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1

Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

Judith A. Kieffer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Based on Pressurized Fluidized Bed Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enviropower Inc. has developed a modern power plant concept based on an integrated pressurized fluidized bed gasification and gas turbine combined cycle (IGCC)....

Kari Salo; J. G. Patel

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Avestar® - Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator. The IGCC simulator builds on and reaches beyond existing combined-cycle and conventional-coal power plant simulators to combine--for the first time--a Gasification with CO2 Capture process simulator with a Combined-Cycle power simulator together in a single dynamic simulation framework. The AVESTAR® center IGCC courses provide unique, comprehensive training on all aspects of an IGCC plant, illustrating the high-efficiency aspects of the gasifier, gas turbine, and steam turbine integration. IGCC Operator training station HMI display for overview of IGCC Plant - Train A Reference:

4

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant Revision 2, March 2012 DOE/NETL-2012/1551 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

5

The development of Coke Carried-Heat Gasification Coal-Fired Combined Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carried-Heat Partial Gasification Combined cycle is a novel combined cycle which was proposed by Thermal Engineering Department ... technology, Coke Carried-Heat Gasification Coal-Fired Combined Cycle, as the imp...

Li Zhao; Xiangdong Xu

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

EIS-0409: Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Mississippi  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to provide funding for the Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project in Kemper County, Mississippi to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a project proposed by Southern Power Company, through its affiliate Mississippi Power Company, which has been selected by DOE for consideration under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) program.

8

Improved System Integration for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improved System Integration for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems ... The model is applied to evaluate integration schemes involving nitrogen injection, air extraction, and combinations of both, as well as different ASU pressure levels. ... The optimal nitrogen injection only case in combination with an elevated pressure ASU had the highest efficiency and power output and approximately the lowest emissions per unit output of all cases considered, and thus is a recommended design option. ...

H. Christopher Frey; Yunhua Zhu

2006-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

9

Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle System Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system using ASPEN. ASPEN is a steady-state chemical process-flow Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system. This study aims at developing a base case analysis

Frey, H. Christopher

10

Analysis of Biomass/Coal Co-Gasification for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems with Carbon Capture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In recent years, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology (IGCC) has become more common in clean coal power operations with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). (more)

Long, Henry A, III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

"Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Status of technologies and components modeled by EIA" Status of technologies and components modeled by EIA" ,"Revolutionary","Evolutionary","Mature" "Pulverized Coal",,,"X" "Pulverized Coal with CCS" " - Non-CCS portion of Pulverized Coal Plant",,,"X" " - CCS","X" "Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle" " - Advanced Combustion Turbine",,"X" " - Heat Recovery Steam Generator",,,"X" " - Gasifier",,"X" " - Balance of Plant",,,"X" "Conventional Natural Gas Combined Cycle" " - Conventional Combustion Turbine",,,"X" " - Heat Recovery Steam Generator",,,"X" " - Balance of Plant",,,"X"

12

Technoeconomic Analysis and Life Cycle Assessment of an Integrated Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A biomass gasification combined-cycle power plant, consisting of a low pressure......Economic analyses were then performed to determine the levelized cost of electricity. The economic viability and efficiency of...

M. K. Mann; P. L. Spath

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (wood waste, petroleum coke, etc.) is a clean way to produce electricity and produce or co-produce a variety of commercial products. The major challenge is cost reduction; current integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is estimated to produce power at a cost higher than that of pulverized coal combustion. However, the Gasification

14

THERMODYNAMIC MODELLING OF BIOMASS INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE (BIGCC) POWER GENERATION SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An attractive and practicable possibility of biomass utilization for energy production is gasification integrated with a combined cycle. This technology seems to have the possibility (more)

Desta, Melaku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Investigation of gasification chemical looping combustion combined cycle performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel combined cycle based on coal gasification and chemical looping combustion (CLC) offers a possibility of both high net power efficiency and separation of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2}. The technique involves the use of a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier, which transfers oxygen from the combustion air to the fuel, and the avoidance of direct contact between fuel and combustion air. The fuel gas is oxidized by an oxygen carrier, an oxygen-containing compound, in the fuel reactor. The oxygen carrier in this study is NiO. The reduced oxygen carrier, Ni, in the fuel reactor is regenerated by the air in the air reactor. In this way, fuel and air are never mixed, and the fuel oxidation products CO{sub 2} and water vapor leave the system undiluted by air. All that is needed to get an almost pure CO{sub 2} product is to condense the water vapor and to remove the liquid water. When the technique is combined with gas turbine and heat recovery steam generation technology, a new type of combined cycle is formed which gives a possibility of obtaining high net power efficiency and CO{sub 2} separation. The performance of the combined cycle is simulated using the ASPEN software tool in this paper. The influence of the water/coal ratio on the gasification and the influence of the CLC process parameters such as the air reactor temperature, the turbine inlet supplementary firing, and the pressure ratio of the compressor on the system performance are discussed. Results show that, assuming an air reactor temperature of 1200{sup o}C, a gasification temperature of 1100 {sup o}C, and a turbine inlet temperature after supplementary firing of 1350{sup o}C, the system has the potential to achieve a thermal efficiency of 44.4% (low heating value), and the CO{sub 2} emission is 70.1 g/(kW h), 90.1% of the CO{sub 2} captured. 22 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Wenguo Xiang; Sha Wang; Tengteng Di [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of the Ministry of Education

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Studies of the thermal circuit of an advanced integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results obtained from a study of the thermal circuit of a combined-cycle plant with coal gasification are presented, and ... of producer gas and calculated values of the combined-cycle power plant efficiency ...

D. G. Grigoruk; A. V. Turkin

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Modeling and Optimization of Membrane Reactors for Carbon Capture in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling and Optimization of Membrane Reactors for Carbon Capture in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Units ... This paper investigates the alternative of precombustion capture of carbon dioxide from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants using membrane reactors equipped with H2-selective zeolite membranes for the water gas shift reaction. ...

Fernando V. Lima; Prodromos Daoutidis; Michael Tsapatsis; John J. Marano

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

18

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/ CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE VOLUME I - CONCEPTUAL COMMERCIAL EVALUATION OPTIONAL PROGRAM FINAL REPORT September 1, 2001 - December 31, 2005 By Dennis A. Horazak (Siemens), Program Manager Richard A. Newby (Siemens) Eugene E. Smeltzer (Siemens) Rachid B. Slimane (GTI) P. Vann Bush (GTI) James L. Aderhold, Jr. (GTI) Bruce G. Bryan (GTI) December 2005 DOE Award Number: DE-AC26-99FT40674 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Siemens Power Generation, Inc. 4400 Alafaya Trail Orlando, FL 32826 & Gas Technology Institute 1700 S. Mt. Prospect Rd. Des Plaines, Illinois 60018 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government.

19

An update technology for integrated biomass gasification combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A discussion is presented on the technical analysis of a 6.4 MWe integrated biomass gasification combined cycle (IBGCC) plant. It features three numbers ... producing 5.85 MW electrical power in open cycle and 55...

Paritosh Bhattacharya; Suman Dey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Application of the integrated gasification combined cycle technology and BGL gasification design for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology promises to be the power generation technology of choice in the late 1990s and beyond. Based on the principle that almost any fuel can be burned more cleanly and efficiently if first turned into a gas, an IGCC plant extracts more electricity from a ton of coal by burning it as a gas in a turbine rather than as a solid in a boiler. Accordingly, coal gasification is the process of converting coal to a clean-burning synthetic gas. IGCC technology is the integration of the coal-gasification plant with a conventional combined-cycle plant to produce electricity. The benefits of this technology merger are many and result in a highly efficient and environmentally superior energy production facility. The lGCC technology holds significant implications for Asia-Pacific countries and for other parts of the world. High-growth regions require additional baseload capacity. Current low prices for natural gas and minimal emissions that result from its use for power generation favor its selection as the fuel source for new power generation capacity. However, fluctuations in fuel price and fuel availability are undermining the industry`s confidence in planning future capacity based upon gas-fueled generation. With the world`s vast coal reserves, there is a continuing effort to provide coal-fueled power generation technologies that use coal cleanly and efficiently. The lGCC technology accomplishes this objective. This chapter provides a summary of the status of lGCC technology and lGCC projects known to date. It also will present a technical overview of the British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) technology, one of the leading and most promising coal gasifier designs.

Edmonds, R.F. Jr.; Hulkowich, G.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop engineering evaluations of technologies for the capture, use, and disposal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This project emphasizes CO{sub 2}-capture technologies combined with integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. Complementary evaluations address CO{sub 2} transportation, CO{sub 2} use, and options for the long-term sequestering of unused CO{sub 2}. Commercially available CO{sub 2}-capture technology is providing a performance and economic baseline against which to compare innovative technologies. The intent is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps, in addition to process design capital and operating costs. The value used for the {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget is 1 kg of CO{sub 2} per kilowatt-hour (electric). The base case is a 458-MW IGCC system that uses an air-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal feed, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production of 454 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.835 kg/kWhe. Two additional life-cycle energy balances for emerging technologies were considered: (1) high-temperature CO{sub 2} separation with calcium- or magnesium-based sorbents, and (2) ambient-temperature facilitated-transport polymer membranes for acid-gas removal.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.R.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Integration of coal utilization and environmental control in integrated gasification combined cycle systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integration of coal utilization and environmental control in integrated gasification combined cycle systems ... The Cost of Carbon Capture and Storage for Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plants ... The Cost of Carbon Capture and Storage for Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plants ...

H. Christopher Frey; Edward S. Rubin

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Analysis of a coal fired combined cycle with carried-heat gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the research of a more efficient, less costly, more environmentally responsible and less technically difficult method for generating electrical power from coal, the Carried-heat Gasification Combined Cycle (CG...

Xiangdong Xu; Weimin Zhu; Li Zhao; F. N. Fett

25

Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Mauldin, SC); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

26

Investigation of Gasification Chemical Looping Combustion Combined Cycle Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combining CLC with a gas turbine combined cycle offers a novel power generation technique with high efficiency and CO2 separation. ... Here, we have developed looping materials based on the integration of NiO, as solid reactants, with a composite metal oxide of NiAl2O4, as a binder, leading to a significant role in improving reaction rate, conversion, and regenerability in cyclic reaction in this combustor, compared with the other materials. ... Chemical looping combustion for combined cycles with CO2 capture. ...

Wenguo Xiang; Sha Wang; Tengteng Di

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 U.S. Department of Energy Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0318) Location: Clark County, Kentucky Contacts: For further information on this environmental For further information on the DOE National impact statement (EIS), call: Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, call: 1-800-432-8330 ext. 5460 1-800-472-2756 or contact: or contact: Mr. Roy Spears Ms. Carol Borgstrom

28

System study on partial gasification combined cycle with CO{sub 2} recovery - article no. 051801  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

S partial gasification combined cycle with CO{sub 2} recovery is proposed in this paper. Partial gasification adopts cascade conversion of the composition of coal. Active composition of coal is simply gasified, while inactive composition, that is char, is burnt in a boiler. Oxy-fuel combustion of syngas produces only CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, so the CO{sub 2} can be separated through cooling the working fluid. This decreases the amount of energy consumption to separate CO{sub 2} compared with conventional methods. The novel system integrates the above two key technologies by injecting steam from a steam turbine into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine to combine the Rankine cycle with the Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiency of this system will be higher based on the cascade utilization of energy level. Compared with the conventional integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), the compressor of the gas turbine, heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) and gasifier are substituted for a pump, reheater, and partial gasifier, so the system is simplified. Furthermore, the novel system is investigated by means of energy-utilization diagram methodology and provides a simple analysis of their economic and environmental performance. As a result, the thermal efficiency of this system may be expected to be 45%, with CO{sub 2} recovery of 41.2%, which is 1.5-3.5% higher than that of an IGCC system. At the same time, the total investment cost of the new system is about 16% lower than that of an IGCC. The comparison between the partial gasification technology and the IGCC technology is based on the two representative cases to identify the specific feature of the proposed system.

Xu, Y.J.; Jin, H.G.; Lin, R.M.; Han, W. [Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Black liquor gasification combined cycle with Co2 capture Technical and economic analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The pulp and paper sector is intensive in the use of energy, and presents a high participation in the industrial context, specially based in the black liquor, a renewable source generated in the pulp process. Black liquor gasification is not still completely dominated; however, it has the potential of becoming an important alternative for the pulp and paper sector. In this article, the traditional steam cycle based on chemical recovery and biomass boilers associated to backpressure/extraction turbine is compared to black liquor gasification combined cycle schemes, associated to biomass boiler, considering the technical and economic attractiveness of capturing and sequestering CO2. Results show that despite its interesting exergetic efficiency, the adoption CO2 capture system for BLGCC did not prove to be attractive under the prescribed conditions without major incentive.

Elzimar Tadeu de Freitas Ferreira; Jos Antonio Perrella Balestieri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined-cycle (GMS) power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined cycle (GMS) refers to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems in which coal gasification is used to supply a clean fuel (free of mineral matter and sulfur) for combustion in an MHD electrical power plant. Advantages of a clean-fuel system include the elimination of mineral matter or slag from all components other than the coal gasifier and gas cleanup system; reduced wear and corrosion on components; and increased seed recovery resulting from reduced exposure of seed to mineral matter or slag. Efficiencies in some specific GMS power plants are shown to be higher than for a comparably sized coal-burning MHD power plant. The use of energy from the MHD exhaust gas to gasify coal (rather than the typical approach of burning part of the coal) results in these higher efficiencies.

Lytle, J.M.; Marchant, D.D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate- Ammonium Bicarbonate Process Description Current commercial processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from conventional power plants are expensive and energy intensive. The objective of this project is to reduce the cost associated with the capture of CO 2 from coal based gasification processes, which convert coal and other carbon based feedstocks to synthesis gas.

33

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

34

CoalFleet RD&D augmentation plan for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiative, which facilitates collaborative research by more than 50 organizations from around the world representing power generators, equipment suppliers and engineering design and construction firms, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others. This group advised EPRI as it evaluated more than 120 coal-gasification-related research projects worldwide to identify gaps or critical-path activities where additional resources and expertise could hasten the market introduction of IGCC advances. The resulting 'IGCC RD&D Augmentation Plan' describes such opportunities and how they could be addressed, for both IGCC plants to be built in the near term (by 2012-15) and over the longer term (2015-25), when demand for new electric generating capacity is expected to soar. For the near term, EPRI recommends 19 projects that could reduce the levelized cost-of-electricity for IGCC to the level of today's conventional pulverized-coal power plants with supercritical steam conditions and state-of-the-art environmental controls. For the long term, EPRI's recommended projects could reduce the levelized cost of an IGCC plant capturing 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from the carbon in coal (for safe storage away from the atmosphere) to the level of today's IGCC plants without CO{sub 2} capture. EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program is also preparing a companion RD&D augmentation plan for advanced-combustion-based (i.e., non-gasification) clean coal technologies (Report 1013221). 7 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs., 4 apps.

NONE

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

S-1 S-1 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The National Environmental Policy Act Process NEPA is a federal law that serves as the basic national charter for protection of the environment. For major federal actions that may significantly affect the quality of the environment, NEPA requires federal agencies to prepare a detailed statement that includes the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and reasonable alternatives. A fundamental objective of NEPA is to foster better decisionmaking by ensuring that high quality environmental information is available to public officials and members of the

36

Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

38

Is Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle with Carbon Capture-Storage the Solution for Conventional Coal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Management Field Project Is Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle with Carbon Capture-Storage the Solution for Conventional Coal Power Plants By Manish Kundi Fall Semester, 2011 An EMGT Field Project report... 2.4 Environmental Aspects-Emissions 23 3.0 Procedure & Methodology 3.1 Working technology Conventional Coal Plants 30 3.2 Working technology IGCC Power Plants 32 3.3 Carbon Capture and Storage 35 3...

Kundi, Manish

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

39

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Off-Design Performance of Power Plants: An Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that of a normal natural gas-fired combined-cycle...for operation in the natural gas-fired combined-cycle...inlet flow around the high-pressure section of the turbine...when converting from natural gas firing to IGCC opera-tion...

M. R. ERBES; J. N. PHILLIPS; M. S. JOHNSON; J. PAFFENBARGER; M. GLUCKMAN; R. H. EUSTIS

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Dynamic Model: H2S Absorption/Stripping, Water?Gas Shift Reactors, and CO2 Absorption/Stripping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Dynamic Model: H2S Absorption/Stripping, Water?Gas Shift Reactors, and CO2 Absorption/Stripping ... Future chemical plants may be required to have much higher flexibility and agility than existing process facilities in order to be able to handle new hybrid combinations of power and chemical units. ...

Patrick J. Robinson; William L. Luyben

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

42

EIS-0429: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Indiana Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Rockport, IN  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a coal-to-substitute natural gas facility proposed to be built in Rockport, IN by Indiana Gasification. The facility would utilize Illinois Basin coal. Other products would be marketable sulfuric acid, argon, and electric power.

43

EIS-0428: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Mississippi Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Moss Point, Mississippi  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a petroleum coke-to-substitute natural gas facility proposed to be built by Mississippi Gasification. The facility would be designed to produce 120 million standard cubic feet of gas per day. Other products would be marketable sulfuric acid, carbon dioxide, argon, and electric power.

44

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Comments Comments Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Clark County Public Library Winchester, KY Page 1 of 5 D-1 Comment No. 1 Issue Code: 11 Gasification is different from incineration. It is a better, more environmentally responsible approach to generating energy from the use of fossil fuels and refuse derived fuel (RDF). Incineration produces criteria pollutants, semi-volatile and volatile organic compounds and dioxin/furan compounds. Ash from hazardous waste incinerators is considered a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). In contrast, gasification, which occurs at high temperatures and pressures, produces no air emissions, only small amounts of wastewater containing salts. Synthesis gas (syngas)

45

Filter system cost comparison for integrated gasification combined cycle and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assess the relative cost of components and sub-systems for a hot gas particulate cleanup system a cost comparison between the filter systems for two advanced coal-based power plants was conducted. Assessing component and sub-system costs permits the most beneficial areas for product improvement to be identified. The results from this study are presented. The filter system is based on a Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filter Concept which is designed to operate with ceramic candle filters. The Foster Wheeler second Generation 453 MWe (net) Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) and the KRW 458 MWe (net) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants are used for the comparison. The comparison presents the general differences of the two power plants and the process related filtration conditions for PFBC and IGCC systems. The results present the conceptual designs for the PFBC and IGCC filter systems as well as a cost summary comparison. The cost summary comparison includes the total plant cost, the fixed operating and maintenance cost, the variable operating and maintenance cost and the effect on the cost of electricity for the two filter systems. The most beneficial areas for product improvement are identified.

Dennis, R.A.; McDaniel, H.M. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center; Buchanan, T.; Chen, H.; Harbaugh, L.B.; Klett, M.; Zaharchuk, R. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Reading, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification 1: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, California EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, California Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for the construction and operation of Hydrogen Energy California LLC (HECA's) project, which would produce and sell electricity, carbon dioxide and fertilizer. DOE selected this project for an award of financial assistance through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative program. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 5, 2013

47

Coal-Fuelled Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined cycle power plant, when used as a generic ... which converts heat into mechanical energy in a combined gas and steam turbine process. Combined cycle processes with coal gasification or coal combustion .....

Dr. Hartmut Spliethoff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Analysis of Membrane and Adsorbent Processes for Warm Syngas Cleanup in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power with CO2 Capture and Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of Membrane and Adsorbent Processes for Warm Syngas Cleanup in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power with CO2 Capture and Sequestration ... The clean syngas is diluted with N2 from the ASU and enters the gas turbine burner. ... The amount of N2 diluent to be added is determined by the requirement of maintaining the appropriate lower heating value of the syngas feeding into the gas turbine burner to achieve sufficiently low NOx emissions (1535 ppmv at 15% O2)(36) and to keep the temperature of the gas low enough to avoid blade failure. ...

David J. Couling; Kshitij Prakash; William H. Green

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

49

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Design of advanced fossil-fuel systems (DAFFS): a study of three developing technologies for coal-fired, base-load electric power generation. Integrated coal gasification/combined cycle power plant with Texaco gasification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are to present the facility description, plant layouts and additional information which define the conceptual engineering design, and performance and cost estimates for the Texaco Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. Following the introductory comments, the results of the Texaco IGCC power plant study are summarized in Section 2. In Section 3, a description of plant systems and facilities is provided. Section 4 includes pertinent performance information and assessments of availability, natural resource requirements and environmental impact. Estimates of capital costs, operation and maintenance costs and cost of electricity are presented in Section 5. A Bechtel Group, Inc. assessment and comments on the designs provided by Burns and Roe-Humphreys and Glasgow Synthetic Fuel, Inc. are included in Section 6. The design and cost estimate reports which were prepared by BRHG for those items within their scope of responsibility are included as Appendices A and B, respectively. Appendix C is an equipment list for items within the BGI scope. The design and cost estimate classifications chart referenced in Section 5 is included as Appendix D. 8 references, 17 figures, 15 tables.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The United States of America and the People`s Republic of China experts report on integrated gasification combined-cycle technology (IGCC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report written by the leading US and Chinese experts in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, intended for high level decision makers, may greatly accelerate the development of an IGCC demonstration project in the People`s Republic of China (PRC). The potential market for IGCC systems in China and the competitiveness of IGCC technology with other clean coal options for China have been analyzed in the report. Such information will be useful not only to the Chinese government but also to US vendors and companies. The goal of this report is to analyze the energy supply structure of China, China`s energy and environmental protection demand, and the potential market in China in order to make a justified and reasonable assessment on feasibility of the transfer of US Clean Coal Technologies to China. The Expert Report was developed and written by the joint US/PRC IGCC experts and will be presented to the State Planning Commission (SPC) by the President of the CAS to ensure consideration of the importance of IGCC for future PRC power production.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Combined Cycles and Cogeneration - An Alternative for the Process Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEM Gasification Numerous programs are underway for gasification of solid fuels and heavy oils and it is among these systems that many feel medium Btu gas will be pro duced for use in combined cycle systems. Many of the problems now facing... the gasification approach are economic in nature caused by the compe titive costs of gas and oil. In addition, in areas lacking a coal infrastructure, extraordinary costs still exist in the early years. FIG. 13 INTEGRATED INTERMEDIATE Btu GASIFICATION CYCLE...

Harkins, H. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Dynamic simulation and load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Load-following control of future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture is expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. To study control performance during load following, a plant-wide dynamic simulation of a coal-fed IGCC plant with CO{sub 2} capture has been developed. The slurry-fed gasifier is a single-stage, downward-fired, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow type with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC). The syngas from the outlet of the RSC goes to a scrubber followed by a two-stage sour shift process with inter-stage cooling. The acid gas removal (AGR) process is a dual-stage physical solvent-based process for selective removal of H{sub 2}S in the first stage and CO{sub 2} in the second stage. Sulfur is recovered using a Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. The recovered CO{sub 2} is compressed by a split-shaft multistage compressor and sent for sequestration after being treated in an absorber with triethylene glycol for dehydration. The clean syngas is sent to two advanced F-class gas turbines (GTs) partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit. A subcritical steam cycle is used for heat recovery steam generation. A treatment unit for the sour water strips off the acid gases for utilization in the Claus unit. The steady-state model developed in Aspen Plus is converted to an Aspen Plus Dynamics simulation and integrated with MATLAB for control studies. The results from the plant-wide dynamic model are compared qualitatively with the data from a commercial plant having different configuration, operating condition, and feed quality than what has been considered in this work. For load-following control, the GT-lead with gasifier-follow control strategy is considered. A modified proportionalintegralderivative (PID) control is considered for the syngas pressure control. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate while load-following, a linear model predictive controller (LMPC) is implemented in MATLAB. A combined process and disturbance model is identified by considering a number of model forms and choosing the final model based on an information-theoretic criterion. The performance of the LMPC is found to be superior to the conventional PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

Bhattacharyya, D,; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS) and the Parallel Computing toolbox from Mathworks. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Cost of energy analysis of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with respect to CO2 capture ratio under climate change scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the cost of energy (COE) analysis of an integrated gasification...2...capture ratio under the climate change scenarios. To obtain process data for a COE analysis, simulation mod...

Kyungtae Park; Dongil Shin; Gibaek Lee

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The combined cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Any combination of at least two cyclic processes converting thermal energy (heat) to work forms a combined cycle. In principle, the potential number of ... number of options reduces to a variety of cycles consi...

R. U. Pitt

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Coal Gasification Report.indb  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Coal Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle: Market Penetration Recommendations and Strategies Produced for the Department of Energy (DOE)/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Gasification Technologies Council (GTC) September 2004 Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle: Market Penetration Strategies and Recommendations Final Report Study Performed by:

58

Avestar® - Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Combined Cycle Simulator, focusing on the power generation process after gasification. This simulator is well-suited for concentrated training on operation and control of the gas and steam turbines; condensate, feed water, and circulating water systems; heat recovery steam generator; and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. Combined cycle simulator startup operations include bringing up the gas turbine to rated speed on natural gas and then switching over to the firing of synthesis gas. Key capabilities of the Combined Cycle Simulator include: Combined Cycle Simulator Operator training station HMI display for overview of Gas Turbine - Train A Normal base load operation

59

Natural Gas Combined Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program is being conducted by B&W at Reliant Energys Niles plant in Niles, Ohio. The total estimated cost of $1,864,603 is co-funded by DOE contributing 37.5%, OCDO providing 33.3 % and B&W providing 17%. The remaining 12 % is in-kind contributions by Reliant Energy and tubing suppliers. Materials development is important to the power industry, and to the use of coal. Figure 1 compares the cost of electricity for subcritical and supercritical coal-fired plants with a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plant based on an 85 % capacity factor. This shows that at $1.20/MBtu for fuel, coal is competitive with NGCC when gas is at $3.40/MBtu or higher. An 85 % capacity factor is realistic for a coal-fired plant, but NGCC plants are currently only achieving about 60%. This gives coal an advantage if compared on the basis of cost per kW generated per year. When subcritical and supercritical plants are compared,

Dennis K. Mcdonald; Subcritical Coal Plant; Supercritical Coal Plant

60

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ethanol; NGCC = natural gas combined-cycle; BIGCC =gasification combined-cycle. P ART III U NCERTAINTY Aaverage, (ii) natural gas combined-cycle (NGCC), (iii) coal

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant.Analysis: Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Power Plant.assessment of natural gas combined cycle power plant with

Sathre, Roger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evaluation of a Combined Cyclone and Gas Filtration System for Particulate Removal in the Gasification Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash gasification facility, owned and operated by sgSolutions LLC, is one of the largest single train solid fuel gasification facilities in the world capable of transforming 2,000 tons per day of petroleum coke or 2,600 tons per day of bituminous coal into synthetic gas for electrical power generation. The Wabash plant utilizes Phillips66 proprietary E-Gas (TM) Gasification Process to convert solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal into synthetic gas that is fed to a combined cycle combustion turbine power generation facility. During plant startup in 1995, reliability issues were realized in the gas filtration portion of the gasification process. To address these issues, a slipstream test unit was constructed at the Wabash facility to test various filter designs, materials and process conditions for potential reliability improvement. The char filtration slipstream unit provided a way of testing new materials, maintenance procedures, and process changes without the risk of stopping commercial production in the facility. It also greatly reduced maintenance expenditures associated with full scale testing in the commercial plant. This char filtration slipstream unit was installed with assistance from the United States Department of Energy (built under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-97FT34158) and began initial testing in November of 1997. It has proven to be extremely beneficial in the advancement of the E-Gas (TM) char removal technology by accurately predicting filter behavior and potential failure mechanisms that would occur in the commercial process. After completing four (4) years of testing various filter types and configurations on numerous gasification feed stocks, a decision was made to investigate the economic and reliability effects of using a particulate removal gas cyclone upstream of the current gas filtration unit. A paper study had indicated that there was a real potential to lower both installed capital and operating costs by implementing a char cyclonefiltration hybrid unit in the E-Gas (TM) gasification process. These reductions would help to keep the E-Gas (TM) technology competitive among other coal-fired power generation technologies. The Wabash combined cyclone and gas filtration slipstream test program was developed to provide design information, equipment specification and process control parameters of a hybrid cyclone and candle filter particulate removal system in the E-Gas (TM) gasification process that would provide the optimum performance and reliability for future commercial use. The test program objectives were as follows: 1. Evaluate the use of various cyclone materials of construction; 2. Establish the optimal cyclone efficiency that provides stable long term gas filter operation; 3. Determine the particle size distribution of the char separated by both the cyclone and candle filters. This will provide insight into cyclone efficiency and potential future plant design; 4. Determine the optimum filter media size requirements for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit; 5. Determine the appropriate char transfer rates for both the cyclone and filtration portions of the hybrid unit; 6. Develop operating procedures for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit; and, 7. Compare the installed capital cost of a scaled-up commercial cyclone-filtration hybrid unit to the current gas filtration design without a cyclone unit, such as currently exists at the Wabash facility.

Rizzo, Jeffrey J. [Phillips66 Company, West Terre Haute, IN (United States)

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

63

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biomass Integrated Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power Systems Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power Systems Project Summary Full Title: Cost and Performance Analysis of Biomass-Based Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (BIGCC) Power Systems Project ID: 106 Principal Investigator: Margaret Mann Brief Description: This project examines the cost and performance potential of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems--high-pressure air blown, low-pressure air blown, and low-pressure indirectly heated. Purpose Examine the cost and performance potential of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems - a high pressure air-blown, a low pressure indirectly heated, and a low pressure air-blown. Performer Principal Investigator: Margaret Mann

64

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Background Gasification Background Challenges for Gasification The widespread market penetration of gasification continues to face some challenges. Over the years, gasification challenges related to gasifier and supporting unit availability, operability, and maintainability have been addressed with substantial success, and new implementations of gasification will continue to improve in this area. At present, perhaps the most significant remaining challenge is the relatively high capital costs of gasification plants, particularly given the low capital investment required for NGCC-based power production combined with low natural gas prices currently being experienced in the domestic market. Accordingly, technology that can decrease capital costs of gasification systems and plant supporting systems will be most important towards further deployment of gasification.

65

Gasification Technologie: Opportunities & Challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This course has been put together to provide a single source document that not only reviews the historical development of gasification but also compares the process to combustion. It also provides a short discussion on integrated gasification and combined cycle processes. The major focus of the course is to describe the twelve major gasifiers being developed today. The hydrodynamics and kinetics of each are reviewed along with the most likely gas composition from each of the technologies when using a variety of fuels under different conditions from air blown to oxygen blown and atmospheric pressure to several atmospheres. If time permits, a more detailed discussion of low temperature gasification will be included.

Breault, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Viable combined cycle design for automotive applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A relatively new approach for improving fuel economy and automotive engine performance involves the use of automotive combined cycle generation technologies. The combined cycle generation, a process widely used i...

K. -B. Kim; K. -W. Choi; K. -H. Lee

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Usage in Coal to Electrical Applications Usage in Coal to Electrical Applications The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) application of gasification offers some water-saving advantages over other technologies for producing electricity from coal. Regions with limited water resources, typical of many parts of the western United States, could conserve resources by meeting increasing electricity demand with IGCC generation. Many of these areas have good coal resources and a need for new generating capacity. Water use in a thermoelectric power plant is described by two separate terms: water withdrawal and water consumption. Water withdrawal is the amount of water taken into the plant from an outside source. Water consumption refers to the portion of the withdrawn water that is not returned directly to the outside source - for example, water lost to evaporative cooling.

68

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2: CO2 Capture: Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs CO2: CO2 Capture: Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs Specific Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs from CO2 Capture In foregoing discussion, results of NETL's comprehensive study comparing the performance and cost of various fossil fuel-based power generation technologies with and without CO2 capture were reviewed. Of particular interest in that study was the companion set of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) designs, using GE's gasification technology, which can be used to illustrate the design changes needed for CO2 capture. Current Technology - IGCC Plant Design Figure 1 shows a simplified block flow diagram (BFD) of a market-ready IGCC design without CO2 capture. As shown, the IGCC plant consists of the following processing islands, of which a more detailed description of each can be found in the cited NETL referenced report: 1

69

Efficiency combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of operating a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: flowing exhaust gas from a combustion turbine through a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG); flowing feed water through an economizer section of the HRSG at a flow rate and providing heated feed water; flowing a first portion of the heated feed water through an evaporator section of the HRSG and producing saturated steam at a production rate, the flow rate of the feed water through the economizer section being greater than required to sustain the production rate of steam in the evaporator section; flowing fuel for the turbine through a heat exchanger; and, flowing a second portion of the heated feed water provided by the economizer section through the heat exchanger then to an inlet of the economizer section, thereby heating the fuel flowing through the heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Meyers, G.A.; Baldwin, T.S.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

70

Coal Gasification for Power Generation, 3. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered include: an overview of Coal Generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; a description of gasification technology including processes and systems; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; a discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; an evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; a discussion of IGCC project development options; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and, a detailed description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

NONE

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Kalina combined cycle performance and operability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas turbine combined cycles using Rankine bottoming cycles have gained broad market acceptance. The favorable plant economics derive from their high efficiency, short construction cycles and excellent environmental performance. The responsive operating characteristics of combined cycles is another key advantage for customers. Duty cycles cover the spectrum from daily start stop (DSS) to base load. Performance and economics of combined cycles have progressed with advances in gas turbine technology as well as the introduction of increasingly efficient multi-pressure Rankine bottoming cycles. Further advances in gas turbine technology and Rankine bottoming cycle performance are becoming incrementally more difficult and costly to achieve. The availability of the Kalina cycle presents a clear path toward improved combined-cycle system performance and reduced cost of electricity. This paper presents detailed performance and operating characteristics of a STAG 207FA combined cycle employing the Kalina bottoming cycle. These characteristics are compared to a conventional three-pressure reheat Rankine bottoming cycle. The Kalina cycle is shown to have performance and operability advantages throughout the range of site conditions and operating regimes, such as base load, load following, DSS duty, wet and dry cooling tower applications and unattended operation. These advantages derive from a single-pressure once-through heat recovery system, above atmospheric working fluid pressure throughout the system, above atmospheric working fluid pressure throughout the system, very high thermal efficiency ({approximately}2.0 to 2.5 percentage points better than the best Rankine), and compatibility with sub-freezing ambient conditions.

Smith, R.W.; Ranasinghe, J.; Stats, D.; Dykas, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Sawdust Pyrolysis and Petroleum Coke CO2 Gasification at High Heating Rates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Clean and efficient electricity can be generated using an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC). Although IGCC is typically used with coal, it can also be (more)

Lewis, Aaron D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbine (s) Heat recovery steam generator (s) - HRSG with or without duct firing Natural gas supply11/17/2014 1 Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Utility Scale Solar PV Steven doing recently around two key supply-side resource technologies 1. Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine

74

A dynamic process model of a natural gas combined cycle -- Model development with startup and shutdown simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research in dynamic process simulation for integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC) with carbon capture has been ongoing at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), culminating in a full operator training simulator (OTS) and immersive training simulator (ITS) for use in both operator training and research. A derivative work of the IGCC dynamic simulator has been a modification of the combined cycle section to more closely represent a typical natural gas fired combined cycle (NGCC). This paper describes the NGCC dynamic process model and highlights some of the simulators current capabilities through a particular startup and shutdown scenario.

Liese, Eric [U.S. DOE; Zitney, Stephen E. [U.S. DOE

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Acid Gas Removal (AGR) Acid gases produced in gasification processes mainly consist of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon dioxide (CO2). Syngas exiting the particulate removal and gas conditioning systems, typically near ambient temperature at 100°F, needs to be cleaned of the sulfur-bearing acid gases to meet either environmental emissions regulations, or to protect downstream catalysts for chemical processing applications. For integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) applications, environmental regulations require that the sulfur content of the product syngas be reduced to less than 30 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in order to meet the stack gas emission target of less than 4 ppmv sulfur dioxide (SO2)1. In IGCC applications, where selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is required to lower NOx emissions to less than 10 ppmv, syngas sulfur content may have to be lowered to 10 to 20 ppmv in order to prevent ammonium bisulfate fouling of the heat recovery steam generator's (HRSG) cold end tubes. For fuels production or chemical production, the downstream synthesis catalyst sulfur tolerance dictates the sulfur removal level, which can be less than 0.1 ppmv.

76

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions,

77

The suitability of coal gasification in India's energy sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), an advanced coal-based power generation technology, may be an important technology to help India meet its future power needs. It has the potential to provide higher generating ...

Simpson, Lori Allison

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Site Characterization, Sustainability Evaluation and Life Cycle Emissions Assessment of Underground Coal Gasification.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Underground Coal Gasification (UCG), although not a new concept, is now attracting considerable global attention as a viable process to provide a clean and economic (more)

Hyder, Zeshan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

SOFC combined cycle systems for distributed generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final phase of the tubular SOFC development program will focus on the development and demonstration of pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC)/gas turbine (GT) combined cycle power systems for distributed power applications. The commercial PSOFC/GT product line will cover the power range 200 kWe to 50 MWe, and the electrical efficiency for these systems will range from 60 to 75% (net AC/LHV CH4), the highest of any known fossil fueled power generation technology. The first demonstration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine combined cycle will be a proof-of-concept 250 kWe PSOFC/MTG power system consisting of a single 200 kWe PSOFC module and a 50 kWe microturbine generator (MTG). The second demonstration of this combined cycle will be 1.3 MWe fully packaged, commercial prototype PSOFC/GT power system consisting of two 500 kWe PSOFC modules and a 300 kWe gas turbine.

Brown, R.A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Vibration Combined High Temperature Cycle Tests for Capacitive MEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vibration Combined High Temperature Cycle Tests for Capacitive MEMS Accelerometers Z. Szcs, G. Nagy|nagyg|hodossy|rencz|poppe>@eet.bme.hu Abstract - In this paper vibration combined high temperature cycle tests for packaged capacitive SOI- MEMS designed and realized at BME ­ DED. Twenty thermal cycles of combined Temperature Cycle Test and Fatigue

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Detailed Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions, water discharges, and solid

82

FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Use of combined-cycle power units at cogeneration plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indices of reconstructed and new cogeneration plants (CPs) using combined cycle units (CCPUs) are considered. The conclusions...

V. M. Batenin; Yu. A. Zeigarnik; V. M. Maslennikov; Yu. L. Shekhter

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Mastering the pilot domestic binary combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results are presented from mastering the pilot binary combined-cycle plants of Type PGU-450T (installed at...

Yu. A. Radin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant ... A natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with capacity of about 430 MW integrated to a chemical solvent absorber/stripping capture plant is investigated. ... The natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) is an advanced power generation technology that improves the fuel efficiency of natural gas. ...

Mehdi Karimi; Magne Hillestad; Hallvard F. Svendsen

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

86

Development of a dynamic simulator for a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with post-combustion carbon capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AVESTAR Center located at the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory and West Virginia University is a world-class research and training environment dedicated to using dynamic process simulation as a tool for advancing the safe, efficient and reliable operation of clean energy plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The AVESTAR Center was launched with a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion carbon capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator offers full-scope Operator Training Simulator (OTS) Human Machine Interface (HMI) graphics for realistic, real-time control room operation and is integrated with a 3D virtual Immersive Training Simulator (ITS), thus allowing joint control room and field operator training. The IGCC OTS/ITS solution combines a gasification with CO{sub 2} capture process simulator with a combined cycle power simulator into a single high-performance dynamic simulation framework. This presentation will describe progress on the development of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) dynamic simulator based on the syngas-fired combined cycle portion of AVESTARs IGCC dynamic simulator. The 574 MW gross NGCC power plant design consisting of two advanced F-class gas turbines, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and a steam turbine in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration will be reviewed. Plans for integrating a post-combustion carbon capture system will also be discussed.

Liese, E.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Enhancement of combined cycle performance using transpiration cooling of gas turbine blades with steam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas/steam combined cycle is synergetic combination of Brayton cycle based topping cycle and Rankine cycle based bottoming cycle, which have capability of operating independently too. Combined cycle performance de...

Sanjay Kumar; Onkar Singh

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Methodology for technology evaluation under uncertainty and its application in advanced coal gasification processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has attracted interest as a cleaner alternative to conventional coal-fired power generation processes. While a number of pilot projects have been launched to ...

Gong, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Thermochemical Gasification of Biomass: Fuel Conversion, Hot Gas Cleanup and Gas Turbine Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air-blown fluidized bed biomass gasification integrated with a gas- and steam turbine combined cycle (BIGCC) is a potentially attractive way to convert biomass into electricity and heat with a high efficiency.

J. Andries; W. de Jong; P. D. J. Hoppesteyn

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The performance of a flashing binary combined cycle for geothermal power generation is analysed. It is proposed to utilize hot residual brine from the separator in flashing-type plants to run a binary cycle, thereby producing incremental power. Parametric variations were carried out to determine the optimum performance of the combined cycle. Comparative evaluation with the simple flashing plant was made to assess its thermodynamic potential and economic viability. Results of the analyses indicate that the combined cycle can generate 13-28% more power than the

91

Hydrothermal Gasification of Waste Biomass: Process Design and Life Cycle Asessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several scenarios are constructed for different Swiss biomass feedstocks and different scales depending on logistical choices: large-scale (155 MWSNG) and small-scale (5.2 MWSNG) scenarios for a manure feedstock and one scenario (35.6 MWSNG) for a wood feedstock. ... In conclusion, the simulation of the catalytic hydrothermal gasification of different biomass feedstocks allowed the design of industrial-scale process configurations. ...

Jeremy S. Luterbacher; Morgan Frling; Frdric Vogel; Franois Marchal; Jefferson W. Tester

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

Combined Cycle (CC) and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems: An Introduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined Cycle (CC)...is a power plant system in which two types of turbines, namely a gas turbine and a steam turbine, are used to generate electricity. Moreover the turbines are combined in one cycle

Andrzej W. Ordys MScEE; PhD; A. W. Pike

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Conceptual design of a black liquor gasification pilot plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In July 1985, Champion International completed a study of kraft black liquor gasification and use of the product gases in a combined cycle cogeneration system based on gas turbines. That study indicated that gasification had high potential as an alternative to recovery boiler technology and offered many advantages. This paper describes the design of the plant, the construction of the pilot plant, and finally presents data from operation of the plant.

Kelleher, E. G.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Thermal Cycling Combined with Dynamic Mechanical Load: Preliminary...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Load: Preliminary Report This PowerPoint presentation summarizes the efforts of the team led by ESPEC Corp. to investigate thermal cycling combined with dynamic mechanical load, a...

95

Off-design Simulations of Offshore Combined Cycles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis presents an off-design simulation of offshore combined cycles. Offshore installations have a substantial power demand to facilitate the oil and gas production. (more)

Flateb, ystein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Insights for Quantitative Risk Assessment of Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditional techniques of risk analysis have been fitted for the application to combined cycle power plants and the results of several...

Gabriele Ballocco; Andrea Carpignano

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Design of advanced fossil-fuel systems (DAFFS): a study of three developing technologies for coal-fired, base-load electric power generation. Integrated coal-gasification/combined power plant with BGC/Lurgi gasification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are to present the facility description, plant layouts and additional information which define the conceptual engineering design, and performance and cost estimates for the BGC/Lurgi Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. Following the introductory comments, the results of the British Gas Corporation (BGC)/Lurgi IGCC power plant study are summarized in Section 2. In Secion 3, a description of plant systems and facilities is provided. Section 4 includes pertinent performance information and assessments of availability, natural resource requirements and environmental impact. Estimates of capital costs, operating and maintenance costs and cost of electricity are presented in Section 5. A Bechtel Group Inc. (BGI) assessment and comments on the designs provided by Burns and Roe-Humphreys and Glasgow Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (BRHG) are included in Section 6. The design and cost estimate reports which were prepared by BRHG for those items within their scope of responsibility are included as Appendices A and B, respectively. Apendix C is an equipment list for items within the BGI scope. The design and cost estimate classifications chart referenced in Section 5 is included as Appendix D. 8 references, 18 figures, 5 tables.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Coal Gasification in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... P. S. Andrews gave a full account of the Federal project for the pressure gasification of non-coking coals for the combined purpose of town's gas ' and the ... of town's gas ' and the production of synthetic liquid fuel. Work on the gasification of brown coal in. Victoria was commenced in 1931 by the technical staff of ...

1955-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

Coal gasification for power generation. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives an overview of the opportunities for coal gasification in the power generation industry. It provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered in the report include: An overview of coal generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; A description of gasification technology including processes and systems; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; A discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; An evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; A discussion of IGCC project development options; A discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; Profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and A description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

NONE

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of Construction and Demolition (C&D) Derived Biomass and U.S. Northeast Forest Residuals Gasification for Electricity Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of Construction and Demolition (C&D) Derived Biomass and U.S. Northeast Forest Residuals Gasification for Electricity Production ... Various types of organic waste including (a) agriculture and forestry residues and (b) municipal and industrial wastes (i.e., biodegradable municipal solid waste, plastic waste, construction and demolition (C&D) waste, and sewage sludge) are considered as potential feedstock for bioenergy and chemicals production. ...

Philip Nuss; Kevin H. Gardner; Jenna R. Jambeck

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid combined cycle power plant including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production.

Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Williams, Thomas A. (Arvada, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Thermal Cycling Combined with Dynamic Mechanical Load: Preliminary Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This PowerPoint presentation summarizes the efforts of the team led by ESPEC Corp. to investigate thermal cycling combined with dynamic mechanical load, a solar project funded by the SunShot Initiative.

104

Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity Via Catalytic Coal Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 Co-ProduCtion of SubStitute natural GaS / eleCtriCity via CatalytiC Coal GaSifiCation Description The United States has vast reserves of low-cost coal, estimated to be sufficient for the next 250 years. Gasification-based technology, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), is the only environmentally friendly technology that provides the flexibility to co-produce hydrogen, substitute natural gas (SNG), premium hydrocarbon liquids including transportation fuels, and electric power in desired combinations from coal and other carbonaceous feedstocks. Rising costs and limited domestic supply of crude oil and natural gas provide a strong incentive for the development of coal gasification-based co-production processes. This project addresses the co-production of SNG and electricity from coal via gasification

105

Vibration Combined High Temperature Cycle Tests for Capacitive MEMS Accelerometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper vibration combined high temperature cycle tests for packaged capacitive SOI-MEMS accelerometers are presented. The aim of these tests is to provide useful Design for Reliability information for MEMS designers. A high temperature test chamber and a chopper-stabilized read-out circuitry were designed and realized at BME - DED. Twenty thermal cycles of combined Temperature Cycle Test and Fatigue Vibration Test has been carried out on 5 samples. Statistical evaluation of the test results showed that degradation has started in 3 out of the 5 samples.

Z. Szucs; G. Nagy; S. Hodossy; M. Rencz; A. Poppe

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Recycling of automobile shredder residue with a microwave pyrolysis combined with high temperature steam gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Presently, there is a growing need for handling automobile shredder residues ASR or car fluff. One of the most promising methods of treatment ASR is pyrolysis. Apart of obvious benefits of pyrolysis: energy and metals recovery, there is serious concern about the residues generated from that process needing to be recycled. Unfortunately, not much work has been reported providing a solution for treatment the wastes after pyrolysis. This work proposes a new system based on a two-staged process. The ASR was primarily treated by microwave pyrolysis and later the liquid and solid products become the feedstock for the high temperature gasification process. The system development is supported within experimental results conducted in a lab-scale, batch-type reactor at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). The heating rate, mass loss, gas composition, LHV and gas yield of producer gas vs. residence time are reported for the steam temperature of 1173K. The sample input was 10g and the steam flow rate was 0.65kg/h. The conversion reached 99% for liquids and 4555% for solids, dependently from the fraction. The H2:CO mol/mol ratio varied from 1.72 solids and 1.4 for liquid, respectively. The average LHV of generated gas was 15.8MJ/Nm3 for liquids and 15MJ/Nm3 for solids fuels.

Pawel Donaj; Weihong Yang; W?odzimierz B?asiak; Christer Forsgren

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Life Cycle Comparison of Coal Gasification by Conventional versus Calcium Looping Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After separation of H2, the remaining gas is used as fuel in a boiler to produce steam that is used in a steam turbine to produce electricity. ... Note that, as described in Section 2.1, the conventional process has nonzero GHG emissions due to combustion of the gases remaining after CO2 and H2S removal, while CLP does not have any GHG emissions. ... The conventional process with CO2 recovery from flue gas was compared with the calcium looping process based on their life cycle land use, water use, and GHG emissions. ...

Berrin Kursun; Shwetha Ramkumar; Bhavik R. Bakshi; Liang-Shih Fan

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Combined Otto and Stirling Cycle Prime-Mover-Based Power Plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? An exploratory study of the combined Otto and Stirling cycle prime mover is presented. The Stirling cycle acts as the bottoming cycle on the (more)

Cullen, Barry, (Thesis)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

AVESTAR® - Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Dynamic Simulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Dynamic Simulator Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Dynamic Simulator A simulator that can provide future engineers with realistic, hands-on experience for operating advanced natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants will soon be available at an innovative U.S. Department of Energy training center. Under a new cooperative research and development agreement signed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Invensys Operations Management, the partners will develop, test, and deploy a dynamic simulator and operator training system (OTS) for a generic NGCC power plant equipped for use with post-combustion carbon capture. NETL will operate the new dynamic simulator/OTS at the AVESTAR (Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research) Center in Morgantown, W.Va.

110

Development of High-Pressure Dry Feed Pump for Gasification Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pressure Dry Feed Pressure Dry Feed Pump for Gasification Systems Background Even though coal-based power generation via Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is more efficient, cleaner, and uses less water than conventional pulverized coal burning systems, widespread IGCC deployment has not occurred because of its relatively high cost. The Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) high-pressure dry feed pump addresses IGCC cost disparity by enabling lower cost and more reliable coal feed

111

EMERY BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emery Recycling Corporation (now Emery Energy Company, LLC) evaluated the technical and economical feasibility of the Emery Biomass Gasification Power System (EBGPS). The gasifier technology is owned and being developed by Emery. The Emery Gasifier for this project was an oxygen-blown, pressurized, non-slagging gasification process that novelly integrates both fixed-bed and entrained-flow gasification processes into a single vessel. This unique internal geometry of the gasifier vessel will allow for tar and oil destruction within the gasifier. Additionally, the use of novel syngas cleaning processes using sorbents is proposed with the potential to displace traditional amine-based and other syngas cleaning processes. The work scope within this project included: one-dimensional gasifier modeling, overall plant process modeling (ASPEN), feedstock assessment, additional analyses on the proposed syngas cleaning process, plant cost estimating, and, market analysis to determine overall feasibility and applicability of the technology for further development and commercial deployment opportunities. Additionally, the project included the development of a detailed technology development roadmap necessary to commercialize the Emery Gasification technology. Process modeling was used to evaluate both combined cycle and solid oxide fuel cell power configurations. Ten (10) cases were evaluated in an ASPEN model wherein nine (9) cases were IGCC configurations with fuel-to-electricity efficiencies ranging from 38-42% and one (1) case was an IGFC solid oxide case where 53.5% overall plant efficiency was projected. The cost of electricity was determined to be very competitive at scales from 35-71 MWe. Market analysis of feedstock availability showed numerous market opportunities for commercial deployment of the technology with modular capabilities for various plant sizes based on feedstock availability and power demand.

Benjamin Phillips; Scott Hassett; Harry Gatley

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

112

Combined cycle and run performance is maximised when the cycle is completed at the highest sustainable intensity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cycle intensity on subsequent running performance and combined cyclerun (CR) performance. Seven triathletes undertook a cycling graded exercise test to exhaus...

Robert Suriano; David Bishop

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Gasification … Program Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, Clearwater, Florida, June 5 to 9, 2011 Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, Clearwater, Florida, June 5 to 9, 2011 Gasification Technologies Advances for Future Energy Plants Jenny B. Tennant Technology Manager - Gasification 2 Gasification Program Goal "Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness" Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy November 2010 The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards 3 Oxygen Membrane - APCI - 25% capital cost reduction - 5.0% COE reduction Warm Gas Cleaning - RTI in combination with H 2 /CO 2 Membrane - Eltron - 2.9 % pt efficiency increase - 12% COE decrease Oxygen CO 2 H 2 rich stream Water Gas Shift*

114

Performance improvement of combined cycle power plant based on the optimization of the bottom cycle and heat recuperation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many F class gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plants are built in ... the efficiency improvement of GTCC plant. A combined cycle with three-pressure reheat heat recovery steam ... HRSG inlet gas temperatur...

Wenguo Xiang; Yingying Chen

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Coal Gasification  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE's Office of Fossil Energy supports activities to advance coal-to-hydrogen technologies, specifically via the process of coal gasification with sequestration. DOE anticipates that coal...

116

This section presents systems analyses of integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) combined cycles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

30, 2007 30, 2007 The Benefits of SOFC for Coal-Based Power Generation Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

117

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A-1 A-1 APPENDIX A CONSULTATION LETTERS This appendix includes consultation/approval letters between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regarding threatened and endangered species, and between other state and Federal agencies as needed. Consultation Letters A-2 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement A-3 Consultation Letters A-4 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement A-5 Consultation Letters A-6 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement A-7 Consultation Letters A-8 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement B-1 APPENDIX B NOTICE OF INTENT TO PREPARE AN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE

118

EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for the construction and operation of Hydrogen Energy California's LLC project, which would produce and sell electricity, carbon dioxide and fertilizer. DOE selected this project for an award of financial assistance through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative program.

119

Simulation and optimization of hot syngas separation processes in integrated gasification combined cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IGCC with CO2 capture offers an exciting approach for cleanly using abundant coal reserves of the world to generate electricity. The present state-of-the-art synthesis gas (syngas) cleanup technologies in IGCC involve ...

Prakash, Kshitij

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

EIS-0318: Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project, Trapp, Kentucky (Clark County)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to provide cost-shared financial support for The Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project, an electrical power station demonstrating use of a Clean Coal Technology in Clark County, Kentucky.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Kinetic mechanism of dimethyl ether production process using syngas from integrated gasification combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a 1-step synthesis gas-to-dimethyl ether process, synthesis gas is converted into dimethyl ether (DME) in a single reactor. Three reactions are involved in this process: methanol synthesis, methanol dehydra...

Hee-Woo Park; Jin-Kuk Ha; Euy Soo Lee

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Potential solar thermal integration in Spanish combined cycle gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs) are volumetric machines, which means that their net power output decreases at air temperatures above the design point. Such temperatures generally occur during periods of high solar irradiation. Many countries where these conditions occur, including Spain, have installed a significant number of \\{CCGTs\\} in recent years, with the subsequent yield losses in the summer. This implies enormous potential for solar hybridization, increasing production in peak hours and overall efficiency and reducing CO2 emissions. This paper analyzes the overall potential for solar thermal integration in 51 CCGTS (25,340MW) in mainland Spain under different operating scenarios based on increasing yield, solar fraction and the hourly operational range adapted to the Spanish electricity market, considering actual meteorological conditions. A production model for integrating solar energy into combined cycles is proposed and described and the code in R is freely released so that the assessment can be replicated.

J. Antonanzas; E. Jimenez; J. Blanco; F. Antonanzas-Torres

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Thermodynamics of combined-cycle electric power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Published data imply an average thermal efficiency of about 0.34 for U.S. electricity generating plants. With clever use of thermodynamics and technology modern gas and steam turbines can be coupled to effect dramatic efficiency increases. These combined-cycle power plants now reach thermal efficiencies in excess of 0.60. It is shown how the laws of thermodynamics make this possible.

Harvey S. Leff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Power Gas and Combined Cycles: Clean Power from Fossil Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a "gravitating bed" gasifier, manufactured by Lurgi...in diameter, and the size of the gasification unit...test a new design for a gasifier in early 1973. A coal...differently. The City College gasifier would be shaped so that...composed of larger coal sizes. The City College gasi-fier...

William D. Metz

1973-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

125

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifiers and Impact of Coal Rank and Coal Properties The available commercial gasification technologies are often optimized for a particular rank of coal or coal properties, and in some cases, certain ranks of coal might be unsuitable for utilization in a given gasification technology. On the other hand, there is considerable flexibility in most of the common gasifiers; this is highlighted by the following table, which provides an overview of the level of experience for the various commercially available gasifiers by manufacturer for each coal type. This experience will only continue to expand as more gasification facilities come online and more demonstrations are completed. SOLID FUEL GASIFICATION EXPERIENCE1 High Ash Coals

126

Gasification Plant Databases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coal gasification projects throughout the world. These databases track proposed gasification projects with approximate outputs greater than 100 megawatts electricity...

127

Gasification Plant Databases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Plant Databases News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan...

128

NETL: Coal Gasification Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal Gasification Systems News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan...

129

Gasification Systems Project Portfolio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2014 Gasification Systems Project Portfolio News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International...

130

Steam turbines of the Ural Turbine Works for combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Matters concerned with selecting the equipment for combined-cycle plants within the framework of work on ... Works regarding the supplies of steam turbines for combined-cycle plants used at retrofitted and newly ...

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev; T. Yu. Linder

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Advanced Feed Water and Cooling Water Treatment at Combined Cycle Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tokyo Gas Yokosuka Power Station is an IPP combined cycle power plant supplied by Fuji Electric Systems...

Ryo Takeishi; Kunihiko Hamada; Ichiro Myogan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as synthetic crude gasification combined cycle powerstand-alone integrated gasification combined cycle powertransmission integrated gasification, combined cycle power

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A study on ultra heavy oil gasification technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Raising the thermal efficiency of a thermal power plant is an important issue from viewpoints of effective energy utilization and environmental protection. In view of raising the thermal efficiency, a gas turbine combined cycle power generation is considered to be very effective. The thermal efficiency of the latest LNG combined cycle power plant has been raised by more than 50%. On the other hand, the diversification of fuels to ensure supply stability is also an important issue, particularly in Japan where natural resources are scarce. Because of excellent handling characteristics petroleum and LNG which produces clean combustion are used in many sectors, and so the demand for such fuels is expected to grow. However, the availability of such fuels is limited, and supplies will be exhausted in the near future. The development of a highly efficient and environment-friendly gas turbine combined cycle using ultra heavy oil such as Orimulsion{trademark} (trademark of BITOR) is thus a significant step towards resolving these two issues. Chubu Electric Power Co, Inc., the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) conducted a collaboration from 1994 to 1998 with the objective of developing an ultra heavy oil integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Construction of the ultra heavy oil gasification testing facility (fuel capacity:2.4t/d) was completed in 1995, and Orimulsion{trademark} gasification tests were carried out in 1995 and 1996. In 1997, the hot dedusting facility with ceramic filter and the water scrubber used as a preprocessor of a wet desulfurization process were installed. Gasification and clean up the syngs tests were carried out on Orimulsion{trademark}, Asmulsion{trademark} (trademark of Nisseki Mitsubishi K.K.), and residue oil in 1997 and 1998. The results of the collaboration effort are described below.

Kidoguchi, Kazuhiro; Ashizawa, Masami; Taki, Masato; Ishimura, Masato; Takeno, Keiji

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Coal gasification 2006: roadmap to commercialization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surging oil and gas prices, combined with supply security and environmental concerns, are prompting power generators and industrial firms to further develop coal gasification technologies. Coal gasification, the process of breaking down coal into its constituent chemical components prior to combustion, will permit the US to more effectively utilize its enormous, low cost coal reserves. The process facilitates lower environmental impact power generation and is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to traditional generation techniques. The study is designed to inform the reader as to this rapidly evolving technology, its market penetration prospects and likely development. Contents include: Clear explanations of different coal gasification technologies; Emissions and efficiency comparisons with other fuels and technologies; Examples of US and global gasification projects - successes and failures; Commercial development and forecast data; Gasification projects by syngas output; Recommendations for greater market penetration and commercialization; Current and projected gasification technology market shares; and Recent developments including proposals for underground gasification process. 1 app.

NONE

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal: Alternatives/Supplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility Coal: Alternatives/Supplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility As important as coal is as a primary gasification feedstock, gasification technology offers the important ability to take a wide range of feedstocks and process them into syngas, from which a similarly diverse number of end products are possible. Gasifiers have been developed to suit all different ranks of coal, and other fossil fuels, petcoke and refinery streams, biomass including agricultural waste, and industrial and municipal waste. The flexibility stems from the ability of gasification to take any carbon and hydrogen containing feedstock and then thermochemically break down the feedstock to a gas containing simple compounds which are easy to process into several marketable products.

136

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxygen Oxygen Commercial Technologies for Oxygen Production Gasification processes require an oxidant, most commonly oxygen; less frequently air or just steam may suffice as the gasification agent depending on the process. Oxygen-blown systems have the advantage of minimizing the size of the gasification reactor and its auxiliary process systems. However, the oxygen for the process must be separated from the atmosphere. Commercial large-scale air separation plants are based on cryogenic distillation technology, capable of supplying oxygen at high purity1 and pressure. This technology is well understood, having been in practice for over 75 years. Cryogenic air separation is recognized for its reliability, and it can be designed for high capacity (up to 5,000 tons per day).

137

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasifipedia > Feedstock Flexibility > Refinery Streams Gasifipedia > Feedstock Flexibility > Refinery Streams Gasifipedia Coal: Feedstock Flexibility Refinery Streams Gasification is a known method for converting petroleum coke (petcoke) and other refinery waste streams and residuals (vacuum residual, visbreaker tar, and deasphalter pitch) into power, steam and hydrogen for use in the production of cleaner transportation fuels. The main requirement for a gasification feedstock is that it contains both hydrogen and carbon. Below is a table that shows the specifications for a typical refinery feedstock. Specifications for a typical refinery feedstock A number of factors have increased the interest in gasification applications in petroleum refinery operations: Coking capacity has increased with the shift to heavier, more sour crude oils being supplied to the refiners.

138

A demonstrator for the SSTO launcher with combined cycle propulsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...airflow almost to saturation. An expander turbo-compressor compresses cold gas before it is piped to an expander rocket. LACE = liquid air cycle...air. In the latter case, an expander cycle turbo- compressor compresses the cold...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

BYPASS FLOW PATTERN CHANGES AT TURBO-RAM TRANSIENT OPERATION OF A COMBINED CYCLE ENGINE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Turbo-Ramjet Combined Cycle Engine is composed of a turbofan engine ... are not available from the transient engine thermo-cycle simulation. CFD calculation showed that such flow ... , yielding rather good agreem...

Shinichi Takata Researcher

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Mathematical Modeling and Computer Simulation of a Combined Cycle Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the simulation procedure developed to predict the performance of a combined cycle power plant from given performance characteristics of ... . Effects of gas turbine and steam turbine cycle par...

Nikhil Dev; Samsher; S. S. Kachhwaha; Mohit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gasifier selected for development under this contract is an innovative and patented hybrid technology which combines the best features of both fixed-bed and fluidized-bed types. PyGas{trademark}, meaning Pyrolysis Gasification, is well suited for integration into advanced power cycles such as IGCC. It is also well matched to hot gas clean-up technologies currently in development. Unlike other gasification technologies, PyGas can be designed into both large and small scale systems. It is expected that partial repowering with PyGas could be done at a cost of electricity of only 2.78 cents/kWh, more economical than natural gas repowering. It is extremely unfortunate that Government funding for such a noble cause is becoming reduced to the point where current contracts must be canceled. The Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) project was initiated to provide a test facility to support early commercialization of advanced fixed-bed coal gasification technology at a cost approaching $1,000 per kilowatt for electric power generation applications. The project was to include an innovative, advanced, air-blown, pressurized, fixed-bed, dry-bottom gasifier and a follow-on hot metal oxide gas desulfurization sub-system. To help defray the cost of testing materials, the facility was to be located at a nearby utility coal fired generating site. The patented PyGas{trademark} technology was selected via a competitive bidding process as the candidate which best fit overall DOE objectives. The paper describes the accomplishments to date.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Combined obliquity and precession pacing of the late Pleistocene glacial cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined obliquity and precession pacing of the late Pleistocene glacial cycles Peter Huybers in Earth's obliquity4,5 , or some combination of both6­11 to control the glacial cycles, though mechanisms, and this general concept has been elaborated to show how precession, obliquity, or combinations of both could

Huybers, Peter

143

THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE COMBINED LENGTH OF SPANNED CYCLES IN A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE COMBINED LENGTH OF SPANNED CYCLES IN A RANDOM PERMUTATION By YANNAI A of the combined length L = L(, M) of all cycles of that contain at least one element of M. We give a simple-MAIL: ratio@math.huji.ac.il URL: http://www.ratio.huji.ac.il/ #12;The Distribution of the Combined Length

Hart, Sergiu

144

Field Test of Combined Desiccant-Evaporator Cycle Providing Lower Dew Points and Enhanced Dehumidification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field Test of Combined Desiccant-Evaporator Cycle Providing Lower Dew Points and Enhanced Dehumidification Charles J. Cromer, PhD, P.E.; Florida Solar Energy Center, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL, 321-638-1445, charlie... of difficult criteria, some with more success than others. Combined Cycle with Desiccant and AC Coil This paper describes the field testing of a novel air conditioning desiccant cycle. This cycle uses a desiccant to move moisture within the air...

Cromer, C. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Entrainment Coal Gasification Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Entrainment Coal Gasification Modeling ... Equivalent Reactor Network Model for Simulating the Air Gasification of Polyethylene in a Conical Spouted Bed Gasifier ... Equivalent Reactor Network Model for Simulating the Air Gasification of Polyethylene in a Conical Spouted Bed Gasifier ...

C. Y. Wen; T. Z. Chaung

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Design and Exergy Analysis of Combined Rankine Cycle Using LNG Cold Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, a 90MWe combined Rankine cycle utilizing LNG cold exergy was proposed. Utilizing LNG cold exergy and waste heat from the conventional steam cycle, this process was able to generate additional power in the CO2 organic Rankine cycle (ORC). A conventional steam cycle generates only 42MW electric power; this combined Rankine cycle produced more than twice as much power as the conventional steam cycle while consuming the same amount of fossil fuel. Through parameter sensitivity analysis and exergy analysis, the optimum design and operating conditions were also determined. Finally, reduction of the power plant de-rate by introducing a CO2 capture process was also analyzed.

Ung Lee; Chonghun Han

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Retrofitting the Strogino district heat supply station with construction of a 260-MW combined-cycle power plant (Consisting of two PGU-130 combined-cycle power units)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The retrofitting carried out at the Strogino district heat supply station and the specific features of works accomplished in the course of constructing the thermal power station based on a combined-cycle power pl...

V. F. Aleksandrov

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Steam turbines produced by the Ural Turbine Works for combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most interesting and innovative solutions adopted in the projects of steam turbines for combined-cycle plants with capacities from...

A. E. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev; T. L. Shibaev; A. A. Goldberg

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The efficiency of technical retrofitting of cogeneration stations using combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the problem of technical retrofitting of gas-and-oil fired steam-turbine cogeneration stations by converting them into combined-cycle plants...

L. S. Popyrin; M. D. Dilman; G. M. Belyaeva

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Constructing the Russian combined-cycle cogeneration plant and mastering its operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main results obtained from the development, construction, mastering, and operation of the PGU-450T combined-cycle power plant are described.

P. A. Berezinets; V. M. Grinenko; I. V. Dolinin; V. N. Kondratev

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Adaptive hybrid predictive control for a combined cycle power plant optimization .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The design and development of an adaptive hybrid predictive controller for the optimization of a real combined cycle power plant (CCPP) are presented. The real (more)

Sez, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

An Edge-based Formulation for the Combined-Cycle Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 1, 2014 ... Abstract: As the number of combined-cycle units increases, efficient modeling approaches for these units play important roles for Independent...

Lei Fan

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Gasification Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION SYSTEMS GASIFICATION SYSTEMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREFACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

154

Gasification system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Gasification system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Air gasification of railroad wood ties treated with creosote: Effects of additives and their combination on the removal of tar in a two-stage gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification experiments with railroad wood ties treated with creosote were conducted in a two-stage gasifier to produce a high caloric producer gas with low tar content. In the experiments, sand and dolomite as the bed material were compared, and the effects of temperature in a range from 666 to 818C and equivalence ratio from 0.19 to 0.52 were also investigated. Additionally, the effectiveness of additives (biomass-based activated carbon, coal-based activated carbon and dolomite) and their combination on the removal of tar were examined. As a result, the combination of dolomite as the bed material and coal-based activated carbon in the tar cracking zone gave the best performance with respect to tar removal. With this combination, the total amount of tar was reduced by 91.9%, compared to that obtained by using only sand as the bed material in the gasifier. Furthermore, the tar content in the producer gas was below 0.1g/Nm3. Coal-based activated carbon also improved the production of hydrogen up to about 29vol.%. The \\{LHVs\\} of most producer gases in these experiments were above 7MJ/Nm3.

Tae-Young Mun; Jin-Won Kim; Joo-Sik Kim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Investigation of the effect of organic working fluids on thermodynamic performance of combined cycle Stirling-ORC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents thermodynamic investigation and environmental consideration of combined Stirling-organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power cycle. Combined cycle can be assisted by solar energy and ... side heat rejec...

Mohammad Bahrami; Ali A Hamidi

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conditioning Conditioning Sulfur Recovery and Tail Gas Treating Sulfur is a component of coal and other gasification feed stocks. Sulfur compounds need to be removed in most gasification applications due to environmental regulations or to avoid catalyst poisoning. Whether it is electricity, liquid fuels, or some other product being output, sulfur emissions are regulated, and sulfur removal is important for this reason, along with the prevention of downstream component fouling. In addition to these constraints, recovering saleable sulfur is an important economic benefit for a gasification plant. To illustrate the previous point, in 2011 8.1 million tons of elemental sulfur was produced, with the majority of this coming from petroleum refining, natural gas processing and coking plants. Total shipments were valued at $1.6 billion, with the average mine or plant price of $200 per ton, up from $70.48 in 2010. The United States currently imports sulfur (36% of consumption, mostly from Canada), meaning the market can support more domestic sulfur production.

159

Investigation of coal fired combined-cycle cogeneration plants for power, heat, syngas, and hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methodology for determination of technical and economic efficiency of coal fired combined-cycle cogeneration plant (CCCP) with low-pressure ... steam-gas generator and continuous flow gasifier at combined pro...

V. E. Nakoryakov; G. V. Nozdrenko; A. G. Kuzmin

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Fuzzy Optimization of Start-Up Operations for Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present a study on the application of fuzzy sets for the start-up optimisation of a combined cycle power plant. We fuzzyfy the output process variables and then we properly combine the resulting ...

Ilaria Bertini; Alessandro Pannicelli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Optimization of a Combined-Cycle Plant with Thermodynamic, Economic and Environmental Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental considerations are combined with thermodynamics and economics for the design optimization of a double-pressure combined-cycle plant, which produces electricity. Two pollutants...2 and NOX, and a pen...

Christos A. Frangopoulos; Vasilios A. Bulmetis

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Chapter 5 - Environmental Impact of Black Liquor Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental impact of black liquor gasification (BLG) is discussed. Biofuels from a BLG process excel in terms of well-to-wheel carbon dioxide emission reduction and energy efficiency. Forest biorefinery utilizing gasification (in a black liquor gasification combined cycle (BLGCC) configuration) rather than a Tomlinson boiler is predicted to produce significantly fewer pollutant emissions due to the intrinsic characteristics of the BLGCC technology. Syngas cleanup conditioning removes a considerable amount of contaminants and gas turbine combustion is more efficient and complete than boiler combustion. Also, there could be reductions in pollutant emissions and hazardous wastes resulting from cleaner production of chemicals and fuels that are now manufactured using fossil energy resources. Production of power, fuels, chemicals, and other products from biomass resources creates a net zero generation of carbon dioxide as plants are renewable carbon sinks. BLG whether conducted at high or low temperatures is still superior to the current recovery boiler combustion technology. Implementation of IGCC power plants will cause net savings in cooling water requirements and net reductions in wastewater discharges. The most significant environmental impact caused by BLG will occur in air emissions. The overall reduction of Total reduced sulphur (TRS) gases using gasification technology will also reduce odor, which will improve public acceptance of pulp and paper mills, particularly in populated areas.

Pratima Bajpai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Combined Cold Compressor/Ejector Helium Refrigerator Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years there has been increasing interest in raising refrigeration efficiency and capacity in cycles which produce cooling below 4.2 K. It is, of course, desirable to be able to produce the required s...

A. P. Schlafke; D. P. Brown; K. C. Wu

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

2007 gasification technologies conference papers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sessions covered: gasification industry roundtable; the gasification market in China; gasification for power generation; the gasification challenge: carbon capture and use storage; industrial and polygeneration applications; gasification advantage in refinery applications; addressing plant performance; reliability and availability; gasification's contribution to supplementing gaseous and liquid fuels supplies; biomass gasification for fuel and power markets; and advances in technology-research and development

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Preliminary Design of a Pulsed Detonation Based Combined Cycle Engine Ramakanth Munipalli*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Preliminary Design of a Pulsed Detonation Based Combined Cycle Engine Ramakanth Munipalli combined cycle engine using periodic detonation waves are presented here. Four modes of operation are used detonation rocket for take off to moderate supersonic Mach numbers (2) A pulsed normal detonation wave mode

Texas at Arlington, University of

166

Diagrams of regimes of cogeneration steam turbines for combined-cycle power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

General considerations regarding the form of the steam-consumption diagram for a three-loop cogeneration-type combined-cycle plant are formulated on the basis of ... 12.4 steam turbine for the PGU-410 combined-cycle

A. Yu. Kultyshev; M. Yu. Stepanov; T. Yu. Linder

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model Kevin and physical processes to test our understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle and to predict ecosystem biomass and carbon fluxes. We combine the photosynthesis and biophysical calculations in the Simple

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

168

The use of sustainable combined cycle technologies in Cyprus: a case study for the use of LOTHECO cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, a costbenefit analysis concerning the use of the low temperature heat combined cycle (LOTHECO cycle) in Cyprus is carried out. Also, the expected main emissions from the LOTHECO cycle are compared with existing commercial technologies. In particular, the future generation system of Cyprus power industry is simulated by the independent power producers optimization algorithm and by the long-term expansion software Wien Automatic System Planning. Various conventional generation options are examined and compared with LOTHECO cycle parametric studies. The economic analysis, based on the assumptions used and the candidate technologies examined, indicated that in the case of conventional technologies the least cost solution is the natural gas combined cycle. Additional computer runs with the various LOTHECO cycle parametric studies indicated that for efficiencies greater than 60% and capital cost between 700 and 900 /kW, LOTHECO cycle is the least cost generation technology. Furthermore, the current state and future improvements of the environmental indicators of the power industry in Cyprus are presented. It is estimated that by the use of LOTHECO cycle instead of the business as usual scenario, the principal environmental indicators would be reduced by the year 2010 by approximately ?23% instead of ?8%. Further, the carbon dioxide environmental indicator will be reduced by +24% instead of +68%.

Andreas Poullikkas; Adonis Kellas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

NETL: Gasification Systems - Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Project No.: DE-FE0007952 Reaction Engineering International (REI) is working to develop practical solutions to mitigate the plugging and fouling of syngas coolers (SC) - fire tube heat exchangers located between the coal gasifier and the combustion turbine. Syngas coolers used in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants offer high efficiency, but their reliability is generally lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The principle downtime events associated with syngas coolers are typically a result of ash deposits that: form on (wall) surfaces upstream of the syngas cooler, break loose, and then lodge in the tubes; or form on the fireside surface of the syngas cooler tubes that lead to fouling and reduced heat transfer. Both ash deposit mechanisms result in reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs.

170

Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Power Gasification Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process Jeff Seabright Arthur Lee Richard Weissman, PhD. Texaco Inc. White Plains, New York Presented at: First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 Washington D.C. ABSTRACT Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is a commercially proven clean coal technology that offers significant environmental and economic benefits today, including decreased air and solids emissions. It also offers the potential to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. Coal IGCC provides electric utilities strategic options in meeting today's growing demand for energy products (electricity, fuel, chemicals) while protecting public health and the environment and providing a pathway to zero emissions coal-based power generation.

171

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power: Typical IGCC Configuration Power: Typical IGCC Configuration Major Commercial Examples of IGCC Plants While there are many coal gasification plants in the world co-producing electricity, chemicals and/or steam, the following are four notable, commercial-size IGCC plants currently in operation solely for producing electricity from coal and/or coke. Tampa Electric, Polk County 250 MW GE Gasifier Wabash, West Terre Haute 265 MW CoP E-Gas(tm) Gasifier Nuon, Buggenum 250 MW Shell Gasifier Elcogas, Puertollano 300 MW Prenflo Gasifier All of the plants began operation prior to 2000 and employ high temperature entrained-flow gasification technology. GE (formerly Texaco-Chevron) and ConocoPhillips (CoP) are slurry feed gasifiers, while Shell and Prenflo are dry feed gasifiers. None of these plants currently capture carbon dioxide (CO2). A simplified process flow diagram of the 250-MW Tampa Electric IGCC plant is shown in Figure 1 to illustrate the overall arrangement of an operating commercial scale IGCC plant. The Tampa Electric plant is equipped with both radiant and convective coolers for heat recovery, generating high pressure (HP) steam.

172

Parametric study for the penetration of combined cycle technologies into Cyprus power system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, a parametric study concerning the use of combined cycle technologies for power generation, by independent power producers in Cyprus, is carried out. The costbenefit analysis is carried out using the Independent Power Producers optimization algorithm in which the electricity unit cost is calculated. Various conventional generation options are examined, such as, steam turbines and open cycle gas turbines, and compared with a parametric study (variations in fuel type, capital cost and efficiency) for combined cycle technologies. The results indicate that the future use of combined cycle technology with natural gas as fuel is recommended. Furthermore, it is estimated that by the use of natural gas combined cycle, the CO2 emissions environmental indicator of Cyprus power industry would be significantly reduced.

Andreas Poullikkas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Effective Renewable Energy Policy: Leave It to the States?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solid waste, or coal integrated gasification combined cycle.integrated gasification combined cycle technologies, waste

Weissman, Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Conceptual Design of a Fossil Hydrogen Infrastructure with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Case Study in Ohio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant couldintegrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants and the

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Combined-cycle gas and steam turbine power plants. 2. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

First published in 1991, this book is the leading reference on technical and economic factors of combined-cycle applications now leading the trend toward merchant plants and the peaking power needed in newly deregulated markets around the world, this long-awaited second edition is more important than ever. In it, Kehlhofer -- an internationally recognized authority in the field of new combined-cycle power plants -- and his co-authors widen the scope and detail found in the first edition. Included are tips on system layout, details on controls and automation, and operating instructions. Loaded with case studies, reference tables, and more than 150 figures, this text offers solid advice on system layout, controls and automation, and operating and maintenance instructions. The author provides real-world examples to apply to one`s own applications. The contents include: Introduction; The electricity market; Thermodynamic principles of combined-cycle plants; Combined-cycle concepts; Applications of combined-cycle; Components; Control and automation; Operating and part load behavior; Environmental considerations; Developmental trends; Typical combined-cycle plants already built; Conclusion; Appendices; Conversions; Calculation of the operating performance of combined-cycle installations; Definitions of terms and symbols; Bibliography; and Index.

Kehlhofer, R.; Bachmann, R.; Nielson, H.; Warner, J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Thermodynamic evaluation of solar integration into a natural gas combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The term integrated solar combined-cycle (ISCC) has been used to define the combination of solar thermal energy into a natural gas combined-cycle (NGCC) power plant. Based on a detailed thermodynamic cycle model for a reference ISCC plant, the impact of solar addition is thoroughly evaluated for a wide range of input parameters such as solar thermal input and ambient temperature. It is shown that solar hybridization into an NGCC plant may give rise to a substantial benefit from a thermodynamic point of view. The work here also indicates that a significant solar contribution may be achieved in an ISCC plant, thus implying substantial fuel savings and environmental benefits.

Guangdong Zhu; Ty Neises; Craig Turchi; Robin Bedilion

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Discovering functional transcription-factor combinations in the human cell cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discovering functional transcription-factor combinations in the human cell cycle Zhou Zhu,1 Jay-factor (TF) combinations using phylogenetically conserved sequences and microarray-based expression data of binding sites in the vicinity of one another and whether these combinations result in more coherent

Church, George M.

178

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Major Partner Test Sites Major Partner Test Sites Gasification Systems Technologies - Major Partner Test Sites Major Partner Test Sites Once a technology is ready to be tested at pilot or commercial scale, the cost of building a test facility becomes significant -- often beyond the funding provided for any one project. It then becomes critical to test the technology at a pre-existing facility willing to test experimental technologies. Not surprisingly, most commercial facilities are hesitant to interfere with their operations to experiment, but others, with a view towards the future, welcome promising technologies. Below is a list of major partner test sites that actively host DOE supported research activities. Many of the test sites were built with DOE support, but many were not. Some are commercial, and were designed to perform experimental work. All play an important role in developing technologies with minimal expense to the project, and to the U.S. taxpayer.

179

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capture R&D Capture R&D DOE/NETL's pre-combustion CO2 control technology portfolio of R&D projects is examining various CO2 capture technologies, and supports identification of developmental pathways linking advanced fossil fuel conversion and CO2 capture. The Program's CO2 capture activity is being conducted in close coordination with that of advanced, higher-efficiency power generation and fossil fuel conversion technologies such as gasification. Links to the projects can be found here. Finally, an exhaustive and periodically updated report on CO2 capture R&D sponsored by NETL is available: DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update (also referred to as the CO2 Handbook). Carbon Dioxide CO2 Capture Commercial CO2 Uses & Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery

180

Chemical-looping combustion in combination with integrated coal gasification -- A way to avoid CO{sub 2} emission from coal fired power plants without a significant decrease in net power efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observation of the increased concentration of carbon dioxide, CO{sub 2}, in the atmosphere and the thereto suspected connected global warming effect has made prevention of CO{sub 2} emission from power plants an important field of research. Today, most fuels used in thermal power plants are fossil fuels like oil, coal or natural gas which upon combustion gives rise to a net release of CO{sub 2}. To avoid this emission, different gas separation techniques like membrane separation and absorption have been suggested to separate CO{sub 2} from the other exhaust gases before the exhaust is released into the atmosphere. This separation is, however, estimated to be rather costly due to the large volume of dilute gas that needs to be treated and the energy consumed in the separation process. In chemical-looping combustion (CLC), CO{sub 2} and the other combustion products are already separated in the combustion process. This is because fuel and air never enter the same reactor. Instead of oxidizing the fuel with oxygen from the combustion air, the fuel is oxidized by an oxygen carrier, that is, an oxygen containing compound, for instance a metal oxide. Chemical-looping combustion is also thought to result in a higher fuel energy conversion efficiency. It is possible to recover some of the heat from the exhaust within the CLC system. In this paper, estimations of the performance of a chemical-looping combustion combined cycle system with integrated coal gasification and NiO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} as an oxygen carrier is compared to the performance of a similarly simulated conventional IGCC-system. Calculations show that the systems reach about the same net power efficiencies but then the chemical-looping systems have an added advantage of CO{sub 2} separation.

Anheden, M.; Svedberg, G. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources is under investigation in this paper. The proposed cycle combines the organic Rankine cycle and the ejector refrigeration cycle. The ejector is driven by the exhausts from the turbine to produce power and refrigeration simultaneously. A simulation was carried out to analyze the cycle performance using R245fa as the working fluid. A thermal efficiency of 34.1%, an effective efficiency of 18.7% and an exergy efficiency of 56.8% can be obtained at a generating temperature of 395 K, a condensing temperature of 298 K and an evaporating temperature of 280 K. Simulation results show that the proposed cycle has a big potential to produce refrigeration and most exergy losses take place in the ejector. (author)

Zheng, B.; Weng, Y.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Optimizing the start-up operations of combined cycle power plants using soft computing methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Fast Start-up of a Combined-Cycle Power Plant: a Simulation Study with Modelica. In: Proceedings 5th International Modelica Conference (2006) 3-10. Modelica Association eds. [4] Zimmerman HJ . Fuzzy set theory (1991) Kluwer Academic......

Ilaria Bertini; Matteo De Felice; Alessandro Pannicelli; Stefano Pizzuti

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Off-design performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle: effects of ambient temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work investigates the influence of ambient temperature on the steady-state off-design thermodynamic performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle. A sensitivity analysis...

Jinling Chi; Bo Wang; Shijie Zhang; Yunhan Xiao

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Proposing a novel combined cycle for optimal exergy recovery of liquefied natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effective utilization of the cryogenic exergy associated with liquefied natural gas (LNG) vaporization is important. In this paper, a novel combined power cycle is proposed which utilizes LNG in different ......

M. R. Salimpour; M. A. Zahedi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Steam turbines of the Ural Turbine Works for advanced projects of combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the design features, basic thermal circuits, and efficiency of steam turbines developed on the basis of serially produced steam turbines of Ural Turbine Works and used as part of combined-cycle plants...

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Discussion of the Key Problems on Designing 350 MW-Class Combined Cycle Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With adjustment of energy structure and enhancement of environmental protection standard, gas-steam combined cycle power plants will be erupt gradually, especially...gas being moved from WEST to EAST and liquefie...

Tai Lu; Sike Hu; Wenrui Wu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Investigation of combined-cycle steam-plant problems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation and maintenance of gas turbine combined-cycle steam generators is reviewed. Feedwater cycles and auxiliary equipment are also discussed, and the results of on-site discussions with operating and maintenance personnel are presented. Actual problems encountered are delineated, and recommendations are given for improving operation of existing plants, for design of new plants, and for future research and development.

Crutchfield, H.C.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

Puga, J. Nicolas

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

A hydrogen and oxygen combined cycle with chemical-looping combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the current paper, new systems integrating chemical-looping hydrogen (CLH) generation and the hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2) combined cycle have been proposed. The new methane-fueled cycle using CLH has been investigated with the aid of the exergy principle (energy utilization diagram methodology). First, H2 is produced in the CLH, in which FeO and Fe3O4 are used as the looping material. The H2 and O2 combined cycle then uses H2 as fuel. Two types of these combined cycles have been analyzed. Waste heat from the H2O2 combined cycle is utilized in the CLH to produce H2. The advantages of CLH and the H2 and O2 combined cycle have resulted in a breakthrough in performance. The new system can achieve 59.8% net efficiency with CO2 separation when the turbine inlet temperature is 1300C. Meanwhile, the cycle is environmentally superior because of the recovery of CO2 without an energy penalty.

Xiaosong Zhang; Sheng Li; Hui Hong; Hongguang Jin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Coal Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell System Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by gasified coal. System concepts that integrate a coal gasifier with a SOFC, a gas turbine, and a steam turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 200 MW. Two alternative integration configurations were selected with projected system efficiency of over 53% on a HHV basis, or about 10 percentage points higher than that of the state-of-the-art Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The initial cost of both selected configurations was found to be comparable with the IGCC system costs at approximately $1700/kW. An absorption-based CO2 isolation scheme was developed, and its penalty on the system performance and cost was estimated to be less approximately 2.7% and $370/kW. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

Chellappa Balan; Debashis Dey; Sukru-Alper Eker; Max Peter; Pavel Sokolov; Greg Wotzak

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Performance and emission characteristics of natural gas combined cycle power generation system with steam injection and oxyfuel combustion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Natural gas combined cycle power generation systems are gaining popularity due to their high power generation efficiency and reduced emission. In the present work, combined (more)

Varia, Nitin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Creation of equipment for combined-cycle installationsOne of the priority problems facing power-machinery builders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offers of OAO Silovye Mashiny for delivery of equipment for combined-cycle installations (CCIs) of reconstructed and newly...

A. S. Lebedev; G. L. Butalov

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM Description Researchers inthe@tamu.edu Skid-mounted gasifier: 1.8 tons-per-day pilot unit Gasification of cotton gin trash The new Texas A

194

Gasification: redefining clean energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This booklet gives a comprehensive overview of how gasification is redefining clean energy, now and in the future. It informs the general public about gasification in a straight-forward, non-technical manner.

NONE

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Current Gasification Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With coal gasification now in modern commercial-scale applications, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy has turned its attention to future gasification concepts that offer...

196

Gasification | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gasification Gasification Gasification The Wabash River Clean Coal Power Plant The Wabash River Clean Coal Power Plant Gasification Technology R&D Coal gasification offers one of the most versatile and clean ways to convert coal into electricity, hydrogen, and other valuable energy products. Coal gasification electric power plants are now operating commercially in the United States and in other nations, and many experts predict that coal gasification will be at the heart of future generations of clean coal technology plants. Rather than burning coal directly, gasification (a thermo-chemical process) breaks down coal - or virtually any carbon-based feedstock - into its basic chemical constituents. In a modern gasifier, coal is typically exposed to steam and carefully controlled amounts of air or oxygen under high

197

Selective Exhaust Gas Recycle with Membranes for CO2 Capture from Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combination of the combustion turbine (Brayton cycle) and steam turbine (Rankine cycle) yields a combined cycle power plant with efficiencies as high as 50%55% (compared to 35%40% in a typical subcritical pulverized coal power plant). ... Of course, it is also possible to combine these designs so that both parallel and series membranes are used. ...

Timothy C. Merkel; Xiaotong Wei; Zhenjie He; Lloyd S. White; J. G. Wijmans; Richard W. Baker

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

Coal gasification development intensifies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal gasification development intensifies ... Three almost simultaneous developments in coal gasification, although widely divergent in purpose and geography, rapidly are accelerating the technology's movement into an era of commercial exploitation. ... A plant to be built in the California desert will be the first commercialsize coal gasification power plant in the U.S. In West Germany, synthesis gas from a coal gasification demonstration plant is now being used as a chemical feedstock, preliminary to scaleup of the process to commercial size. ...

1980-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

199

Gasification Systems Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan Project Portfolio Project...

200

Gasification Systems Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publications News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan Project...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

2010 Worldwide Gasification Database  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.

202

The thermodynamic efficiency of the condensing process circuits of binary combined-cycle plants with gas-assisted heating of cycle air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal efficiencies of condensing-type circuits of binary combined-cycle plants containing one, two, and three ... gas turbine unit, and with preheating of cycle air are analyzed by way of comparison ... ini...

V. P. Kovalevskii

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Coordinated optimization of the parameters of the cooled gas-turbine flow path and the parameters of gas-turbine cycles and combined-cycle power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper, we evaluate the effectiveness of the coordinated solution to the optimization problem for the parameters of cycles in gas turbine and combined cycle power plants and to the optimization prob...

A. M. Kler; Yu. B. Zakharov; Yu. M. Potanina

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Kinetics Of Carbon Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kinetics Of Carbon Gasification ... The steamcarbon reaction, which is the essential reaction of the gasification processes of carbon-based feed stocks (e.g., coal and biomass), produces synthesis gas (H2 + CO), a synthetically flexible, environmentally benign energy source. ... Coal Gasification in CO2 and Steam:? Development of a Steam Injection Facility for High-Pressure Wire-Mesh Reactors ...

C. W. Zielke; Everett. Gorin

1957-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Record of Decision for the Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, (DOE/EIS-0318) (February 4, 2003)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 23 / Tuesday, February 4, 2003 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Information Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request AGENCY: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Agency information collection activities: Submission for OMB review; comment request. SUMMARY: The EIA has submitted the energy information collections listed at the end of this notice to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and a three-year extension under section 3507(h)(1) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-13) (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq). DATES: Comments must be filed on or before March 6, 2003. If you anticipate that you will be submitting comments

206

Combined Brayton-JT cycles with refrigerants for natural gas liquefaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic cycles for natural gas liquefaction with single-component refrigerants are investigated under a governmental project in Korea aiming at new processes to meet the requirements on high efficiency large capacity and simple equipment. Based upon the optimization theory recently published by the present authors it is proposed to replace the methane-JT cycle in conventional cascade process with a nitrogen-Brayton cycle. A variety of systems to combine nitrogen-Brayton ethane-JT and propane-JT cycles are simulated with Aspen HYSYS and quantitatively compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency flow rate of refrigerants and estimated size of heat exchangers. A specific Brayton-JT cycle is suggested with detailed thermodynamic data for further process development. The suggested cycle is expected to be more efficient and simpler than the existing cascade process while still taking advantage of easy and robust operation with single-component refrigerants.

Ho-Myung Chang; Jae Hoon Park; Sanggyu Lee; Kun Hyung Choe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Thermodynamic modelling of three-stage combined cycle power systems utilising ammonia-water mixture as a working fluid in bottoming cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, two three-stage combined power cycles with ammonia-water mixture in bottoming cycle are introduced; one with variable ammonia fraction and the other with constant ammonia fraction. Energy and exergy analyses are carried out and optimal parameters of the proposed cycles are compared with the conventional power cycles. The second law efficiency of three-stage cycles with variable and constant ammonia fraction are 4.71% and 5.15% higher than steam-gas combined power cycle, respectively. Exergy flow diagram for each cycle is presented and exergy destruction of all components is investigated. Results quantitatively highlight the thermodynamic advantages of the proposed cycles in comparison with the conventional cycles. Three-stage cycle with constant ammonia fraction has the best performance in comparison with the others.

Amin Momeni; Hossein Shokouhmand

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Potassium Retention in Updraft Gasification of Wood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wood gasifiers are equipment used for a controlled combustion of wood in limited supply of air as the oxidizing medium to generate a combustible product gas. ... Other oxidizing media, such as oxygen and steam, or a combination of any two media can be used in the gasification process. ... The zone where high rates of char combustion and gasification occur is about 15 mm wide above the grate, as determined in a similar-sized gasifier by Di Blasi. ...

Joseph Olwa; Marcus hman; Pettersson Esbjrn; Dan Bostrm; Mackay Okure; Bjrn Kjellstrm

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

Thermionic-combustor combined-cycle system. Volume III. A thermionic converter design for gas-turbine combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermionic converter design is strongly influenced by the configuration of the heat source and heat sink. These two externally imposed conditions are of major importance in arriving at a viable converter design. In addition to these two factors, the economical and reliable transfer of energy internally within the converter is another major item in the design. The effects of the engineering trade-offs made in arriving at the design chosen for the Gas Turbine Combined Cycle combustor are reviewed.

Fitzpatrick, G.O.; Britt, E.J.; Dick, R.S. Jr.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization Hydrogen: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization Weyburn Project The Great Plains Synfuels Plant (GPSP) has had the ability to capture CO2 through the Rectisol process for sequestration or sale as a byproduct. However, no viable market was found for the CO2 in the early years of operation, and the captured CO2 was simply discharged to the atmosphere. This changed in 2000, when the GPSP began selling CO2 emissions, becoming one of the first commercial coal facilities to have its CO2 sequestered. The program had begun in 1997, when EnCana (formerly PanCanadian Resources) sought a solution to declining production in their Weyburn Oil Fields. Dakota Gasification Company, owners of the GPSP, and EnCana made an agreement to sell CO2 for use in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). DGC installed two large CO2 compressors and began shipping 105 million standard cubic feet per day of compressed CO2 (60% of the total CO2 produced at the plant) through a 205 mile pipeline from Beulah, North Dakota, to the Weyburn Oil Fields, located in Saskatchewan, Canada, for EOR. The pipeline was constructed and operated by a BEPC subsidiary. The CO2, about 95.5% pure and very dry, is injected into the mature fields where it has doubled the oil recovery rate of the field. In 2006, a third compressor was installed and an additional agreement was reached with Apache Canada Ltd. to supply CO2 for EOR to their nearby oilfields. The three compressors increased CO2 delivery to 160 million standard cubic feet (MMSCF; or 8,000 tonnes) per day. Through 2007, over 12 million tons of CO2 had been sold, and over the current expected lifetime of the program, an anticipated 20 million tons of CO2 will be stored.

211

Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2} separation, and also syngas production from coal with the calcium sulfide (CaS)/calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) loop utilizing the PDU facility. The results of Phase I were reported in Reference 1, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase I Report' The objective for Phase II was to develop the carbonate loop--lime (CaO)/calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) loop, integrate it with the gasification loop from Phase I, and ultimately demonstrate the feasibility of hydrogen production from the combined loops. The results of this program were reported in Reference 3, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase II Report'. The objective of Phase III is to operate the pilot plant to obtain enough engineering information to design a prototype of the commercial Chemical Looping concept. The activities include modifications to the Phase II Chemical Looping PDU, solids transportation studies, control and instrumentation studies and additional cold flow modeling. The deliverable is a report making recommendations for preliminary design guidelines for the prototype plant, results from the pilot plant testing and an update of the commercial plant economic estimates.

Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

212

Gasification performance of switchgrass pretreated with torrefaction and densification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate gasification performance of four switchgrass pretreatments (torrefaction at 230 and 270 C, densification, and combined torrefaction and densification) and three gasification temperatures (700, 800 and 900 C). Gasification was performed in a fixed-bed externally heated reactor with air as an oxidizing agent. Switchgrass pretreatment and gasification temperature had significant effects on gasification performance such as gas yields, syngas lower heating value (LHV), and carbon conversion and cold gas efficiencies. With an increase in the gasification temperature, yields of H2 and CO, syngas LHV, and gasifier efficiencies increased whereas CH4, CO2 and N2 yields decreased. Among all switchgrass pretreatments, gasification performance of switchgrass with combined torrefaction and densification was the best followed by that of densified, raw and torrefied switchgrass. Gasification of combined torrefied and densified switchgrass resulted in the highest yields of H2 (0.03 kg/kg biomass) and CO (0.72 kg/kg biomass), highest syngas LHV (5.08 MJ m-3), CCE (92.53%), and CGE (68.40%) at the gasification temperature of 900 C.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Various

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Gasification of New Zealand coals: a comparative simulation study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to conduct a preliminary feasibility assessment of gasification of New Zealand (NZ) lignite and sub-bituminous coals, using a commercial simulation tool. Gasification of these coals was simulated in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) application and associated preliminary economics compared. A simple method of coal characterization was developed for simulation purposes. The carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen content of the coal was represented by a three component vapor solid system of carbon, methane, and water, the composition of which was derived from proximate analysis data on fixed carbon and volatile matter, and the gross calorific value, both on a dry, ash free basis. The gasification process was modeled using Gibb's free energy minimization. Data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Shell Gasifier base cases using Illinios No. 6 coal was used to verify both the gasifier and the IGCC flowsheet models. The H:C and O:C ratios of the NZ coals were adjusted until the simulated gasifier output composition and temperature matched the values with the base case. The IGCC power output and other key operating variables such as gas turbine inlet and exhaust temperatures were kept constant for study of comparative economics. The results indicated that 16% more lignite than sub-bituminous coal was required. This translated into the requirement of a larger gasifier and air separation unit, but smaller gas and steam turbines were required. The gasifier was the largest sole contributor (30%) to the estimated capital cost of the IGCC plant. The overall cost differential associated with the processing of lignite versus processing sub-bituminous coal was estimated to be of the order of NZ $0.8/tonne. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

Smitha V. Nathen; Robert D. Kirkpatrick; Brent R. Young [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand). Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasification with combined cycles biological oxygen demandsintegrated gasification combined cycle Intergovernmentalbe integrated with combined-cycle (CC) technology (BLGCC),

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Tsiklauri-Durst combined cycle (T-D Cycle{trademark}) application for nuclear and fossil-fueled power generating plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tsiklauri-Durst combined cycle is a combination of the best attributes of both nuclear power and combined cycle gas power plants. A technology patented in 1994 by Battelle Memorial Institute offers a synergistic approach to power generation. A typical combined cycle is defined as the combination of gas turbine Brayton Cycle, topping steam turbine Rankine Cycle. Exhaust from the gas turbine is used in heat recovery steam generators to produce steam for a steam turbine. In a standard combined cycle gas turbine-steam turbine application, the gas turbine generates about 65 to 70 percent of system power. The thermal efficiency for such an installation is typically about 45 to 50 percent. A T-D combined cycle takes a new, creative approach to combined cycle design by directly mixing high enthalpy steam from the heat recovery steam generator, involving the steam generator at more than one pressure. Direct mixing of superheated and saturated steam eliminates the requirement for a large heat exchanger, making plant modification simple and economical.

Tsiklauri, B.; Korolev, V.N.; Durst, B.M.; Shen, P.K.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Analysis of design and part load performance of micro gas turbine/organic Rankine cycle combined systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study analyzes the design and part load performance of a power generation system combining a micro gas turbine (MGT) and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC). Design performances of cycles adopting several differe...

Joon Hee Lee; Tong Seop Kim

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Catalytic steam gasification of coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalytic steam gasification of coals ... SteamCoal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture ... SteamCoal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture ...

P. Pereira; G. A. Somorjai; H. Heinemann

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

NETL: Gasification Archived Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > Reference Shelf > Archived Projects Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > Reference Shelf > Archived Projects Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Archived Projects Archived Projects | Active Projects | All NETL Fact Sheets Feed Systems Reaction-Driven Ion Transport Membranes Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Coal/Biomass Gasification at Colorado School of Mines Co-Production of Electricity and Hydrogen Using a Novel Iron-Based Catalyst Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity via Catalytic Coal Gasification Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Technology Development

219

CO2 Offset Options: Comparative Assessment of Terrestial Sinks vs. Natural Gas Combined Cycle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

W. South (south@energyresources.com; 202-785-8833) W. South (south@energyresources.com; 202-785-8833) Energy Resources International, Inc. 1015 18 th Street, N.W., Suite 650 Washington, DC 20036 CO 2 Offset Options: Comparative Assessment of Terrestial Sinks vs. Natural Gas Combined Cycle 1 Abstract This study compares the economic value of two CO 2 mitigation actions: terrestrial reforestation to sequester CO 2 emitted from coal-fired power generation versus natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power generation to avoid (minimize) CO 2 release. The same quantity of carbon offset was assumed for both actions. Tree stock growth, carbon absorption/release cycles, and replanting were considered to maintain the quantity of carbon offset via reforestation. The study identified important parameters with both CO 2 mitigation options that should be considered when examining alternative strategies.

220

Optimizing the start-up operations of combined cycle power plants using soft computing methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......megawatts. Industrial turbines produce high-quality...recovered to improve the efficiency of power generation...steam and drive a steam turbine in a combined-cycle...either gas or steam turbine alone because it performs...generation by their high efficiency and possibility to operate......

Ilaria Bertini; Matteo De Felice; Alessandro Pannicelli; Stefano Pizzuti

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Technical and economic comparison of steam-injected versus combined- cycle retrofits on FT-4 engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study discusses the findings of a conceptual site-specific investigation of the technical and economic aspects of converting the TPM FT4 simple cycle combustion turbines into either the steam injected gas turbine (SIGT) cycle or the combined cycle (CC). It describes the selection of the best retrofit alternatives through the evaluation and data analysis of a large number of sites and units at two utilities. Conceptual designs are performed on the best retrofit alternatives. Flow diagrams and general arrangement drawings are developed for various configurations utilizing drum type and once-through type multipressure heat recovery steam generators. Auxiliary power consumption and capital cost estimates are presented together with an economic evaluation and comparison of the retrofit alternatives. While the investigation is performed utilizing the FT4 combustion turbines, the steps presented in the report may be used as a guide for investigating the conversion of other gas turbines to either cycle at any utility site.

Silaghy, F.J. (Burns and Roe, Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

2007 gasification technologies workshop papers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics covered in this workshop are fundamentals of gasification, carbon capture, reviews of financial and regulatory incentives, coal to liquids, and focus on gasification in the Western US.

NONE

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Evaluation of Indirect Combined Cycle in Very High Temperature Gas--Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and Idaho National Laboratory are developing a very high temperature reactor to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is twofold: (a) efficient, low-cost energy generation and (b) hydrogen production. Although a next-generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual purpose, as assumed here. A dual-purpose design with a combined cycle of a Brayton top cycle and a bottom Rankine cycle was investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting heat to a hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and a helium-nitrogen mixture were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms of the cycle efficiency. The relative component sizes were estimated for the different working fluids to provide an indication of the relative capital costs. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the cycle were performed to determine the effects of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of the cycle to various operating conditions as well as trade-offs between efficiency and component size. Parametric studies were carried out on reactor outlet temperature, mass flow, pressure, and turbine cooling.

Chang Oh; Robert Barner; Cliff Davis; Steven Sherman; Paul Pickard

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Downdraft gasification of biomass.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objectives of this research were to investigate the parameters affecting the gasification process within downdraft gasifiers using biomass feedstocks. In addition to investigations with (more)

Milligan, Jimmy B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Coal Gasification Systems Solicitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Cost Coal Conversion to High Hydrogen Syngas; FE0023577 Alstom's Limestone Chemical Looping Gasification Process for High Hydrogen Syngas Generation; FE0023497 OTM-Enhanced...

226

Modeling of a Biomass Gasification CHP Plant: Influence of Various Parameters on Energetic and Exergetic Efficiencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling of a Biomass Gasification CHP Plant: Influence of Various Parameters on Energetic and Exergetic Efficiencies ... This paper presents a theoretical assessment of energy, exergy, and syngas cleaning performances in a biomass gasification combined heat and power (CHP) plant with varying operating parameters. ... The analysis is carried out using a detailed model of a biomass gasification CHP plant developed with Aspen Plus. ...

Jessica Franois; Guillain Mauviel; Michel Feidt; Caroline Rogaume; Yann Rogaume; Olivier Mirgaux; Fabrice Patisson; Anthony Dufour

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

Performance Diagnosis using Optical Torque Sensor for Selection of a Steam Supply Plant among Advanced Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A newly developed optical torque sensor was applied to select a steam supply plant among advanced combined cycle, i.e. ACC, power plants of...

Shuichi Umezawa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Using energy balances for processing the results from tests of a single-shaft combined-cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of the balance method for dividing the overall power output produced by a single-shaft combined-cycle power plant between the steam turbine and...

G. G. Olkhovskii

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Carbon capture with low energy penalty: Supplementary fired natural gas combined cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enhancing CO2 concentration in exhaust gas has been considered as a potentially effective method to reduce the penalty of electrical efficiency caused by CO2 chemical absorption in post-combustion carbon capture systems. Supplementary firing is an option that inherently has an increased CO2 concentration in the exhaust gas, albeit a relatively low electrical efficiency due to its increased mass flow of exhaust gas to treat and large temperature difference in heat recovery steam generator. This paper focuses on the methods that can improve the electrical efficiency of the supplementary fired combined cycles (SFCs) integrated with MEA-based CO2 capture. Three modifications have been evaluated: (I) integration of exhaust gas reheating, (II) integration of exhaust gas recirculation, and (III) integration of supercritical bottoming cycle. It is further showed that combining all three modifications results in a significant increase in electrical efficiency which is raised from 43.3% to 54.1% based on Lower Heating Value (LHV) of natural gas when compared to the original SFC. Compared with a conventional combined cycle with a subcritical bottoming cycle and without CO2 capture (56.7% of LHV), the efficiency penalty caused by CO2 capture is only 2.6% of LHV.

Hailong Li; Mario Ditaranto; Jinyue Yan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Optimization of Fog Inlet Air Cooling System for Combined Cycle Power Plants using Genetic Algorithm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this research paper, a comprehensive thermodynamic modeling of a combined cycle power plant is first conducted and the effects of gas turbine inlet fogging system on the first and second law efficiencies and net power outputs of combined cycle power plants are investigated. The combined cycle power plant (CCPP) considered for this study consist of a double pressure heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) to utilize the energy of exhaust leaving the gas turbine and produce superheated steam to generate electricity in the Rankine cycle. In order to enhance understanding of this research and come up with optimum performance assessment of the plant, a complete optimization is using a genetic algorithm conducted. In order to achieve this goal, a new objective function is defined for the system optimization including social cost of air pollution for the power generation systems. The objective function is based on the first law efficiency, energy cost and the external social cost of air pollution for an operational system. It is concluded that using inlet air cooling system for the CCPP system and its optimization results in an increase in the average output power, first and second law efficiencies by 17.24%, 3.6% and 3.5%, respectively, for three warm months of year.

Mehdi A. Ehyaei; Mojtaba Tahani; Pouria Ahmadi; M. Esfandiari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Apparatus for fixed bed coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for fixed-bed coal gasification is described in which coal such as caking coal is continuously pyrolyzed with clump formation inhibited, by combining the coal with a combustible gas and an oxidant, and then continually feeding the pyrolyzed coal under pressure and elevated temperature into the gasification region of a pressure vessel. The materials in the pressure vessel are allowed to react with the gasifying agents in order to allow the carbon contents of the pyrolyzed coal to be completely oxidized. The combustion of gas produced from the combination of coal pyrolysis and gasification involves combining a combustible gas coal and an oxidant in a pyrolysis chamber and heating the components to a temperature of at least 1600.degree. F. The products of coal pyrolysis are dispersed from the pyrolyzer directly into the high temperature gasification region of a pressure vessel. Steam and air needed for gasification are introduced in the pressure vessel and the materials exiting the pyrolyzer flow down through the pressure vessel by gravity with sufficient residence time to allow any carbon to form carbon monoxide. Gas produced from these reactions are then released from the pressure vessel and ash is disposed of.

Sadowski, Richard S. (Greenville, SC)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Optimization of waste heat recovery boiler of a combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the details of a procedure developed for optimization of a waste heat recovery boiler (WHRB) of a combined cycle power plant (CCPP) using the program for performance prediction of a typical CCPP, details of which have been presented elsewhere (Seyedan et al., 1994). In order to illustrate the procedure, the optimum design of a WHRB for a typical CCPP (employing dual-pressure bottoming cycle) built by a prominent Indian company, has been carried out. The present design of a WHRB is taken as the base design and the newer designs generated by this procedure are compared with it to assess the extent of cost reduction possible.

Seyedan, B.; Dhar, P.L.; Gaur, R.R. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Bindra, G.S. [Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd., New Delhi (India)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high-temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR.

Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR. (authors)

Conklin, James C.; Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Configurations of the Mercury 50 Recuperated Gas-Turbine-Based Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Heat and Power (BIGCHP) Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, several original configurations of the cogeneration system based on different gasification technologies and Mercury 50 recuperated gas turbine are proposed and examined theoretically. ... (14) Another key problem of the successful commercialization of the technology is the commercial availability of reliable and efficient gas turbines (GTs) modified for syngas operation. ... In particular, the paper presents current development status and design challenges being addressed by Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. for large industrial engines (>200 MW) and by Solar Turbines for smaller engines (Turbine Systems (ATS) program. ...

Jacek Kalina

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

236

Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants

Gary Stiegel

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

237

Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants

Gary Stiegel

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

238

Incentives boost coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Higher energy prices are making technologies to gasify the USA's vast coal reserves attractive again. The article traces the development of coal gasification technology in the USA. IGCC and industrial gasification projects are now both eligible for a 20% investment tax credit and federal loan guarantees can cover up to 80% of construction costs. 4 photos.

Hess, G.

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

239

Techno-economic modelling of integrated advanced power cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concerns regarding the environmental impacts of power generation have stimulated interest in energy efficient cycles such as the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and the integrated gasification humid air turbine (IGHAT) cycle. These advanced power cycles are complex owing to the large number of units involved, interactions among the units, and the presence of streams of diverse compositions and properties. In this paper, techno-economic computer models of IGCC and IGHAT cycles are presented along with some sample results that illustrate the models' capabilities. The models, which were validated using actual data, provide performance predictions, inventories of capital and operating costs, as well as levels of gaseous emissions and solid wastes. While the models are simple enough for use in parametric, sensitivity and optimisation studies, they are responsive to variations in coal characteristics, design and operating conditions, part load operations and financial parameters.

A.O. Ong'iro; V.I. Ugursal; A.M. Al Taweel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

2006 gasification technologies conference papers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sessions covered: business overview, industry trends and new developments; gasification projects progress reports; industrial applications and opportunities; Canadian oil sands; China/Asia gasification markets - status and projects; carbon management with gasification technologies; gasification economics and performance issues addressed; and research and development, and new technologies initiatives.

NONE

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Process for fixed bed coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The combustion of gas produced from the combination of coal pyrolysis and gasification involves combining a combustible gas coal and an oxidant in a pyrolysis chamber and heating the components to a temperature of at least 1600.degree. F. The products of coal pyrolysis are dispersed from the pyrolyzer directly into the high temperature gasification region of a pressure vessel. Steam and air needed for gasification are introduced in the pressure vessel and the materials exiting the pyrolyzer flow down through the pressure vessel by gravity with sufficient residence time to allow any carbon to form carbon monoxide. Gas produced from these reactions are then released from the pressure vessel and ash is disposed of.

Sadowski, Richard S. (Greenville, SC)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Solar's combined-cycle system utilizes novel steam-generator concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As escalating fuel costs force equipment users to seek more efficient prime movers, the combined-cycle system will become increasingly attractive because it retains the advantages of simple-cycle gas turbines - low installation costs, high availability, low maintenance, and low emission levels - while adding 40% power output from the steam-based system operated on the turbine exhaust. Solar Turbines International has sought to develop an automated, remote-control combined-cycle system that can be easily retrofitted to existing simple-cycle power stations. The key component giving the system its advantages over the hazardous, complex steam-drum-type boiler systems is a once-through dual-pressure steam-generator device that eliminates the need for drums and elaborate control mechanisms. Forty identical parallel tube circuits suspended from a single frame are connected to common inlet and discharge manifolds; the individual circuits are made of dual high- and low-pressure bundles, with each bundle having economizer, vaporizer, and superheating sections. The 40 circuits comprise one complete steam-generator module core matrix. By injecting the superheated low-pressure steam into the latter stages of the steam turbine, the dual-pressure feature improves the heat recovery by more than 12% over conventional devices. The only water treatment that the corrosion-resistant tube material requires is the removal of dissolved solids.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A Stoichiometric Analysis of Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Stoichiometric Analysis of Coal Gasification ... Gasification of New Zealand Coals: A Comparative Simulation Study ... Gasification of New Zealand Coals: A Comparative Simulation Study ...

James Wei

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle ( IGCC)coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)will be integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) (Same

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

integrated gasification combined cycle ( IGCC) power plantsintegrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants,be integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) (Same power

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

NETL: Gasification Systems Reference Shelf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shelf Shelf Gasification Systems Reference Shelf TABLE OF CONTENTS Brochures Conferences and Workshops Gasification Systems Projects National Map Gasification Systems Projects and Performers Gasification Systems Project Portfolio Gasifipedia Multi-phase Flow with Interphase eXchange (MFIX) Patents Program Presentations Project Information Projects Summary Table by State Solicitations Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Technical Presentations & Papers Technology Readiness Assessment (Comprehensive Report | Overview Report) Video, Images & Photos Gasification Plant Databases CD Icon Request Gasification Technologies Information on a CD. Gasification RSS Feed Subscribe to the Gasification RSS Feed to follow website updates. LinkedIn DOE Gasification Program Group Subscribe to the LinkedIn DOE Gasification Program group for more information and discussion.

247

NETL: Gasification Systems - Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry for Feeding  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low-Rank Coal to Gasifiers Project Number: DE-FE0007977 There is increased interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) for future coal-based power plants, and in a CCS integrated gasification plant, relatively pure, high pressure CO2 stream(s) will be available within the power plant. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) aims to help reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CCS by using a portion of the high purity CO2 product stream as the carrier fluid to feed low rank coal (LRC) into the gasifier. EPRI proposes to confirm the potential advantages of LRC/liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) slurries by: Conducting plant-wide technical and economic simulations.

248

Steam-Coal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present experimental results of coal gasification with and without the addition of calcium oxide and potassium hydroxide as dual-functioning catalystcapture agents. Using two different coal types and temperatures between 700 and 900 C, we studied the effect of these catalystcapture agents on (1) the syngas composition, (2) CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S capture, and (3) the steamcoal gasification kinetic rate. The syngas composition from the gasifier was roughly 20% methane, 70% hydrogen, and 10% other species when a CaO/C molar ratio of 0.5 was added. We demonstrated significantly enhanced steamcoal gasification kinetic rates when adding small amounts of potassium hydroxide to coal when operating a CaOCaCO{sub 3} chemical looping gasification reactor. For example, the steamcoal gasification kinetic rate increased 250% when dry mixing calcium oxide at a Ca/C molar ratio of 0.5 with a sub-bituminous coal, and the kinetic rate increased 1000% when aqueously mixing calcium oxide at a Ca/C molar ratio of 0.5 along with potassium hydroxide at a K/C molar ratio of 0.06. In addition, we conducted multi-cycle studies in which CaCO{sub 3} was calcined by heating to 900 C to regenerate the CaO, which was then reused in repeated CaOCaCO{sub 3} cycles. The increased steamcoal gasification kinetics rates for both CaO and CaO + KOH persisted even when the material was reused in six cycles of gasification and calcination. The ability of CaO to capture carbon dioxide decreased roughly 24% per CaOCaCO{sub 3} cycle. We also discuss an important application of this combined gasifiercalciner to electricity generation and selling the purge stream as a precalcined feedstock to a cement kiln. In this scenario, the amount of purge stream required is fixed not by the degradation in the capture ability but rather by the requirements at the cement kiln on the amount of CaSO{sub 4} and ash in the precalcined feedstock.

Siefert, Nicholas S.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Litster, Shawn; Berry, David, A

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

17 - Fluidized bed gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The chapter describes the state-of-the-art of fluidized bed gasification of solid fuels, starting from the key role played by hydrodynamics, and its strong correlation with physical and chemical phenomena of the process and operating performance parameters of the reactor. The possible configurations of fluidized bed gasification plants are also assessed, and an analysis of the main methods for syngas cleaning is reported. Finally, the chapter describes some of the most interesting commercial experiences. The analysis indicates that the gasification of biomass and also of municipal and industrial solid wastes appear to be the most interesting sectors for the industrial development and utilization of fluidized bed gasifiers.

U. Arena

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Economic evaluations of coal-based combustion and gasification power plants with post-combustion CO2 capture using calcium looping cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal-based power generation sector is facing important changes to implement energy efficient carbon capture technologies to comply with emission reduction targets for transition to low carbon economy. This paper assesses CaL (Calcium Looping) as one of the innovative carbon capture options able to deliver low energy and cost penalties. The work evaluates how the integration of post-combustion calcium looping influences the economics of power plants providing up-dated techno-economic indicators. Coal-based combustion plants operated in both sub- and super-critical steam conditions were evaluated, as well as coal gasification plant using an oxygen-blown entrained-flow gasifier. As benchmark options used to quantify the carbon capture energy and cost penalties, the same power generation technologies were evaluated without CCS (Carbon capture and storage). The power plant concepts investigated in the paper generates around 545560MW net power with at least 90% carbon capture rate. Introduction of CaL technology for CO2 capture results in a 2442% increase of specific capital investment, the O&M costs are increasing with 2430% and the electricity cost with 3948% (all compared to non-CCS cases). As the techno-economic results suggest, CaL has good application potential in combustion-based power generation.

Calin-Cristian Cormos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Improving process performances in coal gasification for power and synfuel production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is aimed at developing process alternatives of conventional coal gasification. A number of possibilities are presented, simulated, and discussed in order to improve the process performances, to avoid the use of pure oxygen, and to reduce the overall CO{sub 2} emissions. The different process configurations considered include both power production, by means of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant, and synfuel production, by means of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The basic idea is to thermally couple a gasifier, fed with coal and steam, and a combustor where coal is burnt with air, thus overcoming the need of expensive pure oxygen as a feedstock. As a result, no or little nitrogen is present in the syngas produced by the gasifier; the required heat is transferred by using an inert solid as the carrier, which is circulated between the two modules. First, a thermodynamic study of the dual-bed gasification is carried out. Then a dual-bed gasification process is simulated by Aspen Plus, and the efficiency and overall CO{sub 2} emissions of the process are calculated and compared with a conventional gasification with oxygen. Eventually, the scheme with two reactors (gasifier-combustor) is coupled with an IGCC process. The simulation of this plant is compared with that of a conventional IGCC, where the gasifier is fed by high purity oxygen. According to the newly proposed configuration, the global plant efficiency increases by 27.9% and the CO{sub 2} emissions decrease by 21.8%, with respect to the performances of a conventional IGCC process. 29 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

M. Sudiro; A. Bertucco; F. Ruggeri; M. Fontana [University of Padova, Milan (Italy). Italy and Foster Wheeler Italiana Spa

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Exergoeconomic analysis of a biomass post-firing combined-cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomass can be converted thermo- and bio-chemically to solid, liquid and gaseous biofuels. In this paper, energy, exergy and exergoeconomic analyses are applied to a biomass integrated post-firing combined-cycle power plant. The energy and exergy efficiencies of the cycle are found to be maximized at specific compressor pressure ratio values, and that higher pressure ratios reduce the total unit product cost. Increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature and decreasing the compressor pressure ratio decreases the CO2 mole fraction exiting the power plant. The exergoeconomic factor for the biomass integrated post-firing combined-cycle power plant at the optimum energy/exergy efficiency is 0.39. This implies that the major cost rate of this power plant configuration is attributable to the exergy destruction cost rate. Increasing the compressor pressure ratio decreases the mass of air per mass of steam in the power plant, implying a reduction in the gas turbine plant size. Increasing both the compressor pressure ratio and the heat recovery steam generator inlet gas temperature increases the capital investment cost compared with the exergy destruction cost. However, increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature decreases this ratio.

Hassan Athari; Saeed Soltani; Seyed Mohammad Seyed Mahmoudi; Marc A. Rosen; Tatiana Morosuk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Combining biogas LCA reviews with stakeholder interviews to analyse life cycle impacts at a practical level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biogas presents an increasing energy production form in municipalities and rural locations, and it is also a feasible waste management option. In terms of environmental life cycle assessments (LCA), biogas production seems to offer a unique opportunity to combine nutrient recycling with energy production using various underutilised resources such as municipal biowastes or manure. \\{LCAs\\} of biogas production suggest benefits related to CO2 emission savings and the replacement of chemical fertilisers, for example. Existing biogas plants have varying practices related to biogas production and actualisation of the life cycle benefits is influenced by policies, local contexts, and the purposes of the biogas production activity. This paper identifies and explores critical points related to biogas production by reviewing LCA studies and comparing them to actual choices made at Finnish biogas plants based on stakeholder interviews. The most critical points related to biogas production involve the end use of the biogas and the end use of the digestate. The practical implementation and site-specific conditions of biogas plants can lead to significant differences between life cycle impacts. Therefore, we emphasise the importance of site-specific LCA studies for reliable impact assessments. In addition, we suggest the incorporation of stakeholder interviews to support LCA at different phases and better implementation of life cycle thinking in policy design.

Suvi Huttunen; Kaisa Manninen; Pekka Leskinen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Biothermal gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BIOTHERMGAS Process is described for conversion of biomass, organic residues, and peat to substitute natural gas (SNG). This new process, under development at IGT, combines biological and thermal processes for total conversion of a broad variety of organic feeds (regardless of water or nutrient content). The process employs thermal gasification for conversion of refractory digester residues. Ammonia and other inorganic nutrients are recycled from the thermal process effluent to the bioconversion unit. Biomethanation and catalytic methanation are presented as alternative processes for methanation of thermal conversion product gases. Waste heat from the thermal component is used to supply the digester heat requirements of the bioconversion component. The results of a preliminary systems analysis of three possible applications of this process are presented: (1) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with catalytic methanation; (2) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with biomethanation; and (3) 1000 ton/day municipal solid waste (MSW) sewage sludge plant with biomethanation. The results indicate that for these examples, performance is superior to that expected for biological or thermal processes used separately. The results of laboratory studies presented suggest that effective conversion of thermal product gases can be accomplished by biomethanation.

Chynoweth, D.P.; Srivastava, V.J.; Henry, M.P.; Tarman, P.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

NETL: Gasification Systems - Solicitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shelf > Solicitations Shelf > Solicitations Gasification Systems Solicitations All NETL Solicitations / Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOA) Gasification RSS Feed NETL RSS Feeds: List of available NETL RSS feeds. Business & Solicitations RSS: Subscribe to this to be notified of all NETL solicitations or FOA postings. Gasification RSS: Subscribe to this to be notified of Gasification news, solicitations and FOA postings. Business Alert Notification System Official notification is available through the Business Alert Notification System. *These notifications are provided as a courtesy and there may be a delay between the opportunity announcement and the arrival of the alert. SOLICITATION TITLE / AWARDS ANNOUNCEMENT PROJECT PAGE(S) 12.11.13: Fossil Energy's Request for Information DE-FOA-0001054; titled "Novel Crosscutting Research and Development to Support Advanced Energy Systems." Application due date is January 15, 2014. Applications and/or instructions can be found with this Funding Opportunity Announcement on FedConnect.

256

Gasification … Program Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

th th Annual International Colloquium on Environmentally Preferred Advanced Power Generation, Costa Mesa, CA, February 7, 2012 An Overview of U.S. DOE's Gasification Systems Program Jenny B. Tennant Technology Manager - Gasification 2 Gasification Program Goal "Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness" Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy November 2010 The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards 3 U.S. Coal Resources Low rank: lignite and sub-bituminous coal - About 50% of the U.S. coal reserves - Nearly 50% of U.S. coal production - Lower sulfur Bituminous coal

257

Coal gasification: Belgian first  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... hope for Europe's coal production came with the announcement this month that the first gasification of coal at depths of nearly 1,000 metres would take place this May in ... of energy.

Jasper Becker

1982-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

258

Forward and reverse combustion gasification of coal with production of high-quality syngas in a simulated pilot system for in situ gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This research focused on the feasibility and stability of applying the forward and reverse combustion approach to the in situ gasification of lignite and bituminous coal with oxygen or oxygensteam mixtures as gasification agents, especially reverse combustion gasification. A high-quality syngas (H2 and CO) could be obtained using the reverse combustion gasification technique combined with forward combustion gasification in a pilot system for in situ gasification. The gasification time was extended more than 25% using the reverse combustion approach. The controlling conditions for reverse combustion gasification were obtained by comparing and analyzing experimental data. The results show the relationship between the inject gas flow within certain limits and velocity of the gasification flame was linear during reverse combustion. The underground conditions of the coal seam and strata were simulated in a pilot-scale underground gasifier during experiments. The combustion gasification of coal was carried out experimentally for over 5days. The average effective content (H2 and CO) of syngas was in the range of 6070%, meeting the requirement of synthesis gas. The optimal ranges of gasifying lignite and bituminous coal were found to be 1.52.0 and 1.31.75, respectively. The product gas flow was proportional to oxygen blast. These are expected to provide useful guidance on practical underground coal gasification operations and to give experimental evidence in support of theory.

Yong Cui; Jie Liang; Zhangqing Wang; Xiaochun Zhang; Chenzi Fan; Dongyu Liang; Xuan Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Chapter 4 - Natural Gasfired Gas Turbines and Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas turbines can burn a range of liquid and gaseous fuels but most burn natural gas. Power plants based on gas turbines are one of the cheapest types of plant to build, but the cost of their electricity depends heavily on the cost of their fuel. Two types of gas turbine are used for power generation: aero-derivative gas turbines and heavy-duty gas turbines. The former are used to provide power to the grid at times of peak demand. The latter are most often found in combined cycle power stations. These are capable of more than 60% efficiency. There are a number of ways of modifying the gas turbine cycle to improve efficiency, including reheating and intercooling. Micro-turbines have been developed for very small-scale generation of both electricity and heat. The main atmospheric emissions from gas turbines are carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide.

Paul Breeze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A combined cycle designed to achieve greater than 60 percent efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cooperation with the US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Westinghouse is working on Phase 2 of an 8-year Advanced Turbine Systems Program to develop the technologies required to provide a significant increase in natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation plant efficiency. In this paper, the technologies required to yield an energy conversion efficiency greater than the Advanced Turbine Systems Program target value of 60 percent are discussed. The goal of 60 percent efficiency is achievable through an improvement in operating process parameters for both the combustion turbine and steam turbine, raising the rotor inlet temperature to 2,600 F (1,427 C), incorporation of advanced cooling techniques in the combustion turbine expander, and utilization of other cycle enhancements obtainable through greater integration between the combustion turbine and steam turbine.

Briesch, M.S.; Bannister, R.L.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A combined cycle designed to achieve greater than 60 percent efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cooperation with the US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Westinghouse is working on Phase 2 of an 8-year Advanced Turbine Systems Program to develop the technologies required to provide a significant increase in natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation plant efficiency. In this paper, the technologies required to yield an energy conversion efficiency greater than the Advanced Turbine Systems Program target value of 60% are discussed. The goal of 60% efficiency is achievable through an improvement in operating process parameters for both the combustion turbine and steam turbine, raising the rotor inlet temperature to 2,600 F (1,427 C), incorporation of advanced cooling techniques in the combustion turbine expander, and utilization of other cycle enhancements obtainable through greater integration between the combustion turbine and steam turbine.

Briesch, M.S.; Bannister, R.L.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Operating experience of single cylinder steam turbine with 40 inch last blade applied for combined cycle plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inquiries and orders for combined cycle plant have increased recently because of the better efficiency of combined cycle plant in comparison with the usual fossil fuel power plant. The typical features of the steam turbine for combined cycle plant are the lower inlet steam conditions and the more driving steam flow quantity compared with the steam turbine for usual fossil fuel plants. This paper introduces the design and results of operation about 122 MW single cylinder steam turbine. Furthermore, the results of periodical overhaul inspection carried out after one year`s commercial operation is also presented.

Kishimoto, Masaru; Yamamoto, Tetsuya [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Yokota, Hiroshi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagasaki (Northern Mariana Islands); Umaya, Masahide [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Coalbed methane production enhancement by underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sub-surface of the Netherlands is generally underlain by coal-bearing Carboniferous strata at greater depths (at many places over 1,500 m). These coal seams are generally thinner than 3 meter, occur in groups (5--15) within several hundred meters and are often fairly continuous over many square kilometers. In many cases they have endured complex burial history, influencing their methane saturation. In certain particular geological settings, a high, maximum coalbed methane saturation, may be expected. Carboniferous/Permian coals in the Tianjin-region (China) show many similarities concerning geological settings, rank and composition. Economical coalbed methane production at greater depths is often obstructed by the (very) low permeabilities of the coal seams as with increasing depth the deformation of the coal reduces both its macro-porosity (the cleat system) and microporosity. Experiments in abandoned underground mines, as well as after underground coal gasification tests indicate ways to improve the prospects for coalbed methane production in originally tight coal reservoirs. High permeability areas can be created by the application of underground coal gasification of one of the coal seams of a multi-seam cycle with some 200 meter of coal bearing strata. The gasification of one of the coal seams transforms that seam over a certain area into a highly permeable bed, consisting of coal residues, ash and (thermally altered) roof rubble. Additionally, roof collapse and subsidence will destabilize the overburden. In conjunction this will permit a better coalbed methane production from the remaining surrounding parts of the coal seams. Moreover, the effects of subsidence will influence the stress patterns around the gasified seam and this improves the permeability over certain distances in the coal seams above and below. In this paper the effects of the combined underground coal gasification and coalbed methane production technique are regarded for a single injection well. Known geotechnical aspects are combined with results from laboratory experiments on compaction of thermally treated rubble. An axi-symmetric numerical model is used to determine the effects induced by the gasified coal seam. The calculation includes the rubble formation, rubble compaction and induced stress effects in the overlying strata. Subsequently the stress effects are related to changes in coal permeability, based on experimental results of McKee et al.

Hettema, M.H.H.; Wolf, K.H.A.A.; Neumann, B.V.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

NETL: Gasification Systems - Model Based Optimal Sensor Network Design for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Model Based Optimal Sensor Network Design for Condition Monitoring Model Based Optimal Sensor Network Design for Condition Monitoring Project Number: FE0005712 General Electric (GE) Global Research is developing an advanced model-based optimal sensor network to monitor the condition of the gasification section in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant. The work builds on model-based controls aimed at enhancing efficiency and operational flexibility through increased automation. Within an overall strategy of employing model-based online monitoring and predictive controls, GE Global Research is extending existing models for the gasifier and radiant syngas cooler to include the effects of degradation and fouling on the sensed variables like temperature etc., and will implement an estimation algorithm to assess the extent of gasifier refractory degradation and radiant syngas cooler fouling. An optimization-based solution will be employed to optimally place the hardware sensors utilized in the estimation algorithm in order to achieve the monitoring requirements at the lowest cost. The performance of the sensor placement algorithm and resulting monitoring solution will be demonstrated through simulations using representative test cases. The overall approach is one of the first to be applicable to condition monitoring of critical components in IGCC plants.

265

Gasification of Canola Meal and Factors Affecting Gasification Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-catalytic gasification of canola meal for the production of ... in order to study the effects of different gasification parameters on gas composition, H2/CO ratio, gas yield, syngas yield, lower heating value...

Ashwini Tilay; Ramin Azargohar; Regan Gerspacher; Ajay Dalai

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Improving a Pre-Combustion CCS Concept in Gas Turbine Combined Cycle for CHP Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes modifications to improve the feasibility of a pre-combustion CCS concept for a gas turbine combined cycle. A natural gas-fired greenfield combined heat and power (CHP) plant equipped with pre-combustion capture was used as a base case, for which various improvement options were identified, assessed and selected. The base case was modified using the selected improvement options, after which the investment costs were re-evaluated. The results showed that the investment cost can be reduced with 8% by excluding the pre-reformer and the low temperature water-gas-shift reactor from the reforming process. The exclusion of the pre-reformer did not affect the performance of the plant, but the exclusion of the low temperature water-gas-shift reactor led to higher CO2 emissions.

Marjut S. Suomalainen; Antti Arasto; Sebastian Teir; Sari Siitonen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Orlando Gasification Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

This environmental impact statement (EIS) has been prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) as amended (42 USC 4321 et seq.), Council on Environmental Quality regulations for implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and DOE NEPA regulations (10 CFR Part 1021). The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a project which was proposed by Southern Company in partnership with the Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) and which has been selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) program. The proposed project would demonstrate advanced power generation systems using Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC)

268

NETL: Gasification - Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants General Electric Company Project Number: FE0007859 Project Description General Electric Company (GE) is studying the feasibility of improving plant availability and reducing total installed costs in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. GE is evaluating the IGCC technology effects of total installed cost and availability through deployment of a multi-faceted approach in technology evaluation, constructability, and design methodology. Eastman Chemical Company will be supporting the GE effort on certain technologies by providing consulting on the evaluations and technology transfer phases of the project. The end result is aimed at reducing the time to technological maturity and enabling plants to reach higher values of availability in a shorter period of time and at a lower installed cost.

269

NETL: Gasification - Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology Scale-Up and Demonstration Project Research Triangle Institute Project Number: FE0000489 Project Description Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is designing, building, and testing the Warm Temperature Desulfurization Process (WDP) at pre-commercial scale (50 megawatt electric equivalent [MWe]) to remove more than 99.9 percent of the sulfur from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas). RTI is integrating this WDP technology with an activated methyl diethanolamine (aMDEA) solvent technology to separate 90% of the carbon dioxide (CO2) from shifted syngas. The Polk Power Station, an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, will supply approximately 20% of its coal-derived syngas as a slipstream to feed into the pre-commercial scale technologies being scaled-up.

270

DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced electric power generation systems use a coal gasifier to convert coal to a gas rich in fuels such as H{sub 2} and CO. The gas stream contains impurities such as H{sub 2}S and HCl, which attack metal components of the coal gas train, causing plant downtime and increasing the cost of power generation. Corrosion-resistant coatings would improve plant availability and decrease maintenance costs, thus allowing the environmentally superior integrated gasification combined cycle plants to be more competitive with standard power-generation technologies. A startup meeting was held at the National Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA site on July 28, 2003. SRI staff described the technical approach of the project.

Gopala N. Krishnan

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Effect of Gas/Steam Turbine Inlet Temperatures on Combined Cycle Having Air Transpiration Cooled Gas Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Worldwide efforts are being made for further improving the gas/steam combined cycle performance by having better ... . The scope of improvement is possible through turbines having higher turbine inlet temperature...

S. Kumar; O. Singh

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Modeling and optimization of a combined cycle Stirling-ORC system and design of an integrated microchannel Stirling heat rejector.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The performance of a combined Stirling-ORC power cycle is evaluated, and an integrated microchannel heat exchanger is designed as an annular cold-side heat rejector for (more)

Ingram-Goble, Robbie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle Martin Wild,1 Ju¨rgen Grieser,2 and Christoph Scha¨r1 Received 30 radiation (surface radiation balance) is the key driver behind the global hydrological cycle. Here we

Fischlin, Andreas

274

Off-design performance of integrated waste-to-energy, combined cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the off-design operation of plants where a waste-to-energy (WTE) system fed with municipal solid waste (MSW) is integrated with a natural gas-fired combined cycle (CC). Integration is accomplished by sharing the steam cycle: saturated steam generated in a MSW grate combustor is exported to the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) of the combined cycle, where it is superheated and then fed to a steam turbine serving both the CC and the WTE plant. Most likely, the WTE section and the natural gas-fired CC section are subject to different operation and maintenance schedules, so that the integrated plant operates in conditions different from those giving full power output. In this paper we discuss and give performance estimates for the two situations that delimit the range of operating conditions: (a) WTE plant at full power and gas turbine down; (b) WTE plant down and gas turbine at full power. This is done for two integrated plants having the same WTE section, i.e. grate combustors with an overall MSW combustion power of 180MWLHV, coupled with Combined Cycles based on two different heavy-duty gas turbines: a medium-size, 70MW class turbine and a large-size, 250MW class turbine. For each situation we discuss the control strategy and the actions that can help to achieve safe and reliable off-design operation. Heat and mass balances and performances at off-design conditions are estimated by accounting for the constraints imposed by the available heat transfer areas in boilers, heaters and condenser, as well as the characteristic curve of the steam turbine. When the gas turbine is down the net electric efficiency of the WTE section is very close to the one of the stand-alone WTE plant; instead, when the WTE section is down, the efficiency of the CC is much below the one of a stand alone CC. These performances appear most congenial to what is likely to be the operational strategy of these plants, i.e. paramount priority to waste treatment and CC dispatched according to the requirements of the national grid.

Stefano Consonni; Paolo Silva

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Exergetic analysis of solar concentrator aided natural gas fired combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article deals with comparative energy and exergetic analysis for evaluation of natural gas fired combined cycle power plant and solar concentrator aided (feed water heating and low pressure steam generation options) natural gas fired combined cycle power plant. Heat Transfer analysis of Linear Fresnel reflecting solar concentrator (LFRSC) is used to predict the effect of focal distance and width of reflector upon the reflecting surface area. Performance analysis of LFRSC with energetic and exergetic methods and the effect, of concentration ratio and inlet temperature of the fluid is carried out to determine, overall heat loss coefficient of the circular evacuated tube absorber at different receiver temperatures. An instantaneous increase in power generation capacity of about 10% is observed by substituting solar thermal energy for feed water heater and low pressure steam generation. It is observed that the utilization of solar energy for feed water heating and low pressure steam generation is more effective based on exergetic analysis rather than energetic analysis. Furthermore, for a solar aided feed water heating and low pressure steam generation, it is found that the land area requirement is 7ha/MW for large scale solar thermal storage system to run the plant for 24h.

V. Siva Reddy; S.C. Kaushik; S.K. Tyagi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Study of Gas-steam Combined Cycle Power Plants Integrated with MCFC for Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the field of fossil-fuel based technologies, natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants are currently the best option for electricity generation, having an efficiency close to 60%. However, they produce significant CO2 emissions, amounting to around 0.4 tonne/MWh for new installations. Among the carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies, the process based on chemical absorption is a well-established technology, but markedly reduces the NGCC performances. On the other side, the integration of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) is recognized as an attractive option to overcome the main drawbacks of traditional CCS technologies. If the cathode side is fed by NGCC exhaust gases, the MCFC operates as a CO2 concentrator, beside providing an additional generating capacity. In this paper the integration of MCFC into a two pressure levels combined cycle is investigated through an energy analysis. To improve the efficiency of MCFC and its integration within the NGCC, plant configurations based on two different gas recirculation options are analyzed. The first is a traditional recirculation of exhaust gases at the compressor inlet; the second, mainly involving the MCFC stack, is based on recirculating a fraction of anode exhaust gases at the cathode inlet. Effects of MCFC operating conditions on energy and environmental performances of the integrated system are evaluated.

Roberto Carapellucci; Roberto Saia; Lorena Giordano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Status of Coal Gasification: 1977  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-pressure technology is important to coal gasification for several reasons. When the end product ... of high pressures in all types of coal gasification reduces the pressure drop throughout the equipment,...

F. C. Schora; W. G. Bair

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Gasification of selected woody plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article contains laboratory data comparing the rate of gasification of five types of woody plantsbeech, ... oak, willow, poplar and rose. The gasification rate was determined thermogravimetrically. Carbon di...

Buryan Petr

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

NETL: Gasification - Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Recovery Act: Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Project Number: FC26-98FT40343 Project Description Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. is developing, scaling-up, and demonstrating a novel air separation technology for large-scale production of oxygen (O2) at costs that are approximately one-third lower than conventional cryogenic plants. An Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen plant co-produces power and oxygen. A phased technology RD&D effort is underway to demonstrate all necessary technical and economic requirements for scale-up and industrial commercialization. The ITM Oxygen production technology is a radically different approach to producing high-quality tonnage oxygen and to enhance the performance of integrated gasification combined cycle and other advanced power generation systems. Instead of cooling air to cryogenic temperatures, oxygen is extracted from air at temperatures synergistic with power production operations. Process engineering and economic evaluations of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants comparing ITM Oxygen with a state-of-the-art cryogenic air separation unit are aimed to show that the installed capital cost of the air separation unit and the installed capital of IGCC facility are significantly lower compared to conventional technologies, while improving power plant output and efficiency. The use of low-cost oxygen in combustion processes would provide cost-effective emission reduction and carbon management opportunities. ITM Oxygen is an enabling module for future plants for producing coal derived shifted synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen [H2] and carbon dioxide [CO2]) ultimately for producing clean energy and fuels. Oxygen-intensive industries such as steel, glass, non-ferrous metallurgy, refineries, and pulp and paper may also realize cost and productivity benefits as a result of employing ITM Oxygen.

280

Chapter 5 - Gasification Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary There is a broad range of reactor types that are used in the practical realization of the gasification process. For most purposes, these reactor types can be grouped into one of three categories: moving-bed gasifiers, fluid-bed gasifiers, and entrained-flow gasifiers. Moving-bed processes are the oldest processes, and two processes in particular, the producer gas process and the water gas process, have played an important role in the production of synthesis gas from coal and coke. In moving bed processes, there are the sasol-lurgi dry bottom process, British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) slagging gasifier, that are detailed in the chapter along with their applications. Following this, fluid-bed processes are discussed in which the blast has two functions: that of blast as a reactant and that of the fluidizing medium for the bed. The best known fluid-bed gasifiers that have no tar problem are regenerators of catalytic cracking units that often operate under reducing, that is, gasification conditions that can be found in many refineries. HRL process, BHEL gasifier, circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) processes, the KBR transport gasifier, agglomerating fluid-bed processes, the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) gasifier, the GEE gasification process, the Shell Gasification Process (SGP), Lurgi s Multi-Purpose Gasification process (MPG), etc. are the various processes discussed in the chapter.

Christopher Higman; Maarten van der Burgt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gasifier Optimization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasifier Opt & Plant Supporting Systems Gasifier Opt & Plant Supporting Systems Gasification Systems Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems The gasifier is the core system component in the gasification process. It determines both the primary requirements for raw material inputs and the product gas composition. The gasifier is generally a high temperature/pressure vessel where oxygen (or air) and steam are directly contacted with a fuel, such as coal, causing a series of chemical reactions to occur that result in production of a fuel gas. This fuel gas (also referred to either as synthesis gas or syngas) consists primarily of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Minor constituents present in the feedstock are converted to such products as hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and ash/slag (mineral residues from coal). These products can be separated and captured for use or safe disposal. After cleaning to remove contaminants, the syngas consists mainly of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. According to the Department of Energy's vision for coal gasification, at this point steam may be added and the syngas sent through a water-gas shift (WGS) reactor to convert the carbon monoxide to nothing but carbon dioxide and additional hydrogen. After a gas separation process, the carbon dioxide is ready for utilization (such as for Enhanced Oil Recovery) or safe storage, and the hydrogen can be fired in a gas-turbine/steam-turbine generator set to produce electricity with stack emissions containing no greenhouse gases. Alternately, syngas or hydrogen can be used to produce highly-valued fuels and chemicals. Co-production of combinations of these products and electricity is also possible.

282

Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water ... A packed bed of carbon within the reactor catalyzed the gasification of these organic vapors in the water; consequently, the water effluent of the reactor was clean. ... A method for removing plugs from the reactor was developed and employed during an 8-h gasification run involving potato wastes. ...

Michael Jerry Antal, Jr.; Stephen Glen Allen; Deborah Schulman; Xiaodong Xu; Robert J. Divilio

2000-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

283

MODELLING THE LOW-TAR BIG GASIFICATION CONCEPT Lars Andersen, Brian Elmegaard, Bjrn Qvale, Ulrik Henriksen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and gasification chamber are bubbling fluid beds, fluidised with steam. For moist fuels, the gasifier can be integrated with a steam drying process, where the produced steam is used in the pyrolysis plant systems: Gas engine, Simple cycle gas turbine, Recuperated gas turbine and Integrated Gasification

284

Benchmarking Biomass Gasification Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification Technologies for Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals and Hydrogen Production Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Jared P. Ciferno John J. Marano June 2002 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to express their appreciation to all individuals who contributed to the successful completion of this project and the preparation of this report. This includes Dr. Phillip Goldberg of the U.S. DOE, Dr. Howard McIlvried of SAIC, and Ms. Pamela Spath of NREL who provided data used in the analysis and peer review. Financial support for this project was cost shared between the Gasification Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Biomass Power Program within the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

285

A review of integrated solar combined cycle system (ISCCS) with a parabolic trough technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The huge amount of solar energy available on Earth?s surface has heightened awareness in Concentrating Solar Power, and more particularly in hybrid concepts. The integrated solar combined cycle system (ISCCS) is one of the more promising hybrid configurations for converting solar energy into electricity and it might become the technology of choice in the near future. This article reviews the R&D activities and published studies since the introduction of such a concept in the 1990s. The review includes the current status and describes different hybridizations of solar energy with natural gas, coal and other renewable energy sources. Furthermore, it provides in-depth analysis of real and expected R&D finding.

Omar Behar; Abdallah Khellaf; Kamal Mohammedi; Sabrina Ait-Kaci

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

NETL: Gasification - Recovery Act: Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recovery Act: Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes for IGCC and FutureGen Plants Recovery Act: Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes for IGCC and FutureGen Plants Eltron Research & Development Inc. Project Number: FC26-05NT42469 Project Description The Eltron Hydrogen Transport Membrane (HTM) technology uses composite metal alloy materials to separate H2 from coal-derived syngas (a mixture of H2, CO, CO2, and steam). Carbon dioxide on the feed side of the membrane remains at high pressure and in a concentrated form suitable for capture and re-use or storage. The Eltron HTM system is an enabling technology for the production of high purity H2 and the capture of CO2 at high pressure that is applicable to future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and central station H2 production plants. These novel membranes have an operating temperature of 280 to 440 degrees Celsius (°C), which is well-matched with emerging coal gas cleaning technologies and has the potential to significantly improve the overall efficiency and process economics for future gasification-based power, fuels, and chemical production plants. Eltron's membranes can withstand differential pressures of up to 1,000 pounds per square inch gauge (psig) without structural failure, allowing for successful integration into advanced, high-pressure coal gasification plants.

287

Investigation of nickel supported catalysts for the upgrading of brown peat derived gasification products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A gasification test rig was designed in which peat was gasified under nitrogen over a temperature range 25550C at 5Cmin?1. The gasification unit resulted in 35.5 wt% of the carbon present in the peat being converted to a volatile fraction. The volatile fraction was transferred to a secondary catalytic reforming reactor at 800C. The thermal effect of the second reactor resulted in an increase in the CO, CO2 and CH4 content of the volatile fraction, a syngas ratio of 0.75 and a higher heating value (HHV) of 26.5MJkg?1. Several nickel-supported catalysts were investigated with the intention that they should give an increase in the conversion of the condensable hydrocarbons in the volatile fraction to CO, CO2 and CH4, and a resultant gas stream suitable for use in an integrated gasification combined cycle plant (IGCC) (i.e. syngas ratio 2:1, low methane content and better HHV). Alumina-supported nickel catalysts investigated gave the highest activities and co-precipitated Ni/Al catalysts were most active. A Ni/Al 3:17 catalyst increased the conversion of the hydrocarbons to 91.5%, gave a syngas ratio of 1.81:1, increased the HHV by a factor of 5.3 and completely eliminated methane from the gas stream.

David Sutton; Brian Kelleher; Aidan Doyle; J.R.H Ross

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Life-Cycle Implications of Using Crop Residues for Various Energy Demands in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The remaining 34.5% was accounted for by field burning and by a collection-loss component. ... P&Hdigestion represents a biogas power plant with gas turbines >1 MWelectr and with a conversion efficiency of 0.85 divided between electricity (0.40) and heat (0.45). ... Jia Youjian, Y. Z.; Chuangzhi, Wu. Life cycle assessment of a 4MWe biomass integrated gasification gas engines-steam turbine combined cycles power plant Acta Energiae Solaris Sin. ...

Wei Lu; Tianzhu Zhang

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Gasification of black liquor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A concentrated aqueous black liquor containing carbonaceous material and alkali metal sulfur compounds is treated in a gasifier vessel containing a relatively shallow molten salt pool at its bottom to form a combustible gas and a sulfide-rich melt. The gasifier vessel, which is preferably pressurized, has a black liquor drying zone at its upper part, a black liquor solids gasification zone located below the drying zone, and a molten salt sulfur reduction zone which comprises the molten salt pool. A first portion of an oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the gas space in the gasification zone immediatley above the molten salt pool. The remainder of the oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the molten salt pool in an amount sufficient to cause gasification of carbonaceous material entering the pool from the gasification zone but not sufficient to create oxidizing conditions in the pool. The total amount of the oxygen-containing gas introduced both above the pool and into the pool constitutes between 25 and 55% of the amount required for complete combustion of the black liquor feed. A combustible gas is withdrawn from an upper portion of the drying zone, and a melt in which the sulfur content is predominantly in the form of alkali metal sulfide is withdrawn from the molten salt sulfur reduction zone.

Kohl, Arthur L. (Woodland Hills, CA)

1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

291

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation`s carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Meyers, S.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Hauserman, W.B. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation's carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. (Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)); Meyers, S.J. (Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)); Hauserman, W.B. (North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Co-gasification of petroleum coke and biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gasification may be an attractive alternative for converting heavy oil residue petroleum coke into valuable synthetic gas. Due to the low reactivity of petroleum coke, it is maybe preferable to convert it in combination with other fuels such as biomass. Co-gasification of petroleum coke and biomass was studied in an atmospheric bubbling fluidised bed reactor and a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) at KTH Royal University of Technology. Biomass ash in the blends was found to have a catalytic effect on the reactivity of petroleum coke during co-gasification. Furthermore, this synergetic effect between biomass and petcoke was observed in the kinetics data. The activation energy Ea determined from the Arrhenius law for pure petcoke steam gasification in the TGA was 121.5kJ/mol, whereas for the 50/50 mixture it was 96.3, and for the 20/80 blend 83.5kJ/mol.

Vera Nemanova; Araz Abedini; Truls Liliedahl; Klas Engvall

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Table 3-2. Activity and idea summary for unit 2, cycle 3: Combining Pushes and Pulls. Activity Activity Summary Benchmark Ideas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

54 Table 3-2. Activity and idea summary for unit 2, cycle 3: Combining Pushes and Pulls. Activity individual objects and predict the combined weight of groups of objects. The teacher then leads a class, and then the teacher leads a class discussion as to which ideas best explain the cycle phenomena. All cycle ideas. A5

Sandifer, Cody

295

Analysis of a new thermodynamic cycle for combined power and cooling using low and mid temperature solar collectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined thermal power and cooling cycle is proposed which combines the Rankine and absorption refrigeration cycles. It can provide power output as well as refrigeration with power generation as a primary goal. Ammonia-water mixture is used as a working fluid. The boiling temperature of the ammonia-water mixture increases as the boiling process proceeds until all liquid is vaporized, so that a better thermal match is obtained in the boiler. The proposed cycle takes advantage of the low boiling temperature of ammonia vapor so that it can be expanded to a low temperature while it is still in a vapor state or a high quality two phase state. This cycle is ideally suited for solar thermal power using low cost concentrating collectors, with the potential to reduce the capital cost of a solar thermal power plant. The cycle can also be used as a bottoming cycle for any thermal power plant. This paper presents a parametric analysis of the proposed cycle.

Goswami, D.Y.; Xu, F. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Solar Energy and Energy Conversion Lab.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

NETL: Gasification Systems - Evaluation of the Benefits of Advanced Dry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Evaluation of the Benefits of Advanced Dry Feed System for Low Rank Coal Project Number: DE-FE0007902 General Electric Company (GE) is evaluating and demonstrating the benefits of novel dry feed technologies to effectively, reliably, and economically provide feeding of low-cost, low-rank coals into commercial Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. GE is completing comparative techno-economic studies of two IGCC power plant cases, one without and one with advanced dry feed technologies. A common basis of design is being developed so that overall assumptions and methodologies are common in the two cases for both technical and economic areas. The baseline case, without advanced dry feed technologies, will use operational data from the Eastman Chemical Company Kingsport gasification facility in combination with DOE/NETL's Cost and Performance Baseline Low-Rank Coal to Electricity IGCC study for both cost and performance comparisons. Advanced dry feed technologies, based upon the Posimetric® pump currently under development by GE, will be developed to match the proposed plant conditions and configuration, and will be analyzed to provide comparative performance and cost information to the baseline plant case. The scope of this analysis will cover the feed system from the raw coal silo up to, and including, the gasifier injector. Test data from previous and current testing will be summarized in a report to support the assumptions used to evaluate the advanced technologies and the potential value for future applications. This study focuses primarily on IGCC systems with 90 percent carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), but the dry feed system will be applicable to all IGCC power generating plants, as well as other industries requiring pressurized syngas.

297

NETL: 2010 World Gasification Database Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > 2010 World Gasification Database Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > 2010 World Gasification Database Gasification Systems 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database Archive DOE/NETL 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database Worldwide Gasification Database Analysis The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.

298

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scenarios) k. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)fuels via pyrolysis, gasification, and biochemicalAnalysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC)

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Conceptual Design of a Fossil Hydrogen Infrastructure with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Case Study in Ohio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production of H 2 using coal gasification and 2) distributeda more modern integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)and efficient integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

E:\\PUBLAW\\PUBL058.109  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

tees for the following gasification projects: (1) INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECTS.- Integrated gasification combined cycle plants meeting the emis- sion levels...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Thermodynamic and design considerations of organic Rankine cycles in combined application with a solar thermal gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technologies are considered to provide a significant contribution for the electric power production in the future. Different kinds of technologies are presently in operation or under development, e.g. parabolic troughs, central receivers, solar dish systems and Fresnel reflectors. This paper takes the focus on central receiver technologies, where the solar radiation is concentrated by a field of heliostats in a receiver on the top of a tall tower. To get this CSP technology ready for the future, the system costs have to reduce significantly. The main cost driver in such kind of CSP technologies are the huge amount of heliostats. To reduce the amount of heliostats, and so the investment costs, the efficiency of the energy conversion cycle becomes an important issue. An increase in the cycle efficiency results in a decrease of the solar heliostat field and thus, in a significant cost reduction. The paper presents the results of a thermodynamic model of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for combined cycle application together with a solar thermal gas turbine. The gas turbine cycle is modeled with an additional intercooler and recuperator and is based on a typical industrial gas turbine in the 2 MW class. The gas turbine has a two stage radial compressor and a three stage axial turbine. The compressed air is preheated within a solar receiver to 950C before entering the combustor. A hybrid operation of the gas turbine is considered. In order to achieve a further increase of the overall efficiency, the combined operation of the gas turbine and an Organic Rankine Cycle is considered. Therefore an ORC has been set up, which is thermally connected to the gas turbine cycle at two positions. The ORC can be coupled to the solar-thermal gas turbine cycle at the intercooler and after the recuperator. Thus, waste heat from different cycle positions can be transferred to the ORC for additional production of electricity. Within this investigation different working fluids and ORC conditions have been analyzed in order to evaluate the best configuration. The investigations have been performed by application of improved thermodynamic and process analysis tools, which consider the real gas behavior of the analyzed fluids. The results show that by combined operation of the solar thermal gas turbine and the ORC, the combined cycle efficiency is approximately 4%-points higher than in the solar-thermal gas turbine cycle.

R Braun; K Kusterer; T Sugimoto; K Tanimura; D Bohn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

NETL: Gasifipedia - Gasification in Detail  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fundamentals Fundamentals Gasification is a partial oxidation process. The term partial oxidation is a relative term which simply means that less oxygen is used in gasification than would be required for combustion (i.e., burning or complete oxidation) of the same amount of fuel. Gasification typically uses only 25 to 40 percent of the theoretical oxidant (either pure oxygen or air) to generate enough heat to gasify the remaining unoxidized fuel, producing syngas. The major combustible products of gasification are carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2), with only a minor amount of the carbon completely oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2) and water. The heat released by partial oxidation provides most of the energy needed to break up the chemical bonds in the feedstock, to drive the other endothermic gasification reactions, and to increase the temperature of the final gasification products.

303

Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment Maximizing electrical efficiency Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill Maximizing equipment uptime Minimizing water consumption Minimizing post-combustion emissions The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWhs of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

NETL: C&CBTL - Investigation of Coal-Biomass Catalytic Gasification Using  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Investigation of Coal-Biomass Catalytic Gasification Using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Project Number: FE0005476 Project Description The objectives of the proposed study are to obtain experimental reactor data and develop kinetic rate expressions for pyrolysis and char gasification for the coal-biomass blends under conditions free from transport limitations, to develop a detailed understanding of the effect of pyrolysis conditions on the porous char structure, to build mathematical models that combine true kinetic rate expressions with transport models for predicting gasification behavior for a broad range of pressures and temperatures, and to investigate the physical and chemical parameters that might lead to synergistic effects in coal-biomass blends gasification.

305

Pioneering Gasification Plants | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

lighting street lights fueled by "town gas," frequently the product of early forms of coal gasification. Gasification of fuel also provided fuel for steel mills, and toward the...

306

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process Catalytic Coal Gasification Process for the Production of Methane-Rich Syngas Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Production of Methane-Rich Syngas from Fuels Using Multi-functional Catalyst/Capture Agent." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Reducing pollution emitted by coal and waste power plants in an economically viable manner and building power plants that co-generate fuels and chemicals during times of low electricity demand are pressing goals for the energy industry. One way to achieve these goals in an economically viable manner is through the use of a catalytic gasifier that

307

NETL: Gasification Project Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Information Project Information Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Project Information Active Projects | Archived Projects | All NETL Fact Sheets Feed Systems A Cost-Effective Oxygen Separation System Based on Open Gradient Magnetic Field by Polymer Beads [SC0010151] Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications [FE0012065] Dry Solids Pump Coal Feed Technology [FE0012062] Coal-CO2 Slurry Feeding System for Pressurized Gasifiers [FE0012500] National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility [FE0000749] Modification of the Developmental Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) Feeder [NT0000749] Recovery Act: Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems [DE-FC26-98FT40343]

308

The Complete Gasification of Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... plant designed by C. B. Tully, and operated at Bedford, for the complete gasification of coal. Altogether, since 1919, about two hundred such plants have been erected ...

J. S. G. THOMAS

1923-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

309

Carbon dioxide recovery from an integrated coal gasifier, combined cycle plant using membrane separation and a CO2 gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A scheme is described for electricity production based on coal gasification with recovery of carbon dioxide. In this scheme, coal is gasified into a coal gas, consisting mainly of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A ...

Chris Hendriks

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Study on a gas-steam combined cycle system with CO2 capture by integrating molten carbonate fuel cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper studies a gas-steam combined cycle system with CO2 capture by integrating the MCFC (molten carbonate fuel cell). With the Aspen plus software, this paper builds the model of the overall MCFC-GT hybrid system with CO2 capture and analyzes the effects of the key parameters on the performances of the overall system. The result shows that compared with the gas-steam combined cycle system without CO2 capture, the efficiency of the new system with CO2 capture does not decrease obviously and keeps the same efficiency with the original gas steam combined cycle system when the carbon capture percentage is 45%. When the carbon capture percentage reaches up to 85%, the efficiency of the new system is about 54.96%, only 0.67 percent points lower than that of the original gas-steam combined cycle system. The results show that the new system has an obvious superiority of thermal performance. However, its technical economic performance needs be improved with the technical development of MCFC and ITM (oxygen ion transfer membrane). Achievements from this paper will provide the useful reference for CO2 capture with lower energy consumption from the traditional power generation system.

Liqiang Duan; Jingnan Zhu; Long Yue; Yongping Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A feasibility study for underground coal gasification at Krabi Mine, Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study to evaluate the technical, economical, and environmental feasibility of underground coal gasification (UCG) in the Krabi Mine, Thailand, was conducted by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in cooperation with B.C. Technologies (BCT) and the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT). The selected coal resource was found suitable to fuel a UCG facility producing 460,000 MJ/h (436 million Btu/h) of 100--125 Btu/scf gas for 20 years. The raw UCG gas could be produced for a selling price of $1.94/MMBtu. The UCG facility would require a total investment of $13.8 million for installed capital equipment, and annual operating expenses for the facility would be $7.0 million. The UCG gas could be either cofired in a power plant currently under construction or power a 40 MW simple-cycle gas turbine or a 60 MW combined-cycle power plant.

Solc, J.; Steadman, E.N. [Energy and Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Boysen, J.E. [BC Technologies, Laramie, WY (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

NREL: Energy Analysis - Biopower Results - Life Cycle Assessment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

systems, NREL completed a comprehensive review and analysis of life cycle assessments (LCA) on co-fired (with coal), direct combustion, gasification and pyrolysis biopower...

313

NETL: Gasification - Request Gasification Systems Information on a CD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Systems Request Gasification Systems Information on a CD Please fill in the form below to receive the CDs of your choice. * Denotes required field Requestor Contact Information Requested By (Agency/Company): First Name: * Last Name: * Address: * PO Box: City: * State: * Zip: * Country: Email: * Phone: CD Request Select CD(s):* Gasification Systems Project Portfolio Gasification Technologies Training Course Special Instructions: Submit Request Reset Contacts Program Contact: Jenny Tennant (304) 285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov Close Contacts Disclaimer Disclaimer of Liability: This system is made available by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, the Department of Energy, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, nor any of

314

Erosion-corrosion modelling of gas turbine materials for coal-fired combined cycle power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of coal-fired combined cycle power generation systems is receiving considerable worldwide interest. The successful development and commercialisation of these new systems require that all the component parts are manufactured from appropriate materials and that these materials give predictable in-service performance. Corrosion and erosion-corrosion, resulting from coal derived particulates, deposition and gaseous species, have been identified as potential life limiting factors for these systems. Models to predict these modes of materials degradation are under active development. This paper outlines the development and testing of models suitable for use in gas turbine environments. The complexity of the corrosion processes means that an empirical approach to model development is required whereas a more mechanistic approach can be applied to erosion processes. For hot corrosion conditions, statistically based corrosion models have been produced using laboratory tests for two coatings and a base alloy at typical type I and type II hot corrosion temperatures (900 and 700C). These models use the parameters of alkali sulphate deposition flux and \\{SOx\\} partial pressure (at each temperature and for set \\{HCl\\} partial pressures), to predict the rate of the most likely localised damage associated with hot corrosion reactions. For erosion-corrosion modelling, a series of laboratory tests have been carried out to investigate erosion behaviour in corrosive conditions appropriate to coal-fired gas turbines. Materials performance data have been obtained from samples located in the hot gas path of the Grimethorpe PFBC pilot plant, under well characterised conditions, for testing the corrosion and erosion-corrosion models. The models successfully predict the materials damage observed in the pilot plant environments.

N.J. Simms; J.E. Oakey; D.J. Stephenson; P.J. Smith; J.R. Nicholls

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Thermodynamic performance analysis of a combined power cycle using low grade heat source and LNG cold energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermodynamic analysis of a combined cycle using a low grade heat source and LNG cold energy was carried out. The combined cycle consisted of an ammoniawater Rankine cycle with and without regeneration and a LNG Rankine cycle. A parametric study was conducted to examine the effects of the key parameters, such as ammonia mass fraction, turbine inlet pressure, condensation temperature. The effects of the ammonia mass fraction on the temperature distributions of the hot and cold streams in heat exchangers were also investigated. The characteristic diagram of the exergy efficiency and heat transfer capability was proposed to consider the system performance and expenditure of the heat exchangers simultaneously. The simulation showed that the system performance is influenced significantly by the parameters with the ammonia mass fraction having largest effect. The net work output of the ammoniawater cycle may have a peak value or increase monotonically with increasing ammonia mass fraction, which depends on turbine inlet pressure or condensation temperature. The exergy efficiency may decrease or increase or have a peak value with turbine inlet pressure depending on the ammonia mass fraction.

Kyoung Hoon Kim; Kyung Chun Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gasifier Optimization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Program Gasification Systems Program Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products more easily with gasification-based technologies compared to conventional combustion of solid feedstocks. Gasification can generate clean power, and by adding steam to the syngas and performing water-gas-shift to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2), additional hydrogen can be produced. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for enhanced oil recovery (see Gasification Systems Program Research and Development Areas figure). In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Furthermore, polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies.

317

Gasification of Coal and Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , said the Gas Council is spending 120,000 this year on research into coal gasification, and the National Coal Board and the Central Electricity Generating Board 680,000 and ... coal utilization. The Gas Council is spending about 230,000 on research into the gasification of oil under a programme intended to contribute also to the improvement of the economics ...

1960-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

318

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported ... RESULTS of a first step taken toward determining the feasibility of the underground gasification of coal were reported recently to the Interstate Oil Compact Commission by Milton H. Fies, manager of coal operations for the Alabama Power Co. ...

1947-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

319

Kinetic Modeling for the Combined Pyrolysis and Steam Gasification of Petroleum Coke and Experimental Determination of the Rate Constants by Dynamic Thermogravimetry in the 500?1520 K Range  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 An important example of such hybridization is the endothermic steam gasification of petroleum coke (petcoke) to synthesis gas (syngas). ... A 2nd-Law analysis for generating electricity using the solar gasification products indicates the potential of doubling the specific electrical output and, consequently, halving the specific CO2 emissions, vis--vis conventional petcoke-fired power plants. ... 2 The overall chemical process can be represented by the simplified net reaction: where x and y are the elemental molar ratios of H/C and O/C in petcoke, respectively. ...

D. Trommer; A. Steinfeld

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

320

Notice of Availability for the Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (12/13/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

740 740 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 240 / Friday, December 13, 2002 / Notices [FR Doc. 02-31431 Filed 12-12-02; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6450-01-C ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [ER-FRL-6635-7] Environmental Impact Statments; Notice of Availability Responsible Agency: Office of Federal Activities, General Information (202) 564-7167 or http://www.epa.gov/ compliance/nepa/. Weekly receipt of Environmental Impact Statements filed December 2, 2002, through December 6, 2002. Pursuant to 40 CFR 1506.9. EIS No. 020498, Draft EIS, SFW, WA, Daybreak Mine Expansion and Habitat Enhancement Project, Habitat Conservation Plan, Issuance of a Multiple Species Permit for Incidental Take, Implementation, Clark County, WA , Comment Period Ends: February 21, 2003. Contact: Tim Romanski

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Modelling coal gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal gasification processes in a slurry-feed-type entrained-flow gasifier are studied. Novel simulation methods as well as numerical results are presented. We use the vorticity-stream function method to study the characteristics of gas flow and a scalar potential function is introduced to model the mass source terms. The random trajectory model is employed to describe the behaviour of slurry-coal droplets. Very detailed results regarding the impact of the O2/coal ratio on the distribution of velocity, temperature and concentration are obtained. Simulation results show that the methods are feasible and can be used to study a two-phase reacting flow efficiently.

Xiang Jun Liu; Wu Rong Zhang; Tae Jun Park

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

PNNL Coal Gasification Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explains the goals of PNNL in relation to coal gasification research. The long-term intent of this effort is to produce a syngas product for use by internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers in materials, catalysts, and instrumentation development. Future work on the project will focus on improving the reliability and performance of the gasifier, with a goal of continuous operation for 4 hours using coal feedstock. In addition, system modifications to increase operational flexibility and reliability or accommodate other fuel sources that can be used for syngas production could be useful.

Reid, Douglas J.; Cabe, James E.; Bearden, Mark D.

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

Co-gasification of coalpetcoke and biomass in the Puertollano IGCC power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle plants (IGCC) are efficient power generation systems with low pollutants emissions. Moreover, the entrained flow gasifier of IGCC plants allows the combined use of other lower cost fuels (biomass and waste) together with coal. Co-firing with biomass is beneficial for the reduction of CO2 emissions of fossil source. In this paper the results of co-gasification tests with two types of biomass deriving from agricultural residues, namely 2% and 4% by weight of olive husk and grape seed meal, in the 335MWeISO IGCC power plant of ELCOGAS in Puertollano (Spain) are reported. No significant change in the composition of both the raw syngas and the clean syngas was observed. Furthermore, a process simulation model of the IGCC plant of Puertollano was developed and validated with available industrial data. The model was used to assess the technical and economic feasibility of the process co-fired with higher biomass contents up to 60% by weight. The results indicate that a 54% decrease of fossil CO2 emissions implies an energy penalty (a loss of net power) of about 20% while does not cause significant change of the net efficiency of the plant. The mitigation cost (the additional cost of electricity per avoided ton of CO2) is significantly dependent on the price of the biomass cost compared to the price of the fossil fuel.

Daniele Sofia; Pilar Coca Llano; Aristide Giuliano; Mariola Iborra Hernndez; Francisco Garca Pea; Diego Barletta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI (Gas Research Institute) Coal Gasification Research Program: Quarterly report, March 28--June 26, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following joint program projects comprised the scope of Foster Wheeler's current monitoring activities: KRW Energy System, Inc.-- Fluidized-Bed Gasification Process Development Unit (PDU), Madison, Pennsylvania. CNG Research Company--Acid Gas Removal System, Cleveland, Ohio. The test program in KRW's fluidized-bed gasifier PDU was resumed, following shutdown for winter maintenance. During this quarter, CNG completed construction on the new flash crystallizer PDU and started shakedown testing of the unit. Details of Foster Wheeler's monitoring activities on these projects are presented in Sections 3.0 and 4.0 of this report. Under the technical evaluation scope of modular integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems. This study was authorized by DOE in mid-March 1987 and was initiated during the current period. Discussions on the status of the IGCC systems study is included in Section 5.0 of this report. 4 refs.

Mazzella, G.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Chapter 2 - Black Liquor Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Black liquor gasification (BLG) is being considered primarily as an option for production of biofuels in recent years due to the focus on the transport sectors high oil dependence and climate impact. BLG may be performed either at low temperatures or at high temperatures, based on whether the process is conducted above or below the melting temperature range of the spent pulping chemicals. The development of various BLG technologiesSCA-Billerud process, the Copeland recovery process, Weyerhaeusers process, the St. Regis hydropyrolysis process, the Texaco process, VTTs circulating fluidized bed BLG process, Babcock and Wilcoxs bubbling fluidized bed gasification process, NSP process (Ny Sodahus Process), DARS (Direct Alkali Recovery System) process, BLG with direct causticization, Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International fluidized bed gasification, Chemrec gasification, catalytic hydrothermal gasification of black liquoris discussed in this chapter. The two main technologies under development are pressurized gasification and atmospheric gasification, being commercialized by Chemrec AB and ThermoChem Recovery International, respectively.

Pratima Bajpai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Pyrolytic Gasification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pyrolytic Gasification Pyrolytic Gasification Jump to: navigation, search Name Pyrolytic Gasification Sector Biomass References Balboa Pacific Corp[1] Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

327

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology: IGCC.integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants (output. Integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants are

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

integrated gasification combined cycle Integrated Planningwith regard to the gas combined-cycle capacity around theas integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and carbon

Blair, N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of natural gas-powered combined cycle power plants. The mostintegrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) coal plants,integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology for

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water use at combined-?cycle power plants. Gasification Combined Cycle Known Geothermal Energy integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) CFPP,

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

k. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) coal l. PCIntegrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant,Analysis: Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Power Plant,

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S. Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle-A review of IGCCBiomass Gasification Combined Cycle System. December 1997.liquefaction and combined-cycle power plant. Pittsburgh (

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Computational fluid dynamics modeling of coal gasification in a pressurized spout-fluid bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, which has recently proven to be an effective means of analysis and optimization of energy-conversion processes, has been extended to coal gasification in this paper. A 3D mathematical model has been developed to simulate the coal gasification process in a pressurized spout-fluid bed. This CFD model is composed of gas-solid hydrodynamics, coal pyrolysis, char gasification, and gas phase reaction submodels. The rates of heterogeneous reactions are determined by combining Arrhenius rate and diffusion rate. The homogeneous reactions of gas phase can be treated as secondary reactions. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data shows that most gasification performance parameters can be predicted accurately. This good agreement indicates that CFD modeling can be used for complex fluidized beds coal gasification processes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Zhongyi Deng; Rui Xiao; Baosheng Jin; He Huang; Laihong Shen; Qilei Song; Qianjun Li [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

NETL: Gasification Systems Program Contacts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Program Contacts Gasification Systems Program Contacts Jenny Tennant Gasification Technology Manager U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Phone: (304) 285-4830 Email: Jenny.Tennant@netl.doe.gov Pete Rozelle Division of Advanced Energy System - Program Manager, Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy FE-221/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-1209 Phone: (301) 903-2338 Email: Peter.Rozelle@hq.doe.gov Heather Quedenfeld Gasification Division Director U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 Phone: (412) 386-5781 Email: Heather.Quedenfeld@netl.doe.gov Kristin Gerdes Performance Division

335

AVESTAR® - Training - Gasification Process Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Process Operations Gasification Process Operations This course is designed as a familiarization course to increase understanding of the gasification with CO2 capture process. During the training, participants will startup and shutdown the simulated unit in an integrated manner and will be exposed to simple and complex unit malfunctions in the control room and in the field. Course objectives are as follows: Introduce trainees to gasification and CO2 capture process systems and major components and how they dynamically interact Familiarize trainees with the Human Machine Interface (HMI) and plant control and how safe and efficient operation of the unit can be affected by plant problems Provide the trainees with hands-on operating experiences in plant operations using the HMI

336

Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

Gasification Systems 2013 Project Selections  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy in 2013 selected ten projects that will focus on reducing the cost of gasification with carbon capture for producing electric power, fuels, and chemicals. The projects will...

338

Thermophysical models of underground coal gasification and FEM analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, mathematical models of the coupled thermohydromechanical process of coal rock mass in an underground coal gasification panel are established. Combined with the calculation example, the influence of heating effects on the observed values and simulated values for pore water pressure, stress, and displacement in the gasification panel are fully discussed and analyzed. Calculation results indicate that 38, 62, and 96 days after the experiment, the average relative errors for the calculated values and measured values for the temperature and water pressure were between 8.51-11.14% and 3-10%, respectively; with the passage of gasification time, the calculated errors for the vertical stress and horizontal stress gradually declined, but the simulated errors for the horizontal and vertical displacements both showed a rising trend. On the basis of the research results, the calculated values and the measured values agree with each other very well.

Yang, L.H. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Coal gasification vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vessel system (10) comprises an outer shell (14) of carbon fibers held in a binder, a coolant circulation mechanism (16) and control mechanism (42) and an inner shell (46) comprised of a refractory material and is of light weight and capable of withstanding the extreme temperature and pressure environment of, for example, a coal gasification process. The control mechanism (42) can be computer controlled and can be used to monitor and modulate the coolant which is provided through the circulation mechanism (16) for cooling and protecting the carbon fiber and outer shell (14). The control mechanism (42) is also used to locate any isolated hot spots which may occur through the local disintegration of the inner refractory shell (46).

Loo, Billy W. (Oakland, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Textile Drying Via Wood Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXTILE DRYING VIA WOOD GASIFICATION Thomas F. ;McGowan, Anthony D. Jape Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia ABSTRACT This project was carried out to investigate the possibility of using wood gas as a direct replacement... for dryers. In addition to the experimental program described above, the DOE grant covered two other major areas. A survey of the textile industry was made to assess the market for gasification equip ment. The major findings were that a large amount...

McGowan, T. F.; Jape, A. D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Materials of Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

None

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

NETL: Gasifipedia - What is Gasification?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Background Gasification Background Drivers for Gasification Technology The need for low-cost power produced in an environmentally sound way is certain, even if the future of regulations limiting the emission and/or encouraging the capture of CO2, and the price and availability of natural gas and oil are not. Gasification is not only capable of efficiently producing electric power, but a wide range of liquids and/or high-value chemicals (including diesel and gasoline for transportation) can be produced from cleaned syngas, providing the flexibility to capitalize on a range of dynamic changes to either domestic energy markets or global economic conditions. Polygeneration-plants that produce multiple products-is uniquely possible with gasification technologies. Continued advances in gasification-based technology will enable the conversion of our nation's abundant coal reserves into energy resources (power and liquid fuels), chemicals, and fertilizers needed to displace the use of imported oil and, thereby, help mitigate its high price and security supply concerns and to support U.S. economic competitiveness with unprecedented environmental performance.

343

9 - Hybrid fuel cell gas turbine (FC/GT) combined cycle systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Hybrid fuel cell gas turbine systems consisting of high-temperature fuel cells (HTFCs) integrated into cycles with gas turbines can significantly increase fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency and lower emissions of greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants from the electric power sector. In addition, the separated anode and cathode compartments of the fuel cell can enable CO2 separation and sequestration for some cycle configurations. Hybrid fuel cell gas turbine technology has the potential to operate on natural gas, digester gas, landfill gas, and coal and biomass syngas. HTFC technologies are emerging with high reliability and durability, which should enable them to be integrated with gas turbine technology to produce modern hybrid power systems. Advanced thermodynamic and dynamic simulation capabilities have been developed and demonstrated to enable future system integration and control.

J. Brouwer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

New draft projects of steam turbines for combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the design features, basic thermal circuits, and efficiency of steam turbines developed on the basis of serially produced steam turbines at the Ural Turbine Works and intended for use as part of combined

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev; A. A. Ivanovskii

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Material Characterization and Analysis for Selection of Refractories Used in Black Liquor Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black liquor gasification provides the pulp and paper industry with a technology which could potentially replace recovery boilers with equipment that could reduce emissions and, if used in a combined cycle system, increase the power production of the mill allowing it to be a net exporter of electrical power. In addition, rather than burning the syngas produced in a gasifier, this syngas could be used to produce higher value chemicals or fuels. However, problems with structural materials such as the refractory lining of the reactor vessel have caused unplanned shutdowns and resulted in component replacement much sooner than originally planned. Through examination of exposed materials, laboratory corrosion tests and cooperative efforts with refractory manufacturers, many refractory materials issues in high-temperature black liquor gasification have been addressed and optimized materials have been selected for this application. In this paper, an updated summary of the characterization and analysis techniques used for refractory screening and selection will be discussed along with characteristic results from these methods which have led to the selection of optimized materials for both the hot-face and back-up linings used in this application.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this period, we analyzed several coated and exposed samples of 409 steel by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), and report on the findings of four samples: (1) Analysis of two porous coupons after exposure to the porous metal particulate filter of the coal gasification power plant at 370 C for 2140 hours revealed that corrosion takes place in the bulk of the sample while the most external zone surface survived the test. (2) Coating and characterization of several porous 409 steel coupons after being coated with nitrides of Ti, Al and/or Si showed that adjusting experimental conditions results in thicker coatings in the bulk of the sample. (3) Analysis of coupons exposed to simulated coal gas at 370 C for 300 hours showed that a better corrosion resistance is achieved by improving the coatings in the bulk of the samples.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Jordi Perez-Mariano; Angel Sanjurjo

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Storing syngas lowers the carbon price for profitable coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation systems with carbon capture and sequestration have desirable environmental qualities but are not profitable when the carbon dioxide price is less than approximately $50 per metric ton. We examine whether an IGCC facility that operates its gasifier continuously but stores the syngas and produces electricity only when daily prices are high may be profitable at significantly lower CO{sub 2} prices. Using a probabilistic analysis, we have calculated the plant-level return on investment (ROI) and the value of syngas storage for IGCC facilities located in the U.S. Midwest using a range of storage configurations. Adding a second turbine to use the stored syngas to generate electricity at peak hours and implementing 12 h of above-ground high-pressure syngas storage significantly increases the ROI and net present value. Storage lowers the carbon price at which IGCC enters the U.S. generation mix by approximately 25%. 36 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Adam Newcomer; Jay Apt [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

NETL: Gasification- Water-Gas Shift (WGS) Tests to Reduce Steam Use  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Water-Gas Shift (WGS) Tests to Reduce Steam Use National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Southern Company Services, Inc. Project Number: NT0000749 Project Description The National Carbon Capture Center is testing commercial water-gas shift (WGS) catalysts from multiple vendors in support of developing WGS reactor systems which will reduce the cost of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from the production of syngas using coal. These tests have revealed that steam-to-carbon monoxide (CO) ratios can be reduced, resulting in a substantial increase in the net power output and significantly reducing the cost of electricity from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture. Several commercially available WGS catalysts have been tested, and the results are being provided to the manufacturers to aid them in specifying future WGS systems for IGCC plants incorporating CO2 capture.

349

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. The primary activity this period was preparation and presentation of the findings on this project at the Twenty-Third annual Pittsburgh Coal Conference. Dr. Malhotra attended this conference and presented a paper. A copy of his presentation constitutes this quarterly report.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Jordi Perez Mariano; Angel Sanjurjo

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

On Combining Duty-cycling with Network Coding in Flood-based Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coding, there are periods of time when a node does not benefit from overhearing coded packets being transmitted. We seek to precisely determine these periods of time, and let nodes that do not benefit from these ?useless? packets to sleep. Our solution...] is an instance of NetCode. We describe its operation in detail because we aim to analytically demonstrate, in the sections that follow, that the introduction of our smart duty-cycle does not come with any major overhead. The operation of NetCode is depicted...

Chandanala, Roja Ramani

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

Integrated Sensing and Controls for Coal Gasification - Development of Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier and Syngas Cooler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the achievements and final results of this program. The objective of this program is to develop a comprehensive systems approach to integrated design of sensing and control systems for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant, using advanced model-based techniques. In particular, this program is focused on the model-based sensing and control system design for the core gasification section of an IGCC plant. The overall approach consists of (i) developing a first-principles physics-based dynamic model of the gasification section, (ii) performing model-reduction where needed to derive low-order models suitable for controls analysis and design, (iii) developing a sensing system solution combining online sensors with model-based estimation for important process variables not measured directly, and (iv) optimizing the steady-state and transient operation of the plant for normal operation as well as for startup using model predictive controls (MPC). Initially, available process unit models were implemented in a common platform using Matlab/Simulink{reg_sign}, and appropriate model reduction and model updates were performed to obtain the overall gasification section dynamic model. Also, a set of sensor packages were developed through extensive lab testing and implemented in the Tampa Electric Company IGCC plant at Polk power station in 2009, to measure temperature and strain in the radiant syngas cooler (RSC). Plant operation data was also used to validate the overall gasification section model. The overall dynamic model was then used to develop a sensing solution including a set of online sensors coupled with model-based estimation using nonlinear extended Kalman filter (EKF). Its performance in terms of estimating key unmeasured variables like gasifier temperature, carbon conversion, etc., was studied through extensive simulations in the presence sensing errors (noise and bias) and modeling errors (e.g. unknown gasifier kinetics, RSC fouling). In parallel, an MPC solution was initially developed using ideal sensing to optimize the plant operation during startup pre-heating as well as steady state and transient operation under normal high-pressure conditions, e.g. part-load, base-load, load transition and fuel changes. The MPC simulation studies showed significant improvements both for startup pre-heating and for normal operation. Finally, the EKF and MPC solutions were coupled to achieve the integrated sensing and control solution and its performance was studied through extensive steady state and transient simulations in the presence of sensor and modeling errors. The results of each task in the program and overall conclusions are summarized in this final report.

Aditya Kumar

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

352

Optimizing the start-up operations of combined cycle power plants using soft computing methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Energy, New technologies and sustainable Economic development Agency...Detection in Gas Turbines using Fuzzy...fusion for gas turbine power plants...Research Development Center Technical...Energy, New technologies and sustainable Economic development Agency...combination of a gas turbine and a steam......

Ilaria Bertini; Matteo De Felice; Alessandro Pannicelli; Stefano Pizzuti

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory% postconsumer waste #12;i Independent Review Panel Summary Report September 28, 2011 From: Independent Review Panel, Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification To: Mr. Mark Ruth, NREL, DOE

354

Underground Coal Gasification in the USSR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By accomplishing in a single operation the extraction of coal and its conversion into a gaseous fuel, underground gasification makes it possible to avoid the heavy capital investments required for coal gasification

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

June 2007 gasification technologies workshop papers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics covered in this workshop are fundamentals of gasification, carbon capture and sequestration, reviews of financial and regulatory incentives, co-production, and focus on gasification in the Western US.

NONE

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Transport and Other Effects in Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper summarizes the kinetics of coal char gasification excepted surface reactions (mechanisms). The following subjects controlling coal char gasification are treated: Coal as the raw material ... of particle...

K. J. Httinger

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit states that an income taxpayer that makes a qualified investment in a new integrated coal gasification power plant or in the expansion of an existing...

358

Life cycle analysis of distributed concentrating solar combined heat and power: economics, global warming potential and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on life cycle assessment (LCA) of the economics, global warming potential and water (both for desalination and water use in operation) for a distributed concentrating solar combined heat and power (DCS-CHP) system. Detailed simulation of system performance across 1020 sites in the US combined with a sensible cost allocation scheme informs this LCA. We forecast a levelized cost of $0.25kWh?1 electricity and $0.03kWh?1 thermal, for a system with a life cycle global warming potential of ~80gCO2eqkWh?1 of electricity and ~10gCO2eqkWh?1 thermal, sited in Oakland, California. On the basis of the economics shown for air cooling, and the fact that any combined heat and power system reduces the need for cooling while at the same time boosting the overall solar efficiency of the system, DCS-CHP compares favorably to other electric power generation systems in terms of minimization of water use in the maintenance and operation of the plant. The outlook for water desalination coupled with distributed concentrating solar combined heat and power is less favorable. At a projected cost of $1.40m?3, water desalination with DCS-CHP would be economical and practical only in areas where water is very scarce or moderately expensive, primarily available through the informal sector, and where contaminated or salt water is easily available as feed-water. It is also interesting to note that $0.40$1.90m?3 is the range of water prices in the developed world, so DCS-CHP desalination systems could also be an economical solution there under some conditions.

Zack Norwood; Daniel Kammen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Specific features of the schematic solutions adopted in the steam turbine units produced by the Ural Turbine Works and used as part of combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Specific features of the schematic solutions adopted in the steam turbine units designed and produced by the Ural Turbine Works for use as part of combined-cycle plants are considered.

A. A. Goldberg; T. L. Shibaev; H. C. Paneque Aguilera

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Determining the maximal capacity of a combined-cycle plant operating with afterburning of fuel in the gas conduit upstream of the heat-recovery boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect gained from afterburning of fuel in the gas conduit upstream of the heat-recovery boiler used as part of a PGU-450T combined-cycle plant is considered. The results obtained from ... electric and therma...

V. M. Borovkov; N. M. Osmanova

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Exergetic analysis and evaluation of coal-fired supercritical thermal power plant and natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work has been undertaken for energetic and exergetic analysis of coal-fired supercritical thermal power plant and natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant. Comparative analysis has been conducted ...

V. Siva Reddy; S. C. Kaushik; S. K. Tyagi

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A Study of Gasification of Municipal Solid Waste Using a Double Inverse Diffusion Flame Burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Study of Gasification of Municipal Solid Waste Using a Double Inverse Diffusion Flame Burner ... Furthermore, the experiences of the waste incineration industry driven in the past by regulatory as well as technical issues may facilitate their commercial potentials outside the common market, especially in highly populated developing countries such as Korea with scarce landfill sites. ... Recently, several new technologies that involve gasification or combinations of pyrolysis, combustion, and gasification processes are currently being brought into the market for energy-efficient, environmentally friendly and economically sound methods of thermal processing of wastes. ...

Tae-Heon Kwak; Seungmoon Lee; Sanjeev Maken; Ho-Chul Shin; Jin-Won Park; Young Done Yoo

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

363

Integration of stripping of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an integrated fluid coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a wet scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped to remove acidic gases, the stripped vapors of the stripping zone are sent to the gas cleanup stage of the gasification product gas. The improved stripping integration is particularly useful in the combination coal liquefaction process, fluid coking of bottoms of the coal liquefaction zone and gasification of the product coke.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the unique characteristics of high-temperature reactors (T>700 C) to produce electricity for premium electric markets whose demands can not be met by other types of nuclear reactors. It may also make the use of nuclear reactors economically feasible in smaller electrical grids, such as those found in many developing countries. The ability to rapidly vary power output can be used to stabilize electric grid performance-a particularly important need in small electrical grids.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Economic comparison between coal-fired and liquefied natural gas combined cycle power plants considering carbon tax: Korean case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economic growth is main cause of environmental pollution and has been identified as a big threat to sustainable development. Considering the enormous role of electricity in the national economy, it is essential to study the effect of environmental regulations on the electricity sector. This paper aims at making an economic analysis of Korea's power plant utilities by comparing electricity generation costs from coal-fired power plants and liquefied natural gas (LNG) combined cycle power plants with environmental consideration. In this study, the levelized generation cost method (LGCM) is used for comparing economic analysis of power plant utilities. Among the many pollutants discharged during electricity generation, this study principally deals with control costs related only to CO2 and NO2, since the control costs of SO2 and total suspended particulates (TSP) are already included in the construction cost of utilities. The cost of generating electricity in a coal-fired power plant is compared with such cost in a LNG combined cycle power plant. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis with computer simulation is performed according to fuel price, interest rates and carbon tax. In each case, these results can help in deciding which utility is economically justified in the circumstances of environmental regulations.

Suk-Jae Jeong; Kyung-Sup Kim; Jin-Won Park; Dong-soon Lim; Seung-moon Lee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Beluga Coal Gasification - ISER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ISER was requested to conduct an economic analysis of a possible 'Cook Inlet Syngas Pipeline'. The economic analysis was incorporated as section 7.4 of the larger report titled: 'Beluga Coal Gasification Feasibility Study, DOE/NETL-2006/1248, Phase 2 Final Report, October 2006, for Subtask 41817.333.01.01'. The pipeline would carry CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} from a synthetic gas plant on the western side of Cook Inlet to Agrium's facility. The economic analysis determined that the net present value of the total capital and operating lifecycle costs for the pipeline ranges from $318 to $588 million. The greatest contributor to this spread is the cost of electricity, which ranges from $0.05 to $0.10/kWh in this analysis. The financial analysis shows that the delivery cost of gas may range from $0.33 to $0.55/Mcf in the first year depending primarily on the price for electricity.

Steve Colt

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Gasification of Glucose in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification of Glucose in Supercritical Water ... Gasification of 0.6 M glucose in supercritical water was investigated at a temperature range from 480 to 750 C and 28 MPa with a reactor residence time of 10?50 s. ... Carbon gasification efficiency reached 100% at 700 C. ...

In-Gu Lee; Mi-Sun Kim; Son-Ki Ihm

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Separation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Separation Separation Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Gas separation unit operations represent major cost elements in gasification plants. The gas separation technology being supported in the DOE program promises significant reduction in cost of electricity, improved thermal efficiency, and superior environmental performance. Gasification-based energy conversion systems rely on two gas separation processes: (1) separation of oxygen from air for feed to oxygen-blown gasifiers; and (2) post-gasification separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide following (or along with) the shifting of gas composition when carbon dioxide capture is required or hydrogen is the desired product. Research efforts include development of advanced gas separation

371

Current Gasification Research | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gasification » Current Gasification » Current Gasification Research Current Gasification Research Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Carbon Capture Center provides first-class facilities to test carbon capture technologies. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Carbon Capture Center provides first-class facilities to test carbon capture technologies. With coal gasification now in modern commercial-scale applications, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy has turned its attention to future gasification concepts that offer significant improvements in efficiency, fuel flexibility, economics and environmental sustainability. Fuel flexibility is especially important. Tomorrow's gasification plants conceivably could process a wide variety of low-cost feedstocks, handling

372

System study of an MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. HTGL report No. 134  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle system has been designed specifically for applications where the availability of cooling water is very limited. The base case systems which were studied consisted of an MHD plant with a gas turbine bottoming plant, and required no cooling water. The gas turbine plant uses only air as its working fluid and receives its energy input from the MHD exhaust gases by means of metal tube heat exchangers. In addition to the base case systems, vapor cycle variation systems were considered which included the addition of a vapor cycle bottoming plant to improve the thermal efficiency. These systems required a small amount of cooling water. The MHD/gas turbine systems were modeled with sufficient detail, using realistic component specifications and costs, so that the thermal and economic performance of the system could be accurately determined. Three cases of MHD/gas turbine systems were studied, with Case I being similar to an MHD/steam system so that a direct comparison of the performances could be made, with Case II being representative of a second generation MHD system, and with Case III considering oxygen enrichment for early commercial applications. The systems are nominally 800 MW/sub e/ to 1000 MW/sub e/ in size. The results show that the MHD/gas turbine system has very good thermal and economic performances while requiring either little or no cooling water. Compared to the MHD/steam system which has a cooling tower heat load of 720 MW, the Base Case I MHD/gas turbine system has a heat rate which is 13% higher and a cost of electricity which is only 7% higher while requiring no cooling water. Case II results show that an improved performance can be expected from second generation MHD/gas turbine systems. Case III results show that an oxygen enriched MHD/gas turbine system may be attractive for early commercial applications in dry regions of the country.

Annen, K.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Optimization and the effect of steam turbine outlet quality on the output power of a combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A narrow path exists to a sustainable solution which passes through careful steps of efficiency improvement (resource management) and provides environmental friendly energies. Thermal power plants are more common in many power production sites around the world. Therefore, in this current research study a comprehensive thermodynamic modeling of a combined cycle power plant with dual pressure heat recovery steam generator is presented. Since the steam turbine outlet quality is a restrictive parameter, optimization of three cases with different steam quality are conducted and discussed. In other hand, energy and exergy analysis of each components for these three different cases estimated and compared. Obtained results show that it is really important to keep the quality of the vapor at turbine outlet constant in 88% for the results to be more realistic and also optimization and data are more technically feasible and applicable.

A. Ganjehkaviri; M.N. Mohd Jaafar; S.E. Hosseini

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Energy and Economic Analysis of the CO2 Capture from Flue Gas of Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon capture and storage is considered as one of the key strategies for reducing the emissions of carbon dioxide from power generation facilities. Although post-combustion capture via chemical absorption is now a mature technology, the separation of CO2 from flue gases shows many issues, including the solvent degradation and the high regeneration energy requirement, that in turn reduces the power plant performances. Focusing on a triple pressure and reheat combined cycle with exhaust gas recirculation, this paper aims to evaluate the potential impacts of integrating a post-combustion capture system, based on an absorption process with monoethanolamine solvent. Energy and economic performances of the integrated system are evaluated varying the exhaust gas recirculation fraction and the CO2 capture ratio. The different configurations examined are then compared in terms of efficiency and rated capacity of the integrated system, as well as considering the cost of electricity generated and the cost of CO2 avoided.

Maura Vaccarelli; Roberto Carapellucci; Lorena Giordano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants; Volume 3c: Natural Gas Combined Cycle at Elevation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 3c: Natural Gas Combined Cycle at Elevation March 2011 DOE/NETL-2010/1396 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

376

Energetic analysis of a syngas-fueled chemical-looping combustion combined cycle with integration of carbon dioxide sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical-looping combustion for power generation has significant advantages over conventional combustion. Mainly, it allows an integration of CO2 capture in the power plant without energy penalty; secondly, a less exergy destruction in the combustion chemical transformation is achieved, leading to a greater overall thermal efficiency. Most efforts have been devoted to systems based on methane as a fuel, although other systems for alternative fuels have can be proposed. This paper focus on the study of the energetic performance of this concept of combustion in a gas turbine combined cycle when synthesis gas is used as fuel. After optimization of some thermodynamic parameters of the cycle, the power plant performance is evaluated under diverse working conditions and compared to a conventional gas turbine system. Energy savings related with CO2 capture and storage have been quantified. The overall efficiency increase is found to be significant, reaching values of around 5% (even more in some cases). In order to analyze the influence of syngas composition on the results, different H2-content fuels are considered. In a context of real urgency to reduce green house gas emissions, this work is intended to contribute to the conceptual development of highly efficient alternative power generation systems.

ngel Jimnez lvaro; Ignacio Lpez Paniagua; Celina Gonzlez Fernndez; Rafael Nieto Carlier; Javier Rodrguez Martn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

DOE`s high performance power systems program: Development of advanced coal-fired combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal currently provides more than one third of the world`s electricity and more than one half of the US`s electricity. However, for coal to be the fuel of choice in the future, highly efficient, environmentally acceptable, and economically competitive, coal-fired power plants are needed. The US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center, under its High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) Program, has two contracts in place, one with Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and one with United Technologies Research Center, to develop advanced power generation systems. Based on an indirectly fired cycle, HIPPS uses a combined cycle for power generation at efficiencies of 47--50% (HHV) with superior environmental performance (1/10 of New Source Performance Standards) and a lower cost-of-electricity (10% reduction relative to current coal-fired plants). HIPPS, scheduled to be ready for commercialization by the year 2005, could provide a solution to the anticipated worldwide demand for clean, efficient electricity generation. In this paper, the two HIPPS designs are reviewed and on-going research is discussed.

Ruth, L.; Plasynski, S.; Shaffer, F. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center; Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

An assessment of solar-powered organic Rankine cycle systems for combined heating and power in UK domestic applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Performance calculations are presented for a small-scale combined solar heat and power (CSHP) system based on an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), in order to investigate the potential of this technology for the combined provision of heating and power for domestic use in the UK. The system consists of a solar collector array of total area equivalent to that available on the roof of a typical UK home, an ORC engine featuring a generalised positive-displacement expander and a water-cooled condenser, and a hot water storage cylinder. Preheated water from the condenser is sent to the domestic hot water cylinder, which can also receive an indirect heating contribution from the solar collector. Annual simulations of the system are performed. The electrical power output from concentrating parabolic-trough (PTC) and non-concentrating evacuated-tube (ETC) collectors of the same total array area are compared. A parametric analysis and a life-cycle cost analysis are also performed, and the annual performance of the system is evaluated according to the total electrical power output and cost per unit generating capacity. A best-case average electrical power output of 89W (total of 776kWh/year) plus a hot water provision capacity equivalent to ?80% of the total demand are demonstrated, for a whole system capital cost of 27003900. Tracking \\{PTCs\\} are found to be very similar in performance to non-tracking \\{ETCs\\} with an average power output of 89W (776kWh/year) vs. 80W (701kWh/year).

James Freeman; Klaus Hellgardt; Christos N. Markides

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Gasdynamic lasers utilizing carbon gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical investigation was made of the influence of the processes of carbon gasification by combustion products and oxidants on the chemical composition of the active medium and the energy characteristics of a gasdynamic CO2 laser. Conditions were found under which the stored energy of the active medium was greater than 100 J/g.

A S Biryukov; V M Marchenko; A M Prokhorov

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Clean Fuels from Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...been operated as a "pure" gasifier but to supply power gas for...was the air-blown Winkler gasifier pro-ducing power gas at Leuna...fines, additional gasification medium (air or oxygen-steam) is...partial pressure of steam in a gasifier blown with oxygen and steam...

Arthur M. Squires

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Clean Fuels from Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...appreciably larger sizes than coal to other...they grew to a size to fall upon an...air-blown Winkler gasifier pro-ducing power...additional gasification medium (air or oxygen-steam...provide "pure" gasifier Test revamp Develop larger sizes Develop pressure...

Arthur M. Squires

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and power via biomass gasification. Biomass and Bioenergyrenewables Integrated coal gasification combined cycle withLubricants Waxes Naptha Gasification Ethane, Benzene, and

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and power via biomass gasification. Biomass and Bioenergyrenewables Integrated coal gasification combined cycle withLubricants Waxes Naptha Gasification Ethane, Benzene, and

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfur present in biomass often causes catalyst deactivation during downstream operations after gasification. Early removal of sulfur from the syngas stream post-gasification is possible via process rearrangements and can be beneficial for maintaining a low-sulfur environment for all downstream operations. High-temperature sulfur sorbents have superior performance and capacity under drier syngas conditions. The reconfigured process discussed in this paper is comprised of indirect biomass gasification using dry recycled gas from downstream operations, which produces a drier syngas stream and, consequently, more-efficient sulfur removal at high temperatures using regenerable sorbents. A combination of experimental results from NREL's fluidizable Ni-based reforming catalyst, fluidizable Mn-based sulfur sorbent, and process modeling information show that using a coupled process of dry gasification with high-temperature sulfur removal can improve the performance of Ni-based reforming catalysts significantly.

Dutta. A.; Cheah, S.; Bain, R.; Feik, C.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Phillips, S.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

385

Recovery of carbon fibres by the thermolysis and gasification of waste prepreg  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper examines the recovery of carbon fibres from a composite used in the aeronautical industry, via a combined process of thermolysis and gasification in an air atmosphere. The waste was thermolysed at 500C, 600C or 700C in a pilot plant to determine the optimum thermolysis temperature. The solid residues produced char covered carbon fibres were characterized by SEM and XPS. The optimum time for the gasification of the char covering the fibres was determined in a combined thermolysis/gasification assay. After thermolysis at the optimum temperature (500C), 12 l/h of pure air were injected into the reactor and char gasification performed at 500C for 30180min. The optimum gasification time was 30min. Longer gasification times led to the production of fibres of smaller diameter with oxidized surfaces and reduced tensile strength. The optimally recovered fibres showed about 70% of the tensile strength of virgin fibres and some 9096% of their elasticity.

Flix A. Lpez; Olga Rodrguez; Francisco Jos Alguacil; Irene Garca-Daz; Teresa A. Centeno; Jos Luis Garca-Fierro; Carlos Gonzlez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

October 2005 Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October 2005 Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass, without......................................................................... 9 3.1.1 Biomass Gasification, and production cost estimates for gasification-based thermochemical conversion of switchgrass into Fischer

388

Catalytic gasification of tars from a dumping site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The work deals with catalytic gasification, pyrolysis and non-catalytic gasification of tar from an industrial dumping site. ... were carried out in a vertical stainless steel gasification reactor at 800C. Crus...

Luk Gaparovi?; Luk ugr

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Pioneering Gasification Plants | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gasification » Pioneering Gasification » Pioneering Gasification Plants Pioneering Gasification Plants In the 1800s, lamplighters made their rounds in the streets of many of America's largest cities lighting street lights fueled by "town gas," frequently the product of early forms of coal gasification. Gasification of fuel also provided fuel for steel mills, and toward the end of the 19th Century, electric power. These early gasifiers were called "gas producers," and the gas that they generated was called "producer gas." During the early 20th Century, improvements in the availability of petroleum and natural gas products, along with the extension of the infrastructure associated with these products, led to their widespread use, which replaced coal-based producer gas in the energy market.

390

NETL: Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification The Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Key Technology is advancing scientific knowledge of the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal and/or coal-biomass mixtures. Activities support research for handling and processing of coal/biomass mixtures, ensuring those mixtures are compatible with feed delivery systems, identifying potential impacts on downstream components, catalyst and reactor optimization, and characterizing the range of products and product quality. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Coal-biomass fuel preparation Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification Coal-biomass gasification modeling

391

NETL: Gasification Systems Video, Images & Photos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Video, Images, Photos Video, Images, Photos Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Video, Images & Photos The following was established to show a variety of Gasification Technologies: Gasfication powerplant photo Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology (Mar 2008) Movie Icon Windows Media Video (WMV-26MB) [ view | download ] NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants. Proposed APS Advanced Hydrogasification Process Proposed APS Advanced Hydrogasification Process* TRDU and Hot-Gas Vessel in the EERC Gasification Tower Transport reactor development unit

392

Gasification and co-gasification of biomass wastes: Effect of the biomass origin and the gasifier operating conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air gasification of different biomass fuels, including forestry (pinus pinaster pruning) and agricultural (grapevine and olive tree pruning) wastes as well as industry wastes (sawdust and marc of grape), has been carried out in a circulating flow gasifier in order to evaluate the potential of using these types of biomass in the same equipment, thus providing higher operation flexibility and minimizing the effect of seasonal fuel supply variations. The potential of using biomass as an additional supporting fuel in coal fuelled power plants has also been evaluated through tests involving mixtures of biomass and coalcoke, the coke being a typical waste of oil companies. The effect of the main gasifier operating conditions, such as the relative biomass/air ratio and the reaction temperature, has been analysed to establish the conditions allowing higher gasification efficiency, carbon conversion and/or fuel constituents (CO, H2 and CH4) concentration and production. Results of the work encourage the combined use of the different biomass fuels without significant modifications in the installation, although agricultural wastes (grapevine and olive pruning) could to lead to more efficient gasification processes. These latter wastes appear as interesting fuels to generate a producer gas to be used in internal combustion engines or gas turbines (high gasification efficiency and gas yield), while sawdust could be a very adequate fuel to produce a H2-rich gas (with interest for fuel cells) due to its highest reactivity. The influence of the reaction temperature on the gasification characteristics was not as significant as that of the biomass/air ratio, although the H2 concentration increased with increasing temperature.

Magn Lapuerta; Juan J. Hernndez; Amparo Pazo; Julio Lpez

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Analysis of energy recovery potential using innovative technologies of waste gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy recovery from waste by gasification was simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two processes: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of feeding waste: Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and pulper residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different configurations for the energy cycles were considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison with performances from conventional Waste-to-Energy process. - Abstract: In this paper, two alternative thermo-chemical processes for waste treatment were analysed: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma process. The two processes were analysed from the thermodynamic point of view, trying to reconstruct two simplified models, using appropriate simulation tools and some support data from existing/planned plants, able to predict the energy recovery performances by process application. In order to carry out a comparative analysis, the same waste stream input was considered as input to the two models and the generated results were compared. The performances were compared with those that can be obtained from conventional combustion with energy recovery process by means of steam turbine cycle. Results are reported in terms of energy recovery performance indicators as overall energy efficiency, specific energy production per unit of mass of entering waste, primary energy source savings, specific carbon dioxide production.

Lombardi, Lidia, E-mail: lidia.lombardi@unifit.it [Dipartimento di Energetica, University of Florence, via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Carnevale, Ennio [Dipartimento di Energetica, University of Florence, via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Corti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, University of Siena, via Roma 56, 56100 Siena (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Gasification world database 2007. Current industry status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information on trends and drivers affecting the growth of the gasification industry is provided based on information in the USDOE NETL world gasification database (available on the www.netl.doe.gov website). Sectors cover syngas production in 2007, growth planned through 2010, recent industry changes, and beyond 2010 - strong growth anticipated in the United States. A list of gasification-based power plant projects, coal-to-liquid projects and coal-to-SNG projects under consideration in the USA is given.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of as-generated slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, the authors found that it would be extremely difficult for as-generated slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1,400 and 1,700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase 1, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale, and Phase 2, which involves commercial evaluation of these aggregates in a number of applications.

None

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

UTILIZATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MADE FROM COAL GASIFICATION SLAGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of ''as-generated'' slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for ''as-generated'' slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for, various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases Phase I, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale, and Phase II, which involves commercial evaluation of these aggregates in a number of applications.

Unknown

2000-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

397

EIS-0412: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near Beaumont, TX EIS-0412: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near Beaumont, TX February 18, 2009 EIS-0412:...

398

Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production Breakout Session 2A-Conversion...

399

Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of...

400

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Cleaning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cleaning Cleaning Chemicals from Coal Complex Chemicals from Coal Complex (Eastman Company) Novel gas cleaning and conditioning are crucial technologies for achieving near-zero emissions, while meeting gasification system performance and cost targets. DOE's Gasification Systems program supports technology development in the area of gas cleaning and conditioning, including advanced sorbents and solvents, particulate filters, and other novel gas-cleaning approaches that remove and convert gas contaminants into benign and marketable by-products. To avoid the cost and efficiency penalties associated with cooling the gas stream to temperatures at which conventional gas clean-up systems operate, novel processes are being developed that operate at mild to high temperatures and incorporate multi-contaminant control to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Underground coal gasification using oxygen and steam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, through model experiment of the underground coal gasification, the effects of pure oxygen gasification, oxygen-steam gasification, and moving-point gasification methods on the underground gasification process and gas quality were studied. Experiments showed that H{sub 2} and CO volume fraction in product gas during the pure oxygen gasification was 23.63-30.24% and 35.22-46.32%, respectively, with the gas heating value exceeding 11.00 MJ/m{sup 3}; under the oxygen-steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio stood at 2: 1, gas compositions remained virtually stable and CO + H{sub 2} was basically between 61.66 and 71.29%. Moving-point gasification could effectively improve the changes in the cavity in the coal seams or the effects of roof inbreak on gas quality; the ratio of gas flowing quantity to oxygen supplying quantity was between 3.1:1 and 3.5:1 and took on the linear changes; on the basis of the test data, the reasons for gas quality changes under different gasification conditions were analyzed.

Yang, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, S. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Chapter 2 - Chemistry of Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of any carbonaceous or hydrocarbonaceous material is, essentially, the conversion of the carbon constituents by any one of a variety of chemical processes to produce combustible gases. The process includes a series of reaction steps that convert the feedstock into synthesis gas (syngas, carbon monoxide, CO, plus hydrogen, H2) and other gaseous products. This conversion is generally accomplished by introducing a gasifying agent (air, oxygen, and/or steam) into a reactor vessel containing the feedstock where the temperature, pressure, and flow pattern (moving bed, fluidized, or entrained bed) are controlled. The gaseous products other than carbon monoxide and hydrogen and the proportions of these product gases (such as carbon dioxide, CO2, methane, CH4, water vapor, H2O, hydrogen sulfide, H2S, and sulfur dioxide, SO2) depends on the: (1) type of feedstock, (2) the chemical composition of the feedstock, (3) the gasifying agent or gasifying medium, as well as (4) the thermodynamics and chemistry of the gasification reactions as controlled by the process operating parameters. In addition, the kinetic rates and extents of conversion for the several chemical reactions that are a part of the gasification process are variable and are typically functions of: (1) temperature, (2) pressure, and (3) reactor configuration, and (4) the gas composition of the product gases and whether or not these gases influence the outcome of the reaction. It is the purpose of this chapter to present descriptions of the various reactions involved in gasification of carbonaceous and hydrocarbonaceous feedstocks as well as the various thermodynamic aspects of these reactions which dictate the process parameters used to produce the various gases.

James G. Speight

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

NETL: Gasifipedia - Gasification in Detail  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Gasifiers Commercial Gasifiers Types of Gasifiers Although there are various types of gasifers (gasification reactors), different in design and operational characteristics, there are three main gasifier classifications into which most of the commercially available gasifiers fall. These categories are as follows: Fixed-bed gasifiers (also referred as moving-bed gasifiers) Entrained-flow gasifiers Fluidized-bed gasifiers Commercial gasifiers of GE Energy, ConocoPhillips E-Gas(tm) and Shell SCGP are examples of entrained-flow types. Fixed-or moving-bed gasifiers include that of Lurgi and British Gas Lurgi (BGL). Fluidized-bed gasifiers include the catalytic gasifier technology being commercialized by Great Point Energy, the Winkler gasifier, and the KBR transport gasifiers. For more specific information on these gasifiers, follow the links for the bulleted gasifier types above. NOTE: Although specific gasifiers named above are described in detail throughout this website, it is realized that other gasification technologies exist. The gasifiers discussed herein were not preferentially chosen by NETL.

404

Modeling of the rock bed thermal energy storage system of a combined cycle solar thermal power plant in South Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A thermocline-based rock bed thermal energy storage system potentially offers a cheap and simple way of achieving dispatchability in an air-cooled central receiver CSP plant. In order to efficiently match heliostat field size, storage dimensions, back-up fuel consumption and turbine sizes for non-stop power generation and economic feasibility, year-long power plant simulations have to be run. This paper focuses on the storage as the center of in- and outgoing thermal energy. The derived storage model has one spatial dimension which is justified by the high tube-to-particle diameter ratio and because yearly aggregated and not momentary values are of interest. A validation of the correlations with data from the literature shows acceptable agreement. Sensitivity analyses indicate that, due to low costs of the storage system, above certain minimum storage dimensions, the influence on energetic and monetary performance indicators is marginal. The calculated LCOE is in the range of 0.110.18EUR/kWh and in agreement with other studies on combined cycle CSP plants.

Lukas Heller; Paul Gauch

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

In situ catalytic conversion of tar using rice husk char/ash supported nickeliron catalysts for biomass pyrolytic gasification combined with the mixing-simulation in fluidized-bed gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A catalytic gasification technology has been proposed for tar in situ conversion using the rice husk char (RHC) or rice husk ash (RHA) supported nickeliron catalysts. Biomass tar could be converted effectively by co-pyrolysis with the RHC/RHA supported nickeliron catalysts at 800C, simplifying the follow-up tar removal process. Under the optimized conditions, the tar conversion efficiency could reach about 92.3% by the RHC NiFe, which exhibited more advantages of easy preparation and energy-saving. In addition, the tar conversion efficiency could reach about 93% by the RHA Ni. Significantly, partial metal oxides (e.g., NiO, Fe2O3) in the carbon matrix of RHC could be in-situ carbothermally reduced into the metallic state (e.g., Ni0) by reducing gases (e.g., CO) or carbon atom, thereby enhancing the catalytic performance of tar conversion. Furthermore, mixing with other solid particles such as sand and RHA Ni, can also improve biomass (e.g., RH) fluidization behavior by optimizing the operation parameters (e.g., particle size, mass fraction) in the mode of fluidized bed gasifier (FBG). After the solidsolid mixing simulation, the RH mass fraction of 0.5 and the particle diameter of 0.5mm can be employed in the binary mixture of RH and RHA.

Yafei Shen; Peitao Zhao; Qinfu Shao; Fumitake Takahashi; Kunio Yoshikawa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Method for the operation of internal combustion engines. [gasification reactor for reforming gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a method for the operation of internal combustion engines which is designed to decontaminate the exhaust gases. The method includes: feeding a gasification air stream into a gasification reactor; feeding fuel into the same gasification reactor; combining the fuel with the gasification air into a homogeneous fuel-air mixture in the gasification reactor; and converting the fuel-air mixture by partial combustion into a soot -free reformed gas. Then, the reformed gas is fed from the gasification reactor to a mixer where the reformed gas is mixed with combustion air and the reformed gas-air mixture is fed to the internal combustion engine for further combustion with the result that there is intensive decontamination of the exhaust gases which thereby reduces air pollution. The reformed gas temperature is adjusted low for maximum engine output, and is adjusted higher for lower engine temperatures in order to obtain a reformed gas which is richer in hydrogen and thereby produce exhaust gases which are lower in harmful substances. In reference to the exhaust gases in an internal combustion engine, this method achieves the highest possible degree of decontamination, not only of the carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons , but also of the nitrous oxides in the exhaust gases. Using this method, the internal combustion engine can be operated not only with high-test, no-knock gasoline, but also with cheap, lead-free low octane, straight-run gasoline which is low in aromatics and olefins, which normally do not have no-knock properties, and the internal combustion engine can be operated with the lowest possible fuel consumption. The gasification reactor operates through chemical reaction in the presence of a catalyst. Optionally, this method may include a return of part of the reformed gas to the input of the gasification reactor.

Muhlberg, E.

1980-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

407

Integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) demonstration test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As concern about the environment generates interest in ultra-clean energy plants, fuel cell power plants can respond to the challenge. Fuel cells convert hydrocarbon fuels to electricity at efficiencies exceeding conventional heat engine technologies while generating extremely low emissions. Emissions of SOx and NOx are expected to be well below current and anticipated future standards. Nitrogen oxides, a product of combustion, will be extremely low in this power plant because power is produced electrochemically rather than by combustion. Due to its higher efficiencies, a fuel cell power plant also produces less carbon dioxide. Fuel cells in combination with coal gasification, are an efficient and environmentally acceptable means to utilize the abundant coal reserves both in the US and around the world. To demonstrate this technology, FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), is planning to build and test a 2-MW Fuel Cell Power Plant for operation on coal derived gas. This power plant is based on Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{trademark}) technology and will be part of a Clean Coal V IGCC project supported by the US DOE. A British Gas Lurgi (BGL) slagging fixed-bed gasification system with cold gas clean up is planned as part of a 400 MW IGCC power plant to provide a fuel gas slip stream to the fuel cell. The IGFC power plant will be built by Kentucky Pioneer Energy, A subsidiary of Global Energy, in Clark County, KY. This demonstration will result in the world's largest fuel cell power plant operating on coal derived gas. The objective of this test is to demonstrate fuel cell operation on coal derived gas at a commercial scale and to verify the efficiency and environmental benefits.

Steinfeld, G.; Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Sanderson, R.; Abens, S.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Gasification Studies Task 4 Topical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key objective of the Task 4 activities has been to develop simulation tools to support development, troubleshooting and optimization of pressurized entrained-flow coal gasifiers. The overall gasifier models (Subtask 4.1) combine submodels for fluid flow (Subtask 4.2) and heat transfer (Subtask 4.3) with fundamental understanding of the chemical processes (Subtask 4.4) processes that take place as coal particles are converted to synthesis gas and slag. However, it is important to be able to compare predictions from the models against data obtained from actual operating coal gasifiers, and Subtask 4.6 aims to provide an accessible, non-proprietary system, which can be operated over a wide range of conditions to provide well-characterized data for model validation. Highlights of this work include: Verification and validation activities performed with the Arches coal gasification simulation tool on experimental data from the CANMET gasifier (Subtask 4.1). The simulation of multiphase reacting flows with coal particles including detailed gas-phase chemistry calculations using an extension of the one-dimensional turbulence models capability (Subtask 4.2). The demonstration and implementation of the Reverse Monte Carlo ray tracing (RMCRT) radiation algorithm in the ARCHES code (Subtask 4.3). Determination of steam and CO{sub 2} gasification kinetics of bituminous coal chars at high temperature and elevated pressure under entrained-flow conditions (Subtask 4.4). In addition, attempts were made to gain insight into the chemical structure differences between young and mature coal soot, but both NMR and TEM characterization efforts were hampered by the highly reacted nature of the soot. The development, operation, and demonstration of in-situ gas phase measurements from the University of Utahs pilot-scale entrained-flow coal gasifier (EFG) (Subtask 4.6). This subtask aimed at acquiring predictable, consistent performance and characterizing the environment within the gasifier.

Whitty, Kevin; Fletcher, Thomas; Pugmire, Ronald; Smith, Philip; Sutherland, James; Thornock, Jeremy; Boshayeshi, Babak; Hunsacker, Isaac; Lewis, Aaron; Waind, Travis; Kelly, Kerry

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Combined effects of short-term rainfall patterns and soil texture on nitrogen cycling -- A Modeling Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precipitation variability and magnitude are expected to change in many parts of the world over the 21st century. We examined the potential effects of intra-annual rainfall patterns on soil nitrogen (N) transport and transformation in the unsaturated soil zone using a deterministic dynamic modeling approach. The model (TOUGHREACT-N), which has been tested and applied in several experimental and observational systems, mechanistically accounts for microbial activity, soil-moisture dynamics that respond to precipitation variability, and gaseous and aqueous tracer transport in the soil. Here, we further tested and calibrated the model against data from a precipitation variability experiment in a tropical system in Costa Rica. The model was then used to simulate responses of soil moisture, microbial dynamics, nitrogen (N) aqueous and gaseous species, N leaching, and N trace-gas emissions to changes in rainfall patterns; the effect of soil texture was also examined. The temporal variability of nitrate leaching and NO, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O effluxes were significantly influenced by rainfall dynamics. Soil texture combined with rainfall dynamics altered soil moisture dynamics, and consequently regulated soil N responses to precipitation changes. The clay loam soil more effectively buffered water stress during relatively long intervals between precipitation events, particularly after a large rainfall event. Subsequent soil N aqueous and gaseous losses showed either increases or decreases in response to increasing precipitation variability due to complex soil moisture dynamics. For a high rainfall scenario, high precipitation variability resulted in as high as 2.4-, 2.4-, 1.2-, and 13-fold increases in NH{sub 3}, NO, N{sub 2}O and NO{sub 3}{sup -} fluxes, respectively, in clay loam soil. In sandy loam soil, however, NO and N{sub 2}O fluxes decreased by 15% and 28%, respectively, in response to high precipitation variability. Our results demonstrate that soil N cycling responses to increasing precipitation variability depends on precipitation amount and soil texture, and that accurate prediction of future N cycling and gas effluxes requires models with relatively sophisticated representation of the relevant processes.

Gu, C.; Riley, W.J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

FEED SYSTEM INNOVATION FOR GASIFICATION OF LOCALLY ECONOMICAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS (FIGLEAF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Feed System Innovation for Gasification of Locally Economical Alternative Fuels (FIGLEAF) project is being conducted by the Energy and Environmental Research Center and Gasification Engineering Corporation of Houston, Texas (a subsidiary of Global Energy Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), with 80% cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The goal of the project is to identify and evaluate low-value fuels that could serve as alternative feedstocks and to develop a feed system to facilitate their use in integrated gasification combined cycle and gasification coproduction facilities. The long-term goal, to be accomplished in a subsequent project, is to install a feed system for the selected fuels at Global Energy's commercial-scale 262-MW Wabash River Coal Gasification Facility in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The feasibility study undertaken for the project consists of identifying and evaluating the economic feasibility of potential fuel sources, developing a feed system design capable of providing a fuel at 400 psig to the second stage of the E-Gas (Destec) gasifier to be cogasified with coal at up to 30% on a Btu basis, performing bench- and pilot-scale testing to verify concepts and clarify decision-based options, reviewing prior art with respect to high-pressure feed system designs, and determining the economics of cofeeding alternative feedstocks with the conceptual feed system design. Activities and results thus far include the following. Several potential alternative fuels have been obtained for evaluation and testing as potential feedstocks, including sewage sludge, used railroad ties, urban wood waste, municipal solid waste, and used waste tires/tire-derived fuel. Only fuels with potential tipping fees were considered; potential energy crop fuels were not considered since they would have a net positive cost to the plant. Based on the feedstock assessment, sewage sludge has been selected as one of the primary feedstocks for consideration at the Wabash plant. Because of the limited waste heat available for drying and the ability of the gasifier to operate with alternative feedstocks at up to 80% moisture, a decision was made to investigate a pumping system for delivering the as-received fuel across the pressure boundary. High-temperature drop-tube furnace tests were conducted to determine if explosive fragmentation of high-moisture sludge droplets could be expected, but showed that these droplets underwent a shrinking and densification process that implies that the sludge will have to be well dispersed when injected into the gasifier. Fuel dispersion nozzles have been obtained for measuring how well the sludge can be dispersed in the second stage of the gasifier. Future work will include leasing a Schwing America pump to test pumping sewage sludge against 400 psig. In addition, sludge dispersion testing will be completed using two different dispersion nozzles to determine their ability to generate sludge particles small enough to be entrained out of the E-Gas entrained-flow gasifier.

Michael L. Swanson; Mark A. Musich; Darren D. Schmidt

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

FEED SYSTEM INNOVATION FOR GASIFICATION OF LOCALLY ECONOMICAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS (FIGLEAF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Feed System Innovation for Gasification of Locally Economical Alternative Fuels (FIGLEAF) project was conducted by the Energy & Environmental Research Center and Gasification Engineering Corporation of Houston, Texas (a subsidiary of Global Energy Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), with 80% cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the project was to identify and evaluate low-value fuels that could serve as alternative feedstocks and to develop a feed system to facilitate their use in integrated gasification combined-cycle and gasification coproduction facilities. The long-term goal, to be accomplished in a subsequent project, is to install a feed system for the selected fuel(s) at Global Energy's commercial-scale 262-MW Wabash River Coal Gasification Facility in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The feasibility study undertaken for the project consisted of identifying and evaluating the economic feasibility of potential fuel sources, developing a feed system design capable of providing a fuel at 400 psig to the second stage of the E-Gas (Destec) gasifier to be cogasified with coal, performing bench- and pilot-scale testing to verify concepts and clarify decision-based options, reviewing information on high-pressure feed system designs, and determining the economics of cofeeding alternative feedstocks with the conceptual feed system design. A preliminary assessment of feedstock availability within Indiana and Illinois was conducted. Feedstocks evaluated included those with potential tipping fees to offset processing cost: sewage sludge, municipal solid waste, used railroad ties, urban wood waste (UWW), and used tires/tire-derived fuel. Agricultural residues and dedicated energy crop fuels were not considered since they would have a net positive cost to the plant. Based on the feedstock assessment, sewage sludge was selected as the primary feedstock for consideration at the Wabash River Plant. Because of the limited waste heat available for drying and the ability of the gasifier to operate with alternative feedstocks at up to 80% moisture, a decision was made to investigate a pumping system for delivering the as-received fuel across the pressure boundary into the second stage of the gasifier. A high-pressure feed pump and fuel dispersion nozzles were tested for their ability to cross the pressure boundary and adequately disperse the sludge into the second stage of the gasifier. These results suggest that it is technically feasible to get the sludge dispersed to an appropriate size into the second stage of the gasifier although the recycle syngas pressure needed to disperse the sludge would be higher than originally desired. A preliminary design was prepared for a sludge-receiving, storage, and high-pressure feeding system at the Wabash River Plant. The installed capital costs were estimated at approximately $9.7 million, within an accuracy of {+-}10%. An economic analysis using DOE's IGCC Model, Version 3 spreadsheet indicates that in order to justify the additional capital cost of the system, Global Energy would have to receive a tipping fee of $12.40 per wet ton of municipal sludge delivered. This is based on operation with petroleum coke as the primary fuel. Similarly, with coal as the primary fuel, a minimum tipping of $16.70 would be required. The availability of delivered sludge from Indianapolis, Indiana, in this tipping-fee range is unlikely; however, given the higher treatment costs associated with sludge treatment in Chicago, Illinois, delivery of sludge from Chicago, given adequate rail access, might be economically viable.

Michael L. Swanson; Mark A. Musich; Darren D. Schmidt; Joseph K. Schultz

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Cycle cover with short cycles Nicole Immorlica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Given a graph and a subset of marked elements (nodes, edges, or some combination thereof), a cycleCycle cover with short cycles Nicole Immorlica£ Mohammad Mahdian£ Vahab S. Mirrokni£ Abstract Cycle for variants of cycle covering problems which bound the size and/or length of the covering cycles

Immorlica, Nicole

413

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Separation Techniques for Gasification-based Power Generation Point Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (post-combustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle or IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, dry, regenerable processes based on sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Jones, K.L.; Morsi, B.I. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Heintz, Y.J. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Ilconich, J.B. (Parsons)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

CO-PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRICITY USING PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler has completed work under a U.S. Department of Energy cooperative agreement to develop a gasification equipment module that can serve as a building block for a variety of advanced, coal-fueled plants. When linked with other equipment blocks also under development, studies have shown that Foster Wheeler's gasification module can enable an electric generating plant to operate with an efficiency exceeding 60 percent (coal higher heating value basis) while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The heart of the equipment module is a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) that is used to gasify the coal; it can operate with either air or oxygen and produces a coal-derived syngas without the formation of corrosive slag or sticky ash that can reduce plant availabilities. Rather than fuel a gas turbine for combined cycle power generation, the syngas can alternatively be processed to produce clean fuels and or chemicals. As a result, the study described herein was conducted to determine the performance and economics of using the syngas to produce hydrogen for sale to a nearby refinery in a hydrogen-electricity co-production plant setting. The plant is fueled with Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, produces 99.95 percent pure hydrogen at a rate of 260 tons per day and generates 255 MWe of power for sale. Based on an electricity sell price of $45/MWhr, the hydrogen has a 10-year levelized production cost of $6.75 per million Btu; this price is competitive with hydrogen produced by steam methane reforming at a natural gas price of $4/MMBtu. Hence, coal-fueled, PCFB gasifier-based plants appear to be a viable means for either high efficiency power generation or co-production of hydrogen and electricity. This report describes the PCFB gasifier-based plant, presents its performance and economics, and compares it to other coal-based and natural gas based hydrogen production technologies.

Zhen Fan

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification and improved processes for catalytic coal gasification for the production of methane. The catalyst is composed of at least two alkali metal salts and a particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used. 10 figures, 2 tables.

McKee, D.W.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.

1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

416

Biomass Gasification Research Facility Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While thermochemical syngas production facilities for biomass utilization are already employed worldwide, exploitation of their potential has been inhibited by technical limitations encountered when attempting to obtain real-time syngas compositional data required for process optimization, reliability, and syngas quality assurance. To address these limitations, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) carried out two companion projects (under US DOE Cooperative Agreements DE-FC36-03GO13175 and DE-FC36-02GO12024) to develop and demonstrate the equipment and methods required to reliably and continuously obtain accurate and representative on-line syngas compositional data. These objectives were proven through a stepwise series of field tests of biomass and coal gasification process streams. GTI developed the methods and hardware for extractive syngas sample stream delivery and distribution, necessary to make use of state-of-the-art on-line analyzers to evaluate and optimize syngas cleanup and conditioning. This multi-year effort to develop methods to effectively monitor gaseous species produced in thermochemical process streams resulted in a sampling and analysis approach that is continuous, sensitive, comprehensive, accurate, reliable, economical, and safe. The improved approach for sampling thermochemical processes that GTI developed and demonstrated in its series of field demonstrations successfully provides continuous transport of vapor-phase syngas streams extracted from the main gasification process stream to multiple, commercially available analyzers. The syngas stream is carefully managed through multiple steps to successfully convey it to the analyzers, while at the same time bringing the stream to temperature and pressure conditions that are compatible with the analyzers. The primary principle that guides the sample transport is that throughout the entire sampling train, the temperature of the syngas stream is maintained above the maximum condensation temperature of the vapor phase components of the conveyed sample gas. In addition, to minimize adsorption or chemical changes in the syngas components prior to analysis, the temperature of the transported stream is maintained as hot as is practical, while still being cooled only as much necessary prior to entering the analyzer(s). The successful transport of the sample gas stream to the analyzer(s) is accomplished through the managed combination of four basic gas conditioning methods that are applied as specifically called for by the process conditions, the gas constituent concentrations, the analyzer requirements, and the objectives of the syngas analyses: 1) removing entrained particulate matter from the sample stream; 2) maintaining the temperature of the sample gas stream; 3) lowering the pressure of the sample gas stream to decrease the vapor pressures of all the component vapor species in the sample stream; and 4) diluting the gas stream with a metered, inert gas, such as nitrogen. Proof-of-concept field demonstrations of the sampling approach were conducted for gasification process streams from a black liquor gasifier, and from the gasification of biomass and coal feedstocks at GTIs Flex-Fuel Test Facility. In addition to the descriptions and data included in this Final Report, GTI produced a Special Topical Report, Design and Protocol for Monitoring Gaseous Species in Thermochemical Processes, that explains and describes in detail the objectives, principles, design, hardware, installation, operation and representative data produced during this successful developmental effort. Although the specific analyzers used under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-02GO12024 were referenced in the Topical Report and this Final Report, the sampling interface design they present is generic enough to adapt to other analyzers that may be more appropriate to alternate process streams or facilities.

Snyder, Todd R.; Bush, Vann; Felix, Larry G.; Farthing, William E.; Irvin, James H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Co-gasification of municipal solid waste and material recovery in a large-scale gasification and melting system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of MSW with MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No significant difference between MSW treatment with and without MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCDD/DFs yields are significantly low because of the high carbon conversion ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slag quality is significantly stable and slag contains few hazardous heavy metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final landfill amount is reduced and materials are recovered by DMS process. - Abstract: This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of municipal solid waste with and without the municipal solid waste bottom ash using two large-scale commercial operation plants. From the viewpoint of operation data, there is no significant difference between municipal solid waste treatment with and without the bottom ash. The carbon conversion ratios are as high as 91.7% and 95.3%, respectively and this leads to significantly low PCDD/DFs yields via complete syngas combustion. The gross power generation efficiencies are 18.9% with the bottom ash and 23.0% without municipal solid waste bottom ash, respectively. The effects of the equivalence ratio are also evaluated. With the equivalence ratio increasing, carbon monoxide concentration is decreased, and carbon dioxide and the syngas temperature (top gas temperature) are increased. The carbon conversion ratio is also increased. These tendencies are seen in both modes. Co-gasification using the gasification and melting system (Direct Melting System) has a possibility to recover materials effectively. More than 90% of chlorine is distributed in fly ash. Low-boiling-point heavy metals, such as lead and zinc, are distributed in fly ash at rates of 95.2% and 92.0%, respectively. Most of high-boiling-point heavy metals, such as iron and copper, are distributed in metal. It is also clarified that slag is stable and contains few harmful heavy metals such as lead. Compared with the conventional waste management framework, 85% of the final landfill amount reduction is achieved by co-gasification of municipal solid waste with bottom ash and incombustible residues. These results indicate that the combined production of slag with co-gasification of municipal solid waste with the bottom ash constitutes an ideal approach to environmental conservation and resource recycling.

Tanigaki, Nobuhiro, E-mail: tanigaki.nobuhiro@nsc-eng.co.jp [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan); Manako, Kazutaka [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd., 46-59, Nakabaru, Tobata-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8505 (Japan); Osada, Morihiro [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

A Generalized Pyrolysis Model for Simulating Charring, Intumescent, Smoldering, and Noncharring Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Nonflaming Transient Gasification of PMMA and PE duringT. , & Werner, K. , Wood Gasification at Fire Level HeatConcentration on Nonflaming Gasification Rates and Evolved

Lautenberger, Chris; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Higman, C. and M. Burgt, Gasification . 2003: Elsevier/Gulfand N.P. Cheremisinoff, Gasification technologies: a primerbiomass (part 3): gasification technologies. Bioresource

He, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal-gasification technical Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification to Produce SNG (Beulah, North Dakota, USA) (Source:DakotaGasification Petcoke... Source: NETL, 2009 12;12 Dakota Coal Gasification ... Source: Center for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification CoalTek, Inc. Project Number: FE0005293 Project Description This project will demonstrate an application of a CoalTek, Inc. (CoalTek) proprietary microwave process for treating energy feedstock materials. The process combines coal and biomass to produce an economically viable and suitable single-stream feedstock for co-gasification. Phase I of the project will focus on microwave processing, batch-scale production, and laboratory characterizations of briquettes with the objective to identify the combinations of biomass and coal types that provide the most suitable briquetted product for co-gasification. Phase II will use a larger scale, continuous mode process to (1) demonstrate the performance of the co-briquetted fuels during co-gasification in two different pilot-plant designs, i.e., fixed-bed and fluidized-bed gasifiers, and (2) enable realistic cost estimates for the construction and operation of a commercial-scale biomass-coal briquetting plant based on CoalTek's proprietary microwave process.

422

New Clean Coal Cycle Optimized Using Pinch Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

particularly fossil fuels. ' One of the technologies under development to address these concerns is a hybrid cycle pressurized circulating fluid ~ed combustion (PCFBC) system. The cycle 1ncorporates both gasification and combustion of pulverized coal...-06-19 Proceedings from the 12th National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, June 19-20, 1990 have been described previously (reference 1) ? Gasification is a relatively slow process compared to combustion. consequently, a gasifier designed...

Rossiter, A. P.; O'Donnell, J. J.

423

Resource Limits and Conversion Efficiency with Implications for Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants.Natural gas-fired combined cycle plants can be converted toand more efficient combined-cycle plants. Combined cycle

Croft, Gregory Donald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Fluidized bed catalytic coal gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids impregnated with gasification catalyst constituents (16) are oxidized by contact with a gas containing between 2 volume percent and 21 volume percent oxygen at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 250.degree. C. in an oxidation zone (24) and the resultant oxidized, catalyst impregnated solids are then gasified in a fluidized bed gasification zone (44) at an elevated pressure. The oxidation of the catalyst impregnated solids under these conditions insures that the bed density in the fluidized bed gasification zone will be relatively high even though the solids are gasified at elevated pressure and temperature.

Euker, Jr., Charles A. (15163 Dianna La., Houston, TX 77062); Wesselhoft, Robert D. (120 Caldwell, Baytown, TX 77520); Dunkleman, John J. (3704 Autumn La., Baytown, TX 77520); Aquino, Dolores C. (15142 McConn, Webster, TX 77598); Gouker, Toby R. (5413 Rocksprings Dr., LaPorte, TX 77571)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Gasification of New Zealand Coals: A Comparative Simulation Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to conduct a preliminary feasibility assessment of gasification of New Zealand (NZ) lignite and sub-bituminous coals, using a commercial simulation tool. ... Coal is a nonrenewable resource; however, the worlds coal reserves amount to twice the combined oil and gas reserves. ... The reasons for the entrained flow gasifier selection include its high suitability to low rank coals (lignites) and the use of entrained flow gasifiers for an IGCC as the industrially preferred choice dictated through experience. ...

Smitha V. Nathen; Robert D. Kirkpatrick; Brent R. Young

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Gasification of Ponderosa Pine Charcoal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of wood chars with CO2 and steam is an important process step in the conversion of biomass to fuel and synthesis gases. Wood fuels can be gasified in a wide variety of sizes, shapes and densities...

Richard Edrich; Timothy Bradley

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Catalyst for the production of methane from carbon and/or coal by means of catalytic gasification. The catalyst compostion containing at least two alkali metal salts. A particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used.

McKee, Douglas W. (Burnt Hills, NY); Spiro, Clifford L. (Scotia, NY); Kosky, Philip G. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A New Approach to Carbon Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... carbon monoxide plus hydrogen respectively, under the usual conditions of temperature and pressure applying in gasification practice, the rates of reaction measured by the number of gm. moles of product ...

J. D. BLACKWOOD; F. K. McTAGGART

1959-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

430

Biomass Gasification in Dual Fluidized Bed Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dual fluidized bed gasification technology is prospective because it produces high...2...dilution even when air is used to generate the required endothermic heat via in situ combustion. This study is devoted ...

Toshiyuki Suda; Takahiro Murakami

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Underground Coal Gasification at Tennessee Colony  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tennessee Colony In Situ Coal Gasification Project conducted by Basic Resources Inc. is the most recent step in Texas Utilities Company's ongoing research into the utilization of Texas lignite. The project, an application of the Soviet...

Garrard, C. W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

The Role of Oxygen in Coal Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Products supplies oxygen to a number of coal gasification and partial oxidation facilities worldwide. At the high operating pressures of these processes, economics favor the use of 90% and higher oxygen purities. The effect of inerts...

Klosek, J.; Smith, A. R.; Solomon, J.

433

Partial Gasification for CO2Emissions Reduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chemical reaction during partial gasification of coal follows the form (Nag and Raha, 1994) which is based on the Amagat model for ideal gas mixtures: (9.1) ...

Nirmal V. Gnanapragasam; Bale V. Reddy; Marc A. Rosen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process Gasification Process First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 16, 2001 May 16, 2001 Jeff Seabright Jeff Seabright Texaco Inc. Texaco Inc. Presentation Highlights Presentation Highlights * * Texaco and climate change Texaco and climate change * * Introduction to gasification Introduction to gasification * * Environmental benefits of gasification Environmental benefits of gasification * * CO CO 2 2 capture & sequestration capture & sequestration * * Challenges going forward Challenges going forward Texaco's Climate Change Policy Texaco's Climate Change Policy * * Know enough to take action now Know enough to take action now

435

Effect of Microstructural Changes on Gasification Reactivity of Coal Chars during Low Temperature Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Microstructural Changes on Gasification Reactivity of Coal Chars during Low Temperature Gasification ... Pocahontas No. 3, Illinois No. 6, and Beulah-Zap coal char samples were gasified in 1% O2 at 500 C or 600 C up to 90% (daf) conversion, and their structure were observed under a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). ...

Atul Sharma; Hayato Kadooka; Takashi Kyotani; Akira Tomita

2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

436

Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of as-generated slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, the authors found that it would be extremely difficult for as-generated slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1,400 and 1,700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase 1, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale, and Phase 2, which involves commercial evaluation of these aggregates in a number of applications. Primary funding for the project is provided by DOE's Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) at Morgantown, with significant cost sharing by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI).

None

1999-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

437

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Project Number: DE-FE0007966 TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is demonstrating the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low-rank coals. The plant uses an integrated carbon dioxide (CO2) scrubber/water gas shift (WGS) catalyst to capture more than 90 percent of the CO2 emissions, while increasing the cost of electricity by less than 10 percent compared to a plant with no carbon capture. TDA is optimizing the sorbent/catalyst and process design, and assessing the efficacy of the integrated WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system, first in bench-scale experiments and then in a slipstream field demonstration using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. The results will feed into a techno-economic analysis to estimate the impact of the WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system on the thermal efficiency of the plant and the cost of electricity.

438

The direct observation of alkali vapor species in biomass combustion and gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes new data from screening various feedstocks for alkali vapor release under combustion conditions. The successful development of a laboratory flow reactor and molecular beam, mass spectrometer interface is detailed. Its application to several herbaceous and woody feedstocks, as well as a fast-pyrolysis oil, under 800 and 1,100{degrees}C batch combustion, is documented. Chlorine seems to play a large role in the facile mobilization of potassium. Included in the report is a discussion of relevant literature on the alkali problem in combustors and turbines. Highlighted are the phenomena identified in studies on coal and methods that have been applied to alkali speciation. The nature of binding of alkali in coal versus biomass is discussed, together with the implications for the ease of release. Herbaceous species and many agricultural residues appear to pose significant problems in release of alkali species to the vapor at typical combustor temperatures. These problems could be especially acute in direct combustion fired turbines, but may be ameliorated in integrated gasification combined cycles.

French, R.J.; Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this period, we conducted two 300-hour tests. In the first test, we exposed samples at 900 C under conditions simulating the high-temperature heat recovery unit (HTHRU). The second test was at 370 C, corresponding to the filter units following the HTHRU. The tests were showed the resilience of silicon nitride as a coating component, and the new coating procedures better penetrated the pores in sintered metal filter samples. Finally, we also received samples that were exposed in the Wabash River plant. Unfortunately, all these samples, that were prepared last year, were severely eroded and/or corroded.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Jordi Perez-Mariano; Angel Sanjurjo

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Kinetics of steam gasification of bituminous coals in terms of their use for underground coal gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The kinetics of steam gasification was examined for bituminous coals of a low coal rank. The examined coals can be the raw material for underground coal gasification. Measurements were carried out under isothermal conditions at a high pressure of 4MPa and temperatures of 800, 900, 950, and 1000C. Yields of gasification products such as carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane were calculated based on the kinetic curves of formation reactions of these products. Also carbon conversion degrees are presented. Moreover, calculations were made of the kinetic parameters of carbon monoxide and hydrogen formation reaction in the coal gasification process. The parameters obtained during the examinations enable a preliminary assessment of coal for the process of underground coal gasification.

Stanis?aw Porada; Grzegorz Czerski; Tadeusz Dziok; Przemys?aw Grzywacz; Dorota Makowska

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Catalytic Air Gasification of Plastic Waste (Polypropylene) in a Fluidized Bed. Part II: Effects of Some Operating Variables on the Quality of the Raw Gas Produced Using Olivine as the In-Bed Material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalytic Air Gasification of Plastic Waste (Polypropylene) in a Fluidized Bed. ... Wu et al.(11) reported a process involving pyrolysis combined with catalytic steam gasification for postconsumer plastic wastes, mixed plastics, and real-world plastic wastes. ... In this case, the plastic waste was composed of a mixture of PE and PP (50 wt %) from the car industry. ...

Jos M. Toledo; Mara P. Aznar; Jess A. Sancho

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

442

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE November 9, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A database just released by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documents the worldwide growth of gasification, the expected technology of choice for future coal-based plants that produce power, fuels, and/or chemicals with near-zero emissions. The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database, a comprehensive collection of gasification plant data, describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas

443

Utilization of char from biomass gasification in catalytic applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilization of char from biomass gasification in catalytic applications Naomi Klinghoffer Submitted Utilization of char from biomass gasification in catalytic applications Naomi Klinghoffer Utilization takes place during catalytic decomposition. This thesis focuses on the utilization of char as a catalyst

444

What should the government do to encourage technical change in the energy sector?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and storage; (4) clean coal technologies, such as the Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle; and (5

Deutch, John

445

EIS-0431: DOE Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Kern County, CA

446

EIS-0431: Extension of public comment period; Notice of public hearing; Correction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, CA

447

Combustion and Flame 150 (2007) 246262 www.elsevier.com/locate/combustflame  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compression ignition (HCCI) engines [1] and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants [2

Wooldridge, Margaret S.

448

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DL Chase and PT Kehoe, "GE Combined-Cycle Product Line andand W Stenze, "Combined Cycle Heat Recovery Optimization,"bottoming cycle FOR combined cycle power plants," Applied

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Thermochemical Conversion Research and Development: Gasification and Pyrolysis (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass gasification and pyrolysis research and development activities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

451

Small-scale biomass gasification CHP utilisation in industry: Energy and environmental evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomass gasification is regarded as a sustainable energy technology used for waste management and producing renewable fuel. Using the techniques of life cycle assessment (LCA) and net energy analysis this study quantifies the energy, resource, and emission flows. The purpose of the research is to assess the net energy produced and potential environmental effects of biomass gasification using wood waste. This paper outlines a case study that uses waste wood from a factory for use in an entrained flow gasification CHP plant. Results show that environmental impacts may arise from toxicity, particulates, and resource depletion. Toxicity is a potential issue through the disposal of ash. Particulate matter arises from the combustion of syngas therefore effective gas cleaning and emission control is required. Assessment of resource depletion shows natural gas, electricity, fossil fuels, metals, and water are all crucial components of the system. The energy gain ratio is 4.71MJdelivered/MJprimary when only electricity is considered, this increases to 13.94MJdelivered/MJprimary if 100% of the available heat is utilised. Greenhouse gas emissions are very low (715gCO2-e/kWhe) although this would increase if the biomass feedstock was not a waste and needed to be cultivated and transported. Overall small-scale biomass gasification is an attractive technology if the high capital costs and operational difficulties can be overcome, and a consistent feedstock source is available.

P.W.R. Adams; M.C. McManus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Kinetic models for uncatalyzed and potassium-catalyzed gasification of char by carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A differential packed-bed reactor has been employed to study the gasification of uncatalyzed and 7.5 wt% K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-catalyzed Saran char in carbon dioxide/carbon monoxide mixtures at a total pressure near 1 atm (101.3 kPa). The gasification temperature was varied between 1131 and 1229 K for the uncatalyzed case, and between 922 and 1046 K for the catalyzed case. Gasification rate data were tested with a model which involves two-site adsorption and subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the char surface. The results indicate that this model adequately explains both the uncatalyzed and catalyzed gasification data. However, higher concentrations of carbon-oxygen complex, (C(O)), exist on the surface during catalyzed gasification. The increase in (C(O)) weakens carbon-carbon bonds and thus lowers the activation energy for desorption of the C(O) complex. Adsorption of CO and CO/sub 2/ on both catalyzed and uncatalyzed chars was also followed with a volumetric adsorption apparatus at pressures between 1 and 100 kPa and temperatures from 273 to 725 K. The catalyzed char adsorbed an order of magnitude more CO/sub 2/ at 559 K than the uncatalyzed char. Subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the carbon surface does not appear to be catalyzed by potassium. Thus, the catalysts' role is to augment the efficiency and/or number of sites for CO/sub 2/ adsorption, thereby creating more oxygen on the surface. The higher rate during catalyzed gasification can be attributed to a combination of increased (C(O)) and a smaller activation energy for desorption of C(O).

Koenig, P.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Plasma Treatments and Biomass Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exploitation of forest resources for energy production includes various methods of biomass processing. Gasification is one of the ways to recover energy from biomass. Syngas produced from biomass can be used to power internal combustion engines or, after purification, to supply fuel cells. Recent studies have shown the potential to improve conventional biomass processing by coupling a plasma reactor to a pyrolysis cyclone reactor. The role of the plasma is twofold: it acts as a purification stage by reducing production of tars and aerosols, and simultaneously produces a rich hydrogen syngas. In a first part of the paper we present results obtained from plasma treatment of pyrolysis oils. The outlet gas composition is given for various types of oils obtained at different experimental conditions with a pyrolysis reactor. Given the complexity of the mixtures from processing of biomass, we present a study with methanol considered as a model molecule. This experimental method allows a first modeling approach based on a combustion kinetic model suitable to validate the coupling of plasma with conventional biomass process. The second part of the paper is summarizing results obtained through a plasma-pyrolysis reactor arrangement. The goal is to show the feasibility of this plasma-pyrolysis coupling and emphasize more fundamental studies to understand the role of the plasma in the biomass treatment processes.

J Luche; Q Falcoz; T Bastien; J P Leninger; K Arabi; O Aubry; A Khacef; J M Cormier; J Ld

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

5 - Gasification reaction kinetics for synthetic liquid fuel production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The gasification process is a chemically and physically complex operation. This chapter presents a description of the chemistry of gasification reactions. It also discusses the assorted reactions involved in gasification and the various thermodynamic aspects of these reactions that dictate the process parameters used to produce the various gases.

J.G. Speight

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Short Communication Catalytic coal gasification: use of calcium versus potassium*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Communication Catalytic coal gasification: use of calcium versus potassium* Ljubisa R on the gasification in air and 3.1 kPa steam of North Dakota lignitic chars prepared under slow and rapid pyrolysis of calcium is related to its sintering via crystallite growth. (Keywords: coal; gasification; catalysis

456

The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG): A Pilot Study Simon Shackley #12;The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG): A Pilot Study Dr Simon Shackley of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) in the United Kingdom. The objectives were to identify the main dangers

Watson, Andrew

457

Gasification of woody biomass Tessa Jansen (s0140600)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Gasification of woody biomass Tessa Jansen (s0140600) University of Twente Internship at SINTEF costs. So I would be working on biomass gasification and perform thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA process and char reactivity has been investigated by performing multiple gasification, pyrolysis

Luding, Stefan

458

Connecting the second exhaust-heat boiler to the operating first one under the conditions of flow circuits of combined-cycle plants with two gas-turbine units and one steam turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Problems arising with connecting the second exhaust-heat boiler to the first exhaust-heat boiler under load in the case of flow circuits of combined-cycle plants of type PGU-450 are considered. Similar problem...

Yu. A. Radin; I. A. Grishin; T. S. Kontorovich

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

World experience with development of combined-cycle and gas turbine technologies and prospects for employing them in the thermal power engineering of Russia using the capacities of the countrys industry producing power machinery and equipment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

World experience gained from using combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies in power engineering is analyzed. The technical and production capacities of the Russian industry constructing power machinery and...

O. N. Favorskii; V. L. Polishchuk; I. M. Livshits

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Effects of Reducing Conditions on the Properties of Molten Slag in an Entrained Bed Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system combines coal gasification with gas turbine and steam turbine power generation, is the most advanced technology for cleanly generating electricity from ...

Y. Wei; H. Li; N. Yamada; A. Sato; Y. Ninomiya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gasification combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Novel Cell Design for Combined In Situ Acoustic Emission and X-ray Diffraction of Cycling Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been devised and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk which acts as both an X-ray window and a current collector. In this manner the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazard is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles which were previously studied by the AE technique were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin J [ORNL; Kirkham, Melanie J [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Daniel, Claus [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Novel cell design for combined in situ acoustic emission and x-ray diffraction study during electrochemical cycling of batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and x-ray diffraction cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been designed and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk, which acts as both an x-ray window and a current collector. In this manner, the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazards is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles, which were previously studied by the AE technique, were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells, while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin; Meisner, Roberta; Daniel, Claus [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, 434 Dougherty Hall, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Kirkham, Melanie; Parish, Chad M.; Dudney, Nancy [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Energy, Environmental, and Economic Analyses of Design Concepts for the Co-Production of Fuels and Chemicals with Electricity via Co-Gasification of Coal and Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to quantify the energy, environmental, and economic performance of industrial facilities that would coproduce electricity and transportation fuels or chemicals from a mixture of coal and biomass via co-gasification in a single pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier, with capture and storage of CO{sub 2} (CCS). The work sought to identify plant designs with promising (Nth plant) economics, superior environmental footprints, and the potential to be deployed at scale as a means for simultaneously achieving enhanced energy security and deep reductions in U.S. GHG emissions in the coming decades. Designs included systems using primarily already-commercialized component technologies, which may have the potential for near-term deployment at scale, as well as systems incorporating some advanced technologies at various stages of R&D. All of the coproduction designs have the common attribute of producing some electricity and also of capturing CO{sub 2} for storage. For each of the co-product pairs detailed process mass and energy simulations (using Aspen Plus software) were developed for a set of alternative process configurations, on the basis of which lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, Nth plant economic performance, and other characteristics were evaluated for each configuration. In developing each set of process configurations, focused attention was given to understanding the influence of biomass input fraction and electricity output fraction. Self-consistent evaluations were also carried out for gasification-based reference systems producing only electricity from coal, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification solid-oxide fuel cell (IGFC) systems. The reason biomass is considered as a co-feed with coal in cases when gasoline or olefins are co-produced with electricity is to help reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems. Storing biomass-derived CO{sub 2} underground represents negative CO{sub 2} emissions if the biomass is grown sustainably (i.e., if one ton of new biomass growth replaces each ton consumed), and this offsets positive CO{sub 2} emissions associated with the coal used in these systems. Different coal:biomass input ratios will produce different net lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems, which is the reason that attention in our analysis was given to the impact of the biomass input fraction. In the case of systems that produce only products with no carbon content, namely electricity, ammonia and hydrogen, only coal was considered as a feedstock because it is possible in theory to essentially fully decarbonize such products by capturing all of the coal-derived CO{sub 2} during the production process.

Eric Larson; Robert Williams; Thomas Kreutz; Ilkka Hannula; Andrea Lanzini; Guangjian Liu

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

464

Biomass Gasification in Fluidized Bed:? Where To Locate the Dolomite To Improve Gasification?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Figure 5 Steam content in the flue gas vs relative amount of dolomite used for two different locations of the dolomite and for two gasifying agents; (a) gasification with H2O + O2 mixtures, GR = 0.86?1.16, ... Figure 6 Low heating value of the flue gas for two locations of the dolomite and for two gasifying agents; (a) gasification with H2O + O2 mixtures, GR = 0.86?1.16, ... Figure 7 Gas yield for two locations of the dolomite and for two gasifying agents; (a) gasification with H2O + O2 mixtures; GR = 0.86?1.16, ...

Jos Corella; Mara-Pilar Aznar; Javier Gil; Miguel A. Caballero

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

465

Production of Hydrogen from Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system of obtaining hydrogen from a coal seam by providing a production well that extends into the coal seam; positioning a conduit in the production well leaving an annulus between the conduit and the coal gasification production well, the conduit having a wall; closing the annulus at the lower end to seal it from the coal gasification cavity and the syngas; providing at least a portion of the wall with a bifunctional membrane that serves the dual purpose of providing a catalyzing reaction and selectively allowing hydrogen to pass through the wall and into the annulus; and producing the hydrogen through the annulus.

Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Analysis of syngas formation and ecological efficiency for the system of treating biomass waste and other solid fuels with CO2 recuperation based on integrated gasification combined cycle with diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass combustion is a more complex process and its model solving is difficult than combustion of traditional liquid fuels. At the same...2...] to obtain the data for operating regimes of ICE with syngas-based d...

A. Y. Pilatau; H. A. Viarshyna

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Selection of Coal Gasification Parameters for Injection of Gasification Products Into a Blast Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analytical study was performed on the influence of blast parameters on the course of the processes in the volume of a blast furnace and smelting rates by injection of low-grade coal gasification products. It w...

I. G. Tovarovsky; A. E. Merkulov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Heavy metals behaviour in a gasification reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sludge coming from cleaning processes of wastewater, Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) can be exploited for producing energy because of their heating value. Cleaning the produced syngas is important because of environmental troubles, ... Keywords: heavy metals, syngas, thermodynamic, waste gasification

Martino Paolucci; Carlo Borgianni; Paolo De Filippis

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Gasification characteristics of eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is evaluating the gasification characteristics of Eastern oil shales as a part of a cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy and HYCRUDE Corporation to expand the data base on moving-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Gasification of shale fines will improve the overall resource utilization by producing synthesis gas or hydrogen needed for the hydroretorting of oil shale and the upgrading of shale oil. Gasification characteristics of an Indiana New Albany oil shale have been determined over temperature and pressure ranges of 1600 to 1900/sup 0/F and 15 to 500 psig, respectively. Carbon conversion of over 95% was achieved within 30 minutes at gasification conditions of 1800/sup 0/F and 15 psig in a hydrogen/steam gas mixture for the Indiana New Albany oil shale. This paper presents the results of the tests conducted in a laboratory-scale batch reactor to obtain reaction rate data and in a continuous mini-bench-scale unit to obtain product yield data. 2 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Biomass Gasification at The Evergreen State College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Gasification at The Evergreen State College Written by Students of the Winter 2011 Program "Applied Research: Biomass, Energy, and Environmental Justice" At The Evergreen State College, Olympia://blogs.evergreen.edu/appliedresearch/ #12; i Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction to Biomass at the Evergreen State College by Dani

471

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A database just released by the U.S. Department of Energy documents the worldwide growth of gasification, the expected technology of choice for future coal-based plants that produce power, fuels, and/or chemicals with near-zero emissions.

472

Optimum Design of Coal Gasification Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper deals with the optimum design of heat recovery systems using the Texaco Coal Gasification Process (TCGP). TCGP uses an entrained type gasifier and produces hot gases at approximately 2500oF with high heat flux. This heat is removed...

Pohani, B. P.; Ray, H. P.; Wen, H.