 2} transport -by pipeline, and land-based sequestering of CO{sub 2} in geological reservoirs. The intent of this study is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an ``equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. Design capital and operating costs for the process are included in the fill study but are not reported in the present paper. The value used for the equivalent CO{sub 2} budget will be 1 kg CO{sub 2}/kWh{sub e}. The base case is a 470-MW (at the busbar) IGCC system using an air-blown Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, US Illinois {number_sign}6 bituminous coal feed, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production of 461 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.830 kg/kWh{sub e}. In the CO{sub 2} recovery case, the gasifier output is taken through water-gas shift and then to Selexol, a glycol-based absorber-stripper process that recovers CO{sub 2} before it enters the combustion turbine. This process results in 350 MW at the busbar.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Gasification Technology Status -- December 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 5 years, several major power companies have been developing and conducting detailed design studies of commercial-sized coal-based integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) and pulverized coal (PC) projects. Integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) plants can meet very stringent emissions targets, including those for mercury and CO2. This report covers current IGCC designs being offered and reviews the commercial status of gasification technologies, potential improvements, and lesso...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

105

Performance and operational economics estimates for a coal gasification combined-cycle cogeneration powerplant  

SciTech Connect

A performance and operational economics analysis is presented for an integrated-gasifier, combined-cycle (IGCC) system to meet the steam and baseload electrical requirements. The effect of time variations in steam and electrial requirements is included. The amount and timing of electricity purchases from sales to the electric utility are determined. The resulting expenses for purchased electricity and revenues from electricity sales are estimated by using an assumed utility rate structure model. Cogeneration results for a range of potential IGCC cogeneration system sizes are compared with the fuel consumption and costs of natural gas and electricity to meet requirements without cogeneration. The results indicate that an IGCC cogeneration system could save about 10 percent of the total fuel energy presently required to supply steam and electrical requirements without cogeneration. Also for the assumed future fuel and electricity prices, an annual operating cost savings of 21 percent to 26 percent could be achieved with such a cogeneration system. An analysis of the effects of electricity price, fuel price, and system availability indicates that the IGCC cogeneration system has a good potential for economical operation over a wide range in these assumptions.

Nainiger, J.J.; Burns, R.K.; Easley, A.J.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced CO2 Capture Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is demonstrating the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low-rank coals. The...

107

NETL: Gasification - Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the coal gasifier and the combustion turbine. Syngas coolers used in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants offer high efficiency, but their reliability is...

108

NETL: Gasification Systems - Evaluation of the Benefits of Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

economically provide feeding of low-cost, low-rank coals into commercial Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. GE is completing comparative techno-economic studies...

109

Gasification Technology Status: August 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical report covers the lessons learned from the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that are now accumulating commercial operating experience. The current gasification experience includes coal, petroleum residuals, biomass, and wastes.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

Mercury Fate in IGCC Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants are an alternative to conventional pulverized coal boilers. In an IGCC facility, coal or other feedstocks are converted to synthetic gas (syngas) at high temperature and pressure. The syngas can be used to produce electrical power in a combined cycle combustion turbine. One of the advantages of IGCC technology is that contaminants can be removed from the syngas prior to combustion, reducing the volume of gas that must be treated and leading to lo...

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

111

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comments Comments Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Clark County Public Library Winchester, KY Page 1 of 5 D-1 Comment No. 1 Issue Code: 11 Gasification is different from incineration. It is a better, more environmentally responsible approach to generating energy from the use of fossil fuels and refuse derived fuel (RDF). Incineration produces criteria pollutants, semi-volatile and volatile organic compounds and dioxin/furan compounds. Ash from hazardous waste incinerators is considered a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). In contrast, gasification, which occurs at high temperatures and pressures, produces no air emissions, only small amounts of wastewater containing salts. Synthesis gas (syngas)

112

CoalFleet IGCC Permitting Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance to owners of planned Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants in order to assist them in permitting these advanced coal power generation facilities. The CoalFleet IGCC Permitting Guidelines summarize U.S. federal requirements for obtaining air, water, and solid waste permits for a generic IGCC facility, as described in EPRI report 1012227, the CoalFleet User Design Basis Specification (UDBS). The Guidelines present characteristics of IGCC emissions that mus...

2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

113

Coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined-cycle (GMS) power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined cycle (GMS) refers to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems in which coal gasification is used to supply a clean fuel (free of mineral matter and sulfur) for combustion in an MHD electrical power plant. Advantages of a clean-fuel system include the elimination of mineral matter or slag from all components other than the coal gasifier and gas cleanup system; reduced wear and corrosion on components; and increased seed recovery resulting from reduced exposure of seed to mineral matter or slag. Efficiencies in some specific GMS power plants are shown to be higher than for a comparably sized coal-burning MHD power plant. The use of energy from the MHD exhaust gas to gasify coal (rather than the typical approach of burning part of the coal) results in these higher efficiencies.

Lytle, J.M.; Marchant, D.D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Making IGCC slag valuable  

SciTech Connect

All indications are that integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology will play a major role in tomorrow's generation industry. But before it does, some by-products of the process must be dealt with, for example unburned carbon that can make IGCC slag worthless. Charah Inc.'s processing system, used at Tampa Electric's Polk Station for years, segregates the slag's constituents by size, producing fuel and building materials. 3 figs.

Wicker, K.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Gasification Users Association Newsletter: June 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasification Users Group (GUA) Update is published quarterly and provides information on gasification projects in development and in construction, along with a summary of new integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)/ gasification technology developments. The following articles are featured in this issue of the GUA Update: Quarterly Summary Ongoing U.S. Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects News Items on Operating IGCC Plants U.S. IGCC Project Updates Inte...

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

116

IGCC vision  

SciTech Connect

In an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), fuel gas, which is composed of hydrogen and carbon oxides, is generated in a gasifier by coal reacting with steam and air or oxygen. The pressurized fuel gas is then cleaned and fed to a high-efficiency combustion gas turbine to generate power. The hot exhaust gas from the gas turbine produces steam to drive a steam turbine to make additional power. Integration of the inherent advantages of coal gasification and combined cycles results in an ultra high-efficiency, super-clean, low-cost power plant. IGCC plants being demonstrated can achieve efficiencies of 42% (HHV) and with continuous improvements over the next 15 to 20 years, 52% efficiency is achievable. When compared to existing coal plants with flue gas desulfurization, which have efficiencies of about 34%, IGCC reduces by 35% the CO{sub 2} emission because less coal is required to generate an equivalent power. Commercialization of IGCC will result in low-cost power from coal without environmental compromise. These features are crucial to US competitiveness in the world.marketplace. Preservation and creation of jobs will depend on a strong mining and manufacturing sector enhanced by export markets for coal and power generation equipment.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate- Ammonium Bicarbonate Process Description Current commercial processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from conventional power plants are expensive and energy intensive. The objective of this project is to reduce the cost associated with the capture of CO 2 from coal based gasification processes, which convert coal and other carbon based feedstocks to synthesis gas.

118

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

119

Simulation and optimization of hot syngas separation processes in integrated gasification combined cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IGCC with CO2 capture offers an exciting approach for cleanly using abundant coal reserves of the world to generate electricity. The present state-of-the-art synthesis gas (syngas) cleanup technologies in IGCC involve ...

Prakash, Kshitij

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2: CO2 Capture: Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs CO2: CO2 Capture: Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs Specific Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs from CO2 Capture In foregoing discussion, results of NETL's comprehensive study comparing the performance and cost of various fossil fuel-based power generation technologies with and without CO2 capture were reviewed. Of particular interest in that study was the companion set of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) designs, using GE's gasification technology, which can be used to illustrate the design changes needed for CO2 capture. Current Technology - IGCC Plant Design Figure 1 shows a simplified block flow diagram (BFD) of a market-ready IGCC design without CO2 capture. As shown, the IGCC plant consists of the following processing islands, of which a more detailed description of each can be found in the cited NETL referenced report: 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

IGCC system studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems studies are performed on both the currently available, but not fully demonstrated, integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technologies and the future technologies. The objective of these studies is to support and guide the Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s METC Strategic Product Planning efforts. Through these efforts, the research, development and demonstration needs of various alternative gasification and power island components can be quantified and factored into the overall planning processes.

Rath, L.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Worldwide activity in IGCC  

SciTech Connect

EPRI has pursued the development of integrated gasification-combined-cycle technology because it is the cleanest method available for making electricity from coal. Now, a decade after the establishment of the first IGCC demonstration plant, environmental regulations are encouraging the adoption of this technology in a number of countries. An unexpected innovation is the use of residual oil as an IGCC feedstock, a practice that evolved naturally as a result of market forces. Experts are hopeful that the current momentum in IGCC will trigger the introduction of the technology in developing countries, many of which rely heavily on coal and oil for power generation. Environmental regulations and a market glut of low-grade fossil fuels are spurring an unprecedented number of integrated gasification combined-cycle projects worldwide. These projects are described.

Lamarre, L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Coal Gasification for Power Generation, 3. edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered include: an overview of Coal Generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; a description of gasification technology including processes and systems; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; a discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; an evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; a discussion of IGCC project development options; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and, a detailed description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update Newsletter: March 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasification Users Group (GUA) Update is published quarterly and provides information on gasification projects in development and in construction, along with a summary of new integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)/ gasification technology developments. The following articles are featured in this issue of the GUA Update: Quarterly Summary Ongoing U.S. Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects News Items on Operating IGCC Plants U.S. IGCC Project Updates Inte...

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Could IGCC swing  

SciTech Connect

A few big-name utilities are looking to make big-time power from gasified coal. AEP has utility-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants in the works for Ohio and West Virginia. Duke Energy Indiana plans to build a 630 MW IGCC plant at Edwardsport to replace the existing 160 MW coal-fired unit there. NRG hopes to build utility-scale IGCC plants in New York and Delaware. Tampa Electric has announced plans to build a 630 MW IGCC at its Polk site, already the location of a 260 MW IGCC. In Taylorville, IL, another power-oriented IGCC is under development, owned by individuals from original developer ERORA and Omaha-based Tenaska. And yet another power producing IGCC is being proposed by Tondu Corporation at Corpus Christi, Texas to be fired by petroleum coke, also known as petcoke. The article gives an overview of these developments and moves on to discuss the popular question of the economic viability of IGCC making marketable byproducts in addition to power. Several projects are under way to make synthetic natural gas for coal. These are reported. Although the versatility of gasification may well give the ability to swing from various levels of power production to various levels of co-producing one or more products, for the time being it appears the IGCCs being built will produce power only, along with elemental sulphur and slag.

Blankinship, S.

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Gasification Technology Status - December 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) projects that incorporate various degrees of CO2 Capture and Sequestration (CCS) are under development worldwide. This report covers current IGCC designs on offer that include CO2 capture and reviews the commercial status of gasification technologies, potential improvements, and lessons learned from commercial operating experience at IGCC plants. It describes and evaluates the considerable R&D program of the U.S. DOE and industrial companies to improv...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A-1 A-1 APPENDIX A CONSULTATION LETTERS This appendix includes consultation/approval letters between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regarding threatened and endangered species, and between other state and Federal agencies as needed. Consultation Letters A-2 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement A-3 Consultation Letters A-4 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement A-5 Consultation Letters A-6 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement A-7 Consultation Letters A-8 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement B-1 APPENDIX B NOTICE OF INTENT TO PREPARE AN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE

128

Simulation and optimization of hot syngas separation processes in integrated gasification combined cycle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??IGCC with CO2 capture offers an exciting approach for cleanly using abundant coal reserves of the world to generate electricity. The present state-of-the-art synthesis gas (more)

Prakash, Kshitij

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Impact of coal quality and gasifier technology on IGCC performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Impact of coal quality and gasifier technology on IGCC performance Ola Maurstad1 *, Howard Herzog 02139, USA Abstract Integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants withpre different coals were used and alternatives with and without CO2 capture calculated. It was found

130

CoalFleet Advanced Combustion IGCC Permits Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CoalFleet Advanced Combustion IGCC Permits Database presents comprehensive information on permitting requirements and permit conditions for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants in an online database format. This Technical Update is a compilation of the Database contents as of March 31, 2008.

2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

131

Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Capture Retrofit Options: Duke Edwardsport Integrated-Gasification Combined-Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a project supported by Duke Energy using tailored collaboration funds to study the potential impact to plant performance of retrofitted carbon dioxide (CO2) capture on the Duke Edwardsport integrated-gasificationcombined-cycle (IGCC) plant. The Duke Edwardsport IGCC plant is under construction and scheduled to begin operation in September 2012. Details on the project have been published in a 2010 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report, Duke Edwardsport Gener...

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update, September 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasification UsersAssociation (GUA) Update is published quarterly and provides information on gasification projects in development and in construction, along with a summary of new integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)/ gasification technology developments. The following articles are featured in this issue of the GUA Update:Quarterly SummaryOngoing U.S. Energy Program UpdatesNews Items on Operating IGCC PlantsU.S. ...

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

NETL: Gasification Systems - High Temperature Syngas Cleanup...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

construct the project and sequester the CO2. The Polk Power Station, an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, will supply a portion of its coal-derived syngas...

134

Cost of New Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Coal Electricity Generation...................... 17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Future demand for electricity can be met with a range of technologies, with fuels including coal, nuclear, natural gas, biomass and other renewables, as well as with energy efficiency and demand management approaches. Choices among options will depend on factors including capital cost, fuel cost, market and regulatory uncertainty, greenhouse gas emissions, and other environmental impacts. This paper estimates the costs of new electricity generation. The approach taken here is to provide a transparent and verifiable analysis based mainly on recent data provided

Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas; Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

CoalFleet Integrated-Gasification-Combined-Cycle (IGCC) Permitting Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRIs CoalFleet for Tomorrow Program was formed to accelerate the deployment and commercialization of clean, efficient, advanced coal-fired power systems. During the planning and construction of these power systems, facility owners must obtain permits for plant construction and operation, discharge of pollutants to air and water, land and water use, and other areas of regulatory control. Such permits must be negotiated with regulators who are often not familiar with advanced coal technologies. These Coal...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

136

IGCC offers diversity for competitive generation  

SciTech Connect

Over the last couple of years, integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants have begun penetrating competitive markets, Japan and Taiwan are applying IGCC technology in their first round of independent power producer bidding. The versatility of this technology is adding to its cachet, as it finds its niche in a variety of market segments and applications. In the US, the hottest niche for IGCC is seen in repowering of existing facilities. Increased use in the coal-powered portion of the market is projected in the next decade, as gas turbine technology advances are expected to drive the spread of IGCC beyond industrial applications.

Chambers, A.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle System Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1990 Table 1. Characteristics of the Coal Assumed for IGCC System Studies Proximate Analysis Wt-%, run-of-mine for the conversion of a variety of feedstocks, including coal, heavy residue oil, biomass, solid waste, and others is presented to illustrate the typical performance, emissions, and cost of a coal- based system

Frey, H. Christopher

138

Design Options for Enhancing IGCC Flexible Operations Performance and Economics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the cycling experience of integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) plants and the characteristics of IGCC and its component technologies that can make it particularly responsive to renewables-driven, flexible operation and cycling requirements. It also identifies a number of design options for optimizing IGCC cycling performance and economics for such requirements.BackgroundIntermittent renewable sources, such as wind and solar ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Excelsior Energy Mesaba IGCC Project Preliminary Design Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology now entering commercial service, the industry needs specifications that encourage greater standardization in IGCC design. Standardization lowers initial capital cost; supports repeatable, reliable performance; and reduces the time and cost to develop decision-quality economics for potential IGCC plant owners. This CoalFleet Preliminary Design Specification (PDS) defines technical information provided in the permit application submitted by Exce...

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

140

The suitability of coal gasification in India's energy sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), an advanced coal-based power generation technology, may be an important technology to help India meet its future power needs. It has the potential to provide higher generating ...

Simpson, Lori Allison

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biomass Integrated Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power Systems Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power Systems Project Summary Full Title: Cost and Performance Analysis of Biomass-Based Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (BIGCC) Power Systems Project ID: 106 Principal Investigator: Margaret Mann Brief Description: This project examines the cost and performance potential of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems--high-pressure air blown, low-pressure air blown, and low-pressure indirectly heated. Purpose Examine the cost and performance potential of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems - a high pressure air-blown, a low pressure indirectly heated, and a low pressure air-blown. Performer Principal Investigator: Margaret Mann

142

Coal gasification players, projects, prospects  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been running refineries and chemical plants for decades. Power applications have dotted the globe. Two major IGCC demonstration plants operating in the United States since the mid-1900s have helped set the stage for prime time, which is now approaching. Two major reference plant designs are in the wings and at least two major US utilities are poised to build their own IGCC power plants. 2 figs.

Blankinship, S.

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

EIS-0429: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Indiana Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Rockport, IN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a coal-to-substitute natural gas facility proposed to be built in Rockport, IN by Indiana Gasification. The facility would utilize Illinois Basin coal. Other products would be marketable sulfuric acid, argon, and electric power.

144

EIS-0428: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Mississippi Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Moss Point, Mississippi  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a petroleum coke-to-substitute natural gas facility proposed to be built by Mississippi Gasification. The facility would be designed to produce 120 million standard cubic feet of gas per day. Other products would be marketable sulfuric acid, carbon dioxide, argon, and electric power.

145

Toms Creek integrated gasification combined cycle demonstration project. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The use of an upgraded version of General Electric`s Frame 6 gas turbine, which has been designated as Frame 6 (FA) will make a significant improvement to the thermal efficiency and overall economics of the Toms Creek Project. Replacing the smaller, less efficient Frame 6 (B) gas turbine with the new Frame 6 (FA) will increase the net power production from a nominal 55 MW to 105 MW. The coal feed rate will correspondingly increase from 430 tpd to 740 tpd. All process flows and equipment sizes will be increased accordingly. Selected process parameters for the original and revised Toms Creek IGCC plant configurations are compared in Table 2. There is an approximately 10% increase in net plant efficiency for the revised configuration. Using this increased plant size, the pressure vessels become larger due to an increased through-put, but are still dimensioned for shop fabrication and over-the-road shipment. The preliminary cost estimate for the enlarged demonstration plant was prepared by factoring the estimates for the original plant. Revised quotes for the larger equipment will be solicited and used to generate more accurate cost information for the revised plant.

Feher, G.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Wabash River Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project: Clean Coal Technology Program. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed project would result in a combined-cycle power plant with lower emissions and higher efficiency than most existing coal-fired power plants of comparable size. The net plant heat rate (energy content of the fuel input per useable electrical generation output; i.e., Btu/kilowatt hour) for the new repowered unit would be a 21% improvement over the existing unit, while reducing SO{sub 2} emissions by greater than 90% and limiting NO{sub x} emissions by greater than 85% over that produced by conventional coal-fired boilers. The technology, which relies on gasified coal, is capable of producing as much as 25% more electricity from a given amount of coal than today`s conventional coal-burning methods. Besides having the positive environmental benefit of producing less pollutants per unit of power generated, the higher overall efficiency of the proposed CGCC project encourages greater utilization to meet base load requirements in order to realize the associated economic benefits. This greater utilization (i.e., increased capacity factor) of a cleaner operating plant has global environmental benefits in that it is likely that such power would replace power currently being produced by less efficient plants emitting a greater volume of pollutants per unit of power generated.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Plant-Wide Performance and Cost Analysis of ITM-Based IGCC Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in conjunction with Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (AP), and WorleyParsons, Inc. (WP), has reviewed and modeled integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. IGCC is a method of burning coal in which the coal is gasified, creating a synthetic gas, or syngas. After being cleanedincluding potentially of carbon dioxide (CO2)this syngas can be used in a traditional combined cycle to produce power. This ...

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

148

Improved sulfur removal processes evaluated for IGCC  

SciTech Connect

An inherent advantage of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generation is the ability to easily remove and recover sulfur. During the last several years, a number of new, improved sulfur removal and recovery processes have been commercialized. An assessment is given of alternative sulfur removal processes for IGCC based on the Texaco coal gasifier. The Selexol acid gas removal system, Claus sulfur recovery, and SCOT tail gas treating are currently used in Texaco-based IGCC. Other processes considered are: Purisol, Sulfinol-M, Selefning, 50% MDEA, Sulften, and LO-CAT. 2 tables.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Methodology for technology evaluation under uncertainty and its application in advanced coal gasification processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has attracted interest as a cleaner alternative to conventional coal-fired power generation processes. While a number of pilot projects have been launched to ...

Gong, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

IGCC update: are we there yet?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If a number of technical, financial and regulatory hurdles can be overcome, power generated by integrated gasification combined-cycle technology could become an important source for US utilities. Our overview presents diverse perspectives from three industry experts about what it will take to move this technology off the design table and into the field. Well-known advantages are IGCC uses less water, creates a usable slag by-product and the technology required for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture has already been used successfully on coal gasification technology. These points, together with roadblocks to the deployment of IGCC technology in the USA, are discussed. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Neville, A.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Orlando Gasification Project Generic Design Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology is now entering commercial service, so there is a need to develop specifications that encourage greater standardization in IGCC design. This Generic Design Specification (GDS), sponsored by EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program with support from 50 power companies, provides technical information from Front End Engineering Design (FEED) results submitted by Southern Company Services to DOE regarding their Orlando Gasification Project (OGP), a 270 MW...

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

152

Development of High-Pressure Dry Feed Pump for Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Dry Feed Pressure Dry Feed Pump for Gasification Systems Background Even though coal-based power generation via Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is more efficient, cleaner, and uses less water than conventional pulverized coal burning systems, widespread IGCC deployment has not occurred because of its relatively high cost. The Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) high-pressure dry feed pump addresses IGCC cost disparity by enabling lower cost and more reliable coal feed

153

IGCC Design and RAM Analysis for Near Zero Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concern over the continued availability of natural gas at competitive prices has led many power companies to initiate studies and projects on clean coal technologies as a strategic hedge against over-reliance on natural gas alone to provide future power needs. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants can meet very stringent emissions targets including those for mercury and carbon dioxide. Several years of commercial operation have been accumulated on coal-based IGCC plants in the United State...

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

154

Gasification Users Association Update, June 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasification Users Group (GUA) Update is published quarterly and provides information on gasification projects in development and in construction, along with a summary of new integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)/ gasification technology developments. The following articles are featured in this issue of the GUA Update:Quarterly SummaryOngoing U.S. Energy Program UpdatesEuropean Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Gasification Users Association Newsletter: September 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasification Users Group (GUA) Update is published quarterly and provides information on gasification projects in development and in construction, along with a summary of new integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)/ gasification technology developments. The following articles are featured in this issue of the GUA Update:Quarterly SummaryOngoing U.S. Energy Program UpdatesEuropean Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS ...

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

156

Utilities split on readiness of IGCC  

SciTech Connect

For some generating companies, the dearth of operating experience for integrated gasification combined-cycle plants adds too much uncertainty to the risk/reward equation for new-capacity technology options. For others, the possibility of being able to comply with air pollution limits as far out as 2018, as well as to meet all-but-certain CO{sub 2} caps, makes IGCC well worth investing in now. The article compares the highest-level technical and economic characteristics of IGCC with those of pulverised coal combustion and other generating technologies. It then discusses the availability histories of six successful IGCC demonstration plants, presenting that for the Wabash River plant in some detail. The issue of financing IGCC is addressed. An insert on page 58 summarises a paper by Dave Stopek of Sangent and Lundy presented at Electric Power 2006. This discussed IGCC plant cost and factors to consider in selecting a technology supplier. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Javetski, J.

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed therein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

Pulverized Coal

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Conceptual Design of a Fossil Hydrogen Infrastructure with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Case Study in Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant couldintegrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants and the

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Optimal Design of a Fossil Fuel-Based Hydrogen Infrastructure with Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Case Study in Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant couldintegrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants and the

Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ni, Jason; Johnson, Joshua; Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Gasification Technology Status September 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concern over the continued availability of natural gas at competitive prices has led many power companies to initiate studies and projects on clean coal technologies as a strategic hedge against over-reliance on natural gas alone to provide future power needs. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants can meet very stringent emissions targets, including those for mercury and carbon dioxide (CO2). Several years of commercial operation have been accumulated on coal based IGCC plants in the Unite...

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

New low cost IGCC designs for competitive power generation  

SciTech Connect

Design studies of coal based 450 MW new IGCC power plants reveal their ability to compete in today's power generation market. Single train unit designs coupled with significant improvements in IGCC net output and efficiency have brought down the installed costs to the range of 850--1,000 $/kW and net thermal efficiency up to 43--47%. These improvements are shown to result from IGCC design configurations integrating new generation gas turbine combined cycles with High Pressure Texaco Gasification Technology and Elevated Pressure Air Separation Units.

Brdar, D.R.; Depuy, R.A.; Gulko, G.; Jandrisevits, M.; Paolino, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Design optimization of IGCC power plants  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants have the potential for providing performance and cost improvements over conventional coal-fired steam power plants with flue-gas desulfurization. The major design options for IGCC power plants include the following: oxygen-blown versus air-blown gasification processes; entrained-flow, fluidized-bed, or fixed-bed gasifier; coal-slurry feed versus coal-dry feed; hot versus cold fuel-gas cleanup; gas turbine alternatives; and, design alternatives for the Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG). This paper summarizes some results from these studies. The advanced thermoelectric techniques used at Tennessee Technological University (TTU) are very powerful tools for evaluating and optimizing IGCC power plants.

Tsatsaronis, G.; Lin, L.; Pisa, J.; Tawfik, T. (Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Market potential of IGCC for domestic power production  

SciTech Connect

Mitretek Systems and CONSOL Inc. have completed the first phase of a market potential study for Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) domestic power production. The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded this study. The objective of this study is to provide DOE with data to estimate the future domestic market potential of IGCC for electricity generation. Major drivers in this study are the state of technology development, feedstock costs, environmental control costs, demand growth, and dispatchability. This study examines IGCC potential for baseload power production in the Northeast U. S., an important market area by virtue of existing coal infrastructure and proximity to coal producing regions. IGCC market potential was examined for two levels of technology development as a function of natural gas price and carbon tax. This paper discusses the results of this study, including the levels of performance and cost necessary to insure competitiveness with natural gas combined cycle plants.

Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.; Hawk, E.; Maskew, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

IGCC Dynamic Simulator and Training Center  

SciTech Connect

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is emerging as the technology of choice for providing clean, low-cost electricity for the next generation of coal-fired power plants and will play a central role in the development of high-efficiency, zero-emissions power plants such as FutureGen. Several major utilities and developers recently announced plans to build IGCC plants and other major utilities are evaluating IGCCs suitability for base-load capacity additions. This recent surge of attention to IGCC power generation is creating a growing demand for experience with the analysis, operation, and control of commercial-scale IGCC plants. To meet this need, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has launched a project to develop a generic, full-scope, IGCC dynamic plant simulator for use in establishing a state-of-the-art simulator training center at West Virginia Universitys (WVU) National Research Center for Coal and Energy (NRCCE). The IGCC Dynamic Simulator & Training (DS&T) Center will be established under the auspices of the Collaboratory for Process & Dynamic Systems Modeling (Collaboratory) organized between NETL, WVU, the University of Pittsburgh, and Carnegie Mellon University.

Zitney, S.E.; Erbes, M.R. (Enginomix, LLC)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Engineering and Economic Evaluations of Integrated-Gasification Combined-Cycle Plant Designs with Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this research were to assess the performance and costs of coal-fired integrated-gasificationcombined-cycle (IGCC) power plants. The base cases are Greenfield designs without carbon dioxide (CO2) capture; two additional cases were studied with retrofitted full CO2 capture. The study represents Phase 3 of a multiyear study executed on behalf of the CoalFleet for Tomorrow program, a collaborative research and development program that promotes the deployment of advanced coal technologies, i...

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

166

Phased Construction of IGCC Plants for CO2 Capture - Effect of Pre-Investment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, conceptual plant designs for integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) have taken two approaches regarding the capture of CO2. Baseline plants have placed emphasis on producing power with a minimum cost and maximum efficiency without CO2 capture. The primary rationale for designing these plants without CO2 capture is that there have yet to be regulations promulgated that require the capture and sequestration of CO2. Conversely, grass roots IGCC designs with provisions for CO2 capture and c...

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Comparison of Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne IGCC and commercial IGCC performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compares the performance and cost of commercial Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants using General Electric Energy (GEE) and Shell gasifiers with conceptual IGCC plant designs using the Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) compact gasifier. the PWR gasifier is also compared with the GEEE gasifier in hydrogen production and carbon capture mode. With the exception of the PWR gasifier, the plants are designed with commercially available equipment to be operational in approximately 2010. All results should be considered preliminary and dictated in large part by the selected design basis. 10 refs., 54 exhibits

Jeffrey Hoffmann; Jenny Tennant; Gary J. Stiegel [Office of Systems Analysis and Planning (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Development of a dynamic simulator for a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with post-combustion carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AVESTAR Center located at the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory and West Virginia University is a world-class research and training environment dedicated to using dynamic process simulation as a tool for advancing the safe, efficient and reliable operation of clean energy plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The AVESTAR Center was launched with a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion carbon capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator offers full-scope Operator Training Simulator (OTS) Human Machine Interface (HMI) graphics for realistic, real-time control room operation and is integrated with a 3D virtual Immersive Training Simulator (ITS), thus allowing joint control room and field operator training. The IGCC OTS/ITS solution combines a gasification with CO{sub 2} capture process simulator with a combined cycle power simulator into a single high-performance dynamic simulation framework. This presentation will describe progress on the development of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) dynamic simulator based on the syngas-fired combined cycle portion of AVESTARs IGCC dynamic simulator. The 574 MW gross NGCC power plant design consisting of two advanced F-class gas turbines, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and a steam turbine in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration will be reviewed. Plans for integrating a post-combustion carbon capture system will also be discussed.

Liese, E.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Gasification Technology Status--December 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past four years, several major power companies have been conducting detailed design studies of commercial-sized coal based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pulverized Coal (PC) plants. Concern over the continued availability of natural gas at competitive prices has led many power companies to seriously consider clean coal technologies as a strategic hedge against over reliance on natural gas alone to provide future power needs. This report covers the IGCC designs currently offer...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage in Coal to Electrical Applications Usage in Coal to Electrical Applications The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) application of gasification offers some water-saving advantages over other technologies for producing electricity from coal. Regions with limited water resources, typical of many parts of the western United States, could conserve resources by meeting increasing electricity demand with IGCC generation. Many of these areas have good coal resources and a need for new generating capacity. Water use in a thermoelectric power plant is described by two separate terms: water withdrawal and water consumption. Water withdrawal is the amount of water taken into the plant from an outside source. Water consumption refers to the portion of the withdrawn water that is not returned directly to the outside source - for example, water lost to evaporative cooling.

171

Coal gasification for power generation. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect

The report gives an overview of the opportunities for coal gasification in the power generation industry. It provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered in the report include: An overview of coal generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; A description of gasification technology including processes and systems; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; A discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; An evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; A discussion of IGCC project development options; A discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; Profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and A description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Amid all the IGCC talk, PC remains the go-to-guy  

SciTech Connect

Globally, more than 100 sites have integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) installations, including more than a dozen locations that produce power. IGCC 'buzz' has now reached a crescendo, as evidenced by attendance of over 700 at the recent Gasification Technologies conference. However, coal plants currently being developed in the United States are mostly subcritical or supercritical pulverized coal plants, with a handful of CFBs. The article describes some recent developments in IGCC and goes on to address the debate between IGCC and PC. IGCC has the inherent ability to capture CO{sub 2} before combustion, but PC may well be able to capture just as well CO{sub 2} post combustion. More work is needed on a sequestering carbon in the ground, according to Nancy Mohn and others whose opinions are reported. 1 photo.

Blankinship, S.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

INTEGRATED PYROLYSIS COMBINED CYCLE BIOMASS POWER SYSTEM CONCEPT DEFINITION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced power systems based on integrated gasification/combined cycles (IGCC) are often presented as a solution to the present shortcomings of biomass as fuel. Although IGCC has been technically demonstrated at full scale, it has not been adopted for commercial power generation. Part of the reason for this situation is the continuing low price for coal. However, another significant barrier to IGCC is the high level of integration of this technology: the gas output from the gasifier must be perfectly matched to the energy demand of the gas turbine cycle. We are developing an alternative to IGCC for biomass power: the integrated (fast) pyrolysis/ combined cycle (IPCC). In this system solid biomass is converted into liquid rather than gaseous fuel. This liquid fuel, called bio-oil, is a mixture of oxygenated organic compounds and water that serves as fuel for a gas turbine topping cycle. Waste heat from the gas turbine provides thermal energy to the steam turbine bottoming cycle. Advantages of the biomass-fueled IPCC system include: combined cycle efficiency exceeding 37 percent efficiency for a system as small as 7.6 MW{sub e}; absence of high pressure thermal reactors; decoupling of fuel processing and power generation; and opportunities for recovering value-added products from the bio-oil. This report provides a technical overview of the system including pyrolyzer design, fuel clean-up strategies, pyrolysate condenser design, opportunities for recovering pyrolysis byproducts, gas turbine cycle design, and Rankine steam cycle. The report also reviews the potential biomass fuel supply in Iowa, provide and economic analysis, and present a summery of benefits from the proposed system.

Eric Sandvig; Gary Walling; Robert C. Brown; Ryan Pletka; Desmond Radlein; Warren Johnson

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Getting IGCC a seat at the table  

SciTech Connect

A dominant theme at the Gasification Technologies Conference in Washington, DC in early October was how all parties need to step up to assure integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology finds a place at the power generation table. That included a call for utilities and their ratepayers to be willing to accept more risk than they are accustomed to assuming. John Hofmeister, president and CEO of Shell Oil Company chided lawmakers and regulators for hindering progress by not adopting uniform regulations for carbon dioxide emissions. Among Shell's IGCC projects is Australia's equivalent of the United States' FutureGen Project - a 275 MW power production facility in Queensland that is expected to achieve 99.8% CO{sub 2} capture with sequestration and produce hydrogen. Randy Zwirn, president nd CEO of Siemens Power Generation, said OEMs must develop a philosophy for IGCC that he terms RAM - reliability, availability and maintainability. Texas Railroad Commissioner, Mike Williams described how his state has welcomed IGCC plants that can capture carbon and has established the groundwork for using or sequestrating it. Presentations reviewed in this article include status updates of more than a dozen IGCC projects underway. 1 photo.

Blankinship, S.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

The role of IGCC in USDOE clean coal research, development and demonstration  

SciTech Connect

For many years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been funding research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to develop advanced power generation technologies. The goal of this RD&D is private sector commercialization of technologies that will provide reasonably priced electricity and still meet stringent environmental standards. Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) systems are emerging as one of the more attractive candidate technologies to meet this goal. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has been assigned the responsibility for implementing IGCC projects in DOE`s Clean Coal RD&D program. Projects related to IGCC are briefly described.

Schmidt, D.K.; Rath, L.K.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Evaluation of Alternative IGCC Plant Designs for High Availability and Near Zero Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the historical reliability and availability data of solids-fed integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants and describes how these data can be used to analyze design options meant to improve the availability of new IGCCs. It also looks at the technical and economic impacts of adding a Selective Catalytical Reduction (SCR) system to an IGCC. Adding an SCR will result in a coal-based power plant with an emissions profile that is very close to a natural gas fired combined...

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

Numerical modeling of injection and mineral trapping of CO2 with H2S and SO2 in a Sandstone Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology: IGCC.advanced integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants, in

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten; Yamamoto, Hajime

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Filter systems for IGCC applications  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program were to identify metallic filter medium to be utilized in the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle process (IGCC). In IGCC processes utilizing high efficiency desulfurizing technology, the traditional corrosion attack, sulfidation, is minimized so that metallic filters are viable alternatives over ceramic filters. Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station is being developed to demonstrate Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology. The Pall Gas Solid Separation (GSS) System is a self cleaning filtration system designed to remove virtually all particulate matter from gas streams. The heart of the system is the filter medium used to collect the particles on the filter surface. The medium`s filtration efficiency, uniformity, permeability, voids volume, and surface characteristics are all important to establishing a permeable permanent cake. In-house laboratory blowback tests, using representative full scale system particulate, were used to confirm the medium selection for this project. Test elements constructed from six alloys were supplied for exposure tests: PSS 310SC (modified 310S alloy); PSS 310SC heat treated; PSS 310SC-high Cr; PSS 310SC-high Cr heat treated; PSS Hastelloy X; and PSS Hastelloy X heat treated.

Bevan, S.; Gieger, R.; Sobel, N.; Johnson, D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle ( IGCC)coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)will be integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) (Same

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrated gasification combined cycle ( IGCC) power plantsintegrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants,be integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) (Same power

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

SCHUMACHER HOT GAS FILTER LONG-TERM OPERATING EXPERIENCE in the NUON POWER BUGGENUM IGCC POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Coal is a main source of primary energy for power generation and it will remain indispensable in the future. In order to increase the efficiency and to meet environmental challenges new advanced coal-fired power systems were developed starting in the beginning of the 1990s. One of these efficient and clean technologies is the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process.

Scheibner, B.; Wolters, C.

2002-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

182

Advanced IGCC power systems for the United States  

SciTech Connect

Integrated coal gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems offer the potential of superior efficiency and environmental performance over power plants using pulverized coal-fired boilers with scrubbers to generate electricity in the United States. The Cool Water plant is demonstrating the feasibility of an IGCC system using an entrained-bed gasifier and ''cold'' gas cleanup technology. Technology is now being developed to simplify the IGCC system, increase its efficiency and reduce its capital costs. Hot gas sulfur and particulate cleanup is the most promising technology option for the gas supply block. Improved performance is also available from the power island by use of high-efficiency aircraft derivative turbines. Progress in these technologies and the exceptional match of these IGCC systems to the projected needs of the utility industry is presented.

Wieber, P.R.; Halow, J.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Dynamic simulation for IGCC process and control design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed dynamic simulation analysis is a valuable tool that increases the understanding of unit interactions and control system performance in a complex integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) plant. The Sarlux integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant must simultaneously satisfy electrical power and refinery hydrogen and steam demands (trigeneration gasification). The plant`s gasifier, heat recovery, sulfur removal, hydrogen recovery and steam power generation units are highly integrated and require coordinated control. In this study, dynamic simulation provides insights into the behavior of the process and combined cycle units during normal and upset conditions. The dynamic simulation is used to design a control system that drives the gasifiers to satisfy power, steam and hydrogen demands before a load change or upset is detected by the syngas pressure controller. At the study conclusion, the model will demonstrate how the IGCC plant will respond to the contractual maximum load change rate and process upsets. The study tests the basic process and control system design during the project engineering phase to minimize startup troubleshooting and expensive field changes.

Depew, C.; Martinez, A. [Fluor Daniel, Irvine, CA (United States); Collodi, G.; Meloni, R. [Snamprogetti, Milan (Italy)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Dynamic Simulation and Training for IGCC Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is emerging as the technology of choice for providing clean, low-cost electricity for the next generation of coal-fired power plants and will play a central role in the development of high-efficiency, zero-emissions power plants such as FutureGen. Several major utilities and developers recently announced plans to build IGCC plants and other major utilities are evaluating IGCCs suitability for base-load capacity additions. This recent surge of attention to IGCC power generation is creating a growing demand for experience with the analysis, operation, and control of commercial-scale IGCC plants. To meet this need, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has launched a project to develop a generic, full-scope, IGCC dynamic plant simulator for use in establishing a state-of-the-art simulator training center at West Virginia Universitys (WVU) National Research Center for Coal and Energy (NRCCE). The IGCC Dynamic Simulator & Training (DS&T) Center will be established under the auspices of the Collaboratory for Process & Dynamic Systems Modeling (Collaboratory) organized between NETL, WVU, the University of Pittsburgh, and Carnegie Mellon University.

Erbes, M.R. (Enginomix, LLC); Zitney, S.E

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

UPDATE ON GASIFICATION TESTING AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama was established in 1995 to lead the United States ' effort to develop cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable, coal-based power plant technologies. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key components of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power

Senior Engineer; Pannalal Vimalchand; Roxann Leonard; Robert C. Lambrecht

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

New technology trends for improved IGCC system performance  

SciTech Connect

The application of gas turbine technology to IGCC systems requires careful consideration of the degree and type of integration used during the system design phase. Although gas turbines provide the primary output and efficiency gains for IGCC systems, as compared with conventional coal-fired power generation systems, they are commercially available only in specific size ranges. Therefore, it is up to the IGCC system designer to optimize the IGCC power plant within the required output, efficiency, and site conditions by selecting the system configuration carefully, particularly for air separation unit (ASU) integration incorporated with oxygen blown gasification systems. An IGCC system, based on a generic, entrained flow, oxygen blown gasification system and a GE STAG 109FA combined cycle has been evaluated with varying degrees of ASU integration, two fuel equivalent heating values and two gas turbine firing temperatures to provide net plant output and efficiency results. The data presented illustrate the system flexibility afforded by variation of ASU integration and the potential performance gains available through the continued use of gas turbine advances. Emphasis is placed on system design choices that favor either low initial investment cost or low operating cost for a given IGCC system output.

Anand, A.K.; Cook, C.S.; Corman, J.C. [GE Power Generation, Schenectady, NY (United States); Smith, A.R. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Microsoft Word - 41889_GE_IGCC System Study_Factsheet_Rev01_07-20-04.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact Sheet: Fact Sheet: "System Study For Improved Gas Turbine Performance For Coal IGCC Application" DOE Contract No: DE-FC26-03NT41889 I Project Description: A. Objective: This study will identify improvements in gas turbine performance for coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) application. The study will identify vital gas turbine parameters and quantify their influence in meeting the DOE Turbine Program overall IGCC plant goals of 50% net HHV efficiency, $1000/kW capital cost, and low emissions. Focus will be on air-cooled gas turbines for near-term operation in coal fed oxygen blown IGCC power plants with commercially demonstrated gasification, gas cleaning, & air separation technologies. A roadmap towards achieving DOE's goals for

188

Commercial gasifier for IGCC applications study report  

SciTech Connect

This was a scoping-level study to identify and characterize the design features of fixed-bed gasifiers appearing most important for a gasifier that was to be (1) potentially commercially attractive, and (2) specifically intended for us in integrated coal gasification/combined-cycle (IGCC) applications. It also performed comparative analyses on the impact or value of these design features and on performance characteristics options of the whole IGCC system since cost, efficiency, environmental traits, and operability -- on a system basis -- are what is really important. The study also reviewed and evaluated existing gasifier designs, produced a conceptual-level gasifier design, and generated a moderately advanced system configuration that was utilized as the reference framework for the comparative analyses. In addition, technical issues and knowledge gaps were defined. 70 figs., 31 tabs.

Notestein, J.E.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology: IGCC.integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants (output. Integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants are

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Filter system cost comparison for IGCC and PFBC power systems  

SciTech Connect

A cost comparison was conducted between the filter systems for two advanced coal-based power plants. The results from this study are presented. The filter system is based on a Westinghouse advanced particulate filter concept, which is designed to operate with ceramic candle filters. The Foster Wheeler second-generation 453 MWe (net) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) and the KRW 458 MWe (net) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are used for the comparison. The comparison presents the general differences of the two power plants and the process-related filtration conditions for PFBC and IGCC systems. The results present the conceptual designs for the PFBC and IGCC filter systems as well as a cost summary comparison. The cost summary comparison includes the total plant cost, the fixed operating and maintenance cost, the variable operating and maintenance cost, and the effect on the cost of electricity (COE) for the two filter systems.

Dennis, R.A.; McDaniel, H.M.; Buchanan, T. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Life Cycle Results from the IGCC LCI&C Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results from the IGCC LCI&C Study Results from the IGCC LCI&C Study Robert E. James III, Timothy J. Skone Office of Systems, Analyses and Planning National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), U.S. DOE Revision 2, June 2013 DOE/NETL-2012/1551 ‹#› Conceptual Study Boundary Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) ‹#› LCA's Expanded Boundary for IGCC Mine Construction Train & Rail Manufacturing Plant Construction/ Installation Coal Extraction/ Operation Train Operation Mine Decommissioning Stage #1 Raw Material Acquisition Stage #2 Raw Material Transport Plant Operation Carbon Capture (CC), Operation CO 2 Pipeline, Operation CO 2 Sequestration, Operation Plant Decommissioning Construction & Installation Deinstallation Transmission & Distribution, Operation

192

Secretary Chu Announces $14 Million for Six New Projects to Advance IGCC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Million for Six New Projects to Advance 4 Million for Six New Projects to Advance IGCC Technology Secretary Chu Announces $14 Million for Six New Projects to Advance IGCC Technology September 9, 2011 - 6:16pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selection of six projects aimed at developing technologies to lower the cost of producing electricity in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants using carbon capture, while maintaining the highest environmental standards. Supported with up to $14 million in total funding, the selected projects will improve the economics of IGCC plants and promote the use of the Nation's abundant coal resources to produce clean, secure, and affordable energy. The successful development of advanced technologies and innovative concepts

193

DOE-Sponsored IGCC Project in Texas Takes Important Step Forward |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Sponsored IGCC Project in Texas Takes Important Step Forward DOE-Sponsored IGCC Project in Texas Takes Important Step Forward DOE-Sponsored IGCC Project in Texas Takes Important Step Forward June 20, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A newly signed memorandum of understanding (MOU) for the purchase of electricity produced by the Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP) is an important step forward for what will be one of the world's most advanced and cleanest coal-based power plants, funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Under the MOU, CPS Energy - a municipally owned utility serving San Antonio, Texas - will purchase electricity generated by the first-of-a-kind commercial clean coal power plant, starting in mid 2014. TCEP, a 400-megawatt integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility located

194

Secretary Chu Announces $14 Million for Six New Projects to Advance IGCC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14 Million for Six New Projects to Advance 14 Million for Six New Projects to Advance IGCC Technology Secretary Chu Announces $14 Million for Six New Projects to Advance IGCC Technology September 9, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selection of six projects aimed at developing technologies to lower the cost of producing electricity in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants using carbon capture, while maintaining the highest environmental standards. Supported with up to $14 million in total funding, the selected projects will improve the economics of IGCC plants and promote the use of the Nation's abundant coal resources to produce clean, secure, and affordable energy. The successful development of advanced technologies and innovative concepts

195

Mesaba next-generation IGCC plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through a US Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement awarded in June 2006, MEP-I LLC plans to demonstrate a next generation integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generating plant, the Mesaba Energy Project. The 606-MWe plant (the first of two similarly sized plants envisioned by project sponsors) will feature next-generation ConocoPhillips E-Gas{trademark} technology first tested on the DOE-funded Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering project. Mesaba will benefit from recommendations of an industry panel applying the Value Improving Practices process to Wabash cost and performance results. The project will be twice the size of Wabash, while demonstrating better efficient, reliability and pollutant control. The $2.16 billion project ($36 million federal cost share) will be located in the Iron Range region north of Duluth, Minnesota. Mesaba is one of four projects selected under Round II of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. 1 fig.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Demonstration plant for IGCC using the U-GAS process  

SciTech Connect

Tampella, Ltd., in cooperation with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), is developing the gasification technology for U-GAS{reg_sign} to produce electricity from coal using the integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC). The concept of IGCC is to join the clean burning gasification island with a more efficient gas and stream turbine island to produce electric power with minimal environmental impact. IGT has developed the U-GAS process to produce a low- or medium-Btu gas from different types of coal feedstocks. The process uses a combination of fluidized=bed gasification and ash agglomeration in a single-stage reactor. A 30-tons/day-capacity pilot plant located in Chicago has been used to develop the process. Feedstocks ranging from relatively unreactive metallurgical coke to highly reactive peat have been gasified successfully in the this pilot plant, indicating its ability to handle a feedstock with widely varying properties. A new 10 megawatt pilot plant has been designed and is under construction in Tampere, Finland, as the first step toward the commercialization of this technology. Tampella is planning to design and deliver a commercial-scale IGCC demonstration plant by 1994. 7 refs., 5 figs.

Lau, F.S. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Salo, K. [Tampella Power, Tampere (Finland)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Kemper County IGCC (tm) Project Preliminary Public Design Report  

SciTech Connect

The Kemper County IGCC Project is an advanced coal technology project that is being developed by Mississippi Power Company (MPC). The project is a lignite-fueled 2-on-1 Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) facility incorporating the air-blown Transport Integrated Gasification (TRIG) technology jointly developed by Southern Company; Kellogg, Brown, and Root (KBR); and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama. The estimated nameplate capacity of the plant will be 830 MW with a peak net output capability of 582 MW. As a result of advanced emissions control equipment, the facility will produce marketable byproducts of ammonia, sulfuric acid, and carbon dioxide. 65 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) will be captured and used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR), making the Kemper County facilitys carbon emissions comparable to those of a natural-gas-fired combined cycle power plant. The commercial operation date (COD) of the Kemper County IGCC plant will be May 2014. This report describes the basic design and function of the plant as determined at the end of the Front End Engineering Design (FEED) phase of the project.

Nelson, Matt; Rush, Randall; Madden, Diane; Pinkston, Tim; Lunsford, Landon

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Acid Gas Removal (AGR) Acid gases produced in gasification processes mainly consist of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon dioxide (CO2). Syngas exiting the particulate removal and gas conditioning systems, typically near ambient temperature at 100°F, needs to be cleaned of the sulfur-bearing acid gases to meet either environmental emissions regulations, or to protect downstream catalysts for chemical processing applications. For integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) applications, environmental regulations require that the sulfur content of the product syngas be reduced to less than 30 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in order to meet the stack gas emission target of less than 4 ppmv sulfur dioxide (SO2)1. In IGCC applications, where selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is required to lower NOx emissions to less than 10 ppmv, syngas sulfur content may have to be lowered to 10 to 20 ppmv in order to prevent ammonium bisulfate fouling of the heat recovery steam generator's (HRSG) cold end tubes. For fuels production or chemical production, the downstream synthesis catalyst sulfur tolerance dictates the sulfur removal level, which can be less than 0.1 ppmv.

199

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions,

200

Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020{degree}F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

Virr, M.J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020[degree]F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

Virr, M.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

NETL: Gasification - Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants General Electric Company Project Number: FE0007859 Project Description General Electric Company (GE) is studying the feasibility of improving plant availability and reducing total installed costs in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. GE is evaluating the IGCC technology effects of total installed cost and availability through deployment of a multi-faceted approach in technology evaluation, constructability, and design methodology. Eastman Chemical Company will be supporting the GE effort on certain technologies by providing consulting on the evaluations and technology transfer phases of the project. The end result is aimed at reducing the time to technological maturity and enabling plants to reach higher values of availability in a shorter period of time and at a lower installed cost.

203

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions, water discharges, and solid

204

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of natural gas-powered combined cycle power plants. The mostintegrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) coal plants,integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology for

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Optimal Design of a Fossil Fuel-Based Hydrogen Infrastructure with Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Case Study in Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydrogen using coal gasification and distributed hydrogena more modern integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)and efficient integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)

Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ni, Jason; Johnson, Joshua; Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Conceptual Design of a Fossil Hydrogen Infrastructure with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Case Study in Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production of H 2 using coal gasification and 2) distributeda more modern integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)and efficient integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Coal combined cycle system study. Volume I. Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential advantages for proceeding with demonstration of coal-fueled combined cycle power plants through retrofit of a few existing utility steam plants have been evaluated. Two combined cycle concepts were considered: Pressurized Fluidized Bed (PFB) combined cycle and gasification combined cycle. These concepts were compared with AFB steam plants, conventional steam plants with Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), and refueling such as with coal-oil mixtures. The ultimate targets are both new plants and conversion of existing plants. Combined cycle plants were found to be most competitive with conventional coal plants and offered lower air emissions and less adverse environmental impact. A demonstration is a necessary step toward commercialization.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Improved Refractory Materials for Slagging Gasifiers in IGCC Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

Gasifiers are the heart of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power system currently being developed as part of the DOE's Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Power Plant. A gasification chamber is a high pressure/high temperature reaction vessel used to contain a mixture of O2, H2O, and coal (or other carbon containing materials) while it is converted into thermal energy and chemicals (H2, CO, and CH4). IGCC systems are expected to play a dominant role in meeting the Nation's future energy needs. Gasifiers are also used to produce chemicals that serve as feedstock for other industrial processes, and are considered a potential source of H2 in applications such as fuel cells. A distinct advantage of gasifiers is their ability to meet or exceed current and anticipated future environmental emission regulations. Also, because gasification systems are part of a closed circuit, gasifiers are considered process ready to capture CO2 emissions for reuse or processing should that become necessary or economically feasible in the future. The service life of refractory liners for gasifiers has been identified by users as a critical barrier to IGC

Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Powell, Cynthia A.; Krabbe, Rick; Thomas, Hugh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Improved Refractory Materials for Slagging Gasifiers in IGCC Power Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gasifiers are the heart of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power system currently being developed as part of the DOE's Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Power Plant. A gasification chamber is a high pressure/high temperature reaction vessel used to contain a mixture of O2, H2O, and coal (or other carbon containing materials) while it is converted into thermal energy and chemicals (H2, CO, and CH4). IGCC systems are expected to play a dominant role in meeting the Nation's future energy needs. Gasifiers are also used to produce chemicals that serve as feedstock for other industrial processes, and are considered a potential source of H2 in applications such as fuel cells. A distinct advantage of gasifiers is their ability to meet or exceed current and anticipated future environmental emission regulations. Also, because gasification systems are part of a closed circuit, gasifiers are considered process ready to capture CO2 emissions for reuse or processing should that become necessary or economically feasible in the future. The service life of refractory liners for gasifiers has been identified by users as a critical barrier to IGC

Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Powell, Cynthia A.; Krabbe, Rick; Thomas, Hugh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Combustion Engineering IGCC Repowering Project  

SciTech Connect

C-E gasification process uses an entrained-flow, two-stage, slagging bottom gasifier. Figure 1 shows a schematic of the gasifier concept. Some of the coal and all of the char is fed to the combustor section, while the remaining coal is fed to the reducter section of the gasifier. The coal and char in the combustor is mixed with air and the fuel-rich mixture is burned creating the high temperature necessary to gasify the coal and melt the mineral matter in the coal. The slag flows through a slag tap at the bottom of the combustor into a water-filled slag tank where it is quenched and transformed into an inert, glassy, granular material. This vitrified slag is non-leaching, making it easy to dispose of in an environmentally acceptable manner. The hot gas leaving the combustor enters the second stage called the reductor. In the reducter, the char gasification occurs along the length of the reductor zone until the temperature falls to a point where the gasification kinetics become too slow. Once the gas temperature reaches this level, essentially no further gasification takes place and the gases subsequently are cooled with convective surface to a temperature low enough to enter the cleanup system. Nearly all of the liberated energy from the coal that does not produce fuel gas is collected and recovered with steam generating surface either in the walls of the vessel or by conventional boiler convective surfaces in the backpass of the gasifier. A mixture of unburned carbon and ash (called char) is carried out of the gasifier with the product gas strewn. The char is collected and recycled back to the gasifier where it is consumed. Thus, there is no net production of char which results in negligible carbon loss. The product gas enters a desulfurization system where it is cleaned of sulfur compounds present in the fuel gas. The clean fuel gas is now available for use in the gas turbine combuster for an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) application.

Andrus, H.E.; Thibeault, P.R.; Gibson, C.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Combustion Engineering IGCC Repowering Project  

SciTech Connect

C-E gasification process uses an entrained-flow, two-stage, slagging bottom gasifier. Figure 1 shows a schematic of the gasifier concept. Some of the coal and all of the char is fed to the combustor section, while the remaining coal is fed to the reducter section of the gasifier. The coal and char in the combustor is mixed with air and the fuel-rich mixture is burned creating the high temperature necessary to gasify the coal and melt the mineral matter in the coal. The slag flows through a slag tap at the bottom of the combustor into a water-filled slag tank where it is quenched and transformed into an inert, glassy, granular material. This vitrified slag is non-leaching, making it easy to dispose of in an environmentally acceptable manner. The hot gas leaving the combustor enters the second stage called the reductor. In the reducter, the char gasification occurs along the length of the reductor zone until the temperature falls to a point where the gasification kinetics become too slow. Once the gas temperature reaches this level, essentially no further gasification takes place and the gases subsequently are cooled with convective surface to a temperature low enough to enter the cleanup system. Nearly all of the liberated energy from the coal that does not produce fuel gas is collected and recovered with steam generating surface either in the walls of the vessel or by conventional boiler convective surfaces in the backpass of the gasifier. A mixture of unburned carbon and ash (called char) is carried out of the gasifier with the product gas strewn. The char is collected and recycled back to the gasifier where it is consumed. Thus, there is no net production of char which results in negligible carbon loss. The product gas enters a desulfurization system where it is cleaned of sulfur compounds present in the fuel gas. The clean fuel gas is now available for use in the gas turbine combuster for an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) application.

Andrus, H.E.; Thibeault, P.R.; Gibson, C.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This slideshow presentation begins by outlining US energy challenges, particularly with respect to power generation capacity and clean energy plant operations. It goes on to describe the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR{sup TM}). Its mission and goals are given, followed by an overview of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} capture. The Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS) and 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS) are then presented. Facilities, training, education, and R&D are covered, followed by future simulators and directions.

Provost, G,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation begins with a description of U.S. Energy Challenges, particularly Power Generation Capacity and Clean Energy Plant Operations. It goes on to describe the missions and goals of the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTARTM). It moves on to the subject of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} Capture, particularly a Process/Project Overview, Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS), 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS), Facilities, Training, Education, and R&D, and Future Simulators/Directions

Provost, G,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Control system design for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture in IGCC power plants while loading-following  

SciTech Connect

Load-following requirements for future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with precombustion CO{sub 2} capture are expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. In this work, loadfollowing studies are performed using a comprehensive dynamic model of an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture developed in Aspen Engineering Suite (AES). Considering multiple single-loop controllers for power demand load following, the preferred IGCC control strategy from the perspective of a power producer is gas turbine (GT) lead with gasifier follow. In this strategy, the GT controls the load by manipulating its firing rate while the slurry feed flow to the gasifier is manipulated to control the syngas pressure at the GT inlet. The syngas pressure control is an integrating process with significant time delay mainly because of the large piping and equipment volumes between the gasifier and the GT inlet. A modified proportionalintegralderivative (PID) control is considered for IGCC syngas pressure control. The desired CO{sub 2} capture rate must be maintained while the IGCC plant follows the load. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate, the control performance of PID control is compared with linear model predictive control (LMPC). The results show that the LMPC outperforms PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Integrated gasifier combined cycle polygeneration system to produce liquid hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

An integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) system which simultaneously produces electricity, process steam, and liquid hydrogen was evaluated and compared to IGCC systems which cogenerate electricity and process steam. A number of IGCC plants, all employing a 15 MW gas turbine and producing from 0 to 20 tons per day of liquid hydrogen and from 0 to 20 MW of process steam were considered. The annual revenue required to own and operate such plants was estimated to be significantly lower than the potential market value of the products. The results indicate a significant potential economic benefit to configuring IGCC systems to produce a clean fuel in addition to electricity and process steam in relatively small industrial applications.

Burns, R.K.; Staiger, P.J.; Donovan, R.M.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Systems Study for Improving Gas Turbine Performance for Coal/IGCC Application  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies vital gas turbine (GT) parameters and quantifies their influence in meeting the DOE Turbine Program overall Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant goals of 50% net HHV efficiency, $1000/kW capital cost, and low emissions. The project analytically evaluates GE advanced F class air cooled technology level gas turbine conceptual cycle designs and determines their influence on IGCC plant level performance including impact of Carbon capture. This report summarizes the work accomplished in each of the following six Tasks. Task 1.0--Overall IGCC Plant Level Requirements Identification: Plant level requirements were identified, and compared with DOE's IGCC Goal of achieving 50% Net HHV Efficiency and $1000/KW by the Year 2008, through use of a Six Sigma Quality Functional Deployment (QFD) Tool. This analysis resulted in 7 GT System Level Parameters as the most significant. Task 2.0--Requirements Prioritization/Flow-Down to GT Subsystem Level: GT requirements were identified, analyzed and prioritized relative to achieving plant level goals, and compared with the flow down of power island goals through use of a Six Sigma QFD Tool. This analysis resulted in 11 GT Cycle Design Parameters being selected as the most significant. Task 3.0--IGCC Conceptual System Analysis: A Baseline IGCC Plant configuration was chosen, and an IGCC simulation analysis model was constructed, validated against published performance data and then optimized by including air extraction heat recovery and GE steam turbine model. Baseline IGCC based on GE 207FA+e gas turbine combined cycle has net HHV efficiency of 40.5% and net output nominally of 526 Megawatts at NOx emission level of 15 ppmvd{at}15% corrected O2. 18 advanced F technology GT cycle design options were developed to provide performance targets with increased output and/or efficiency with low NOx emissions. Task 4.0--Gas Turbine Cycle Options vs. Requirements Evaluation: Influence coefficients on 4 key IGCC plant level parameters (IGCC Net Efficiency, IGCC Net Output, GT Output, NOx Emissions) of 11 GT identified cycle parameters were determined. Results indicate that IGCC net efficiency HHV gains up to 2.8 pts (40.5% to 43.3%) and IGCC net output gains up to 35% are possible due to improvements in GT technology alone with single digit NOx emission levels. Task 5.0--Recommendations for GT Technical Improvements: A trade off analysis was conducted utilizing the performance results of 18 gas turbine (GT) conceptual designs, and three most promising GT candidates are recommended. A roadmap for turbine technology development is proposed for future coal based IGCC power plants. Task 6.0--Determine Carbon Capture Impact on IGCC Plant Level Performance: A gas turbine performance model for high Hydrogen fuel gas turbine was created and integrated to an IGCC system performance model, which also included newly created models for moisturized syngas, gas shift and CO2 removal subsystems. This performance model was analyzed for two gas turbine technology based subsystems each with two Carbon removal design options of 85% and 88% respectively. The results show larger IGCC performance penalty for gas turbine designs with higher firing temperature and higher Carbon removal.

Ashok K. Anand

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

217

Systems Study for Improving Gas Turbine Performance for Coal/IGCC Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study identifies vital gas turbine (GT) parameters and quantifies their influence in meeting the DOE Turbine Program overall Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant goals of 50% net HHV efficiency, $1000/kW capital cost, and low emissions. The project analytically evaluates GE advanced F class air cooled technology level gas turbine conceptual cycle designs and determines their influence on IGCC plant level performance including impact of Carbon capture. This report summarizes the work accomplished in each of the following six Tasks. Task 1.0--Overall IGCC Plant Level Requirements Identification: Plant level requirements were identified, and compared with DOE's IGCC Goal of achieving 50% Net HHV Efficiency and $1000/KW by the Year 2008, through use of a Six Sigma Quality Functional Deployment (QFD) Tool. This analysis resulted in 7 GT System Level Parameters as the most significant. Task 2.0--Requirements Prioritization/Flow-Down to GT Subsystem Level: GT requirements were identified, analyzed and prioritized relative to achieving plant level goals, and compared with the flow down of power island goals through use of a Six Sigma QFD Tool. This analysis resulted in 11 GT Cycle Design Parameters being selected as the most significant. Task 3.0--IGCC Conceptual System Analysis: A Baseline IGCC Plant configuration was chosen, and an IGCC simulation analysis model was constructed, validated against published performance data and then optimized by including air extraction heat recovery and GE steam turbine model. Baseline IGCC based on GE 207FA+e gas turbine combined cycle has net HHV efficiency of 40.5% and net output nominally of 526 Megawatts at NOx emission level of 15 ppmvd{at}15% corrected O2. 18 advanced F technology GT cycle design options were developed to provide performance targets with increased output and/or efficiency with low NOx emissions. Task 4.0--Gas Turbine Cycle Options vs. Requirements Evaluation: Influence coefficients on 4 key IGCC plant level parameters (IGCC Net Efficiency, IGCC Net Output, GT Output, NOx Emissions) of 11 GT identified cycle parameters were determined. Results indicate that IGCC net efficiency HHV gains up to 2.8 pts (40.5% to 43.3%) and IGCC net output gains up to 35% are possible due to improvements in GT technology alone with single digit NOx emission levels. Task 5.0--Recommendations for GT Technical Improvements: A trade off analysis was conducted utilizing the performance results of 18 gas turbine (GT) conceptual designs, and three most promising GT candidates are recommended. A roadmap for turbine technology development is proposed for future coal based IGCC power plants. Task 6.0--Determine Carbon Capture Impact on IGCC Plant Level Performance: A gas turbine performance model for high Hydrogen fuel gas turbine was created and integrated to an IGCC system performance model, which also included newly created models for moisturized syngas, gas shift and CO2 removal subsystems. This performance model was analyzed for two gas turbine technology based subsystems each with two Carbon removal design options of 85% and 88% respectively. The results show larger IGCC performance penalty for gas turbine designs with higher firing temperature and higher Carbon removal.

Ashok K. Anand

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

IGCC+S Financing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II II William G. Rosenberg, Dwight C. Alpern, Michael R. Walker Energy Technology Innovation Project a joint project of the Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and the Environment and Natural Resources Program Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs 2 0 0 4 - 0 8 J U LY 2 0 0 4 Deploying IGCC in this Decade with 3Party Covenant Financing VOLUME II William G. Rosenberg, Dwight C. Alpern, and Michael R. Walker Energy Technology Innovation Project a joint project of the Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and the Environment and Natural Resources Program Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Center for Business and Government John F. Kennedy School of Government Harvard University July 2004 Financing IGCC - 3Party Covenant ii

219

Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Power Gasification Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process Jeff Seabright Arthur Lee Richard Weissman, PhD. Texaco Inc. White Plains, New York Presented at: First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 Washington D.C. ABSTRACT Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is a commercially proven clean coal technology that offers significant environmental and economic benefits today, including decreased air and solids emissions. It also offers the potential to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. Coal IGCC provides electric utilities strategic options in meeting today's growing demand for energy products (electricity, fuel, chemicals) while protecting public health and the environment and providing a pathway to zero emissions coal-based power generation.

220

WABASH RIVER COAL GASIFICATION REPOWERING PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The close of 1999 marked the completion of the Demonstration Period of the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project. This Final Report summarizes the engineering and construction phases and details the learning experiences from the first four years of commercial operation that made up the Demonstration Period under Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-92MC29310. This 262 MWe project is a joint venture of Global Energy Inc. (Global acquired Destec Energy's gasification assets from Dynegy in 1999) and PSI Energy, a part of Cinergy Corp. The Joint Venture was formed to participate in the Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program and to demonstrate coal gasification repowering of an existing generating unit impacted by the Clean Air Act Amendments. The participants jointly developed, separately designed, constructed, own, and are now operating an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant, using Global Energy's E-Gas{trademark} technology (E-Gas{trademark} is the name given to the former Destec technology developed by Dow, Destec, and Dynegy). The E-Gas{trademark} process is integrated with a new General Electric 7FA combustion turbine generator and a heat recovery steam generator in the repowering of a 1950's-vintage Westinghouse steam turbine generator using some pre-existing coal handling facilities, interconnections, and other auxiliaries. The gasification facility utilizes local high sulfur coals (up to 5.9% sulfur) and produces synthetic gas (syngas), sulfur and slag by-products. The Project has the distinction of being the largest single train coal gasification combined-cycle plant in the Western Hemisphere and is the cleanest coal-fired plant of any type in the world. The Project was the first of the CCT integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) projects to achieve commercial operation.

Unknown

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"ASTM Standard Inch-Pound Reinforcing Bars". http:www.crsi.orgrebarmetric.html. Davis, Leroy,(2007). Reference & Information: American Wire Gauge Cable Descriptions....

222

Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (BIGCC).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Conversion of biomass to energy does not contribute to the net increase of carbon dioxide in the environment, therefore the use of biomass waste as (more)

Yap, Mun Roy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Gasification Product Improvement Facility status  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) project is to provide a test site to support early commercialization of the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology. The design of this facility will by based on PyGas{trademark}, a patented air blown fixed bed gasification process. The GPIF will be capable of processing run-of-mine high swelling coals that comprise 87% of all Eastern US coals. The GPIF project is expected to deliver a gasifier design that will satisfy the criteria for good process performance and cost effectiveness. The PyGas{trademark} process was conceived to handle high swelling coals, crack tars, and reduce ammonia and trace metal emissions. The GPIF program will generate useful scale up data. Initially, the PyGas{trademark}-IGCC systems will be offered as modular units for the repowering markets which will reduce the financial burden on utilities in comparison to large plants. In addition, modular designs will also reduce the plant construction schedules.

Carson, R.D.; Sadowski, R.S.; Skinner, W.H. [CRS Sirrine Engineers, Inc., Greenville, SC (United States); Dixit, V.B.; Lisauskas, R.A. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States); Johnson, S.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States). PowerServe Div.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Trace metal transformation in gasification  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to 1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, 2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and 3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; O`Keefe, C.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; Allen, S.E.; Hassett, D.J.; Hauserman, W.B. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Holcombe, N.T. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Trace metal transformations in gasification  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.; Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Avestar® - Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Combined Cycle Simulator, focusing on the power generation process after gasification. This simulator is well-suited for concentrated training on operation and control of the gas and steam turbines; condensate, feed water, and circulating water systems; heat recovery steam generator; and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. Combined cycle simulator startup operations include bringing up the gas turbine to rated speed on natural gas and then switching over to the firing of synthesis gas. Key capabilities of the Combined Cycle Simulator include: Combined Cycle Simulator Operator training station HMI display for overview of Gas Turbine - Train A Normal base load operation

227

IGCC and PFBC By-Products: Generation, Characteristics, and Management Practices  

SciTech Connect

The following report is a compilation of data on by-products/wastes from clean coal technologies, specifically integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC). DOE had two objectives in providing this information to EPA: (1) to familiarize EPA with the DOE CCT program, CCT by-products, and the associated efforts by DOE contractors in the area of CCT by-product management and (2) to provide information that will facilitate EPA's effort by complementing similar reports from industry groups, including CIBO (Council of Industrial Boiler Owners) and EEI USWAG (Edison Electric Institute Utility Solid Waste Activities Group). The EERC cooperated and coordinated with DOE CCT contractors and industry groups to provide the most accurate and complete data on IGCC and PFBC by-products, although these technologies are only now being demonstrated on the commercial scale through the DOE CCT program.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

PINON PINE: An advanced IGCC demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Pinon Pine Power Project is a second generation integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, located at Sierra Pacific Power Company`s (SPPC) Tracy Station, 17 miles east of Reno, Nevada. The project is being partially funded under the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCT). SPPC intends to operate the plant in base-load mode to supply approximately 100 megawatts electric (MWe) to the transmission grid. This plant will be the first full-scale integration of several advanced technologies: an air-blown KRW gasifier; full-stream hot gas desulfurization using a transport reactor system with a zinc-based sorbent; full-stream, high-temperature ceramic filters for particulate removal; the General Electric Model MS6001FA (617A) Gas Turbine Engine/generator, and a 950 pound per square inch absolute (psia), 950{degrees}F steam turbine generator. This paper reviews the overall configuration and integration of the gasification and power islands components, which yield the plant`s high efficiency. Current status of the project is addressed.

Freier, M.D.; Jewell, D.M. [Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Motter, J.W. [Sierra Pacific Power Co., Reno, NV (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Coal Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell System Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by gasified coal. System concepts that integrate a coal gasifier with a SOFC, a gas turbine, and a steam turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 200 MW. Two alternative integration configurations were selected with projected system efficiency of over 53% on a HHV basis, or about 10 percentage points higher than that of the state-of-the-art Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The initial cost of both selected configurations was found to be comparable with the IGCC system costs at approximately $1700/kW. An absorption-based CO2 isolation scheme was developed, and its penalty on the system performance and cost was estimated to be less approximately 2.7% and $370/kW. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

Chellappa Balan; Debashis Dey; Sukru-Alper Eker; Max Peter; Pavel Sokolov; Greg Wotzak

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Concepts in Slurry Fed Low Rank Coal Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports on experimental and theoretical analyses of low rank coal/liquid CO2 slurries (LRC/CO2(l)). The results showed that viscosities of LRC/CO2(l) were much lower than for LRC/water slurries of similar coal concentrations and higher coal concentrations could be obtained for liquid CO2 slurries than for water-based slurries at flow conditions typical of industrial scale gasification systems. ASPENplus analyses of a typical integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system showed no del...

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity Via Catalytic Coal Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Co-ProduCtion of SubStitute natural GaS / eleCtriCity via CatalytiC Coal GaSifiCation Description The United States has vast reserves of low-cost coal, estimated to be sufficient for the next 250 years. Gasification-based technology, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), is the only environmentally friendly technology that provides the flexibility to co-produce hydrogen, substitute natural gas (SNG), premium hydrocarbon liquids including transportation fuels, and electric power in desired combinations from coal and other carbonaceous feedstocks. Rising costs and limited domestic supply of crude oil and natural gas provide a strong incentive for the development of coal gasification-based co-production processes. This project addresses the co-production of SNG and electricity from coal via gasification

232

Avestar - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meet Our Partners Simulators IGCC Gasification Combined Cycle NGCC SCOT Oxy-coal Shale Gas 3D Virtual IGCC Training How to Register for Training IGCC Gasification Combined...

233

Avestar - Simulators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meet Our Partners Simulators IGCC Gasification Combined Cycle NGCC SCOT Oxy-coal Shale Gas 3D Virtual IGCC Training How to Register for Training IGCC Gasification Combined...

234

AVESTAR - Register  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meet Our Partners Simulators IGCC Gasification Combined Cycle NGCC SCOT Oxy-coal Shale Gas 3D Virtual IGCC Training How to Register for Training IGCC Gasification Combined...

235

AVESTAR - Training Calender and Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meet Our Partners Simulators IGCC Gasification Combined Cycle NGCC SCOT Oxy-coal Shale Gas 3D Virtual IGCC Training How to Register for Training IGCC Gasification Combined...

236

AVESTAR - WVU  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meet Our Partners Simulators IGCC Gasification Combined Cycle NGCC SCOT Oxy-coal Shale Gas 3D Virtual IGCC Training How to Register for Training IGCC Gasification Combined...

237

AVESTAR - Images  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meet Our Partners Simulators IGCC Gasification Combined Cycle NGCC SCOT Oxy-coal Shale Gas 3D Virtual IGCC Training How to Register for Training IGCC Gasification Combined...

238

AVESTAR - Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meet Our Partners Simulators IGCC Gasification Combined Cycle NGCC SCOT Oxy-coal Shale Gas 3D Virtual IGCC Training How to Register for Training IGCC Gasification Combined...

239

Gasification Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home...

240

Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update, September 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue: Quarterly Summary Ongoing U.S. Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects News Items on Operating IGCC Plants U.S. IGCC Project Updates International IGCC Project Updates International Gasification Projects for Chemicals Biomass and Waste Gasification Projects Coal to SNG Coal to Liquids (CTL) Gas to Liquids (GTL) Underground Coal Gasification (U...

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project. Quarterly report, April 1 - June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Tampa Electric Company continued efforts to complete construction and start-up of the Polk Power Station, Unit {number_sign}1 which will use Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology for power generation. From an overall standpoint, the Project continues to track well. The completion of construction system turnovers to Start-up is encouraging. Start-up will accept responsibility of the plant until turnover to operations. The major focus continues to be on the production of first Syngas, scheduled for July 17. All construction, engineering, and start-up activities are in support of Syngas production. Key activities toward this goal include final checkout and startup of remaining gasification systems, completion of punch list items required for first syngas, finalization of operating procedures, preparation of site and area access control plans, site- wide safety training, and other Process Safety management (PSM) requirements.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Enhanced IGCC regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control strategies for improving power ramp rates  

SciTech Connect

As part of ongoing R&D activities at the National Energy Technology Laboratorys (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training & Research (AVESTAR) Center, this paper highlights strategies for enhancing low-level regulatory control and system-wide coordinated control strategies implemented in a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture. The underlying IGCC plant dynamic model contains 20 major process areas, each of which is tightly integrated with the rest of the power plant, making individual functionally-independent processes prone to routine disturbances. Single-loop feedback control although adequate to meet the primary control objective for most processes, does not take into account in advance the effect of these disturbances, making the entire power plant undergo large offshoots and/or oscillations before the feedback action has an opportunity to impact control performance. In this paper, controller enhancements ranging from retuning feedback control loops, multiplicative feed-forward control and other control techniques such as split-range control, feedback trim and dynamic compensation, applicable on various subsections of the integrated IGCC plant, have been highlighted and improvements in control responses have been given. Compared to using classical feedback-based control structure, the enhanced IGCC regulatory control architecture reduces plant settling time and peak offshoots, achieves faster disturbance rejection, and promotes higher power ramp-rates. In addition, improvements in IGCC coordinated plant-wide control strategies for Gasifier-Lead, GT-Lead and Plantwide operation modes have been proposed and their responses compared. The paper is concluded with a brief discussion on the potential IGCC controller improvements resulting from using advanced process control, including model predictive control (MPC), as a supervisory control layer.

Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

NETL: CO2 Capture from IGCC Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process Project No.: DE-FE0000896 Batch scale...

244

Gasification Users Association Update Newsletter: Sept 2009 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GUA Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update: International Support for CO2 Capture & Sequestration (CCS) Ongoing US Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects US IGCC and Gasification Project Updates US Biomass and Waste Gasification Projects International IGCC and Gasification Projects US Coal to SNG Projects Coal to Liquids (CTL) Underground Coal Gasification New IGCC/Ga...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

245

Gasification, polygeneration capture interest of refiners  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are moving into the mainstream of international refining. Such plants can turn refinery dregs into the whitest of all products--sparkling electricity--plus hydrogen and synthesis gas. Hydrogen is an indispensable element for cleaning up and improving modern fuels, while syngas is the feedstock for important finished petrochemicals and intermediaries. The status and potential of gasification technologies and projects were covered in a 3 day conference early in October in San Francisco. What made this conference different from others on the subject in the past was recognition that oil and natural gas producers and the international refining industry are becoming major power producers without government subsidies. Such projects can pass the scrutiny of lenders and the test of commerciality. They are not targeted simply for electricity, but also for production of hydrogen, steam, and petrochemical feedstock. The process objective for projects now far exceeds simple cogeneration. It`s now trigeneration, even polygeneration.

Aalund, L.R.

1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Role of Oxygen in Coal Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Products supplies oxygen to a number of coal gasification and partial oxidation facilities worldwide. At the high operating pressures of these processes, economics favor the use of 90% and higher oxygen purities. The effect of inerts in the oxidant on gasifier and downstream production units also favor the use of oxygen in place of air. Factors that must be considered in selecting the optimum oxygen purity include: end use of the gasifier products, oxygen delivery pressure and the cost of capital and energy. This paper examines the major factors in oxygen purity selection for typical coal gasifiers. Examples demonstrating the effect of oxygen purity on several processes are presented: production of synthetic natural gas (SNG), integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation and methanol synthesis. The potential impact of a non-cryogenic air separation process currently under development is examined based on integration with a high temperature processes.

Klosek, J.; Smith, A. R.; Solomon, J.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Uncertainty analysis of an IGCC system with single-stage entrained-flow gasifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems using coal gasification is an attractive option for future energy plants. Consequenty, understanding the system operation and optimizing gasifier performance in the presence of uncertain operating conditions is essential to extract the maximum benefits from the system. This work focuses on conducting such a study using an IGCC process simulation and a high-fidelity gasifier simulation coupled with stochastic simulation and multi-objective optimization capabilities. Coal gasifiers are the necessary basis of IGCC systems, and hence effective modeling and uncertainty analysis of the gasification process constitutes an important element of overall IGCC process design and operation. In this work, an Aspen Plus{reg_sign} steady-state process model of an IGCC system with carbon capture enables us to conduct simulation studies so that the effect of gasification variability on the whole process can be understood. The IGCC plant design consists of an single-stage entrained-flow gasifier, a physical solvent-based acid gas removal process for carbon capture, two model-7FB combustion turbine generators, two heat recovery steam generators, and one steam turbine generator in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration. In the Aspen Plus process simulation, the gasifier is represented as a simplified lumped-parameter, restricted-equilibrium reactor model. In this work, we also make use of a distributed-parameter FLUENT{reg_sign} computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to characterize the uncertainty for the entrained-flow gasifier. The CFD-based gasifer model is much more comprehensive, predictive, and hence better suited to understand the effects of uncertainty. The possible uncertain parameters of the gasifier model are identified. This includes input coal composition as well as mass flow rates of coal, slurry water, and oxidant. Using a selected number of random (Monte Carlo) samples for the different parameters, the CFD model is simulated to observe the variations in the output variables (such as syngas composition, gas and ash flow rates etc.). The same samples are then used to conduct simulations using the Aspen Plus IGCC model. The simulation results for the high-fidelity CFD-based gasifier model and the Aspen Plus equilibrium reactor model for selected uncertain parameters are then used to perform the estimation. Defining the ratio of CFD based results to the Aspen Plus result as the uncertainty factor (UF), the work quantifies the extent of uncertainty and then uses uniform* distribution to characterize the uncertainty factor distribution. The characterization and quantification of uncertainty is then used to conduct stochastic simulation of the IGCC system in Aspen Plus. The CAPE-OPEN compliant stochastic simulation capability allows one to conduct a rigorous analysis and generate the feasible space for the operation of the IGCC system. The stochastic simulation results can later be used to conduct multi-objective optimization of the gasifier using a set of identified decision variables. The CAPE-OPEN compliant multi-objective capability in Aspen Plus can be used to conduct the analysis. Since the analysis is based on the uncertainty modeling studies of the gasifier, the optimization accounts for possible uncertainties in the operation of the system. The results for the optimized IGCC system and the gasifier, obtained from the stochastic simulation results, are expected to be more rigorous and hence closer to those obtained from CFD-based rigorous modeling.

Shastri, Y.; Diwekar, U.; Zitney, S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrated gasification combined cycle Integrated Planningwith regard to the gas combined-cycle capacity around theas integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and carbon

Blair, N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Coal Gasification Report.indb  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Coal Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle: Market Penetration Recommendations and Strategies Produced for the Department of Energy (DOE)/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Gasification Technologies Council (GTC) September 2004 Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle: Market Penetration Strategies and Recommendations Final Report Study Performed by:

250

Gasification Users Association Update Newsletter: June 2009 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GUA Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update: US Energy & Climate AgendaStimulus Package Ongoing US Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects US IGCC and Gasification Project Updates International IGCC and Gasification Projects US Coal to SNG Projects Coal to Liquids (CTL) Underground Coal Gasification

2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

251

Gasification of New Zealand coals: a comparative simulation study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to conduct a preliminary feasibility assessment of gasification of New Zealand (NZ) lignite and sub-bituminous coals, using a commercial simulation tool. Gasification of these coals was simulated in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) application and associated preliminary economics compared. A simple method of coal characterization was developed for simulation purposes. The carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen content of the coal was represented by a three component vapor solid system of carbon, methane, and water, the composition of which was derived from proximate analysis data on fixed carbon and volatile matter, and the gross calorific value, both on a dry, ash free basis. The gasification process was modeled using Gibb's free energy minimization. Data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Shell Gasifier base cases using Illinios No. 6 coal was used to verify both the gasifier and the IGCC flowsheet models. The H:C and O:C ratios of the NZ coals were adjusted until the simulated gasifier output composition and temperature matched the values with the base case. The IGCC power output and other key operating variables such as gas turbine inlet and exhaust temperatures were kept constant for study of comparative economics. The results indicated that 16% more lignite than sub-bituminous coal was required. This translated into the requirement of a larger gasifier and air separation unit, but smaller gas and steam turbines were required. The gasifier was the largest sole contributor (30%) to the estimated capital cost of the IGCC plant. The overall cost differential associated with the processing of lignite versus processing sub-bituminous coal was estimated to be of the order of NZ $0.8/tonne. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

Smitha V. Nathen; Robert D. Kirkpatrick; Brent R. Young [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand). Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power: Typical IGCC Configuration Power: Typical IGCC Configuration Major Commercial Examples of IGCC Plants While there are many coal gasification plants in the world co-producing electricity, chemicals and/or steam, the following are four notable, commercial-size IGCC plants currently in operation solely for producing electricity from coal and/or coke. Tampa Electric, Polk County 250 MW GE Gasifier Wabash, West Terre Haute 265 MW CoP E-Gas(tm) Gasifier Nuon, Buggenum 250 MW Shell Gasifier Elcogas, Puertollano 300 MW Prenflo Gasifier All of the plants began operation prior to 2000 and employ high temperature entrained-flow gasification technology. GE (formerly Texaco-Chevron) and ConocoPhillips (CoP) are slurry feed gasifiers, while Shell and Prenflo are dry feed gasifiers. None of these plants currently capture carbon dioxide (CO2). A simplified process flow diagram of the 250-MW Tampa Electric IGCC plant is shown in Figure 1 to illustrate the overall arrangement of an operating commercial scale IGCC plant. The Tampa Electric plant is equipped with both radiant and convective coolers for heat recovery, generating high pressure (HP) steam.

253

Resource Limits and Conversion Efficiency with Implications for Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants.Natural gas-fired combined cycle plants can be converted toand more efficient combined-cycle plants. Combined cycle

Croft, Gregory Donald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Analysis of potential benefits of integrated-gasifier combined cycles for a utility system  

SciTech Connect

Potential benefits of integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) units were evaluated for a reference utility system by comparing long range expansion plans using IGCC units and gas turbine peakers with a plan using only state of the art steam turbine units and gas turbine peakers. Also evaluated was the importance of the benefits of individual IGCC unit characteristics, particularly unit efficiency, unit equivalent forced outage rate, and unit size. A range of IGCC units was analyzed, including cases achievable with state of the art gas turbines and cases assuming advanced gas turbine technology. All utility system expansion plans that used IGCC units showed substantial savings compared with the base expansion plan using the steam turbine units.

Choo, Y.K.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant  

SciTech Connect

In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the AVESTAR Center is poised to develop a workforce well-prepared to operate and control commercial-scale gasification-based power plants capable of 90% pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture and compression, as well as low sulfur, mercury, and NOx emissions. With additional support from the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), the Center will educate and train engineering students and researchers by providing hands-on 'learning by operating' experience The AVESTAR Center also offers unique collaborative R&D opportunities in high-fidelity dynamic modeling, advanced process control, real-time optimization, and virtual plant simulation. Objectives and goals are aimed at safe and effective management of power generation systems for optimal efficiency, while protecting the environment. To add another dimension of realism to the AVESTAR experience, NETL will introduce an immersive training system with innovative three-dimensional virtual reality technology. Wearing a stereoscopic headset or eyewear, trainees will enter an interactive virtual environment that will allow them to move freely throughout the simulated 3-D facility to study and learn various aspects of IGCC plant operation, control, and safety. Such combined operator and immersive training systems go beyond traditional simulation and include more realistic scenarios, improved communication, and collaboration among co-workers.

Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Gasification Users Association Update Newsletter: March 2011 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GUA Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update: Quarterly Summary Ongoing U.S. Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects News Items on Operating IGCC Plants U.S. IGCC Project Updates U.S. Gasification Projects for Chemicals International IGCC Project Updates International Gasification Projects for Chemicals Biomass and Waste Gasification Projects Coal to SNG Coal to Liquids (CTL) ...

2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

257

Advanced regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control strategies for IGCC targeted towards improving power ramp-rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of ongoing R&D activities at the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training & Research (AVESTAR) Center, this paper highlights strategies for enhancing low-level regulatory control and system-wide coordinated control strategies implemented in a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture. The underlying IGCC plant dynamic model contains 20 major process areas, each of which is tightly integrated with the rest of the power plant, making individual functionally-independent processes prone to routine disturbances. Single-loop feedback control although adequate to meet the primary control objective for most processes, does not take into account in advance the effect of these disturbances, making the entire power plant undergo large offshoots and/or oscillations before the feedback action has an opportunity to impact control performance. In this paper, controller enhancements ranging from retuning feedback control loops, multiplicative feed-forward control and other control techniques such as split-range control, feedback trim and dynamic compensation, applicable on various subsections of the integrated IGCC plant, have been highlighted and improvements in control responses have been given. Compared to using classical feedback-based control structure, the enhanced IGCC regulatory control architecture reduces plant settling time and peak offshoots, achieves faster disturbance rejection, and promotes higher power ramp-rates. In addition, improvements in IGCC coordinated plant-wide control strategies for Gasifier-Lead, GT-Lead and Plantwide operation modes have been proposed and their responses compared. The paper is concluded with a brief discussion on the potential IGCC controller improvements resulting from using advanced process control, including model predictive control (MPC), as a supervisory control layer.

Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

NETL: News Release - DOE-Sponsored IGCC Project in Texas Takes Important  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, 2011 1, 2011 DOE-Sponsored IGCC Project in Texas Takes Important Step Forward MOU Provides for Electricity Purchase from First-of-a-Kind Commercial IGCC Power Plant Washington, DC - A newly signed memorandum of understanding (MOU) for the purchase of electricity produced by the Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP) is an important step forward for what will be one of the world's most advanced and cleanest coal-based power plants, funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Under the MOU, CPS Energy - a municipally owned utility serving San Antonio, Texas - will purchase electricity generated by the first-of-a-kind commercial clean coal power plant, starting in mid 2014. TCEP, a 400-megawatt integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility located about 15 miles west of Odessa, will capture 90 percent of its carbon dioxide (CO2) - approximately 3 million tons annually - more than any power plant of commercial scale operating anywhere in the world.

259

Refractory failure in IGCC fossil fuel power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current generation refractory materials used in slagging gasifiers employed in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) fossil fuel power systems have unacceptably short service lives, limiting the reliability and cost effectiveness of gasification as a means to generate power. The short service life of the refractory lining results from exposure to the extreme environment inside the operating gasifier, where the materials challenges include temperatures to 1650 C, thermal cycling, alternating reducing and oxidizing conditions, and the presence of corrosive slags and gases. Compounding these challenges is the current push within the industry for fuel flexibility, which results in slag chemistries and operating conditions that can vary widely as the feedstock for the gasifier is supplemented with alternative sources of carbon, such as petroleum coke and biomass. As a step toward our goal of developing improved refractory materials for this application, we have characterized refractory-slag interactions, under a variety of simulated gasifier conditions, utilizing laboratory exposure tests such as the static cup test and a gravimetric test. Combining this information with that gained from the post-mortem analyses of spent refractories removed from working gasifiers, we have developed a better understanding of refractory failure in gasifier environments. In this paper, we discuss refractory failures in slagging gasifiers and possible strategies to reduce them. Emphasis focuses on the refractories employed in gasifier systems which utilize coal as the primary feedstock.

Dogan, Cynthia P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James P.; Chinn, Richard E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Air permitting of IGCC plants  

SciTech Connect

The IGCC process is, currently, the preferred choice over conventional thermal power production in regard to cleanup of fuel and significantly reduced contaminant emissions. The air permitting requirements include the review of: feed preparation and PM emissions; feed gasification and contaminant emissions; elemental sulfur recovery and SO{sub 2} emissions; options for carbon-dioxide recovery; syngas characteristics for combustion; CT design and combustion mechanisms; air contaminant emissions of CT; controlled CT emissions of nitrogen-oxides and carbon-monoxide gases using the SCR and oxidation catalysts, respectively; and, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). However, the IGCC processes are being rigorously reviewed for the system integration and reliability, and significant reduction of air contaminant emissions (including the greenhouse gases). This paper included a review of IGCC air contaminant emission rates, and various applicable regulatory requirements, such as NSR (New Source Review), NSPS (New Source Performance Standards), and MACT (Maximum Achievable Control Technology). The IGCC facility's NOX, CO, SO{sub 2}, PM, VOCs, and HAPs emission rates would be significantly low. Thus, effective, construction and installation, and operation air permits would be necessary for IGCC facilities.

Chitikela, S.R.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Improving process performances in coal gasification for power and synfuel production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is aimed at developing process alternatives of conventional coal gasification. A number of possibilities are presented, simulated, and discussed in order to improve the process performances, to avoid the use of pure oxygen, and to reduce the overall CO{sub 2} emissions. The different process configurations considered include both power production, by means of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant, and synfuel production, by means of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The basic idea is to thermally couple a gasifier, fed with coal and steam, and a combustor where coal is burnt with air, thus overcoming the need of expensive pure oxygen as a feedstock. As a result, no or little nitrogen is present in the syngas produced by the gasifier; the required heat is transferred by using an inert solid as the carrier, which is circulated between the two modules. First, a thermodynamic study of the dual-bed gasification is carried out. Then a dual-bed gasification process is simulated by Aspen Plus, and the efficiency and overall CO{sub 2} emissions of the process are calculated and compared with a conventional gasification with oxygen. Eventually, the scheme with two reactors (gasifier-combustor) is coupled with an IGCC process. The simulation of this plant is compared with that of a conventional IGCC, where the gasifier is fed by high purity oxygen. According to the newly proposed configuration, the global plant efficiency increases by 27.9% and the CO{sub 2} emissions decrease by 21.8%, with respect to the performances of a conventional IGCC process. 29 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

M. Sudiro; A. Bertucco; F. Ruggeri; M. Fontana [University of Padova, Milan (Italy). Italy and Foster Wheeler Italiana Spa

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

NETL: Gasification Systems - Evaluation of the Benefits of Advanced Dry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Evaluation of the Benefits of Advanced Dry Feed System for Low Rank Coal Project Number: DE-FE0007902 General Electric Company (GE) is evaluating and demonstrating the benefits of novel dry feed technologies to effectively, reliably, and economically provide feeding of low-cost, low-rank coals into commercial Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. GE is completing comparative techno-economic studies of two IGCC power plant cases, one without and one with advanced dry feed technologies. A common basis of design is being developed so that overall assumptions and methodologies are common in the two cases for both technical and economic areas. The baseline case, without advanced dry feed technologies, will use operational data from the Eastman Chemical Company Kingsport gasification facility in combination with DOE/NETL's Cost and Performance Baseline Low-Rank Coal to Electricity IGCC study for both cost and performance comparisons. Advanced dry feed technologies, based upon the Posimetric® pump currently under development by GE, will be developed to match the proposed plant conditions and configuration, and will be analyzed to provide comparative performance and cost information to the baseline plant case. The scope of this analysis will cover the feed system from the raw coal silo up to, and including, the gasifier injector. Test data from previous and current testing will be summarized in a report to support the assumptions used to evaluate the advanced technologies and the potential value for future applications. This study focuses primarily on IGCC systems with 90 percent carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), but the dry feed system will be applicable to all IGCC power generating plants, as well as other industries requiring pressurized syngas.

263

Thermoeconomic design optimization of a KRW-based IGCC power plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discussed the cost and efficiency optimization of an integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant design and the effects of important design options and parameters. Advanced thermoeconomic techniques were used to evaluate and optimize a given IGCC concept which uses Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, air-blown KRW coal gasifiers, a hot gas cleanup system, and GE MS7001F gas turbines. Three optimal design concepts are presented and discussed in the report. Two of the concepts are characterized by minimum cost of electricity at two different values of the steam high pressure. The third concept represents the thermodynamic optimum. This study identified several differences between the original design and the design of the optimized cases. Compared with the original concept, significant annual savings are achieved in the cost optimal cases. Comparisons were made between results obtained using both the old and the new performance data for the MS7001F gas turbine. This report discusses the effects of gasification temperature, steam high pressure, coal moisture, and various design options on the overall plant efficiency and cost of electricity. Cost sensitivity studies were conducted and recommendations for future studies were made.

Tsatsaronis, G.; Lin, L.; Pisa, J.; Tawfik, T. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Center for Electric Power

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Thermoeconomic design optimization of a KRW-based IGCC power plant  

SciTech Connect

This report discussed the cost and efficiency optimization of an integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant design and the effects of important design options and parameters. Advanced thermoeconomic techniques were used to evaluate and optimize a given IGCC concept which uses Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, air-blown KRW coal gasifiers, a hot gas cleanup system, and GE MS7001F gas turbines. Three optimal design concepts are presented and discussed in the report. Two of the concepts are characterized by minimum cost of electricity at two different values of the steam high pressure. The third concept represents the thermodynamic optimum. This study identified several differences between the original design and the design of the optimized cases. Compared with the original concept, significant annual savings are achieved in the cost optimal cases. Comparisons were made between results obtained using both the old and the new performance data for the MS7001F gas turbine. This report discusses the effects of gasification temperature, steam high pressure, coal moisture, and various design options on the overall plant efficiency and cost of electricity. Cost sensitivity studies were conducted and recommendations for future studies were made.

Tsatsaronis, G.; Lin, L.; Pisa, J.; Tawfik, T. (Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Center for Electric Power)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Storing syngas lowers the carbon price for profitable coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation systems with carbon capture and sequestration have desirable environmental qualities but are not profitable when the carbon dioxide price is less than approximately $50 per metric ton. We examine whether an IGCC facility that operates its gasifier continuously but stores the syngas and produces electricity only when daily prices are high may be profitable at significantly lower CO{sub 2} prices. Using a probabilistic analysis, we have calculated the plant-level return on investment (ROI) and the value of syngas storage for IGCC facilities located in the U.S. Midwest using a range of storage configurations. Adding a second turbine to use the stored syngas to generate electricity at peak hours and implementing 12 h of above-ground high-pressure syngas storage significantly increases the ROI and net present value. Storage lowers the carbon price at which IGCC enters the U.S. generation mix by approximately 25%. 36 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Adam Newcomer; Jay Apt [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

+ , with activities in hydrogen production and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) facilities. + , Cincinnati + , Ohio + Place Cincinnati, Ohio + Product Gasification...

267

NETL: Gasification Systems - Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Project No.: DE-FE0007952 Reaction Engineering International (REI) is working to develop practical solutions to mitigate the plugging and fouling of syngas coolers (SC) - fire tube heat exchangers located between the coal gasifier and the combustion turbine. Syngas coolers used in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants offer high efficiency, but their reliability is generally lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The principle downtime events associated with syngas coolers are typically a result of ash deposits that: form on (wall) surfaces upstream of the syngas cooler, break loose, and then lodge in the tubes; or form on the fireside surface of the syngas cooler tubes that lead to fouling and reduced heat transfer. Both ash deposit mechanisms result in reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs.

268

NETL: Gasification - Recovery Act: Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act: Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes for IGCC and FutureGen Plants Recovery Act: Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes for IGCC and FutureGen Plants Eltron Research & Development Inc. Project Number: FC26-05NT42469 Project Description The Eltron Hydrogen Transport Membrane (HTM) technology uses composite metal alloy materials to separate H2 from coal-derived syngas (a mixture of H2, CO, CO2, and steam). Carbon dioxide on the feed side of the membrane remains at high pressure and in a concentrated form suitable for capture and re-use or storage. The Eltron HTM system is an enabling technology for the production of high purity H2 and the capture of CO2 at high pressure that is applicable to future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and central station H2 production plants. These novel membranes have an operating temperature of 280 to 440 degrees Celsius (°C), which is well-matched with emerging coal gas cleaning technologies and has the potential to significantly improve the overall efficiency and process economics for future gasification-based power, fuels, and chemical production plants. Eltron's membranes can withstand differential pressures of up to 1,000 pounds per square inch gauge (psig) without structural failure, allowing for successful integration into advanced, high-pressure coal gasification plants.

269

[Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. 1996 DOE annual technical report, January--December 1996  

SciTech Connect

Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project uses a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal to syngas. The gasification plant is coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTUs/cf (HHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product. Approximately 10% of the raw, hot syngas at 900 F is designed to pass through an intermittently moving bed of metal-oxide sorbent which removes sulfur-bearing compounds from the syngas. PPS-1 will be the first unit in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology on a commercial unit. The emphasis during 1996 centered around start-up activities.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

H gas turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

A major step has been taken in the development of the Next Power Generation System--``H`` Technology Combined Cycle. This new gas turbine combined-cycle system increases thermal performance to the 60% level by increasing gas turbine operating temperature to 1,430 C (2,600 F) at a pressure ratio of 23 to 1. Although this represents a significant increase in operating temperature for the gas turbine, the potential for single digit NOx levels (based upon 15% O{sub 2}, in the exhaust) has been retained. The combined effect of performance increase and environmental control is achieved by an innovative closed loop steam cooling system which tightly integrates the gas turbine and steam turbine cycles. The ``H`` Gas Turbine Combined Cycle System meets the goals and objectives of the DOE Advanced Turbine System Program. The development and demonstration of this new system is being carried out as part of the Industrial/Government cooperative agreement under the ATS Program. This program will achieve first commercial operation of this new system before the end of the century.

Corman, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Combined-cycle power tower  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper evaluates a new power tower concept that offers significant benefits for commercialization of power tower technology. The concept uses a molten nitrate salt centralreceiver plant to supply heat, in the form of combustion air preheat, to a conventional combined-cycle power plant. The evaluation focused on first commercial plants, examined three plant capacities (31, 100, and 300 MWe), and compared these plants with a solar-only 100-MWe plant and with gas-only combined-cycle plants in the same three capacities. Results of the analysis point to several benefits relative to the solar-only plant including low energy cost for first plants, low capital cost for first plants, reduced risk with respect to business uncertainties, and the potential for new markets. In addition, the concept appears to have minimal technology development requirements. Significantly, the results show that it is possible to build a first plant with this concept that can compete with existing gas-only combined-cycle plants.

Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.; Price, H.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

NETL: Gasification - Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Recovery Act: Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Project Number: FC26-98FT40343 Project Description Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. is developing, scaling-up, and demonstrating a novel air separation technology for large-scale production of oxygen (O2) at costs that are approximately one-third lower than conventional cryogenic plants. An Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen plant co-produces power and oxygen. A phased technology RD&D effort is underway to demonstrate all necessary technical and economic requirements for scale-up and industrial commercialization. The ITM Oxygen production technology is a radically different approach to producing high-quality tonnage oxygen and to enhance the performance of integrated gasification combined cycle and other advanced power generation systems. Instead of cooling air to cryogenic temperatures, oxygen is extracted from air at temperatures synergistic with power production operations. Process engineering and economic evaluations of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants comparing ITM Oxygen with a state-of-the-art cryogenic air separation unit are aimed to show that the installed capital cost of the air separation unit and the installed capital of IGCC facility are significantly lower compared to conventional technologies, while improving power plant output and efficiency. The use of low-cost oxygen in combustion processes would provide cost-effective emission reduction and carbon management opportunities. ITM Oxygen is an enabling module for future plants for producing coal derived shifted synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen [H2] and carbon dioxide [CO2]) ultimately for producing clean energy and fuels. Oxygen-intensive industries such as steel, glass, non-ferrous metallurgy, refineries, and pulp and paper may also realize cost and productivity benefits as a result of employing ITM Oxygen.

273

Optimal control system design for IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing an optimal control system for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture addresses the challenge of efficiently operating and controlling a coal-fed IGCC plant with the desired extent of CO2 capture in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. The control system design needs to optimize a desired scalar objective function while satisfying all the operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. Various objective functions can be considered for the control system design such as maximization of profit, maximization of the power produced, or minimization of the auxiliary power. The design of such a control system makes the plant suitable to play an active role in the smart grid era as the plant will have the required agility. In addition, other penalty function(s) such as emission penalties for CO2 or other criteria pollutants can be considered in the framework as well as losses associated with any hydrogen or carbon monoxide loses. The proposed control system design is performed in two stages. In the first stage, a top-down analysis is performed to generate a list of controlled, manipulated, and disturbance variables considering a scalar operational objective and other process constraints. In the second stage, a bottom-up approach for simultaneous design of the control structure and the controllers is used. In this paper, the first stage of the two-stage approach is applied to the IGCCs acid gas removal (AGR) process which removes both H2S and CO2 from the shifted synthesis gas. While these results are still preliminary, they demonstrate the application of the proposed approach for a commercial-scale plant and show some interesting results related to controlled variable selection. Such an approach can be followed not only to design control systems for new power plants, but also to retrofit control systems for existing plants with suitable modifications.

Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

NETL: Gasification- Water-Gas Shift (WGS) Tests to Reduce Steam Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Water-Gas Shift (WGS) Tests to Reduce Steam Use National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Southern Company Services, Inc. Project Number: NT0000749 Project Description The National Carbon Capture Center is testing commercial water-gas shift (WGS) catalysts from multiple vendors in support of developing WGS reactor systems which will reduce the cost of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from the production of syngas using coal. These tests have revealed that steam-to-carbon monoxide (CO) ratios can be reduced, resulting in a substantial increase in the net power output and significantly reducing the cost of electricity from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture. Several commercially available WGS catalysts have been tested, and the results are being provided to the manufacturers to aid them in specifying future WGS systems for IGCC plants incorporating CO2 capture.

275

Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update Newsletter: June 2011 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of the GUA Update: Quarterly Summary Ongoing U.S. Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects News Items on Operating IGCC Plants U.S. IGCC Project Updates International IGCC Project Updates International Gasification Projects for Chemicals Biomass and Waste Gasification Projects Coal to SNG Coal to Liquids (CTL) Gas to Liquids (GTL) Underground Co...

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

EMERY BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emery Recycling Corporation (now Emery Energy Company, LLC) evaluated the technical and economical feasibility of the Emery Biomass Gasification Power System (EBGPS). The gasifier technology is owned and being developed by Emery. The Emery Gasifier for this project was an oxygen-blown, pressurized, non-slagging gasification process that novelly integrates both fixed-bed and entrained-flow gasification processes into a single vessel. This unique internal geometry of the gasifier vessel will allow for tar and oil destruction within the gasifier. Additionally, the use of novel syngas cleaning processes using sorbents is proposed with the potential to displace traditional amine-based and other syngas cleaning processes. The work scope within this project included: one-dimensional gasifier modeling, overall plant process modeling (ASPEN), feedstock assessment, additional analyses on the proposed syngas cleaning process, plant cost estimating, and, market analysis to determine overall feasibility and applicability of the technology for further development and commercial deployment opportunities. Additionally, the project included the development of a detailed technology development roadmap necessary to commercialize the Emery Gasification technology. Process modeling was used to evaluate both combined cycle and solid oxide fuel cell power configurations. Ten (10) cases were evaluated in an ASPEN model wherein nine (9) cases were IGCC configurations with fuel-to-electricity efficiencies ranging from 38-42% and one (1) case was an IGFC solid oxide case where 53.5% overall plant efficiency was projected. The cost of electricity was determined to be very competitive at scales from 35-71 MWe. Market analysis of feedstock availability showed numerous market opportunities for commercial deployment of the technology with modular capabilities for various plant sizes based on feedstock availability and power demand.

Benjamin Phillips; Scott Hassett; Harry Gatley

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

277

EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, California EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated...

278

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IGCC PC advanced coal-wind hybrid combined cycle power plantnatural gas combined cycle gas turbine power plant carboncrude gasification combined cycle power plant with carbon

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IGCC Integrated gasification combined cycle IID ImperialCorporation NGCC Natural gas combined-cycle NGCT Natural gas79% from natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants, and

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant.Analysis: Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Power Plant.assessment of natural gas combined cycle power plant with

Sathre, Roger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a natural gas-fired combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT).integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) generationrate exceeding that of a combined-cycle natural gas unit.

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant.Analysis: Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Power Plant.assessment of natural gas combined cycle power plant with

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Combined Cycle Performance Tracking Guideline: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) Combined Cycle Performance Monitoring and Recovery Guideline (EPRI report 1023971) was developed in 2012 to provide plant owners and operators with a comprehensive guideline for identifying and quantifying combined-cycle performance losses and appropriate recovery activities for a generic F-Class combined-cycle power plant (CCPP). This report, Combined-Cycle Performance Tracking Guideline, has been developed as an adjunct ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

Gasification Users Association Update Newsletter: September 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update Newsletter is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of the GUA Update: Quarterly Summary August 12 Report from Interagency Task force on Carbon Capture and Storage International Support for CO2 Capture Sequestration (CCS) Ongoing US Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects US IGCC and Gasification Project Updates Biomass and Waste Gasification Projects International IGCC and Gasificati...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

285

Efficiency combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of operating a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: flowing exhaust gas from a combustion turbine through a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG); flowing feed water through an economizer section of the HRSG at a flow rate and providing heated feed water; flowing a first portion of the heated feed water through an evaporator section of the HRSG and producing saturated steam at a production rate, the flow rate of the feed water through the economizer section being greater than required to sustain the production rate of steam in the evaporator section; flowing fuel for the turbine through a heat exchanger; and, flowing a second portion of the heated feed water provided by the economizer section through the heat exchanger then to an inlet of the economizer section, thereby heating the fuel flowing through the heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Meyers, G.A.; Baldwin, T.S.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

286

The systems and the developmental target for IGCC  

SciTech Connect

Brief descriptions are provided concerning integrated combined cycle power technology and fluidized bed combustion technology. The General Electric Integrated Gasifier and HGCU Operation program, Power Systems Development Facility, Gasification Product Improvement Facility, and Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Program are discussed.

Schmidt, D.K.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

ConocoPhillips Sweeny IGCC/CCS Project  

SciTech Connect

Under its Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Program, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) selected ConocoPhillips Company (ConocoPhillips) to receive funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 for the proposed Sweeny Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC)/Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project (Project) to be located in Brazoria County, Texas. Under the program, the DOE is partnering with industry to demonstrate the commercial viability and operational readiness of technologies that would capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources and either sequester those emissions, or beneficially reuse them. The primary objective of the proposed Project was to demonstrate the efficacy of advanced technologies that capture CO{sub 2} from a large industrial source and store the CO{sub 2} in underground formations, while achieving a successful business venture for the entity (entities) involved. The Project would capture 85% of the CO{sub 2} produced from a petroleum coke (petcoke) fed, 703 MWnet (1,000 MWgross) IGCC power plant, using the ConocoPhillips (COP) proprietary and commercially proven E-Gas{trademark} gasification technology, at the existing 247,000 barrel per day COP Sweeny Refinery. In addition, a number of other commercially available technologies would be integrated into a conventional IGCC Plant in a unique, efficient, and reliable design that would capture CO{sub 2}. The primary destination for the CO{sub 2} would be a depleted natural gas field suitable for CO{sub 2} storage ('Storage Facility'). COP would also develop commercial options to sell a portion of the IGCC Plant's CO{sub 2} output to the growing Gulf Coast enhanced oil recovery (EOR) market. The IGCC Plant would produce electric power for sale in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas Houston Zone. The existing refinery effluent water would be treated and reused to fulfill all process water needs. The DOE ICCS program adopts a two-phase approach. During the 7-month Phase 1 period, ConocoPhillips further defined the Project by advancing the preliminary design, permits, and contracts. In addition, ConocoPhillips was developing a Phase 2 renewal application to seek continued DOE funding for the Project's design, construction, and early operations. The DOE and ConocoPhillips entered into a Phase1 Cooperative Agreement (DOE Award Number DE-FE0001859) on November 16, 2009, agreeing to share cost on a 50/50 basis during the Phase 1 period, with a DOE budget of $2,989,174. On April 7, 2010, ConocoPhillips informed the DOE that it would not participate in Phase 2 of the DOE ICCS program. The company believes that enabling legislation and regulations at both the federal and state levels will not be approved and implemented in time to make a final investment decision such that the Project would be substantially constructed by September 30, 2015, the end of the AARA funding period. Considering current price assumptions, the Project would not generate investment level returns. ConocoPhillips elected not to submit a Phase 2 renewal application, which was due on April 16, 2010. This Final Scientific/Technical Report provides an overview of the Project, including highlights and benefits of the proposed carbon capture and storage project scope, sites, and technologies. It also summarizes the work accomplishments during the Phase 1 period from November 16, 2009 to June 16, 2010. Due to ConocoPhillips decision not to submit the Phase 2 renewal application and not to enter into related agreements, certain information regarding the proposed CO{sub 2} storage facility cannot be publicly reported due to confidentiality agreements.

Paul Talarico; Charles Sugg; Thomas Hren; Lauri Branch; Joseph Garcia; Alan Rezigh; Michelle Pittenger; Kathleen Bower; Jonathan Philley; Michael Culligan; Jeremy Maslen; Michele Woods; Kevin Elm

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

Westinghouse to launch coal gasifier with combined cycle unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Westinghouse has designed a prototype coal gasifier which can be intergrated with a combined cycle unit and enable power plants to use coal in an efficient and environmentally acceptable way. Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (CGCC) technology burns gas made from coal in a gas turbine to generate power and then collects the hot exhaust gases to produce steam for further power generation. The commercialization of this process would meet the public's need for an economical and clean way to use coal, the utitities' need to meet electric power demands, and the nation's need to reduce dependence on imported oil. The Westinghouse process is described along with the company's plans for a demonstration plant and the option of a phased introduction to allow utilities to continue the use of existing equipment and generate revenue while adding to capacity. (DCK)

Stavsky, R.M.; Margaritis, P.J.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Development of a hot-gas desulfurization system for IGCC applications  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are being advanced worldwide to produce electricity from coal because of their superior environmental performance, economics, and efficiency in comparison to conventional coal-based power plants. One key component of an advanced IGCC power plant is a hot-gas desulfurization system employing regenerable sorbents. To carry out hot-gas desulfurization in a fluidized-bed reactor, it is necessary that the sorbents have high attrition resistance, while still maintaining high chemical reactivity and sulfur absorption capacity. Also, efficient processes are needed for the treatment of SO{sub 2}-containing regeneration off-gas to produce environmentally benign waste or useful byproducts. A series of durable zinc titanate sorbents were formulated and tested in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor system. Reactive sorbents were developed with addition resistance comparable to fluid-bed cracking (FCC) catalysts used in petroleum refineries. In addition, progress continues on the development of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for converting SO{sub 2} in the regeneration off-gas to elemental sulfur. Plans are under way to test these bench-scale systems at gasifier sites with coal gas. This paper describes the status and future plans for the demonstration of these technologies.

Gupta, R.; McMichael, W.J.; Gangwal, S.K. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Jain, S.C.; Dorchak, T.P. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Gasification Users Association Update Newsletter: June 2010 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GUA Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update: Quarterly Summary President Obama Establishes Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage International Support for CO2 Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Ongoing US Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects US IGCC and Gasification Project Updates US Biomass and Waste Gasification Projects International IGCC and Gasification...

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

291

Gasification Users Association Update Newsletter: March 2010 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GUA Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update: President Obama Establishes Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage International Support for CO2 Capture & Sequestration (CCS) Ongoing US Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects US IGCC and Gasification Project Updates US Biomass and Waste Gasification Projects International IGCC and Gasification Projects US Coal t...

2010-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

292

NETL: Gasification Systems - Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry for Feeding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low-Rank Coal to Gasifiers Project Number: DE-FE0007977 There is increased interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) for future coal-based power plants, and in a CCS integrated gasification plant, relatively pure, high pressure CO2 stream(s) will be available within the power plant. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) aims to help reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CCS by using a portion of the high purity CO2 product stream as the carrier fluid to feed low rank coal (LRC) into the gasifier. EPRI proposes to confirm the potential advantages of LRC/liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) slurries by: Conducting plant-wide technical and economic simulations.

293

An Overview of hydrogen production from KRW oxygen-blown gasification with carbon dioxide recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All the process elements are commercially available to operate coal gasification so that it can produce electricity, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide while delivering the same quantity of power as without H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} recovery. To assess the overall impact of such a scheme, a full-energy cycle must be investigated (Figure 1). Figure 2 is a process flow diagram for a KRW oxygen-blown integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) plant that produces electricity, H{sub 2}, and supercritical CO{sub 2}. This system was studied in a full-energy cycle analysis, extending from the coal mine to the final destination of the gaseous product streams [Doctor et al. 1996, 1999], on the basis of an earlier study [Gallaspy et al. 1990]. The authors report the results of updating these studies to use current turbine performance.

Doctor, R. D.; Brockmeier, N. F.; Molburg, J. C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Chess, K. L.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

NETL: Gasification Systems - Model Based Optimal Sensor Network Design for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Based Optimal Sensor Network Design for Condition Monitoring Model Based Optimal Sensor Network Design for Condition Monitoring Project Number: FE0005712 General Electric (GE) Global Research is developing an advanced model-based optimal sensor network to monitor the condition of the gasification section in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant. The work builds on model-based controls aimed at enhancing efficiency and operational flexibility through increased automation. Within an overall strategy of employing model-based online monitoring and predictive controls, GE Global Research is extending existing models for the gasifier and radiant syngas cooler to include the effects of degradation and fouling on the sensed variables like temperature etc., and will implement an estimation algorithm to assess the extent of gasifier refractory degradation and radiant syngas cooler fouling. An optimization-based solution will be employed to optimally place the hardware sensors utilized in the estimation algorithm in order to achieve the monitoring requirements at the lowest cost. The performance of the sensor placement algorithm and resulting monitoring solution will be demonstrated through simulations using representative test cases. The overall approach is one of the first to be applicable to condition monitoring of critical components in IGCC plants.

295

A utility`s perspective of the market for IGCC  

SciTech Connect

I believe, in the short-term U. S. market that IGCC`s primary competition is, natural gas-fired combined cycle technology. I believe that in order for IGCC to compete on a commercial basis, that natural gas prices have to rise relative to coal prices, and that the capital cost of the technology must come down. While this statement may seem to be somewhat obvious, it raises two interesting points. The first is that while the relative pricing of natural gas and coal is not generally within the technology supplier`s control, the capital cost is. The reduction of capital cost represents a major challenge for the technology suppliers in order for this technology to become commercialized. The second point is that the improvements being achieved with IGCC efficiencies probably won`t help it outperform the effects of natural gas pricing. This is due to the fact that the combined cycle portion of the IGCC technology is experiencing the most significant improvements in efficiency. I do see, however, a significant advantage for IGCC technology compared to conventional pulverized coal-fired units. As IGCC efficiencies continue to improve, combined with their environmentally superior performance, I believe that IGCC will be the ``technology of choice`` for utilities that install new coal-fired generation. We have achieved economic justification of our project by virtue of the DOE`s funding of $120 million awarded in Round III of their Clean Coal Technology Program. This program provides the bridge between current technology economics and those of the future. And Tampa Electric is pleased to be taking a leadership position in furthering the IGCC knowledge base.

Black, C.R. [Tampa Electric Co., FL (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To eliminate the harmful effects of greenhouse gases, especially that of CO2, future coalfired power plants need to consider the option for CO2 capture. The loss in efficiency for CO2 capture is less in an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant compared to other conventional coal combustion processes. However, no IGCC plant with CO2 capture currently exists in the world. Therefore, it is important to consider the operability and controllability issues of such a plant before it is commercially built. With this objective in mind, a detailed plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture has been developed. The plant considers a General Electric Energy (GEE)-type downflow radiant-only gasifier followed by a quench section. A two-stage water gas shift (WGS) reaction is considered for conversion of about 96 mol% of CO to CO2. A two-stage acid gas removal (AGR) process based on a physical solvent is simulated for selective capture of H2S and CO2. The clean syngas is sent to a gas turbine (GT) followed by a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The steady state results are validated with data from a commercial gasifier. A 5 % ramp increase in the flowrate of coal is introduced to study the system dynamics. To control the conversion of CO at a desired level in the WGS reactors, the steam/CO ratio is manipulated. This strategy is found to be efficient for this operating condition. In the absence of an efficient control strategy in the AGR process, the environmental emissions exceeded the limits by a great extent.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Orlando Gasification Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This environmental impact statement (EIS) has been prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) as amended (42 USC 4321 et seq.), Council on Environmental Quality regulations for implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and DOE NEPA regulations (10 CFR Part 1021). The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a project which was proposed by Southern Company in partnership with the Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) and which has been selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) program. The proposed project would demonstrate advanced power generation systems using Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC)

298

NETL: Gasification - Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology Scale-Up and Demonstration Project Research Triangle Institute Project Number: FE0000489 Project Description Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is designing, building, and testing the Warm Temperature Desulfurization Process (WDP) at pre-commercial scale (50 megawatt electric equivalent [MWe]) to remove more than 99.9 percent of the sulfur from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas). RTI is integrating this WDP technology with an activated methyl diethanolamine (aMDEA) solvent technology to separate 90% of the carbon dioxide (CO2) from shifted syngas. The Polk Power Station, an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, will supply approximately 20% of its coal-derived syngas as a slipstream to feed into the pre-commercial scale technologies being scaled-up.

299

Polygeneration Integration of Gasoline Synthesis and IGCC Power Production Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas produced by gasification in a gas turbine. This synthesis gas is also an excellent raw material for a gas turbine in a combined cycle power generation scheme. Coal Residue Gasification Gas Cleaning for chemicals production such as methanol, DiMethyl Ether (DME), gasoline, Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG), hydrogen

300

IGCC Design Considerations for CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains technical design, plant performance, cost estimates, and economic analysis of IGCC power plants designed with future retrofit for full CO2 capture in mind. The gasification technologies supplied by General Electric, Shell, and Siemens studied in the report were designed to initially produce power without CO2 capture; but their designs included moderate pre-investment to economically accommodate retrofit of full CO2 capture at a later date. The base plant designs include deep sulfur r...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Materials Guidelines for Gasification Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report distills and condenses EPRI's knowledge of materials performance in numerous pilot and commercial-scale gasifiers into guidelines for the application and expected performance of materials in key parts of gasification-combined-cycle power plants.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

303

Proceedings of the coal-fired power systems 94: Advances in IGCC and PFBC review meeting. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coal-Fired Power Systems 94 -- Advances in IGCC and PFBC Review Meeting was held June 21--23, 1994, at the Morgantown Energy Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. This Meeting was sponsored and hosted by METC, the Office of Fossil Energy, and the US Department of Energy (DOE). METC annually sponsors this conference for energy executives, engineers, scientists, and other interested parties to review the results of research and development projects; to discuss the status of advanced coal-fired power systems and future plans with the industrial contractors; and to discuss cooperative industrial-government research opportunities with METC`s in-house engineers and scientists. Presentations included industrial contractor and METC in-house technology developments related to the production of power via coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems, the summary status of clean coal technologies, and developments and advancements in advanced technology subsystems, such as hot gas cleanup. A keynote speaker and other representatives from the electric power industry also gave their assessment of advanced power systems. This meeting contained 11 formal sessions and one poster session, and included 52 presentations and 24 poster presentations. Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: filter technology issues; hazardous air pollutants; sorbents and solid wastes; and membranes. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

McDaniel, H.M.; Staubly, R.K.; Venkataraman, V.K. [eds.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

AVESTAR - AVESTAR Team Advances Dynamic Modeling and Control...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trainers Meet Our Partners Simulators IGCC Gasification Combined Cycle NGCC SCOT Oxy-coal Shale Gas 3D Virtual IGCC Training How to Register for Training IGCC Gasification Combined...

305

Axisymmetric Inlet Design for Combined Cycle Engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Performance considerations for a turbine-based combined-cycle engine inlet are presented using the inlet of the Lockheed SR-71 as a baseline. A numerical model is developed (more)

Colville, Jesse

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Download EIS-0409: Final Environmental Impact Statement Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) Project http:energy.govnepadownloads...

307

Mixed-Conducting Nanomaterials for Application in High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... plants and future Integrated Combined Cycle Gasification (IGCC) systems. ... Modeling and Optimizing the Thermal Stress Distribution in a Plasma Spray...

308

Combined Cycle Performance Monitoring and Recovery Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of improved combined cycle power plant performance continue to grow as the cost of fuel rises and international concerns over global warming increase.This guideline provides a framework for performance monitoring, assessment, recovery and optimization of combined cycle power plants. The guideline distills existing experience and documents on heat rate recovery and capacity improvement into a comprehensive manual for plant implementation and training applications. The purpose ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Download CX-000380: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sweeney Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC)Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project - IGCC Plant CX(s) Applied:...

310

NOTICE OF INTENT TO GRANT PARTIALLY EXCLUSIVE LICENSE NATIONAL ...  

Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Operator Training System (OTS) Software. The software license will include source and executable copies of the IGCC Dynamic Model ...

311

Split stream boilers for high-temperature/high-pressure topping steam turbine combined cycles  

SciTech Connect

Research and development work on high-temperature and high-pressure (up to 1,500 F TIT and 4,500 psia) topping steam turbines and associated steam generators for steam power plants as well as combined cycle plants is being carried forward by DOE, EPRI, and independent companies. Aeroderivative gas turbines and heavy-duty gas turbines both will require exhaust gas supplementary firing to achieve high throttle temperatures. This paper presents an analysis and examples of a split stream boiler arrangement for high-temperature and high-pressure topping steam turbine combined cycles. A portion of the gas turbine exhaust flow is run in parallel with a conventional heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). This side stream is supplementary fired opposed to the current practice of full exhaust flow firing. Chemical fuel gas recuperation can be incorporated in the side stream as an option. A significant combined cycle efficiency gain of 2 to 4 percentage points can be realized using this split stream approach. Calculations and graphs show how the DOE goal of 60 percent combined cycle efficiency burning natural gas fuel can be exceeded. The boiler concept is equally applicable to the integrated coal gas fuel combined cycle (IGCC).

Rice, I.G. [Rice (I.G.), Spring, TX (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project: A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCT) is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering (WRCGR) Project, as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1992). Repowering consists of replacing an existing coal-fired boiler with one or more clean coal technologies to achieve significantly improved environmental performance. The desire to demonstrate utility repowering with a two-stage, pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow, integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) system prompted Destec Energy, Inc., and PSI Energy, Inc., to form a joint venture and submit a proposal for this project. In July 1992, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture (WRCGRPJV, the Participant) entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. The project was sited at PSI Energy's Wabash River Generating Station, located in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate IGCC repowering using a Destec gasifier and to assess long-term reliability, availability, and maintainability of the system at a fully commercial scale. DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding (for capital and operating costs during the demonstration period) of $438 million.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Project Number: DE-FE0007966 TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is demonstrating the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low-rank coals. The plant uses an integrated carbon dioxide (CO2) scrubber/water gas shift (WGS) catalyst to capture more than 90 percent of the CO2 emissions, while increasing the cost of electricity by less than 10 percent compared to a plant with no carbon capture. TDA is optimizing the sorbent/catalyst and process design, and assessing the efficacy of the integrated WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system, first in bench-scale experiments and then in a slipstream field demonstration using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. The results will feed into a techno-economic analysis to estimate the impact of the WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system on the thermal efficiency of the plant and the cost of electricity.

314

Enhancement of IGCC through clean by-product fuel coproduction  

SciTech Connect

The major objective of this paper is to first design a base case IGCC plant that is representative of a base-loaded power plant, and then to identify and to quantify the potential benefits of a spare gasifier and fuel-grade methanol coproduction as additions to the base case plant. This is significantly different than previous methanol coproduction IGCC studies which have assumed cyclic operation with undersized coal gasification capacity. The proposed IGCC plant will be at FPL's Martin Site, located near the eastern shore of Lake Okeechobee, Florida. The major components of the proposed IGCC plant are: dry-feed (Shell) or slurry-feed (Dow) gasifiers, GE advanced gas turbine (Model MS7001F), methanol plant based on liquid Phase Methanol (LPMeOH*) process.

Schmoe, L.A. (Bechtel Power Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)); Tam, S.S. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)); Walters, A.B. (Florida Power and Light Co., West Palm Beach, FL (US)); Weber, W. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project  

SciTech Connect

Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit [number sign]1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

Jenkins, S.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project  

SciTech Connect

Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit {number_sign}1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

Jenkins, S.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

COST OF MERCURY REMOVAL IN IGCC PLANTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost of Mercury Removal Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report September 2002 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory By: Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group Inc. Reading, Pennsylvania Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania DOE Product Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Task Manager: James R. Longanbach Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Russell C. Maxwell Michael D. Rutkowski PARSONS The Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report i September 2002 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page 1 Summary 1 2 Introduction 3 3 Background 4 3.1 Regulatory Initiatives 4 3.2 Mercury Removal for Conventional Coal-Fired Plants 4 3.3 Mercury Removal Experience in Gasification 5 3.4 Variability of Mercury Content in Coal 6 4 Design Considerations 7 4.1 Carbon Bed Location

318

Changes related to "A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twitter icon Changes related to "A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation" A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation...

319

Gasification Technologie: Opportunities & Challenges  

SciTech Connect

This course has been put together to provide a single source document that not only reviews the historical development of gasification but also compares the process to combustion. It also provides a short discussion on integrated gasification and combined cycle processes. The major focus of the course is to describe the twelve major gasifiers being developed today. The hydrodynamics and kinetics of each are reviewed along with the most likely gas composition from each of the technologies when using a variety of fuels under different conditions from air blown to oxygen blown and atmospheric pressure to several atmospheres. If time permits, a more detailed discussion of low temperature gasification will be included.

Breault, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

DOE IGCC Project. Fourth quarterly report, [October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

We have previously reported a decision to move the simple cycle commercial operation to a date coincident with the July 1, 1996 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) commercial operation date. This necessitated a major rescheduling of the engineering and construction efforts to ensure a totally coordinated plan. This rescheduling was completed in mid October 1994 and resulted in an integrated engineering and construction schedule. The major effort in the fourth quarter of 1994 centered around equipment procurement to support the new integrated plan. This is required so that sufficient engineering details will be available to generate construction bid packages with at least 90% completed effort. During the reporting period 43 material requisitions (MR`s) were issued for bids. Also during-the reporting period a total of 14 purchase orders were issued including the generator step-up transformer and major columns and vessels. Bid packages were prepared, for bid submittal in January 1994, for a turnkey sulfuric acid plant and for the transportation/erection of the radiant syngas cooler (RSC). The original concept was for MAN GHH to deliver the RSC as part of their design and fabrication contract. However, in an attempt to improve coordination for the overall handling of this significant piece of equipment, it was decided to remove the transportation from MAN GHH`s scope of work and include the transportation with the RSC erection contract. Initial indication from prospective bidders and Bechtel are that lower total costs will be achieved in addition to the expected improved coordination.

1994-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Load-following control of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a decentralized control strategy is considered for load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture without flaring the syngas. The control strategy considered is gas turbine (GT) lead with gasifier follow. In this strategy, the GT controls the power load by manipulating its firing rate while the slurry feed flow to the gasifier is manipulated to control the syngas pressure at the GT inlet. However, the syngas pressure control is an integrating process with significant timedelay. In this work, a modified proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control is considered for syngas pressure control given that conventional PID controllers show poor control performance for integrating processes with large time delays. The conventional PID control is augmented with an internal feedback loop. The P-controller used in this internal loop converts the integrating process to an open-loop stable process. The resulting secondorder plus time delay model uses a PID controller where the tuning parameters are found by minimizing the integral time-weighted absolute error (ITAE) for disturbance rejection. A plant model with single integrator and time delay is identified by a P-control method. When a ramp change is introduced in the set-point of the load controller, the performance of both the load and pressure controllers with the modified PID control strategy is found to be superior to that using a traditional PID controller. Key

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Thermodynamic Phase Stability in Gasification Carbon Feedstock ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... Symposium, Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management ... Abstract Scope, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle for power production is considered a clean ... of Differently Heat Treated Steels in CCS Environment with Supercritical CO2.

323

Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant utilizing wood waste products as a fuel has been designed. This plant will yield a 50% efficiency improvement compared to conventional wood-fueled steam power plants. The power plant features an externally-fired gas turbine combined cycle system that obtains its heat input from a high temperature, high pressure ceramic air heater burning wood waste products as a fuel. This paper presents the results of the design study including the cycle evaluation and a description of the major components of the power plant. The cycle configuration is based on maximum fuel efficiency with minimum capital equipment risk. The cycle discussion includes design point performance of the power plant. The design represents a significant step forward in wood-fueled power plants.

Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL Visiting NETL People Search Go to US DOE Gasifipedia TOC > Applications > Power-IGCC Gasifipedia Applications of Gasification Power (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle)...

325

Green Manufacturing II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2011 ... In an integrated coal gasification combined cycle power generation (IGCC) and an integrated coal gasification Fuel cell power generation...

326

SOFC combined cycle systems for distributed generation  

SciTech Connect

The final phase of the tubular SOFC development program will focus on the development and demonstration of pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC)/gas turbine (GT) combined cycle power systems for distributed power applications. The commercial PSOFC/GT product line will cover the power range 200 kWe to 50 MWe, and the electrical efficiency for these systems will range from 60 to 75% (net AC/LHV CH4), the highest of any known fossil fueled power generation technology. The first demonstration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine combined cycle will be a proof-of-concept 250 kWe PSOFC/MTG power system consisting of a single 200 kWe PSOFC module and a 50 kWe microturbine generator (MTG). The second demonstration of this combined cycle will be 1.3 MWe fully packaged, commercial prototype PSOFC/GT power system consisting of two 500 kWe PSOFC modules and a 300 kWe gas turbine.

Brown, R.A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

PFBC and IGCC power generation technologies: status and opportunities  

SciTech Connect

View graphs are presented for pressurized fluidized bed combustion and combined-cycle power plants/coal gasification technologies. Photographs, graphs and flowsheets are included covering the following topics: product line; product goals; product development strategy; this year`s success; barrier issues; key plans for next year; technical status; and market opportunities.

Brdar, R.D.; Reuther, R.B.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Refinery IGCC plants are exceeding 90% capacity factor after 3 years  

SciTech Connect

Steep learning curves for commercial IGCC plants in Italy show annual capacity factors of 55-60% in the first year of service and improvement to over 90% after the third year. The article reviews the success of three IGCC projects in Italy - those of ISAB Energy, Sarlux Saras and Api Energy. EniPower is commissioning a 250 MW IGCC plant that will burn syngas produced by gasification of residues at an adjacent Eni Sannazzaro refinery in north central Italy. The article lists 14 commercially operating IGCC plants worldwide that together provide close to 3900 MW of generating capacity. These use a variety of feedstock-coals, petroleum coke and refinery residues and biomass. Experience with commercial scale plants in Europe demonstrates that IGCC plants can operate at capacity factors comparable to if not better than conventional coal plants. 2 figs., 1 photo.

Jaeger, H.

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Solid oxide fuel cell combined cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The integration of the solid oxide fuel cell and combustion turbine technologies can result in combined-cycle power plants, fueled with natural gas, that have high efficiencies and clean gaseous emissions. Results of a study are presented in which conceptual designs were developed for 3 power plants based upon such an integration, and ranging in rating from 3 to 10 MW net ac. The plant cycles are described and characteristics of key components summarized. Also, plant design-point efficiency estimates are presented as well as values of other plant performance parameters.

Bevc, F.P. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States). Power Generation Business Unit; Lundberg, W.L.; Bachovchin, D.M. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Progress in carbon dioxide capture and separation research for gasification-based power generation point sources  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the present work is to investigate novel approaches, materials, and molecules for the abatement of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the pre-combustion stage of gasification-based power generation point sources. The capture/separation step for CO2 from large point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the Office of Research and Development of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the present research is focused on the capture/separation of carbon dioxide from fuel gas (precombustion gas) from processes such as the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process. For such applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical sorption, chemical sorption with solid sorbents, and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, processes based on dry, regenerable sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

Pennline, H.; Luebke, D.; Jones, K.; Myers, C.; Morsi, B.; Heintz, Y.; Ilconich, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Combined Cycle Cogeneration at NALCO Chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nalco Chemical Company, while expanding their corporate headquarters, elected to investigate the potential for cogeneration. The headquarters complex has a central physical plant for heating and chilling. The authors describe the analysis approach for determining the most economical system design. Generation capacity ranging from 2.7 MW up to 7.0 MW in both simple cycle cogeneration and combined cycle cogeneration was analyzed. Both single pressure and dual pressure waste heat boilers were included in the evaluation. In addition, absorption chilling and electrical centrifugal chilling capacity expansion were integrated into the model. The gas turbine selection procedure is outlined. Bid evaluation procedure involved a life cycle cost comparison wherein the bid specification responses for each model turbine were incorporated into the life cycle facility program. The recommendation for the facility is a 4.0MW combined cycle cogeneration system. This system is scheduled for startup in October of 1985. Most major equipment has been purchased and the building to house the system is nearing completion. A discussion of the purchase and scheduling integration will be included.

Thunem, C. B.; Jacobs, K. W.; Hanzel, W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Westinghouse fuel cell combined cycle systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficiency (voltage) of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) should increase with operating pressure, and a pressurized SOFC could function as the heat addition process in a Brayton cycle gas turbine (GT) engine. An overall cycle efficiency of 70% should be possible. In cogeneration, half of the waste heat from a PSOFC/GT should be able to be captured in process steam and hot water, leading to a fuel effectiveness of about 85%. In order to make the PSOFC/GT a commercial reality, satisfactory operation of the SOFC at elevated pressure must be verified, a pressurized SOFC generator module must be designed, built, and tested, and the combined cycle and parameters must be optimized. A prototype must also be demonstrated. This paper describes progress toward making the PSOFC/GT a reality.

Veyo, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Integrated Sensing and Controls for Coal Gasification - Development of Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier and Syngas Cooler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the achievements and final results of this program. The objective of this program is to develop a comprehensive systems approach to integrated design of sensing and control systems for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant, using advanced model-based techniques. In particular, this program is focused on the model-based sensing and control system design for the core gasification section of an IGCC plant. The overall approach consists of (i) developing a first-principles physics-based dynamic model of the gasification section, (ii) performing model-reduction where needed to derive low-order models suitable for controls analysis and design, (iii) developing a sensing system solution combining online sensors with model-based estimation for important process variables not measured directly, and (iv) optimizing the steady-state and transient operation of the plant for normal operation as well as for startup using model predictive controls (MPC). Initially, available process unit models were implemented in a common platform using Matlab/Simulink{reg_sign}, and appropriate model reduction and model updates were performed to obtain the overall gasification section dynamic model. Also, a set of sensor packages were developed through extensive lab testing and implemented in the Tampa Electric Company IGCC plant at Polk power station in 2009, to measure temperature and strain in the radiant syngas cooler (RSC). Plant operation data was also used to validate the overall gasification section model. The overall dynamic model was then used to develop a sensing solution including a set of online sensors coupled with model-based estimation using nonlinear extended Kalman filter (EKF). Its performance in terms of estimating key unmeasured variables like gasifier temperature, carbon conversion, etc., was studied through extensive simulations in the presence sensing errors (noise and bias) and modeling errors (e.g. unknown gasifier kinetics, RSC fouling). In parallel, an MPC solution was initially developed using ideal sensing to optimize the plant operation during startup pre-heating as well as steady state and transient operation under normal high-pressure conditions, e.g. part-load, base-load, load transition and fuel changes. The MPC simulation studies showed significant improvements both for startup pre-heating and for normal operation. Finally, the EKF and MPC solutions were coupled to achieve the integrated sensing and control solution and its performance was studied through extensive steady state and transient simulations in the presence of sensor and modeling errors. The results of each task in the program and overall conclusions are summarized in this final report.

Aditya Kumar

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

334

CE IGCC repowering project: Controls & instrumentation. Topical report, June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IGCC Control System is used to provide operator interface and controls for manual and auto operation of the IGCC Repowering Project Located at Springfield, Illinois. A Distributed Control System (DCS) is provided for analog (process control) loop functions and to provide the operator interface. A Data Acquisition System (DAS) is provided for gathering performance data and optimization. Programmable Logic Controllers will be provided for the following digital control systems: (a) GSSS (Gasifier Supervisory Safety System) including pulverized coal handling and char handling; (b) Coal Pulverization System; (c) HRSG (Heat Recovery Steam Generation); (d) Hot Gas Cleanup System; (e) Steam Turbine; and (f) Combined Cycle Operation. In general all systems are provided for auto/manual cascade operation; upstream equipment is interlocked to be proven in service operation and/or valve position before downstream equipment may operate.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

CE IGCC repowering project: Clean Coal II Project. Annual report, 1 January, 1992--31 December, 1992  

SciTech Connect

CE is participating in a $270 million coal gasification combined cycle repowering project that will provide a nominal 60 MW of electricity to City, Water, light and Power (CWL and P) in Springfield, Illinois. The IGCC system will consist of CE`s air-blown entrained flow two-stage gasifier; an advanced hot gas cleanup system; a combustion turbine adapted to use low-Btu gas: and all necessary coal handling equipment. The project is currently in the second budget period of five. The major activities during this budgeted period are: Establishment of an approved for design (AFD) engineering package; development of a detailed cost estimate; resolution of project business issues; CWL and P renewal and replacement activities; and application for environmental air permits. The Project Management Plan was updated. The conceptual design of the plant was completed and a cost and schedule baseline for the project was established previously in Budget Period One. This information was used to establish AFD Process Flow Diagrams, Piping and Instrument Diagrams, Equipment Data Sheets, material take offs, site modification plans and other information necessary to develop a plus or minus 20% cost estimate. Environmental permitting activities are continuing. At the end of 1992 the major activities remaining for Budget Period two is to finish the cost estimate and complete the Continuation Request Documents.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A review of the efficacy of silicon carbide hot-gas filters in coal gasification and pressurized fluidized bed combustion environments  

SciTech Connect

Reviews of relevant literature and interviews with individuals cognizant of the state of the art in ceramic filters for hot-gas cleaning were conducted. Thermodynamic calculations of the stability of various ceramic phases were also made. Based on these calculations, reviews, and interviews, conclusions were reached regarding the use of silicon carbide-based ceramics at hot-gas filter media. Arguments are presented that provide the basis for the conclusion that high-purity silicon carbide is a viable material in the integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) environments which were examined. Clay-bonded materials are, the authors concluded, suspect for these applications, their extensive use notwithstanding. Operations data reviewed focused primarily on clay-bonded filters, for which a great deal of experience exists. The authors used the clay-bonded filter experience as a point of reference for their review and analysis.

Judkins, R.R.; Stinton, D.P.; DeVan, J.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project: A DOE Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCT) is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering (WRCGR) Project, as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1992). Repowering consists of replacing an existing coal-fired boiler with one or more clean coal technologies to achieve significantly improved environmental performance. The desire to demonstrate utility repowering with a two-stage, pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow, integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) system prompted Destec Energy, Inc., and PSI Energy, Inc., to form a joint venture and submit a proposal for this project. In July 1992, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture (WRCGRPJV, the Participant) entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. The project was sited at PSI Energy's Wabash River Generating Station, located in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate IGCC repowering using a Destec gasifier and to assess long-term reliability, availability, and maintainability of the system at a fully commercial scale. DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding (for capital and operating costs during the demonstration period) of $438 million. Construction for the demonstration project was started in July 1993. Pre-operational tests were initiated in August 1995, and construction was completed in November 1995. Commercial operation began in November 1995, and the demonstration period was completed in December 1999. The independent evaluation contained herein is based primarily on information provided in Wabash's Final Report (Dowd 2000), as well as other references and bibliographic sources.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The performance of a flashing binary combined cycle for geothermal power generation is analysed. It is proposed to utilize hot residual brine from the separator in flashing-type plants to run a binary cycle, thereby producing incremental power. Parametric variations were carried out to determine the optimum performance of the combined cycle. Comparative evaluation with the simple flashing plant was made to assess its thermodynamic potential and economic viability. Results of the analyses indicate that the combined cycle can generate 13-28% more power than the

339

Advanced Control Demonstration on a Combined Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Company, Electricit de France (EDF), and EPRI have undertaken a project to demonstrate the applicability of advanced control techniques on a combined-cycle heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). This report describes progress on the project during 2005 including model identification, the advanced controller design, controller program development, and controller testing in a simulation environment. A combined-cycle plant was selected as the host plant because many combined-cycle plants have chang...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Off-design Simulations of Offshore Combined Cycles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis presents an off-design simulation of offshore combined cycles. Offshore installations have a substantial power demand to facilitate the oil and gas production. (more)

Flateb, ystein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Optimal control system design of an acid gas removal unit for an IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture should be operated optimally in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. To achieve this goal, a systematic approach is taken in this work to design the control system of a selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for a commercial-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The control system design is performed in two stages with the objective of minimizing the auxiliary power while satisfying operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. In the first stage of the control system design, a top-down analysis is used to analyze degrees of freedom, define an operational objective, identify important disturbances and operational/environmental constraints, and select the control variables. With the degrees of freedom, the process is optimized with relation to the operational objective at nominal operation as well as under the disturbances identified. Operational and environmental constraints active at all operations are chosen as control variables. From the results of the optimization studies, self-optimizing control variables are identified for further examination. Several methods are explored in this work for the selection of these self-optimizing control variables. Modifications made to the existing methods will be discussed in this presentation. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for control variables and due to the complexity of the underlying optimization problem, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS) and the Parallel Computing toolbox from Mathworks. The second stage is a bottom-up design of the control layers used for the operation of the process. First, the regulatory control layer is designed followed by the supervisory control layer. Finally, an optimization layer is designed. In this paper, the proposed two-stage control system design approach is applied to the AGR unit for an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Aspen Plus Dynamics is used to develop the dynamic AGR process model while MATLAB is used to perform the control system design and for implementation of model predictive control (MPC).

Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Separation Techniques for Gasification-based Power Generation Point Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (post-combustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle or IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, dry, regenerable processes based on sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Jones, K.L.; Morsi, B.I. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Heintz, Y.J. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Ilconich, J.B. (Parsons)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Coal gasification for the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer  

SciTech Connect

TVA is proposing to develop and commercially demonstrate the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer (urea) using integrated gasification/combined cycle (IGCC) technology. The coal-based coproduction demonstration project will show that the coproduction process can economically and environmentally enhance the production of both electric power and urea. As conceptualized, the proposed coproduction demonstration project facility would be designed for a nominal electrical capacity of about 250 megawatts (MW), Table I. During normal operation, the facility would produce about 150 MW of base-load electrical power and 1,000 tons per day of urea. Sulfur from the coal would be recovered as elemental sulfur. During peak power demand, the fertilizer capacity could be reduced or bypassed and the full 250 MW could be made available. This scheme would allow continuous operation of the gasifier at 100% of its rated capacity which would reduce the annual revenue requirements for power generation by permitting the production of fertilizer. As TVA's vision of this proposal matures (i.e., as consideration is given to alternative schemes, as TVA reviews its power demands, and as more detailed engineering estimates are developed), the nature and scope of cyclic-operation may be altered.

Kelly, D.A.; Nichols, D.E.; Faucett, H.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Coal gasification for the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer  

SciTech Connect

TVA is proposing to develop and commercially demonstrate the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer (urea) using integrated gasification/combined cycle (IGCC) technology. The coal-based coproduction demonstration project will show that the coproduction process can economically and environmentally enhance the production of both electric power and urea. As conceptualized, the proposed coproduction demonstration project facility would be designed for a nominal electrical capacity of about 250 megawatts (MW), Table I. During normal operation, the facility would produce about 150 MW of base-load electrical power and 1,000 tons per day of urea. Sulfur from the coal would be recovered as elemental sulfur. During peak power demand, the fertilizer capacity could be reduced or bypassed and the full 250 MW could be made available. This scheme would allow continuous operation of the gasifier at 100% of its rated capacity which would reduce the annual revenue requirements for power generation by permitting the production of fertilizer. As TVA`s vision of this proposal matures (i.e., as consideration is given to alternative schemes, as TVA reviews its power demands, and as more detailed engineering estimates are developed), the nature and scope of cyclic-operation may be altered.

Kelly, D.A.; Nichols, D.E.; Faucett, H.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

NETL: Gasification Project Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Project Information Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Project Information Active Projects | Archived Projects | All NETL Fact Sheets Feed Systems A Cost-Effective Oxygen Separation System Based on Open Gradient Magnetic Field by Polymer Beads [SC0010151] Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications [FE0012065] Dry Solids Pump Coal Feed Technology [FE0012062] Coal-CO2 Slurry Feeding System for Pressurized Gasifiers [FE0012500] National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility [FE0000749] Modification of the Developmental Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) Feeder [NT0000749] Recovery Act: Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems [DE-FC26-98FT40343]

346

NETL: Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brochures Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Brochures The Gasification Technology brochures are as follows: Gasification Plant Databases (Aug 2013) Gasification Systems...

347

A Joint Workshop on Promoting the Development and Deployment of IGCC/Co-Production/CCS Technologies in China and the United States. Workshop report  

SciTech Connect

With both China and the United States relying heavily on coal for electricity, senior government officials from both countries have urged immediate action to push forward technology that would reduce carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants. They discussed possible actions at a high-level workshop in April 2009 at the Harvard Kennedy School jointly sponsored by the Belfer Center's Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, China's Ministry of Science and Technology, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The workshop examined issues surrounding Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) coal plants, which turn coal into gas and remove impurities before the coal is combusted, and the related carbon capture and sequestration, in which the carbon dioxide emissions are captured and stored underground to avoid releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Though promising, advanced coal technologies face steep financial and legal hurdles, and almost certainly will need sustained support from governments to develop the technology and move it to a point where its costs are low enough for widespread use.

Zhao, Lifeng; Ziao, Yunhan; Gallagher, Kelly Sims

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

348

A Joint Workshop on Promoting the Development and Deployment of IGCC/Co-Production/CCS Technologies in China and the United States. Workshop report  

SciTech Connect

With both China and the United States relying heavily on coal for electricity, senior government officials from both countries have urged immediate action to push forward technology that would reduce carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants. They discussed possible actions at a high-level workshop in April 2009 at the Harvard Kennedy School jointly sponsored by the Belfer Center's Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, China's Ministry of Science and Technology, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The workshop examined issues surrounding Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) coal plants, which turn coal into gas and remove impurities before the coal is combusted, and the related carbon capture and sequestration, in which the carbon dioxide emissions are captured and stored underground to avoid releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Though promising, advanced coal technologies face steep financial and legal hurdles, and almost certainly will need sustained support from governments to develop the technology and move it to a point where its costs are low enough for widespread use.

Zhao, Lifeng; Ziao, Yunhan; Gallagher, Kelly Sims

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

349

Combined cycle meets Thailand's growing power demands  

SciTech Connect

This article describes how an ample supply of natural gas led the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to choose gas-fired combustion turbines. Thailand's rapid industrialization, which began in the late 1980's, placed a great strain on the country's electricity supply system. The demand for electricity grew at an astonishing 14% annually. To deal with diminishing reserve capacity margins, the EGAT announced, in 1988, a power development program emphasizing gas-fired combined cycle power plants. Plans included six 320-MW combined cycle blocks at three sites, and an additional 600-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant at Bang Pakong. As electricity demand continued to increase, EGAT expanded its plans to include two additional 320-MW combined cycle blocks, a 600-MW combined cycle block, and a 650-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant. All are currently in various stages of design and construction.

Sheets, B.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Takabut, K. (Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0409: Final Environmental Impact Statement Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) Project http:energy.govnepadownloadseis-0409-final-environmenta...

351

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATIO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage CO2 capture with geologic sequestration from a grassroots Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle(IGCC power plant. Steven A. Mascaro Digitally signed by Steven A. Mascaro...

352

CX-000422: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Dioxide Capture From Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate...

353

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY AIR PRODUCTS & CHEMICALS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

tonnage quantities, and for integration of ITM Oxygen plants with Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and other power generation systems. The Department of Energy's...

354

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATIO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant CO2 capture with geologic sequestration from a grassroots Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle(IGCC power plant. Steven A. Mascaro Digitally signed by Steven A. Mascaro...

355

High Temperature Corrosion Behavior of DS GTD-111 in Oxidizing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in coal combustion have made coal a cleaner, more viable source for power generation. Integrated Gasification. Combined Cycle (IGCC)...

356

Session III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012... implementation of advanced sensor nets within coal-fired power plants and future Integrated Combined Cycle Gasification (IGCC) systems.

357

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Abstract: In the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process for electricity generation, the hot synthesis gas may be quenched with water ...

2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

358

EIS-0382: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

operational demonstration of a coal-based, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric generating facility on the Iron Range of northern Minnesota. Notice of...

359

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a lower cost from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) coal generation power plant than from a conventional pulverized coal power plant. This advantage for addressing...

360

Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lean (RCL TM ) technology, Figure 1, is being developed as an ultra low NOx gas turbine combustor for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC). In this concept, ultra...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Lean (RCL TM ) technology, Figure 1, is being developed as an ultra low NOx gas turbine combustor for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC). In this concept,...

362

S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Ceramic Membrane Enabling Technology for Improved Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC)...

363

Project 195  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for implementing the reactive separation concept with the WGS reaction in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. The membranes are being developed using...

364

EIS-0409: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement EIS-0409: Final Environmental Impact Statement Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) Project This Final EIS assesses the potential environmental...

365

NETL: Fabrication and Scale-Up of Polybenzimidazole-Based Membrane...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

polymer membrane and designing a membrane module for pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)-derived synthesis...

366

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 1, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop standardized air blown fixed bed gasification hot gas cleanup integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) systems.

Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Hester, J.C.; Harriz, J.T.; Ritz, G.J.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop standardized air blown fixed bed gasification hot gas cleanup integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) systems.

Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Hester, J.C.; Harriz, J.T.; Ritz, G.J.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Hot Gas Cleaning with Gas-Solid Reactions and Related Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an integrated coal gasification combined cycle power generation (IGCC) and an integrated ... Preparation of Biomass Char for Ironmaking and Its Reactivity.

369

Microsoft Word - 41893_GE_Premixer Design_FactSheet_012405.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the combustion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) fuels use diffusion flame combustors with high amount of diluents to abate NOx to 15-25 ppmvd level. This...

370

EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification 1: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, California EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, California Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for the construction and operation of Hydrogen Energy California LLC (HECA's) project, which would produce and sell electricity, carbon dioxide and fertilizer. DOE selected this project for an award of financial assistance through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative program. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 5, 2013

371

Houston Lighting and Power Company's evaluation of coal gasification coproduction energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to reduce the cost of electricity from Integral ed Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants, the Electric Power Research Institute has embarked on a program to evaluate and potentially demonstrate a coal gasification-based coproduction energy facility. Houston Lighting Power Company (HL P) responded with a proposal in its ongoing effort to study emerging technologies for electricity production. HL P recognized the opportunities available to them in coproduction because of their close proximity to the world's largest petrochemical complex located on the Houston Ship Channel. Coparticipant utilities with HL P were Central and South West Services and TU Electric. Two sites were selected for study, a Houston Ship Channel site, utilizing barge-delivered Illinois No. 6 coal blended with petroleum coke, and to satisfy C SWS and TU needs, a central Texas site utilizing Texas lignite. Stone Webster Engineering and InterFact, Inc. were engineers and consulting partners in the study.Eight cases were developed to cover the various possibilities for coproduction. Four cases involved utilizing Texas lignite and four cases involved utilizing Illinois No. 6 as fuel blended with petroleum coke. The eight cases are described. Each of the cases utilized the Shell coal gasification process and were evaluated for either base load operation using two G.E. 7F gas turbines and a spare gasifier for chemicals production or for cyclic operationusing four G.E. 7EA gas turbines and no spare gasifier. The sum of the coproducts produced over all eight cases were electricity, methanol, ammonia, and urea, depending on location and economics.

Kern, E.E.; Havemann, S.D.; Chmielewski, R.G. (Houston Lighting and Power Co., TX (United States)); Baumann, P. (InterFact, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Goelzer, A.R.; Karayel, R.; Keady, G.S.; Chernoff, B. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Houston, TX (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Closely Aligned Programs Gasification Systems Technologies Closely Aligned Programs The Department of Energy's (DOE) Gasification Systems is conducted under the Clean Coal Research...

373

Advanced Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Gasification Carbon feedstock gasification is a promising pathway for high-efficiency, low-pollutant power generation and chemical production. The inability, however, to...

374

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Gasification Current Calendar of Events Below are events that are specifically related to Gasification. Also visit the NETL Events page to learn about other events....

375

Combined cycle phosphoric acid fuel cell electric power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By arranging two or more electric power generation cycles in series, combined cycle systems are able to produce electric power more efficiently than conventional single cycle plants. The high fuel to electricity conversion efficiency results in lower plant operating costs, better environmental performance, and in some cases even lower capital costs. Despite these advantages, combined cycle systems for the 1 - 10 megawatt (MW) industrial market are rare. This paper presents a low noise, low (oxides of nitrogen) NOx, combined cycle alternative for the small industrial user. By combining a commercially available phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) with a low-temperature Rankine cycle (similar to those used in geothermal applications), electric conversion efficiencies between 45 and 47 percent are predicted. While the simple cycle PAFC is competitive on a cost of energy basis with gas turbines and diesel generators in the 1 to 2 MW market, the combined cycle PAFC is competitive, on a cost of energy basis, with simple cycle diesel generators in the 4 to 25 MW market. In addition, the efficiency and low-temperature operation of the combined cycle PAFC results in a significant reduction in carbon dioxide emissions with NO{sub x} concentration on the order of 1 parts per million (per weight) (ppmw).

Mollot, D.J.; Micheli, P.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

AVESTAR® - Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Dynamic Simulator Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Dynamic Simulator A simulator that can provide future engineers with realistic, hands-on experience for operating advanced natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants will soon be available at an innovative U.S. Department of Energy training center. Under a new cooperative research and development agreement signed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Invensys Operations Management, the partners will develop, test, and deploy a dynamic simulator and operator training system (OTS) for a generic NGCC power plant equipped for use with post-combustion carbon capture. NETL will operate the new dynamic simulator/OTS at the AVESTAR (Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research) Center in Morgantown, W.Va.

378

IGCC rides a regulatory seesaw  

SciTech Connect

The Mesaba Energy Project to build a 603 MW IGCC power plant in Minnesota's Iron Range may or may not go ahead. Developers have proposed incorporating carbon capture and sequestration (CCS), including a pipeline. Opponents insist Mesaba should not go ahead unless it uses CCS immediately. Until November the project looked on the road to recovery but then the regulators came close to derailing the project citing recent delays and cancellations of IGCC projects in Florida, Colorado and Arizona. The next step is to work with the US DOE to structure the loan guarantee and to work with regulators in Minnesota to structure an off-take plan. 1 photo.

Blankinship, S.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

NETL: Gasification - Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations, Papers, and Publications Presentations, Papers, and Publications ITM Oxygen Development for Advanced Oxygen Supply (Oct 2011) Ted Foster, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. presented at the Gasification Technologies Conference, San Francisco, CA Oct 9-12, 2011. ASU/IGCC Integration Strategies (Oct 2009), David McCarthy, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., 2009 Gasification Technologies Conference, Colorado Springs, CO. ITM Oxygen: Taking the Next Step (Oct 2009), VanEric Stein, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., 2009 Gasification Technologies Conference, Colorado Springs, CO. ITM Oxygen: Scaling Up a Low-Cost Oxygen Supply Technology (Oct 2006) Philip Armstrong, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., 2006 Gasification Technologies Conference, Washington, D.C. ITM Oxygen: The New Oxygen Supply for the New IGCC Market (Oct 2005)

380

Pages that link to "A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twitter icon Pages that link to "A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation" A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Cost and carbon emissions of coal and combined cycle power plants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and carbon emissions of coal and combined cycle power plants in India: international implications Title Cost and carbon emissions of coal and combined cycle power plants in...

382

CX-000380: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Sweeney Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC)Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project - IGCC Plant CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.1 Date:...

383

California Energy Commission Assessment of Natural Gas Combined Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Commission 1 Assessment of Natural Gas Combined Cycle Plants for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in a Gas-Dominated Electricity Market California Energy Commission Request for Proposals RFP # 500-10-502 Pre-Bid Conference Date: Wednesday, November 3, 2010 #12;California Energy

384

Secondary steam models of a combined cycle power plant simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the general description of a full scope simulator for a combined cycle power plant is presented; the antecedents of this work are explained; the basis of the models of the auxiliary and turbine gland steam systems are exposed and some ...

Edgardo J. Roldan-Villasana; Ma. de Jesus Cardoso-Goroztieta; Adriana Verduzco-Bravo; Jorge J. Zorrilla-Arena

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Assessment of Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Plants with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Plants with CO2 Capture and Storage Mike Gravely.5 Million Annual Budget FY 10/11 · $62.5 million electric · $24 million natural gas · Program Research Areas:45 Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc's Role and Reference Documents Rich Myhre ­ Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc 3:05 Pacific Gas

386

Hydrometallurgical recovery of germanium from coal gasification fly ash. Solvent extraction method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is concerned with a simple hydrometallurgical method for the selective recovery of germanium from fly ash (FA) generated in an integrated gasification with combined cycle (IGCC) process. The method is based on the leaching of FA with water and a subsequent concentration and selective separation of germanium by a solvent method. Regarding the leaching step, the different operational conditions studied were liquid/solid (L/S) ratio and time of contact. The solvent extraction method was based on germanium complexation with catechol (CAT) in an aqueous solution followed by the extraction of the Ge-CAT complex with an extracting organic reagent diluted in an organic solvent. The main factors examined during the extraction tests were aqueous phase/organic phase (AP/OP) volumetric ratio, aqueous phase pH, amounts of reagents, and time of contact. Germanium extraction yields were higher than 90%. Alkaline and acid stripping of organic extracts were studied obtaining the best results with 1M NaOH (85%). A high-purity germanium solution was obtained. Experimental data presented in this work show that the extraction of germanium by the solvent method designed can be selective toward germanium, and this element can be effectively separated from arsenic, molybdenum, nickel, antimony, vanadium, and zinc.

Arroyo, F.; Fernandez-Pereira, C. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Hydrometallurgical recovery of germanium from coal gasification fly ash: pilot plant scale evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, a hydrometallurgical method for the selective recovery of germanium from fly ash (FA) has been tested at pilot plant scale. The pilot plant flowsheet comprised a first stage of water leaching of FA, and a subsequent selective recovery of the germanium from the leachate by solvent extraction method. The solvent extraction method was based on Ge complexation with catechol in an aqueous solution followed by the extraction of the Ge-catechol complex (Ge(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}){sub 3}{sup 2-}) with an extracting organic reagent (trioctylamine) diluted in an organic solvent (kerosene), followed by the subsequent stripping of the organic extract. The process has been tested on a FA generated in an integrated gasification with combined cycle (IGCC) process. The paper describes the designed 5 kg/h pilot plant and the tests performed on it. Under the operational conditions tested, approximately 50% of germanium could be recovered from FA after a water extraction at room temperature. Regarding the solvent extraction method, the best operational conditions for obtaining a concentrated germanium-bearing solution practically free of impurities were as follows: extraction time equal to 20 min; aqueous phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5; stripping with 1 M NaOH, stripping time equal to 30 min, and stripping phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5. 95% of germanium were recovered from water leachates using those conditions.

Arroyo, F.; Fernandez-Pereira, C.; Olivares, J.; Coca, P. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hydrogen production and carbon dioxide recovery from KRW oxygen-blown gasification.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An oxygen-blown KRW integrated gasification combined-cycle plant producing hydrogen, electricity, and supercritical-CO{sub 2}, was studied in a full-energy cycle analysis extending from the cord mine to the final destination of the gaseous product streams. A location in the mid-western US was chosen 160-km from Old Ben No.26 mine which ships 3,866 tonnes/day of Illinois No.6 coal by diesel locomotive. Three parallel gasifier trains, each capable of providing 42% of the plant's 413.5 MW nominal capacity use a combined total of 3,488 tonnes/day of 1/4 inch prepared coal. The plant produces a net 52 MW of power and 3.71 x 10{sup 6} nm{sup 3}/day of 99.999% purity hydrogen which is sent 100 km by pipeline at 34 bars. The plant also produces 3.18 x 10{sup 6} nm{sup 3}3/day of supercritical CO{sub 2} at 143 bars, which is sequestered in enhanced oil recovery operations 500 km away. A CO{sub 2} emission rate of 1 kgCO{sub 2}/kWh was assumed for power purchases outside the fence of the IGCC plant.

Doctor, R. D.

1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

389

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Background Gasification Background Challenges for Gasification The widespread market penetration of gasification continues to face some challenges. Over the years, gasification challenges related to gasifier and supporting unit availability, operability, and maintainability have been addressed with substantial success, and new implementations of gasification will continue to improve in this area. At present, perhaps the most significant remaining challenge is the relatively high capital costs of gasification plants, particularly given the low capital investment required for NGCC-based power production combined with low natural gas prices currently being experienced in the domestic market. Accordingly, technology that can decrease capital costs of gasification systems and plant supporting systems will be most important towards further deployment of gasification.

390

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IGCC CO2 capture is pre-combustion based, using selective Selexol technology. PC and NGCC power plant CO2 capture designs are post-combustion, using amine absorption. Performance...

391

Gasification Systems Projects & Performers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Systems Projects & Performers Gasification Systems - Key Technologies Feed Systems Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Syngas...

392

Combined-cycle plants can challenge feedwater control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stable feedwater control is critical to the reliable operation of any power plant steam generator system. This is particularly true for combustion turbine/heat recovery steam generator/steam turbine combined-cycle power plants where steam production may have to be sustained under varying modes of operation. Feedwater control system implementation in this type of installation often requires specialized designs to accommodate equipment limitations and the system's process dynamics. In particular, combined-cycle power plants that include integral deaerator and multiple pressure heat recovery steam generators may pose special control challenges in several areas. These include integral deaerator pressure, boiler feed pump recirculation control, boiler feed pump protective interlocks, and drum level control. This article describes a number of basic feedwater control logic features, derived from conventional fired boiler designs adapted for specific cycle configuration, applied in recent medium and large combustion turbine-heat recovery steam generator projects.

Bossio, R.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

This section presents systems analyses of integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) combined cycles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30, 2007 30, 2007 The Benefits of SOFC for Coal-Based Power Generation Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

394

Program on Technology Innovation: Development of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Performance and Cost Modeling Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the development of an integrated performance and cost model for advanced coal power plant undertaken to enable users to screen technologies prior to engaging in more extensive studies of their preferred choice. Such screening activities generally require utilities to contract with outside engineering firms with access to sophisticated engineering modeling software and experienced staff to perform the studies, thus costing significant time and investment.

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Economic Rationale for Safety Investment in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Gas Turbine Membrane Reactor Modules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilized in the petrochemical,, chemical processing industries as well as natural gas?based power generation, However, their integration represents a fairly recently conceived technology option to produce commercial electricity... . Please notice that after the condensation of steam and given the fact that CO2 is at a high pressure (~25 atm), a significant reduction in the compression costs associated with the operation of the sequestration units downstream...

Koc, Reyyan; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K.; Nuttall, William J.; Ma, Yi Hua

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

396

EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Draft Environmental Impact Statement: Public Comment Period Extended Until 10/01/13This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for the construction and operation of Hydrogen Energy California's LLC (HECA's) project, which would produce and sell electricity, carbon dioxide and fertilizer. DOE selected this project for an award of financial assistance through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative program.

397

Integrated gasification combined cycle and steam injection gas turbine powered by biomass joint-venture evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the economic and environmental potential of biomass integrated gasifier/gas turbine technology including its market applications. The mature technology promises to produce electricity at $55--60/MWh and to be competitive for market applications conservatively estimated at 2000 MW. The report reviews the competitiveness of the technology of a stand-alone, mature basis and finds it to be substantial and recognized by DOE, EPRI, and the World Bank Global Environmental Facility.

Sterzinger, G J [Economics, Environment and Regulation, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(kWh) to 8.25 centskWh. Chemical Solvents Diagram Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture for Gasification Application Pre-combustion CO2 capture related to a gasification plant is...

399

Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid combined cycle power plant is described including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production. 1 figure.

Bharathan, D.; Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

400

Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid combined cycle power plant including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production.

Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Williams, Thomas A. (Arvada, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Economic comparison of cogeneration/combined-cycle alternatives for industry  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines various cogeneration alternatives available today and provides an economic comparison for a range of conditions that will enable the most significant factors to be considered in the selection of cogeneration alternatives, and to determine which alternatives are most suitable for the particular application. The cogeneration methods considered are: a combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by an unfired heat recovery steam generator, a combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a supplementary fired heat recovery steam generator, a combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a fully fired boiler, a combined-cycle combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a supplementary fired high-pressure heat recovery boiler delivering steam to a noncondensing steam turbine-generator, a combined-cycle combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a fully fired boiler delivering steam to a noncondensing steam turbine-generator, and a conventional coal-fired boiler and a noncondensing steam turbine-generator. It is concluded that over a wide range of financial and operating conditions, almost all of the cogeneration/combined-cycle alternatives are more economical than continued operation of an existing conventional boiler generating steam only.

Cahill, G.J.; Germinaro, B.D.; Martin, D.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Configuration and performance of fuel cell-combined cycle options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The natural gas, indirect-fired, carbonate fuel-cell-bottomed, combined cycle (NG-IFCFC) and the topping natural-gas/solid-oxide fuel-cell combined cycle (NG-SOFCCC) are introduced as novel power-plant systems for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20-200 mega-watt (MW) size range. The novel NG-IFCFC power-plant system configures the ambient pressure molten-carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger: The topping solid-oxide fuel-cell (SOFC) combined cycle is not new. The purpose of combining a gas turbine with a fuel cell was to inject pressurized air into a high-pressure fuel cell and to reduce the size, and thereby, to reduce the cost of the fuel cell. Today, the SOFC remains pressurized, but excess chemical energy is combusted and the thermal energy is utilized by the Carnot cycle heat engine to complete the system. ASPEN performance results indicate efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFCFC or NG-SOFCCC are better than conventional fuel cell or gas turbine steam-bottomed cycles, but with smaller and less expensive components. Fuel cell and gas turbine systems should not be viewed as competitors, but as an opportunity to expand to markets where neither gas turbines nor fuel cells alone would be commercially viable. Non-attainment areas are the most likely markets.

Rath, L.K.; Le, P.H.; Sudhoff, F.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in IGCC Projects in IGCC Projects The Great Plains Synfuels Plant has long been gasifying coal to produce synthetic natural gas and ammonia, and capturing CO2 which is pipelined to Canada for EOR in the Weyburn oil field. Several new IGCC-based projects in the United States will be greatly expanding the scope of CO2 capture and use/storage. Kemper County Energy Facility Mississippi Power's Kemper County facility is in late stages of construction. It will be a lignite-fuel IGCC plant, generating a net 524 MW of power from syngas, while capturing over 65% of CO2 generated. The CO2 will be sent by pipeline to depleted oil fields in Mississippi for enhanced oil recovery operations. Hydrogen Energy California (HECA) Project HECA will be a 300MW net, coal and petroleum coke-fueled IGCC polygeneration plant (producing hydrogen for both power generation and fertilizer manufacture). Ninety percent of the CO2 produced will be captured and transported to Elk Hills Oil Field for EOR, enabling recovery of 5 million additional barrels of domestic oil per year.

404

Combined Cycles and Cogeneration - An Alternative for the Process Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power sequentially with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. The state-of-the-art combined cycle system consisting of combustion turbines, heat recovery steam generators, and steam turbine-generator units, offers a high efficiency method for the production of electrical and heat energy at relatively low installed and operating costs. This paper describes the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology.

Harkins, H. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Direct coal-fired gas turbines for combined cycle plants  

SciTech Connect

The combustion/emissions control island of the CFTCC plant produces cleaned coal combustion gases for expansion in the gas turbine. The gases are cleaned to protect the turbine from flow-path degeneration due to coal contaminants and to reduce environmental emissions to comparable or lower levels than alternate clean coal power plant tedmologies. An advantage of the CFTCC system over other clean coal technologies using gas turbines results from the CFTCC system having been designed as an adaptation to coal of a natural gas-fired combined cycle plant. Gas turbines are built for compactness and simplicity. The RQL combustor is designed using gas turbine combustion technology rather than process plant reactor technology used in other pressurized coal systems. The result is simpler and more compact combustion equipment than for alternate technologies. The natural effect is lower cost and improved reliability. In addition to new power generation plants, CFTCC technology will provide relatively compact and gas turbine compatible coal combustion/emissions control islands that can adapt existing natural gas-fired combined cycle plants to coal when gas prices rise to the point where conversion is economically attractive. Because of the simplicity, compactness, and compatibility of the RQL combustion/emission control island compared to other coal technologies, it could be a primary candidate for such conversions.

Rothrock, J.; Wenglarz, R.; Hart, P.; Mongia, H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Choose best option for enhancing combined-cycle output  

SciTech Connect

This article describes several methods available for boosting the output of gas-turbine-based combined-cycle plants during warm-weather operation. The technology comparisons help choose the option that is most appropriate. Amidst the many advantages of gas-turbine (GT) combined cycles (CC), one drawback is that their achievable output decreases significantly as ambient temperature increases. Reason: The lower density of warm air reduces mass flow through the GT. Unfortunately, hot weather typically corresponds to peak power loads in many areas. Thus, the need to meet peak-load and power-sales contract requirements causes many plant developers to compensate for ambient-temperature-related output loss. The three most common methods of increasing output include: (1) injecting water or steam into the GT, (2) precooling GT inlet air, and/or (3) supplementary firing of the heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG). All of these options require significant capital outlays and affect other performance parameters. In addition, they may uniquely impact the operation and/or selection of other components, including boiler feedwater and condensate pumps, valves, steam turbine/generators, condensers, cooling towers, and emissions control systems. Although plant-specific issues will have a significant effect on selecting an option, comparing the performance of different systems based on a theoretical reference plant can be helpful. The comparisons here illustrate the characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages of the major power augmentation technologies now in use.

Boswell, M.; Tawney, R.; Narula, R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Energy, Environmental, and Economic Analyses of Design Concepts for the Co-Production of Fuels and Chemicals with Electricity via Co-Gasification of Coal and Biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All of the coproduction designs have the common attribute of producing some electricity and also of capturing CO{sub 2} for storage. For each of the co-product pairs detailed process mass and energy simulations (using Aspen Plus software) were developed for a set of alternative process configurations, on the basis of which lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, Nth plant economic performance, and other characteristics were evaluated for each configuration. In developing each set of process configurations, focused attention was given to understanding the influence of biomass input fraction and electricity output fraction. Self-consistent evaluations were also carried out for gasification-based reference systems producing only electricity from coal, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification solid-oxide fuel cell (IGFC) systems. The reason biomass is considered as a co-feed with coal in cases when gasoline or olefins are co-produced with electricity is to help reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems. Storing biomass-derived CO{sub 2} underground represents negative CO{sub 2} emissions if the biomass is grown sustainably (i.e., if one ton of new biomass growth replaces each ton consumed), and this offsets positive CO{sub 2} emissions associated with the coal used in these systems. Different coal:biomass input ratios will produce different net lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems, which is the reason that attention in our analysis was given to the impact of the biomass input fraction. In the case of systems that produce only products with no carbon content, namely electricity, ammonia and hydrogen, only coal was considered as a feedstock because it is possible in theory to essentially fully decarbonize such products by capturing all of the coal-derived CO{sub 2} during the production process.

Eric Larson; Robert Williams; Thomas Kreutz; Ilkka Hannula; Andrea Lanzini; Guangjian Liu

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

408

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: AlternativesSupplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility Waste Streams Gasification can be applied to a variety of waste streams, of which municipal solid waste (MSW)...

409

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

runs a very active Carbon Storage Program as a companion strategic activity to gasification, under the Coal and Power Systems Program. Also, see the Carbon Sequestration...

410

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Procurement Guideline for Simple- and Combined-Cycle Combustion Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) procurement guideline for simple- and combined-cycle combustion turbines.

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

411

Conceptual design report -- Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF)  

SciTech Connect

The problems heretofore with coal gasification and IGCC concepts have been their high cost and historical poor performance of fixed-bed gasifiers, particularly on caking coals. The Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) project is being developed to solve these problems through the development of a novel coal gasification invention which incorporates pyrolysis (carbonization) with gasification (fixed-bed). It employs a pyrolyzer (carbonizer) to avoid sticky coal agglomeration caused in the conventional process of gradually heating coal through the 400 F to 900 F range. In so doing, the coal is rapidly heated sufficiently such that the coal tar exists in gaseous form rather than as a liquid. Gaseous tars are then thermally cracked prior to the completion of the gasification process. During the subsequent endothermic gasification reactions, volatilized alkali can become chemically bound to aluminosilicates in (or added to) the ash. To reduce NH{sub 3} and HCN from fuel born nitrogen, steam injection is minimized, and residual nitrogen compounds are partially chemically reduced in the cracking stage in the upper gasifier region. Assuming testing confirms successful deployment of all these integrated processes, future IGCC applications will be much simplified, require significantly less mechanical components, and will likely achieve the $1,000/kWe commercialized system cost goal of the GPIF project. This report describes the process and its operation, design of the plant and equipment, site requirements, and the cost and schedule. 23 refs., 45 figs., 23 tabs.

Sadowski, R.S.; Skinner, W.H.; House, L.S.; Duck, R.R. [CRS Sirrine Engineers, Inc., Greenville, SC (United States); Lisauskas, R.A.; Dixit, V.J. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States); Morgan, M.E.; Johnson, S.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States). PowerServe Div.; Boni, A.A. [PSI-Environmental Instruments Corp., Andover, MA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Method and apparatus for operating a combined cycle power plant having a defective deaerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: a deaerator having primary and secondary functions, the primary function to degasify feedwater for use in the combined cycle power plant; means for normally coupling the deaerator to the combined cycle power plant as a normally functioning part thereof; means for isolating the deaerator from the combined cycle power plant during operations thereof; and alternate means for performing the primary and secondary functions when the deaerator is isolated from the combined cycle power plant, during operations thereof, by the isolating means.

Pavel, J.; Richardson, B.L.; Myers, G.A.

1990-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

CURRENT AND FUTURE IGCC TECHNOLOGIES:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16, 2008 16, 2008 DOE/NETL-2008/1337 A Pathway Study Focused on Non-Carbon Capture Advanced Power Systems R&D Using Bituminous Coal - Volume 1 Current and Future IGCC Technologies Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

414

Decomposition of Ammonia in IGCC Fuel Gas Streams  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of the research work is to develop technically feasible and potentially low cost processes to decompose NH{sub 3} present in coal gases at high temperatures upstream of the gas turbine. Specific objectives of the work include development of NH3 decomposition processes applicable to both air-blown and oxygen-blown coal gasification-based combined cycle power plants, Ammonia decomposition tests were carried out in a bench-scale tubular flow reactor. The flow system includes feed gas supply with flow control and pressure regulation, preheater and reactor, heaters, monitoring and control of system temperature and pressure, and feed and product analysis instrumentation. Non-catalytic NH{sub 3} decomposition tests were carried out in both Alloy RA-330 and quartz reactors. Catalytic tests were conducted only in the quartz reactor.

Qader, S.A.; Qader, Q.A. [Energy and Environmental Technology Corp., Rancho Cucamonga, CA (United States); Muzio, L.J. [Fossil Energy Research Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Gasification Plant Databases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Plant Databases Welcome to the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory's Gasification Plant Databases Within these...

416

Deaerator heat exchanger for combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a combined cycle power plant. It comprises a steam turbine including an inlet portion for receiving motive steam and an exhaust portion for exhausting the motive steam that is spent by the steam turbine; a condenser connected to the exhaust portion of the steam turbine for receiving the spent motive steam and for condensing the spent motive steam to a supply of condensate; a gas turbine including an exhaust portion for exhausting waste heat that is produced by the gas turbine in the form of exhaust gases; a heat recovery steam generator connected between the exhaust portion of the gas turbine and the steam turbine, for receiving the waste heat exhausted by the gas turbine, for generating the motive steam from a supply of feedwater heated by the waste heat, and for supplying the motive steam to the steam turbine; a deaerator connected to the condenser for receiving the supply of condensate and for deaerating the condensate to provide the supply of feedwater to the heat recovery steam generator; and a heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Richardson, B.L.

1990-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

417

Operational strategies for dispatchable combined cycle plants, Part I  

SciTech Connect

The Brush Cogeneration Facility is a dual-unit, combined cycle, cogeneration plant operating in a daily cycling, automatically-dispatchable mode. According to the PSCO tariff for cogenerators, the Independent Power Production Facility Policy, the highest payment schedule is reserved for those facilities capable of automatic generation control (AGC), the so-called `Category 4A Facilities.` AGC entails the ability to receive microwave signals from PSCO`s Load Control Center at Lookout Mountain, Colorado, and automatically adjust output at a rate of 2% of contract maximum load per minute, over at least the top 40% of contract load range. Perhaps the most critical equipment modification enabling AGC was the re-enabling of automatic variable inlet guide vane (IGV) control. During control system modifications for automatic IGVs, the operators realized that the Woodward NetCon control system`s capabilities of control, monitoring and information display were better than anticipated. The relative ease with which IGV changes were made encouraged the operating team to continue to maximize efficiency and optimize plant operations. In fact, the ease of use and modification led to the purchase of an additional NetCon system for plant-wide performance monitoring. The retrofit of the gas turbine control system with the NetCon system was a success. 1 tab.

Nolan, J.P.; Landis, F.P. [Brush Cogeneration Facility, Brush, CO (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifiers and Impact of Coal Rank and Coal Properties The available commercial gasification technologies are often optimized for a particular rank of coal or coal properties, and in some cases, certain ranks of coal might be unsuitable for utilization in a given gasification technology. On the other hand, there is considerable flexibility in most of the common gasifiers; this is highlighted by the following table, which provides an overview of the level of experience for the various commercially available gasifiers by manufacturer for each coal type. This experience will only continue to expand as more gasification facilities come online and more demonstrations are completed. SOLID FUEL GASIFICATION EXPERIENCE1 High Ash Coals

419

Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION SYSTEMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREFACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United...

420

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Options CO2 Capture Technology Options All gasification-based conversion processes require removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S; an acid gas) from the synthesis gas (syngas)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined-cycle igcc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Gas Shift & Hydrogen Production Slag High-temperatureWarm Sygas Cleanup & DOE R&D Other DOE R&D Supporting Syngas Cleanup Technology Emissions Advantages of Gasification...

422

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Combustion Turbine Combined-Cycle Duct Burner Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides component-level information regarding the maintenance of major components associated with the compressor section of a combustion turbine typically installed at a combined-cycle facility. It combines recommendations offered by major equipment manufacturers with lessons learned from owner/operators of combined-cycle facilities. BackgroundCombustion turbine combined-cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that are unique to ...

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this series of design and estimating efforts was to start from the as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project and to develop optimized designs for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC power and coproduction projects. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This unoptimized plant has a thermal efficiency of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW. This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal and coke-fueled power plants. This side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, showed their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a multiple train coal-fueled IGCC powerplant, also based on the Subtaks 1.3 cases. The Subtask 1.6 four gasification train plant has a thermal efficiency of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency of 45.4% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,096 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to coproduce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. As gasification technology matures, SCOHS and other improvements identified in this study will lead to further cost reductions and efficiency improvements.

Samuel S. Tam

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Screening of low cost sorbents for arsenic and mercury capture in gasification systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor has been developed to investigate trace metal capture on selected sorbents for cleaning the hot raw gas in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants. The new reactor design is presented, together with initial results for mercury and arsenic capture on five sorbents. It was expected that the capture efficiency of sorbents would decrease with increasing temperature. However, a commercial activated carbon, Norit Darco 'Hg', and a pyrolysis char prepared from scrap tire rubber exhibit similar efficiencies for arsenic at 200 and at 400{sup o}C (70% and 50%, respectively). Meta-kaolinite and fly ash both exhibit an efficiency of around 50% at 200{sup o}C, which then dropped as the test temperature was increased to 400{sup o}C. Activated scrap tire char performed better at 200{sup o}C than the pyrolysis char showing an arsenic capture capacity similar to that of commercial Norit Darco 'Hg'; however, efficiency dropped to below 40% at 400{sup o}C. These results suggest that the capture mechanism of arsenic (As4) is more complex than purely physical adsorption onto the sorbents. Certain elements within the sorbents may have significant importance for chemical adsorption, in addition to the effect of surface area, as determined by the BET method. This was indeed the case for the mercury capture efficiency for all four sorbents tested. Three of the sorbents tested retained 90% of the mercury when operated at 100{sup o}C. As the temperature increased, the efficiency of activated carbon and pyrolysis char reduced significantly. Curiously, despite having the smallest Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area, a pf-combustion ash was the most effective in capturing mercury over the temperature range studied. These observations suggest that the observed mercury capture was not purely physical adsorption but a combination of physical and chemical processes. 27 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Cedric Charpenteau; Revata Seneviratne; Anthe George; Marcos Millan; Denis R. Dugwell; Rafael Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

What Energy ModelersWhat Energy Modelers Need to Know AboutNeed to Know About  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$4­7/GJ; 90% capture; aquifer storage Current Coal Plants PC NGCC Natural Gas Plants Plants with CCS combustion (PC) Natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) Integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC.S. Rubin, Carnegie Mellon Post-Combustion Technology for Industrial CO2 Capture BP Natural Gas Processing

426

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifipedia > Feedstock Flexibility > Refinery Streams Gasifipedia > Feedstock Flexibility > Refinery Streams Gasifipedia Coal: Feedstock Flexibility Refinery Streams Gasification is a known method for converting petroleum coke (petcoke) and other refinery waste streams and residuals (vacuum residual, visbreaker tar, and deasphalter pitch) into power, steam and hydrogen for use in the production of cleaner transportation fuels. The main requirement for a gasification feedstock is that it contains both hydrogen and carbon. Below is a table that shows the specifications for a typical refinery feedstock. Specifications for a typical refinery feedstock A number of factors have increased the interest in gasification applications in petroleum refinery operations: Coking capacity has increased with the shift to heavier, more sour crude oils being supplied to the refiners.

427

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: Alternatives/Supplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility Coal: Alternatives/Supplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility As important as coal is as a primary gasification feedstock, gasification technology offers the important ability to take a wide range of feedstocks and process them into syngas, from which a similarly diverse number of end products are possible. Gasifiers have been developed to suit all different ranks of coal, and other fossil fuels, petcoke and refinery streams, biomass including agricultural waste, and industrial and municipal waste. The flexibility stems from the ability of gasification to take any carbon and hydrogen containing feedstock and then thermochemically break down the feedstock to a gas containing simple compounds which are easy to process into several marketable products.

428

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen Oxygen Commercial Technologies for Oxygen Production Gasification processes require an oxidant, most commonly oxygen; less frequently air or just steam may suffice as the gasification agent depending on the process. Oxygen-blown systems have the advantage of minimizing the size of the gasification reactor and its auxiliary process systems. However, the oxygen for the process must be separated from the atmosphere. Commercial large-scale air separation plants are based on cryogenic distillation technology, capable of supplying oxygen at high purity1 and pressure. This technology is well understood, having been in practice for over 75 years. Cryogenic air separation is recognized for its reliability, and it can be designed for high capacity (up to 5,000 tons per day).

429

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combustion Turbine Combined-Cycle Heat Recovery Steam Generator Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides information to assist personnel involved with the maintenance of the heat recovery steam generator at a combustion gas turbine combined cycle facility, including good maintenance practices, preventive maintenance techniques and troubleshooting guidance.BackgroundCombustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that can be unique to this particular type of power plant. As such, owners and ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

They`re he-e-re (almost): The 60% efficient combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the technology that promises 60% efficiency from combined-cycle power plants. The topics of the article include advancing design, off-peak thermal energy storage, improving heat recovery steam generator performance, Kalina thermal cycle, performance of Kalina combined-cycle plants, and heat recovery in vapor generators.

DeMoss, T.B.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioning: Sulfur Recovery and Tail Gas Treating Conditioning: Sulfur Recovery and Tail Gas Treating Sulfuric Acid The option to recover sulfur in the form of sulfuric acid is practiced at Tampa Electric's IGCC demonstration plant, given the local demand for sulfuric acid for fertilizer manufacture in this area of Florida. Figure 1 shows a simplified flow of the Tampa Electric IGCC sulfuric acid plant. The sulfuric acid plant receives the H2S from the AGR unit and H2S and ammonia from the water stripper. The gas streams are then burned in a decomposition furnace, where the H2S produces primarily SO2 with trace amounts of SO3, sulfuric acid and elemental sulfur and the ammonia is converted to N2 and water. The decomposition furnace exit gas is cooled from about 1,950°F to 650°F in a waste heat boiler to produce medium pressure steam for in plant use. The gas is then further cooled and dried. This step produces a 'weak acid' waste stream which needs to be neutralized before discharging into the cooling pond. The SO2 and oxygen (from either air or an air separation plant) then react over a vanadium based catalyst bed in a converter according to the reaction;

432

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Power IGCC Efficiency / Performance Consideration of efficiency and relative performance of current technology-based IGCC cycles has been made by NETL in ongoing studies.1 These include IGCC power plants based upon a few major