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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Unfinished Oils - Heavy Gas Oils Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil stocks in the ...

2

Unfinished Oils - Naphthas and Lighter Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil stocks in the ...

3

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Unfinished Oils - Kerosene and Light ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil stocks in the ...

4

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

5

Liquefied Petroleum Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

6

Total Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

7

Raman/FTIR spectroscopy of oil shale retort gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Raman facility was assembled in order to aid in the evaluation of the feasibility of using Raman or FTIR spectroscopy for analyzing gas mixtures of interest in oil shale. Applications considered in oil shale research included both retort monitoring and laboratory kinetic studies. Both techniques gave limits of detection between 10 and 1000 ppM for ten representative pertinent gases. Both techniques are inferior as a general analytical technique for oil shale gas analysis in comparison with mass spectroscopy, which had detection limits between 1 and 50 ppM for the same gases. The conclusion of the feasibility study was to recommend that mass spectroscopic techniques be used for analyzing gases of interest to oil shale.

Richardson, J.H.; Monaco, S.B.; Sanborn, R.H.; Hirschfeld, T.B.; Taylor, J.R.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Volatile oils and retrograde gases - What's the difference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part 1 showed that at reservoir conditions, volatile oils exhibit bubble points and retrograde gases exhibit dew points. The article contained a graph of initial producing gas-oil ratio plotted against concentration of heptanes plus in the fluid. This paper reproduces a portion of that graph with the data points indicating that the fluid had a dew point or a bubble point at reservoir conditions. The scatter in the data reflects the compositional differences among the fluids and the differences in surface separation facilities and conditions. In this graph, only three fluids have dew points and initial producing gas-oil ratios less than 3,200 scf/STB, and only one fluid reaches a bubble point above this value. Therefore, a value of 3,200 scf/STB appears to be a good cutoff between volatile oils and retrograde gases.

McCain, W.D. Jr. (S.A. Holditch and Associates, College Station, TX (United States)); Bridges, B. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

10

USE OF ZEEMAN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY IN OIL SHALE GASES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. E. Poulson. Mercury Emissions From A Simulated In-for the Measurement of Mercury in Oil Shale Gases D. GirvinJFOR THE MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY IN OIL SHALE GASES D. C.

Girvin, D.G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Unfinished Oils Imports from China  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

12

Unfinished Oils Imports from Azerbaijan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

13

Unfinished Oils Imports from Syria  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

14

Unfinished Oils Imports from Iraq  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

15

Unfinished Oils Imports from Oman  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

16

Unfinished Oils Imports from Chile  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

17

Unfinished Oils Imports from Ecuador  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

18

Unfinished Oils Imports from Peru  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

19

Unfinished Oils Imports from Bolivia  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

20

Unfinished Oils Imports from Greece  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

U.S. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propylene (Nonfuel Use) Normal Butane/Butylene Refinery Grade Butane Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

22

Residual Fuel Oil - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

23

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from Benin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PAD District Imports by Country of Origin Product: ... Crude oil and unfinished oils are reported by the PAD District in which they are processed; ...

24

Unfinished Oils Imports from Persian Gulf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

25

Unfinished Oils Imports from Puerto Rico  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

26

Flash pyrolysis of oil shale with various gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The flash pyrolysis of Colorado Oil Shale with methane at a temperature of 800/sup 0/C and pressure of 500 psi appears to give the highest yield of hydrocarbon gas and liquid followed by hydrogen and lowest with helium. In the methane pyrolysis over 54.5% of the carbon in the kerogen is converted to ethylene and benzene. The flash pyrolysis with hydrogen (flash hydropyrolysis) of the oil shale at increasing temperatures showed a rapidly increasing amount of methane formed and a decrease in ethane formation, while the BTX (benzene mainly) yield remained at approximately 10%. At 950/sup 0/C and 500 psi almost all (97.0%) of the carbon in the kerogen is converted to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons. Experiments with a mixture of a New Mexico sub-bituminous coal and oil shale under flash hydropyrolysis and methane pyrolysis conditions indicated higher yields of methane and ethylene and slightly lower yields of benzene than predicted by partial additive calculations. These exploratory experiments appear to be of sufficient interest to warrant a fuller investigation of the interaction of the natural resources, oil shale, coal and natural gas under flash pyrolysis conditions.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Conventional Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reformulated Gasoline Blend. Comp. Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

28

USE OF ZEEMAN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY IN OIL SHALE GASES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minor Elements in Oil Shale and Oil-Shale Products. LERC RIChemistry of Tar Sands and Oil Shale, ACS, New Orleans.Constituent Analysis of Oil Shale and Solvent-Refined Coal

Girvin, D.G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Survey Forms › Facebook Twitter ... Petroleum products include unfinished oils, liquefied petroleum gases, pentanes plus, aviation gasoline, motor gasoline, ...

30

Supply, disposition, and stocks of all oils by P. A. D. districts and imports into the United States, by country, final 1978  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Final annual US supply, disposition, and stocks are detailed for: all oils, petroleum products, crude oil, selected natural gas plant liquids, and net unfinished oils for each of five P.A.D. (Petroleum Administration for Defense) Districts for 1978. Petroleum products include motor gasoline, aviation gasoline, jet engine fuels, ethane, liquefied gases, kerosene, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, petrochemical feedstocks, naphthas, lubricants, wax, coke, asphalt, and other products. Also given is the percentage of refinery yields based on crude and net unfinished oil rerun. Imports of petroleum products and of crude oil into the United States are shown by country and continent, with US totals and subtotals for each P.A.D. District. OPEC (Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries) members are indicated. Data are reported in barrels per day. An accompanying map indicates the US P.A.D. Districts. A brief narrative discusses salient statistics. Prior to the 1978 annual issue, this report was entitled Supply Demand, and Stocks of All Oils by P.A.D. Districts and Imports into the United States, by Country. 1 figure, 6 tables.

Not Available

1980-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Oil and gas exploration system and method for detecting trace amounts of hydrocarbon gases in the atmosphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil and gas exploration system and method for land and airborne operations, the system and method used for locating subsurface hydrocarbon deposits based upon a remote detection of trace amounts of gases in the atmosphere. The detection of one or more target gases in the atmosphere is used to indicate a possible subsurface oil and gas deposit. By mapping a plurality of gas targets over a selected survey area, the survey area can be analyzed for measurable concentration anomalies. The anomalies are interpreted along with other exploration data to evaluate the value of an underground deposit. The system includes a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with a spectroscopic grade laser light and a light detector. The laser light is continuously tunable in a mid-infrared range, 2 to 5 micrometers, for choosing appropriate wavelengths to measure different gases and avoid absorption bands of interference gases. The laser light has sufficient optical energy to measure atmospheric concentrations of a gas over a path as long as a mile and greater. The detection of the gas is based on optical absorption measurements at specific wavelengths in the open atmosphere. Light that is detected using the light detector contains an absorption signature acquired as the light travels through the atmosphere from the laser source and back to the light detector. The absorption signature of each gas is processed and then analyzed to determine if a potential anomaly exists.

Wamsley, Paula R. (Littleton, CO); Weimer, Carl S. (Littleton, CO); Nelson, Loren D. (Evergreen, CO); O' Brien, Martin J. (Pine, CO)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

USE OF ZEEMAN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY IN OIL SHALE GASES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. A. Robb, and T. J. Spedding. Minor Elements in Oil Shaleand Oil-Shale Products. LERC RI 77-1, 1977. Bertine, K. K.From A Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort. In: Procedings of

Girvin, D.G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

USE OF ZEEMAN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY IN OIL SHALE GASES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Robb, and T. J. Spedding. Minor Elements in Oil Shale andOil-Shale Products. LERC RI 77-1, 1977. Bertine, K. K. andFrom A Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort. In: Procedings of

Girvin, D.G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Ether* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Less than 0.31 Percent Sulfur 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Greater than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

35

Unfinished Oils Imports from Syria - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

36

Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels) Product: Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Still Gas Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Other...

37

Withdrawal of gases and liquids from an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ oil shale retort is formed within a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. A production level drift extends below the fragmented mass, leaving a lower sill pillar of unfragmented formation between the production level drift and the fragmented mass. During retorting operations, liquid and gaseous products are recovered from a lower portion of the fragmented mass. A liquid outlet line extends from a lower portion of the fragmented mass through the lower sill pillar for conducting liquid products to a sump in the production level drift. Gaseous products are withdrawn from the fragmented mass through a plurality of gas outlet lines distributed across a horizontal cross-section of a lower portion of the fragmented mass. The gas outlet lines extend from the fragmented mass through the lower sill pillar and into the production level drift. The gas outlet lines are connected to a gas withdrawal manifold in the production level drift, and gaseous products are withdrawn from the manifold separately from withdrawal of liquid products from the sump in the production level drift.

Siegel, Martin M. (Broken Arrow, OK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Product Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petro. Feed Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Petroleum Coke - Marketable Petroleum Coke - Catalyst Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

39

East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

40

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

42

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual FO - Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual FO - 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual FO - Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

43

DRAFT - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Liquids (NGPL) and Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG)*: 242: Propane/Propylene. 246: Unfinished Oils. 812: Fuel Ethanol. 141: Finished ...

44

OMB No. 1905-0165 Expiration Date: 1/31/2013 Version No.:2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Liquids (NGPL) and Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG)*: 242 Propane/Propylene 246 Unfinished Oils 812 Fuel Ethanol 141 Finished Motor ...

45

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

46

Electronegative gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent knowledge on electronegative gases essential for the effective control of the number densities of free electrons in electrically stressed gases is highlighted. This knowledge aided the discovery of new gas dielectrics and the tailoring of gas dielectric mixtures. The role of electron attachment in the choice of unitary gas dielectrics or electronegative components in dielectric gas mixtures, and the role of electron scattering at low energies in the choice of buffer gases for such mixtures is outlined.

Christophorou, L.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

18,553 18,551 18,724 19,046 19,091 19,116 1963-2013 18,553 18,551 18,724 19,046 19,091 19,116 1963-2013 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2013 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs 2,297 2,086 2,138 2,169 2,159 2,331 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 52 48 113 -52 15 114 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,245 2,038 2,025 2,222 2,144 2,217 1973-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 921 930 894 963 940 1,027 1981-2013 Propane/Propylene 1,148 924 979 1,052 1,036 1,093 1973-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 130 138 85 141 103 78 1981-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene 47 45 68 66 64 18 1981-2013 Other Liquids 66 100 24 184 -43 199 1981-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 0 0 0 0 0 0 1991-2013 Unfinished Oils 67 100 24 184 -43 199 1981-2013 Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2013

48

U.S. Imports from Azerbaijan of Unfinished Oils (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1998: 0: 31: 0: 0: 0: 165: 92: 618: 748: 0: 0: 0: 2005: 193: 101: 2006: 215: 2007: 614: 33: 524: 171: 359: 143 ...

49

31443,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,840,"UNFINISHED OILS, HEAVY GAS...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

CO",7,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED",2704,"LOS ANGELES, CA","CALIFORNIA",5,515,"KOREA, REPUBLIC OF",205,0,0,,,,, 31443,"ATLANTIC TRDG & MKTG INC",1,509,"RESIDUAL FUEL,...

50

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Area of Entry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Area of Entry by Area of Entry Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Ethylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene-Type Bonded Aircraft Fuel Other Bonded Aircraft Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Bonded, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Other, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 2000 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

51

Comparative Summer Thermal Performance of Finished and Unfinished Metal Roofing Products with Composition Shingles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of results from experimental research conducted at FSEC's Flexible Roofing Facility in the summer of 2002. The Flexible Roof Facility (FRF) is a test facility in Cocoa, Florida designed to evaluate a combination of five roofing systems against a control roof using dark shingles. The intent of the testing is to evaluate how roofing systems impact residential cooling energy use. Recent testing emphasizes evaluation of how increasingly popular metal roofing systems, both finished and unfinished, might compare with other more traditional roofing types. All of the test cells had R-19 insulation installed on the attic floor except in the double roof configuration which had R-19 of open cell foam blown onto the underside of the roof decking. The test results were used to determine relative thermal performance of various roofing systems under typical Florida summer conditions. Measured impacts included changes to ceiling heat flux and attic air temperature which influences loads from unintended attic air leakage and duct heat gain. We also develop an analysis method to estimate total cooling energy benefits of different roofing systems considering the various impacts. The results show that all the options perform better than dark composition shingles. White metal performs best with an estimated cooling energy reduction of about 15%, but the spectrally selective metal shingles (12%) and unfinished Galvalume roofs (11%) do surprisingly well. Galvanized roofing did less well than Galvalume (7% reduction) and worse performance in the second year of exposure was observed due to corrosion of the zinc surface. The sealed attic with a double roof produced an estimated cooling energy reduction of only 2% -- largely due to increases in ceiling flux.

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J.; Sonne, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

Eugene A. Fritzler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Processing Area  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Total Products Other Liquids Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Total Products Other Liquids Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History East Coast (PADD 1) 62,196 60,122 54,018 52,671 54,668 52,999 1981-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 54,439 53,849 53,638 60,984 63,482 56,972 1981-2013 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 141,142 150,846 138,204 149,059 141,421 138,656 1981-2013

54

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

products, percent: Oil Gas Spent Shale TOTAL Average tracecontent of the gases for the lean shale exceeded that for

Bellman Jr., R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A Grand Solar Plan: How Solar Power can Cut Greenhouse Gases and End U.S. Dependence on Foreign Oil (436th Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect

With oil now around $100 per barrel, solar power is no longer impractical, notes BNL's Vasilis Fthenakis, who, with two of his collaborators, authored "A Grand Solar Plan," the cover story of the January 2008 issue of Scientific American. As Dr. Fthenakis will detail in his special, open-to-the-public Earth Day lecture co-sponsored by the Brookhaven Lecture Committee and the Environment & Waste Management Services Division, the three solar experts propose covering thousands of square miles of the Southwest U.S. with photovoltaic arrays. These would convert sunlight into electricity, which would then be distributed across the U.S. -- ending foreign-oil dependence, reducing the trade deficit, cutting air pollution, and slowing global climate change. Given oil's record price, the time for solar power as an affordable and technically implementable solution is now -- if, according to Dr. Fthenakis, the U.S. makes the commitment and investment.

Fthenakis, Vasilis (Energy Sciences and Technology Dept)

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

56

Biological production of products from waste gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

57

Diffusive separation of noble gases and noble gas abundance patterns in sedimentary rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inventory of Xenon on noble gases in shales: the plastic bagnoble gas signature by shale, rock, gas, oil and or water byof noble gases on organic rich shales in the terrestrial

Torgersen, T.; Kennedy, B.M.; van Soest, M.C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Total Blender Net Input of Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Input Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquid Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Oxygenates/Renewables Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

59

OIL SHALE RESEARCH. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil, water, spent shale, and gas. These data were enteredtoxic trace elements in oil shale gases and is using thisin the raw oil shale and input gases that is accounted for

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Suppressant: Inert Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Influencing the Reported Extinguishing Concentrations of Inert Gases.. ... for the Protection of Machinery Spaces and Gas Turbine Enclosures in ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Quantum Coulomb Gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lectures on Quantum Coulomb gases delivered at the CIME summer school on Quantum Many Body Systems 2010

Jan Philip Solovej

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

62

Method for controlling corrosion in thermal vapor injection gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the method for producing high pressure thermal vapor streams from combustion gases for injection into subterranean oil producing formations to stimulate the production of viscous minerals is described. The improvement involves controlling corrosion in such thermal vapor gases by injecting water near the flame in the combustion zone and injecting ammonia into a vapor producing vessel to contact the combustion gases exiting the combustion chamber.

Sperry, John S. (Houston, TX); Krajicek, Richard W. (Houston, TX)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

Kulprathipanja, S.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

64

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the viscosity of crude oil systems, J. Pet. Tech. (Sep. ),gases released from the BP oil well blowout, Natureof reservoir depletion and oil flow from the Macondo well

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

comparison of bio-oil produced in a fractionated bio-oil collection system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fast pyrolysis bio-oil, char and non-condensable gases were produced from a 8 kg/hr fluidized bed reactor. The bio-oil was collected in a fractionating bio-oil collection… (more)

Pollard, Anthony Joseph Sherwood

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Allocation of the Social Costs of Motor-Vehicle Use to Six Classes of Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alcohol Unfinished oils Motor gasoline blending componentsalcohol Unfinished oils Motor gasoline blending componentsthe Use of Persian-Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles (M. Delucchi

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Markun, Francis (Joliet, IL); Zawadzki, Mary T. (South Bend, IN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are disclosed for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir. 6 figs.

Gross, K.C.; Markun, F.; Zawadzki, M.T.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

69

Refinery Yield of Liquefied Refinery Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Yield Refinery Yield (Percent) Product: Liquefied Refinery Gases Finished Motor Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 3.9 1993-2013 PADD 1 4.4 5.1 4.9 4.9 4.6 2.1 1993-2013 East Coast 4.4 5.3 5.1 5.1 4.9 2.2 1993-2013

70

Method of producing pyrolysis gases from carbon-containing materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gasification process of improved efficiency is disclosed. A dual bed reactor system is used in which carbon-containing feedstock materials are first treated in a gasification reactor to form pyrolysis gases. The pyrolysis gases are then directed into a catalytic reactor for the destruction of residual tars/oils in the gases. Temperatures are maintained within the catalytic reactor at a level sufficient to crack the tars/oils in the gases, while avoiding thermal breakdown of the catalysts. In order to minimize problems associated with the deposition of carbon-containing materials on the catalysts during cracking, a gaseous oxidizing agent preferably consisting of air, oxygen, steam, and/or mixtures thereof is introduced into the catalytic reactor at a high flow rate in a direction perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the reactor. This oxidizes any carbon deposits on the catalysts, which would normally cause catalyst deactivation.

Mudge, Lyle K. (Richland, WA); Brown, Michael D. (West Richland, WA); Wilcox, Wayne A. (Kennewick, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Biological production of ethanol from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products is disclosed. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various product, such as organic acids, alcohols H.sub.2, SCP, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The northern GOM is a prolific hydrocarbon province where rapid migration of oil, gases, and brines from deep subsurface petroleum reservoirs occurs through faults...

73

OIL SHALE RESEARCH. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

each of retort water and shale oil, about 10 1 000 standardfrom In-Situ Retorting of Oil Shale," Energy and Environmentanic species present in shale oils process waters, gases,

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Kyoto's Unfinished Business  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors offer a provisional assessment of where the Kyoto negotiations have left the climate change issue. They present a few widely divergent assesments of what the Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change will accomplish, ...

Jacoby, Henry D.; Prinn, Ronald G.; Schmalensee, Richard.

75

A primer on greenhouse gases  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a reference summarizing current understanding of basic information for information greenhouse gases. Each of the gases included is recognized to be important to the future state of global atmospheric chemistry and climate. Included as greenhouse gases are thoses of direct radiative importance to climate, thoses that act as radiative precursors, and those of importance as intermediate constitutents because of their chemical activities. Knowns, unknowns and uncertainties for each gas are described. This document focuses on information relevant to understanding the role of energy and atmospheric chemical and radiative processes in the determination of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases.

Wuebbles, D.J.; Edmonds, J.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Control of pollutants in flue gases and fuel gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.2 Flue gases and fuel gases: combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, incineration and other and gasification technologies for heat and power . . . . . . . . 2-3 2.4 Waste incineration and waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 3.3 Formation of sulphur compounds during combustion and gasification . . 3-5 3.4 Emission

Zevenhoven, Ron

77

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program established a mechanism by which corporations, government agencies, individuals, voluntary organizations, etc., can report to the EIA, any actions taken that have or are expected to reduce/avoid emissions of greenhouse gases or sequester carbon.

Information Center

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Basics Federal Requirements Guidance & Reporting Inventories & Performance Mitigation Planning Resources Contacts Water Efficiency Data Center Energy Efficiency Industrial Facilities Sustainable Federal Fleets

79

PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elements. Over 25% of the raw shale gas five groups productsthe oil, in the raw oil shale gas, consequence of retorting„good product raw oil shale and input gases that is accounted

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases October 7, 2013 - 9:59am Addthis Executive Order 13514 requires Federal agencies to inventory and manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate change. Basics: Read an overview of greenhouse gases. Federal Requirements: Look up requirements for agency greenhouse gas management as outlined in Federal initiatives and executive orders. Guidance and Reporting: Find guidance documents and resources for greenhouse gas accounting and reporting. GHG Inventories and Performance: See detailed comprehensive GHG inventories by Federal agency and progress toward achieving Scope 1 and 2 GHG and Scope 3 GHG reduction targets. Mitigation Planning: Learn how Federal agencies can cost-effectively meet their GHG reduction goals.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Oil shale retorting and retort water purification process  

SciTech Connect

An oil shale process is provided to retort oil shale and purify oil shale retort water. In the process, raw oil shale is retorted in an in situ underground retort or in an above ground retort to liberate shale oil, light hydrocarbon gases and oil shale retort water. The retort water is separated from the shale oil and gases in a sump or in a fractionator or quench tower followed by an API oil/water separator. After the retort water is separated from the shale oil, the retort water is steam stripped, carbon adsorbed and biologically treated, preferably by granular carbon adsorbers followed by activated sludge treatment or by activated sludge containing powdered activated carbon. The retort water can be granularly filtered before being steam stripped. The purified retort water can be used in various other oil shale processes, such as dedusting, scrubbing, spent shale moisturing, backfilling, in situ feed gas injection and pulsed combustion.

Venardos, D.G.; Grieves, C.G.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

82

Climate VISION: Greenhouse Gases Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information Greenhouse Gases, Global Climate Change, and Energy Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2001 [1605(a)] This report, required by Section 1605(a) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, provides estimates of U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, as well as information on the methods used to develop the estimates. The estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors, not on measured or metered emissions monitoring. Available Energy Footprints Industry NAICS* All Manufacturing Alumina & Aluminum 3313 Cement 327310 Chemicals 325 Fabricated Metals 332 Food and Beverages 311, 312 Forest Products 321, 322 Foundries 3315 Glass & Glass Products, Fiber Glass 3272, 3296 Iron & Steel Mills 331111 Machinery & Equipment 333, 334, 335, 336

83

Control of pollutants in flue gases and fuel gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Mercury typically forms the sulfide (HgS) #12;4 because of the prevalence of sulfides in volcanic gases Aq + 2e-- ´ Hg0 Atmos Equation 1 Ionic mercury can form from the oxidation of elemental mercury Coal is known to contain mercury as a result of testing done upon the flue gas emitted from power plant

Laughlin, Robert B.

84

Oil shale retorting and off-gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is a process for removing acidic impurities from off-gases generated in the retorting of oil shale comprising contacting a rubblized mass of oil shale which has been substantially depleted in hydrocarbonaceous materials with water, so as to extract basic components from the mass; and contacting off-gases, which were generated during the retorting of oil shale and which contain acidic impurities, with the water containing basic components so as to substantially remove said acidic impurities from the off-gases. Also disclosed is a process for the in situ retorting of oil shale and removal of acidic impurities from off-gases generated in the in situ or surface retorting of oil shale comprising forming a plurality of subterranean in situ oil shale retorts containing rubblized oil shale having a void space of about 5 to about 40 per cent; retorting a first subterranean in situ retort until the rubblized oil shale is spent and substantially depleted in hydrocarbonaceous material; injecting water into the spent retort so as to deplete the heat content of the retorted rubblized oil shale and to form steam; recovering and using the steam in the retorting of a second subterranean in situ oil shale retort; continuing to inject water into the spent first retort so as to extract basic components from the retorted rubblized oil shale; recovering the water containing basic components; and contacting off-gases generated during the in situ or surface retorting of oil shale, the off-gases containing acidic impurities, with the water containing basic components so as to substantially remove acidic impurities from the off-gases.

Honaker, D.E.

1978-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

85

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006. “California Crude Oil Production and Imports” Aprilwww.energy.ca.gov/oil/statistics/crude_oil_receipts.html desector shows inputs of crude oil, unfinished oil and

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 September 2013 Table 42. PAD District 2 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 1,083 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. - - - - - - - - - - Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. - - - - - - - - - - Libya ................................... - - - - - - - - - - Nigeria ................................

87

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 September 2013 Table 46. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 11,451 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. - - - - - - - - - - Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. 949 - - - - - - - - - Libya ...................................

88

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 December 2011 Table 59. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil ................................................................. 374 533 - 294 1,445 - Petroleum Products ............................................... 143 6 0 1,165 3,822 0 Liquified Petroleum Gases ................................... - - - - - - Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 65 0 - 0 317 - Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 41 0 - 643 183 - Reformulated - RBOB ....................................... - - - - - - Conventional ..................................................... 41 0 - 643 183 - CBOB ...........................................................

89

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

58 58 September 2013 Table 41. PAD District 1 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 12,102 - - - - - - - 2,112 2,112 Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola ................................ 3,271 - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. - - - - - - - - 160 160 Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. - - - - - - - - - - Libya ................................... 1,046

90

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 September 2013 Table 44. PAD District 4 and 5 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total PAD District 4 OPEC ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. - - - - - - - - - - Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. - - - - - - - - - - Libya ................................... - - -

91

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PAD District 2 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 15,713 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ 4,074 - - - - - - - - - Angola ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. - - - - - - - - - - Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. - - - - - - - - - - Libya ................................... - - - - - - - - - - Nigeria ................................

92

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8.PDF 8.PDF Table 28. PAD District 2 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 1,764 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ 1,043 - - - - - - - - - Angola ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. - - - - - - - - - - Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. - - - - - - - - - - Libya ................................... - - - - - - - - - - Nigeria ................................

93

Recovery of CO2 from Flue Gases: Commercial Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 from Flue Gases: Commercial Trends Originally presented at the Canadian Society of Chemical Engineers annual meeting October 4-6, 1999, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada Authors: Dan G. Chapel (dan.chapel@fluor.com; 949-349-7530) Carl L. Mariz (carl.mariz@fluor.com; 949-349-7530) FluorDaniel One Fluor Drive Aliso Viejo CA, 92698 John Ernest (john.ernest@minimed.com; 818-576-4293) Advanced Quality Services Inc 11024 Balboa Blvd. PMB154, Granada Hills, CA 91344-5007 1 Recovery of CO 2 from Flue Gases: Commercial Trends Originally presented at the Canadian Society of Chemical Engineers annual meeting October 4-6, 1999, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada Authors: Dan Chapel - Fluor Daniel Inc., Senior Vice President Technology; Oil, Gas & Power John Ernest - Advanced Quality Services Inc., Validation Engineer

94

Clostridium stain which produces acetic acid from waste gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration.

Gaddy, James L. (2207 Tall Oaks Dr., Fayetteville, AR 72703)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Clostridium strain which produces acetic acid from waste gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration. 4 figs.

Gaddy, J.L.

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

96

Trace gases could double climate warming  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric concentrations of several trace gases capable of changing the climate are increasing. Researchers are concerned about the trace gases despite their miniscule concentrations because they are such efficient absorbers of far-infrared radiation. The trace gases that concern climatologists are methane, nitrous oxide, and the chlorofluorocarbons or CFC's. The increase in atmospheric concentrations of these gases are discussed and atmospheric models predicting their greenhouse effect are described.

Kerr, R.A.

1983-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

97

Sustainability: Economics, Lifecycle Analysis, Green House Gases ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Report on Linking Transformational Materials and Processing for Energy and ... LIFECYCLE ANALYSIS, GREEN HOUSE GASES, AND CLIMATE CHANGE ...

98

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

99

Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel carbon-conversion-fig-1.jpg Key Challenges: An important strategy for reducing global CO2 emissions calls for capturing the greenhouse gas and converting it to fuels and chemicals. Although researchers working toward that goal demonstrated in 1992 such a reaction in the lab, a key outstanding scientific challenge was explaining the details of how the reaction took place - its "mechanism." Why it Matters: An important potential strategy for reducing global CO2 emissions calls for capturing the greenhouse gas and converting it electrochemically to fuels and chemicals. Accomplishments: Computation to explain how carbon dioxide can be converted to small organic molecules with little energy input. The

100

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 14 631 332 -449 -31 12 606 14 690 Crude Oil 448 - - - - 317 -146 -38 8 573 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 379 0 9 10 -325 - - 0 19 12 41 Pentanes Plus...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 14 665 293 -389 -59 -70 641 16 762 Crude Oil 515 - - - - 285 -153 -65 -1 584 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 311 0 18 4 -280 - - 1 16 13 23 Pentanes...

102

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse Gases, Climate Change, and Energy Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States. Contact the 1605(b) Program ...

103

Glossary API Gravity: An  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gil- sonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, resid- ual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

104

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil shale: A sedimentary rock containing kerogen, a solid organic material. Oil stocks: Oil stocks include crude oil (including strategic reserves), unfinished ...

105

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, re- sidual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

106

Glossary Glossary  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, residual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

107

X:\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma00.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gil- sonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, resid- ual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

108

Experimental work on oil shale at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and predictions of retorting characteristics of oil shale. [RISE  

SciTech Connect

An experimental program is being carried out to advance oil-shale retorting technology. This paper summarizes some results of laboratory and pilot retorting and gives the reactions of oil-shale char with gases. A computer model of the retorting process has been compared with retort experiments and has been used to predict in situ retorts under various operating conditions. Finally, the results of a retort using Negev (Israel) oil shale are compared with those using Colorado oil shale.

Rothman, A.J.; Lewis, A.E.

1977-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

109

Estimating Emissions of Other Greenhouse Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimating Emissions of Other Greenhouse Gases Presentation to the Department of Energy Republic of the Philippines September 17, 1997 Arthur Rypinski Energy ...

110

Purchased Electricity - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

111

Purchased Steam - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

112

East Coast (PADD 1) Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

113

Midwest (PADD 2) Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

114

PAD District 5 Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

115

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

116

PAD District 4 Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

117

Still Gas - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

118

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, ...

119

Granular gases under extreme driving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study inelastic gases in two dimensions using event-driven molecular dynamics simulations. Our focus is the nature of the stationary state attained by rare injection of large amounts of energy to balance the dissipation due to collisions. We find that under such extreme driving, with the injection rate much smaller than the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a power-law high energy tail. The numerically measured exponent characterizing this tail is in excellent agreement with predictions of kinetic theory over a wide range of system parameters. We conclude that driving by rare but powerful energy injection leads to a well-mixed gas and constitutes an alternative mechanism for agitating granular matter. In this distinct nonequilibrium steady-state, energy cascades from large to small scales. Our simulations also show that when the injection rate is comparable with the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a stretched exponential tail.

W. Kang; J. Machta; E. Ben-Naim

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

120

APPARATUS FOR CATALYTICALLY COMBINING GASES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A convection type recombiner is described for catalytically recombining hydrogen and oxygen which have been radiolytically decomposed in an aqueous homogeneous nuclear reactor. The device is so designed that the energy of recombination is used to circulate the gas mixture over the catalyst. The device consists of a vertical cylinder having baffles at its lower enda above these coarse screens having platinum and alumina pellets cemented thereon, and an annular passage for the return of recombined, condensed water to the reactor moderator system. This devicea having no moving parts, provides a simple and efficient means of removing the danger of accumulated hot radioactive, explosive gases, and restoring them to the moderator system for reuse.

Busey, H.M.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Gas collection system for oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

An in-situ oil shale retorting process is described in which a cavity filled with broken particles of oil shale is formed within the subsurface oil shale formation and air is forced down through the cavity to sustain combustion of the top layer of oil shale particles, the products of combustion being withdrawn at the bottom of the cavity. A plurality of exhaust pipes traverse the bottom of the cavity and extend out through the sealed entrance to the retort cavity. The pipes are supported above the floor of the cavity and have holes opening on the bottom side of the pipes through which the product gases are withdrawn from the cavity. Valves in each pipe control the flow so as to balance the flow distribution of air and exhaust gases through the retorting cavity.

Ridley, R.D.; Burton, R.S. III

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Refining Crude Oil - Energy Explained, Your Guide To Understanding Energy -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Petroleum Products > Refining Crude Oil Oil and Petroleum Products > Refining Crude Oil Energy Explained - Home What Is Energy? Forms of Energy Sources of Energy Laws of Energy Units and Calculators Energy Conversion Calculators British Thermal Units (Btu) Degree-Days U.S. Energy Facts State and U.S. Territory Data Use of Energy In Industry For Transportation In Homes In Commercial Buildings Efficiency and Conservation Energy and the Environment Greenhouse Gases Effect on the Climate Where Emissions Come From Outlook for Future Emissions Recycling and Energy Nonrenewable Sources Oil and Petroleum Products Refining Crude Oil Where Our Oil Comes From Imports and Exports Offshore Oil and Gas Use of Oil Prices and Outlook Oil and the Environment Gasoline Where Our Gasoline Comes From Use of Gasoline Prices and Outlook

123

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Archive  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program established a mechanism by which corporations, government agencies, individuals, voluntary organizations, etc., can report to the EIA, any actions taken that have or are expected to reduce/avoid emissions of greenhouse gases or sequester carbon.

Information Center

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

In situ noncombustive microwave processing of oil shale. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A unified analytical examination of the products of microwave oil shale has been completed. A sample of subituminous Colorado coal was also included. Analysis systems have been planned, constructed and placed into operation so as to provide a definitive profile of the composition of gases, oil, and water released by the microwave heated oil shale and coal samples. In a previous NSF study, it was reported that microwave retorted oil shale produced large quantities of high BTU content gas. In the data presented in this report, using a modular microcoulometric analysis system, a definitive profile of the composition of the gases, oil, and water, released by the microwave retorted oil shale and coal show that the previous results are confirmed.

Wall, E.T.

1979-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

WEMOS Gas-in-Oil Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial work on Taguchi-type metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) sensors indicated that they were sensitive to several of the gases produced by the overheated cellulosic insulation and mineral oil found in transformers, and that their output drifted in time. Modification of the sensors with postmanufacturing surface active treatments achieved improved but not completely satisfactory stability.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

EIA-14 REFINERS’ MONTHLY COST REPORT INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

completed forms to: Oil & Gas Survey . U.S. Department of Energy . Ben Franklin Station . PO Box 279 . ... finished petroleum products from crude oil, unfinished oils,

127

Biomass Burning and the Production of Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning is a source of greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. In addition, biomass burning is a source of chemically active gases, including carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and nitric oxide. These gases, along ...

Levine J. S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Light Collection in Liquid Noble Gases  

SciTech Connect

Liquid noble gases are increasingly used as active detector materials in particle and nuclear physics. Applications include calorimeters and neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for neutrinoless double beta decay, direct dark matter, muon electron conversion, and the neutron electric dipole moment. One of the great advantages of liquid noble gases is their copious production of ultraviolet scintillation light, which contains information about event energy and particle type. I will review the scintillation properties of the various liquid noble gases and the means used to collect their scintillation light, including recent advances in photomultiplier technology and wavelength shifters.

McKinsey, Dan [Yale University

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

129

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amoco Oil Company is investigating the direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels via partial oxidation. This report describes work completed in the first quarter of the two-year project (first quarter FY 1990). Task 1 of the work, preparation of the Project Management Plan, has been completed. Work was started and progress made on three other tasks during this quarter: Task 2. Modification of an existing Amoco pilot plant to handle the conditions of this project. Minor modifications were made to increase the maximum operating pressure to 1500 psig. Other more extensive modifications are being designed, including addition of an oxygen compressor and recycle system. Task 3.1. Evaluation of a Los Alamos National Laboratory methane oxidation kinetic model for suitability in guiding the experimental portions of this project. Task 3.2. Process variable (e.g. temperature, pressure, residence time) studies to determine optimal partial oxidation conditions. 1 fig.

Foral, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Improved correlations for retrograde gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three correlations for retrograde gases have been developed. First, a correlation was developed that relates the composition of a retrograde gas-condensate mixture at any depletion stage to the composition at its dew point pressure. This correlation is as accurate as previous correlations, and in addition, to the composition, it includes the trends for molecular weight of heptanes plus fraction (A4WC7+), specific gravity of heptanes plus fraction (SGC7+), gas produced (GP) and fraction of liquid (FL). Second, a correlation to describe the molar distribution Of C7+ of a gas-condensate mixture as a function of carbon number (CN), the C6 mole fraction and the properties Of C7+ has been developed. For comparison, the Ahmed, et aL, and Whitson methods were evaluated using a data base of 52 extended (from C]5+ and up) retrograde gascondensate samples. The evaluation of the Ahmed, et al. and Whitson methods showed that both methods are better than the new method. The Ahmed, et aL method does a better overall job than the Vvlhitson method. Comparing the relative error, Ahmed, et al. method had an error of 20.6 percent, and Whitson's method had an error of 25.1 percent. Third, a new and improved retrograde dew point pressure correlation has been developed. The new dew point correlation is an improvement of the Kennedy-Nemeth dew point correlation. Contrary to the Kennedy-Nemeth correlation, temperature is not included in the new correlation. The new dew point correlation is based on composition and the C7+ properties, molecular weight and specific gravity of the heptanes plus fraction.

Crogh, Arne

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Michigan Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from...

132

Welcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology: Editorial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology Editorial CurtisWelcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology. Throughon greenhouse gas emissions science and technology, this

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

134

Oil and Oil Derivatives Compliance Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for international connection of oiled residues discharge ... C to + 163°C, fuels, lubricating oils and hydraulic ... fuel of gas turbine, crude oil, lubricating oil ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Denitrification of combustion gases. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating waste combustion gas to remove the nitrogen oxygen gases therefrom is disclosed wherein the waste gas is first contacted with calcium oxide which absorbs and chemically reacts with the nitrogen oxide gases therein at a temperature from about 100/sup 0/ to 430/sup 0/C. The thus reacted calcium oxide (now calcium nitrate) is then heated at a temperature range between about 430/sup 0/ and 900/sup 0/C, resulting in regeneration of the calcium oxide and production of the decomposition gas composed of nitrogen and nitrogen oxide gas. The decomposition gases can be recycled to the calcium oxide contacting step to minimize the amount of nitrogen oxide gases in the final product gas.

Yang, R.T.

1980-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

137

Enriching off gas from oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

Liquid and gaseous products are recovered from oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort in which a combustion zone is advanced therethrough by a method which includes the steps of establishing a combustion zone in the oil shale in the in situ oil shale retort and introducing a gaseous feed mixture into the combustion zone in the direction the combustion zone is to be advanced through the in situ oil shale retort. The gaseous feed mixture comprises an oxygen supplying gas and water vapor and is introduced into the combustion zone at a rate sufficient to maintain the temperature in the combustion zone within a predetermined range of temperatures above the retorting temperature of the oil shale in the in situ oil shale retort and sufficient to advance the combustion zone through the in situ oil shale retort. The introduction of the gaseous feed mixture into the combustion zone generates combustion products gases which together with the portion of the gaseous feed mixture which does not take part in the combustion process, is called flue gas. The flue gas passes through the oil shale on the advancing side of the combustion zone, thereby retorting the oil shale to produce liquid and gaseous products. The liquid product and the retort off gas, which comprises gaseous product and flue gas, are withdrawn from the in situ oil shale retort at a point on the advancing side of the retorting zone. 47 claims, 1 figure.

Cha, C.Y.; Ridley, R.D.

1977-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

138

Oil shale oxidation at subretorting temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Green River oil shale was air oxidized at subretorting temperatures. Off gases consisting of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water were monitored and quantitatively determined. A mathematical model of the oxidation reactions based on a shrinking core model has been developed. This model incorporates the chemical reaction of oxygen and the organic material in the oil shale as well as the diffusivity of the oxygen into the shale particle. Diffusivity appears to be rate limiting for the oxidation. Arrhenius type equations, which include a term for oil shale grade, have been derived for both the chemical reaction and the diffusivity.

Jacobson, I.A. Jr.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Collection and analysis of geothermal gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rapid, reliable procedures are described for the collection and analysis of geothermal gases at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Gases covered are H/sub 2/, He, Ar, O/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 6/, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/S. The methods outlined are suitable for geothermal exploration. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Gritzo, L.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

EOR boosts Twofreds oil production. [Enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

Higher crude oil prices have spurred enhanced oil recovery action in Twofreds field in west Texas. Houston Natural Gas Corporation's (HNG) Fossil Fuels Corporation has a fieldwide waterflood and miscible CO/sub 2/ enhanced recovery program under way. HNG is alternating water injection with injection of CO/sub 2/ and inert gases to boost oil yield from ca. 4392 productive acres. Cumulative production since tertiary recovery began is 1.4 million bbl. HNG is injecting an average of 8 to 10 MMCFD of CO/sub 2/. CO/sub 2/ source is Oasis Pipeline Company's Mi Vida treating plant near Pecos, Texas. The CO/sub 2/ is extracted from gas produced by wells that tap the deep Ordovician Ellenburger in the area.

Not Available

1982-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The safe use of low temperature liquefied gases 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(5-10%) but the others are odourless. Liquefied gases ­ oxygen, nitrogen, argon, helium and carbonCare with cryogenics The safe use of low temperature liquefied gases #12;Index 1. Introduction 1.1 Objective 1.2 Gases considered and typical uses 2. Properties of low temperature liquefied atmospheric gases

Martin, Ralph R.

142

Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases Print Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases Print ALS users should follow Berkeley Lab policy, as described below, for the purchase, delivery, storage, and use of all gases at the ALS. See Shipping and Receiving for information on any non-gas deliveries. Contacts: Gas purchase or delivery: ALS Receiving, 510-486-4494 Gas use and storage: Experiment Coordination, 510-486-7222, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Gas Storage: Berkeley Lab Chemical Inventory All gas bottles and cylinders at the ALS must be identified with bar code and logged into the Berkeley Lab Chemical Inventory by ALS staff. The inventory will be updated periodically; for more information contact Experiment Coordination. Gases are stored either in the racks between buildings 6 and 7; toxic and corrosive gases are stored in Building 6, room 6C across the walkway from beamline 10.0.

143

Oil reserves  

SciTech Connect

As of March 1988, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory totaled 544.9 million barrels of oil. During the past 6 months the Department of Energy added 11.0 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR. During this period, DOE distributed $208 million from the SPR Petroleum Account. All of the oil was purchased from PEMEX--the Mexican national oil company. In FY 1988, $164 million was appropriated for facilities development and management and $439 million for oil purchases. For FY 1989, DOE proposes to obligate $173 million for facilities development and management and $236 million for oil purchases. DOE plans to postpone all further drawdown exercises involving crude oil movements until their effects on cavern integrity are evaluated. DOE and the Military Sealift Command have made progress in resolving the questions surrounding nearly $500,000 in payments for demurrage charges.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 2: Appendixes A--S  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the appendices to the report on Emission of Greenhouse Gases from the Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity. Emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, and other greenhouse gases are discussed. Sources of emission including vehicles, natural gas operations, oil production, coal mines, and power plants are covered. The various energy industries are examined in terms of greenhouse gas production and emissions. Those industries include electricity generation, transport of goods via trains, trucks, ships and pipelines, coal, natural gas and natural gas liquids, petroleum, nuclear energy, and biofuels.

DeLuchi, M.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Greenhouse gases and the metallurgical process industry  

SciTech Connect

The present lecture offers a brief review of the greenhouse effect, the sources of greenhouse gases, the potential effect of these gases on global warming, the response of the international community, and the probable cost of national compliance. The specific emissions of the metallurgical process industry, particularly those of the steel and aluminum sectors, are then examined. The potential applications of life-cycle assessments and of an input-output model in programs of emissions' abatement are investigated, and, finally, a few remarks on some implications for education are presented.

Lupis, C.H.P.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Composition of gases vented from a condenser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Designers of systems that involve condensers often need to predict the amount of process vapor that accompanies the noncondensable gases that are vented from the condensers. An approximation is given that appears to provide, in many cases, reasonably accurate values for the mole ratio of process vapor to noncondensable gases in the vented mixture. The approximation is particularly applicable to flash and direct-contact power systems for geothermal brines and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). More regorous relationships are available for exceptional cases.

Lyon, R.N.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Stationary light in cold atomic gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss stationary light created by a pair of counter-propagating control fields in Lambda-type atomic gases with electromagnetically induced transparency for the case of negligible Doppler broadening. In this case the secular approximation used in the discussion of stationary light in hot vapors is no longer valid. We discuss the quality of the effective light-trapping system and show that in contrast to previous claims it is finite even for vanishing ground-state dephasing. The dynamics of the photon loss is in general non exponential and can be faster or slower than in hot gases.

Gor Nikoghosyan; Michael Fleischhauer

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports Exports Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

149

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen FLUE GASES and FUEL GASES 19.6.2001 2-1 Chapter 2 Flue gases and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is combusted in a hot fuel / bed material (mostly sand) / ash mixture which is fluidised by the combustion air.8 Principle of a fuel cell (picture OECD/IEA&ETSU, 1993) Future technologies will be based increasingly on the direct oxidation of fuel gases in fuel cells, which implies direct conversion of chemical potential

Zevenhoven, Ron

150

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

151

Liquefied Petroleum Gases Exports - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

152

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

153

Enriching off gas from oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

A method whereby liquid and gaseous products are recovered from oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort is discussed. A combustion zone is advanced by establishing a combustion zone in the oil shale and introducing a gaseous feed mixture into the zone in the direction the zone is to be advanced through the oil shale retort. The gaseous feed mixture consists of an oxygen supplying gas and water vapor and is introduced into the combustion zone at a rate sufficient to maintain the temperature in the combustion zone within a predetermined range of temperatures above the retorting temperature of the oil shale in the in situ oil shale retort. The introduction of the gaseous feed mixture into the combustion zone generates combustion product gases which together with the portion of the gaseous feed mixture which does not take part in the combustion process, is called flue gas. The flue gas passes through the oil shale on the advancing side of the combustion zone, thereby retorting the oil shale to produce liquid and gaseous products. The liquid product and the retort off gas, which consists of gaseous product and flue gas, are withdrawn from the in situ oil shale retort at a point on the advancing side of the retorting zone. (47 claims) (Continuation-in-part of U.S. Appl. 492,289, f. 7/26/74)

Cha, C.Y.; Ridley, R.D.

1977-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

154

Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing the same  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing them from carbonaceous biomass feedstock are provided. The carbonaceous biomass feedstock is pyrolyzed in the presence of a catalyst comprising base metal-based catalysts, noble metal-based catalysts, treated zeolitic catalysts, or combinations thereof to produce pyrolysis gases. During pyrolysis, the catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction whereby at least a portion of the oxygenated hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis gases are converted into hydrocarbons. The oxygen is removed as carbon oxides and water. A condensable portion (the vapors) of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

Marinangeli, Richard; Brandvold, Timothy A; Kocal, Joseph A

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

East Coast (PADD 1) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products for  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Total 60,122 54,018 52,671 54,668 52,999 47,100 1981-2013 Crude Oil 27,587 25,670 24,699 27,070 27,065 18,146 1981-2013 Total Products 32,535 28,348 27,972 27,598 25,934 28,954 1995-2013 Other Liquids 24,957 20,056 20,754 17,137 16,653 17,339 1981-2013 Unfinished Oils 4,375 2,077 2,253 1,874 1,960 1,500 1981-2013

156

Biological production of acetic acid from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Biological production of acetic acid from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration. 5 figs.

Gaddy, J.L.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Documentation for Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data Sources for High-GWP Gases from Aerosols..... 163 Table 4-5. Data Sources for High-GWP Gases from Solvent Applications ..... 164 Table 4-6. Data Sources for High ...

159

BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases BOCLH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases BOCLH BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases BOCLH Jump to: navigation, search Name BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases (BOCLH) Place Taipei, Taiwan Sector Solar Product BOCLH is a joint venture between the Lien Hwa Industrial Corporation and the BOC Group in the United Kingdom and produces high-purity gases used in solar component production. References BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases (BOCLH)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases (BOCLH) is a company located in Taipei, Taiwan . References ↑ "BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases (BOCLH)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=BOC_Lienhwa_Industrial_Gases_BOCLH&oldid=342956

160

Residual?Gas Analysis of a DC-705 Oil?Diffusion?Pumped uhv System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The residual gases present in a DC-705 oil?diffusion?pump uhv system have been determined as a function of various trapping conditions. The system was equipped with a metal 2-in. oil?diffusion pump in series with a specially designed trap in which zeolite was used. The configuration of the trap permitted the trapping zone to be immersed in cryogenic liquids

Charles M. Gosselin; Paul J. Bryant

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Method for increasing the pressure in oil-bearing geological structures  

SciTech Connect

A method for increasing pressure in geological oil-bearing structures by gas production due to microbial activity comprising adding to a geological oil-bearing structure, an aneorobic microorganism (Methanobacterium termoautotroficum), a culture medium and formic acid. The formic acid is converted to carbon dioxide and methane gases resulting in increased pressure in the structures.

Hellman, B.G.; Ronnow, P.H.; Tengblad, P.F.; Wiberger, L.I.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases. 3 figs.

Turick, C.E.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

JILA Team Finds New Parallel Between Cold Gases and 'Hot' ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... theorists, have discovered another notable similarity between ultracold atomic gases and high-temperature superconductors, suggesting there may ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

164

Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases.

Turick, Charles E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Improved Recovery from Gulf of Mexico Reservoirs, Volume 4, Comparison of Methane, Nitrogen and Flue Gas for Attic Oil. February 14, 1995 - October 13, 1996. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas injection for attic oil recovery was modeled in vertical sandpacks to compare the process performance characteristics of three gases, namely methane, nitrogen and flue gas. All of the gases tested recovered the same amount of oil over two cycles of gas injection. Nitrogen and flue gas recovered oil more rapidly than methane because a large portion of the methane slug dissolved in the oil phase and less free gas was available for oil displacement. The total gas utilization for two cycles of gas injection was somewhat better for nitrogen as compared to methane and flue gas. The lower nitrogen utilization was ascribed to the lower compressibility of nitrogen.

Wolcott, Joanne; Shayegi, Sara

1997-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

166

MEASUREMENT OF RADIOIODINE IN PUREX STACK GASES  

SciTech Connect

The chemical behavior of iodine-131 in stack air from this site's Purex process is reported. The radioiodine in the stack gases apparently consists of variable proportions of molecular vapor and other forms of iodine, thus causing the efficiencies for most collection media to vary widely. Activated charcoal is a satisfactory collection medium although Process gases (ammonia and oxides of nitrogen) lower the efficiency of the charcoal from 99 to 88%. Ambient temperature and humidity had no effect on deposition and retention of iodine in long stainless steel sampling lines. Process conditions did have an effect and estimates of iodine released were 10 to 15% low due to this line loss. (auth)

Jacobsen, W.R.; Jolly, L. Jr.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Cycling with air and other nonhydrocarbon gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injecting lean gas into condensate reservoirs is a practice currently used to increase recovery. The process reduces condensation and increases liquid recovery by revaporization. However, delaying natural gas sales for long periods of time is economically unattractive. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of nonhydrocarbon gases (i.e., air, N/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/) for improving recovery from retrograde condensate reservoirs. A compositional model that uses the Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR-EOS) was developed to evaluate condensate reservoir performance. A 15-component hydrocarbon system and extensive experimental data were used in the study. The simulator was tuned to match the available experimental data. The model shows that nonhydrocarbon gases can vaporize hydrocarbon liquids effectively, with CO/sub 2/ the most effective nonhydrocarbon for vaporizing heavy fractions.

Striefel, M.A.; Ahmed, T.H.; Cady, G.V.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 September 2013 Table 53. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 3,690 0 -28 112 - -37 -37 - 70 70 Algeria ................................ 27 - - 95 - - - - - - Angola ................................ 226 - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. 250 - -28 - - -9 -9 - 5 5 Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... 287 - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. 299 0 - - - - - - - - Libya ...................................

169

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 54. Year-to-Date Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 3,551 1 -23 98 - -55 -55 0 60 60 Algeria ................................ 32 1 - 70 - -2 -2 0 1 1 Angola ................................ 223 - - 9 - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. 234 0 -12 1 - -15 -15 - 3 3 Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... 372 - - - - - - - 0 0 Kuwait ................................. 316 0 - - - - - - 0 0 Libya ...................................

170

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.PDF 2.PDF Table 32. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Destination, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Destination Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Argentina ............................ - 1 0 - - 58 58 - - - Australia .............................. - 0 0 - - 1 1 - 0 0 Bahamas ............................ - 0 6 - - 21 21 2 0 2 Bahrain ............................... - - - - - 1 1 - - - Belgium ............................... - 2 - - - - - - 0 0 Belize .................................. - - - - - 62 62 - 0 0 Brazil ................................... - 0 410 - - 609 609 - - - Canada ............................... 2,425 2,728 421 - - 34 34 0 183 183 Cayman Islands .................. - - - - - 25 25 - -

171

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 40. Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 969,414 375 - 26,834 - - - 69 16,922 16,991 Algeria ................................ 8,776 302 - 19,131 - - - 69 275 344 Angola ................................ 60,776 - - 2,435 - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. 63,927 - - 181 - - - - 845 845 Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... 101,662 - - - - - - - - - Kuwait .................................

172

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 September 2013 Table 51. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Destination, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Destination Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Argentina ............................ - 0 0 - - 118 118 - - - Australia .............................. - 0 0 - - 0 0 - 0 0 Bahamas ............................ - - 23 - - 875 875 0 314 315 Bahrain ............................... - - - - - 1 1 - - - Belgium ............................... - - - - - - - - - - Belize .................................. - - - - - 0 0 - - - Brazil ................................... - 4 1,238 - - - - - - - Canada ............................... 2,975 2,324 654 - - 348 348 0 1,408 1,408 Cayman Islands ..................

173

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 43. PAD District 3 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 72,560 - - 2,597 - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - 2,099 - - - - - - Angola ................................ 1,423 - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. 2,190 - - - - - - - - - Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... 4,104 - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. 7,946 - - - - - - - - - Libya ...................................

174

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.PDF 3.PDF Table 33. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 3,814 16 -28 94 - -34 -34 - 77 77 Algeria ................................ 113 - - 71 - - - - - - Angola ................................ 364 - 3 12 - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. 100 - -20 - - -9 -9 - 0 0 Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... 374 0 - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. 319 0 - - - - - - 0 0 Libya ................................... - - -

175

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 September 2013 Table 47. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 639,194 302 - 19,745 - - - - 890 890 Algeria ................................ 2,113 302 - 14,873 - - - - - - Angola ................................ 17,325 - - 1,766 - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. 14,996 - - 181 - - - - 157 157 Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... 57,792 - - - - - - - - - Kuwait .................................

176

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.PDF 7.PDF Table 27. PAD District 1 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 13,474 - - 375 - - - - 2,130 2,130 Algeria ................................ 1,393 - - 375 - - - - - - Angola ................................ 2,644 - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. - - - - - - - - - - Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... 1,307 - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. - - - - - - - - - - Libya ................................... - - - - - -

177

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6.PDF 6.PDF Table 26. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 118,223 496 94 2,901 - - - - 2,386 2,386 Algeria ................................ 3,505 - - 2,200 - - - - - - Angola ................................ 11,282 - 94 378 - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. 3,087 - - - - - - - - - Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... 11,596 - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. 9,882 - - - - - - - - - Libya ...................................

178

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 September 2013 Table 39. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 110,695 - - 3,356 - - - - 2,112 2,112 Algeria ................................ 800 - - 2,858 - - - - - - Angola ................................ 6,792 - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. 7,502 - - - - - - - 160 160 Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... 8,618 - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. 8,980 - - - - - - - - - Libya ...................................

179

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PAD District 1 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 176,626 185 1,396 2,823 - - - - 18,028 18,028 Algeria ................................ 16,009 - 1,396 878 - - - - 302 302 Angola ................................ 30,771 - - - - - - - 61 61 Ecuador .............................. 714 - - - - - - - 1,099 1,099 Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... 17,247 - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. - - - - - - - - - - Libya ...................................

180

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8.PDF 8.PDF Table 38. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil ................................................................. 18 141 - 303 1,948 - Petroleum Products ............................................... 137 44 0 855 3,010 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. - 0 - 0 0 - Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 36 0 - 0 871 - Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 83 0 - 396 158 - Reformulated - RBOB ....................................... - - - - - - Conventional ..................................................... 83 0 - 396 158 - CBOB ........................................................... 0 0 - 396 0 -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 45. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 130,822 73 - 4,052 - - - 69 16,032 16,101 Algeria ................................ 4,828 - - 2,036 - - - 69 275 344 Angola ................................ 24,309 - - 669 - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. - - - - - - - - 688 688 Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... 2,713 - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. - -

182

U.S. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9,456 10,076 10,052 9,790 10,243 10,197 1973-2013 Crude Oil 7,460 7,726 7,737 7,730 8,071 8,099 1920-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 202 176 170 156 155...

183

U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,623 2,882 3,243 3,111 3,208 3,467 1973-2013 Crude Oil 58 73 124 101 132 125 1920-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 326 287 390 440 417 476 1981-2013...

184

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5,263 90 7,284 5,124 -3,866 305 126 6,689 2,354 5,032 Crude Oil 3,787 - - - - 4,456 -667 185 23 7,734 4 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 1,476 0 410 32 278...

185

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6,100 109 7,959 4,723 -3,750 601 357 7,315 2,684 5,385 Crude Oil 4,444 - - - - 3,897 -330 475 36 8,429 21 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 1,656 0 518 45...

186

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup.  The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

187

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

188

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Flows and the 2008 BoomBust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research...

189

U.S. Exports of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid Refinery Gases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Exports; Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Supply and Disposition;

190

Traveling dark solitons in superfluid Fermi gases  

SciTech Connect

Families of dark solitons exist in superfluid Fermi gases. The energy-velocity dispersion and number of depleted particles completely determine the dynamics of dark solitons on a slowly varying background density. For the unitary Fermi gas, we determine these relations from general scaling arguments and conservation of local particle number. We find solitons to oscillate sinusoidally at the trap frequency reduced by a factor of 1/{radical}(3). Numerical integration of the time-dependent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation determines spatial profiles and soliton-dispersion relations across the BEC-BCS crossover, and proves consistent with the scaling relations at unitarity.

Liao Renyuan; Brand, Joachim [New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study and Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, Massey University, Private Bag 102904 NSMC, Auckland 0745 (New Zealand)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Heat conduction in relativistic neutral gases revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The kinetic theory of dilute gases to first order in the gradients yields linear relations between forces and fluxes. The heat flux for the relativistic gas has been shown to be related not only to the temperature gradient but also to the density gradient in the representation where number density, temperature and hydrodynamic velocity are the independent state variables. In this work we show the calculation of the corresponding transport coefficients from the full Boltzmann equation and compare the magnitude of the relativistic correction.

A. L. Garcia-Perciante; A. R. Mendez

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Efficieny handling effluent gases through chemical scrubbing  

SciTech Connect

This paper is presented as an information source for efficiencies of chemical scrubbing. In it, we will discuss the specific problems of scrubbing silane, disilane, diborane, phosphine, hydrogen selenide and arsine. We will explain the scrubber dynamics, gases and flow rates used along with liquid mediums. The equipment and procedures used for testing, as well as the determination of the results, will be discussed. We intend to give examples of possible reactions and documentation of our efficiencies. Installation and maintenance will be touched, as well as our experiments into accidental catastrophic releases. From all of this we will derive conclusions as to the best possible means of wet chemical scrubbing.

Herman, T.; Soden, S.

1988-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope crude oil; (3) ...

194

Heavy Oil Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select Reports from Heavy Oil Projects Project Number Performer Title Heavy Oil Recovery US (NIPERBDM-0225) BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Feasibility Study of Heavy Oil Recovery in the...

195

3. Crude Oil Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. Crude Oil Statistics The United States had 21,371 million barrels of crude oil proved reserves as of December 31, 2004. Crude oil proved reserves ...

196

Oil production by entrained pyrolysis of biomass and processing of oil and char  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Entrained pyrolysis of lignocellulosic material proceeds from a controlled pyrolysis-initiating temperature to completion of an oxygen free environment at atmospheric pressure and controlled residence time to provide a high yield recovery of pyrolysis oil together with char and non-condensable, combustible gases. The residence time is a function of gas flow rate and the initiating temperature is likewise a function of the gas flow rate, varying therewith. A controlled initiating temperature range of about 400.degree. C. to 550.degree. C. with corresponding gas flow rates to maximize oil yield is disclosed.

Knight, James A. (Atlanta, GA); Gorton, Charles W. (Atlanta, GA)

1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

197

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

198

Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases April 10, 2007 - 12:34pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - In step with the Bush Administration's call to increase the supply of alternative and renewable fuels nationwide, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today established the nation's first comprehensive Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program. At a press conference today, EPA Administrator Johnson, joined by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator Nicole Nason, discussed the RFS program, increasing the use of alternative fuels and modernizing CAFÉ standards for cars. "The Renewable Fuel Standard offers the American people a hat trick - it

199

Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases April 10, 2007 - 12:34pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - In step with the Bush Administration's call to increase the supply of alternative and renewable fuels nationwide, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today established the nation's first comprehensive Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program. At a press conference today, EPA Administrator Johnson, joined by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator Nicole Nason, discussed the RFS program, increasing the use of alternative fuels and modernizing CAFÉ standards for cars. "The Renewable Fuel Standard offers the American people a hat trick - it

200

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Greenhouse Gases and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) (From Appendix E of the instructions to Form EIA-1605) GREENHOUSE GAS NAME GREENHOUSE GAS CODE FORMULA GWP TAR1 AR42 (1) Carbon Dioxide CO2 CO2 1 1 (2) Methane CH4 CH4 23 25 (3) Nitrous Oxide N2O N2O 296 298 (4) Hydroflourocarbons HFC-23 (trifluoromethane) 15 CHF3 12000 14800 HFC-32 (difluoromethane) 16 CH2F2 550 675 HFC-41 (monofluoromethane) 43 CH3F 97 -3 HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane) 17 CHF2CF3 3400 3500 HFC-134 (1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane) 44 CHF2CHF2 1100 -3 HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) 18 CH2FCF3 1300 1430 HFC-143 (1,1,2-trifluorethane) 45 CHF2CH2F 330 -3 HFC-143a (1,1,1-trifluoroethane) 46 CF3CH3 4300 4470 HFC-152 (1,2-difluorethane) 47 CH2FCH2F

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Industrial hygiene aspects of underground oil shale mining  

SciTech Connect

Health hazards associated with underground oil shale mining are summarized in this report. Commercial oil shale mining will be conducted on a very large scale. Conventional mining techniques of drilling, blasting, mucking, loading, scaling, and roof bolting will be employed. Room-and-pillar mining will be utilized in most mines, but mining in support of MIS retorting may also be conducted. Potential health hazards to miners may include exposure to oil shale dusts, diesel exhaust, blasting products, gases released from the oil shale or mine water, noise and vibration, and poor environmental conditions. Mining in support of MIS retorting may in addition include potential exposure to oil shale retort offgases and retort liquid products. Based upon the very limited industrial hygiene surveys and sampling in experimental oil shale mines, it does not appear that oil shale mining will result in special or unique health hazards. Further animal toxicity testing data could result in reassessment if findings are unusual. Sufficient information is available to indicate that controls for dust will be required in most mining activities, ventilation will be necessary to carry away gases and vapors from blasting and diesel equipment, and a combination of engineering controls and personal protection will likely be required for control of noise. Recommendations for future research are included.

Hargis, K.M.; Jackson, J.O.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Specialty Oils. Samples tested include Walnut Oil, Pecan Oil, Pistachio Oil, Sesame Seed Oil, Flax Seed Oil, Neem Oil, Safflower Oil, Sunflower Oil. Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Pro

203

Oil | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. |...

204

Apparatus for recovery of heat from exhaust gases of dryer  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus and method are disclosed for recovery of heat from exhaust gases of dryers and return of heat to the dryer system. Fresh air is drawn through a plurality of tubes in heat exchange relation to heated exhaust gases and introduced into the drying system without intermingling of contaminated exhaust gases with the heated fresh air. The apparatus and method have particular utility in gas-fired commercial and industrial laundry dryers.

Winstel, F.H.

1977-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

205

of oil yields from enhanced oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO 2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. The primary goal of the project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO 2 -EOR technology in untested areas of the United States. The Citronelle Field appears to be an ideal site for concurrent CO 2 storage and EOR because the field is composed of sandstone reservoirs

206

EIA Oil price timeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions.

207

Formation and Incorporation Energies of Fission Gases He, Xe, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Formation and Incorporation Energies of Fission Gases He, Xe , ... nuclear fuels are bcc alloys of uranium that swell under fission conditions, ...

208

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1999 iii ... The 1.1-percent average annual growth in U.S. green-

209

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program -Data and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Environment > Voluntary Reporting Program > Data and Reports Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Data and Reports The first reporting cycle under the revised...

210

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Contact  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Mail: Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Energy Information Administration, EI-81 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave, SW Washington, DC 20585...

211

Swapping Global Warming Gases for Methane in Gas Hydrate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Swapping Global Warming Gases for Methane in Gas Hydrate Layer ... would serve as energy sources as well as carbon dioxide storage sites in the ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

212

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interface: Spreadsheet Website: greet.es.anl.govmain Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation...

213

Graphics: Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphics graphics Graphics: Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples The following links are for methane, nonmethane hydrocarbons, alkyl nitrates, and chlorinated carbon...

214

FLAMMABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF COMBUSTIBLE GASES AND VAPORS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Bulletin 627 Bulletin 627 BUREAU o b MINES FLAMMABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF COMBUSTIBLE GASES AND VAPORS By Michael G. Zabetakis DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

215

Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program, required by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, records the results of voluntary measures to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions. In 1998, 156 US companies and other organizations reported to the Energy information Administration that, during 1997, they had achieved greenhouse gas emission reductions and carbon sequestration equivalent to 166 million tons of carbon dioxide, or about 2.5% of total US emissions for the year. For the 1,229 emission reduction projects reported, reductions usually were measured by comparing an estimate of actual emissions with an estimate of what emissions would have been had the project not been implemented.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

217

Quantum oscillations in ultracold Fermi gases : realizations with rotating gases or artificial gauge fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the angular momentum of a harmonically trapped, noninteracting Fermi gas subject to either rotation or to an artificial gauge field. The angular momentum of the gas is shown to display oscillations as a function of the particle number or chemical potential. This phenomenon is analogous to the de Haas - van Alphen oscillations of the magnetization in the solid-state context. However, key differences exist between the solid-state and ultracold atomic gases that we point out and analyze. We explore the dependence of the visibility of these oscillations on the physical parameters and propose two experimental protocols for their observation. Due to the very strong dependence of the amplitude of the oscillations on temperature, we propose their use as a sensitive thermometer for Fermi gases in the low temperature regime.

Charles Grenier; Corinna Kollath; Antoine Georges

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

218

Greenhouse gases: What is their role in climate change  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes information relevant to understanding the role of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It examines the nature of the greenhouse effect, the Earth's radiation budget, the concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere, how these concentrations have been changing, natural processes which regulate these concentrations of greenhouse gases, residence times of these gases in the atmosphere, and the rate of release of gases affecting atmospheric composition by human activities. We address the issue of the greenhouse effect itself in the first section. In the second section we examine trends in atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases and emissions sources. In the third section, we examine the natural carbon cycle and its role in determining the atmospheric residence time of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). In the fourth section, we examine the role atmospheric chemistry plays in the determining the concentrations of greenhouse gases. This paper is not intended to be an exhaustive treatment of these issues. Exhaustive treatments can be found in other volumes, many of which are cited throughout this paper. Rather, this paper is intended to summarize some of the major findings, unknowns, and uncertainties associated with the current state of knowledge regarding the role of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. 57 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

Edmonds, J.A.; Chandler, W.U. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Wuebbles, D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Continuous cryopump with a method for removal of solidified gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved cryopump for the removal of gases from a high vacuum, comprising a cryopanel incorporating honeycomb structure, refrigerant means thermally connected to the cryopanel, and a rotatable channel moving azimuthally around an axis located near the center of the cryopanel, removing gases adsorbed within the honeycomb structure by subliming them and conducting them outside the vacuum vessel. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

220

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products, Vsd ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Compressor Suppliers and Vsd Oil ...

222

J:\\_GasAss97\\Current\\Motor Gas Ass2.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Distillation Products . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Table C.2 PADD 3 Annual Average Refinery Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Table C.3 PADD 3 Unfinished Oil...

223

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - High-GWP gases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. High-GWP gases 5. High-GWP gases 5.1. Total emissions Greenhouse gases with high global warming potential (high-GWP gases) are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which together represented 3 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2009. Emissions estimates for the high-GWP gases are provided to EIA by the EPA's Office of Air and Radiation. The estimates for emissions of HFCs not related to industrial processes or electric transmission are derived from the EPA Vintaging Model. Emissions from manufacturing and utilities are derived by the EPA from a mix of public and proprietary data, including from the EPA's voluntary emission reduction partnership programs. For this year's EIA inventory, 2008 values for HFC-23 from HCFC-22

224

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet) Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: greet.es.anl.gov/main Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model, GREET References: GREET Fleet Main Page[1] Logo: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet)

225

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Greenhouse Gases Program of Greenhouse Gases Program Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program ***THE VOLUNTARY REPORTING OF GREENHOUSE GASES ("1605(b)") PROGRAM HAS BEEN SUSPENDED.*** This affects all survey respondents. Please visit the What's New page for full details. What Is the Voluntary Reporting Program? logo Established by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program encourages corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations, households, and other private and public entities to submit annual reports of their greenhouse gas emissions, emission reductions, and sequestration activities. The Program provides a means for voluntary reporting that is complete, reliable, and consistent. More information on the program...

226

Oil and Gas Air Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most conventional air heaters adopt indirect heat transfer, which uses combustion gases to indirectly heat fresh air by heating surfaces to generate hot air used for material drying and dehumidification. We call them indirect air heaters. However, they have a higher manufacturing cost and lower thermal efficiency, especially when high temperature air is needed. For this reason, a direct air heater applicable for or feed and industrial raw products is put forward, which has advantages such as less production cost, smaller dimensions and higher thermal efficiency. Their design, working principles, characteristics, structure and applications are presented in this article, and brief comparisons are made between the indirect and direct air heater. Finally, the relation of hot-air temperature, oil or gas consumption and fresh airflow is determined based on energy equilibrium.

Kou, G.; Wang, H.; Zhou, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

EU Gas Supply Security: Unfinished Business  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

country in Europe for shale gas production. Exploration work was suspended after hydraulic fracturing-induced seismic activity was reported but the government allowed companies to resume work in late 2012. The UK enjoys a relatively wide political... of factors: rapid growth in Europe’s natural gas consumption until 2005; even more rapid growth of imports as European production declined; Europe’s reliance on a very small number of external suppliers; dominance of long- term, bilateral contracts between...

Noël, Pierre

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Enron's Dabhol Power Project - An Unfinished Saga  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will focus briefly on the background of this project showcased as the biggest foreign direct investment in India. It will discuss the issues in conflict between the Dabhol Power...

229

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research is the outgrowth of a survey paper I prepared for the Air Transport Association of America. I am grateful to Kristoffer Laursen for research assistance and to Kristoffer and Stefan Nagel for their comments. Abstract This paper explores the impact of investor flows and financial market conditions on returns in crude-oil futures markets. I begin by arguing that informational frictions and the associated speculative activity may induce prices to drift away from "fundamental" values and show increased volatility. This is followed by a discussion of the interplay between imperfect infor- mation about real economic activity, including supply, demand, and inventory accumulation, and speculative

230

Methods for minimizing plastic flow of oil shale during in situ retorting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an in situ oil shale retorting process, plastic flow of hot rubblized oil shale is minimized by injecting carbon dioxide and water into spent shale above the retorting zone. These gases react chemically with the mineral constituents of the spent shale to form a cement-like material which binds the individual shale particles together and bonds the consolidated mass to the wall of the retort. This relieves the weight burden borne by the hot shale below the retorting zone and thereby minimizes plastic flow in the hot shale. At least a portion of the required carbon dioxide and water can be supplied by recycled product gases.

Lewis, Arthur E. (Los Altos, CA); Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

DeLuchi, M.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

DeLuchi, M.A. (California Univ., Davis, CA (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Oil price; oil demand shocks; oil supply shocks; dynamic effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using a newly developed measure of global real economic activity, a structural decomposition of the real price of crude oil in four components is proposed: oil supply shocks driven by political events in OPEC countries; other oil supply shocks; aggregate shocks to the demand for industrial commodities; and demand shocks that are specific to the crude oil market. The latter shock is designed to capture shifts in the price of oil driven by higher precautionary demand associated with fears about future oil supplies. The paper quantifies the magnitude and timing of these shocks, their dynamic effects on the real price of oil and their relative importance in determining the real price of oil during 1975-2005. The analysis sheds light on the origin of the observed fluctuations in oil prices, in particular during oil price shocks. For example, it helps gauge the relative importance of these shocks in the build-up of the real price of crude oil since the late 1990s. Distinguishing between the sources of higher oil prices is shown to be crucial in assessing the effect of higher oil prices on U.S. real GDP and CPI inflation, suggesting that policies aimed at dealing with higher oil prices must take careful account of the origins of higher oil prices. The paper also quantifies the extent to which the macroeconomic performance of the U.S. since the mid-1970s has been driven by the external economic shocks driving the real price of oil as opposed to domestic economic factors and policies. Key words: JEL:

Lutz Kilian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gases Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gases Mission The team establishes an energy conservation program as defined in Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability, and approved by LM. The team incorporates requirements for energy efficiency and reductions in greenhouse gases, and it advocates conserving environmental resources and improving operational capabilities and mission sustainability. Scope The team evaluates how to maintain and operate its buildings and facilities in a resource-efficient, sustainable, and economically viable manner. The

235

Cryogenic method for measuring nuclides and fission gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryogenic method is provided for determining airborne gases and particulates from which gamma rays are emitted. A special dewar counting vessel is filled with the contents of the sampling flask which is immersed in liquid nitrogen. A vertically placed sodium-iodide or germanium-lithium gamma-ray detector is used. The device and method are of particular use in measuring and identifying the radioactive noble gases including emissions from coal-fired power plants, as well as fission gases released or escaping from nuclear power plants.

Perdue, P.T.; Haywood, F.F.

1980-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

236

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andWorld Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andProduction of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, and Re?

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),Figure 3. Price of crude oil contract maturing December ofbarrels per day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

239

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interpretations of China’s foreign oil strategy. Argumentsof aspects of China’s foreign oil activities, they do notits largest directly-run foreign oil project. Supplying 10

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas, Heating Oil and Gasoline,” NBER Working Paper.2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Oil Spills and Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Spills and Wildlife Name: jess Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: what are some effects of oil spills on plants? Replies: The effects of oil spills over the last...

242

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michael T. Klare, Blood and Oil: The Dangers of America’sDowns and Jeffrey A. Bader, “Oil-Hungry China Belongs at BigChina, Africa, and Oil,” (Council on Foreign Relations,

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the residual quantity of oil that never gets produced.order to purchase a quantity Q barrels of oil at a price P tD t Q t Q t+1 Quantity Figure 5. Monthly oil production for

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is an important oil source for China, yet unlike itsthe United States as a major oil source outside the volatileto be a critical source of oil, and one that is almost

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residential rooms residential rooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-59303 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 3251-3265 Keywords adsorption, hazardous air pollutants, nerve agents, sink effect, volatile organic compounds Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential rooms studied ''as-is'' with furnishings and material surfaces unaltered and in a furnished chamber designed to simulate a residential room. Results are presented for 10 rooms (five bedrooms, two bathrooms, a home office, and two multi-function spaces) and the chamber. Exposed materials were characterized and areas quantified. A mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was rapidly volatilized within each room as it was closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase; this was followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. Included were alkane, aromatic, and oxygenated VOCs representing a range of ambient and indoor air pollutants. Three organophosphorus compounds served as surrogates for Sarin-like nerve agents. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at a surface sink and potentially a second, embedded sink. The 3-parameter sink-diffusion model provided acceptable fits for most compounds and the 4-parameter two-sink model provided acceptable fits for the others. Initial adsorption rates and sorptive partitioning increased with decreasing vapor pressure for the alkanes, aromatics and oxygenated VOCs. Best-fit sorption parameters obtained from experimental data from the chamber produced best-fit sorption parameters similar to those obtained from the residential rooms

248

Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2] by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorus preferably in a wet scrubber. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50 C is attractive. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2], alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, 100% of the by-products created are usable, and close to 100% of the NO or NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2] can be removed in an economic fashion. 9 figs.

Chang, S.G.; Liu, D.K.

1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

249

Screening criteria for enhanced recovery of Saudi crude oils  

SciTech Connect

This investigation studies and analyzes the screening guides that can be used to select the applicable enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method under Saudi oil field conditions. Based on the analysis of data obtained from 186 Saudi formations, the crude oils are produced from low to intermediate permeability formations in the range of 1-1500 millidarcies. The original reservoirs' pressure and temperature range from 2000 to 5500 psi and from 140 to 240{degrees}F, respectively. The porosity of the formations varies from 10 to 30% and the formations thickness ranges from 10 to 300 feet. The reservoirs of Saudi Arabia are characterized by high formation water salinity, which can be as high as 30% by weight. Saudi oil formations are characterized by connate water in the range of 10-50%. Thus residual oil saturation is expected to be high. The viscosity of most Saudi crude oils ranges from 0.10 to 10 centipoise. The API gravity ranges from 15 to 45. The basic parameters studied include formation permeability, porosity, and thickness; reservoir pressure and temperature; crude oil viscosity and API gravity, formation connate water saturation and its salinity, and formation type and heterogeneity. Based on the screening analysis the most suitable technical methods applicable to Saudi oil fields are the miscible processes using gases.

Sayyouh, M.H.; Al-Blehed (Petroleum Engineering Dept., King Saud Univ., Riyadh (SA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Monthly oil production for Iran, Iraq, and Kuwait, inday. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq Kuwait Figure 6.Arabia PRODUCTION QUOTA Iran PRODUCTION QUOTA Venezuela

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Semi-Continuous Detection of Mercury in Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous Detection of Mercury in Gases Continuous Detection of Mercury in Gases Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Semi-Continuous Detection of Mercury in Gases." The technology, which is a spinoff of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) GP-254 Process (U.S. patent 6,576,092), is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's NETL. Overview This invention discloses a method for the quantitative detection of heavy metals, especially mercury, in effluent gas streams. The method employs photo-deposition and an array of surface acoustic wave sensors where each sensor monitors a specific metal. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued a national regulation for mercury removal from coal-derived flue and fuel gases in December 2011,

253

Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://globalresearchalliance. References Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases [1] Background "The Alliance is a bottom-up network, founded on the voluntary, collaborative efforts of countries. It will coordinate research on agricultural greenhouse gas emission reductions by linking up existing and new research efforts across a range of sub-sectors and work areas. It will

254

Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases. 1 fig.

Beverly, C.R.; Ernstberger, E.G.

1985-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

255

Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of a gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases.

Beverly, Claude R. (Paducah, KY); Ernstberger, Harold G. (Paducah, KY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were constructed with plywood under the wallboard. Theof organic gases 20.4-m 2 plywood floor was covered firstthrough the walls with plywood yields L d = 0.017-0.05 h -

Singer, Brett C.; Revzan, Kenneth L.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Brown, Nancy J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Studying coherence in ultra-cold atomic gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis will discuss the study of coherence properties of ultra-cold atomic gases. The atomic systems investigated include a thermal cloud of atoms, a Bose-Einstein condensate and a fermion pair condensate. In each ...

Miller, Daniel E. (Daniel Edward)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Conference report for nuclear fusion phenomena in ionized gases  

SciTech Connect

A summary of the Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases, held in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, is given. In particular, the format of the conference and the content of the review papers are summarized. (auth)

Porkolab, M.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2004  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

260

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Greenhouse Gases Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Greenhouse Gases Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2005  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

263

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1995  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1994  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1999  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1997  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2003  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Radio-frequency spectroscopy of ultracold atomic Fermi gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents experiments investigating the phase diagram of ultracold atomic Fermi gases using radio-frequency spectroscopy. The tunability of many experimental parameters including the temperature, the interparticle ...

Schirotzek, Andre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Development of laser absorption sensors for combustion gases.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In situ sensors based on laser absorption spectroscopy are developed to monitor key species in combustion exhaust gases. Direct absorption (DA) and wavelength-modulation-spectroscopy (WMS) strategies… (more)

Chao, Xing.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices. WTI Crude Oil Price. Retail Gasoline Price. Source: Energy Information Administration

275

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

277

Modeling of the Solubility of Light Gases in Heavy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is injected into petroleum reservoirs for improving production especially for ... model for pure hydrocarbons, petroleum fractions, crude oil and coal ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

278

Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases and production of phosphoric acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorous preferably in a wet scrubber. The addition of yellow phosphorous in the system induces the production of O.sub.3 which subsequently oxidizes NO to NO.sub.2. The resulting NO.sub.2 dissolves readily and can be reduced to form ammonium ions by dissolved SO.sub.2 under appropriate conditions. In a 20 acfm system, yellow phosphorous is oxidized to yield P.sub.2 O.sub.5 which picks up water to form H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 mists and can be collected as a valuable product. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50.degree. C. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, better than 90% of SO.sub.2 and NO in simulated flue gas can be removed. Stoichiometric ratios (P/NO) ranging between 0.6 and 1.5 were obtained.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, David K. (San Pablo, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Eco Oil 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article describes the processes, challenges, and achievements of researching and developing a biobased motor oil.

Brett Earl; Brenda Clark

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

Subject is oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The article reviews the current financial, legislative and regulatory problems of oil shale development. 2 refs.

Due, M.J.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

282

Oil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. Oil is used for heating and transportation -- most notably, as fuel for gas-powered vehicles. America's dependence on foreign oil has declined in recent years, but oil prices have increased. The Energy Department supports research and policy options to increase our domestic supply of oil while ensuring environmentally sustainable supplies domestically and abroad, and is investing in research, technology and

283

Oil Dependencies and Peak Oil's Effects on Oil Consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? During the year of 2007, the world has experienced historically high oil prices both in nominal and in real terms, which has reopened discussions… (more)

Tekin, Josef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Asheville, NC Mike Burdette Petroleum Division, Energy ...

286

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook. Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast . Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance

287

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Wilmington, DE by Douglas MacIntyre

288

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Suppliers ...

289

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Products from Global Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Suppliers ...

290

Development of Energy Balances for the State of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waxes, unfinished oils, motor and aviation gasoline blendingimports for motor gasoline, jet fuel, and residual fuel oil.Motor gasoline consumption by end-use sector 41 Table 24. Distillate fuel oil

Murtishaw, Scott; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Sahtaye, Jayant

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Allocation of the Social Costs of Motor-Vehicle Use to Six Classes of Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higher the amount of foreign oil embodied, and consequentlyof domestic and foreign crude oil used to make motor fuels10-13b). Mass of foreign crude oil (including unfinished

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power, and Oil Commission (FERC) Source: http://10,718 Unfinished Oils Source: CEC 2006a The energy sectorIndustries Data Sources Oil and gas extraction energy use

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Oil-Well Fire Fighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oil Well Fire Fighting. NIST fire Research NIST Fire Research 2 Oil Well Fire Fighting RoboCrane Model Oil Well Fire Fighting Working Model.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

294

AN ENGINE OIL LIFE ALGORITHM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An oil-life algorithm to calculate the remaining percentage of oil life is presented as a means to determine the right time to change the oil… (more)

Bommareddi, Anveshan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Fuel Oil Use in Manufacturing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and residual fuel oils. Distillate fuel oil, the lighter product, is also used for heating of homes and commercial buildings. Residual oil is a much denser, heavier product...

296

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Electricity Factors  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program (Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emission Coefficients) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Emission Coefficients Table 1: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion Table 2: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Transportation Fuels Table 3: Generic Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Stationary Fuel Combustion Table 4: Specific Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Biogenic Fuel Sources Table 5: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions Factors for Highway Vehicles Table 6: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Table 7: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Non-Highway Mobile Combustion

297

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Website: greet.es.anl.gov/ This full life-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission impacts of advanced vehicle technologies and new transportation fuels. The model allows users to evaluate various vehicle and fuel combinations. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air

298

NRC symposium explores links between greenhouse gases, stratospheric ozone  

SciTech Connect

Two important climatic issues stratospheric ozone depletion and greenhouse gas increase and the apparent connection between them led to the holding in March 1988 of a Joint Symposium on Ozone Depletion, Greenhouse Gases and Climate Change. This symposium was primarily concerned with the linkages between ozone depletion and increasing greenhouse gases and with their combined effect in causing climate change to occur on a global scale. The presentations review the current state of knowledge about stratospheric ozone depletion, discuss the probable effect of predicted greenhouse gas increase on future ozone trends, summarize observational data on changing atmospheric chemistry and associated atmospheric temperatures, and describe the continuing effort to model and predict future scenarios of climatic change relative to ozone and greenhouse gases in both the stratosphere and the troposphere.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Lattice vibrations of pure and doped GaSe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bridgman method is used to grow especially undoped and doped single crystals of GaSe. Composition and impurity content of the grown crystals were determined using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) method. X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, photoluminescence (PL), and IR transmission measurements were performed at room temperature. The long wavelength lattice vibrations of four modifications of GaSe were described in the framework of modified one-layer linear-chain model which also takes into consideration the interaction of the selenium (Se) atom with the second nearest neighbor gallium (Ga) atom in the same layer. The existence of an eight-layer modification of GaSe is suggested and the vibrational frequencies of this modification are explained in the framework of a lattice dynamical model considered in the present work. Frequencies and the type of vibrations (gap, local, or resonance) for the impurity atoms were calculated and compared with the experimental results.

Allakhverdiev, K. [Materials Institute, Marmara Research Center, TUBITAK, Gebze/Kocaeli 41470 (Turkey) and Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: kerim.allahverdi@mam.gov.tr; Baykara, T. [Materials Institute, Marmara Research Center, TUBITAK, Gebze/Kocaeli 41470 (Turkey); Ellialtioglu, S. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey); Hashimzade, F. [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan); Huseinova, D. [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan); Kawamura, K. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Kaya, A.A. [Materials Institute, Marmara Research Center, TUBITAK, Gebze/Kocaeli 41470 (Turkey); Kulibekov, A.M. [Department of Physics, Mugla University, Mugla 48000 (Turkey); Onari, S. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan)

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

300

Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Fuel Economy for Cars and Trucks Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Fuel Economy for Cars and Trucks Agency/Company /Organization: EPA and NHTSA Focus Area: Standards - Incentives - Policies - Regulations Topics: Policy Impacts Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.epa.gov/oms/climate/regulations/420f10014.pdf This document establish a national program consisting of new standards for model year 2012 through 2016 light-duty vehicles that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel economy. EPA is finalizing the first-ever national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards under the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Sampling and analysis methods for geothermal fluids and gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sampling procedures for geothermal fluids and gases include: sampling hot springs, fumaroles, etc.; sampling condensed brine and entrained gases; sampling steam-lines; low pressure separator systems; high pressure separator systems; two-phase sampling; downhole samplers; and miscellaneous methods. The recommended analytical methods compiled here cover physical properties, dissolved solids, and dissolved and entrained gases. The sequences of methods listed for each parameter are: wet chemical, gravimetric, colorimetric, electrode, atomic absorption, flame emission, x-ray fluorescence, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, ion exchange chromatography, spark source mass spectrometry, neutron activation analysis, and emission spectrometry. Material on correction of brine component concentrations for steam loss during flashing is presented. (MHR)

Watson, J.C.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Spinor Bose gases: Explorations of symmetries, magnetism and quantum dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spinor Bose gases form a family of quantum fluids manifesting both magnetic order and superfluidity. This article reviews experimental and theoretical progress in understanding the static and dynamic properties of these fluids. The connection between system properties and the rotational symmetry properties of the atomic states and their interactions are investigated. Following a review of the experimental techniques used for characterizing spinor gases, their mean-field and many-body ground states, both in isolation and under the application of symmetry-breaking external fields, are discussed. These states serve as the starting point for understanding low-energy dynamics, spin textures and topological defects, effects of magnetic dipole interactions, and various non-equilibrium collective spin-mixing phenomena. The paper aims to form connections and establish coherence among the vast range of works on spinor Bose gases, so as to point to open questions and future research opportunities.

Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Separating hydrogen from coal gasification gases with alumina membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synthesis gas produced in coal gasification processes contains hydrogen, along with carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, water, nitrogen, and other gases, depending on the particular gasification process. Development of membrane technology to separate the hydrogen from the raw gas at the high operating temperatures and pressures near exit gas conditions would improve the efficiency of the process. Tubular porous alumina membranes with mean pore radii ranging from about 9 to 22 {Angstrom} have been fabricated and characterized. Based on hydrostatic tests, the burst strength of the membranes ranged from 800 to 1600 psig, with a mean value of about 1300 psig. These membranes were evaluated for separating hydrogen and other gases. Tests of membrane permeabilities were made with helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. Measurements were made at room temperature in the pressure range of 15 to 589 psi. Selected membranes were tested further with mixed gases simulating a coal gasification product gas. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Egan, B.Z. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1997  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth annual report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases. It covers emissions over the period 1990--1996, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1997. Chapter one summarizes some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect. Important recent developments in global climate change activities are discussed, especially the third Conference of the Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, which was held in December of 1997 in Kyoto, Japan. Chapters two through five cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons and related gases, respectively. Chapter six describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Six appendices are included in the report. 96 refs., 38 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

“Hard probes” of strongly-interacting atomic gases  

SciTech Connect

We investigate properties of an energetic atom propagating through strongly interacting atomic gases. The operator product expansion is used to systematically compute a quasiparticle energy and its scattering rate both in a spin-1/2 Fermi gas and in a spinless Bose gas. Reasonable agreement with recent quantum Monte Carlo simulations even at a relatively small momentum k/kF > 1.5 indicates that our large-momentum expansions are valid in a wide range of momentum. We also study a differential scattering rate when a probe atom is shot into atomic gases. Because the number density and current density of the target atomic gas contribute to the forward scattering only, its contact density (measure of short-range pair correlation) gives the leading contribution to the backward scattering. Therefore, such an experiment can be used to measure the contact density and thus provides a new local probe of strongly interacting atomic gases.

Nishida, Yusuke [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

306

Other States Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 513 491 515 539 557 534 541 579 574 585 558 573 1998 578 536 591 581 517 456 486 486 471 477 457 468 1999 466 438 489 495 499 510 547 557 544 555 541 579 2000 587 539 605 587 615 570 653 629 591 627 609 611 2001 658 591 677 690 718 694 692 679 686 697 688 700 2002 639 591 587 621 622 605 654 639 649 650 623 638 2003 689 624 649 676 702 691 733 732 704 734 719 748 2004 741 697 727 692 692 688 718 729 706 723 711 718

307

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Using  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Assess Potential Agency Size Changes to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Assess Potential Agency Size Changes to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:15am Addthis To support planning for using renewable energy to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the Federal agency or program-level, it is important to consider what changes to the agencies building or land-holding portfolio may have on opportunities for renewable energy. Changes to consider include: Addition of new buildings or sites to the agencies portfolio Major renovations to existing buildings Office moves into or out of agency-owned or leased space. As is the case with planning energy efficiency measures, planning for renewable energy in new construction can be more cost-effective than

308

Hazardous Gases VASILIS M. FTHENAKIS Department of Applied Science  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Mitigation Options for Mitigation Options for Accidental Releases of Hazardous Gases VASILIS M. FTHENAKIS Department of Applied Science Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, N Y 11973 ABSTRACT The objective of this paper is to review and compare technologies available for mitigation of unconfined releases of toxic and flammable gases. These technologies indude: secondary confinement, de- inventory, vapor barriers, foam spraying, and water sprays/monitors. Guidelines for the design and/or operation of effective post-release mitigation systems and case studies involving actual industrial mitigation systems are also presented. 1. ACCIDENT PREVENTION & MITIGATION OPTIONS Accident prevention and mitigation in the process industries is based on the military concept of defense in

309

Methods, systems, and devices for deep desulfurization of fuel gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A highly effective and regenerable method, system and device that enables the desulfurization of warm fuel gases by passing these warm gasses over metal-based sorbents arranged in a mesoporous substrate. This technology will protect Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts and other sulfur sensitive catalysts, without drastic cooling of the fuel gases. This invention can be utilized in a process either alone or alongside other separation processes, and allows the total sulfur in such a gas to be reduced to less than 500 ppb and in some instances as low as 50 ppb.

Li, Liyu (Richland, WA); King, David L. (Richland, WA); Liu, Jun (Richland, WA); Huo, Qisheng (Richland, WA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

310

Removal of sulfur and nitrogen containing pollutants from discharge gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxides of sulfur and of nitrogen are removed from waste gases by reaction with an unsupported copper oxide powder to form copper sulfate. The resulting copper sulfate is dissolved in water to effect separation from insoluble mineral ash and dried to form solid copper sulfate pentahydrate. This solid sulfate is thermally decomposed to finely divided copper oxide powder with high specific surface area. The copper oxide powder is recycled into contact with the waste gases requiring cleanup. A reducing gas can be introduced to convert the oxide of nitrogen pollutants to nitrogen.

Joubert, James I. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Welcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology: Editorial  

SciTech Connect

This editorial introduces readers and contributors to a new online journal. Through the publication of articles ranging from peer-reviewed research papers and short communications, to editorials and interviews on greenhouse gas emissions science and technology, this journal will disseminate research results and information that address the global crisis of anthropogenic climate change. The scope of the journal includes the full spectrum of research areas from capture and separation of greenhouse gases from flue gases and ambient air, to beneficial utilization, and to sequestration in deep geologic formations and terrestrial (plant and soil) systems, as well as policy and technoeconomic analyses of these approaches.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Maroto-Valer, M.M.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

Senum, Gunnar I. (Patchogue, NY); Dietz, Russell N. (Patchogue, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

314

Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

315

Greenhouse Gases - Part 4 - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uncontrolled emissions from utility boilers. I have updated the factors for uncontrolled emissions from coal and fuel-oil utility boilers (Table D.4) ...

316

East Coast (PADD 1) Liquefied Petroleum Gases Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil stocks in the ...

317

Analysis and Control of Light Hydrocarbon Gases in the Pyrolysis ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing a Collaborative System for Socio-Environmental Management of ... Oils Post-Consumption Residential and Commercial Clay with Two Brazilian.

318

Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

319

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Pipeline between PAD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline between PAD Districts Pipeline between PAD Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Renewable Diesel Fuel Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

320

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils offers new insights into these important (and growing) products of vegetable oils, while also covering developments in biodegradable grease, vegetable oils-based polyols, and the synthesis of surfactants from vegetable oil

322

The Legacy of Oil Spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a 1979 exploratory oil well blew out and leaked oil foraddicted to oil directly causes spills as well as globalmagnitudes of past oil spills. They are well aware of the

Trevors, J. T.; Saier, M. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Oil shale health and environment research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While there have been sporadic efforts to demonstrate certain shale oil extraction technologies in recent years, none of the techniques have been thoroughly analyzed to determine the extent of potential occupational health impacts and even those technologies that have been demonstrated cannot be regarded as typical of a scaled-up, fully mature industry. Industrial hygiene studies have served to identify operations within certain technologies where mitigating methods can and should be applied to protect the industrial populations. Judging from data developed by on-site sampling it is probable that, with the possible exception of MIS techniques, oil shale mining presents no unique problems that cannot be handled with state-of-the-art control procedures. The conditions that may exist in a mine where in situ retorts are being simultaneously prepared, burned and abandoned have not as yet been defined. The probability of combined exposures to spent shale dusts and fugitive emissions in the form of vapors and gases added to the potential for skin exposure to product oils and other liquid effluents raises more complex questions. It has been shown by both epidemiological evidence and experimental data gathered both in the US and in foreign industries that crude shale oil and some of its products carry a higher carcinogenic potential than most of the natural petroleums. Preliminary data suggest that this particular hazard may be almost self-eliminating if hydrotreating, in preparation for refining, is universally practiced. The determination of specific hazards should be done on a technology-specific basis since it is highly probable that the biological activity of most of the products and by-products of shale oil production is process-specific.

Holland, L.M.; Tillery, M.I.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

North and west central Texas. Mitchell EOR (enhanced oil recovery) projects yield tertiary oil in Wise and Jack counties  

SciTech Connect

An enhanced oil recovery project utilizing a miscible LPG process provides Mitchell Energy and Development Corp. engineers with a springboard for other miscible flood projects while yielding incremental tertiary oil that otherwise would remain in the ground. The LPG flood project is in the Alvord (3,000-ft Strawn) Unit in Wise County, Texas. The field had been waterflooded for 14 yr, and was producing near its economic limit under waterflood, the alternative to starting a tertiary project would have been to abandon the field. The LPG flood process was chosen because liquefied petroleum gases are miscible with oil at the low pressures that must be maintained in shallow reservoirs such as the Alvord Strawn. Propane was determined to be the suitable LPG for the project because of its availability and ease of handling.

Mickey, V.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Simplified configuration for the combustor of an oil burner using a low pressure, high flow air-atomizing nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to clean burning of fuel oil with air. More specifically, to a fuel burning combustion head using a low-pressure, high air flow atomizing nozzle so that there will be a complete combustion of oil resulting in a minimum emission of pollutants. The improved fuel burner uses a low pressure air atomizing nozzle that does not result in the use of additional compressors or the introduction of pressurized gases downstream, nor does it require a complex design. Inventors:

Butcher, Thomas A. (Port Jefferson, NY); Celebi, Yusuf (Middle Island, NY); Fisher, Leonard (Colrain, MA)

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Oil and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil and Plants Name: Matt Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: If you could please tell me exactly what motor oil (unused) does to plants, and the effects. Does it...

327

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developApril 21, “China and Venezuela sign oil agreements. ” Chinaaccessed April 21, “Venezuela and China sign oil deal. ” BBC

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Palm oil pundit speaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dorab E. Mistry, director of Godrej International Ltd. in Mumbai, India, spoke about palm oil on March 15, 2010, during the 2010 Annual Convention of the National Institute of Oilseed Products in Palm Springs, California, USA. Palm oil pundit speaks ...

329

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

330

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

well below unity accounts for the broad trends we see in the share of oil purchases in totalWells. ” Middle panel: percent of U.S. total crude oil

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ozone depletion, greenhouse gases, and climate change: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This symposium was primarily concerned with the linkages between ozone depletion and increasing greenhouse gases and with their combined effect in causing climate change to occur on a global scale. The presentations in these proceedings review the current state of knowledge about stratospheric ozone depletion, discuss the probable effect of predicted greenhouse gas increase on future ozone trends, summarize observational data on changing atmospheric chemistry and associated atmospheric temperatures, and describe the continuing effort to model and predict future scenarios of climatic change relative to ozone and greenhouse gases in both the stratosphere and the troposphere. Some of the questions and answers that followed the presentations have been included when they highlight noteworthy points that were not covered in the presentation itself. The request by the National Climate Program Office for a symposium on the above related issues is included. The symposium agenda and participants are given. As well as a glossary of special terms and abbreviations. In summary, the Joint Symposium on Ozone Depletion, Greenhouse Gases, and Climate Change reviewed the magnitude and causes of stratospheric ozone depletion and examined the connections that exist between this problem and the impending climate warming to increasing greenhouse gases. The presentations of these proceedings indicate that the connections are real and important, and that the stratospheric ozone depletion and tropospheric greenhouse warming problems must be studied as parts of an interactive global system rather than as more or less unconnected events.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

OPTIONS FOR ABATING GREENHOUSE GASES FROM EXHAUST STREAMS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines different alternatives for replacing, treating, and recycling greenhouse gases. It is concluded that treatment (abatement) is the only viable short-term option. Three options for abatement that were tested for use in semiconductor facilities are reviewed, and their performance and costs compared. This study shows that effective abatement options are available to the photovoltaic (PV) industry, at reasonable cost.

FTHENAKIS,V.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Very high resolution etching of magnetic nanostructures in organic gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two methods for high resolution dry etching of permalloy (NiFe) and iron (Fe) nanostructures are presented and discussed. The first involves the use of carbon monoxide (CO) and ammonia (NH"3) as etching gases, the second uses methane (CH"4), hydrogen ... Keywords: CH4/H2/O2, CO/NH3, Dry etching, Fe, NiFe

X. Kong; D. Krása; H. P. Zhou; W. Williams; S. McVitie; J. M. R. Weaver; C. D. W. Wilkinson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

National Waste Processing Conference Proceedings ASME 1994 ACID GASES, MERCURY,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and elemental mercury (Hg«» under oxidizing conditions of the off-gases downstream of the refuse incinerator), sulfur dioxide (S02)' nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), PCDDs/PCDFs, cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg emission regulations. Mercury Control in MWCs The capture of Hg in flue gas cleaning devices depends on the

Columbia University

335

Use of low temperature blowers for recirculation of hot gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for maintaining motors at low operating temperatures during recirculation of hot gases in fuel cell operations and chemical processes such as fluidized bed coal gasification. The apparatus includes a means for separating the hot process gas from the motor using a secondary lower temperature gas, thereby minimizing the temperature increase of the motor and associated accessories.

Maru, H.C.; Forooque, M.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

336

Noble gases and radiocarbon in natural gas hydrates Gisela Winckler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Noble gases and radiocarbon in natural gas hydrates Gisela Winckler Lamont-Doherty Earth 2001; published 24 May 2002. [1] In samples of pure natural gas hydrates from Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia of rigid cages of water molecules that enclose guest gas molecules. The gas component of natural hydrates

Winckler, Gisela

337

Oil Peak or Panic?  

SciTech Connect

In this balanced consideration of the peak-oil controversy, Gorelick comes down on the side of the optimists.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

SRC Residual fuel oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

Tewari, Krishna C. (Whitehall, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Synthetic fuels. Independent has practical oil-shale operation  

SciTech Connect

Geokinetics Inc., Salt Lake City, has been developing a relatively inexpensive process to develop lean shale resources in Utah since 1975. The firm has produced almost 50,000 bbl of shale oil during the past 6 years at its test site south of Vernal, Utah. Geokinetics is projected to produce eventually 109 million bbl of shale oil from its Utah properties at a cost of ca. $30/bbl. The Low Front End Cost (Lofreco) Process, with its small scale, modular construction, and low front end capital load, can develop oil shale under conditions inhibiting firms with big, capital intensive technologies. Lofreco entails blasting a thin shale bed to create a highly permeable in situ retort. The oil shale is ignited via air injection wells, and low pressure blowers provide air to create a fire front that covers the pay section. The front moves horizontally through the fracture shale bed, with hot combustion gases heating the shale to yield shale oil which drains to the bottom of the sloped retort. The oil is recovered via small, conventional pumping units.

Williams, B.

1982-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

340

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty OilsChapter 11 Camellia Oil and Tea Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty Oils Chapter 11 Camellia Oil and Tea Oil Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 11 Camellia Oil and T

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Oil shale: potential environmental impacts and control technology. Environmental research brief  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory in Cincinnati, Ohio (IERL-Ci) has performed research related to oil shale processing and disposal since 1973. This research is in support of the Clean Air Act, The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, and the Toxic Substances Control Act. Potential environmental impacts from oil shale development activities have been identified and potential control technologies are being evaluated through a combination of laboratory and field tests on actual oil shale waste streams. This paper discusses recent results from this program. Included are field test results on control of sulfur gases at Occidental Oil Shale's Logan Wash Site and Geokinetic's Kamp Kerogen Site, wastewater treatability studies on retort water and gas condensate at Logan Wash, and results of laboratory and field testing on raw and retorted oil shales.

Bates, E.R.; Liberick, W.W.; Burckle, J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Using Oils As Pesticides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum and plant-derived spray oils show increasing potential for use as part of Integrated Pest Management systems for control of soft-bodied pests on fruit trees, shade trees, woody ornamentals and household plants. Sources of oils, preparing oils for use, application and precautions are discussed.

Bogran, Carlos E.; Ludwig, Scott; Metz, Bradley

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

344

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a “negative” storage cost for oil in the form of a bene?tin levels. oil for more than your costs, that is, if P t+1 QSaudi oil, and M S the Saudi’s marginal cost of production.

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Exploiting heavy oil reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the behaviour of oil and gas prices and the fruits of future exploration. The rate of technological progress. How optimistic are you that the North Sea remains a viable source of oil and gas? A) Our new researchNorth Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen

Levi, Ran

347

Utah Heavy Oil Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

348

Environmental assessment of oil degasification at four Strategic Petroleum Reserve facilities in Texas and Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to treat gassy oil at four Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage sites to lower the gas content of the stored crude oil and help ensure safe transfer of the oil during drawdown. The crude oil is stored underground in caverns created in salt domes. The degree of gassiness of the oil varies substantially among sites and among caverns within a site. This environmental assessment describes the proposed degasification operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. The need for degasification has arisen because over time, gases, principally methane and nitrogen, have migrated into and become dissolved in the stored crude oil. This influx of gas has raised the crude oil vapor pressure above limits required by safety and emission guidelines. When oil is drawn from the caverns, excess gases may come out of solution. Based on preliminary data from an ongoing sampling program, between 200 and 350 million of the 587 million barrels of crude oil stored at these four sites would require processing to remove excess gas. Degasification, a commonly used petroleum industry process, would be done at four crude oil storage facilities: Bryan Mound and Big Hill in Texas, and West Hackberry and Bayou Choctaw in Louisiana. DOE would use a turnkey services contract for engineering, procurement, fabrication, installation, operation and maintenance of two degasification plants. These would be installed initially at Bryan Mound and West Hackberry. Degasification would be complete in less than three years of continuous operations. This report summarizes the environmental impacts of this gasification process.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Oil shale commercialization study  

SciTech Connect

Ninety four possible oil shale sections in southern Idaho were located and chemically analyzed. Sixty-two of these shales show good promise of possible oil and probable gas potential. Sixty of the potential oil and gas shales represent the Succor Creek Formation of Miocene age in southwestern Idaho. Two of the shales represent Cretaceous formations in eastern Idaho, which should be further investigated to determine their realistic value and areal extent. Samples of the older Mesozonic and paleozoic sections show promise but have not been chemically analyzed and will need greater attention to determine their potential. Geothermal resources are of high potential in Idaho and are important to oil shale prospects. Geothermal conditions raise the geothermal gradient and act as maturing agents to oil shale. They also might be used in the retorting and refining processes. Oil shales at the surface, which appear to have good oil or gas potential should have much higher potential at depth where the geothermal gradient is high. Samples from deep petroleum exploration wells indicate that the succor Creek shales have undergone considerable maturation with depth of burial and should produce gas and possibly oil. Most of Idaho's shales that have been analyzed have a greater potential for gas than for oil but some oil potential is indicated. The Miocene shales of the Succor Creek Formation should be considered as gas and possibly oil source material for the future when technology has been perfectes. 11 refs.

Warner, M.M.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

124 22 3,585 1,761 3,291 117 -137 3,532 241 5,264 124 22 3,585 1,761 3,291 117 -137 3,532 241 5,264 Crude Oil 34 - - - - 897 1 113 -43 1,084 3 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 90 0 25 32 86 - - 16 27 15 174 Pentanes Plus 15 0 - - - - - - 0 - 10 4 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 75 - - 25 32 86 - - 16 27 5 169 Ethane/Ethylene 1 - - 0 - - - - 0 - - 1 Propane/Propylene 51 - - 36 27 83 - - 24 - 4 168 Normal Butane/Butylene 16 - - -11 3 3 - - -8 17 1 0 Isobutane/Isobutylene 8 - - 0 2 - - - -1 9 - 0 Other Liquids - - 22 - - 555 1,614 193 -31 2,421 5 -10 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 22 - - 25 273 -19 -35 332 5 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 4 - - 4 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol)

351

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,164 20 3,171 1,425 308 193 28 2,990 349 2,914 1,164 20 3,171 1,425 308 193 28 2,990 349 2,914 Crude Oil 1,104 - - - - 1,209 - 140 10 2,443 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 61 0 66 4 - - - 36 59 13 22 Pentanes Plus 26 0 - - - - - - 5 18 3 -1 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 34 - - 66 4 - - - 30 41 10 23 Ethane/Ethylene 0 - - - - - - - - - - 0 Propane/Propylene 14 - - 49 4 - - - 12 - 10 45 Normal Butane/Butylene 5 - - 15 0 - - - 13 19 0 -11 Isobutane/Isobutylene 15 - - 1 - - - - 5 22 - -12 Other Liquids - - 20 - - 107 252 94 -71 488 13 43 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 20 - - 19 143 37 -2 219 3 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 47 - - 47 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol)

352

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,980 842 4,204 1,948 672 -339 187 3,995 240 4,886 ,980 842 4,204 1,948 672 -339 187 3,995 240 4,886 Crude Oil 1,472 - - - - 1,839 556 -359 17 3,416 76 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 508 -17 115 63 -14 - - 75 105 71 404 Pentanes Plus 63 -17 - - 0 98 - - -18 37 53 72 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 444 - - 115 63 -112 - - 93 68 18 332 Ethane/Ethylene 163 - - - 0 -100 - - 11 - - 52 Propane/Propylene 186 - - 104 49 -22 - - 66 - 7 244 Normal Butane/Butylene 52 - - 16 5 5 - - 22 17 11 29 Isobutane/Isobutylene 43 - - -4 8 5 - - -6 50 - 7 Other Liquids - - 858 - - 12 -143 127 346 474 40 -6 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 858 - - 5 -547 -8 11 271 26 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 23 - - 23 0 - -

353

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

562 822 4,163 1,839 735 -69 52 3,955 244 4,801 562 822 4,163 1,839 735 -69 52 3,955 244 4,801 Crude Oil 1,116 - - - - 1,730 800 -87 62 3,442 55 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 446 -16 121 74 -25 - - -12 105 111 395 Pentanes Plus 50 -16 - - 1 82 - - -4 31 101 -12 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 396 - - 121 73 -107 - - -8 74 11 407 Ethane/Ethylene 163 - - - 0 -108 - - -2 - - 58 Propane/Propylene 156 - - 108 59 -24 - - -3 - 2 300 Normal Butane/Butylene 48 - - 11 9 10 - - -4 29 9 45 Isobutane/Isobutylene 29 - - 2 6 14 - - 1 46 - 5 Other Liquids - - 838 - - 5 -258 -159 8 408 25 -16 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 838 - - 3 -565 4 1 257 21 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 22 - - 22 0 - -

354

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,173 16 2,988 1,321 324 106 21 2,811 344 2,751 1,173 16 2,988 1,321 324 106 21 2,811 344 2,751 Crude Oil 1,111 - - - - 1,160 2 62 4 2,331 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 61 0 50 5 - - - 1 66 15 35 Pentanes Plus 28 0 - - - - - - 0 21 3 4 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 33 - - 50 5 - - - 1 45 12 31 Ethane/Ethylene 0 - - - - - - - - - - 0 Propane/Propylene 12 - - 46 4 - - - 1 - 10 51 Normal Butane/Butylene 6 - - 6 1 - - - 0 26 1 -14 Isobutane/Isobutylene 15 - - -2 0 - - - 0 20 - -7 Other Liquids - - 16 - - 74 245 103 11 414 13 1 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 16 - - 7 138 37 2 193 3 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 43 - - 43 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) - - - - 1 1 0

355

System for trapping and storing gases for subsequent chemical reduction to solids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for quantitatively reducing oxide gases. A pre-selected amount of zinc is provided in a vial. A tube is provided in the vial. The zinc and the tube are separated. A pre-selected amount of a catalyst is provided in the tube. Oxide gases are injected into the vial. The vial, tube, zinc, catalyst, and the oxide gases are cryogenically cooled. At least a portion of the vial, tube, zinc, catalyst, and oxide gases are heated.

Vogel, John S. (San Jose, CA); Ognibene, Ted J. (Oakland, CA); Bench, Graham S. (Livermore, CA); Peaslee, Graham F. (Holland, MI)

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

356

Analysis of drying wood waste fuels with boiler exhaust gases: simulation, performance, and economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study evaluates the feasibility of retrofitting a rotary dryer to a hog fuel boiler, using the boiler exhaust gases as the drying medium. Two simulation models were developed. Each model accurately predicts system performance given site-specific parameters such as boiler steam demand, fue moisture content, boiler exhaust temperature and combustion excess air. Three rotary dryers/hog fuel boilers currently in operation in the forest products industry were analyzed. The data obtained were used to validate te accuracy of the simulation models and to establish the performance of boiler/dryer systems under field conditions. The boiler exhaust temperatures observed ranged from 340 to 500/sup 0/F and indicated that significant drying could be realized at moderate stack temperatures, as substantitated by experimental moisture content data. The simulation models were used to evaluate a general boiler/dryer system's sensitivity to variation in operating conditions. The sensitivity analyses indicated that under moderate conditions (400/sup 0/F boiler exhaust, etc.) the installation of a rotary dryer results in a 15% increase in boiler efficiency and a 13% decrease in fuel consumption. Both the field data and sensitivity analyses indicated that a greater increase in boiler efficiency could be realized at higher stack temperatures, approximately a 30% increase in boiler efficiency for a stack temperature of 600/sup 0/F. The cash flow basis payback periods based on hog fuel savings due to dryer installation ranged from 2.7 years for a used dryer to 3.9 years for a new dryer. The payback periods for equivalent BTU savings of gas and oil ranged from 1.2 to 2.0 for gas and from 1.3 to 2.1 years for oil. This study concludes that retrofitting a rotary dryer to an existing hog fuel boiler is an economically feasible option to the forest products industry. 31 references, 24 figures, 18 tables.

Kirk, R.W.; Wilson, J.B.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Effect of oil shale type and retorting atmosphere on the products from retorting various oil shales by the controlled-state retort  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six oil shales from different locations (the Green River formation of Colorado and Utah, the Antrim Basin of Michigan, and Morocco) having different Fischer Assay oil yields were retorted using three retorting atmospheres (N/sub 2/, N/sub 2//steam, and N/sub 2//steam/O/sub 2/) under the same retorting conditions. The products (oils, gases, waters, and shales) were analyzed and the data are reported. Changing retorting atmospheres had little observable effect on the product oils; however, there was a great deal of change in the composition and amount of gas produced. Steam in the retorting atmosphere increased the amount of carbon dioxide produced and decreased the amount of carbonate and organic carbon in the retorted shale. Addition of oxygen to N/sub 2//steam and increasing the maximum temperature compounded the above effect. 3 figures, 20 tables.

Duvall, J.J.; Mason, K.K.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field, Colombia. Experimental and simulation studies were conducted to achieve these objectives. The experimental study consisted of injecting reconstituted gas into a cell containing sand and "live" San Francisco oil. Experimental runs were made with injection of (i) the two field gases and their 50-50 mixture, (ii) the two field gases enriched with propane, and (iii) WAG with the two field gases enriched with propane. Produced oil volume, density, and viscosity; and produced gas volume and composition were measured and analyzed. A 1D 7-component compositional simulation model of the laboratory injection cell and its contents was developed. After a satisfactory history-match of the results of a WAG run, the prediction runs were made using the gas that gave the highest oil recovery in the experiments, (5:100 mass ratio of propane:Balcon gas). Oil production results from simulation were obtained for a range of WAG cycles and gas injection rate. The main results of the study may be summarized as follows. For all cases studied, the lowest oil recovery is obtained with injection of San Francisco gas, (60% of original oil-in-place OOIP), and the highest oil recovery (84% OOIP) is obtained with a WAG 7.5-7.5 (cycle of 7.5 minutes water injection followed by 7.5 minutes of gas injection at 872 ml/min). This approximately corresponds to WAG 20-20 in the field (20 days water injection followed by 20 days gas injection at 6.8 MMSCF/D). Results clearly indicate increase in oil recovery with volume of the gas injected. Lastly, of the three injection schemes studied, WAG injection with propane-enriched gas gives the highest oil recovery. This study is based on the one-dimensional displacement of oil. The three-dimensional aspects and other reservoir complexities that adversely affect oil recovery in reality have not been considered. A 3D reservoir simulation study is therefore recommended together with an economic evaluation of the cases before any decision can be made to implement any of the gas or WAG injection schemes.

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013. Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013 Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013 ...

360

PPPL Wins Department of Energy Award For Reducing Greenhouse Gases |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wins Department of Energy Award For Reducing Greenhouse Gases Wins Department of Energy Award For Reducing Greenhouse Gases By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 2, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has received a federal Sustainability Award for reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions 48 percent since 2008 - far exceeding the U.S. government's goal of a 28 percent reduction. Members of the PPPL staff were among the 20 recipients of the Sustainability Awards in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, Sept.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options Keith Paustian (keithp@nrel.colostate.edu; 970-491-1547) Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory Colorado State University Ft. Collins, CO 80523 Bruce Babcock (babcock@iastate.edu; 515-294-6785) Cathy Kling (ckling@iastate.edu; 515-294-5767) Center for Agriculture and Rural Development Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011-1070 Jerry Hatfield (hatfield@nstl.gov; 515-294-5723) USDA - National Soil Tilth Laboratory Ames, IA 50011 Rattan Lal (lal.1@osu.edu; 614-292-9069) School of Natural Resources The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210-1085 Bruce McCarl (mccarl@tamu.edu; 979-845-1706) Department of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-2124 Sandy McLaughlin (un4@ornl.gov; 865-574-7358)

362

CO2 Separation from Low-Temperature Flue Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,842,126 entitled "Co 2 Separation from Low-Temperature Flue Gases." Disclosed in this patent are novel methods for processing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from combustion gas streams. Researchers at NETL are focused on the development of novel sorbent systems that can effectively remove CO 2 and other gases in an economically feasible manner with limited impact on energy production cost. The current invention will help in reducing greenhouse gas emissions by using an improved, regenerable aqueous amine and soluble potassium carbonate sorbent system. This novel solvent system may be capable of achieving CO 2 capture from larger emission streams at lower overall cost. Overview Sequestration of CO

363

EIA - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) This report-the eighteenth annual report-presents the U.S. Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. Download the GHG Report Introduction For this report, activity data on coal and natural gas consumption and electricity sales and losses by sector were obtained from the January 2011 Monthly Energy Review (MER). In keeping with current international practice, this report presents data on greenhouse gas emissions in million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data can be converted to carbon equivalent units by

364

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Getting Started  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Getting Started Getting Started Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Getting Started Form EIA-1605 may seem daunting at first, even for entities that have reported under the original program. That's why EIA has developed the Getting Started page to help entities take a systematic approach to reporting their emissions and reductions. The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program suggests that prospective reporters familiarize themselves with the specific requirements for reporting their entity's inventory and reductions by answering the questions embodied in the 10 steps below. In addition, EIA has prepared the interactive Getting Started tool to help reporters determine what parts of Form EIA-1605 they need to complete. Getting Started Tool Getting Started PDF Tables

365

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Compressed Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Gases Compressed Gases Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Return Cylinders Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Staff may personally move (self-transport) compressed gas cylinders by hand & foot between buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, elevators, etc.) within buildings provided it can be done safely. The following safety precautions apply: Use standard cylinder dollies to transport compressed gas cylinders. While dollies are preferred, cylinders weighing 11 Kg (25 lbs) or less may be hand-carried. Never move a cylinder with a regulator connected to it. Cylinder valve-protection caps and valve-opening caps must be in place when moving cylinders. Lecture bottles and other cylinders that are

366

PPPL wins Department of Energy award for reducing greenhouse gases |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPPL wins Department of Energy award for reducing greenhouse gases PPPL wins Department of Energy award for reducing greenhouse gases By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 2, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One PPPL engineer Tim Stevenson checks for possible leaks of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), the gas used to insulate electronic equipment that has the potential to cause global warming at many times the rate of carbon dioxide. PPPL reduced leaks of SF6 by 65 percent over three years - reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions by 48 percent between 2008 and 2011. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL engineer Tim Stevenson checks for possible leaks of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), the gas used to insulate electronic equipment that has the potential to cause global warming at many times the rate of carbon

367

Reading Comprehension - Properties of Solids, Liquids, and Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Properties of Solids, Liquids, and Gases Properties of Solids, Liquids, and Gases A solid has a definite _________ mass texture volume and a _________ 3D irregular definite shape. The particles in a solid are _________ free to move around motionless packed tightly together . Particles in a solid move by _________ sliding past one another vibrating back and forth slightly jiggling around . _________ Viscosity Amorphous Crystalline solids soften before melting. The particles in this type of solid are not arranged in regular pattern. Amorphous solids _________ do don't have a distinct melting point. Crystalline solids have a _________ distinct color and shape distinct pattern and melting point . Liquids have no _________ volume mass shape of their own. A liquid takes the shape of its container. Without a container liquids spread into a wide,

368

Measurement of biocarbon in flue gases using 14C  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary investigation of the biocarbon fraction in carbon dioxide emissions of power plants using both fossil- and biobased fuels is presented. Calculation of the biocarbon fraction is based on radiocarbon content measured in power plant flue gases. Samples were collected directly from the chimneys into plastic sampling bags. The C-14 content in CO{sub 2} was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Flue gases from power plants that use natural gas, coal, wood chips, bark, plywood residue, sludge from the pulp factory, peat, and recovered fuel were measured. Among the selected plants, there was one that used only fossil fuel and one that used only biofuel; the other investigated plants burned mixtures of fuels. The results show that C-14 measurement provides the possibility to determine the ratio of bio and fossil fuel burned in power plants.

Haemaelaeinen, K.M.; Jungner, H.; Antson, O.; Rasanen, J.; Tormonen, K.; Roine, J. [University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland). Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Apparatus for the plasma destruction of hazardous gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma cell for destroying hazardous gases. An electric-discharge cell having an electrically conducting electrode onto which an alternating high-voltage waveform is impressed and a dielectric barrier adjacent thereto, together forming a high-voltage electrode, generates self-terminating discharges throughout a volume formed between this electrode and a grounded conducting liquid electrode. The gas to be transformed is passed through this volume. The liquid may be flowed, generating thereby a renewable surface. Moreover, since hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids may be formed from destruction of various chlorofluorocarbons in the presence of water, a conducting liquid may be selected which will neutralize these corrosive compounds. The gases exiting the discharge region may be further scrubbed if additional purification is required.

Kang, Michael (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

371

Viewpoint on occupational health in the oil-shale industry  

SciTech Connect

In assessing the potential health and safety hazards which may be expected in a large-scale oil shale industry, the types of operations that will be utilized to extract oil from oil shale are examined. These are broadly characterized as mining, raw shale processing and handling, retorting and refining, and spent shale disposal. With few exceptions, these operations in shale oil production are similar to operations in existing industries. Health and safety risks and occupational health controls are also expected to be similar. To date medical studies on workers in the oil shale industry who have been exposed to shale dusts and oil products have indicated that the chief problem areas are pneumoconiosis and skin cancers. A broad viewpoint of the prospective occupational health problems in the oil shale industry can be obtained by reviewing similar activities and exposures in other industrial operations. This viewpoint would suggest that the prospective problems can be controlled adequately by conventional methods of worker protection. Several unique situations do exist in this industry. The mining and material handling of tonnages of oil shale exceeds any experience in other mining activities. This is a problem of scale. It seems unlikely that it will produce new safety problems. The in situ mining offers the unique situation of burning and abandoned underground retorts in near proximity to work forces preparing future in situ retorts. The potential of exposures to dusts, gases and vapors will simply have to be measured as such operations come on stream. Measurements made to date have not shown unique hazards to exist, although existing data are limited to demonstration-scale retorts burning one-at-a-time under normal conditions.

Voelz, G.L.; Grier, R.S.; Hargis, K.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Crude Oil Analysis Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

Shay, Johanna Y.

373

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases from Flashed-Steam Geothermal Power Plants:April 1999 - March 2000 Dataset Summary Description This dataset corresponds to the final report on a screening study to compare six methods of removing noncondensable gases from direct-use geo-thermal steam power plants. This report defines the study methodologies and compares the performance and economics of selected gas-removal systems. Recommendations are presented for follow-up investigations and implementation of some of the technologies discussed. The specific gas-removal methods include five vacuum system configurations using the conventional approach of evacuating gas/vapor mixtures from the power plant condenser system and a system for physical separation of steam and gases upstream of the power turbine. The study focused on flashed-steam applications, but the results apply equally well to flashed-steam and dry-steam geothermal power plant configurations. Two gas-removal options appear to offer profitable economic potential. The hybrid vacuum system configurations and the reboiler process yield positive net present value results over wide-ranging gas concentrations. The hybrid options look favorable for both low-temperature and high-temperature resource applications. The reboiler looks profitable for low-temperature resource applications for gas levels above about 20,000 parts per million by volume. A vacuum system configuration using a three-stage turbocompressor battery may be profitable for low-temperature resources, but results show that the hybrid system is more profitable. The biphase eductor alternative cannot be recommended for commercialization at this time. The report is available from NREL's publication database.

374

Bose-Einstein-condensed gases with arbitrary strong interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bose-condensed gases are considered with an effective interaction strength varying in the whole range of the values between zero and infinity. The consideration is based on the usage of a representative statistical ensemble for Bose systems with broken global gauge symmetry. Practical calculations are illustrated for a uniform Bose gas at zero temperature, employing a self-consistent mean-field theory, which is both conserving and gapless.

V. I. Yukalov; E. P. Yukalova

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

Remote monitoring of volcanic gases using passive Fourier transform spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic gases provide important insights on the internal workings of volcanoes and changes in their composition and total flux can warn of impending changes in a volcano`s eruptive state. In addition, volcanoes are important contributors to the earth`s atmosphere, and understanding this volcanic contribution is crucial for unraveling the effect of anthropogenic gases on the global climate. Studies of volcanic gases have long relied upon direct in situ sampling, which requires volcanologists to work on-site within a volcanic crater. In recent years, spectroscopic techniques have increasingly been employed to obtain information on volcanic gases from greater distances and thus at reduced risk. These techniques have included UV correlation spectroscopy (Cospec) for SO{sub 2} monitoring, the most widely-used technique, and infrared spectroscopy in a variety of configurations, both open- and closed-path. Francis et al. have demonstrated good results using the sun as the IR source. This solar occultation technique is quite useful, but puts rather strong restrictions on the location of instrument and is thus best suited to more accessible volcanoes. In order to maximize the flexibility and range of FTIR measurements at volcanoes, work over the last few years has emphasized techniques which utilize the strong radiance contrast between the volcanic gas plume and the sky. The authors have successfully employed these techniques at several volcanoes, including the White Island and Ruapehu volcanoes in New Zealand, the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii, and Mt. Etna in Italy. But Popocatepetl (5452 m), the recently re-awakened volcano 70 km southeast of downtown Mexico City, has provided perhaps the best examples to date of the usefulness of these techniques.

Love, S.P.; Goff, F.; Counce, D.; Schmidt, S.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Siebe, C.; Delgado, H. [Univ. Nactional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan (Mexico)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Measurements of waste tank passive ventilation rates using tracer gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of ventilation rate studies of eight passively ventilated high-level radioactive waste tanks using tracer gases. Head space ventilation rates were determined for Tanks A-101, AX-102, AX-103, BY-105, C-107, S-102, U-103, and U-105 using sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) and/or helium (He) as tracer gases. Passive ventilation rates are needed for the resolution of several key safety issues. These safety issues are associated with the rates of flammable gas production and ventilation, the rates at which organic salt-nitrate salt mixtures dry out, and the estimation of organic solvent waste surface areas. This tracer gas study involves injecting a tracer gas into the tank headspace and measuring its concentration at different times to establish the rate at which the tracer is removed by ventilation. Tracer gas injection and sample collection were performed by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation and/or Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Characterization Project Operations. Headspace samples were analyzed for He and SF{sub 6} by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The tracer gas method was first demonstrated on Tank S-102. Tests were conducted on Tank S-102 to verify that the tracer gas was uniformly distributed throughout the tank headspace before baseline samples were collected, and that mixing was sufficiently vigorous to maintain an approximately uniform distribution of tracer gas in the headspace during the course of the study. Headspace samples, collected from a location about 4 in away from the injection point and 15, 30, and 60 minutes after the injection of He and SF{sub 6}, indicated that both tracer gases were rapidly mixed. The samples were found to have the same concentration of tracer gases after 1 hour as after 24 hours, suggesting that mixing of the tracer gas was essentially complete within 1 hour.

Huckaby, J.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Sklarew, D.S.; Evans, J.C.; Remund, K.M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Thermodynamic and hydrodynamic behaviour of interacting Fermi gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data processing speed and decreased power consumption. Understanding the spin relaxation, diffusion and other transport properties is of fundamental importance this field. An important advantage of cold gases in studies of spin transport phenomena... of information [39]. Either extending conventional charge-based electronic appliances by the spin degree of free- dom, or using the spin alone can be the foundation for a new generation of “spintronic” devices. Advantages are for instance nonvolatility, increased...

Goulko, Olga

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases  

SciTech Connect

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes sample gases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for analysis. Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement facilities must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for routine waste characterization analyses of WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Mixtures of Bose Gases Confined in a Ring Potential  

SciTech Connect

The rotational properties of a mixture of two distinguishable Bose gases that are confined in a ring potential provide novel physical effects that we demonstrate in this study. Persistent currents are shown to be stable for a range of the population imbalance between the two components at low angular momentum. At higher values of the angular momentum, even small admixtures of a second species of atoms make the persistent currents highly fragile.

Smyrnakis, J.; Kavoulakis, G. M.; Magiropoulos, M. [Technological Education Institute of Crete, P.O. Box 1939, GR-71004, Heraklion (Greece); Bargi, S.; Kaerkkaeinen, K.; Reimann, S. M. [Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

380

Persistent currents in Bose gases confined in annular traps  

SciTech Connect

We examine the problem of stability of persistent currents in a mixture of two Bose gases trapped in an annular potential. We evaluate the critical coupling for metastability in the transition from quasi-one- to two-dimensional motion. We also evaluate the critical coupling for metastability in a mixture of two species as a function of the population imbalance. The stability of the currents is shown to be sensitive to the deviation from one-dimensional motion.

Bargi, S.; Malet, F.; Reimann, S. M. [Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Kavoulakis, G. M. [Technological Educational Institute of Crete, P.O. Box 1939, GR-71004, Heraklion (Greece)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Crude Oil Watch - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Watch April 19, 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil & Gas A large stockbuild in crude oil inventories contributed to blunt crude oil inputs ...

382

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to prepare a report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987--1990, with annual updates thereafter. This report is the fifth annual update, covering national emissions over the period 1989--1995, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1996. The estimates contained in this report have been revised from those in last year`s report. Emissions estimates for carbon dioxide are reported in metric tons of carbon; estimates for other gases are reported in metric tons of gas. Chapter 1 of this report briefly recapitulates some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect and discusses important recent developments in global climate change activities. Chapter 2 through 6 cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons, and criteria pollutants, respectively. Chapter 7 describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Five appendixes are included with this report. 216 refs., 11 figs., 38 tabs.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - What's New  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Environment > Voluntary Reporting Program > What's New Environment > Voluntary Reporting Program > What's New Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program What's New Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Suspended May 2011 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases ("1605(b)") Program has been suspended. The suspension is due to recent reductions in budget appropriations and is effective immediately. Survey respondents may still submit data to the 1605(b) Program using the program's Workbook Form via EIA's Secure File Transfer mechanism. However, EIA will not be able to process and review submitted data or offer respondent support on the submitted data. Should a respondant submit data under the current collection cycle to EIA, the data will be retained in our electronic records. If the 1605(b) Program resumes normal operations, your submitted data will be reviewed and processed at that time. You will be notified in the future if the 1605(b) Program resumes normal operation. If you have any questions, please contact the survey manager, Paul McArdle, at paul.mcardle@eia.gov

385

Evaluación de la generación de gases de efecto invernadero asociados al ciclo de vida de los biocombustibles colombianos = Assessment of greenhouse gases emissions associated to colombian biofuels lifecycle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Valencia Botero, Monica Julieth (2012) Evaluación de la generación de gases de efecto invernadero asociados al ciclo de vida de los biocombustibles colombianos = Assessment… (more)

Valencia Botero, Monica Julieth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Shale oil: process choices  

SciTech Connect

The four broad categories of shale-oil processing are discussed. All of these processes share the basic function of retorting oil-shale rock at high temperature so that the kerogen material in the rocks is thermally decomposed to shale oil and gaseous products. The technologies and the organizations working on their development are: solids-to-solids heating, The Oil Shale Co. (TOSCO) and Lurgi-Rhur; gas-to-solids heating with internal gas combustion, U. S. Bureau of Mines, Development Engineering Inc. and Union Oil of California; gas-to-solid heating with external heat generation, Development Engineering, Union Oil, Petrobas, and Institute of Gas Technology; and in-situ retorting, Occidental Petroleum Corp. The TOSCO II process is considered proven and on the verge of commercialization. (BLM)

1974-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

387

World Oil: Market or Mayhem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

Smith, James L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Process of treating oil shale  

SciTech Connect

A process of destructively distilling oil shale is described consisting in subjecting the oil shale containing aluminum to the action of heat and pressure to destructively distill it and separate the light oil constituents. Chlorine gas is simultaneously passed through the hot oil shale countercurrent to the direction of movement of the oil shale.

Egloff, G.

1927-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

389

2 World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Crude oil prices react to a variety of geopolitical and economic events price per barrel (real 2010 dollars, quarterly average) 140 120 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude oil price Global financial collapse 100 80 60 U.S. spare capacity exhausted Iran-Iraq War Saudis abandon swing producer role Asian financial crisis 9-11 attacks Low spare capacity

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

U.S. Imports from Chad - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Import Area: Period/Unit: Country: ... 51: 30: 2003-2012: Crude Oil: 77: 102: 65: 18: 49: 28: 2003-2012: Products: 1: 2: 4: 13: 1: 2: 2003-2012: Unfinished Oils ...

391

Texas Gulf Coast Refinery Yield - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+)-8.3-7.7-8.3-7.9-8.8-8.7: 1993-2013 ... Based on crude oil input and net reruns of unfinished oils. See Definitions, ...

392

Texas Gulf Coast Refinery Yield  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+)-7.4-7.6-8.2-8.4-8.6-8.0: 1993-2012 ... Based on crude oil input and net reruns of unfinished oils. See Definitions, ...

393

Louisiana Gulf Coast Refinery Yield  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+)-7.1-7.1-6.7-7.3-7.7-7.5: 1993-2012 ... Based on crude oil input and net reruns of unfinished oils. See Definitions, ...

394

38017,"AMERADA HESS CORP ",1,130,"MOTOR...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

CO ",32,840,"UNFINISHED OILS, HEAVY GAS OILS",1003,"NEWARK, NJ","NEW JERSEY",1,515,"KOREA, REPUBLIC OF",265,0,0,"IMTT BAYONNE ","BAYONNE TERM","NJ","NEW JERSEY",1 38017,"SHELL...

395

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help reduce gasoline prices U.S. gasoline prices are expected to fall as more oil refineries come back on line and crude...

396

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

397

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disruptions, and the peak in U.S. oil production account foroil increased 81.1% (logarithmically) between January 1979 and the peak

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Oil from rock  

SciTech Connect

The article discusses first the Green River Formation oil shale projects in the western United States from which conservative estimates have suggested an output of 400,000 to 600,000 bbl/day of crude shale oil by 1990. The western reserves recoverable with present technology are said to exceed 600 billion (10/sup 9/) bbl. Three major considerations could limit the large-scale development of shale oil: availability of water, environmental factors, and socio-economic considerations. Water is used to obtain and process the crude shale oil, and additional water is needed to cool the spent shale and to establish new vegetation on top of it. Nitrogenous compounds and arsenic in crude shale oil are among potential pollutants. Spent shale contains salts that are potentially leachable, as well as organic pyrolytic products. Retorting oil shales may release more CO/sub 2/ through decomposition of carbonate minerals that will subsequently be generated by burning the oil produced. Topographic effects of oil shale mining may raise socio-economic problems. Next the article discusses the conversion of coal to liquid by pyrolysis or hydrogenation, including the Gulf solvent refined coal (SRC) and the Exxon (EDS) liquefaction processes. Also described in the South African SASOL process for producing synthetic fuel from coal. A parallel account is included on the estimated complete cycle of United States and of worldwide crude oil production, forecasting depletion within less than a century. 11 refs.

Walters, S.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Global Oil Geopolitics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Iran-Iraq War . Iranian revolution . Arab Oil Embargo . Asian financial crisis . capacity exhausted . Global financial collapse . 9-11 attacks . OPEC cuts targets 1.7 ...

400

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

402

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

403

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

404

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

405

Residual Fuel Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

406

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollution has become one of the main problems being faced by humanity. Preventing pollution from occurring might be the best idea but is not possible in this fast developing world. So the next best thing to do would be to respond to the pollution source in an effective manner. Oil spills are fast becoming pollution sources that are causing the maximum damage to the environment. This is owing to the compounds that are released and the way oil spreads in both water and land. Preventing the oil spill would be the best option. But once the oil has been spilled, the next best thing to do is to respond to the spill effectively. As a result, time becomes an important factor while responding to an oil spill. Appropriate response to contain and cleanup the spill is required to minimize its potential damage to the ecosystem. Since time and money play a very important role in spill response, it would be a great idea if decisions can be made in such a way that a quick response can be planned. The first part of this study deals with the formation of an 'Oil Spill Resources Handbook', which has information on all the important Oil Spill Contractors. The second and the main part of the study, deals with creating a database in Microsoft Access of the Oil Spill Contractors. The third portion of the study deals with planning an oil spill response using a systems approach.

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry analysts and academics agree that China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robert Ebel, China’s Energy

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Crude Oil Price Forecast  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

We believe crude oil prices will strengthen somewhat, but prices will rise much more slowly than they fell, and they are expected to remain lower in ...

409

Oil And The Macroeconomy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This paper examines the oil price-macro economy relationship by means of analyzing the impact ofoil price on Industrial production, real effective exchange rate, long… (more)

Al-Ameri, Leyth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

California Crude Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... of different quality crudes vary over time based on the value the market places on such quality attributes. A heavy crude oil has more heavy, ...

411

Determination of Aluminum Rolling Oil and Machinery Oil Residues ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Determination of Aluminum Rolling Oil and Machinery Oil Residues on Aluminum Sheet and Foil by Using Elemental Analysis and Fourier  ...

412

Relaxation studies on oil, pressboard and oil impregnated pressboard.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a laboratory relaxation study with FDS and RVM was carried out for a period of 3 years with the fabricated oil (OIL),… (more)

Cao, Hongyan.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Why solar oil shale retorting produces more oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar oil shale retorting process may produce higher oil yield than conventional processing. High oil yield is obtained for three reasons: oil carbonization inside of the shale is reduced, oil cracking outside of the shale is reduced, and oil oxidation is essentially eliminated. Unique capabilities of focused solar energy produce these advantages. An increase in yield will reduce the cost of mining and shale transportation per barrel of oil produced. These cost reductions may justify the increased processing costs that will probably be associated with solar oil shale retorting.

Aiman, W.R.

1981-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Shale Oil Upgrading Utilizing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Companies providing oil samples of at least five (5) gallons include Chevron, Oil Shale Exploration Company (OSEC), and Red Leaf Resources, Inc. Background Work performed...

415

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Enhanced Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that have unconventional characteristics (e.g., oil in fractured shales, kerogen in oil shale, bitumen in tar sands) constitute an enormous potential domestic supply of energy....

416

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 of 18 Notes: Using the Northeast as an appropriate regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming...

417

Distillate and Crude Oil Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fuel and residential heating oil prices on the East Coast is being driven by higher crude oil prices than last year and higher spreads. Crude oil is projected to average almost...

418

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Oil and Natural Gas Supply > Events Oil and Natural Gas Supply Events The following is a listing of events of interest to the oil and natural gas community....

419

The Legacy of Oil Spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

010-0527-5 The Legacy of Oil Spills J. T. Trevors & M. H.workers were killed, and oil has been gushing out everday. It is now June, and oil continues to spew forth into

Trevors, J. T.; Saier, M. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Handbook of Australasian Edible Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book highlights various aspects of Australasian edible oils. Handbook of Australasian Edible Oils Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Soft Bound Books Oils and Fats Specialist

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical? Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practi

422

Oil price analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport has been in the whole history of mankind the basic and determining mover of the human society shape. It determined not only the position of towns, but also their inner design and it was also last but not least the basic element of the economic ... Keywords: GDP, deposit, fuels, history, market equilibrium, oil, oil reserves, price

Zdenek Riha; Viktorie Jirova; Marek Honcu

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Edible Oils Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contains four (4) titles regarding frying and edible oils. Edible Oils Package Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Value Packages 1766A8D5F05863694E128DE1C47D07C3 This Value Package includes: ...

424

Menhaden Fish Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical Characteristics of Oils, Fats, and Waxes Menhaden Oil Specific Gravity (SG) 15.5/15.5°C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.912– 0.930 25/25°C Other SG Refractive Index (RI) 25°C 40°C Other RI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (65) 1

425

Refining of shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The refining of shale oil is reviewed to assess the current state-of-the-art, especially as to the avaiability of technology suitable for operation on a commercial scale. Oil shale retorting processes as they affect the quality of the crude shale oil for refining, exploratory research on the character and refining of shale oil, and other published refining background leading to the present status are discussed. The initial refining of shale oil requires the removal of a large concentration of nitrogen, an added step not required for typical petroleum crude oils, and recently published estimates show that the total cost of refining will be high. Specific technoloy is reported by industry to be technically proven and available for commercial-scale refining. Although the refining will be more costly than that of petroleum, the viability of a shale oil industry will also be affected greatly by the technology and costs of producing the crude shale oil, environmental costs, and future price and tax treatment, and these are outside the scope of this study of refining.

Lanning, W.C.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-56787 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Conference Name Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate - Indoor Air 2005 Volume 2(9) Publisher Tsinghua University Press Conference Location Beijing, China Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential bedrooms (n=4), bathrooms (n=2), and a furnished test chamber. Rooms were studied "as-is" with material surfaces and furnishings unaltered. Surface materials were characterized and areas quantified. Experiments included rapid volatilization of a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture with the room closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase, followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. The mixture included n-alkanes, aromatics, glycol ethers, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, dichlorobenzene, and organophosphorus compounds. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at one surface sink and one potential embedded sink. The 2-parameter sink model tracked measurements for most compounds, but improved fits were obtained for some VOCs with a 3-parameter sink-diffusion or a 4-parameter two-sink model. Sorptive partitioning and initial adsorption rates increased with decreasing vapour pressure within each chemical class.

427

SORPTION OF GASES BY VAPOR-DEPOSITED TITANIUM FILMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are summarized for an investigation of the sorption rates of gases on vapor-deposited titanium films. The usefulness of such films for ultrahigh speed vacuum pumping is appraised. The sorption of hydrogen, deuterium, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water vapor, helium, argon, and methane onto titanium films was measured for a variety of circumstances using techniques and apparatus developed for this specific purpose. The information obtained and techniques evolved in this study have shown that large-scale getter pumping is feasible and can be a very effective means of pumping many gases. Sticking fractions larger than 0.8 were obtained for hydrogen, deuterium, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The experiments have shown that the sticking fraction for gases on vapor-deposited films is a function of the deposition conditions. There is strong evidence to support the supposition that conditions which favor the formation of a porous, fine-grained film structure with a large surface-to-volume ratio produce films with the highest sorption rates. The technique for measuring sticking fractions is new and in many respects unique. It utilizes a very large sorption surface, thus minimizing the perturbing effect of the instrumentation and evaporation apparatus and reducing the hazard of film contamination due to small leaks in the system or outgassing of system components. The method gives especially good accuracy for measurements of sticking fractions approaching unity. The quantity of gas adsorbed, the gas flux onto the getter surface, and the gas flux leaving the getter surface are measured directly. Any two of these three independent measurements can be used to determine the sticking fraction, thereby providing a means of checking the data. The evaporation techniques, substrate surface, and substrate area were chosen to very nearly duplicate the conditions likely to be encountered in the practical application of large-scale getter pumping. (auth)

Clausing, R.E.

1964-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement facilities must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for routine waste characterization analyses of WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

429

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases  

SciTech Connect

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement facilities must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for routine waste characterization analyses of WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

430

Peak oil: diverging discursive pipelines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Peak oil is the claimed moment in time when global oil production reaches its maximum rate and henceforth forever declines. It is highly controversial as… (more)

Doctor, Jeff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Oil and Natural Gas - Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Search NETL Oil and Natural Gas Document Information Oil & Natural Gas Document Repository Results will be shown in two categories. "Document Database Results" provides...

432

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

433

Supersolid phase in atomic gases with magnetic dipole interaction  

SciTech Connect

A major obstacle for the experimental realization of a supersolid phase with cold atomic gases in an optical lattice is the weakness of the nearest-neighbor interactions achievable via magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. In this paper, we show that by using a large filling of atoms within each well, the characteristic energy scales are strongly enhanced. Within this regime, the system is well described by the rotor model, and the qualitative behavior of the phase diagram derives from mean-field theory. We find a stable supersolid phase for realistic parameters with chromium atoms.

Buehler, Adam; Buechler, Hans Peter [Institute for Theoretical Physics III, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 (Germany)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Reporting Guidelines  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reporting Guidelines Reporting Guidelines Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Reporting Guidelines The purpose of the guidelines is to establish the procedures and requirements for filing voluntary reports, and to ensure that the annual reports of greenhouse gas emissions, emission reductions, and sequestration activities submitted by corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations, households, and other private and public entities to submit are complete, reliable, and consistent. Over time, it is anticipated that these reports will provide a reliable record of the contributions reporting entities have made toward reducing their greenhouse gas emissions. General Guidelines General Guidelines Technical Guidelines Technical Guidelines Appendices to the Technical Guidelines:

435

Handbook of radiative heat transfer in high-temperature gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work offers both an original method for calculating optical properties of low-temperature plasma at elevated densities ... and an effective new means for calculating radiative heat transfer in hot gases and plasma with arbitrary temperature and pressure distributions. These methods allow for automatic accounting of all details of the plasma spectrum, including the line structure. This volume contains radiant transfer in problems of heat transfer; integration over frequency; methods of partial characteristics; method of effective populations; calculation of partial characteristics; appendix: tabular data.

Soloukhin, R.I.; Golovnev, I.F.; Zamurayev, V.P.; Katsnelson, S.S.; Kovalskaya, G.A.; Sevastyanenko, V.G.; Soloukhin, R.I.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Prospecting by sampling and analysis of airborne particulates and gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is claimed for prospecting by sampling airborne particulates or gases at a ground position and recording wind direction values at the time of sampling. The samples are subsequently analyzed to determine the concentrations of a desired material or the ratios of the desired material to other identifiable materials in the collected samples. By comparing the measured concentrations or ratios to expected background data in the vicinity sampled, one can select recorded wind directions indicative of the upwind position of the land-based source of the desired material.

Sehmel, G.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

MAGNETIC METHOD FOR PRODUCING HIGH VELOCITY SHOCK WAVES IN GASES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for producing high-energy plasmas comprising a tapered shock tube of dielectric material and having a closed small end, an exceedingly low-inductance coll supported about and axially aligned with the small end of the tapered tube. an elongated multiturn coil supported upon the remninder of the exterior wall of the shock tube. a potential source and switch connected in series with the low-inductance coil, a potential source and switch connected in series with the elongated coil, means for hermetically sealing the large end of the tube, means for purging the tube of gases, and means for admitting a selected gas into the shock tube.

Josephson, V.

1960-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

438

Quantum mechanics of one-dimensional trapped Tonks gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several experimental groups are currently working towards realizing quasi-one-dimensional (1D) atom waveguides and loading them with ultracold atoms. The dynamics becomes truly 1D in a regime (Tonks gas) of low temperatures and densities and large positive scattering lengths for which the transverse mode becomes frozen, in which case the many-body Schrodinger dynamics becomes exactly soluble via a Fermi-Bose mapping theorem. In this paper we review our recent work on the exact ground state and quantum dynamics of 1D Tonks gases and assess the possibility of approaching the Tonks regime using Bessel beam optical dipole traps.

M. D. Girardeau; E. M. Wright

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

oil | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oil oil Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 134, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA end-of-year reserves gas oil Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions- Reference Case (xls, 58.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset

440

Heavy crude oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The oil crisis of the past decade has focused most of the attention and effort of researchers on crude oil resources, which are accepted as unrecoverable using known technology. World reserves are estimated to be 600-1000 billion metric tons, and with present technology 160 billion tons of this total can be recovered. This book is devoted to the discussion of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques, their mechanism and applicability to heavy oil reservoirs. The book also discusses some field results. The use of numerical simulators has become important, in addition to laboratory research, in analysing the applicability of oil recovery processes, and for this reason the last section of the book is devoted to simulators used in EOR research.

Okandan, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

Keiser, James R [ORNL; Bestor, Michael A [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Apparatus for dusting off gas by filtration and aspiration cleaning of filter, and application to combustion gases  

SciTech Connect

Method and apparatus for dusting off gases by filtration and cleaning of filter by aspiration and application thereof to combustion gases are disclosed. This invention relates to the filtration of dust loaded gases, and, in particular, combustion gases in the hot state. It consists of passing gases to be dusted off from top to bottom over a bed of pulverulent material, in particular, a sand bed and cleaning the upper layer of said bed by aspiration of dusts deposited thereon. This invention is particularly adapted for dusting off combustion gases from boilers or thermal power stations or gases to be supplied to gas turbines.

Merry, J.

1982-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

443

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 December 2011 Table 57. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil ................................................................. 374 1,067 - 459 5,402 2,850 - 682 28,102 Petroleum Products ............................................... 9,201 6 0 3,132 17,764 2,323 0 97,844 20,880 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 0 0 - - 417 0 - - 2,853 Liquified Petroleum Gases ................................... 0 0 - 1,539 12,003 99 - 2,163 6,192 Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 65 0 - 0 317 - - 0 347 Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 4,931 0 0 698 616 346 0 40,455 4,008 Reformulated - RBOB

444

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 52. Year-to-Date Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Destination, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Destination Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Argentina ............................ - 1 1 - - 1,675 1,675 - 0 0 Australia .............................. - 2 5 - - 302 302 - 0 0 Bahamas ............................ - 1 157 - - 2,602 2,602 7 958 965 Bahrain ............................... - - - - - 2 2 - 0 0 Belgium ............................... - 3 256 - - - - - 19 19 Belize .................................. - - - - - 0 0 - 1 1 Brazil ................................... - 24 10,364 - - 1,626 1,626 - 3,162 3,162 Canada ...............................

445

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Destination, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Destination Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Argentina ............................ - 3 2 - - 1,506 1,506 - - - Australia .............................. - 2 7 - - 316 316 0 1 1 Bahamas ............................ - 1 136 - - 1,284 1,284 12 1,042 1,054 Bahrain ............................... - - - - - 4 4 - 0 0 Belgium ............................... - 5 303 - - 248 248 - 50 50 Belize .................................. - - 0 - - 96 96 - 1 1 Brazil ................................... - 29 5,443 - - 6,240 6,240 - 3,909 3,909 Canada ............................... 24,688 42,457 6,994 - - 2,958 2,958 1,832 6,854 8,687

446

TABLE13.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. 3. PAD District V - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Crude Oil ............................................ 2,165 - 440 154 -73 101 0 2,393 193 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........ 93 43 (s) - 0 -51 - 98 15 75 Pentanes Plus ................................... 51 - 0 - 0 (s) - 42 (s) 9 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 42 43 (s) - 0 -51 - 56 15 66 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ (s) 0 0 - 0 0 - 0 0 (s) Propane/Propylene ....................... 12 47 (s) - 0 -26 - 0 5 80 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 21 -8 0 - 0 -25 - 43 10 -15 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 10 5 0 - 0 (s) - 13 0 2 Other Liquids ..................................... 87 - 71 - 24 87 - 73 3 19 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates ..... 109 - 28 - 0 14 - 121 3 0 Unfinished Oils ................................. - - 43 - 0 32 - -8 0 19 Motor

447

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil ................................................................. 1,646 3,624 0 5,350 102,565 33,807 0 4,046 351,020 Petroleum Products ............................................... 109,235 465 0 32,407 177,805 31,369 0 1,159,745 245,412 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 19 0 - 0 5,780 0 - 0 30,395 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 0 0 - 10,283 127,973 288 - 16,440 50,605 Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 571 10 0 0 6,901 - 0 305 1,643 Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 64,780 102 0 9,507 4,411 4,155 0 538,610 69,841

448

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 1,475,508 2,823 1,490 30,752 - - - - 18,761 18,761 Algeria ................................ 43,791 652 1,396 22,274 - - - - 302 302 Angola ................................ 81,206 - 94 3,313 - - - - 61 61 Ecuador .............................. 64,618 - - - - - - - 1,099 1,099 Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... 174,080 - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. 110,892 - - 323 - - - - - - Libya

449

TABLE11.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. 1. PAD District IV-Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Crude Oil ........................................... 356 - 204 52 -131 -1 0 483 0 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........ 131 (s) 17 - -93 (s) - 19 (s) 35 Pentanes Plus .................................. 25 - 4 - -11 (s) - 5 (s) 12 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 106 (s) 14 - -82 (s) - 14 (s) 23 Ethane/Ethylene ........................... 31 0 0 - -41 0 - 0 0 -10 Propane/Propylene ....................... 48 9 8 - -23 -2 - 0 (s) 43 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 18 -7 6 - -10 1 - 11 0 -5 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 9 -3 0 - -8 1 - 2 0 -4 Other Liquids .................................... 11 - 0 - 0 18 - -5 0 -2 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates .... 3 - 0 - 0 -1 - 4 0 0 Unfinished Oils ................................. - - 0 - 0 3 - -1 0 -2 Motor Gasoline

450

table03.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. 3. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 1998 Crude Oil ............................................... 6,541 - 8,339 60 389 0 14,319 231 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........... 1,805 497 238 - -497 - 478 68 2,492 Pentanes Plus .................................... 303 - 38 - 37 - 138 15 151 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ................ 1,502 497 200 - -534 - 340 53 2,340 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ 636 24 18 - -55 - 0 0 734 Propane/Propylene ........................ 533 527 137 - -310 - 0 29 1,478 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 155 -65 28 - -179 - 234 24 39 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 178 11 17 - 11 - 106 0 89 Other Liquids ........................................ 285 - 476 - 244 - 564 69 -116 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates ...... 369 - 51 - 33 - 337 50 0 Unfinished Oils ...................................

451

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6.PDF 6.PDF Table 36. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil ................................................................. 146 175 - 475 6,913 2,886 - 265 27,489 Petroleum Products ............................................... 8,469 44 0 2,765 17,339 2,569 0 98,419 19,332 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 0 0 - - 406 0 - - 4,121 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 0 0 - 1,378 12,271 111 - 1,243 6,062 Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 36 0 - 0 871 - - 0 47 Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 4,378 0 0 536 527 307 0 41,206 3,077 Reformulated - RBOB .......................................

452

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

453

Illinois Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

454

Performance demonstration program plan for analysis of simulated headspace gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for analysis of headspace gases will consist of regular distribution and analyses of test standards to evaluate the capability for analyzing VOCs, hydrogen, and methane in the headspace of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles will provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for TRU waste characterization. Laboratory performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste drum headspace gases according to the criteria set within the text of this Program Plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAPP QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization gas samples. Analyses which are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories which have demonstrated acceptable performance in the PDP.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Process for recovery of sulfur from acid gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Elemental sulfur is recovered from the H.sub.2 S present in gases derived from fossil fuels by heating the H.sub.2 S with CO.sub.2 in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of a catalyst selected as one which enhances the thermal dissociation of H.sub.2 S to H.sub.2 and S.sub.2. The equilibrium of the thermal decomposition of H.sub.2 S is shifted by the equilibration of the water-gas-shift reaction so as to favor elemental sulfur formation. The primary products of the overall reaction are S.sub.2, CO, H.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O. Small amounts of COS, SO.sub.2 and CS.sub.2 may also form. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture results in a substantial increase in the efficiency of the conversion of H.sub.2 S to elemental sulfur. Plant economy is further advanced by treating the product gases to remove byproduct carbonyl sulfide by hydrolysis, which converts the COS back to CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S. Unreacted CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H.sub.2 and CO, which has value either as a fuel or as a chemical feedstock and recovers the hydrogen value from the H.sub.2 S.

Towler, Gavin P. (Kirkbymoorside, GB2); Lynn, Scott (Pleasant Hill, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth Energy Information Administration (EIA) annual report on US emissions of greenhouse gases. This report presents estimates of US anthropogenic (human-caused) emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and several other greenhouse gases for 1988 through 1994. Estimates of 1995 carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and halocarbon emissions are also provided, although complete 1995 estimates for methane are not yet available. Emissions of carbon dioxide increased by 1.9% from 1993 to 1994 and by an additional 0.8% from 1994 to 1995. Most carbon dioxide emissions are caused by the burning of fossil fuels for energy consumption, which is strongly related to economic growth, energy prices, and weather. The US economy grew rapidly in 1994 and slowed in 1995. Estimated emissions of methane increased slightly in 1994, as a result of a rise in emissions from energy and agricultural sources. Estimated nitrous oxide emissions increased by 1.8% in 1995, primarily due to increased use of nitrogen fertilizers and higher output of chemicals linked to nitrous oxide emissions. Estimated emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which are known to contribute to global warming, increased by nearly 11% in 1995, primarily as a result of increasing substitution for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). With the exception of methane, the historical emissions estimates presented in this report are only slightly revised from those in last year`s report.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

458

Fuel Oil Prepared by Blending Heavy Oil and Coal Tar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of temperature, harmonic ration, surfactant and shearing to fuel oil prepared by blending heavy oil and coal tar were detailedly studied. The results show that the viscosity of the blended oil increases gradually with the increase of harmonic ... Keywords: coal tar, heavy oil, blending, surfactant

Guojie Zhang; Xiaojie Guo; Bo Tian; Yaling Sun; Yongfa Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

An informal description of Standard OIL and Instance OIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An informal description of Standard OIL and Instance OIL 28 November 2000 Sean Bechhofer (1) Jeen to be specified in some language. This paper introduces the newest version of OIL ­ the ontology inference layer of the DAML language, with working name DAML-OIL, was proposed in a message to the rdf-logic mailing list

Ohlbach, Hans Jürgen

460

Table 5.2 Crude Oil Production and Crude Oil Well ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 5.2 Crude Oil Production and Crude Oil Well Productivity, 1954-2011: Year: Crude Oil Production: Crude Oil Well 1 Productivity: 48 States 2: ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

South Dakota Residual Fuel Oil Adj Sales/Deliveries to Oil Company ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil for Oil Company Use ; Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil for Oil Company Use ; South Dakota Adjusted Distillate ...

462

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 CHAPTER 1: WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 CHAPTER 1: WORLD OIL TRENDS Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Onshore Oil Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Offshore Oil Production

463

Oil shale data book  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Shale Data Book has been prepared as a part of its work under DOE Management Support and Systems Engineering for the Naval Oil Shale Reserves Predevelopment Plan. The contract calls for the preparation of a Master Development Plan for the Reserves which comprise some 145,000 acres of oil shale lands in Colorado and Utah. The task of defining the development potential of the Reserves required that the resources of the Reserves be well defined, and the shale oil recovery technologies that are potentially compatible with this resource be cataloged. Additionally, processes associated with shale oil recovery like mining, materials handling, beneficiation, upgrading and spent shale disposal have also been cataloged. This book, therefore, provides a ready reference for evaluation of appropriate recovery technologies and associated processes, and should prove to be valuable for many oil shale activities. Technologies that are still in the process of development, like retorting, have been treated in greater detail than those that are commercially mature. Examples of the latter are ore crushing, certain gas clean-up systems, and pipeline transportation. Emphasis has been on documenting available design information such as, maximum module size, operation conditions, yields, utility requirements, outlet gas compositions, shale oil characteristics, etc. Cost information has also been included where available.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

OpenEI - oil  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

/0 en AEO2011: Oil and Gas /0 en AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/805 This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 134, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. 

License
Type of License: 

465

Tenth oil recovery conference  

SciTech Connect

The Tertiary Oil Recovery Project is sponsored by the State of Kansas to introduce Kansas producers to the economic potential of enhanced recovery methods for Kansas fields. Specific objectives include estimation of the state-wide tertiary oil resource, identification and evaluation of the most applicable processes, dissemination of technical information to producers, occasional collaboration on recovery projects, laboratory studies on Kansas applicable processes, and training of students and operators in tertiary oil recovery methods. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Sleeper, R. (ed.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Oil Speculation by Jussi Keppo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Speculation by Jussi Keppo July 8, 2008 The increase in the oil spot price seems to be mainly, the surplus oil capacity decreased from 5 million barrels a day to 2 million barrels a day. There seems, i.e., they are long in these markets. Here I focus on oil and I have simple points

Keppo, Jussi

467

Market assessment for shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study identified several key issues on the cost, timeliness, and ease with which shale oil can be introduced into the United States' refining system. The capacity of the existing refining industry to process raw shale oil is limited by the availability of surplus hydrogen for severe hydrotreating. The existing crude oil pipeline system will encounter difficulties in handling raw shale oil's high viscosity, pour point, and contaminant levels. The cost of processing raw shale oil as an alternate to petroleum crude oil is extremely variable and primarily dependent upon the percentage of shale oil run in the refinery, as well as the availability of excess hydrogen. A large fraction of any shale oil which is produced will be refined by the major oil companies who participate in the shale oil projects and who do not anticipate problems in processing the shale oil in their refineries. Shale oil produced for sale to independent refiners will initially be sold as boiler fuel. A federal shale oil storage program might be feasible to supplement the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Based on refinery configurations, hydrogen supply, transportation systems, and crude availability, eleven refineries in Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs) 2A and 2B have been identified as potential processors of shale oil. Based on refining technology and projected product demands to the year 2000, shale oil will be best suited to the production of diesel fuel and jet fuel. Tests of raw shale oil in boilers are needed to demonstrate nitrogen oxide emissions control.

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Integrated model shows that atmospheric brown clouds and greenhouse gases have reduced rice harvests in India  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies have found that atmospheric brown clouds partially offset the warming effects of greenhouse gases. This finding suggests a tradeoff between the impacts of reducing emissions of aerosols and greenhouse gases. Results from a statistical model of historical rice harvests in India, coupled with regional climate scenarios from a parallel climate model, indicate that joint reductions in brown clouds and greenhouse gases would in fact have complementary, positive impacts on harvests. The results also imply that adverse climate change due to brown clouds and greenhouse gases contributed to the slowdown in harvest growth that occurred during the past two decades.

Auffhammer, M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Agricultural and Resource Economics; Ramanathan, V. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, CA (United States); Vincent, J.R. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies

2007-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

469

Potential Application of Coal-Derived Fuel Gases for the Glass...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitretek Technical Report Potential Application of Coal-Derived Fuel Gases for the Glass Industry: A Scoping Analysis December 2004 David Gray Salvatore Salerno Glen Tomlinson...

470

Utilization of the noble gases in studies of underground nuclear detonations  

SciTech Connect

From symposium on noble gases; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA (24 Sep 1973). The Livermore Gas Diagnostics Program employs a number of rare gas isotopes, both stable and radioactive, in its investigations of the phenomenology of underground nuclear detonations. Radioactive gases in a sample are radiochemically purified by elution chromatography, and the separated gases are radioassayed by gamma-ray spectrometry and by internal or thin-window beta proportional counting. Concentrations of the stable gases are determined by mass-spectrometry, following chemical removal of the reactive gases in the sample. The most general application of the noble gases is as device fraction indicators to provide a basis for estimating totals of chimney-gas components. All of the stable rare gases except argon have been used as tracers, as have /sup 127/Xe and /sup 85/Kr. /sup 37/Ar and /sup 85/Kr have proven to be of particular value in the absence of a good tracer material as reference species for studies of chimney-gas chemistry. The rate of mixing of chimney gases and the degree to which the sampled gas truly represents the underground gas mixture can be studied with the aid of the fission- product gases. /sup 222/Ra and He are released to the cavity from the surrounding rock and are therefore useful in studies of the interaction of the detonation with the surrounding medium. (auth)

Smith, C.F.

1973-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

471

Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dry fuels were ignited using a butane pilot lighter applied4 H 8 (butene), and C 4 H 10 (n-butane) gases with a Hewlett

McMeeking, Gavin R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Gases other than carbon dioxide make up nearly 20% of U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These gases are commonly used as refrigerants, aerosols, and solvents. Although PFC and SF 6 concentrations have decreased greatly since 1990, ...

473

EIA's Energy in Brief: What are greenhouse gases and how much are ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gases trap heat from the sun and warm the planet's surface. Of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, 87% are related to energy consumption. Since 1990, greenhouse ...

474

HS_Oil_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil Oil Fossil Energy Study Guide: Oil Pet roleum-or cr ude oil-is a fossil fuel that is found in large quantities beneath the Earth's sur face and is often used as a fuel or raw material in the chemical indust r y. It is a smelly, yellow-to-black liquid and is usually found in underg round areas called reser voirs. If you could look down an oil well and see oil where Nature created it, you might be surprised. You wouldn't see a big underground lake, as a lot of people think. Oil doesn't exist in deep, black pools. In fact, an underground oil formation-an "oil reservoir"-looks very much like any other rock formation. Oil exists in this underground formation as tiny droplets trapped inside the open spaces, called "pores," inside rocks. Th

475

MS_Oil_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LOOKING DOWN AN OIL WELL LOOKING DOWN AN OIL WELL Ever wonder what oil looks like underground, down deep, hundreds or thousands of feet below the surface, buried under millions of tons of rock and dirt? If you could look down an oil well and see oil where nature created it, you might be surprised. You wouldn't see a big underground lake, as a lot of people think. Oil doesn't exist in deep, black pools. In fact, an underground oil formation-called an "oil reservoir" -looks very much like any other rock formation. It looks a lot like...well, rock. Oil exists underground as tiny droplets trapped inside the open spaces, called "pores," inside rocks. Th e "pores" and the oil droplets can be seen only through a microscope. Th e droplets cling to the rock, like drops of water cling

476

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 119 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides

477

Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and past heating season. As you can see, prices have started the heating season, about 40 to 50 cents per gallon higher than last year at this time. The data presented are from EIA's State Heating Oil and Propane Program. We normally collect and publish this data twice a month, but given the low stocks and high prices, we started tracking the prices weekly. These data will also be used to determine the price trigger mechanism for the Northeast Heating Oil Reserve. The data are published at a State and regional level on our web site. The slide is to give you some perspective of what is happening in these markets, since you probably will get a number of calls from local residents about their heating fuels bills

478

3. Crude Oil Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

a key area for discoveries, had no significant impact on the National total in 2002. Operators replaced 112 ... 51 4,444 73 12 27 67 61 107 15 13 Crude Oil Proved ...

479

Oil Price Volatility  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Robert J. Weiner Robert J. Weiner Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Public Administration, and International Affairs Public Administration, and International Affairs George Washington University; George Washington University; Membre Associ Membre Associ é é , GREEN, Universit , GREEN, Universit é é Laval Laval EIA Annual Conference Washington Washington 7 April 2009 7 April 2009 1 FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY ► ► Market fundamentals Market fundamentals . . Fluctuations in supply, Fluctuations in supply, demand, and market power demand, and market power Some fundamentals related to expectations of Some fundamentals related to expectations of

480

Winter Crude Oil and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: While the relatively low stock forecast (although not as low as last winter) adds some extra pressure to prices, the price of crude oil could be the major factor affecting heating oil prices this winter. The current EIA forecast shows residential prices averaging $1.29 this winter, assuming no volatility. The average retail price is about 7 cents less than last winter, but last winter included the price spike in November 2000, December 2000, and January 2001. Underlying crude oil prices are currently expected to be at or below those seen last winter. WTI averaged over $30 per barrel last winter, and is currently forecast to average about $27.50 per barrel this winter. As those of you who watch the markets know, there is tremendous uncertainty in the amount of crude oil supply that will be available this winter. Less

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gases unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Oil Market Assessment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Logo Oil Market Assessment - September Logo Oil Market Assessment - September 12, 2001 EIA Home Page Based on Energy Information Administration (EIA) contacts and trade press reports, overall U.S. and global oil supplies appear to have been minimally impacted by yesterday's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Rumors of scattered closures of U.S. refineries, pipelines, and terminals were reported, and Louisiana Offshore Oil Port operations were partially suspended. While the NYMEX and New York Harbor were temporarily closed, operations are expected to resume soon. Most, if not all petroleum industry infrastructure is expected to resume normal operations today or in the very near term. Prices at all levels (where markets were open) posted increases yesterday, but many prices fell today, as initial reactions

482

Industrial Oil Products Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A forum for professionals involved in research, development, engineering, marketing, and testing of industrial products and co-products from fats and oils, including fuels, lubricants, coatings, polymers, paints, inks, cosmetics, dielectric fluids, and ad

483

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21, 2008. “China signs $2bn Iran oil deal. ” Al Jazeera (11of its partnerships: Sudan, Iran and Venezuela. An analysiss $400 million contract with Iran may omit information about

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Crude Oil Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July are likely to not be felt until the very end of August or early September. OPEC crude oil production cuts are not likely to be as great as their cuts in quotas. However, they...

485

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20.86 20.67 20.47 20.24 20.32 19.57 See footnotes at end of table. 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

486

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19.11 18.73 18.63 17.97 18.75 18.10 See footnotes at end of table. 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

487

Crude Oil Price Cycles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The heating oil and diesel fuel price runups in late January were made even more problematic by coming on top of the high side of the latest crude market cycle. Over the past 10...

488

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Res., 104(B10), 22985-23003. Collett, T.S. (1992), Potential of gas hydrates outlined, Oil Gas J., 90(25), 84-87. 70 Cook, A.E., Goldberg, D., and R.L. Kleinberg (2008),...

489

Crude Oil Price Cycles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The heating oil and diesel price runups in late January were made even more problematic by coming on top of the high side of the latest crude market cycle.

490

3. Crude Oil Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coastal Region Onshore ... Los Angeles Basin Onshore. . . 330 0 31 24 31 26 3 0 0 16 319 ... the net loss of proved reserves of crude oil in 2003.

491

Total OECD Oil Stocks  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Notes: OECD oil inventory levels are not expected to rise sufficiently during the rest of the year to match the average levels seen prior to the wide swings since 1995. This...

492

Futures oil market outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We expect the broader expansion of global economic activity in 1995 to more than offset the anticipated slowdown in the US economic growth. This should result in worldwide oil demand growth in excess of 1 million barrels per day and firmer oil prices. This comes on the heels of nearly identical growth in 1994 and should be followed by an even larger increase in 1996. This year`s demand growth comes against a backdrop of flat OPEC production and an increase in non-OPEC supplies that will fall short of the expected increase in consumption. Some degree of political upheaval in at least a half dozen important oil exporting nations could also have implication for crude supplies. One major wildcard that remains for global oil markets is the status of the United Nations` sanctions on Iraqi exports and the timing of when these sanctions are to be eased or lifted completely.

Saucer, J. [Smith Barney, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Sound Oil Company  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sound Oil Company Sound Oil Company file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/blackard/Desktop/EIA/LEE0152.HTM[11/29/2012 2:30:44 PM] DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Application for Exception Name of Petitioner: Sound Oil Company Date of Filing: August 16, 1994 Case Number: LEE-0152 On August 16, 1994, Sound Oil Company (Sound) of Seattle Washington, filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals of the Department of Energy. In its Application, Sound requests that it be relieved of the requirement that it file the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) form entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report" (Form EIA-782B). As explained below, we have determined that the Application for Exception should be denied.

494

Biocatalysis in Oil Refining  

SciTech Connect

Biocatalysis in Oil Refining focuses on petroleum refining bioprocesses, establishing a connection between science and technology. The micro organisms and biomolecules examined for biocatalytic purposes for oil refining processes are thoroughly detailed. Terminology used by biologists, chemists and engineers is brought into a common language, aiding the understanding of complex biological-chemical-engineering issues. Problems to be addressed by the future R&D activities and by new technologies are described and summarized in the last chapter.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Ramirez-Corredores, M. M. [BP Global Fuels Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Oil in Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil is the single most dominant force in the ''energy outlook'' and will continue to be throughout the foreseeable generations. Tennesseans now spend about $10 billion annually to satisfy energy needs; nearly half of that is for oil-based products. Most of the petroleum products sold are in the form of motor fuel, but a third of these products are made up of other categories, such as aviation and jet fuels, heating fuels, and lubricants. Baseline industry data is supplied.

Lamp, R.; Forester, C. (ed.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Oil recovery process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An on-site, in-line process and system is claimed for recovering oil from oil-bearing subterranean formations which involves the production, modification, dilution and injection of a polymer solution, preferably consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide, having injectivity and mobility properties capable of meeting the specific permeability requirements of substantially any subterranean formation to be achieved. The polymer solutions prepared by the process and system can be used as drive fluids for displacing oil (secondary polymer flood) in an oil-bearing formation, as mobility buffers to follow micellar dispersion floods in the conjoint presence of chemical reagents in other chemical floods (e.g., surfactant, caustic, etc.), or they can follow a water flood. The solutions can also be used to promote pipelining of high viscosity crude oil. Irrespective of the use to which the solutions are put, the process and system enable the polymer solutions to be customized, or tailor-made, so to speak, to meet the performance demands of the environment in which they are to be used, whether it be an oil-bearing formation or a pipeline.

Argabright, P.A.; Rhudy, J.S.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

497

Chemically enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yet when conducted according to present state of the art, chemical flooding (i.e., micellar/polymer flooding, surfactant/polymer flooding, surfactant flooding) can mobilize more residual crude oil than any other method of enhanced oil recovery. It also is one of the most expensive methods of enhanced oil recovery. This contribution will describe some of the technology that comprises the state of the art technology that must be adhered to if a chemical flood is to be successful. Although some of the efforts to reduce cost and other points are discussed, the principle focus is on technical considerations in designing a good chemical flooding system. The term chemical flooding is restricted here to methods of enhanced oil recovery that employs a surfactant, either injected into the oil reservoir or generated in situ, primarily to reduce oil-water interfacial tension. Hence, polymer-water floods for mobility or profile control, steam foams, and carbon dioxide foams are excluded. Some polymer considerations are mentioned because they apply to providing mobility control for chemical flooding systems.

Nelson, R.C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Commuting Employee Commuting Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 1:42pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 For employee commuting, it is important to account for any planned or expected changes in a Federal agency's size when estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction potential for different operating units or worksites. Considerations include: Are employment levels expected to change in the next decade at specific facilities or agency-wide? Are there any planned facility moves at major worksites? Employee commute coordinators may want to engage human resources and strategic planners in this effort to establish likely changes in employment numbers. Facility planners may be engaged to understand changes in commutes

499

Entanglement creation in cold molecular gases using strong laser pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While many-particle entanglement can be found in natural solids and strongly interacting atomic and molecular gases, generating highly entangled states between weakly interacting particles in a controlled and scalable way presents a significant challenge. We describe here a one-step method to generate entanglement in a dilute gas of cold polar molecules. For molecules in optical traps separated by a few micrometers, we show that maximally entangled states can be created using the strong off-resonant pulses that are routinely used in molecular alignment experiments. We show that the resulting alignment-mediated entanglement can be detected by measuring laser-induced fluorescence with single-site resolution and that signatures of this molecular entanglement also appear in the microwave absorption spectra of the molecular ensemble. We analyze the robustness of these entangled molecular states with respect to intensity fluctuations of the trapping laser and discuss possible applications of the system for quantum information processing.

Felipe Herrera; Sabre Kais; K. Birgitta Whaley

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

500

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 Planned changes in a Federal agency's size, missions, transportation needs, and vehicle inventory all impact the strategic portfolio planning efforts that target greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mitigation for vehicles and mobile equipment. Under Section 142 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) and Section 8 of Executive Order (E.O.) 13514, agencies are required to develop a plan that will reduce fleet GHG emissions to meet Federally mandated petroleum reduction and alternative fuel increase targets. Agencies can use these plans as a basis for determining potential changes in fleet size and