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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

KKG Group Paraffin Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of a paraffin removal system developed by the KKG Group utilizing the technology of two Russian scientists, Gennady Katzyn and Boris Koggi. The system consisting of chemical ''sticks'' that generate heat in-situ to melt the paraffin deposits in oilfield tubing. The melted paraffin is then brought to the surface utilizing the naturally flowing energy of the well.

Schulte, Ralph

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Laboratory and field investigation of the adsorption of gaseous organic compounds onto quartz filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A common method for measuring the mass of organic carbon in airborne particulate matter involves collection on a quartz filter and subsequent thermal analysis. If unaccounted for, the adsorption of organic gases onto quartz filters will lead to the overestimation of aerosol organic carbon concentrations (positive artifact). A recommended method of correction for the positive artifact involves sampling with a backup filter. Placed behind either the primary quartz filter, or behind a Teflon filter and collected in parallel with the primary quartz filter, the carbon content of the quartz backup filter is a measure of the adsorbed organic material on the primary quartz filter. In this paper, we illustrate the application of this technique to samples collected in Berkeley, California. While the tandem quartz filter method can be successfully applied to correct for the positive artifact, we discuss two cases when this method will fail. We have found that the capacity for adsorption of organic gases is not uniform for all filters. Instead, filters manufactured by the same company, but having different lot numbers, exhibit variable adsorption capacity. Thus, a filter pair composed of filters from different lots may lead to significant under- or overestimation of particulate organic carbon concentration. Additionally, we have observed that the tandem filter method under-corrects for the positive artifact if the sampling time is short (few hours). Laboratory experiments with vapors of single organic compounds corroborate results based on ambient samples. The evolution of adsorbed organic gases, particularly polar compounds, during thermal analysis indicates that a single compound may experience two distinct adsorbent-adsorbate binding energies. Adsorbed gases may co-evolve with particles at temperatures in excess of 250-degree C.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Corrigan, Craig E.; Novakov, T.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multiphase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines. The following deliverables are scheduled during the first three projects of the program: (1) Single-Phase Studies, with three different black oils, which will yield an enhanced computer code for predicting paraffin deposition in deepwater and surface pipelines. (2) Two-Phase Studies, with a focus on heat transfer and paraffin deposition at various pipe inclinations, which will be used to enhance the paraffin deposition code for gas-liquid flow in pipes. (3) Deposition Physics and Water Impact Studies, which will address the aging process, improve our ability to characterize paraffin deposits and enhance our understanding of the role water plays in paraffin deposition in deepwater pipelines. As in the previous two studies, knowledge gained in this suite of studies will be integrated into a state-of-the-art three-phase paraffin deposition computer program.

Michael Volk; Cem Sarica

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

New correlation calculates reliable paraffin solubilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new correlation based on boiling point has been developed which accurately calculates paraffin solubilities in water. The correlation provides reliable solubility values down to very low concentrations (parts per million and less), for which the API correlation is not accurate. It can be used for initial engineering studies, including those involving health, safety, and environmental considerations.

Yaws, C.L.; Pan, X. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (US))

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

5

Gaseous insulators for high voltage electrical equipment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Gaseous insulators comprise compounds having high attachment cross sections for electrons having energies in the 0-1.3 electron volt range. Multi-component gaseous insulators comprise compounds and mixtures having overall high electron attachment cross sections in the 0-1.3 electron volt range and moderating gases having high cross sections for inelastic interactions with electrons of energies 1-4 electron volts. Suitable electron attachment components include hexafluorobutyne, perfluorobutene-2, perfluorocyclobutane, perfluorodimethylcyclobutane, perfluorocyclohexene, perfluoromethylcyclohexane, hexafluorobutadiene, perfluoroheptene-1 and hexafluoroazomethane. Suitable moderating gases include N.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The gaseous insulating mixture can also contain SF.sub.6, perfluoropropane and perfluorobenzene.

Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); James, David R. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Pai, Robert Y. (Concord, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Paraffin deposition in offshore oil production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARAFFIN DEPOSITION IN OFFSHORE OIL PRODUCTION A Thesis by G E R A L D M A S O N E L P H I N G S T O N E J R . Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A & M Univers i ty in part ial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of M A S T E R O F S C I E N C E May 1995 Major Subject: Chemica l Engineering PARAFFIN DEPOSITION IN OFFSHORE OIL PRODUCTION A Thesis by G E R A L D M A S O N E L P H I N G S T O N E J R . Submitted to Texas A & M University in part ial...

Elphingstone, Gerald Mason

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7 detection Pipeline Safety: odorants, flame visibility Compression: cost, reliability #12;Breakout Session goal of a realistic, multi-energy distribution network model Pipeline Technology Improved field

8

Thermal Energy Storage in Metal Foams filled with Paraffin Wax.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Phase change materials (PCM) such as paraffin wax are known to exhibit slow thermal response due to their relatively low thermal conductivity. In this study,… (more)

Vadwala, Pathik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Paraffinic versus naphthenic oils for power circuit breaker applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests comparing paraffinic and naphthenic crude-based insulating oils revealed no significant differences in the mechanical operation of an oil circuit breaker using the two oils. However, the higher pour point, longer carbon-setting rate, and lower gas generation of the paraffinic oil could affect a breaker's insulating and interrupting performance.

Sloat, T.K.; Martello, N.E.; Benish, E.A.; Donohue, E.P.; Tragesser, C.W.; Zinchuk, T.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Composition of paraffinic and naphthenic hydrocarbons in petroleum asphalts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uses a combination of chromatographic, chemical, and spectroscopic methods to determine the composition of the paraffinic and naphthenic hydrocarbons recovered from asphalts. Monitors the completeness of separation of the hydrocarbons from the aromatics on the basis of UV spectra. Finds that in the mixture of adduct-forming hydrocarbons, along with the n-paraffins there were admixtures of isoparaffins and longchain alkylnaphthenes. Concludes that a comparison of the structural-group composition of the asphalt fractions from the different crudes shows that there are only slight differences in the structure of the paraffinic/naphthenic hydrocarbons present in these asphalts, particularly with regard to those hydrocarbons that do not react with urea.

Botvin'eva, A.M.; Dubkova, R.V.; Shkredova, N.A.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout - Strategic Directions for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop...

12

Solid and gaseous fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review covers methods of sampling, analyzing, and testing coal, coke, and coal-derived solids covered during the period of October 1984 through Sept 30, 1986. Energy Research Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts were used as the reference sources. In most categories the volume of material available made it necessary to limit the number of publications in the review. This review also surveys publications concerned with methods for the chemical, physical, and instrumental analyses of gaseous fuels and related materials. Articles of significance appearing in foreign journals and the patent literature that were not available at the time of the last review are also included. Chemical Abstracts and Energy Research Abstracts were used extensively as reference sources. Some selectivity was necessary in order to include the most pertinent publications in preparing this review.

Schultz, H.; Wells, A.W.; Frommell, E.A.; Flenory, P.B.

1987-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Simulation of paraffin damage due to natural cooling in reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the well bore. The precipitated paraffin particles form a suspension with the reservoir fluids. The suspended solid particles tend to be carried towards the wellbore by the liquid stream. Some of these particles deposit in the pore spaces... that the rate of removal of suspended solids is equal to the concentration of suspended solids times a deposition coefficient. The deposition coefficient is obtained by fitting experimental data. This method, introduced by Iwasaki' in 1937 is widely used...

Peddibhotla, Sriram

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Ionic liquids for separation of olefin-paraffin mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to an ionic liquid comprising (i) a cationic portion containing a complex of a silver (I) ion and one or more neutral ligands selected from organoamides, organoamines, olefins, and organonitriles, and (ii) an anionic portion having the chemical formula ##STR00001## wherein m and n are independently 0 or an integer of 1 or above, and p is 0 or 1, provided that when p is 0, the group --N--SO.sub.2--(CF.sub.2).sub.nCF.sub.3 subtended by p is replaced with an oxide atom connected to the shown sulfur atom. The invention is also directed to a method for separating an olefin from an olefin-paraffin mixture by passing the mixture through a layer of the ionic liquid described above.

Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Huang, Jing-Fang

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

15

Ionic liquids for separation of olefin-paraffin mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to an ionic liquid comprising (i) a cationic portion containing a complex of a silver (I) ion and one or more neutral ligands selected from organoamides, organoamines, olefins, and organonitriles, and (ii) an anionic portion having the chemical formula ##STR00001## wherein m and n are independently 0 or an integer of 1 or above, and p is 0 or 1, provided that when p is 0, the group --N--SO.sub.2--(CF.sub.2).sub.nCF.sub.3 subtended by p is replaced with an oxide atom connected to the shown sulfur atom. The invention is also directed to a method for separating an olefin from an olefin-paraffin mixture by passing the mixture through a layer of the ionic liquid described above.

Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Huang, Jing-Fang

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Enforcement Documents - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gaseous Diffusion Plant March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, INC - March 26, 2010 Issued to Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors,...

18

Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2011 August 2011 Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant HIAR-PORTS-2011-08-03 This Independent Activity Report documents an operational awareness...

19

Naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons of residual lube stock from West Siberian crudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lube stocks from West Siberian crudes are characterized by high contents of aromatic hydrocarbons and by high viscosity indexes of the naphthenic/paraffinic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that isoparaffins account for one-third of the total naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons. The study showed that the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons of the residual lube stock from West Siberia crudes, even with a variation of molecular weight over broad limits, are relatively uniform in composition. They consist mainly of isoparaffinic and monocyclic and noncondensed naphthenic structures.

Detusheva, E.P.; Bogdanov, Sh.K.; Khramtsova, L.P.; Nekrasova, A.V.; Shkol'nikov, V.M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Solid and gaseous fuels. [Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review covers methods of sampling, analyzing, and testing coal, coke, and coal-derived solids. Energy Research Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts were used as reference sources. The volume of material available made it necessary to limit the number of publications in the review. This review also surveys publications concerned with methods for the chemical, physical, and instrumental analyses of gaseous fuels and related materials. Articles of significance appearing in foreign journals and the patent literature that were not available at the time of the last review are also included. Chemical Abstracts and Energy Research Abstracts were used extensively as reference sources. Some selectivity was necessary in order to include the most pertinent publications in preparing this review. 386 references.

Schultz, H.; Wells, A.W.; Mima, M.J.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

Hindin, Saul G. (Mendham, NJ); Roberts, George W. (Westfield, NJ)

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

22

Development of Compact Gaseous Sensors with Internal Reference...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Compact Gaseous Sensors with Internal Reference for Monitoring O2 and NOx in Combustion Environments Development of Compact Gaseous Sensors with Internal Reference for Monitoring...

23

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP)...

24

Oxygen stabilized zirconium vanadium intermetallic compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen stabilized intermetallic compound having the formula Zr.sub.x OV.sub.y where x=0.7 to 2.0 and y=0.18 to 0.33. The compound is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures from -196.degree. C. to 450.degree. C. at pressures down to 10.sup.-6 Torr. The compound is also capable of selectively sorbing hydrogen from gaseous mixtures in the presence of CO and CO.sub.2.

Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Combination free electron and gaseous laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Removal of a liquid paraffin film from a water surface by short pulses from a CO{sub 2} laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of removal of a liquid paraffin film from a water surface irradiated by 40 - 270-{mu}s pulses from a CO{sub 2} laser is studied experimentally and theoretically. It is found for the first time that the mass of removed paraffin can exceed that of paraffin located in the region irradiated by the laser pulse. A theoretical model is proposed which explains the results obtained. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Antonova, L I; Drobyazko, S V; Evdokimov, I A; Krasyukov, A G; Likhanskii, V V; Loboiko, A I; Senatorov, Yu M [State Research Center of Russian Federation 'Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research', Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

27

Removal of asphaltene and paraffin deposits using micellar solutions and fused reactions. Final report, 1995--1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical treatments of paraffin and asphaltene deposition by means of cleaning fluids were carried out in this research project. Research focused on the characterization of asphaltene and paraffin materials and dissolution of asphaltene and paraffin deposits using surfactant/micellar fluids developed early in the project. The key parameters controlling the dissolution rate were identified and the process of asphaltene/paraffin dissolution were examined using microscopic apparatus. Numerical modeling was also carried out to understand the dissolution of paraffin deposits. The results show that fused chemical reaction systems are a promising way of removing paraffin deposits in subsea pipelines. The fused system may be in the form of alternate pulses, emulsions systems or encapsulated catalyst systems. Fused reaction systems, in fact, are extremely cost-effective--less than 10% of the cost of replacing entire sections of the blocked pipeline. The results presented in this report can have a real impact on the petroleum industry and the National Oil Program, if it is realized that the remediation technologies developed here can substantially delay abandonment (due to asphaltene/paraffin plugging) of domestic petroleum resources. The report also sheds new light on the nature and properties of asphaltenes and paraffin deposits which will ultimately help the scientific and research community to develop effective methods in eliminating asphaltene/paraffin deposition problems. It must also be realized that asphaltene remediation technologies developed and presented in this report are a real alternative to aromatic cleaning fluids currently used by the petroleum industry.

Chang, C.L.; Nalwaya, V.; Singh, P.; Fogler, H.S.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Method for converting asbestos to non-carcinogenic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hazardous and carcinogenic asbestos waste characterized by a crystalline fibrous structure is transformed into non-carcinogenic, relatively nonhazardous, and non-crystalline solid compounds and gaseous compounds which have commercial utilization. The asbestos waste is so transformed by the complete fluorination of the crystalline fibrous silicate mineral defining the asbestos.

Selby, Thomas W. (Kingston, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Method for converting asbestos to non-carcinogenic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hazardous and carcinogenic asbestos waste characterized by a crystalline fibrous structure is transformed into non-carcinogenic, relatively nonhazardous, and non-crystalline solid compounds and gaseous compounds which have commercial utilization. The asbestos waste is so transformed by the complete fluorination of the crystalline fibrous silicate mineral defining the asbestos. 7 figs.

Selby, T.W.

1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

30

Analysis of Steam Heating of a Two-Layer TBP/N-Paraffin/Nitric Acid Mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of steam heating of a two-layer tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/n-paraffin-nitric acid mixture.The purpose of this study is to determine if the degree of mixing provided by the steam jet or by bubbles generated by the TBP/nitric acid reaction is sufficient to prevent a runaway reaction.

Laurinat, J.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hassan, N.M.; Rudisill, T.S.; Askew, N.M.

1998-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

31

A Study of Cu(I)-Ethylene Complexation for OlefinParaffin Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. An alternative olefin­paraffin separation process with lower energy consumption would significantly decrease oper. Such an absorption method eliminates the need for refrigeration, thus increasing energy efficiency and reducing serves as a key process in the production of many industrial chemicals such as ethylene (95 million tons

Eldridge, R. Bruce

32

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout- Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Targets, barriers and research and development priorities for gaseous delivery of hydrogen through hydrogen and natural gas pipelines.

33

Gaseous modification of MCrAlY coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally describes methods for modifying MCrAlY coatings by using gaseous carburization, gaseous nitriding or gaseous carbonitriding. The modified MCrAlY coatings are useful in thermal barrier coating systems, which may be used in gas turbine engines.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Software digitizer for high granular gaseous detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A sampling calorimeter using gaseous sensor layers with digital readout [1] is near perfect for ``Particle Flow Algorithm'' [2,3] approach, since it is homogeneous over large surfaces, robust, cost efficient, easily segmentable to any readout pad dimension and size and almost insensitive to neutrons. Monte-Carlo (MC) programs such as GEANT4 [4] simulate with high precision the energy deposited by particles. The sensor and electronic response associated to a pad are calculated in a separate ``digitization'' process. We develop a general method for simulating the pad response using the spatial information from a simulation done at high granularity. The digitization method proposed here has been applied to gaseous detectors including Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) and MicroMegas, and validated on test beam data. Experimental observable such as pad multiplicity and mean number of hits at different thresholds have been reproduced with high precision.

Haddad, Y; Boudry, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Diffusion method of seperating gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of effecting a relatively large change in the relative concentrations of the components of a gaseous mixture by diffusion which comprises separating the mixture into heavier and lighter portions according to major fraction mass recycle procedure, further separating the heavier portions into still heavier subportions according to a major fraction mass recycle procedure, and further separating the lighter portions into still lighter subportions according to a major fraction equilibrium recycle procedure.

Pontius, Rex B. (Rochester, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Uranium enrichment export control guide: Gaseous diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was prepared to serve as a guide for export control officials in their interpretation, understanding, and implementation of export laws that relate to the Zangger International Trigger List for gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment process components, equipment, and materials. Particular emphasis is focused on items that are especially designed or prepared since export controls are required for these by States that are party to the International Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Characteristics of naphthenic and paraffinic hydrocarbons of residual oil from West Siberian crudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons segregated by liquid chromatography from a residual oil after removal of the resins and solid hydrocarbons. The studied hydrocarbons were fractionated on the basis of molecular weight (by molecular distillation) and on the basis of the content of rings (by thermal diffusion separation in a laboratory column). The results of mass-spectrometric analysis indicate that the first fraction consists mainly of isoparaffins and naphthenes with few rings. The polycyclic condensed naphthenes are concentrated in the last fraction. The content of isoparaffins drops off and the content of condensed polycyclic naphthenic structures increases from the second fraction to the next to the last. It is concluded that the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons of the residual oil from mixed West Siberian crudes have a relatively narrow composition and therefore have similar physicochemical properties.

Detusheva, E.P.; Khramtsova, L.P.; Muchinskii, T.D.; Shkol'nikov, V.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Band Formation during Gaseous Diffusion in Aerogels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study experimentally how gaseous HCl and NH_3 diffuse from opposite sides of and react in silica aerogel rods with porosity of 92 % and average pore size of about 50 nm. The reaction leads to solid NH_4Cl, which is deposited in thin sheet-like structures. We present a numerical study of the phenomenon. Due to the difference in boundary conditions between this system and those usually studied, we find the sheet-like structures in the aerogel to differ significantly from older studies. The influence of random nucleation centers and inhomogeneities in the aerogel is studied numerically.

M. A. Einarsrud; F. A. Maao; A. Hansen; M. Kirkedelen; J. Samseth

1997-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

39

Thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments using molecular dynamics simulations. It is reported that the thermal conductivity of perfect graphene nanoribbons decreases with the gaseous pressure. The decreasing is more obvious for the noble gas with large atomic number. However, the gaseous pressure cannot change the thermal conductivity of defective graphene nanoribbons apparently. The phonon spectra of graphene nanoribbons are also provided to give corresponding supports.

Zhong, Wei-Rong, E-mail: wrzhong@hotmail.com; Xu, Zhi-Cheng; Zheng, Dong-Qin [Department of Physics and Siyuan Laboratory, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ai, Bao-Quan, E-mail: aibq@scnu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Quantum Information Technology, ICMP and SPTE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

Chemical nature of high-molecular hydrocarbons of gaseous condensates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass spectrometry was used to study the group-structure composition of high-boiling 50 deg (200/degrees/-250/degrees/, 250/degrees/-300/degrees/, and 300/degrees/-350/degrees/C) fractions of East Turkmenistan condensates: the hydrocarbons composition is characterized by a high content of paraffinic hydrocarbons, and that of others by aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons. For all the condensates under investigation, as the boiling temperature of fractions increases, the content of paraffinic hydrocarbons in them is increased, while that of naphthenic hydrocarbons is reduced. The distribution of naphthenic hydrocarbons according to the number of rings is identical. In high-paraffin condensates, monoaromatic hydrocarbons consist mainly structures with alkyl substituents, but in condensates with a high content of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons they consist mainly of structures with naphthenic substituents. 4 references, 1 figures, 2 tables.

Kul'dzhayev, B.A.; Makarov, V.V.; Sergiyenko, S.R.; Khramova, E.V.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Analysis (DSA) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Category 2 Non-leased Facilities: X-345 Special Nuclear Material Storage Facility;...

42

Software digitizer for high granular gaseous detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A sampling calorimeter equipped with gaseous sensor layers with digital readout is near perfect for "Particle Flow Algorithm" approach, since it is homogeneous over large surfaces, robust, cost efficient, easily segmentable to any readout pad dimension and size and almost insensitive to neutrons. The response of a finely segmented digital calorimeter is characterized by track efficiency and multiplicity. Monte Carlo (MC) programs such as GEANT4 simulate with high precision the energy deposited by particles. The sensor and electronic response associated to a pad are calculated in a separate "digitization" process. We developed a general method for simulating the pad response, a digitization, reproducing efficiency and multiplicity, using the spatial information from a simulation done at higher granularity. The digitization method proposed here has been applied to gaseous detectors including Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) and MicroMegas. Validating the method on test beam data, experimental observables such as efficiency, multiplicity and mean number of hits at different thresholds have been reproduced with high precision.

Y. Haddad; M. Ruan; V. Boudry

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

43

Structure H hydrate phase equilibria of paraffins, naphthalenes, and olefins with methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initial phase equilibrium data are reported for 10 methane + liquid hydrocarbon systems forming structure H hydrates in the pressure range of 1--6 MPa. Four-phase equilibrium conditions were measured for each system, with paraffinic, naphthenic, and olefinic liquid hydrocarbons filling the large cage of structure H, and methane stabilizing the two smaller cages present in the hydrate. Many of these liquid hydrocarbons constitute a small fraction of crude oils and condensates, and the high stability and relative ease of formation of structure H suggest a possible impact of these hydrates upon hydrocarbon facilities.

Mehta, A.P.; Sloan, E.D. Jr. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Preparation and characterization of a viscosity index improver for naphthenic and paraffinic base oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Copolymers of [alpha]-methyl styrene and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate were prepared in a benzene solution. The presence of the copolymers were confirmed by solubility, IR and NMR tests. The molecular weight and the polydispersity of the polymers were estimated by GPC. The copolymers obtained were blended with paraffinic and naphthenic base oils. The viscosity, the viscosity index (VI), the Q value as well as the stability to shear and oxidation were obtained for these blends. The results are compared with the results obtained with an oil blend containing a commonly used high temperature additive. Two of the copolymers obtained have shown to be good alternatives for specific applications.

Bataille, P. (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (Canada)); Sharifi-Sangani, N.; Evin, E. (Univ. of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Dry etching method for compound semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dry etching method. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators.

Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Constantine, Christopher (Safety Harbor, FL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

An approach for simulation of paraffin deposition in pipelines as a function of flow characteristics with a reference to Teesside oil pipeline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paraffin deposition is experienced in pipelines during transportation of oil when the oil temperature is cooled below its paraffin deposition temperature. The formed paraffin crystals in the bulk flow are believed to be transported by molecular, brownian diffusion and shear dispersion. Gravity settling mechanism in previous work in the authors` laboratory has been shown to contribute to the total paraffin deposition, however, to a lesser extent than the above mentioned mechanisms. The work done here demonstrates that the paraffin deposition by molecular diffusion mechanism is a dominant one. This is in agreement with other previous studies done on the paraffin deposition. In this study, however, experimental design was made to quantify this statement. The paraffin concentration gradient (dc/dr) is the driving force of the molecular diffusion mechanism (where r is the pipeline radius). In pipelines the cooling rate is one of many factors that affect the paraffin deposition profile. Equipment was designed to simulate the flow characteristics at pipeline pressure. A three dimensional model was developed for paraffin deposition rates at various flow regimes. The developed experimental approach and the designed equipment for simulating the pipeline conditions are presented in this paper.

Hamouda, A.A.; Davidsen, S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Simulating the Gaseous Halos of Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of local X-ray absorbers, high-velocity clouds, and distant quasar absorption line systems suggest that a significant fraction of baryons may reside in multi-phase, low-density, extended, ~100 kpc, gaseous halos around normal galaxies. We present a pair of high-resolution SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) simulations that explore the nature of cool gas infall into galaxies, and the physical conditions necessary to support the type of gaseous halos that seem to be required by observations. The two simulations are identical other than their initial gas density distributions: one is initialized with a standard hot gas halo that traces the cuspy profile of the dark matter, and the other is initialized with a cored hot halo with a high central entropy, as might be expected in models with early pre-heating feedback. Galaxy formation proceeds in dramatically different fashions in these two cases. While the standard cuspy halo cools rapidly, primarily from the central region, the cored halo is quasi-stable for ~4 Gyr and eventually cools via the fragmentation and infall of clouds from ~100 kpc distances. After 10 Gyr of cooling, the standard halo's X-ray luminosity is ~100 times current limits and the resultant disk galaxy is twice as massive as the Milky Way. In contrast, the cored halo has an X-ray luminosity that is in line with observations, an extended cloud population reminiscent of the high-velocity cloud population of the Milky Way, and a disk galaxy with half the mass and ~50% more specific angular momentum than the disk formed in the low-entropy simulation. These results suggest that the distribution and character of halo gas provides an important testing ground for galaxy formation models and may be used to constrain the physics of galaxy formation.

Tobias Kaufmann; James S. Bullock; Ari Maller; Taotao Fang

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Polybenzimidazole compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Chubbuck, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Trowbridge, Tammy L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

49

Polybenzimidazole compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

Process for reforming naphthene and paraffin-containing hydrocarbons in the naphtha boiling range and isomerizing C sub 5 -C sub 6 normal paraffin feedstock to produce a high octane gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for reforming a naphthenic and paraffin-containing hydrocarbon feedstock to produce a reformate product having an increased octane rating by contacting the feedstock with a reforming catalyst in the presence of hydrogen at reforming conditions in a reforming zone, the reforming zone including a naphtha dehydrogenation zone and a paraffin dehydrocyclization zone wherein heated, pressurized hydrogen is added to the effluent stream from the naphtha dehydrogenation zone prior to charging the effluent stream to the paraffin dehydrocyclization zone to produce a first product stream comprising a gasoline range reformate product having an RON octane rating of at least about 90 and hydrogen wherein the reformate product is separated from the hydrogen in a reformate separation zone. It comprises: charging at least a portion of the heated, pressurized hydrogen with a C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} n-paraffin feedstock to an isomerization zone containing an isomerization catalyst at isomerization conditions to produce a second product stream containing an isomerized C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} product and passing the second product stream to the reformate separation zone and recovering at least a major portion of the isomerized C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} product with the reformate product.

Dalson, M.H.

1990-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

51

Gaseous Detectors: recent developments and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multiwire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volume with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photo-lithography and micro-processing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high energy physics, MPGD applications has expanded to nuclear physics, UV and visible photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection and medical physics.

Maxim Titov

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

52

Combustion characteristics of alternative gaseous fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental flame properties of mixtures of air with hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and C{sub 1}–C{sub 4} saturated hydrocarbons were studied both experimentally and numerically. The fuel mixtures were chosen in order to simulate alternative gaseous fuels and to gain insight into potential kinetic couplings during the oxidation of fuel mixtures. The studies included the use of the counterflow configuration for the determination of laminar flame speeds, as well as extinction and ignition limits of premixed flames. The experiments were modeled using the USC Mech II kinetic model. It was determined that when hydrocarbons are added to hydrogen flames as additives, flame ignition, propagation, and extinction are affected in a counterintuitive manner. More specifically, it was found that by substituting methane by propane or n-butane in hydrogen flames, the reactivity of the mixture is reduced both under pre-ignition and vigorous burning conditions. This behavior stems from the fact that propane and n-butane produce higher amounts of methyl radicals that can readily recombine with atomic hydrogen and reduce thus the rate of the H + O{sub 2} ? O + OH branching reaction. The kinetic model predicts closely the experimental data for flame propagation and extinction for various fuel mixtures and pressures, and for various amounts of carbon dioxide in the fuel blend. On the other hand, it underpredicts, in general, the ignition temperatures.

Park, O.; Veloo, Peter S.; Liu, N.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Syntheses and studies of organosilicon compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The syntheses of polycarbosilanes and polysilanes as silicon carbide ceramic precursors have been active research areas in the Barton Research Group. In this thesis, the work is focused on the preparation of polycarbosilanes and polysilanes as stoichiometric silicon carbide precursor polymers. The syntheses of the precursor polymers are discussed and the conversions of these precursors to silicon carbide via pyrolysis are reported. The XRD pattern and elemental analyses of the resulting silicon carbide ceramics are presented. Silicon monoxide is an important intermediate in the production of silicon metal. The existence of silicon monoxide in gap phase has been widely accepted. In the second part of this thesis, the generation of gaseous silicon monoxide in four different reactors and the reactions of gaseous silicon monoxide towards organic compounds are discussed.

Xie, R.

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

54

Separation of Olefin/Paraffin Mixtures with Carrier Facilitated Membrane Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the results of a DOE funded joint effort of Membrane Technology and Research Inc. (MTR), SRI International (SRI), and ABB Lummus (ABB) to develop facilitated transport membranes for olefin/paraffin separations. Currently, olefin/paraffin separation is done by distillation—an extremely energy-intensive process because of the low relative volatilities of olefins and paraffins. If facilitated transport membranes could be successfully commercialized, the potential energy savings achievable with this membrane technology are estimated to be 48 trillion Btu per year by the year 2020. We discovered in this work that silver salt-based facilitated transport membranes are not stable even in the presence of ideal olefin/paraffin mixtures. This decline in membrane performance appears to be caused by a previously unrecognized phenomenon that we have named olefin conditioning. As the name implies, this mechanism of performance degradation becomes operative once a membrane starts permeating olefins. This project is the first study to identify olefin conditioning as a significant factor impacting the performance of facilitated olefin transport membranes. To date, we have not identified an effective strategy to mitigate the impact of olefin conditioning. other than running at low temperatures or with low olefin feed pressures. In our opinion, this issue must be addressed before further development of facilitated olefin transport membranes can proceed. In addition to olefin conditioning, traditional carrier poisoning challenges must also be overcome. Light, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, and acetylene exposure adversely affect membrane performance through unwanted reaction with silver ions. Harsh poisoning tests with these species showed useful membrane lifetimes of only one week. These tests demonstrate a need to improve the stability of the olefin complexing agent to develop membranes with lifetimes satisfactory for commercial application. A successful effort to improve membrane coating solution stability resulted in the finding that membrane performance loss could be reversed for all poisoning cases except hydrogen sulfide exposure. This discovery offers the potential to extend membrane lifetime through cyclic regeneration. We also found that certain mixed carriers exhibited greater stability in reducing environments than exhibited by silver salt alone. These results offer promise that solutions to deal with carrier poisoning are possible. The main achievement of this program was the progress made in gaining a more complete understanding of the membrane stability challenges faced in the use of facilitated olefin transport membranes. Our systematic study of facilitated olefin transport uncovered the full extent of the stability challenge, including the first known identification of olefin conditioning and its impact on membrane development. We believe that significant additional fundamental research is required before facilitated olefin transport membranes are ready for industrial implementation. The best-case scenario for further development of this technology would be identification of a novel carrier that is intrinsically more stable than silver ions. If the stability problems could be largely circumvented by development of a new carrier, it would provide a clear breakthrough toward finally recognizing the potential of facilitated olefin transport. However, even if such a carrier is identified, additional development will be required to insure that the membrane matrix is a benign host for the olefin-carrier complexation reaction and shows good long-term stability.

Merkel, T.C.; Blanc, R.; Zeid, J.; Suwarlim, A.; Firat, B.; Wijmans, H.; Asaro, M. (SRI); Greene, M. (Lummus)

2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

Feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The five buildings at the K-25 Site formerly involved in the gaseous diffusion process contain 5000 gaseous diffusion stages as well as support facilities that are internally contaminated with uranium deposits. The gaseous diffusion facilities located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant also contain similar equipment and will eventually close. The decontamination of these facilities will require the most cost-effective technology consistent with the criticality, health physics, industrial hygiene, and environmental concerns; the technology must keep exposures to hazardous substances to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report documents recent laboratory experiments that were conducted to determine the feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of the internal surfaces of the gaseous diffusion equipment that is contaminated with uranium deposits. A gaseous fluorinating agent is used to fluorinate the solid uranium deposits to gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The lab results regarding the feasibility of the gas-phase process are encouraging. These results especially showed promise for a novel decontamination approach called the long-term, low-temperature (LTLT) process. In the LTLT process: The equipment is rendered leak tight, evacuated, leak tested, and pretreated, charged with chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) to subatmospheric pressure, left for an extended period, possibly > 4 months, while processing other items. Then the UF{sub 6} and other gases are evacuated. The UF{sub 6} is recovered by chemical trapping. The lab results demonstrated that ClF{sub 3} gas at subatmospheric pressure and at {approx} 75{degree}F is capable of volatilizing heavy deposits of uranyl fluoride from copper metal surfaces sufficiently that the remaining radioactive emissions are below limits.

Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Oxygen-stabilized zirconium-vanadium intermetallic compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen stabilized intermetallic compound having the formula Zr/sub x/OV/sub y/ where x = 0.7 to 2.0 and y = 0.18 to 0.33 is described. The compound is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures from - 196/sup 0/C to 450/sup 0/C at pressures down to 10/sup -6/ Torr. The compound is also capable of selectively sorbing hydrogen from gaseous mixtures in the presence of CO and CO/sub 2/.

Mendelsohn, M.H.; Gruen, D.M.

1981-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

57

Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

Hanna, Mark Cooper (Boulder, CO); Reedy, Robert (Golden, CO)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

58

The effect of a paraffin screen on the neutron dose at the maze door of a 15 MV linear accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a paraffin screen located at various positions in the maze on the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door.Methods: The neutron dose equivalent was measured at the maze door of a room containing a 15 MV linear accelerator for x-ray therapy. Measurements were performed for several positions of the paraffin screen covering only 27.5% of the cross-sectional area of the maze. The neutron dose equivalent was also measured at all screen positions. Two simple models of the neutron source were considered in which the first assumed that the source was the cross-sectional area at the inner entrance of the maze, radiating neutrons in an isotropic manner. In the second model the reduction in the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door due to the paraffin screen was considered to be a function of the mean values of the neutron fluence and energy at the screen.Results: The results of this study indicate that the equivalent dose at the maze door was reduced by a factor of 3 through the use of a paraffin screen that was placed inside the maze. It was also determined that the contributions to the dosage from areas that were not covered by the paraffin screen as viewed from the dosimeter, were 2.5 times higher than the contributions from the covered areas. This study also concluded that the contributions of the maze walls, ceiling, and floor to the total neutron dose equivalent were an order of magnitude lower than those from the surface at the far end of the maze.Conclusions: This study demonstrated that a paraffin screen could be used to reduce the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door by a factor of 3. This paper also found that the reduction of the neutron dose equivalent was a linear function of the area covered by the maze screen and that the decrease in the dose at the maze door could be modeled as an exponential function of the product ?·E at the screen.

Krmar, M.; Kuzmanovi?, A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad 21000 (Serbia)] [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad 21000 (Serbia); Nikoli?, D. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada)] [National Institute for Nanotechnology, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Kuzmanovi?, Z. [International Medical Centers, Banja Luka 78000, Republika Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegowina)] [International Medical Centers, Banja Luka 78000, Republika Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Ganezer, K. [Physics Department, California State University Dominguez Hills, Carson, California 90747 (United States)] [Physics Department, California State University Dominguez Hills, Carson, California 90747 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

A new carbon-13 method for determining aromatic, naphthenic and paraffinic carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The determination of the relative percentages of aromatic, naphthenic and paraffinic carbon in samples of natural origin is important for many petroleum related studies including processing, geological studies, and certain product specifications. The normal method is the n-d-M method which requires the measurement of refractive index, density and molecular weight and a ternary correlation diagram to obtain the relative carbon percentages. It is difficult or inconvenient to make n-d-M measurements of very heavy products and the presence of significant amounts of polar materials makes n-d-M results inaccurate. The average molecular parameters determinable by a number of NMR techniques are directly or indirectly related to the percentage of various carbon types present in the mixture. Unfortunately, all the standard techniques we have examined have some built-in assumption which does not allow the accurate calculation of relative carbon percentages. For example, any proton technique applicable to aromatic fractions will give potentially low values for naphthenic carbon because naphthenic carbon is normally determined from the ..beta..-CH/sub 2/ region of tetralin-type structures (1.65-1.9 ppm). This is a very specific kind of naphthenic structure and to the extent that more than one saturate ring is asymmetrically condensed to the aromatic ring or that the saturate rings are not directly condensed to the aromatic rings, the method will fail.

Galya, L.G.; Young, D.C.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Something to buy paraffin with: an investigation into domestic energy consumption in rural Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, two government agencies have surveyed energy consumption in Kenya. These two studies yielded conflicting results, necessitating that a third, more carefully conducted survey be used as the basis for this study. The survey instrument used was designed by the author and included questions regarding the types and quantities of fuels used, income information, and demographic data; 572 households were surveyed. The results are first aggregated by ecological zone and compared with the responses of the same households from the 1979 energy survey. Two findings emerge. First, wood consumption is lower in the high and medium potential lands. Fuelwood scarcity appears to be caused by high population density, not low ecological potential. Second, consumption of fuelwood and paraffin (i.e., kerosene) has decreased significantly over the past two years, due mainly to the increased price of the latter and the increased scarcity of the former. Next, the survey results are analyzed by way of a farm-type classification system which classifies the respondents into five groups: non-surplus farmers, surplus farmers, cash-surplus farmers, cash crop farmers, and wage workers. Finally, the analysis takes a relational perspective relying upon regression analysis. Income serves as a determinant of kerosene consumption, but not of fuelwood consumption.

Hosier, R.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Direct vapor/solid synthesis of mercuric iodide using compounds of mercury and iodine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for producing high purity mercuric iodide by passing a gaseous source of a mercuric compound through a particulate bed of a low vapor pressure iodide compound which is maintained at an elevated temperature which is the lower of either: (a) just below the melting or volatilization temperature of the iodide compound (which ever is lower); or (b) just below the volatilization point of the other reaction product formed during the reaction; to cause the mercuric compound to react with the iodide compound to form mercuric iodide which then passes as a vapor out of the bed into a cooler condensation region.

Skinner, Nathan L. (Carpinteria, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1 , L. Loyon2 , F. Guiziou2 , P to measure emissions factors of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O) methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from stored pig slurry and measured the variations of the emissions in time and space. In 2006, dynamic

Boyer, Edmond

63

Separation phenomenon in the Windowless Gaseous Tritium Source of KATRIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Separation phenomenon in the Windowless Gaseous Tritium Source of KATRIN experiment. Ternary separa- tion. In the KATRIN experiment, in order to analyze the spectrum of electrons emmited by Tritium decay, it is very important to know the concentration distribution of Tritium along the source

Sharipov, Felix

64

Test of potential homogeneity in the KATRIN gaseous tritium source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

83mKr is supposed to be used to study the properties of the windowless gaseous tritium source of the experiment KATRIN. In this work we deduce the amount of 83mKr which is necessary to determine possible potential inhomogeneities via conversion-electron-line broadening.

M. Rysavy

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

65

THE POSSIBILITY OF PRODUCING THERMONUCLEAR REACTIONS IN A GASEOUS DISCHARGE*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE POSSIBILITY OF PRODUCING THERMONUCLEAR REACTIONS IN A GASEOUS DISCHARGE* I.V. Kurchatov of the energy of thermonuclear reactions. Physicists the world over are attracted by the extraordinarily interest- ing and very difficult task of controlling thermonuclear reactiom. Investigations in this field

66

Methods for deacidizing gaseous mixtures by phase enhanced absorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process for deacidizing a gaseous mixture using phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption is described. The process utilizes a multiphasic absorbent that absorbs an acid gas at increased rate and leads to reduced overall energy costs for the deacidizing operation.

Hu, Liang

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

67

Development of a Field Design for In Situ Gaseous Treatment of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Design for In Situ Gaseous Treatment of Sediment Based on Laboratory Column Test Data. Development of a Field Design for In Situ Gaseous Treatment of Sediment Based on...

68

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report for 1992, is published annually. It reflects the results of an environmental monitoring program designed to quantify potential increases in the concentration of contaminants and potential doses to the resident human population. The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP`s neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, reduce the generation of waste, and minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

Horak, C.M. [ed.] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Method of producing gaseous products using a downflow reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reactor systems and methods are provided for the catalytic conversion of liquid feedstocks to synthesis gases and other noncondensable gaseous products. The reactor systems include a heat exchange reactor configured to allow the liquid feedstock and gas product to flow concurrently in a downflow direction. The reactor systems and methods are particularly useful for producing hydrogen and light hydrocarbons from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons using aqueous phase reforming. The generated gases may find used as a fuel source for energy generation via PEM fuel cells, solid-oxide fuel cells, internal combustion engines, or gas turbine gensets, or used in other chemical processes to produce additional products. The gaseous products may also be collected for later use or distribution.

Cortright, Randy D; Rozmiarek, Robert T; Hornemann, Charles C

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site Environmental Report for 1990, is published annually. It reflects the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on the area's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation, and wildlife. In addition, an assessment of the effect of PGDP effluents on the resident human population is made. PGDP's overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, to reduce the formation of waste, and to minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Dry deposition of gaseous elemental iodine on water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to receptor is essential in hazard evaluation. These processes include diffusion in the atmosphere and deposition on the earth's surface, followed by translocation through bioenvironmental pathways. All nuclear power plants sre constructed near a large... body of water used for cooling, and, at the present time, all nuclear plants release gaseous radioiodine. As a result, deposition of I2 on surface water is sn additional exposure pathway which must be considered when evaluating the hazard...

Allen, Michael Dana

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Chapter 4 The Gaseous State Chemistry of Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.15 V = V0[1+(t/273.15oC)] Kelvin T = 273.15 + t(Celsius) #12;Boyle's Law · The stirling engine, a heatChapter 4 The Gaseous State NO2 #12;AIR #12;Chemistry of Gases SO3 .. corrosive gas SO2...burning) ~1760 Charle The definition of the Temperature All gases expand with increasing temperature by the same

Ihee, Hyotcherl

74

Origin of gaseous hydrocarbons in east-central Texas groundwaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Follett, 1974). The high transmissivity and sandy lithology of the Sparta are much like those of the Queen City, as is the quality of water. 40 LIGNITE STREAKS 30 Laminated and discontinuous lenticular. Trough cross bedded siltstones. 20 ROAD l... hydrocarbons simply reflects a difference in the 5 C of the substrate. Sparta lignite is about 7%%do enriched in ' C relative to Yegua lignite, comparable to the difference seen in the gaseous hydrocarbons. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank Dr. Steven...

Coffman, Bryan Keith

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Onsite Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plant UF6 Cylinder Destructive Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IAEA safeguards approach for gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) includes measurements of gross, partial, and bias defects in a statistical sampling plan. These safeguard methods consist principally of mass and enrichment nondestructive assay (NDA) verification. Destructive assay (DA) samples are collected from a limited number of cylinders for high precision offsite mass spectrometer analysis. DA is typically used to quantify bias defects in the GCEP material balance. Under current safeguards measures, the operator collects a DA sample from a sample tap following homogenization. The sample is collected in a small UF6 sample bottle, then sealed and shipped under IAEA chain of custody to an offsite analytical laboratory. Current practice is expensive and resource intensive. We propose a new and novel approach for performing onsite gaseous UF6 DA analysis that provides rapid and accurate assessment of enrichment bias defects. DA samples are collected using a custom sampling device attached to a conventional sample tap. A few micrograms of gaseous UF6 is chemically adsorbed onto a sampling coupon in a matter of minutes. The collected DA sample is then analyzed onsite using Laser Ablation Absorption Ratio Spectrometry-Destructive Assay (LAARS-DA). DA results are determined in a matter of minutes at sufficient accuracy to support reliable bias defect conclusions, while greatly reducing DA sample volume, analysis time, and cost.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Carter, Jennifer C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Phillips, Jon R.; Curtis, Michael M.

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

76

Infrared scintillation yield in gaseous and liquid argon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of primary and secondary scintillations in noble gases and liquids is of paramount importance to rare-event experiments using noble gas media. In the present work, the scintillation yield in gaseous and liquid Ar has for the first time been measured in the near infrared (NIR) and visible region, both for primary and secondary (proportional) scintillations, using Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APDs) and pulsed X-ray irradiation. The primary scintillation yield of the fast component was measured to be 17000 photon/MeV in gaseous Ar in the NIR, in the range of 690-1000 nm, and 510 photon/MeV in liquid Ar, in the range of 400-1000 nm. Proportional NIR scintillations (electroluminescence) in gaseous Ar have been also observed; their amplification parameter at 163 K was measured to be 13 photons per drifting electron per kV. Possible applications of NIR scintillations in high energy physics experiments are discussed.

A. Buzulutskov; A. Bondar; A. Grebenuk

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

Modified gaseous atmospheres for storage of beef, lamb and pork  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODIFIED G'~. ' . . OUS ATMOSPHERI. S FOR STORAGE OI REEF, I. PMB AND PORK A Thesis by GEORGE THEODORE DAVIS I II Submitted to thc. graduate college of Texas AsM University in partial fulfillment of the rec, u. 'rement fox the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December ' 1979 Major Subject: Animal "" ience MODIF1ED GASEOUS ATMOSPHERES FOR STORAGE OF BEEFi LAMB AND PORK A Thesis GEORGE THEODORE DAVIS III Approved as to style and content. by (Co Chairman of ommittee) (Member) (Member...

Davis, George Theodore

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calendar year 1990 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the summary, discussion, and conclusions (Part 1) and the data presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are as follows: report 1990 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (when appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance.

Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared Temanson - Project Leader atDepartment ofK-25 Gaseous

80

Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope $\\alpha$-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

J. Renner; V. M. Gehman; A. Goldschmidt; H. S. Matis; T. Miller; Y. Nakajima; D. Nygren; C. A. B. Oliveira; D. Shuman; V. Álvarez; F. I. G. Borges; S. Cárcel; J. Castel; S. Cebrián; A. Cervera; C. A. N. Conde; T. Dafni; T. H. V. T. Dias; J. Díaz; R. Esteve; P. Evtoukhovitch; L. M. P. Fernandes; P. Ferrario; A. L. Ferreira; E. D. C. Freitas; A. Gil; H. Gómez; J. J. Gómez-Cadenas; D. González-Díaz; R. M. Gutiérrez; J. Hauptman; J. A. Hernando Morata; D. C. Herrera; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; M. A. Jinete; L. Labarga; A. Laing; I. Liubarsky; J. A. M. Lopes; D. Lorca; M. Losada; G. Luzón; A. Marí; J. Martín-Albo; A. Martínez; A. Moiseenko; F. Monrabal; M. Monserrate; C. M. B. Monteiro; F. J. Mora; L. M. Moutinho; J. Muñoz Vidal; H. Natal da Luz; G. Navarro; M. Nebot-Guinot; R. Palma; J. Pérez; J. L. Pérez Aparicio; L. Ripoll; A. Rodríguez; J. Rodríguez; F. P. Santos; J. M. F. dos Santos; L. Seguí; L. Serra; A. Simón; C. Sofka; M. Sorel; J. F. Toledo; A. Tomás; J. Torrent; Z. Tsamalaidze; J. F. C. A. Veloso; J. A. Villar; R. C. Webb; J. White; N. Yahlali

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Low energy consumption method for separating gaseous mixtures and in particular for medium purity oxygen production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the separation of gaseous mixtures such as air and for producing medium purity oxygen, comprising compressing the gaseous mixture in a first compressor to about 3.9-4.1 atmospheres pressure, passing said compressed gaseous mixture in heat exchange relationship with sub-ambient temperature gaseous nitrogen, dividing the cooled, pressurized gaseous mixture into first and second streams, introducing the first stream into the high pressure chamber of a double rectification column, separating the gaseous mixture in the rectification column into a liquid oxygen-enriched stream and a gaseous nitrogen stream and supplying the gaseous nitrogen stream for cooling the compressed gaseous mixture, removing the liquid oxygen-enriched stream from the low pressure chamber of the rectification column and pumping the liquid, oxygen-enriched steam to a predetermined pressure, cooling the second stream, condensing the cooled second stream and evaporating the oxygen-enriched stream in an evaporator-condenser, delivering the condensed second stream to the high pressure chamber of the rectification column, and heating the oxygen-enriched stream and blending the oxygen-enriched stream with a compressed blend-air stream to the desired oxygen concentration.

Jujasz, Albert J. (North Olmsted, OH); Burkhart, James A. (Olmsted Falls, OH); Greenberg, Ralph (New York, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Paducah Gaseous...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

27: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Paducah, Kentucky EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the...

83

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of residual enriched uranium in facility components for safeguards and nuclear criticality...

84

Liquid and gaseous waste operations section. Annual operating report CY 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents information on the liquid and gaseous wastes operations section for calendar year 1997. Operating activities, upgrade activities, and maintenance activities are described.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - absorbing gaseous medium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Elperin, Tov - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University Collection: Engineering 3 Extending the Photon Mapping Method for Realistic Rendering of Hot Gaseous...

86

Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids, producing a small atomic uranium vapor plume. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. LAARS has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for U-235. The sample is scanned and assayed point-by-point at rates reaching 1 million measurements/hour, enabling LAARS to detect and analyze uranium in trace samples. The spectrometer is assembled using primarily commercially available components and features a compact design and automated analysis.Two specific gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) applications of the spectrometer are currently under development: 1) LAARS-Environmental Sampling (ES), which collects and analyzes aerosol particles for GCEP misuse detection and 2) LAARS-Destructive Assay (DA), which enables onsite enrichment DA sample collection and analysis for protracted diversion detection. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in GCEP safeguards verification.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Munley, John T.; Nelson, Danny A.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Phillips, Jon R.

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

87

INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB--the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is equal to that of hexanitrostilbene (HNS), yet it too is a better explosive performer. The recently discovered tetrazol derivative, 3,6-bis-(1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-ylamino)-s-tetrazine (BTATz) was measured to have exceptional positive heats of formation and to be insensitive to explosive initiation. Because of its high burn rate with low sensitivity to pressure, this material is of great interest to the propellant community.

D. CHAVEZ; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12 #12;First shell Second shell Third shell Hydrogen 1H Lithium 3Li Sodium 11Na Beryllium 4Be Magnesium energy Higher energy (a) A ball bouncing down a flight of stairs provides an analogy for energy levels

Frey, Terry

89

Seismic issues at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A seismic expert workshop was held at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on March 13--15, 1989. the PGDP is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). During the last twenty years the design criteria for natural phenomenon hazards has steadily become more demanding at all of the DOE Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) sites. The purpose of the two-day workshop was to review the seismic vulnerability issues of the PGDP facilities. Participants to the workshop included recognized experts in the fields of seismic engineering, seismology and geosciences, and probabilistic analysis, along with engineers and other personnel from Energy Systems. A complete list of the workshop participants is included in the front of this report. 29 refs.

Fricke, K.E. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-part environmental report is published annually. It reflects the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on the area's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation, and wildlife. In addition, an assessment of the effect of PGDP effluents on the resident human population is made. PGDP's overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, to reduce the formation of waste, and to minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials. 36 refs.

Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Spectral modeling of gaseous metal disks around DAZ white dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on our attempt for the first non-LTE modeling of gaseous metal disks around single DAZ white dwarfs recently discovered by Gaensicke et al. and thought to originate from a disrupted asteroid. We assume a Keplerian rotating viscous disk ring composed of calcium and hydrogen and compute the detailed vertical structure and emergent spectrum. We find that the observed infrared CaII emission triplet can be modeled with a hydrogen-deficient gas ring located at R=1.2 R_sun, inside of the tidal disruption radius, with Teff about 6000 K and a low surface mass density of about 0.3 g/cm**2. A disk having this density and reaching from the central white dwarf out to R=1.2 R_sun would have a total mass of 7 10**21 g, corresponding to an asteroid with about 160 km diameter.

K. Werner; T. Nagel; T. Rauch

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program.

Horak, C.M. [ed.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Jupiter and Super-Earth embedded in a gaseous disc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we investigate the evolution of a pair of interacting planets - a Jupiter mass planet and a Super-Earth with the 5.5 Earth masses - orbiting a Solar type star and embedded in a gaseous protoplanetary disc. We focus on the effects of type I and II orbital migrations, caused by the planet-disc interaction, leading to the Super-Earth capture in first order mean motion resonances by the Jupiter. The stability of the resulting resonant system in which the Super-Earth is on the internal orbit relatively to the Jupiter has been studied numerically by means of full 2D hydrodynamical simulations. Our main motivation is to determine the Super-Earth behaviour in the presence of the gas giant in the system. It has been found that the Jupiter captures the Super-Earth into the interior 3:2 or 4:3 mean motion resonances and the stability of such configurations depends on the initial planet positions and eccentricity evolution. If the initial separation of planet orbits is larger or close to that required for the exact resonance than the final outcome is the migration of the pair of planets with the rate similar to that of the gas giant at least for time of our simulations. Otherwise we observe a scattering of the Super-Earth from the disc. The evolution of planets immersed in the gaseous disc has been compared with their behaviour in the case of the classical three-body problem when the disc is absent.

E. Podlewska; E. Szuszkiewicz

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

94

Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turbo Compounding Technology Update Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update 15 August, 2007 Carl Vuk 15 August, 2007 Carl Vuk Electric Turbo Compounding Highlights Electric...

95

XAFS Model Compound Library  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

Newville, Matthew

96

Preparation of uranium compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds are prepared. They are useful in the preparation of partially fluorinated dienes, in which the repeat units are cycloaliphatic.

Han, legal representative, Amy Qi (Hockessin, DE); Yang, Zhen-Yu (Hockessin, DE)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

98

Method for production of an isotopically enriched compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is presented for producing and isolating an isotopically enriched compound of a desired isotope from a parent radionuclide. The method includes forming, or placing, a precipitate containing a parent radionuclide of the desired daughter isotope in a first reaction zone and allowing sufficient time for the parent to decay into the desired gaseous daughter radioisotope. The method further contemplates collecting the desired daughter isotope as a solid in a second reaction zone through the application of temperatures below the freezing point of the desired isotope to a second reaction zone that is connected to the first reaction zone. Specifically, a method is presented for producing isotopically enriched compounds of xenon, including the radioactive isotope Xe-131m and the stable isotope Xe-131.

Watrous, Matthew G.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

Nuclear criticality safety aspects of gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in the diffusion cascade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper determines the nuclear safety of gaseous UF{sub 6} in the current Gaseous Diffusion Cascade and auxiliary systems. The actual plant safety system settings for pressure trip points are used to determine the maximum amount of HF moderation in the process gas, as well as the corresponding atomic number densities. These inputs are used in KENO V.a criticality safety models which are sized to the actual plant equipment. The ENO V.a calculation results confirm nuclear safety of gaseous UF{sub 6} in plant operations..

Huffer, J.E. [Parallax, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Application of Gaseous Sphere Injection Method for Modeling Under-expanded H2 Injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology for modeling gaseous injection has been refined and applied to recent experimental data from the literature. This approach uses a discrete phase analogy to handle gaseous injection, allowing for addition of gaseous injection to a CFD grid without needing to resolve the injector nozzle. This paper focuses on model testing to provide the basis for simulation of hydrogen direct injected internal combustion engines. The model has been updated to be more applicable to full engine simulations, and shows good agreement with experiments for jet penetration and time-dependent axial mass fraction, while available radial mass fraction data is less well predicted.

Whitesides, R; Hessel, R P; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Northwest Plume interceptor system evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) recently installed an interceptor system consisting of four wells, evenly divided between two well fields, to contain the Northwest Plume. As stated in the Northwest Plume Record of Decision (ROD), groundwater will be pumped at a rate to reduce further contamination and initiate control of the northwest contaminant plume. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the optimum (minimal) well field pumping rates required for plume hotspot containment. Plume hotspot, as defined in the Northwest Plume ROD and throughout this report, is that portion of the plume with trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations greater than 1,000 {micro}g/L. An existing 3-dimensional groundwater model was modified and used to perform capture zone analyses of the north and south interceptor system well fields. Model results suggest that the plume hotspot is not contained at the system design pumping rate of 100 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well field. Rather, the modeling determined that north and south well field pumping rates of 400 and 150 gal/min, respectively, are necessary for plume hotspot containment. The difference between the design and optimal pumping rates required for containment can be attributed to the discovery of a highly transmissive zone in the vicinity of the two well fields.

Laase, A.D.; Clausen, J.L.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Bioavailability study for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this plan is to assess the bioavailability of metals in the continuous and intermittent outfalls. The results may be used to determine alternative metal limits that more appropriately measure the portion of metal present necessary for toxicity to aquatic life. These limits must remain protective of in-stream aquatic life; thus, the highest concentration of metal in the water will be determined concurrently with an assessment of acute or chronic toxicity on laboratory tests. Using the method developed by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW), biomonitoring results and chemical data will be used to recommend alternative metal limits for the outfalls of concern. The data will be used to meet the objectives of the study: (1) evaluate the toxicity of continuous outfalls and intermittent outfalls at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; (2) determine the mean ratio of dissolved to Total Recoverable metal for Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn in the continuous and intermittent outfalls; (3) determine whether the concentration of total recoverable metal discharged causes toxicity to fathead minnows and /or Ceriodaphnia; and (4) determine alternative metal limits for each metal of concern (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn).

Phipps, T.L.; Kszos, L.A.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calendar year 1989 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the Summary, Discussion, and Conclusions (Part 1) and the Data Presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are the following: report 1989 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance. Routine monitoring and sampling for radiation, radioactive materials, and chemical substances on and off the DOE site are used to document compliance with appropriate standards, to identify trends, to provide information for the public, and to contribute to general environmental knowledge. The surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of protecting the public, employees, and environment from harm that could be caused by its activities and reducing negative environmental impacts to the greatest degree practicable. Environmental-monitoring information complements data on specific releases, trends, and summaries. 26 refs.

Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

E-Print Network 3.0 - amount gaseous fission Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

) reports that the amount of non-gaseous nuclides retained on the filters of the Windscale pile... . Petersen Abstract. The fission-product release to the atmosphere from a...

105

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the operating activities, upgrade activities, maintenance, and other activities regarding liquid and gaseous low level radioactive waste management at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits, tours, and environmental restoration support.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Hybrid Multi Micropattern Gaseous Photomultiplier for detection of liquid-xenon scintillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gaseous PhotoMultipliers (GPM) are a very promising alternative of vacuum PMTs especially for large-size noble-liquid detectors in the field of Functional Nuclear Medical Imaging and Direct Dark Matter Detection. We present recent characterization results of a Hybrid-GPM made of three Micropattern Gaseous Structures; a Thick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM), a Parallel Ionization Multiplier (PIM) and a MICROMesh GAseous Structure (MICROMEGAS),operating in Ne/CF4 (90:10). Gain values close to 10^7 were recorded in this mixture, with 5.9keV x-rays at 1100 mbar, both at room temperature and at that of liquid xenon (T = 171K). The results are discussed in term of scintillation detection. While the present multiplier was investigated without photocathode, complementary results of photoextraction from CsI UV photocathodes are presented in Ne/CH4 (95:5) and CH4 in cryogenic conditions.

Samuel Duval; Lior Arazi; Amos Breskin; Ranny Budnik; Wan-Ting Chen; Hervé Carduner; A. E. C. Coimbra; Marco Cortesi; Roy Kaner; Jean-Pierre Cussonneau; Jérôme Donnard; Jacob Lamblin; Olivier Lemaire; Patrick Le Ray; J. A. M. Lopes; Abdul-Fattah Mohamad Hadi; Eric Morteau; Tugdual Oger; J. M. F. dos Santos; Luca Scotto Lavina; Jean-Sébastien Stutzmann; Dominique Thers

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

107

The development of a sensitive method to study volatile organic compounds in gaseous emissions of lung cancer cell lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HCO3 producing excess H+ ions in the medium and therefore a fall in pH. This is seen as a color change. 10 When the confluence has reached 90% the cells are ready to be sub-cultured (Fig 2). 50 % cells in media Thawed... patients with no prior treatment for lung cancer. We have used an alternative method for the spectrometric analysis and quantitation of the selected chemical markers. The pre-concentration method involved a Purge and Trap unit with a thermal desorber...

Maroly, Anupam

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

108

Influence of the pump wavelength on the parameters of lasing of complex organic compounds in the gaseous phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lasing was observed in pentane-stabilized vapors of 1,4-di(2-(5-phenyloxazolyl))benzene (POPOP) and 1,4-di(benzoxazol-2'-yl)benzene (BOPBO) pumped by KrF* excimer laser radiation (lambda/sub p/ = 248 nm). An investigation was made of the dependences of the threshold pump power density W/sub p.th/ on the pentane pressure, on temperature, and on the vapor pressure of the lasing substance at pump wavelengths lambda/sub p/ = 248, 308, 337, and 350 nm. In the case of BOPBO the minimum threshold power density was W/sub p.th/ = 250 kW/cm/sup 2/.

Gruzinskii, V.V.; Danilova, V.I.; Degtyarenko, K.M.; Kopylova, T.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Mixed waste storage facility CDR review, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Solid waste landfill CDR review, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consists of two papers reviewing the waste storage facility and the landfill projects proposed for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant complex. The first paper is a review of DOE`s conceptual design report for a mixed waste storage facility. This evaluation is to review the necessity of constructing a separate mixed waste storage facility. The structure is to be capable of receiving, weighing, sampling and the interim storage of wastes for a five year period beginning in 1996. The estimated cost is assessed at approximately $18 million. The review is to help comprehend and decide whether a new storage building is a feasible approach to the PGDP mixed waste storage problem or should some alternate approach be considered. The second paper reviews DOE`s conceptual design report for a solid waste landfill. This solid waste landfill evaluation is to compare costs and the necessity to provide a new landfill that would meet State of Kentucky regulations. The assessment considered funding for a ten year storage facility, but includes a review of other facility needs such as a radiation detection building, compactor/baler machinery, material handling equipment, along with other personnel and equipment storage buildings at a cost of approximately $4.1 million. The review is to help discern whether a landfill only or the addition of compaction equipment is prudent.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The determination of compressibility factors of gaseous butane-nitrogen mixtures in the gas phase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DETERMINATION OF COMPRESSIBILITY FACTORS OF GASEOUS BUTANE-NITROGEN MIXTURES IN THE GAS PHASE A D issertation By Robert Buckner Evans, III Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of^ 'ent Advisor) June 1955... ?-; i'i i ; A R y ? 'A 'Gi- Or- T EX AS THE DETERMINATION OF COMHIESSIBILITI FACTORS OF GASEOUS BUTANE-NITROGEN MIXTURES IN THE GAS PHASE A D issertation By ROBERT BUCKNER EVANS, III Submitted' to the Graduate School of the Agricultural...

Evans, Robert Buckner

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department Annual Operating Report, CY 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities of the waste management operations section of the liquid and gaseous waste operations department at ORNL for 1993. The process waste, liquid low-level waste, gaseous waste systems activities are reported, as well as the low-level waste solidification project. Upgrade activities is the various waste processing and treatment systems are summarized. A maintenance activity overview is provided, and program management, training, and other miscellaneous activities are covered.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

1983-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

114

Microoptical compound lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apposition microoptical compound lens comprises a plurality of lenslets arrayed around a segment of a hollow, three-dimensional optical shell. The lenslets collect light from an object and focus the light rays onto the concentric, curved front surface of a coherent fiber bundle. The fiber bundle transports the light rays to a planar detector, forming a plurality of sub-images that can be reconstructed as a full image. The microoptical compound lens can have a small size (millimeters), wide field of view (up to 180.degree.), and adequate resolution for object recognition and tracking.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Gill, David D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

115

EA-1856: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Piketon, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of conveyance of land and facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, in Piketon, Ohio, for economic development purposes.

116

Microhotplate for Low Power and Ultra Dense Gaseous Sensor Arrays using Recessed Silica Aerogel for Heat Insulation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In the operation of an air pitted gaseous sensors, the microhotplate (µHP) consumes almost all the power used by the sensor. The required area… (more)

Kumar, Sanjay

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to obtain results from a given sample collection. The destructive assay instrument, LAARS-destructive assay (DA), uses a simple purpose-built fixture with a sampling planchet to collect adsorbed UF6 gas from a cylinder valve or from a process line tap or pigtail. A portable LAARS-DA instrument scans the microgram quantity of uranium collected on the planchet and the assay of the uranium is measured to ~0.15% relative precision. Currently, destructive assay samples for bias defect measurements are collected in small sample cylinders for offsite mass spectrometry measurement.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Phillips, Jon R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Aminopropyl thiophene compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiopharmaceuticals useful in brain imaging comprising radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives. The compounds are 5-halo-thiophene-2-isopropyl amines able to cross the blood-brain barrier and be retained for a sufficient length of time to allow the evaluation of regional blood flow by radioimaging of the brain.

Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

On-line vibration and analysis system at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enrichment facility in Paducah, KY uses a unique hard-wired vibration monitoring and analysis system for gaseous diffusion equipment. The axial flow and centrifugal flow compressors used in uranium enrichment range in size from 6 feet in diameter to less than one foot in diameter. These compressors must operate smoothly and safely, without breech of containment, since the working fluid of gaseous diffusion is gaseous UF/sub 6/. The condition of 1925 compressors is monitored by use of the 2500 point vibration analysis system. Since the failure mechanisms of the compressors are well known and documented, only one accelerometer per machine is needed for most machines. The system is completely automated and can generate spectra or broadband levels in either acceleration or velocity units. Levels are stored for historical review. The analyst can, via a custom telecommunications link, view and analyze data from all monitored points with an office PC. 4 figs.

Herricks, D.M.; Strunk, W.D.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Oak Ridge National Lebroatory Liquid&Gaseous Waste Treatment System Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excellence in Laboratory operations is one of the three key goals of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Agenda. That goal will be met through comprehensive upgrades of facilities and operational approaches over the next few years. Many of ORNL's physical facilities, including the liquid and gaseous waste collection and treatment systems, are quite old, and are reaching the end of their safe operating life. The condition of research facilities and supporting infrastructure, including the waste handling facilities, is a key environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concern. The existing infrastructure will add considerably to the overhead costs of research due to increased maintenance and operating costs as these facilities continue to age. The Liquid Gaseous Waste Treatment System (LGWTS) Reengineering Project is a UT-Battelle, LLC (UT-B) Operations Improvement Program (OIP) project that was undertaken to develop a plan for upgrading the ORNL liquid and gaseous waste systems to support ORNL's research mission.

Van Hoesen, S.D.

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The determination of compressibility factors of gaseous propane-nitrogen mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of thc Beg;voc cf kBSTBACT The propane-nitrogen system has been investigated in the gaseous phase at a temperature of 300 F. and at pressures up to 4/0 atmospheres. Compressibility curves for three mixtures of this system have been determined. A... the pressure corresponding to the "n " expansion ? th? the partial pressure of nitrogen the partial pressure oi' propane the total pressure of a gaseous system the universal gas constant (0. 08206 liter-atmosphere/ gram mole - oK) the absolute...

Hodges, Don

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The determination of compressibility factors of gaseous propane-nitrogen mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBRARY A A N O'iLLEOE OF 1EXAS THE DETERMINATION OF COMPRESSIBILITY FACTORS OF GASEOUS PROPANE-NITROGEIN MIXTURES A Thesis Cecil Herman Dickson Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of' Texas in partial... f'ulf'illment of the requirements for the de~ree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Ma]or GubjectI Chemistry May I&55 THE DETERMINATION OF COMPRESSIBILITY FACTORS OF GASEOUS PROPANE-NITROGEN MIXTURES A Thesis Cecil Herman Dickson Approved as to style...

Dickson, Cecil Herman

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Thermal decomposition of energetic materials; 65: Conversion of insensitive explosives (NTO, ANTA) and related compounds to polymeric melon-like cyclic azine burn-rate suppressants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selected triazole, tetrazole, triazine, tetrazine, furazan, and acyclic backbone compounds are shown by IR spectroscopy to convert to polymeric, melon-like, cyclic azine residues upon heating to T [ge] 500 C. These compounds include the insensitive explosives 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO), 3-amino-5-nitro-1,2,4-triazole (ANTA), and nitroguanidine. The melon-like residue could suppress the burn rate if these compounds are formulated into solid rocket propellants. The IR-active gaseous products from thermolysis are determined as a function of pressure and are related to the atom connectivity in the parent molecules.

Williams, G.K.; Palopoli, S.F.; Brill, T.B. (Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Emission and Long-Range Transport of Gaseous Mercury from a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emission and Long-Range Transport of Gaseous Mercury from a Large-Scale Canadian Boreal Forest FireQuebec.Thesemeasurementsindicated significant and highly correlated increases in Hg and CO during the plume event. The Hg:CO emissions ratio emissions and biomass burned to determine a mean area-based Hg emission flux density for boreal forest fires

Lee, Xuhui

125

Method for measuring the effectiveness of gaseous-contaminant removal filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a brief review of the gas-adsorption kinetics theory applicable to adsorption of gaseous contaminants by filter media, and an algorithm for assessing the effectiveness of filtering devices with flow bypass. It briefly describes the selected testing technique for measuring the effectiveness of filter media, and presents experimental data for adsorption of n-butane, toluene, and carbon monoxide.

Mahajan, B.M.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Changes in seal capacity of fractured claystone caprocks induced by dissolved and gaseous CO2 seepage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes in seal capacity of fractured claystone caprocks induced by dissolved and gaseous CO2; accepted 17 June 2008; published 31 July 2008. [1] Claystone caprocks are often the ultimate seal for CO2 underground storage when residual CO2 gas reaches the reservoir top due to buoyancy. Permeability changes

Luquot, Linda

128

Fracture response of externally flawed aluminum cylindrical shells under internal gaseous detonation loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fracture response of externally flawed aluminum cylindrical shells under internal gaseous. Experiments were performed to observe the fracture behavior of thin- wall and initially-flawed aluminum tubes to different fracture events are analyzed. Keywords: tube fracture, detonation, crack branching, crack curving

Barr, Al

129

Alignment of molecules in gaseous transport: Alkali dimers in supersonic nozzle beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alignment of molecules in gaseous transport: Alkali dimers in supersonic nozzle beams M. P. SinhaO) + a.P lcosO), where 0 is the angle between the angular momentum vector J of the molecule and the beam direction. This method is applied to determine the alignment of Na2 molecules in a supersonic nozzle beam

Zare, Richard N.

130

Numerical assessment of stability criteria from disturbance energies in gaseous combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical assessment of stability criteria from disturbance energies in gaseous combustion A, which corresponds to a ducted, laminar premixed propane-air flame, is used to assess the different terms a contribution from the unsteady heat flux-pressure correlation, allows a better agreement with the numerical

Nicoud, Franck

131

CHARACTERISTICS Nitrated compounds constitute a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds. If there is a chance of an explosive reaction, conduct the operation behind a blast shield

Wilcock, William

132

Boronated porphyrin compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

Kahl, Stephen B. (Portola Valley, CA); Koo, Myoung-Seo (San Francisco, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Boronated porphyrin compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

Kahl, S.B.; Koo, M.S.

1992-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hydraulic Containment of TCE Contaminated Groundwater at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will describe the progress of a groundwater remedial action at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. The X-749 southern boundary hydraulic containment system, combining a four-well extraction system with a previously constructed subsurface barrier wall, has been employed at PORTS. The hydraulic containment project has been implemented as part of containment and remediation of the X-749/X-120 area trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminant. The X-749/X-120 groundwater contaminant plume is located in the south central section (Quadrant I) of the PORTS facility. The plume is associated with the former X-120 Goodyear Training Facility and a landfill known as the X-749 Contaminated Materials Disposal Facility. The principal contaminants of concern are chlorinated solvents (primarily TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99). A subsurface barrier wall (X-749 South Barrier Wall) was completed in 1994 at the PORTS southern reservation boundary as an interim remedial measure to slow the advancement of the leading edge of the contaminated groundwater plume or to prevent the plume from migrating off DOE property. Remedial measures identified by Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) included installation of a barrier wall around the eastern and southern portions of the X-749 landfill to provide source control and installation of a phyto-remediation system to help contain groundwater flow and remove volatile organic compounds. Previous remedial measures that were implemented as elements of 'closures' on the X-749 landfill included a multimedia cap, barrier walls, and a groundwater collection system. Despite these measures, the X-749/X-120 groundwater plume has migrated beyond the southern DOE property boundary. Current TCE concentrations in off-site groundwater monitoring wells are below the preliminary remediation goal and drinking water maximum contaminant level for TCE of 5 {mu}g/kg, but continue to increase. Hydraulic containment was selected as the method for controlling the plume at the southern DOE property boundary. Recent borings and pumping tests indicate that approximately a 400-foot section of the existing subsurface barrier wall near the DOE property boundary may been improperly keyed into the Sunbury Shale bedrock which underlies the unconsolidated uppermost Gallia sand and gravel aquifer (Gallia). This gap is reported to be as much as 4 vertical feet. In addition, the X-749 groundwater plume is migrating around the western end of the X-749 South Barrier Wall. Four groundwater extraction wells were installed at the DOE property boundary to provide hydraulic control of the plume currently flowing under and around the existing subsurface barrier wall. Placement of the new extraction wells was based on groundwater modeling and data collected from pumping tests in the area. The extracted groundwater is being sent to the on-site X-622 Groundwater Treatment Facility via subsurface piping. The hydraulic containment system began operation in June 2007. The preliminary water elevations from monitoring wells in the vicinity of two of the four extraction wells demonstrate a significant decrease in groundwater potentiometric head in the southern boundary area. The current extraction rates should be adequate to contain the leading edge of the contaminant plume. Monitoring wells in the area will continue to be sampled on a quarterly basis. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Rieske, D.P.G.; Baird, D.R.P.E. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Origins of volatile organic compounds emerging from tank 241-C-106 during sluicing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unexpectedly high concentrations of inorganic gases and volatile organic compounds (VOC) were released from the ventilation stack of tank 241-C-106 during sluicing operations on November 18, 1998. Workers experienced serious discomfort. They reported an obnoxious acrid odor and the 450 ppm VOC in ventilation stack 296-C-006 exceeded the level approved in the air discharge permit. Consequently, the operation was terminated. Subsequent analyses of samples collected opportunistically from the stack indicated many organic compounds including heptenes, heptanones, and normal paraffin hydrocarbons (NPH) and their remnants were present. Subsequently, a process test designed to avoid unnecessary worker exposure and enable collection of analytical samples from the stack, the breathing area, and the receiver tank was conducted on December 16, 1998. The samples obtained during that operation, in which the maximum VOC content of the stack was approximately 35 ppm, have been analyzed by teams at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Special Analytic Services (SAS). This report examines the results of these investigations. Future revisions of the report will examine the analytical results obtained for samples collected during sluicing operations in March. This report contains the available evidence about the source term for these emissions. Chapter 2 covers characterization work, including historical information about the layers of waste in the tank, the location of organic compounds in these layers, the total organic carbon (TOC) content and the speciation of organic compounds. Chapter 3 covers the data for the samples from the ventilation stack, which has the highest concentrations of organic compounds. Chapter 4 contains an interpretation of the information connecting the composition of the organic emissions with the composition of the original source term. Chapter 5 summarizes the characterization work, the sample data, and the interpretation of the results.

STAUFFER, L.A.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

136

Natural phenomena hazards evaluation of equipment and piping of Gaseous Diffusion Plant Uranium Enrichment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report Upgrade program (GDP SARUP), a natural phenomena hazards evaluation was performed for the main process equipment and piping in the uranium enrichment buildings at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants. In order to reduce the cost of rigorous analyses, the evaluation methodology utilized a graded approach based on an experience data base collected by SQUG/EPRI that contains information on the performance of industrial equipment and piping during past earthquakes. This method consisted of a screening walkthrough of the facility in combination with the use of engineering judgment and simple calculations. By using these screenings combined with evaluations that contain decreasing conservatism, reductions in the time and cost of the analyses were significant. A team of experienced seismic engineers who were trained in the use of the DOE SQUG/EPRI Walkdown Screening Material was essential to the success of this natural phenomena hazards evaluation.

Singhal, M.K.; Kincaid, J.H.; Hammond, C.R.; Stockdale, B.I.; Walls, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Technical Programs and Services; Brock, W.R.; Denton, D.R. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Process and system for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gaseous streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-stage UCSRP process and system for removal of sulfur from a gaseous stream in which the gaseous stream, which contains a first amount of H.sub.2S, is provided to a first stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess SO.sub.2 mode at a first amount of SO.sub.2, producing an effluent gas having a reduced amount of SO.sub.2, and in which the effluent gas is provided to a second stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess H.sub.2S mode, producing a product gas having an amount of H.sub.2S less than said first amount of H.sub.2S.

Basu, Arunabha (Aurora, IL); Meyer, Howard S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Lynn, Scott (Pleasant Hill, CA); Leppin, Dennis (Chicago, IL); Wangerow, James R. (Medinah, IL)

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

Nuclear safety procedure upgrade project at USEC/MMUS gaseous diffusion plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Martin Marietta Utility Services has embarked on a program to upgrade procedures at both of its Gaseous Diffusion Plant sites. The transition from a U.S. Department of Energy government-operated facility to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated has necessitated a complete upgrade of plant operating procedures and practices incorporating human factors as well as a philosophy change in their use. This program is designed to meet the requirements of the newly written 10CFR76, {open_quotes}The Certification of Gaseous Diffusion Plants,{close_quotes} and aid in progression toward NRC certification. A procedures upgrade will help ensure increased nuclear safety, enhance plant operation, and eliminate personnel procedure errors/occurrences.

Kocsis, F.J. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the major Environmental Restoration (ER) concerns at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The identified solid waste management units at PGDP are listed. In the Department of Energy (DOE) Five Year Plan development process, one or more waste management units are addressed in a series of activity data sheets (ADSs) which identify planned scope, schedule, and cost objectives that are representative of the current state of planned technical development for individual or multiple sites.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of Spray Booth Operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for Spray Booth Operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current procedures and related hardware/equipment is presented. Control parameters relevant to nuclear criticality safety are explained, and a consolidated listing of administrative controls and safety systems is developed. Based on compliance with DOE Orders and MMES practices, the overall operation is evaluated, and recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested.

Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon, zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high parity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber.

Ghate, Madhav R. (Morgantown, WV); Yang, Ralph T. (Williamsville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high purity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Ghate, M.R.; Yang, R.T.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

143

Joint Test Plan to Identify the Gaseous By-Products of CH3I Loading on AgZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this test plan is to describe research to determine the gaseous by-products of the adsorption of CH3I on hydrogen reduced silver exchanged mordenite (AgZ).

R. T. Jubin; N. R. Soelberg; D. M. Strachan; T. M. Nenoff; B. B. Spencer

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

EA-0767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary at the U.S. Department of Energy's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion plant...

145

Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

Wijmans Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

STAR FORMATION IN THE EXTENDED GASEOUS DISK OF THE ISOLATED GALAXY CIG 96  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation law and efficiency in the gaseous disk of the isolated galaxy CIG 96 (NGC 864), with special emphasis on its unusually large atomic gas (H I) disk (r{sub Hmathsci}/r{sub 25} = 3.5, r{sub 25} = 1.'85). We present deep Galaxy Evolution Explorer near- and far-UV observations, used as a recent star formation tracer, and we compare them with new, high-resolution (16''or 1.6 kpc) Very Large Array H I observations. The UV and H I maps show good spatial correlation outside the inner 1', where the H I phase dominates over H{sub 2}. Star-forming regions in the extended gaseous disk are mainly located along the enhanced H I emission within two (relatively) symmetric, giant gaseous spiral arm-like features, which emulate an H I pseudo-ring at r {approx_equal} 3'. Inside this structure, two smaller gaseous spiral arms extend from the northeast and southwest of the optical disk and connect to the previously mentioned H I pseudo-ring. Interestingly, we find that the (atomic) Kennicutt-Schmidt power-law index systematically decreases with radius, from N {approx_equal} 3.0 {+-} 0.3 in the inner disk (0.'8-1.'7) to N = 1.6 {+-} 0.5 in the outskirts of the gaseous disk (3.'3-4.'2). Although the star formation efficiency (SFE), the star formation rate per unit of gas, decreases with radius where the H I component dominates as is common in galaxies, we find that there is a break of the correlation at r = 1.5r{sub 25}. At radii 1.5r{sub 25} < r < 3.5r{sub 25}, mostly within the H I pseudo-ring structure, regions exist whose SFE remains nearly constant, SFE {approx_equal} 10{sup -11} yr{sup -1}. We discuss possible mechanisms that might be triggering the star formation in the outskirts of this galaxy, and we suggest that the constant SFE for such large radii (r > 2r{sub 25}) and at such low surface densities might be a common characteristic in extended UV disk galaxies.

Espada, D.; Sabater, J.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Sulentic, J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa, CSIC, Apdo. 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Munoz-Mateos, J. C.; Gil de Paz, A. [Departamento de Astrofisica y CC. de la Atmosfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. de la Complutense, s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Boissier, S.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, OAMP, Universite Aix-Marseille and CNRS UMR 6110, 38 rue Frederic Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Verley, S. [Dept. de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Granada (Spain); Leon, S. [Joint ALMA Observatory/ESO, Av. Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Yun, M., E-mail: daniel.espada@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: despada@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

147

MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTY PERFORMANCE OF COMMERCIAL GRADE API PIPELINE STEELS IN HIGH PRESSURE GASEOUS HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continued growth of the world s developing countries has placed an ever increasing demand on traditional fossil fuel energy sources. This development has lead to increasing research and development of alternative energy sources. Hydrogen gas is one of the potential alternative energy sources under development. Currently the most economical method of transporting large quantities of hydrogen gas is through steel pipelines. It is well known that hydrogen embrittlement has the potential to degrade steel s mechanical properties when hydrogen migrates into the steel matrix. Consequently, the current pipeline infrastructure used in hydrogen transport is typically operated in a conservative fashion. This operational practice is not conducive to economical movement of significant volumes of hydrogen gas as an alternative to fossil fuels. The degradation of the mechanical properties of steels in hydrogen service is known to depend on the microstructure of the steel. Understanding the levels of mechanical property degradation of a given microstructure when exposed to hydrogen gas under pressure can be used to evaluate the suitability of the existing pipeline infrastructure for hydrogen service and guide alloy and microstructure design for new hydrogen pipeline infrastructure. To this end, the 2 Copyright 2010 by ASME microstructures of relevant steels and their mechanical properties in relevant gaseous hydrogen environments must be fully characterized to establish suitability for transporting hydrogen. A project to evaluate four commercially available pipeline steels alloy/microstructure performance in the presences of gaseous hydrogen has been funded by the US Department of Energy along with the private sector. The microstructures of four pipeline steels were characterized and then tensile testing was conducted in gaseous hydrogen and helium at pressures of 800, 1600 and 3000 psi. Based on measurements of reduction of area, two of the four steels that performed the best across the pressure range were selected for evaluation of fracture and fatigue performance in gaseous hydrogen at 800 and 3000 psi. This paper will describe the work performed on four commercially available pipeline steels in the presence of gaseous hydrogen at pressures relevant for transport in pipelines. Microstructures and mechanical property performances will be compared. In addition, recommendations for future work related to gaining a better understanding of steel pipeline performance in hydrogen service will be discussed.

Stalheim, Mr. Douglas [DGS Metallurgical Solutions Inc; Boggess, Todd [Secat; San Marchi, Chris [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Jansto, Steven [Reference Metals Company; Somerday, Dr. B [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Sofronis, Prof. Petros [University of Illinois

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Devices for collecting chemical compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired. 5 figs.

Stowell, M.S.

1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

151

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, Michael S. (New Ellenton, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Interchangeability of gaseous fuels - The importance of the Wobbe-index  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wobbe-index is introduced as an important gas quality criterion when interchanging gaseous fuels for engines. Changes in fuel gas composition appear not to induce noticeable changes in air to fuel ratio and combustion velocity when the Wobbe-index remains the same. This implies that no re-adjustment of ignition timing and air to fuel ratio settings is required, then. The volumetric energy content, the explosion limits and the knock resistance of a mixture can vary to a moderate extent when the Wobbe-index is constant and the gas composition varies.

Klimstra, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Stability of an Isentropic Model for a Gaseous Relativistic Star  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the isentropic subclass of Buchdahl's exact solution for a gaseous relativistic star is stable and gravitationally bound for all values of the compactness ratio $u [\\equiv (M/R)$, where $M$ is the total mass and $R$ is the radius of the configuration in geometrized units] in the range, $0 < u \\leq 0.20$, corresponding to the {\\em regular} behaviour of the solution. This result is in agreement with the expectation and opposite to the earlier claim found in the literature.

P. S. Negi

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

2013 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, FEBRUARY 24 - MARCH 1, 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The long-standing goal of our community is to develop new strategies for capturing complex molecular architectures as gas phase ions where they can be isolated, characterized and manipulated with great sensitivity. Emergent areas of interest include catalytic mechanisms, cryogenic processing of ions extracted from solution, ion fragmentation mechanisms, and new methods for ion formation and structural characterization. The conference will cover theoretical and experimental advances on systems ranging from model studies at the molecular scale to preparation of nanomaterials and characterization of large biological molecules.

Williams, Evan

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6Department ofGaseous Diffusion Plant Director's

157

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Summary  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6Department ofGaseous Diffusion Plant

158

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL); Jalan, Vinod M. (Concord, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur-containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorbtion capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

Brown, Nancy J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Aza compounds as anion receptors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.Q.; McBreen, J.

1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

166

Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Site-specific earthquake response analysis for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated under contract by Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., is located southwest of Paducah, Kentucky. An aerial photograph and an oblique sketch of the plant are shown in Figures 1 and 2, respectively. The fenced portion of the plant consists of 748 acres. This plant was constructed in the 1950`s and is one of only two gaseous diffusion plants in operation in the United States; the other is located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The facilities at PGDP are currently being evaluated for safety in response to natural seismic hazards. Design and evaluation guidelines to evaluate the effects of earthquakes and other natural hazards on DOE facilities follow probabilistic hazard models that have been outlined by Kennedy et al. (1990). Criteria also established by Kennedy et al. (1990) classify diffusion plants as ``moderate hazard`` facilities. The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was tasked to calculate the site response using site-specific design earthquake records developed by others and the results of previous geotechnical investigations. In all, six earthquake records at three hazard levels and four individual and one average soil columns were used.

Sykora, D.W.; Davis, J.J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Using large environmental chamber technique for gaseous contaminant removal equipment test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) has set a voluntary standard for testing the initial dust-removal capacity of portable air cleaners. In the authors` test of portable air cleaners for the local consumer council, the AHAM method was extended to test the initial removal capacity for gaseous phase pollutants. Also, carbon filters` efficiency change over time in toluene removal on a number of air cleaners was tested. In using a large chamber to carry out these tests, the chamber wall adsorption and re-emission effects were experimentally quantified. These tests indicated that a large chamber, with its wall surface adsorption controlled, is simple and robust to use to quantify the initial cleaning capacity for gaseous phase pollutants. Based on these test results, a large chamber method is proposed to test the performance lifetimes of portable air cleaners. The system advantages of the method over the in-duct performance life test methods are that no continuous air-cleaning system is required and that the chamber`s humidity and temperature can be maintained at the desired values more easily with the combination of a unitary dehumidifier and a bubbler system. This paper will present the trial results with portable air cleaner tests and discuss the large environmental chamber techniques.

Niu, J.; Tung, T.C.W.; Chui, V.W.Y. [Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ. (Hong Kong). Dept. of Building Services Engineering

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) Apparatus for Nuclear Diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RAGS (Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility. Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D A; Velsko, C A; Jedlovec, D R; Yeamans, C B; Moody, K J; Tereshatov, E; Stoeffl, W; Riddle, A

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

170

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for Environment has responsibility for identifying, characterizing, and ameliorating the environmental, health, and safety issues and public concerns associated with commercial operation of specific energy systems. The need for developing a safety and environmental control assessment for liquefied gaseous fuels was identified by the Environmental and Safety Engineering Division as a result of discussions with various governmental, industry, and academic persons having expertise with respect to the particular materials involved: liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, and anhydrous ammonia. This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in Fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 1 (Executive Summary) describes the background, purpose and organization of the LGF Program and contains summaries of the 25 reports presented in Volumes 2 and 3. Annotated bibliographies on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety and Environmental Control Research and on Fire Safety and Hazards of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) are included in Volume 1.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Dual wall reverse circulation drilling with multi-level groundwater sampling for groundwater contaminant plume delineation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dual wall reverse circulation (DWRC) drilling was used to drill 48 borings during a groundwater contaminant investigation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. This method was selected as an alternative to conventional hollow stem auger drilling for a number of reasons, including the expectation of minimizing waste, increasing the drilling rate, and reducing the potential for cross contamination of aquifers. Groundwater samples were collected from several water-bearing zones during drilling of each borehole. The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds using a field gas chromatograph. This approach allowed the investigation to be directed using near-real-time data. Use of downhole geophysical logging, in conjunction with lithologic descriptions of borehole cuttings, resulted in excellent correlation of the geology in the vicinity of the contaminant plume. The total volume of cuttings generated using the DWRC drilling method was less than half of what would have been produced by hollow stem augering; however, the cuttings were recovered in slurry form and had to be dewatered prior to disposal. The drilling rate was very rapid, often approaching 10 ft/min; however, frequent breaks to perform groundwater sampling resulted in an average drilling rate of < 1 ft/min. The time required for groundwater sampling could be shortened by changing the sampling methodology. Analytical results indicated that the drilling method successfully isolated the various water bearing zones and no cross contamination resulted from the investigation.

Smuin, D.R.; Morti, E.E.; Zutman, J.L.; Pickering, D.A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Method and system for low-NO.sub.x dual-fuel combustion of liquid and/or gaseous fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for combustion in which a pressurized preheated liquid fuel is atomized and a portion thereof flash vaporized, creating a mixture of fuel vapor and liquid droplets. The mixture is mixed with primary combustion oxidant, producing a fuel/primary oxidant mixture which is then injected into a primary combustion chamber in which the fuel/primary oxidant mixture is partially combusted, producing a secondary gaseous fuel containing hydrogen and carbon oxides. The secondary gaseous fuel is mixed with a secondary combustion oxidant and injected into the second combustion chamber wherein complete combustion of the secondary gaseous fuel is carried out. The resulting second stage flue gas containing very low amounts of NO.sub.x is then vented from the second combustion chamber.

Gard, Vincent; Chojnacki, Dennis A; Rabovitser, Ioseph K

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

173

Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning...

174

Process for production of a borohydride compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for production of a borohydride compound. The process comprises combining a compound comprising boron and oxygen with an adduct of alane.

Chin, Arthur Achhing; Jain, Puja; Linehan, Suzanne; Lipiecki, Francis Joseph; Maroldo, Stephen Gerard; November, Samuel J; Yamamoto, John Hiroshi

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

175

Reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake- induced settlements at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake-induced settlements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located southwest of Paducah, KY. The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was authorized to conduct this study from FY91 to FY94 by the DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), Oak Ridge, TN, through Inter- Agency Agreement (IAG) No. DE-AI05-91OR21971. The study was conducted under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report (GDP SAR) Program.

Sykora, D.W.; Yule, D.E.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride National Center for Physics, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest, Romania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dans le UF6 gazeux. L'examen de la raie d'absorption du 19F appartenant au UF6 gazeux isotopiquement in indirect detection of the 235U nucleus in gaseous UF6 is discussed. The 19F absorption spectra linewidths in gaseous UF6 was investigated as a function of 235U enrichment, revealing a dependence on the isotope

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

177

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 consists of 19 reports describing technical effort performed by Government Contractors in the area of LNG Safety and Environmental Control. Report topics are: simulation of LNG vapor spread and dispersion by finite element methods; modeling of negatively buoyant vapor cloud dispersion; effect of humidity on the energy budget of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vapor cloud; LNG fire and explosion phenomena research evaluation; modeling of laminar flames in mixtures of vaporized liquefied natural gas (LNG) and air; chemical kinetics in LNG detonations; effects of cellular structure on the behavior of gaseous detonation waves under transient conditions; computer simulation of combustion and fluid dynamics in two and three dimensions; LNG release prevention and control; the feasibility of methods and systems for reducing LNG tanker fire hazards; safety assessment of gelled LNG; and a four band differential radiometer for monitoring LNG vapors.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A probabilistic safety analysis of UF{sub 6} handling at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A probabilistic safety study of UF{sub 6} handling activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has recently been completed. The analysis provides a unique perspective on the safety of UF{sub 6} handling activities. The estimated release frequencies provide an understanding of current risks, and the examination of individual contributors yields a ranking of important plant features and operations. Aside from the probabilistic results, however, there is an even more important benefit derived from a systematic modeling of all operations. The integrated approach employed in the analysis allows the interrelationships among the equipment and the required operations to be explored in depth. This paper summarizes the methods used in the study and provides an overview of some of the technical insights that were obtained. Specific areas of possible improvement in operations are described.

Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Summitt, R.L. [Safety and Reliability Optimization Services (SAROS), Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Purex Plant gaseous iodine-129 control capability and process development requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the ability of the Purex Plant to effectively control iodine-129 emissions. Based on historical evidence, the current Purex Plant iodine control system appears capable of meeting the goal of limiting gaseous iodine-129 emissions at the point of discharge to levels stipulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) for an uncontrolled area. Expected decontamination factors (DF`s) with the current system will average about 100 and will be above the calculated DF`s of 2.2 and 87 required to meet DOE yearly average concentration limits for controlled and uncontrolled areas respectively, but below the calculated DF of 352 required for meeting the proposed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mass emission limit. Chemical costs for maintaining compliance with the DOE limits will be approximately $166 per metric ton of fuel processed (based on a silver nitrate price of $12.38/oz). Costs will increase in proportion to increases in silver prices.

Evoniuk, C.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Gusty, gaseous flows of FIRE: galactic winds in cosmological simulations with explicit stellar feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of the galaxy-scale gaseous outflows from the FIRE (Feedback in Realistic Environments) simulations. This suite of hydrodynamic cosmological zoom simulations provides a sample of halos where star-forming giant molecular clouds are resolved to z=0, and features an explicit stellar feedback model on small scales. In this work, we focus on quantifying the gas mass ejected out of galaxies in winds and how this material travels through the halo. We correlate these quantities to star formation in galaxies throughout cosmic history. Our simulations reveal that a significant portion of every galaxy's evolution, particularly at high redshift, is dominated by bursts of star formation, which are followed by powerful gusts of galactic outflow that sweep up a large fraction of gas in the interstellar medium and send it through the circumgalactic medium. The dynamical effect of these outflows can significantly limit the amount of star formation within the affected galaxy. At low redshift, however, su...

Muratov, Alexander L; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Hopkins, Philip F; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1992--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The goals of BMP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, characterize potential health and environmental impacts, document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, bioaccumulation studies, and ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1992 to December 1993, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A.; Hinzman, R.L.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Local drainage analyses of the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Local drainage analyses have been performed for the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm having an approximate 10,000-yr recurrence interval. This review discusses the methods utilized to accomplish the analyses in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) design and evaluation guidelines, and summarizes trends, results, generalizations, and uncertainties applicable to other DOE facilities. Results indicate that some culverts may be undersized, and that the storm sewer system cannot drain the influx of precipitation from the base of buildings. Roofs have not been designed to sustain ponding when the primary drainage system is clogged. Some underground tunnels, building entrances, and ground level air intakes may require waterproofing.

Johnson, R.O.; Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Seismically-induced soil amplification at the DOE Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A site-specific earthquake site response (soil amplification) study is being conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This study is pursuant to an upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report in accordance with requirements specified by DOE. The seismic hazard at PGDP is dominated by the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Site-specific synthetic earthquake records developed by others were applied independently to four soil columns with heights above baserock of about 325 ft. The results for the 1000-year earthquake event indicate that the site period is between 1.0 and 1.5 sec. Incident shear waves are amplified at periods of motion greater than 0.15 sec. The peak free-field horizontal acceleration, occurring at very low periods, is 0.28 g. 13 refs., 13 figs.

Sykora, D.W.; Haynes, M.E. (Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Geotechnical Lab.); Brock, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Shaffer, K.E. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to "float" in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields.

Hobson, David O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Alexeff, Igor (Oak Ridge, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Clinton, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Liquefied gaseous fuels safety and environmental control assessment program: third status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Status Report contains contributions from all contractors currently participating in the DOE Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LG) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program and is presented in two principal sections. Section I is an Executive Summary of work done by all program participants. Section II is a presentation of fourteen individual reports (A through N) on specific LGF Program activities. The emphasis of Section II is on research conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Reports A through M). Report N, an annotated bibliography of literature related to LNG safety and environmental control, was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of its LGF Safety Studies Project. Other organizations who contributed to this Status Report are Aerojet Energy Conversion Company; Applied Technology Corporation; Arthur D. Little, Incorporated; C/sub v/ International, Incorporated; Institute of Gas Technology; and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for Reports A through N for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

Heffel, James W. (Lake Matthews, CA); Scott, Paul B. (Northridge, CA); Park, Chan Seung (Yorba Linda, CA)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1990 to November 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 23, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, guiding plans for remediation, and protecting human health. In September 1992, a renewed permit was issued which requires toxicity monitoring of continuous and intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities. This report includes ESD/ORNL activities occurring from December 1990 to November 1992.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Apparatus for recovering gaseous hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Santa Fe, NM); Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

Heffel, James W.; Scott, Paul B.

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

192

Selective Gaseous Extraction: Research, Development and Training for Isotope Production, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General Atomics and the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) completed research and development of selective gaseous extraction of fission products from irradiated fuel, which included training and education of MURR students. The process used porous fuel and after irradiation flowed product gases through the fuel to selectively removed desired fission products with the primary goal of demonstrating the removal of rhodium 105. High removal rates for the ruthenium/rhodium (Ru/Rh), tellurium/iodine (Te/I) and molybdenum/technetium (Mo/Tc) series were demonstrated. The success of this research provides for the reuse of the target for further production, significantly reducing the production of actinide wastes relative to processes that dissolve the target. This effort was conducted under DOE funding (DE-SC0007772). General Atomics objective of the project was to conduct R&D on alternative methods to produce a number of radioactive isotopes currently needed for medical and industry applications to include rhodium-105 and other useful isotopes. Selective gaseous extraction was shown to be effective at removing radioisotopes of the ruthenium/rhodium, tellurium/iodine and molybdenum/technetium decay chains while having trace to no quantities of other fission products or actinides. This adds a new, credible method to the area of certain commercial isotope production beyond current techniques, while providing significant potential reduction of process wastes. Waste reduction, along with reduced processing time/cost provides for superior economic feasibility which may allow domestic production under full cost recovery practices. This provides the potential for improved access to domestically produced isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment at reduced cost, providing for the public good.

Bertch, Timothy C, [General Atomics

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Shaping of fuel delivery characteristics for solenoid operated diesel engine gaseous injectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solenoid operated gaseous injectors, when compared to conventional liquid fuel diesel injectors, differ in the way the fuel dose and its discharge rate are controlled. While in conventional diesel systems, the fuel dose and its injection rate depends on the fuel injection pump effective stroke and on the plunger diameter and velocity, the solenoid injectors operate in an on-off manner which limits the ability to control the gas discharge rate, resulting in its profile to be basically rectangular in shape. To reduce the gas injection rate at the beginning of the injection process in order to suppress the diesel-knock phenomenon, similar procedures as used in diesel engines could be implemented. One such approach is to use a throttling type pintle nozzle, and another method is to use a double-spring injector with a hole nozzle. The rationale for using such nozzle configurations is that gaseous fuels do not require atomization, and therefore, can be injected at lower discharge velocities than with liquid fuels. The gas delivery characteristics from a solenoid injector has been computer-simulated in order to assess the impact of the investigated three modes of fuel discharge rate control strategies. The simulation results confirmed that the gas dose and its discharge rate can be shaped as required. An experimental set-up is described to measure the gas discharge rate using a special gas injection mass flow rate indicator with a strain-gage sensor installed at the entry to a long tube, similar to that proposed by Bosch for liquid fuel volumetric flow rate measurements.

Hong, H.; Krepec, T.; Kekedjian, H.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Effect of Debris on Collector Optics, its Mitigation and Repair: Next-Step a Gaseous Sn EUV DPP Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effect of Debris on Collector Optics, its Mitigation and Repair: Next-Step a Gaseous Sn EUV DPP to advanced fuel plasma EUV sources is collector lifetime. The Illinois Debris-mitigation EUV Applications based on this work. Keywords: EUV source, debris, optics, collector lifetime, mitigation, plasma

Spila, Timothy P.

195

EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Paducah, Kentucky  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE’s Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office is preparing an EA for a proposal to convey DOE land and facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant to the Paducah Area Community Reuse Organization and potentially other parties in furtherance of reindustrialization and reuse for economic development purposes.

196

New C-H Stretching Vibrational Spectral Features in the Raman Spectra of Gaseous and Liquid Ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New C-H Stretching Vibrational Spectral Features in the Raman Spectra of Gaseous and Liquid Ethanol Traditionally, the Raman spectrum of ethanol in the C-H vibrational stretching region between 2800 cm-1 and 3100, and the -CH3 antisymmetric stretching. In this report, new Raman spectral features were observed for ethanol

Liu, Shilin

197

Delafosse, D. 2012. "Chapter 9 -Hydrogen Effects on the Plasticity of Face Centred Cubic (fcc) Crystals." In Gaseous Hydrogen Embrittlement of Materials in Energy Technologies, edited by Richard P Gangloff and B P Somerday,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Crystals." In Gaseous Hydrogen Embrittlement of Materials in Energy Technologies, edited by Richard P-11May2014 Author manuscript, published in "Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of materials in energy) Crystals." In Gaseous Hydrogen Embrittlement of Materials in Energy Technologies, edited by Richard P

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

198

TREATMENT OF GASEOUS EFFLUENTS ISSUED FROM RECYCLING – A REVIEW OF THE CURRENT PRACTICES AND PROSPECTIVE IMPROVEMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of gaseous waste management for the recycling of nuclear used fuel is to reduce by best practical means (ALARA) and below regulatory limits, the quantity of activity discharged to the environment. The industrial PUREX process recovers the fissile material U(VI) and Pu(IV) to re-use them for the fabrication of new fuel elements e.g. recycling plutonium as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel or recycling uranium for new enrichment for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Meanwhile the separation of the waste (activation and fission product) is performed as a function of their pollution in order to store and avoid any potential danger and release towards the biosphere. Raffinate, that remains after the extraction step and which contains mostly all fission products and minor actinides is vitrified, the glass package being stored temporarily at the recycling plant site. Hulls and end pieces coming from PWR recycled fuel are compacted by means of a press leading to a volume reduced to 1/5th of initial volume. An organic waste treatment step will recycle the solvent, mainly tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) and some of its hydrolysis and radiolytic degradation products such as dibutyl phosphate (HDPB) and monobutyl phosphate (H2MBP). Although most scientific and technological development work focused on high level waste streams, a considerable effort is still under way in the area of intermediate and low level waste management. Current industrial practices for the treatment of gaseous effluents focusing essentially on Iodine-129 and Krypton-85 will be reviewed along with the development of novel technologies to extract, condition, and store these fission products. As an example, the current industrial practice is to discharge Kr-85, a radioactive gas, entirely to the atmosphere after dilution, but for the large recycling facilities envisioned in the near future, several techniques such as 1) cryogenic distillation and selective absorption in solvents, 2) adsorption on activated charcoal, 3) selective sorption on chemical modified zeolites, or 4) diffusion through membranes with selective permeability are potential technologies to retain the gas.

Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; William Kerlin; Steven Bakhtiar

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Feedback Capacity of the Compound Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we find the capacity of a compound finite-state channel (FSC) with time-invariant deterministic feedback. We consider the use of fixed length block codes over the compound channel. Our achievability result ...

Shrader, Brooke E.

200

Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWR-GALE Code). Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report revises the original issuance of NUREG-0017, ''Calculation of Releases of Radioactive Materials in Gaseous and Liquid Effluents from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR-GALE-Code)'' (April 1976), to incorporate more recent operating data now available as well as the results of a number of in-plant measurement programs at operating pressurized water reactors. The PWR-GALE Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the releases of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents (i.e., the gaseous and liquid source terms). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses the PWR-GALE Code to determine conformance with the requirements of Appendix I to 10 CFR Part 50.

Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Thin films of mixed metal compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compositionally uniform thin film of a mixed metal compound is formed by simultaneously evaporating a first metal compound and a second metal compound from independent sources. The mean free path between the vapor particles is reduced by a gas and the mixed vapors are deposited uniformly. The invention finds particular utility in forming thin film heterojunction solar cells.

Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA); Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Volatile organic compound sensor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Waxahachie, TX); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY); Wong, Gregory K. (Laramie, WY)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) conducted March 14 through 25, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental risk associated with ORGDP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORGDP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during is on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the ORGDP Survey findings for in inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 120 refs., 41 figs., 74 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Modeling of temporal behavior of isotopic exchange between gaseous hydrogen and palladium hydride power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A parametric rate-equation model is described which depicts the time dependent behavior of the isotopic exchange process occurring between the solid and gas phases in gaseous hydrogen (deuterium) flows through packed-powder palladium deuteride (hydride) beds. The exchange mechanism is assumed to be rate-limited by processes taking place on the surface of the powder. The fundamental kinetic parameter of the model is the isotopic exchange probability, p, which is the probability that an isotopic exchange event occurs during a collision of a gas phase atom with the surface. Isotope effects between the gas and solid phases are explicitly included in terms of the isotope separation factor, ..cap alpha... Results of the model are compared with recent experimental measurements of isotope exchange in the ..beta..-phase hydrogen/palladium system and, using a literature value of ..cap alpha.. = 2.4, a good description of the experimental data is obtained for p approx. 10/sup -7/. In view of the importance of the isotope effects in the hydrogen/palladium system and the range of ..cap alpha.. values reported for the ..beta..-phase in the literature, the sensitivity of the model results to a variation in the value of ..cap alpha.. is examined.

Melius, C F; Foltz, G W

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Gravitational drag on a point mass in hypersonic motion through a gaseous medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore a ballistic orbit model to infer the gravitational drag force on an accreting point mass M, such as a black hole, moving at a hypersonic velocity v_{0} through a gaseous environment of density \\rho_{0}. The streamlines blend in the flow past the body and transfer momentum to it. The total drag force acting on the body, including the nonlinear contribution of those streamlines with small impact parameter that bend significantly and pass through a shock, can be calculated by imposing conservation of momentum. In this fully analytic approach, the ambiguity in the definition of the lower cut-off distance $r_{\\rm min}$ in calculations of the effect of dynamical friction is removed. It turns out that $r_{\\rm min}=\\sqrt{e}GM/2v_{0}^{2}$. Using spherical surfaces of control of different sizes, we carry out a successful comparison between the predicted drag force and the one obtained from a high resolution, axisymmetric, isothermal flow simulation. We demonstrate that ballistic models are reasonably success...

Canto, J; Esquivel, A; Sanchez-Salcedo, F J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Determination of operating limits for radionuclides for a proposed landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operating limits for radionuclides in sanitary and industrial wastes were determined for a proposed landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Kentucky. These limits, which may be very small but nonzero, are not mandated by law or regulation but are needed for rational operation. The approach was based on analyses of the potential contamination of groundwater at the plant boundary and the potential exposure to radioactivity of an intruder at the landfill after closure. The groundwater analysis includes (1) a source model describing the disposal of waste and the release of radionuclides from waste to the groundwater, (2) site-specific groundwater flow and contaminant transport calculations, and (3) calculations of operating limits from the dose limit and conversion factors. The intruder analysis includes pathways through ingestion of contaminated vegetables and soil, external exposure to contaminated soil, and inhalation of suspended activity from contaminated soil particles. In both analyses, a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) was adopted. The intended application of the results is to refine the radiological monitoring standards employed by the PGDP Health Physics personnel to determine what constitutes radioactive wastes, with concurrence of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Kocher, D.C.

1994-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

207

Assessment and interpretation of cross- and down-hole seismograms at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is an assessment and interpretation of cross-and down-hole seismograms recorded at four sites in the vicinity of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Arrival times of shear (S-) and compressional (P-) waves are recorded on these seismograms in milliseconds. Together with known distances between energy sources and seismometers lowered into boreholes, these arrival times are used to calculate S- and P-wave velocities in unconsolidated soils and sediments that overlie bedrock approximately 320 ft beneath PGDP. The soil columns are modified after an earlier draft by ERC Environmental and Energy Services Company (ERCE), 1990. In addition to S- and P- wave velocity estimates from this paper, the soil columns contain ERCE's lithologic and other geotechnical data for unconsolidated soils and sediments from the surface to bedrock. Soil columns for Sites 1 through 4 and a site location map are in Plates 1 through 5 of Appendix 6. The velocities in the four columns are input parameters for the SHAKE computer program, a nationally recognized computer model that simulates ground response of unconsolidated materials to earthquake generated seismic waves. The results of the SHAKE simulation are combined with predicted ground responses on rock foundations (caused by a given design earthquake) to predict ground responses of facilities with foundations placed on unconsolidated materials. 3 refs.

Staub, W.P.; Wang, J.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Selfridge, R.J. (Automated Sciences Group, (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). A plan for the biological monitoring of the receiving streams was implemented in 1987 and consisted of ecological surveys, toxicity monitoring of effluents and receiving streams, evaluation of bioaccumulation of trace contaminants in biota, and supplemental chemical characterization of effluents. Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in (1) identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, and (3) guiding plans for remediation and protecting human health. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of benthic macroinvertebrate communities and fish. With the exception of the benthic macroinvertebrate community surveys, this report focuses on activities from January to December 1997.

Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was conducted by the University of Kentucky Between 1987 and 1992 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from January 1996 to December 1996, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.; Konetsky, B.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Petrie, R.B.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1993 to December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was implemented in 1987 by the University of Kentucky. Research staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as reviewers and advisers to the University of Kentucky. Beginning in fall 1991, ESD added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and (4) recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. In September 1992, a renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit was issued to PGDP. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1993 to December 1994, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Operating limit study for the proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) would accept wastes generated during normal operations that are identified as non-radioactive. These wastes may include small amounts of radioactive material from incidental contamination during plant operations. A site-specific analysis of the new solid waste landfill is presented to determine a proposed operating limit that will allow for waste disposal operations to occur such that protection of public health and the environment from the presence of incidentally contaminated waste materials can be assured. Performance objectives for disposal were defined from existing regulatory guidance to establish reasonable dose limits for protection of public health and the environment. Waste concentration limits were determined consistent with these performance objectives for the protection of off-site individuals and inadvertent intruders who might be directly exposed to disposed wastes. Exposures of off-site individuals were estimated using a conservative, site-specific model of the groundwater transport of contamination from the wastes. Direct intrusion was analyzed using an agricultural homesteader scenario. The most limiting concentrations from direct intrusion or groundwater transport were used to establish the concentration limits for radionuclides likely to be present in PGDP wastes.

Lee, D.W.; Wang, J.C.; Kocher, D.C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant proposed pilot pump-and-treat project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 23, 1992, R.C. Sleeman of the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office requested that a Groundwater Corrective Actions Team be assembled to evaluate the technical merit of and the need to implement a proposed groundwater pump-and-treat demonstration project for the Northwest contaminant plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. In addition to other suggestions, the Team recommended that further characterization data be obtained for the plume. In the Fall of 1993 additional, temporary well points were installed so that groundwater samples from the shallow groundwater system and the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA) could be obtained to provide a three-dimensional view of groundwater contamination in the region of the plume. The results indicate that pure-phase DNAPL (trichloroethylene [TCE]) probably are present in the source area of the plume and extend in depth to the base of the RGA. Because the DNAPL likely will represent a source of a dissolved phase plume for decades it is essential that source containment take place. The Team recommends that although effective hydraulic containment can be achieved, other alternatives should be considered. For example, recent advances in emplacing low permeability barrier walls to depths of 100 to 150 ft make it possible to consider encirclement of the source of the Northwest plume.

Bodenstein, G.W.; Bonczek, R.R.; Early, T.O.; Huff, D.D.; Jones, K.S.; Nickelson, M.D.; Rightmire, C.T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

On the possible environmental effect in distributing heavy elements beyond individual gaseous halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a study of extended galaxy halo gas through HI and OVI absorption over two decades in projected distance at $z\\approx0.2$. The study is based on a sample of $95$ galaxies from a highly complete ($ > 80\\%$) survey of faint galaxies ($L > 0.1L_*$) with archival quasar absorption spectra and $53$ galaxies from the literature. A clear anti-correlation is found between HI (OVI) column density and virial radius normalized projected distance, $d/R_{\\rm h}$. Strong HI (OVI) absorption systems with column densities greater than $10^{14.0}$ ($10^{13.5}$) cm$^{-2}$ are found for $48$ of $54$ ($36$ of $42$) galaxies at $d R_{\\rm h}$ compared to isolated galaxies ($\\kappa_{\\rm OVI}\\approx0.13$ versus $0.04$) but no excess HI absorption. These findings suggest that environmental effects play a role in distributing heavy elements beyond the enriched gaseous halos of individual galaxies. Finally, we find that differential HI and OVI absorption between early- and late-type galaxies continues from $d < R_{\\rm h}$...

Johnson, Sean D; Mulchaey, John S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

DYNAMICAL FRICTION IN A GASEOUS MEDIUM WITH A LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamical friction force experienced by a massive gravitating body moving through a gaseous medium is modified by sufficiently strong large-scale magnetic fields. Using linear perturbation theory, we calculate the structure of the wake generated by, and the gravitational drag force on, a body traveling in a straight-line trajectory in a uniformly magnetized medium. The functional form of the drag force as a function of the Mach number ({identical_to} V{sub 0}/c{sub s} , where V{sub 0} is the velocity of the body and c{sub s} is the sound speed) depends on the strength of the magnetic field and on the angle between the velocity of the perturber and the direction of the magnetic field. In particular, the peak value of the drag force is not near Mach number {approx}1 for a perturber moving in a sufficiently magnetized medium. As a rule of thumb, we may state that for supersonic motion, magnetic fields act to suppress dynamical friction; for subsonic motion, they tend to enhance dynamical friction. For perturbers moving along the magnetic field lines, the drag force at some subsonic Mach numbers may be stronger than at supersonic velocities. We also mention the relevance of our findings to black hole coalescence in galactic nuclei.

Sanchez-Salcedo, F. J., E-mail: jsanchez@astroscu.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico City (Mexico)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Variable Emission from a Gaseous Disc around a Metal-Polluted White Dwarf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the discovery of strongly variable emission lines from a gaseous disc around the DA white dwarf SDSS J1617+1620, a star previously found to have an infrared excess indicative of a dusty debris disc formed by the tidal disruption of a rocky planetary body. Time-series spectroscopy obtained during the period 2006-2014 has shown the appearance of strong double-peaked Ca II emission lines in 2008. The lines were weak, at best, during earlier observations, and monotonically faded through the remainder of our monitoring. Our observations represent unambiguous evidence for short-term variability in the debris environment of evolved planetary systems. Possible explanations for this extraordinary variability include the impact onto the dusty disc of either a single small rocky planetesimal, or of material from a highly eccentric debris tail. The increase in flux from the emission lines is sufficient that similar events could be detected in the broadband photometry of ongoing and future large-area time domai...

Wilson, David J; Koester, Detlev; Raddi, Roberto; Breedt, Elmé; Southworth, John; Parsons, Steven G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Postplasma particle dynamics in a Gaseous Electronics Conference RF Reference Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particle contamination in plasma tools used for the manufacture of very large scale integrated semiconductor devices on silicon wafers is a major cause of yield loss. Understanding the dynamics of particle movement in the postplasma regime is important to explain the process of their transport to the wafer. The movement of particle contamination in a Gaseous Electronics Conference RF Reference Cell in the postplasma regime was investigated using a novel technique. Particle clouds were observed using laser light scattering together with an image intensifier and a monochromator. This technique allowed particle clouds of low density, that could not otherwise be detected, to be seen. Video analysis of the particles showed movement of the cloud front during the first second after the plasma was extinguished. Using the particle terminal velocity to estimate particle size, we estimate diameters of 0.11 {mu}m in argon and 0.05 {mu}m in krypton. The role of the thermophoretic force on particles during the postplasma was shown to be larger than gravitational forces and to dominate particle transport for small particles under the conditions investigated. A temperature gradient of 12 {degree}C/cm was observed to move these particles away from a warm electrode as the plasma was extinguished and the particles were released from the electrostatic confinement forces generated by the plasma. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

Collins, S.M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Brown, D.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); O`Hanlon, J.F.; Carlile, R.N. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Activities to support the liquefied gaseous fuels spill test facility program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately a hundred years ago the petrochemical industry was in its infancy, while the chemical industry was already well established. Today, both of these industries, which are almost indistinguishable, are a substantial part of the makeup of the U.S. economy and the lifestyle we enjoy. It is difficult to identify a single segment of our daily lives that isn`t affected by these industries and the products or services they make available for our use. Their survival and continued function in a competitive world market are necessary to maintain our current standard of living. The occurrence of accidents in these industries has two obvious effects: (1) the loss of product during the accident and future productivity because of loss of a portion of a facility or transport medium, and (2) the potential loss of life or injury to individuals, whether workers, emergency responders, or members of the general public. A great deal of work has been conducted at the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill test Facility (LGFSTF) on hazardous spills. WRI has conducted accident investigations as well as provided information on the research results via the internet and bibliographies.

Sheesley, D.; King, S.B.; Routh, T.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

An evaluation of gaseous sterilants under various conditions and their effect upon the heat resistance of Salmonella  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gaseous Sterilant Exposure Chamber Environment for Gas Exposure Tests with Formaldehyde Preparation for Heat Treatment Heat Treatment Test with Beta-propiolactone Test with Penn Gas 10 10 10 10 12 IV. RESULTS Test wi. th Formaldehyde Test... with BPL Test with Penn Gas 14 14 17 19 V DISCUSSION 23 iv Chapter VI. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS LITERATURE CITED . . . , ~ ~ ~ . 26 47 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Effect of formaldehyde (conc. 0. 005 ml/L) with subsequent heat treatment (50 C...

Ali, Md. Razzak

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

PAndAS IN THE MIST: THE STELLAR AND GASEOUS MASS WITHIN THE HALOS OF M31 AND M33  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale surveys of the prominent members of the Local Group have provided compelling evidence for the hierarchical formation of massive galaxies, revealing a wealth of substructure that is thought to be the debris from ancient and ongoing accretion events. In this paper, we compare two extant surveys of the M31-M33 subgroup of galaxies: the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey of the stellar structure, and a combination of observations of the H I gaseous content, detected at 21 cm. Our key finding is a marked lack of spatial correlation between these two components on all scales, with only a few potential overlaps between stars and gas. The paucity of spatial correlation significantly restricts the analysis of kinematic correlations, although there does appear to be H I kinematically associated with the Giant Stellar Stream where it passes the disk of M31. These results demonstrate that different processes must significantly influence the dynamical evolution of the stellar and H I components of substructures, such as ram pressure driving gas away from a purely gravitational path. Detailed modeling of the offset between the stellar and gaseous substructures will provide a determination of the properties of the gaseous halos of M31 and M33.

Lewis, Geraint F. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)] [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Braun, Robert [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); McConnachie, Alan W. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)] [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Irwin, Michael J.; Chapman, Scott C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Martin, Nicolas F. [Observatoire de Strasbourg, 11, rue de l'Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France)] [Observatoire de Strasbourg, 11, rue de l'Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Fardal, Mark [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Dubinski, John [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George Street, University of Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George Street, University of Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Widrow, Larry [Department of Physics, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Mackey, A. Dougal [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)] [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Babul, Arif [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Tanvir, Nial R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Rich, Michael, E-mail: geraint.lewis@sydney.edu.au [Division of Astronomy, University of California, 8979 Math Sciences, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)] [Division of Astronomy, University of California, 8979 Math Sciences, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Summary and Outlook of the International Workshop on Aging Phenomena in Gaseous Detectors (DESY, Hamburg, October, 2001)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Energy Physics experiments are currently entering a new era which requires the operation of gaseous particle detectors at unprecedented high rates and integrated particle fluxes. Full functionality of such detectors over the lifetime of an experiment in a harsh radiation environment is of prime concern to the involved experimenters. New classes of gaseous detectors such as large-scale straw-type detectors, Micro-pattern Gas Detectors and related detector types with their own specific aging effects have evolved since the first workshop on wire chamber aging was held at LBL, Berkeley in 1986. In light of these developments and as detector aging is a notoriously complex field, the goal of the workshop was to provide a forum for interested experimentalists to review the progress in understanding of aging effects and to exchange recent experiences. A brief summary of the main results and experiences reported at the 2001 workshop is presented, with the goal of providing a systematic review of aging effects in state-of-the-art and future gaseous detectors.

M. Titov; M. Hohlmann; C. Padilla; N. Tesch

2002-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Central Kiloparsec of Seyfert and Inactive Host Galaxies: a Comparison of Two-Dimensional Stellar and Gaseous Kinematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the properties of the two-dimensional distribution and kinematics of ionised gas and stars in the central kiloparsecs of a matched sample of nearby active (Seyfert) and inactive galaxies, using the SAURON Integral Field Unit on the William Herschel Telescope. The ionised gas distributions show a range of low excitation regions such as star formation rings in Seyferts and inactive galaxies, and high excitation regions related to photoionisation by the AGN. The stellar kinematics of all galaxies in the sample show regular rotation patterns typical of disc-like systems, with kinematic axes which are well aligned with those derived from the outer photometry and which provide a reliable representation of the galactic line of nodes. After removal of the non-gravitational components due to e.g. AGN-driven outflows, the ionised gas kinematics in both the Seyfert and inactive galaxies are also dominated by rotation with global alignment between stars and gas in most galaxies. This result is consistent with previous findings from photometric studies that the large-scale light distribution of Seyfert hosts are similar to inactive hosts. However, fully exploiting the two-dimensional nature of our spectroscopic data, deviations from axisymmetric rotation in the gaseous velocity fields are identified that suggest the gaseous kinematics are more disturbed at small radii in the Seyfert galaxies compared with the inactive galaxies, providing a tentative link between nuclear gaseous streaming and nuclear activity.

Gaelle Dumas; Carole Mundell; Eric Emsellem; Neil Nagar

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

222

Thin films of mixed metal compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

223

Method for selectively removing fluorine and fluorine-containing contaminants from gaseous UF/sub 6/. [ClF/sub 3/  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a method for effecting preferential removal and immobilization of certain gaseous contaminants from gaseous UF/sub 6/. The contaminants include fluorine and fluorides which are more reactive with CaCO/sub 3/ than is UF/sub 6/. The method comprises contacting the contaminant-carrying UF/sub 6/ with particulate CaCO/sub 3/ at a temperature effecting reaction of the contaminant and the CaCO/sub 3/.

Jones, R.L.; Otey, M.G.; Perkins, R.W.

1980-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

224

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

225

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

228

Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio, is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Uranium hexafluoride enriched uranium than 1.0 wt percent {sup 235}U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 (Reference 1) and 178 (Reference 2), or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF{sub 6} cylinders/overpacks. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF{sub 6} packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the is documented in Reference 4.

Becker, D.L.; Green, D.J.; Lindquist, M.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Ground penetrating radar surveys over an alluvial DNAPL site, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to map shallow sands and gravels which are DNAPL migration pathways at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in western Kentucky. The sands and gravels occur as paleochannel deposits, at depths of 17-25 ft, embedded in Pleistocene lacustrine clays. More than 30 GPR profiles were completed over the Drop Test Area (DTA) to map the top and base of the paleochannel deposits, and to assess their lateral continuity. A bistatic radar system was used with antenna frequencies of 25 and 50 MHz. An average velocity of 0.25 ft/ns for silty and clayey materials above the paleochannel deposits was established from radar walkaway tests, profiles over culverts of known depth, and comparison of radar sections with borings. In the south portion of the DTA, strong reflections corresponded to the water table at approximately 9-10 ft, the top of the paleochannel deposits at approximately 18 ft, and to gravel horizons within these deposits. The base of these deposits was not visible on the radar sections. Depth estimates for the top of the paleochannel deposits (from 50 records) were accurate to within 2 ft across the southern portion of the DTA. Continuity of these sands and gravels could not be assessed due to interference from air-wave reflections and lateral changes in signal penetration depth. However, the sands and gravels appear to extend across the entire southern portion of the DTA, at depths as shallow as 17 ft. Ringing, air-wave reflections and diffractions from powerlines, vehicles, well casings, and metal equipment severly degraded GPR profiles in the northern portion of the DTA; depths computed from reflection times (where visible) were accurate to within 4 ft in this area. The paleochannel deposits are deeper to the north and northeast where DNAPL has apparently pooled (DNAPL was not directly imaged by the GPR, however). Existing hydrogeological models of the DTA will be revised.

Carpenter, P.J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Doll, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phillips, B.E. [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Inorganic soil and groundwater chemistry near Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-surface soils, boreholes, and sediments near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) were sampled in 1989-91 as were monitoring wells, TVA wells, and privately-owned wells. Most wells were sampled two or three times. The resulting chemical analyses have been published in previous reports and have been previously described (CH2M HILL 1991, 1992; Clausen et al. 1992). The two reports by CH2M HILL are controversial, however, because, the concentrations of some constituents were reported to exceed background levels or drinking water standards and because both on-site (within the perimeter fence at PGDP) and off-site pollution was reported to have occurred. The groundwater samples upon which these interpretations were based may not be representative, however. The CH2M HILL findings are discussed in the report. The purpose of this report is to characterize the inorganic chemistry of groundwater and soils near PGDP, using data from the CH2M HILL reports (1991, 1992), and to determine whether or not any contamination has occurred. The scope is limited to analysis and interpretation of data in the CH2M HILL reports because previous interpretations of these data may not be valid, because samples were collected in a relatively short period of time at several hundred locations, and because the chemical analyses are nearly complete. Recent water samples from the same wells were not considered because the characterization of inorganic chemistry for groundwater and soil requirements only one representative sample and an accurate analysis from each location.

Moore, G.K. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Proposed sale of radioactively contaminated nickel ingots located at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to sell 8,500 radioactively contaminated nickel ingots (9.350 short tons), currently in open storage at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), to Scientific Ecology Group, Inc. (SEG) for decontamination and resale on the international market. SEG would take ownership of the ingots when they are loaded for transport by truck to its facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. SEG would receive approximately 200 short tons per month over approximately 48 months (an average of 180 ingots per month). The nickel decontamination process specified in SEG`s technical proposal is considered the best available technology and has been demonstrated in prototype at SEG. The resultant metal for resale would have contamination levels between 0.3 and 20 becquerel per gram (Bq/g). The health hazards associated with release of the decontaminated nickel are minimal. The activity concentration of the end product would be further reduced when the nickel is combined with other metals to make stainless steel. Low-level radioactive waste from the SEG decontamination process, estimated to be approximately 382 m{sup 3} (12,730 ft), would be shipped to a licensed commercial or DOE disposal facility. If the waste were packaged in 0.23 m{sup 3}-(7.5 ft{sup 3}-) capacity drums, approximately 1,500 to 1,900 drums would be transported over the 48-month contract period. Impacts from the construction of decontamination facilities and the selected site are minimal.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Modifying woody plants for efficient conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Short Rotation Woody Crop Program (SRWCP), Department of Energy, is developing woody plant species as sources of renewable energy. Much progress has been made in identifying useful species, and testing site adaptability, stand densities, coppicing abilities, rotation lengths, and harvesting systems. Conventional plant breeding and intensive cultural practices have been used to increase above-ground biomass yields. Given these and foreseeable accomplishments, program leaders are now shifting attention to prospects for altering biomass physical and chemical characteristics, and to ways for improving the efficiency with which biomass can be converted to gaseous and liquid fuels. This report provides a review and synthesis of literature concerning the quantity and quality of such characteristics and constituents, and opportunities for manipulating them via conventional selection and breeding and/or molecular biology. Species now used by SRWCP are emphasized, with supporting information drawn from others as needed. Little information was found on silver maple (Acer saccharinum), but general comparisons (Isenberg 1981) suggest composition and behavior similar to those of the other species. Where possible, conclusions concerning means for and feasibility of manipulation are given, along with expected impacts on conversion efficiency. Information is also provided on relationships to other traits, genotype X environment interactions, and potential trade-offs or limitations. Biomass productivity per se is not addressed, except in terms of effects that may by caused by changes in constituent quality and/or quantity. Such effects are noted to the extent they are known or can be estimated. Likely impacts of changes, however effected, on suitability or other uses, e.g., pulp and paper manufacture, are notes. 311 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Dinus, R.J.; Dimmel, D.R.; Feirer, R.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Malcolm, E.W. (Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

TIME-DEPENDENT PHOTOIONIZATION OF GASEOUS NEBULAE: THE PURE HYDROGEN CASE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the problem of time-dependent photoionization of low density gaseous nebulae subjected to sudden changes in the intensity of ionizing radiation. To this end, we write a computer code that solves the full time-dependent energy balance, ionization balance, and radiation transfer equations in a self-consistent fashion for a simplified pure hydrogen case. It is shown that changes in the ionizing radiation yield ionization/thermal fronts that propagate through the cloud, but the propagation times and response times to such fronts vary widely and nonlinearly from the illuminated face of the cloud to the ionization front (IF). IF/thermal fronts are often supersonic, and in slabs initially in pressure equilibrium such fronts yield large pressure imbalances that are likely to produce important dynamical effects in the cloud. Further, we studied the case of periodic variations in the ionizing flux. It is found that the physical conditions of the plasma have complex behaviors that differ from any steady-state solution. Moreover, even the time average of ionization and temperature is different from any steady-state case. This time average is characterized by overionization and a broader IF with respect to the steady-state solution for a mean value of the radiation flux. Around the time average of physical conditions there is a large dispersion in instantaneous conditions, particularly across the IF, which increases with the period of radiation flux variations. Moreover, the variations in physical conditions are asynchronous along the slab due to the combination of nonlinear propagation times for thermal fronts/IFs and equilibration times.

Garcia, J.; Elhoussieny, E. E.; Bautista, M. A. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Kallman, T. R., E-mail: javier@head.cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: manuel.bautista@wmich.edu, E-mail: ehab.elhoussieny@wmich.edu, E-mail: timothy.r.kallman@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

Short-term effects of gaseous pollutants on cause-specific mortality in Wuhan, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was to determine the acute mortality effects of the gaseous pollutants in Wuhan, China a city with 7.5 million permanent residents during the period from 2000 to 2004. The major sources of air pollution in the city are motor vehicles and the use of coal for domestic cooking, heating, and industrial processes. In recent years, combustion of gas has been the most common method for domestic cooking. There is a large coal-combustion smelter in the district. There are approximately 4.5 million residents in Wuhan who live in the city's core area of 201 km{sup 2}, where air pollution levels are highest, and pollution ranges are wider than the majority of the cities in the published literature. We used the generalized additive model to analyze pollution, mortality, and covariate data. We found consistent NO{sub 2} effects on mortality with the strongest effects on the same day. Every 10-{mu}g/m{sup 3} increase in NO{sub 2} daily concentration on the same day was associated with an increase in nonaccidental cardiovascular, stroke, cardiac, respiratory, and cardiopulmonary mortality. These effects were stronger among the elderly than among the young. Formal examination of exposure-response curves suggests no-threshold linear relationships between daily mortality and NO{sub 2}, where the NO{sub 2} concentrations ranged from 19.2 to 127.4 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. SO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} were not associated with daily mortality. The exposure response relationships demonstrated heterogeneity, with some curves showing nonlinear relationships for SO{sub 2} and O{sub 3}. We conclude that there is consistent evidence of acute effects of NO{sub 2} on mortality and suggest that a no-threshold linear relationship exists between NO{sub 2} and mortality. 36 refs., 7 tabs.

Zhengmin Qian; Qingci He; Hung-Mo Lin (and others) [Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Neutral Current Coherent Cross Sections- Implications on Gaseous Spherical TPC's for detecting SN and Earth neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection of galactic supernova (SN) neutrinos represents one of the future frontiers of low-energy neutrino physics and astrophysics. The neutron coherence of neutral currents (NC) allows quite large cross sections in the case of neutron rich targets, which can be exploited in detecting earth and sky neutrinos by measuring nuclear recoils. A core-collapse supernova represents one of the most powerful source of (anti)neutrinos in the Universe. These (NC) cross sections are not dependent on flavor conversions and, thus, their measurement will provide useful information about the neutrino source. In particular the case of SN they will yield information about the primary neutrino fluxes, i.e. before flavor conversions in neutrino sphere. The advantages of large gaseous low threshold and high resolution time projection counters (TPC) detectors TPC detectors will be discussed. These are especially promising since they are expected to be relatively cheap and easy to maintain. The information thus obtained can also be useful to other flavor sensitive detectors, e.g. the large liquid scintillation detectors like LENA. All together such detectors will provide invaluable information on the astrophysics of core-collapse explosion and on the neutrino mixing parameters. In particular, neutrino flavor transitions in SN envelope might be sensitive to the value of theta-{13} and to the unknown neutrino mass hierarchy. Till a real SN explosion is detected, one can use available earth neutrino sources with similar energy spectra to test the behavior of these detectors. Among them, the ORNL Neutron Spallation source (SNS) and boosted radioactive neutrino beams are good candidates.

J. D. Vergados

2011-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

A GENERAL CIRCULATION MODEL FOR GASEOUS EXOPLANETS WITH DOUBLE-GRAY RADIATIVE TRANSFER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new version of our code for modeling the atmospheric circulation on gaseous exoplanets, now employing a 'double-gray' radiative transfer scheme, which self-consistently solves for fluxes and heating throughout the atmosphere, including the emerging (observable) infrared flux. We separate the radiation into infrared and optical components, each with its own absorption coefficient, and solve standard two-stream radiative transfer equations. We use a constant optical absorption coefficient, while the infrared coefficient can scale as a power law with pressure; however, for simplicity, the results shown in this paper use a constant infrared coefficient. Here we describe our new code in detail and demonstrate its utility by presenting a generic hot Jupiter model. We discuss issues related to modeling the deepest pressures of the atmosphere and describe our use of the diffusion approximation for radiative fluxes at high optical depths. In addition, we present new models using a simple form for magnetic drag on the atmosphere. We calculate emitted thermal phase curves and find that our drag-free model has the brightest region of the atmosphere offset by {approx}12 Degree-Sign from the substellar point and a minimum flux that is 17% of the maximum, while the model with the strongest magnetic drag has an offset of only {approx}2 Degree-Sign and a ratio of 13%. Finally, we calculate rates of numerical loss of kinetic energy at {approx}15% for every model except for our strong-drag model, where there is no measurable loss; we speculate that this is due to the much decreased wind speeds in that model.

Rauscher, Emily [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

237

Feedback from galactic stellar bulges and hot gaseous haloes of galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate that the feedback from stellar bulges can play an essential role in shaping the halo gas of galaxies with substantial bulge components by conducting 1-D hydrodynamical simulations. The feedback model we consider consists of two distinct phases: 1) an early starburst during the bulge formation and 2) a subsequent long-lasting mass and energy injection from stellar winds of low-mass stars and Type Ia SNe. An energetic outward blastwave is initiated by the starburst and is maintained and enhanced by the long-lasting stellar feedback. For a MW-like galactic bulge, this blastwave sweeps up the halo gas in the proto-galaxy and heats up the surrounding medium to a scale much beyond the virial radius of the halo, thus the accretion of the halo hot gas can be completely stopped. In addition, the long-lasting feedback in the later phase powers a galactic bulge wind that is reverse-shocked at a large radius in the presence of surrounding intergalactic medium and hence maintains a hot gaseous halo. As the mass and energy injection decreases with time, the feedback evolves to a subsonic and quasi-stable outflow, which is enough to prevent halo gas from cooling. The two phases of the feedback thus re-enforce each-other's impact on the gas dynamics. The simulation results demonstrate that the stellar bulge feedback may provide a plausible solution to the long-standing problems in understanding the MW type galaxies, such as the "missing stellar feedback" problem and the "over-cooling" problem. The simulations also show that the properties of the hot gas in the subsonic outflow state depend sensitively on the environment and the formation history of the bulge. This dependence and variance may explain the large dispersion in the X-ray to B-band luminosity ratio of the low $L_X/L_B$ Es.

Shikui Tang; Q. Daniel Wang; Yu Lu; H. J. Mo

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Modeling and analyses of postulated UF{sub 6} release accidents in gaseous diffusion plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer models have been developed to simulate the transient behavior of aerosols and vapors as a result of a postulated accident involving the release of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant. UF{sub 6} undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form hydrogen fluoride (HF) and radioactive uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}). As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, this study evaluated source terms consisting of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} as well as HF during a postulated UF{sub 6} release accident in a process building. In the postulated accident scenario, {approximately}7900 kg (17,500 lb) of hot UF{sub 6} vapor is released over a 5 min period from the process piping into the atmosphere of a large process building. UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} mainly remains as airborne-solid particles (aerosols), and HF is in a vapor form. Some UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols are removed from the air flow due to gravitational settling. The HF and the remaining UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} are mixed with air and exhausted through the building ventilation system. The MELCOR computer code was selected for simulating aerosols and vapor transport in the process building. MELCOR model was first used to develop a single volume representation of a process building and its results were compared with those from past lumped parameter models specifically developed for studying UF{sub 6} release accidents. Preliminary results indicate that MELCOR predicted results (using a lumped formulation) are comparable with those from previously developed models.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carter, J.C. [J.C. Carter Associates, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dyer, R.H. [Dyer Enterprises, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Sensitive ion detection device and method for analysis of compounds as vapors in gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for the detection of trace gaseous molecular compounds dissolved or suspended in a carrier gas, particularly in ambient air, without preconcentration or the trapping of analyte particles. The IMS of the invention comprises an ionization volume of greater than 5 cm.sup.3 and preferably greater than 100 cm.sup.3. The larger size ionizers of this invention enable analysis of trace (<1 ppb) of sample compounds in the gas phase. To facilitate efficient ion motion through the large volume ionization and reaction regions of the IMS, an electric field gradient can be provided in the ionization region or in both the ionization and reaction regions. The systems can be implemented with radioactive ionization sources, corona discharge ion sources or ions can be formed by photoionization. In specific embodiments, particularly when the sample gas is ambient air, the sample gas is heater prior to entry into the instrument, the instrument is run at temperatures above ambient, and the instrument can be heated by contact with heated sample gas exiting the instrument.

Denton, M. Bonner; Sperline, Roger P

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

240

Methods and compositions for removing carbon dioxide from a gaseous mixture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided is a method for adsorbing or separating carbon dioxide from a mixture of gases by passing the gas mixture through a porous three-dimensional polymeric coordination compound having a plurality of layers of two-dimensional arrays of repeating structural units, which results in a lower carbon dioxide content in the gas mixture. Thus, this invention provides useful compositions and methods for removal of greenhouse gases, in particular CO.sub.2, from industrial flue gases or from the atmosphere.

Li, Jing; Wu, Haohan

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hydrodesulfurization catalyst by Chevrel phase compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for the hydrodesulfurization of sulfur-containing hydrocarbon fuel with reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides, known as Chevrel phase compounds. Chevrel phase compounds of the general composition M/sub x/Mo/sub 6/S/sub 8/, with M being Ho, Pb, Sn, Ag, In, Cu, Fe, Ni, or Co, were found to have hydrodesulfurization activities comparable to model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS/sub 2/ catalysts. The most active catalysts were the ''large'' cation compounds (Ho, Pb, Sn), and the least active catalysts were the ''small'' cation compounds (Cu, Fe, Ni, Co.).

McCarty, K.F.; Schrader, G.L.

1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

244

Health risk from earthquake caused releases of UF{sub 6} at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The health risk to the public and workers from potential exposure to the toxic materials from earthquake caused releases of uranium hexafluoride from the Paducah gaseous Diffusion Plant are evaluated. The results of the study show that the health risk from earthquake caused releases is small, and probably less than risks associated with the transportation of hydrogen fluoride and other similar chemicals used by industry. The probability of more than 30 people experiencing health consequences (injuries) from earthquake damage is less than 4xlO{sup 4}/yr.

Brown, N.W; Lu, S.; Chen, J.C.; Roehnelt, R.; Lombardi, D.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Method of preparing and utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a method of utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream with a mitigation of carbon accumulation. The system is comprised of a catalytically active phase deposited onto an oxygen conducting phase, with or without supplemental support. The catalytically active phase has a specified crystal structure where at least one catalytically active metal is a cation within the crystal structure and coordinated with oxygen atoms within the crystal structure. The catalyst system employs an optimum coverage ratio for a given set of oxidation conditions, based on a specified hydrocarbon conversion and a carbon deposition limit. Specific embodiments of the catalyst system are disclosed.

Berry, David A; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Smith, Mark; Haynes, Daniel

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

Research Article Decomposition of Epoxy Model Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-critical water (NCW) or subcritical water, i.e., water at 250­300 °C [20], turn out to be alternative candidatesResearch Article Decomposition of Epoxy Model Compounds in Near-Critical Water Two tpyes of epoxy water (NCW). In the case of model compound I, at low temperatures the water molecules behave

Guo, John Zhanhu

247

ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the multiple lines of evidence support the occurrence of cometabolism and the potential for the process to contribute to temporal and spatial attenuation of TCE in PGDP groundwater, then a follow-up enzyme probe microcosm study to better estimate biological degradation rate(s) is warranted.

Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

248

Summary and Outlook of the International Workshop on Aging Phenomena in Gaseous Detectors (DESY, Hamburg, October, 2001)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Energy Physics experiments are currently entering a new era which requires the operation of gaseous particle detectors at unprecedented high rates and integrated particle fluxes. Full functionality of such detectors over the lifetime of an experiment in a harsh radiation environment is of prime concern to the involved experimenters. New classes of gaseous detectors such as large-scale straw-type detectors, Micro-pattern Gas Detectors and related detector types with their own specific aging effects have evolved since the first workshop on wire chamber aging was held at LBL, Berkeley in 1986. In light of these developments and as detector aging is a notoriously complex field, the goal of the workshop was to provide a forum for interested experimentalists to review the progress in understanding of aging effects and to exchange recent experiences. A brief summary of the main results and experiences reported at the 2001 workshop is presented, with the goal of providing a systematic review of aging effects in ...

Titov, M L; Padilla, C; Tesch, N

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) apparatus for nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D. A.; Velsko, C. A.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Yeamans, C. B.; Moody, K. J.; Tereshatov, E.; Stoeffl, W.; Riddle, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-236, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Pattern recognition techniques to reduce backgrounds in the search for the {sup 136}Xe double beta decay with gaseous TPCs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The observation of the neutrinoless double beta decay may provide essential information on the nature of neutrinos. Among the current experimental approaches, a high pressure gaseous TPC is an attractive option for the search of double beta decay due to its good energy resolution and the detailed topological information of each event. We present in this talk a detailed study of the ionization topology of the {sup 136}Xe double beta decay events in a High Pressure Xenon TPC, as well as that of the typical competing backgrounds. We define some observables based on graph theory concepts to develop automated discrimination algorithms. Our criteria are able to reduce the background level by about three orders of magnitude in the region of interest of the {sup 136}Xe Q{sub ??} for a signal acceptance of 40%. This result provides a quantitative assessment of the benefit of topological information offered by gaseous TPCs for double beta decay search, and proves that it is a promising feature in view of future experiments in the field. Possible ideas for further improvement in the discrimination algorithms and the dependency of these results with the gas diffusion and readout granularity will be also discussed.

Iguaz, F. J.; Cebrián, S.; Dafni, T.; Gómez, H.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Luzon, G.; Segui, L.; Tomas, A. [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)] [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

251

Production method for making rare earth compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Dennis, Kevin W. (Ames, IA); Hofer, Robert J. (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

252

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

al. have taken just this tack in their study of a europium (the rare earth)-nickel-phosphorous intermetallic compound. Thirty years ago, the discovery of superconductivity in the...

253

Digital Construction Platform: A Compound Arm Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a novel large-scale Digital Construction Platform (DCP) for on-site sensing, analysis, and fabrication. The DCP is an in-progress research project consisting of a compound robotic arm system comprised of a ...

Spielberg, Nathan A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Production method for making rare earth compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

255

Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

256

Excitonic effects in oxyhalide scintillating host compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ab-initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to study the electronic, optical, mechanical, and vibrational properties of scintillator host compounds YOX (X?=?F, Cl, Br, and I). Semiempirical dispersion correction schemes are used to find the effect of van der Waals forces on these layered compounds and we found this effect to be negligible except for YOBr. Calculations of phonons and elastic constants showed that all the compounds studied here are both dynamically and mechanically stable. YOF and YOI are found to be indirect band gap insulators while YOCl and YOBr are direct band gap insulators. The band gap is found to decrease as we move from fluorine to iodine, while the calculated refractive index shows the opposite trend. As the band gap decreases on going down the periodic table from YOF to YOI, the luminescence increases. The excitonic binding energy calculated, within the effective mass approximation, is found to be more for YOF than the remaining compounds, suggesting that the excitonic effect to be more in YOF than the other compounds. The optical properties are calculated within the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) and compared with results obtained within the random phase approximation. The TDDFT calculations, using the newly developed bootstrap exchange-correlation kernel, showed significant excitonic effects in all the compounds studied here.

Shwetha, G.; Kanchana, V., E-mail: kanchana@iith.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, Ordnance Factory Estate, Yeddumailaram 502 205, Telangana (India); Valsakumar, M. C. [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology (SEST), University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500 046, Telangana (India)

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

Gamma radiological surveys of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, 1990-1993, and overview of data processing and analysis by the Environmental Restoration Remote Sensing Program, Fiscal Year 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three gamma radiological surveys have been conducted under auspices of the ER Remote Sensing Program: (1) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (1992), (2) Clinch River (1992), and (3) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) (1993). In addition, the Remote Sensing Program has acquired the results of earlier surveys at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) (1990) and PORTS (1990). These radiological surveys provide data for characterization and long-term monitoring of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contamination areas since many of the radioactive materials processed or handled on the ORR, PGDP, and PORTS are direct gamma radiation emitters or have gamma emitting daughter radionuclides. High resolution airborne gamma radiation surveys require a helicopter outfitted with one or two detector pods, a computer-based data acquisition system, and an accurate navigational positioning system for relating collected data to ground location. Sensors measure the ground-level gamma energy spectrum in the 38 to 3,026 KeV range. Analysis can provide gamma emission strength in counts per second for either gross or total man-made gamma emissions. Gross count gamma radiation includes natural background radiation from terrestrial sources (radionuclides present in small amounts in the earth`s soil and bedrock), from radon gas, and from cosmic rays from outer space as well as radiation from man-made radionuclides. Man-made count gamma data include only the portion of the gross count that can be directly attributed to gamma rays from man-made radionuclides. Interpretation of the gamma energy spectra can make possible the determination of which specific radioisotopes contribute to the observed man-made gamma radiation, either as direct or as indirect (i.e., daughter) gamma energy from specific radionuclides (e.g., cesium-137, cobalt-60, uranium-238).

Smyre, J.L.; Moll, B.W.; King, A.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium compounds efecto Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

United States Konarik Stephen... gaseous ammonia (NH3) which through chemical reaction in rainwater changes into ammonium ion ... Source: Aneja, Viney P. - Department of Marine,...

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

United States Konarik Stephen... gaseous ammonia (NH3) which through chemical reaction in rainwater changes into ammonium ion ... Source: Aneja, Viney P. - Department of Marine,...

260

Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Polymers comprising residues of cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent are provided. The cage compound monomers are selected from borane cage compound monomers comprising at least 7 cage atoms and/or carborane cage compound monomers comprising 7 to 11 cage compound monomers. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Articles of manufacture comprising such polymers are also disclosed.

Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

An interim report to the manager of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant from the Paducah Environmental Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paducah Environmental Advisory Committee was formed as: (1) an outgrowth of other Environmental Advisory Committees already in existence at Oak Ridge and other Martin Marietta Energy Systems plants; (2) a result of public concern following significant nuclear incidents at Bhopal and Chernobyl; (3) a result of the new direction and commitment of the management of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant following contract acquisition by Martin Marietta Energy Systems; and (4) a means of reducing and/or preventing local and/or public concern regarding the activities of and potential risks created by PGDP. This report discusses the following issues and concerns of the Committee arrived at through a series of meetings: (1) groundwater monitoring; (2) long-range tails storage; C-404, scrap yrads, and PCB and TCE cleanup; nuclear criticality plan and alarm systems; documentation of historical data regarding hazardous waste burial grounds; dosimeter badges; and asbestos handling and removal.

Jackson, G.D.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Detection of illicit HEU production in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants using neutron counting techniques on product cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Innovative and novel safeguards approaches are needed for nuclear energy to meet global energy needs without the threat of nuclear weapons proliferation. Part of these efforts will include creating verification techniques that can monitor uranium enrichment facilities for illicit production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU). Passive nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques will be critical in preventing illicit HEU production because NDA offers the possibility of continuous and unattended monitoring capabilities with limited impact on facility operations. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) are commonly used to produce low-enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel. In a GCEP, gaseous UF{sub 6} spins at high velocities in centrifuges to separate the molecules containing {sup 238}U from those containing the lighter {sup 235}U. Unfortunately, the process for creating LEU is inherently the same as HEU, creating a proliferation concern. Insuring that GCEPs are producing declared enrichments poses many difficult challenges. In a GCEP, large cascade halls operating thousands of centrifuges work together to enrich the uranium which makes effective monitoring of the cascade hall economically prohibitive and invasive to plant operations. However, the enriched uranium exiting the cascade hall fills product cylinders where the UF{sub 6} gas sublimes and condenses for easier storage and transportation. These product cylinders hold large quantities of enriched uranium, offering a strong signal for NDA measurement. Neutrons have a large penetrability through materials making their use advantageous compared to gamma techniques where the signal is easily attenuated. One proposed technique for detecting HEU production in a GCEP is using neutron coincidence counting at the product cylinder take off stations. This paper discusses findings from Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code simulations that examine the feasibility of such a detector.

Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Novel Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells Novel Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells 2010 DOE Vehicle...

264

Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization...

265

International Symposium on Gaseous and Odour Emissions from Animal Production Facilities, Horsens, Jutland, Denmark 1-4 June, 2003 Ammonia Emissions from Broiler Houses in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Symposium on Gaseous and Odour Emissions from Animal Production Facilities, Horsens, Jutland, Denmark 1-4 June, 2003 1 Ammonia Emissions from Broiler Houses in Pennsylvania During Cold of reducing ammonia (NH3) emissions are under study. Ammonia emissions during cold weather conditions from

Kentucky, University of

266

International Symposium on Gaseous and Odour Emissions from Animal Production Facilities, Horsens, Jutland, Denmark 1-4 June, 2003 Ammonia Emissions from Broiler Houses in Kentucky during Winter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Symposium on Gaseous and Odour Emissions from Animal Production Facilities, Horsens, Jutland, Denmark 1-4 June, 2003 Ammonia Emissions from Broiler Houses in Kentucky during Winter Kenneth D a comprehensive database of ammonia emission rates (ER) from US poultry facilities. The influence of common

Kentucky, University of

267

International Symposium on Gaseous and Odour Emissions from Animal Production Facilities, Horsens, Jutland, Denmark 1-4 June, 2003 AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM LAYER HOUSES IN IOWA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Symposium on Gaseous and Odour Emissions from Animal Production Facilities, Horsens, Jutland, Denmark 1-4 June, 2003 1 AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM LAYER HOUSES IN IOWA Y. Liang1 , H. Xin2 , A. Casey10 ABSTRACT An ongoing project of monitoring ammonia (NH3) emissions from U.S. layer houses

Kentucky, University of

268

Dispersion of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosol and HF vapor in the operating floor during winter ventilation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gaseous diffusion process is currently employed at two plants in the US: the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, a postulated design basis accident involving large line-rupture induced releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) is evaluated. When UF{sub 6} is released into the atmosphere, it undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form vaporized hydrogen fluoride (HF) and aerosolized uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}). These reactants disperse in the process building and transport through the building ventilation system. The ventilation system draws outside air into the process building, distributes it evenly throughout the building, and discharges it to the atmosphere at an elevated temperature. Since air is recirculated from the cell floor area to the operating floor, issues concerning in-building worker safety and evacuation need to be addressed. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the transport of HF vapor and UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols throughout the operating floor area following B-line break accident in the cell floor area.

Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carter, J.C. [J.C. Carter Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1996-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Type B Accident Investigation of the August 22, 2000, Injury Resulting From Violent Exothermic Chemical Reaction at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, X-701B Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On August 22, 2000, an accident occurred at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) located in Piketon, Ohio. An employee of the IT Corporation (IT) working on an Environmental Management (EM) Technology Deployment Project received serious burns from a violent chemical reaction.

270

Process for production of a borohydride compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for production of a borohydride compound M(BH.sub.4).sub.y. The process has three steps. The first step combines a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.yM with aluminum, hydrogen and a metallic catalyst containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group; M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two; wherein the catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum. The second step combines the compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y with a borate, boroxine or borazine compound to produce M(BH.sub.4).sub.y and a byproduct mixture containing alkali metal and aluminum aryloxides. The third step separates M(BH.sub.4).sub.y from the byproduct mixture.

Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

Agblevor, F.A.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

Rand, Barry (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Mutolo, Kristin L. (Hollywood, CA); Mayo, Elizabeth (Alhambra, CA); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

273

Beta cell device using icosahedral boride compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A beta cell for converting beta-particle energies into electrical energy having a semiconductor junction that incorporates an icosahedral boride compound selected from B.sub.12 As.sub.2, B.sub.12 P.sub.2, elemental boron having an .alpha.-rhombohedral structure, elemental boron having a .beta.-rhombohedral structure, and boron carbides of the chemical formula B.sub.12-x C.sub.3-x, where 0.15compound self-heals, resisting degradation from radiation damage.

Aselage, Terrence L. (62 Avenida Del Sol, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Emin, David (1502 Harvard Ct., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106-3712)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

Kabalka, George W. (Knoxville, TN); Srivastava, Rajiv R. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

275

Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

276

Process for preparing a deuterated or tritiated compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for labeling organic compounds with deuterium and tritium is described using specific catalysts.

Klei, Steven R.; Bergman, Robert C.

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

277

Process for preparing a deuterated or tritiated compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for labeling organic compounds with deuterium and tritium is described using specific catalysts.

Bergman, Robert C.; Klei, Steven R.

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

278

Process for preparing a deuterated or tritiated compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for labeling organic compounds with deuterium and tritium is described using specific catalysts.

Bergman, Robert C.; Klei, Steven R.

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

279

Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

280

Effect of paraffinic, naphthenic and aromatic distribution in the hydrocarbon mixture and water on the phase equilibria of carbon dioxide-hydrocarbon systems over the temperature range from 333 K to 366 K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide flooding has been suggested as an efficient and effective means of achieving additional oil recoveries from depleted and/or water flooded reservoirs. The numerical simulation of a carbon dioxide flood requires a phase equilibria predictor that will provide the compositional distribution of the reservoir fluids as the displacement propagates through the reservoir. The objective of this work was to provide a phase equilibria predictor that utilizes the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) equation of state. A new PUT apparatus was constructed. This apparatus was used to measure the isothermal P-x data of the systems: CO/sub 2/-toluene, CO/sub 2/-ethylbenzene, CO/sub 2/-propylbenzene, CO/sub 2/-cyclopentane, CO/sub 2/-cyclohexane and CO/sub 2/-methylcyclohexane at 333.15 K, 349.82 K and 366.48 K. Interaction parameters were regressed from literature data for CO/sub 2/-paraffin systems and from the experimental data of this work for CO/sub 2/-aromatic and CO/sub 2/-naphthenic systems. Recommended interaction parameters for these systems are provided. Experimental results indicated that the dominant effect of water on CO/sub 2/-hydrocarbon systems was the solubilization of carbon dioxide by water into the aqueous phase. This concept was simulated with the SRK equation of state and a correlation of literature data on the solubility of carbon dioxide in water. The predicted results agreed well with the experimental results. The presence of dissolved salts in water mitigates the effect of water on CO/sub 2/-hydrocarbon systems. The presence on n-butylbenzene or n-butylcylcohexane in the heavy ends with n-decane improved the maximum miscibility composition of the system. Pressure has a substantial effect on maximum miscibility compositions.

Ezekwe, J.N.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Quaternary Ammonium Compounds as Water Channel Blockers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/AQP2/AQP4, whereas the water permeability of AQP3 and AQP5, which lack a corresponding TyrQuaternary Ammonium Compounds as Water Channel Blockers SPECIFICITY, POTENCY, AND SITE OF ACTION, West Mains Road, EH9 3JJ Scotland, United Kingdom Excessive water uptake through Aquaporins (AQP) can

de Groot, Bert

282

High Performance Subgraph Mining in Molecular Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Performance Subgraph Mining in Molecular Compounds Giuseppe Di Fatta1,2 and Michael R data makes distributed graph mining techniques particularly relevant. In this paper, we present method has been evaluated on the well-known National Cancer Institute's HIV-screening dataset, where

Reiterer, Harald

283

Superconductivity in iron compounds G. R. Stewart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the superconductivity in this new class of compounds. These iron pnictide and chalcogenide (FePn/Ch) superconductors-phonon coupled ``conventional'' superconductors. Clearly, superconductivity and magnetism or magnetic of magnetism and superconductivity in FePn/Ch superconductors 1606 D. Tc and TS=TSDW versus pressure 1607 1

Wu, Zhigang

284

HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS M.D. MCCLUSKEY* University) spectroscopy of hydrogen and deuterium in GaP, AlSb, ZnSe, and GaN has provided important information about the structures of dopant- hydrogen complexes and their interaction with the host lattice. In GaN:Mg, for example

McCluskey, Matthew

285

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Prediction of external corrosion for steel cylinders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Application of an empirical method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the summer of 1995, ultrasonic wall thickness data were collected for 100 steel cylinders containing depleted uranium (DU) hexafluoride located at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The cylinders were selected for measurement to assess the condition of the more vulnerable portion of the cylinder inventory at PGDP. The purpose of this report is to apply the method used in Lyon to estimate the effects of corrosion for larger unsampled populations as a function of time. The scope of this report is limited and is not intended to represent the final analyses of available data. Future efforts will include continuing analyses of available data to investigate defensible deviations from the conservative assumptions made to date. For each cylinder population considered, two basic types of analyses were conducted: (1) estimates were made of the number of cylinders as a function of time that will have a minimum wall thickness of either 0 mils (1 mil = 0.00 1 in.) or 250 mils and (2) the current minimum wall thickness distributions across cylinders were estimated for each cylinder population considered. Additional analyses were also performed investigating comparisons of the results for F and G yards with the results presented in Lyon (1995).

Lyon, B.F.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Source term evaluation for UF{sub 6} release event in feed facility at gaseous diffusion plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of UF{sub 6} release accidents was conducted for the feed facility of a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP). Release rates from pig-tail connections were estimated from CYLIND code predictions, whereas, MELCOR was utilized for simulating reactions of UF{sub 6} with moisture and consequent transport of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols and HF vapor through the building and to the environment. Two wind speeds were utilized. At the high end (Case 1) a wind speed of {approximately} 1 m/s (200 fpm) was assumed to flow parallel to the building length. At the low end (Case 2) to represent stagnant conditions a corresponding wind speed of 1 cm/s (2 fpm) was utilized. A further conservative assumption was made to specify no closure of crane and train doors at either end of the building. Relaxation of this assumption should provide for additional margins. Results indicated that, for the high (200 fpm) wind speed, close to 66% of the UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols and 100% of the HF gas get released to the environment over a 10-minute period. However, for the low (2 fpm) wind speed, negligible amount ({approximately} 1% UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) of aerosols get released even over a 2 hour period.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Investigation of high temperature gaseous species by Knudsen cell mass spectrometry above the condensed systems Au-Ge-Cu and Au-Si / by Joseph Edward Kingcade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0), in kJ mol for the Gaseous Molecules AuSi, Ie 24 27 3l 34 TABLE 12. 13. 14. 15. 1 6. 17a 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. Au2Si, AuSi2, CuGe and CuGe2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Summary of Enthalpy Changes: for the Molecule Au..., (HT-H ), in kJ mol for the Gaseous T o Molecules Au2Ge2, AuGe3 and AuGe4 MOLECULE AND STRUCTURE 298 1200 1400 1600 TEMPERATURE ( K) 1800 2000 2200 hu2 Ge2 (Linear) Au2 Gep (Square Planar) FEF HCF FEF HCF 297. 7 18. 69 317. 1 18. 83...

Kingcade, Joseph Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

Direct synthesis of catalyzed hydride compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for directly preparing alkali metal aluminum hydrides such as NaAlH.sub.4 and Na.sub.3 AlH.sub.6 from either the alkali metal or its hydride, and aluminum. The hydride thus prepared is doped with a small portion of a transition metal catalyst compound, such as TiCl.sub.3, TiF.sub.3, or a mixture of these materials, in order to render them reversibly hydridable. The process provides for mechanically mixing the dry reagents under an inert atmosphere followed by charging the mixed materials with high pressure hydrogen while heating the mixture to about 125.degree. C. The method is relatively simple and inexpensive and provides reversible hydride compounds which are free of the usual contamination introduced by prior art wet chemical methods.

Gross, Karl J.; Majzoub, Eric

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

290

Compound refractive X-ray lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

Nygren, David R. (Berkeley, CA); Cahn, Robert (Walnut Creek, CA); Cederstrom, Bjorn (Traellborg, SE); Danielsson, Mats (Stocksund, SE); Vestlund, Jonas (Stockholm, SE)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hydromechanical transmission with compound planetary assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power transmission having three distinct ranges: (1) hydrostatic, (2) simple power-split hydromechanical, and (3) compound power-split hydromechanical. A single compound planetary assembly has two sun gears, two ring gears, and a single carrier with two sets of elongated planet gears. The two sun gears may be identical in size, and the two ring gears may be identical in size. A speed-varying module in driving relationship to the first sun gear is clutchable, in turn, to (1) the input shaft and (2) the second sun gear. The speed-varying means may comprise a pair of hydraulic units hydraulically interconnected so that one serves as a pump while the other serves as a motor and vice versa, one of the units having a variable stroke and being the one clutchable to either the input shaft or to the second sun gear. The other unit, which may have a fixed stroke, is connected in driving relation to the first sun gear. A brake grounds the carrier in the first range and in reverse and causes drive to be delivered to the output shaft through the first ring gear in a hydrostatic mode, the first ring gear being rigidly connected to the output shaft. The input shaft is also clutchable to the second ring gear of the compound planetary assembly.

Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias (late of San Francisco, CA); Weseloh, William E. (San Diego, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Paraffin Polydispersity Facilitates Mechanical Gelation Kristofer Paso,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climates or subsea producing fields. When the temperature of a crude oil or gas condensate fluid drops-ray diffraction,1-5 Raman and IR spectroscopy,6 and thermal analysis.7,8 Nucleation studies performed

Yi, Yun-Bo

293

Hydroxyalkyl phosphine compounds for use as diagnostic and therapeutic pharmaceuticals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This research discloses a compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical comprises a functionalized hydroxyalkyl phosphine ligand and a metal combined with the ligand. 16 figs.

Katti, K.V.; Singh, P.R.; Reddy, V.S.; Katti, K.K.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hydroxyalkyl phosphine compounds for use as diagnostic and therapeutic pharmaceuticals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical comprises a functionalized hydroxyalkyl phosphine ligand and a metal combined with the ligand.

Katti, Kattesh V. (Columbia, MO); Singh, Prahlad R. (Columbia, MO); Reddy, V. Sreenivasa (Columbia, MO); Katti, Kavita K. (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Ketring, Alan R. (Columbia, MO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Micropatterned Polymeric Gratings as Chemoresponsive Volatile Organic Compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micropatterned Polymeric Gratings as Chemoresponsive Volatile Organic Compound Sensors, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 Micropatterned polymeric diffraction gratings have been

296

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness...

297

Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of lanthanide cluster compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation focuses on the exploratory synthesis of compounds that contain R6ZI12 (R= Ce, Gd, Er; Z=Mn, Fe, Co, C2) clusters with the goal of finding magnetically interesting compounds. Several new compounds were made via high temperature...

Sweet, Lucas Edward

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Method for conversion of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for conversion of salts of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds forming useful conversion products including, e.g., .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and/or salts of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Conversion products find use, e.g., as feedstock and/or end-use chemicals.

Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); White, James F. (Richland, WA); Holladay, Johnathan E. (Kennewick, WA); Zacher, Alan H. (Kennewick, WA); Muzatko, Danielle S. (Kennewick, WA); Orth, Rick J. (Kennewick, WA)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Godshall, Ned A. (Stanford, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

Raistrick, I.D.; Godshall, N.A.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural attenuation: Chlorinated and recalcitrant compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural, or intrinsic, attenuation is an increasingly important component of site closure strategy. At first maligned as a do-nothing alternative, natural attenuation is now being recognized as a legitimate approach that can supplement and sometimes even supplant more costly approaches. Having gained more widespread acceptance as an option at hydrocarbon-contaminated sites, natural attenuation is now beginning to emerge as an option for sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents and other recalcitrant compounds such as MTBE. This book brings together the latest research and field applications, with chapters covering field characterization and monitoring, transformation processes, natural attenuation of MTBE, and a number of natural attenuation case studies.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Compound droplet manipulations on fiber arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent works demonstrated that fiber arrays may constitue the basis of an open digital microfluidics. Various processes, such as droplet motion, fragmentation, trapping, release, mixing and encapsulation, may be achieved on fiber arrays. However, handling a large number of tiny droplets resulting from the mixing of several liquid components is still a challenge for developing microreactors, smart sensors or microemulsifying drugs. Here, we show that the manipulation of tiny droplets onto fiber networks allows for creating compound droplets with a high complexity level. Moreover, this cost-effective and flexible method may also be implemented with optical fibers in order to develop fluorescence-based biosensor.

Weyer, Floriane; Dreesen, Laurent; Vandewalle, Nicolas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 ?m which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

Gary, Charles K.

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

Materials Chemistry and Performance of Silicone-Based Replicating Compounds.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Replicating compounds are used to cast reproductions of surface features on a variety of materials. Replicas allow for quantitative measurements and recordkeeping on parts that may otherwise be difficult to measure or maintain. In this study, the chemistry and replicating capability of several replicating compounds was investigated. Additionally, the residue remaining on material surfaces upon removal of replicas was quantified. Cleaning practices were tested for several different replicating compounds. For all replicating compounds investigated, a thin silicone residue was left by the replica. For some compounds, additional inorganic species could be identified in the residue. Simple solvent cleaning could remove some residue.

Brumbach, Michael T.; Mirabal, Alex James; Kalan, Michael; Trujillo, Ana B; Hale, Kevin

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. population. The study found significantly lower death rates from all causes and cancer in general when compared to the overall U.S. population. However, slight increases...

307

Gaseous reactor control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a nuclear reactor control system for controlling the reactivity of the core of a nuclear reactor. It includes a control gas having a high neutron cross-section; a first tank containing a first supply of the control gas; a first conduit providing a first fluid passage extending into the core, the first conduit being operatively connected to communicate with the first tank; a first valve operatively connected to regulate the flow of the control gas between the first tank and the first conduit; a second conduit concentrically disposed around the first conduit such that a second fluid passage is defined between the outer surface of the first conduit and the inner surface of the second conduit; a second tank containing a second supply of the control gas, the second tank being operatively connected to communicate with the second fluid passage; a second supply valve operatively connected to regulate the flow of the control gas between the second tank and the second fluid passage.

Abdel-Khalik, S.

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

308

Improved gaseous leak detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

Juravic, F.E. Jr.

1983-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

309

Gaseous leak detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the non linear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

Juravic, Jr., Frank E. (Aurora, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384FuelYear125 137 Monthly Annual

311

NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year2per ThousandWellhead+WellheadMr.NEMSNGPL

312

Fiber Bulk Gaseous Carriers  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecordFederal Registry Comments May 4-9, 2007.FedwireAmorphous States

313

Source term evaluation for postulated UF{sub 6} release accidents in gaseous diffusion plants -- Summer ventilation mode (non-seismic cases)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer models have been developed to simulate the transient behavior of aerosols and vapors as a result of a postulated accident involving the release of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant. For the current study, gaseous UF{sub 6} is assumed to get released in the cell housing atmosphere through B-line break at 58.97 kg/s for 10 min and 30 min duration at the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants. The released UF{sub 6} undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form hydrogen fluoride (HF) and radioactive uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) while it disperses throughout the process building. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, this study evaluated source terms consisting of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} as well as HF during a postulated UF{sub 6} release accident in a process building. UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} mainly remains as airborne-solid particles (aerosols), and HF is in a vapor form. Some UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols are removed from the air flow due to gravitational settling. The HF and the remaining UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} are mixed with air and exhausted through the building ventilation system. The MELCOR computer code was selected for simulating aerosols and vapor transport in the process building. To characterize leakage flow through the cell housing wall, 3-D CFD tool (CFDS-FLOW3D) was used. About 57% of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} was predicted to be released into the environment. Since HF was treated as vapor, close to 100% was estimated to get released into the environment.

Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Wendel, M.W.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carter, J.C. [J.C. Carter Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Dyer, R.H. [Dyer Enterprises, Harriman, TN (United States)

1996-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3.

Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Adsorption -capacity data for 283 organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption on activated carbon is a widely used method for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from gases and other exhaust streams. This article presents a compilation of adsorption-capacity data as a function of the VOC concentration in the gas. The results are useful in engineering and environmental studies, and in the design of carbon-based adsorption systems to remove unwanted organic pollutants from gases. For vapor control, carbon-based systems typically combine a carbon-adsorption unit with a secondary control method to reclaim or destroy the vapors desorbed during carbon-bed regeneration. To remove organics dissolved in wastewater, air stripping is typically used to transfer the organics to a vapor stream. Carbon adsorption is then used to separate the organics from the stripper exhaust. Collected vapors can be recovered for reuse or destroyed, depending on their value.

Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

System and process for capture of H.sub.2S from gaseous process streams and process for regeneration of the capture agent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and process are disclosed for selective removal and recovery of H.sub.2S from a gaseous volume, e.g., from natural gas. Anhydrous organic, sorbents chemically capture H.sub.2S gas to form hydrosulfide salts. Regeneration of the capture solvent involves addition of an anti-solvent that releases the captured H.sub.2S gas from the capture sorbent. The capture sorbent and anti-solvent are reactivated for reuse, e.g., by simple distillation.

Heldenbrant, David J; Koech, Phillip K; Rainbolt, James E; Bearden, Mark D; Zheng, Feng

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

317

Development of a complex compound chill storage system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage system applicable to industrial refrigeration needs at temperatures as low as {minus}28{degree}C has been developed. The system is based on the chemical bonding between a gaseous refrigerant and a solid salt. The system has been tested successfully in the laboratory and a small unit capable of holding 4 ton-h has been constructed in a factory environment. Much of the development efforts have centered on designing the reactor/heat exchanger where the salt and the refrigerant are combined. Economic evaluations have been made and show an estimated simple rate of return between 30 and 50%. 6 refs., 30 figs.

Rockenfelleer, U.; Kirol, L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Standard test method for the analysis of refrigerant 114, plus other carbon-containing and fluorine-containing compounds in uranium hexafluoride via fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers determining the concentrations of refrigerant-114, other carbon-containing and fluorine-containing compounds, hydrocarbons, and partially or completely substituted halohydrocarbons that may be impurities in uranium hexafluoride. The two options are outlined for this test method. They are designated as Part A and Part B. 1.1.1 To provide instructions for performing Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis for the possible presence of Refrigerant-114 impurity in a gaseous sample of uranium hexafluoride, collected in a "2S" container or equivalent at room temperature. The all gas procedure applies to the analysis of possible Refrigerant-114 impurity in uranium hexafluoride, and to the gas manifold system used for FTIR applications. The pressure and temperatures must be controlled to maintain a gaseous sample. The concentration units are in mole percent. This is Part A. 1.2 Part B involves a high pressure liquid sample of uranium hexafluoride. This method can be appli...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Thin sections were prepared of the different lithologies from each...

320

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Standard X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analyses were used in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Model Compound Studies of Fuel Cell Membrane Degradation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on Model Compound Studies of Fuel Cell Membrane Degradation to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held in Arlington, Virginia, May 26,2005.

322

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

323

Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

269 Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis, in organic geochemistry cases highlighting subtle yet important details not revealed by bulk analyses alone. For example

Long, Bernard

324

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis...

325

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region...

326

Microfluidic self-assembly of quantum dot compound micelles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis is devoted to the development of microfluidic processes for the controlled self-assembly of quantum dot compound micelles (QDCMs). Microfluidic processes are developed to… (more)

Schabas, Greg

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and...

328

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Redondo Geothermal Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis...

329

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental...

330

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

331

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake City Hot Springs Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

332

Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe.sub.3 Al and FeAl.

Rabin, Barry H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

aromatic nitro compounds: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the reactions of amines with aldehydes and with aromatic nitro - compounds in acetonitrile. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Kinetic and equilibrium studies of...

334

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

336

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1989-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

339

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

340

Comment on Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic compounds...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic compounds in the vapor phase at trace levels: A tool for testing and Comment on Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

antimalarial compounds measured: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

William Carter; William P. L. Carter 1995-01-01 16 Logconcavity, ultralogconcavity, and a maximum entropy property of discrete compound Poisson measures Computer Technologies and...

342

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING VARIABILITY IN MW66 AND NEARBY WELLS, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of disposal records, soil data, and spatial/temporal groundwater data from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 7 indicate that the peak contaminant concentrations measured in monitoring well (MW) 66 result from the influence of the regional PGDP NW Plume, and does not support the presence of significant vertical transport from local contaminant sources in SWMU 7. This updated evaluation supports the 2006 conceptualization which suggested the high and low concentrations in MW66 represent different flow conditions (i.e., local versus regional influences). Incorporation of the additional lines of evidence from data collected since 2006 provide the basis to link high contaminant concentrations in MW66 (peaks) to the regional 'Northwest Plume' and to the upgradient source, specifically, the C400 Building Area. The conceptual model was further refined to demonstrate that groundwater and the various contaminant plumes respond to complex site conditions in predictable ways. This type of conceptualization bounds the expected system behavior and supports development of environmental cleanup strategies, providing a basis to support decisions even if it is not feasible to completely characterize all of the 'complexities' present in the system. We recommend that the site carefully consider the potential impacts to groundwater and contaminant plume migration as they plan and implement onsite production operations, remediation efforts, and reconfiguration activities. For example, this conceptual model suggests that rerouting drainage water, constructing ponds or basin, reconfiguring cooling water systems, capping sites, decommissioning buildings, fixing (or not fixing) water leaks, and other similar actions will potentially have a 'direct' impact on the groundwater contaminant plumes. Our conclusion that the peak concentrations in MW66 are linked to the regional PGDP NW Plume does not imply that there TCE is not present in SWMU 7. The available soil and groundwater data indicate that the some of the waste disposed in this facility contacted and/or were contaminated by TCE. In our assessment, the relatively small amount of TCE associated with SWMU 7 is not contributing detectable TCE to the groundwater and does not represent a significant threat to the environment, particularly in an area where remediation and/or management of TCE in the NW plume will be required for an extended timeframe. If determined to be necessary by the PGDP team and regulators, additional TCE characterization or cleanup activities could be performed. Consistent with the limited quantity of TCE in SWMU 7, we identify a range of low cost approaches for such activities (e.g., soil gas surveys for characterization or SVE for remediation). We hope that this information is useful to the Paducah team and to their regulators and stakeholders to develop a robust environmental management path to address the groundwater and soil contamination associated with the burial ground areas.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

COMBINED GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION TECHNIQUES TO IDENTIFY BURIED WASTE IN AN UNCONTROLLED LANDFILL AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the investigation was to confirm the presence and determine the location of a cache of 30 to 60 buried 55-gallon drums that were allegedly dumped along the course of the pre-existing, northsouth diversion ditch (NSDD) adjacent to permitted landfills at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky. The ditch had been rerouted and was being filled and re-graded at the time of the alleged dumping. Historic information and interviews with individuals associated with alleged dumping activities indicated that the drums were dumped prior to the addition of other fill materials. In addition, materials alleged to have been dumped in the ditch, such as buried roofing materials, roof flashing, metal pins, tar substances, fly ash, and concrete rubble complicated data interpretation. Some clean fill materials have been placed over the site and graded. This is an environment that is extremely complicated in terms of past waste dumping activities, construction practices and miscellaneous landfill operations. The combination of site knowledge gained from interviews and research of existing site maps, variable frequency EM data, classical total magnetic field data and optimized GPR lead to success where a simpler less focused approach by other investigators using EM-31 and EM-61 electromagnetic methods and unfocused ground penetrating radar (GPR)did not produce results and defined no real anomalies. A variable frequency electromagnetic conductivity unit was used to collect the EM data at 3,030 Hz, 5,070 Hz, 8,430 Hz, and 14,010 Hz. Both in-phase and quadrature components were recorded at each station point. These results provided depth estimates for targets and some information on the subsurface conditions. A standard magnetometer was used to conduct the magnetic survey that showed the locations and extent of buried metal, the approximate volume of ferrous metal present within a particular area, and allowed estimation of approximate target depths. The GPR survey used a 200 megahertz (MHz) antenna to provide the maximum depth penetration and subsurface detail yielding usable signals to a depth of about 6 to 10 feet in this environment and allowed discrimination of objects that were deeper, particularly useful in the southern area of the site where shallow depth metallic debris (primarily roof flashing) complicated interpretation of the EM and magnetic data. Several geophysical anomalies were defined on the contour plots that indicated the presence of buried metal. During the first phase of the project, nine anomalies or anomalous areas were detected. The sizes, shapes, and magnitudes of the anomalies varied considerably, but given the anticipated size of the primary target of the investigation, only the most prominent anomalies were considered as potential caches of 30 to 60 buried drums. After completion of a second phase investigation, only two of the anomalies were of sufficient magnitude, not identifiable with existing known metallic objects such as monitoring wells, and in positions that corresponded to the location of alleged dumping activities and were recommended for further, intrusive investigation. Other important findings, based on the variable frequency EM method and its combination with total field magnetic and GPR data, included the confirmation of the position of the old NSDD, the ability to differentiate between ferrous and non-ferrous anomalies, and the detection of what may be plumes emanating from the landfill cell.

Miller, Peter T.; Starmer, R. John

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

344

Use of ferric sulfate: acid media for the desulfurization of model compounds of coal. [Dibenzothiophene, diphenyl sulfide, di-n-butyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work has been to investigate the ability of ferric sulfate-acid leach systems to oxidize the sulfur in model compounds of coal. Ferric iron-acid leach systems have been shown to be quite effective at removal of inorganic sulfur in coal. In this study, the oxidative effect of ferric iron in acid-leach systems was studied using dibenzothiophene, diphenyl sulfide, and di-n-butyl sulfide as models of organic sulfur groups in coal. Nitrogen and oxygen, as well as various transition metal catalysts and oxidants, were utilized in this investigation. Dibenzothiophene was found to be quite refractory to oxidation, except in the case where metavanadate was added, where it appears that 40% oxidation to sulfone could have occurred per hour at 150/sup 0/C and mild oxygen pressure. Diphenyl sulfide was selectively oxidized to sulfoxide and sulfone in an iron and oxygen system. Approximately 15% conversion to sulfone occurred per hour under these conditions. Some of the di-n-butyl sulfide was cracked to 1-butene and 1-butanethiol under similar conditions. Zinc chloride and ferric iron were used at 200/sup 0/C in an attempt to desulfonate dibenzothiophene sulfone, diphenyl sulfone, and di-n-butyl sulfone. Di-n-butyl sulfone was completely desulfurized on one hour and fragmented to oxidized parafins, while dibenzothiophene sulfone and diphenyl sulfone were unaffected. These results suggest that an iron-acid leach process could only selectively oxidize aryl sulfides under mild conditions, representing only 20% of the organic sulfur in coal (8% of the total sulfur). Removal through desulfonation once selective sulfur oxidation had occurred was only demonstrated for alkyl sulfones, with severe oxidation of the fragmented paraffins also occurring in one hour.

Clary, L.R.; Vermeulen, T.; Lynn, S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

On-Road Emission Measurements of Reactive Nitrogen Compounds from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ammonia (NH3), and nitrous acid (HONO) produced by internalOn-Road Emission Measurements of Reactive Nitrogen Compounds from Three California Cities G A R Y measurements of reactive nitrogen compounds from light-duty vehicles. At the San Jose and wLA sites

Denver, University of

347

Method and reaction pathway for selectively oxidizing organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of selectively oxidizing an organic compound in a single vessel comprises: a) combining an organic compound, an acid solution in which the organic compound is soluble, a compound containing two oxygen atoms bonded to one another, and a metal ion reducing agent capable of reducing one of such oxygen atoms, and thereby forming a mixture; b) reducing the compound containing the two oxygen atoms by reducing one of such oxygen atoms with the metal ion reducing agent to, 1) oxidize the metal ion reducing agent to a higher valence state, and 2) produce an oxygen containing intermediate capable of oxidizing the organic compound; c) reacting the oxygen containing intermediate with the organic compound to oxidize the organic compound into an oxidized organic intermediate, the oxidized organic intermediate having an oxidized carbon atom; d) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the acid counter ion and higher valence state metal ion to bond the acid counter ion to the oxidized carbon atom and thereby produce a quantity of an ester incorporating the organic intermediate and acid counter ion; and e) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the higher valence state metal ion and water to produce a quantity of alcohol which is less than the quantity of ester, the acid counter ion incorporated in the ester rendering the carbon atom bonded to the counter ion less reactive with the oxygen containing intermediate in the mixture than is the alcohol with the oxygen containing intermediate.

Camaioni, Donald M. (Richland, WA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Experimental investigation of single carbon compounds under hydrothermal conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental investigation of single carbon compounds under hydrothermal conditions Jeffrey S; accepted in revised form 8 September 2005 Abstract The speciation of carbon in subseafloor hydrothermal reactant during the abiotic synthesis of reduced carbon compounds via Fischer­Tropsch-type processes

Rhoads, James

349

Method for selective dehalogenation of halogenated polyaromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for dehalogenating halogenated polyaromatic compounds is provided wherein the polyaromatic compounds are mixed with a hydrogen donor solvent and a carbon catalyst in predetermined proportions, the mixture is maintained at a predetermined pressure, and the mixture is heated to a predetermined temperature and for a predetermined time.

Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Petrosius, Steven C. (Library, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater, Surface, Ground.W., Meyer, M.T., and Zaugg, S.D., 2004, Presence and distri- bution of organic wastewater compounds in wastewater, surface, ground, and drinking waters, Minnesota, 2000-02: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific

351

Super-compound Engines Enable Multifuel Vehicles to Match Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Super-compound Engines Enable Multifuel Vehicles to Match Efficiency of Diesel-powered Vehicles in the last 25 years. Lightduty truck engines historically have poor efficiency, converting only 20 percent of gasoline into useful work. Multifuel compound engine technologies make it possible to increase efficiency

352

Redox chromophore compounds and electrodes of metal containing substituted bipyridines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Chromophoric compounds, each having a wide range of distinct color changes in response to changes in the oxidation states thereof, are provided in the form of polymerizable monomers, and polymers thereof, of certain metal containing, and electron group substituted, 2,2'-bipyridine compounds.

Elliott, Cecil M. (Fort Collins, CO); Redepenning, Jody G. (Fort Collins, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Polymers comprising residues of borane and/or carborane cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Methods of making and applications for using such polymers are also disclosed.

Bowen, III, Daniel E. (Olathe, KS); Eastwood, Eric A. (Raymore, MO)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

354

Mutual Rényi information for two disjoint compound systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The leading term for the mutual R\\'enyi information is studied for two widely separated identical compound systems for free scalar fields in $(d+1)$ Euclidean space. The compound system consists of two identical spheres in contact, with a result consistent with a universal form for the leading term for the mutual R\\'enyi information.

Howard J. Schnitzer

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

355

Device for collecting chemical compounds and related methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from the fixed surfaces so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

Scott, Jill R.; Groenewold, Gary S.; Rae, Catherine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, Milton E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wright, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

1988-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

358

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Compound cast product and method for producing a compound cast product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound cast product is formed in a casting mold (14) having a mold cavity (16) sized and shaped to form the cast product. A plurality of injectors (24) is supported from a bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). The injectors (24) are in fluid communication with the mold cavity (16) through the bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). A molten material holder furnace (12) is located beneath the casting mold (14). The holder furnace (12) defines molten material receiving chambers (36) configured to separately contain supplies of two different molten materials (37, 38). The holder furnace (12) is positioned such that the injectors (24) extend downward into the receiving chamber (36). The receiving chamber (36) is separated into at least two different flow circuits (51, 52). A first molten material (37) is received in a first flow circuit (51), and a second molten material (38) is received into a second flow circuit (52). The first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into the mold cavity (16) by the injectors (24) acting against the force of gravity. The injectors (24) are positioned such that the first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into different areas of the mold cavity (16). The molten materials (37, 38) are allowed to solidify and the resulting compound cast product is removed from the mold cavity (16).

Meyer, Thomas N. (3987 Murray Highlands Cir., Murrysville, PA 15668-1747); Viswanathan, Srinath (1104 Albermarle La., Knoxville, TN 37923)

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

360

Proceedings of waste stream minimization and utilization innovative concepts: An experimental technology exchange. Volume 2, Industrial liquid waste processing, industrial gaseous waste processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-volume proceedings summarize the results of fifteen innovations that were funded through the US Department of Energy`s Innovative Concept Program. The fifteen innovations were presented at the sixth Innovative Concepts Fair, held in Austin, Texas, on April 22--23, 1993. The concepts in this year`s fair address innovations that can substantially reduce or use waste streams. Each paper describes the need for the proposed concept, the concept being proposed, and the concept`s economics and market potential, key experimental results, and future development needs. The papers are divided into two volumes: Volume 1 addresses innovations for industrial solid waste processing and municipal waste reduction/recycling, and Volume 2 addresses industrial liquid waste processing and industrial gaseous waste processing. Individual reports are indexed separately.

Lee, V.E. [ed.; Watts, R.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Probe into Gaseous Pollution and Assessment of Air Quality Benefit under Sector Dependent Emission Control Strategies over Megacities in Yangtze River Delta, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On February 29th 2012, China published its new National Ambient Air Quality Standard (CH-NAAQS) aiming at revising the standards and measurements for both gaseous pollutants including ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), and also particle pollutants including PM10 and PM2.5. In order to understand the air pollution status regarding this new standard, the integrated MM5/CMAQ modeling system was applied over Yangtze River Delta (YRD) within this study to examine the criteria gaseous pollutants listed in the new CH-NAAQS. Sensitivity simulations were also conducted to assess the responses of gaseous pollutants under 8 different sector-dependent emission reduction scenarios in order to evaluate the potential control strategies. 2006 was selected as the simulation year in order to review the air quality condition at the beginning of China’s 11th Five-Year-Plan (FYP, from 2006 to 2010), and also compared with air quality status in 2010 as the end of 11th FYP to probe into the effectiveness of the national emission control efforts. Base case simulation showed distinct seasonal variation for gaseous pollutants: SO2, and NO2 were found to have higher surface concentrations in winter while O3 was found to have higher concentrations in spring and summer than other seasons. According to the analyses focused on 3 megacities within YRD, Shanghai, Nanjing, and Hangzhou, we found different air quality conditions among the cities: NO2 was the primary pollutant that having the largest number of days exceeding the CH-NAAQS daily standard (80 ?g/m3) in Shanghai (59 days) and Nanjing (27 days); SO2 was the primary pollutant with maximum number of days exceeding daily air quality standard (150 ?g/m3) in Hangzhou (28 days), while O3 exceeding the daily maximum 8-hour standard (160 ?g/m3) for relatively fewer days in all the three cities (9 days in Shanghai, 14 days in Nanjing, and 11 days in Hangzhou). Simulation results from predefined potential applicable emission control scenarios suggested significant air quality improvements from emission reduction: 90% of SO2 emission removed from power plant in YRD would be able to reduce more than 85% of SO2 pollution, 85% NOx emission reduction from power plant would reduce more than 60% of NO2 pollution, in terms of reducing the number of days exceeding daily air quality standard. NOx emission reduction from transportation and industry were also found to effectively reduce NO2 pollution but less efficient than emission control from power plants. We also found that multi-pollutants emission control including both NOx and VOC would be a better strategy than independent NOx control over YRD which is China’s 12th Five-Year-Plan (from 2011 to 2015), because O3 pollution would be increased as a side effect of NOx control and counteract NO2 pollution reduction benefit.

Dong, Xinyi; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Li, Juan; Huang, Kan; Zhuang, G.; Zhou, Ying

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative feedbacks on leakage rates, with a combination of self-enhancing and self-limiting effects. Lower viscosity and density of CO{sub 2} as compared to aqueous fluids provides a potential for self-enhancing effects during leakage, while strong cooling effects from liquid CO{sub 2} boiling into gas, and from expansion of gas rising towards the land surface, act to self-limit discharges. Strong interference between fluid phases under three-phase conditions (aqueous - liquid CO{sub 2} - gaseous CO{sub 2}) also tends to reduce CO{sub 2} fluxes. Feedback on different space and time scales can induce non-monotonic behavior of CO{sub 2} flow rates.

Pruess, K.

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

Vo-Dinh, T.

1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

Mechanistic Study of Oxygen Atom Transfer Catalyzed by Rhenium Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two ionic and one neutral methyl(oxo)rhenium(V) compounds were synthesized and structurally characterized. They were compared in reactivity towards the ligands triphenylphosphane, pyridines, pyridine N-oxides. Assistance from Broensted bases was found on ligand displacement of ionic rhenium compounds as well as nucleophile assistance on oxidation of all compounds. From the kinetic data, crystal structures, and an analysis of the intermediates, a structural formula of PicH{sup +}3{sup -} and mechanisms of ligand displacement and oxidation were proposed.

Xiaopeng Shan

2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

365

Characterization of nitrogen compound types in hydrotreated Paraho shale oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results from the separation and characterization of nitrogen compound types in hydrotreated Paraho shale oil samples were obtained. Two samples of Paraho shale oil were hydrotreated by Chevron Research Company such that one sample contained about 0.05 wt. percent nitrogen and the other sample contained about 0.10 wt. percent nitrogen. A separation method concentrate specific nitrogen compound types was developed. Characterization of the nitrogen types was accomplished by infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, potentiometric titration, and elemental analysis. The distribution of nitrogen compound types in both samples and in the Paraho crude shale oil is compared.

Holmes, S.A.; Latham, D.R.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Removal of basic nitrogen compounds from hydrocarbon liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for reducing the concentration of basic nitrogen compounds in hydrocarbonaceous feedstock fluids used in the refining industry by providing a solid particulate carbonaceous adsorbent/fuel material such as coal having active basic nitrogen complexing sites on the surface thereof and the coal with a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock containing basic nitrogen compounds to facilitate attraction of the basic nitrogen compounds to the complexing sites and the formation of complexes thereof on the surface of the coal. The adsorbent coal material and the complexes formed thereon are from the feedstock fluid to provide a hydrocarbonaceous fluid of reduced basic nitrogen compound concentration. The coal can then be used as fuel for boilers and the like.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Electrochemically driven phase transformation in energy storage compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale lithium transition metal phosphate olivines have become commercially important as positive electrode materials in a new generation of lithium-ion batteries. Not surprisingly, many energy storage compounds undergo ...

Gao, Yuhua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Rules for understanding rare-earth magnetic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Using fragments based on structures of metal-rich lanthanide compounds, we have investigated molecular and low-dimensional extended structures, and have shown that open-d-shell clusters facilitate strong ferromagnetic coupling whereas closed...

Roy, Lindsay Elizabeth

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

369

Wood-Fiber/High-Density-Polyethylene Composites: Compounding Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood-Fiber/High-Density-Polyethylene Composites: Compounding Process J. Z. Lu,1 Q. Wu,1 I. I parameters for the wood-fiber/high-density-polyethylene blends at 60 rpm were a temperature of 180°C

370

Determination of Selenium in Seleno Compounds and Marine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomization Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Journalof Analytical I Atomic I Spectrometry M. DEAKER AND W. MAHER determination; electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry; seleno compounds; marine biological tissues; chemical modijcation Electrothermal (graphite furnace) atomic absorption spec- trometry (ETAAS

Canberra, University of

371

Are BKME effects on fish caused by chlorinated compounds?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much of the debate about the use and environmental impacts of chlorinated compounds has been fueled by attempts to regulate the effluents discharged by pulp and paper mills. Swedish field studies have associated effects on fish health and reproduction with the discharge of AOX. A recent study has demonstrated that the effect of black liquor is three orders of magnitude more potent than the first chlorine dioxide bleachery effluent on fish. Black liquors from various pulp mills, including a mill which uses alcohol to extract lignin, also suggest that effects on fish could be caused by non-chlorinated wood extractives, Chemical analysis of isolated fractions from final BKME effluent and pure compound bioassays also indicate the high probability that non-chlorinated compounds may be responsible for fish effects. While chlorination may increase the potency of these compounds, it is clear that chlorine is not essential for effects on fish.

Burnison, B.K.; Hodson, P.V.; Parrott, J. [National Water Research Institute, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Lattice mismatched compound semiconductors and devices on silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III-V compound semiconductors, due to their superior electron mobility, are promising candidates for n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). However, the limited size of III-V substrates and ...

Yang, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Dairy Cows and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, acetone + propanal, dimethylsulfide, and m/z 109 (likely 4-methyl-phenol). The compounds with highest. Agricultural pro- cesses, notably animal operations, are no longer exempt from emission controls as a result with a pro

Goldstein, Allen

374

Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders is described. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe[sub 3] Al and FeAl. 25 figures.

Rabin, B.H.; Wright, R.N.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

375

Microfluidic in vivo screen identifies compounds enhancing neuronal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compound screening is a powerful tool to identify new therapeutic targets, drug leads, and elucidate the fundamental mechanisms of biological processes. We report here the results of the first in vivo small-molecule screens ...

Haggarty, Stephen

376

Catalysis of 6? Electrocyclizations & Catalytic Disproportionation of Lignin Model Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. D. ; McNally, T. J. Lignin. In Kirk-Othmer EncyclopediaK. ; Gellerstedt, G. Lignin. In Analytical Methods in Woodof a 1-phenylpropane-1,3-diol lignin model compound via ?-

Bishop, Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

acid related compounds: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Events, Compound 424 Separation of Vitamin B2 and B12 by Impregnate HPTLC Plates with Boric Acid CiteSeer Summary: AbstractA high performance thin layer chromatography system...

378

The Effect of Organic Compounds in Pot Experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 174 APRIL, 1915 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Effect of Organic Compounds in Pot Experiments POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS VON BOECK~UNN-JON&S CO ?? PRINTERS, AUSTIN, TEXAS... 19 15 BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL A116-715-10m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 174 APRIL,. 1915 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Effect of Organic Compounds In Pot Experiments BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist in Charge; State Chemist...

Fraps, G. S.

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Polarographic determination of arsenate in the presence of polyhydroxy compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be found only after the arsenic compounds have been i denti fied and their concentrations reliably determined. The most common arsenic compounds occurring in natural waters (in contrast to water polluted by man) are arsenate and arsenite. A method... Furnace-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. In homogeneous natural water samples the polarographically determined concentration of total inorganic arsenic differed from those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry by an average of 12 percent (range 7...

Nichols, Randy Lee

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for nitro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound. 4 figures.

Reagen, W.K.; Schulz, A.L.; Ingram, J.C.; Lancaster, G.D.; Grey, A.E.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Novel biosensors for environmental monitoring of phenolic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation will describe new strategies for amperometric biosensing of phenolic compounds. The class enzyme tyrosinase is employed in connection with these biosensing schemes. The enzyme can tolerate the high temperature of screen-printing/drying processes used for fabricating disposable sensor strips. In addition to single-use electrodes, we will describe the characteristic of a remote enzyme electrode for field monitoring of phenolic compounds. Finally, a novel bioamplification scheme for enhancing the sensitivity of phenol biosensing will be reported.

Chen, O.; Wang, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Theoretical descriptions of compound-nuclear reactions: open problems & challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compound-nuclear processes play an important role for nuclear physics applications and are crucial for our understanding of the nuclear many-body problem. Despite intensive interest in this area, some of the available theoretical developments have not yet been fully tested and implemented. We revisit the general theory of compound-nuclear reactions, discuss descriptions of pre-equilibrium reactions, and consider extensions that are needed in order to get cross section information from indirect measurements.

Brett V. Carlson; Jutta E. Escher; Mahir S. Hussein

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

383

Control of insects and spider mites by translocated compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentration in foliage of 9 90 to 100 parts per million practically eliminated the red spider population, and black chrysanthemum aphids were controlled when the selenium content was 45 parts per million. Selenium compounds are extremely toxic to higher... insecticide, "Systox" (compound E-1059) which is reported to be effective at somewhat lower concentrations than octa? methyl pyrophosphoramide. Experimental quantities of "Systox" are being distributed to various research agencies? The chemical name...

Ivy, Edward Everett

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Lattice thermal expansion for normal tetrahedral compound semiconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cubic root of the deviation of the lattice thermal expansion from that of the expected value of diamond for group IV semiconductors, binary compounds of III-V and II-VI, as well as several ternary compounds from groups I-III-VI{sub 2}, II-IV-V{sub 2} and I-IV{sub 2}V{sub 3} semiconductors versus their bonding length are given straight lines. Their slopes were found to be 0.0256, 0.0210, 0.0170, 0.0259, 0.0196, and 0.02840 for the groups above, respectively. Depending on the valence electrons of the elements forming these groups, a formula was found to correlate all the values of the slopes mentioned above to that of group IV. This new formula which depends on the melting point and the bonding length as well as the number of valence electrons for the elements forming the compounds, will gives best calculated values for lattice thermal expansion for all compounds forming the groups mentioned above. An empirical relation is also found between the mean ionicity of the compounds forming the groups and their slopes mentioned above and that gave the mean ionicity for the compound CuGe{sub 2}P{sub 3} in the range of 0.442.

Omar, M.S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq)]. E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Study of the reactivity of sodium compounds and Ca(OH){sub 2} towards SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The J.Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry (IPC) has conducted a detailed basic research under contract to Solvay Company (Belgium) to examine the reactivity of solid substances towards acid gases (SO{sub 2},NO{sub x}) with the aim to find the best conditions for their efficient removal. The reactivity of different sodium compounds (sodium bicarbonate, active soda, sodium carbonate monohydrate, dense soda ash) and Ca(OH){sub 2} was examined in the reaction with sulphur dioxide in a broad range of experimental variables (temperature, gas composition). The reactivity of selected samples was investigated also in the reactions with gaseous mixtures containing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in the dependence on temperature, SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}, and NO/NO{sub 2} ratios and the hydrodynamic regime of the fixed bed flow reactor. Further, ESCA and SEM methods were used for the identification of solid reaction products and their evolution as a function of reaction parameters. It is shown that in the case of NaHCO{sub 3} precursor it is possible to achieve in average at least a 90 % SO{sub 2} and simultaneously an almost 50 % NO{sub x} removal. The results obtained are very promising with respect to the NaHCO{sub 3} utilization especially for the purification of waste gases from incinerators and power plants.

Mocke, K.; Stejskalova, K.; Bach, P. [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Prague (Czechoslovakia)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - aniline compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Halogenated Compounds Allyl chloride Carbon tetrachloride... Nitrates and Acids Ammoniated Compounds and Hypochlorites and Bleach Organic Nitrates Source: Oliver, Douglas L. -...

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - analogues compounds lnap6i3 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

millions of compounds can be examined in silico... compound. In particular, within the pharmaceutical industry, the use of virtual screening as a filter Source: Skop, Ahna -...

388

E-Print Network 3.0 - astatine compound nuclei Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HASSIUM, Summary: , the production of weakly excited heavy compound nuclei by complete fusion using lead or bismuth targets... the production of cold compound nuclei with...

389

SPECIES DETERMINATION OF ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS USING ZEEMAN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY WITH LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compounds Using Zeeman Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy WithCompounds Using Zeeman ,Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy withcapabilities of Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy (ZAA)

Koizumi, H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium compounds n-alkyl Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which are incompatible with other compounds. Summary: compounds, fulminic acid Sodium carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Sodium nitrite ammonium nitrate... chemicals...

391

E-Print Network 3.0 - antidiabetic compound isolated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, isolation, identification of phenolic compounds from industry co-products, and plants. "Green" food... extracted, separated and characterized. The bitter compounds in...

392

E-Print Network 3.0 - antifungal compound produced Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

requirements to produce the antifungal response and can provide a guide for the design of compounds... with this biological activity. Antifungal activity of these compounds...

393

E-Print Network 3.0 - antifungal compounds produced Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

requirements to produce the antifungal response and can provide a guide for the design of compounds... with this biological activity. Antifungal activity of these compounds...

394

E-Print Network 3.0 - antifungal compounds enzymatic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

requirements to produce the antifungal response and can provide a guide for the design of compounds... with this biological activity. Antifungal activity of these compounds...

395

Effects of gaseous NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on the concentration profiles of PCDD/F in flyash under post-combustion zone conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on 2378-PCDD/F in flyash and flue gases was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 21-40% from the flue gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 99% PCDD and 93% PCDF reductions in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 89% PCDD and 76% PCDF reductions in the flue gases. - Abstract: The influence of gaseous ammonia and sulphur dioxide on the formation of 2378-substituted PCDD/F on a reference flyash from a municipal waste incinerator has been investigated using a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor. The reference flyash samples (BCR-490) was reacted under a simulated flue gas stream at temperatures of 225 and 375 Degree-Sign C for 96 h. The experiments were carried out in two series: first with simulated flue gas alone, and then with injection of NH{sub 3} or SO{sub 2} gas into the flue gas just before the reactor inlet. It was found that the injection of gaseous ammonia into the flue gas could decrease the concentration of both PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% from the solid phase and by 21-40% from the gas phase. Converting the results to I-TEQ values, it could reduce the total I-TEQ values of PCDD and PCDF in the sum of the flyash and exhaust flue gas by 42-75% and 24-57% respectively. The application of SO{sub 2} led to 99% and 93% reductions in the PCDD and PCDF average congener concentrations, respectively in the solid phase. In the gas phase, the total reductions were 89% and 76% for PCDD and PCDF, respectively. Moreover, addition of SO{sub 2} reduced the total I-TEQ value of PCDD and PCDF in the flyash and exhaust flue gas together by 60-86% and 72-82% respectively. Sulphur dioxide was more effective than ammonia in suppressing PCDD/F formation in flyash under the conditions investigated.

Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A. [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Williams, Paul T., E-mail: p.t.williams@leeds.ac.uk [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Reactions of Lignin Model Compounds in Ionic Liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin, a readily available form of biomass, awaits novel chemistry for converting it to valuable aromatic chemicals. Recent work has demonstrated that ionic liquids are excellent solvents for processing woody biomass and lignin. Seeking to exploit ionic liquids as media for depolymerization of lignin, we investigated reactions of lignin model compounds in these solvents. Using Brønsted acid catalysts in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate at moderate temperatures, we obtained up to 11.6% yield of the dealkylation product guaiacol from the model compound eugenol and cleaved phenethyl phenyl ether, a model for lignin ethers. Despite these successes, acid catalysis failed in dealkylation of the unsaturated model compound 4-ethylguaiacol and did not produce monomeric products from organosolv lignin, demonstrating that further work is required to understand the complex chemistry of lignin depolymerization.

Holladay, John E.; Binder, Joseph B.; Gray, Michel J.; White, James F.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Survey of electrochemical production of inorganic compounds. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical generation of inorganic compounds, excluding chlorine/caustic, has been critically reviewed. About 60 x 10/sup 12/ Btu/y fossil fuel equivalent will be used in the year 2000 for the electrosynthesis of inorganic compounds. Significant energy savings in chlorate production can result from the development of suitable electrocatalysts for lowering the cathodic overpotential. Perchlorates, electrolytic hypochlorite, electrolytic manganese dioxide, fluorine and other miscellaneous compounds use relatively small amounts of electrical energy. Implementation of caustic scrubber technology for stack gas cleanup would result in appreciable amounts of sodium sulfate which could be electrolyzed to regenerate caustic. Hydrogen peroxide, now produced by the alkyl anthraquinone process, could be made electrolytically by a new process coupling anodic oxidation of sulfate with cathodic reduction of oxygen in alkaline solution. Ozone is currently manufactured using energy-inefficient silent discharge equipment. A novel energy-efficient approach which uses an oxygen-enhanced anodic reaction is examined.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Improved estimates of separation distances to prevent unacceptable damage to nuclear power plant structures from hydrogen detonation for gaseous hydrogen storage. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides new estimates of separation distances for nuclear power plant gaseous hydrogen storage facilities. Unacceptable damage to plant structures from hydrogen detonations will be prevented by having hydrogen storage facilities meet separation distance criteria recommended in this report. The revised standoff distances are based on improved calculations on hydrogen gas cloud detonations and structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures. Also, the results presented in this study do not depend upon equivalencing a hydrogen detonation to an equivalent TNT detonation. The static and stagnation pressures, wave velocity, and the shock wave impulse delivered to wall surfaces were computed for several different size hydrogen explosions. Separation distance equations were developed and were used to compute the minimum separation distance for six different wall cases and for seven detonating volumes (from 1.59 to 79.67 lbm of hydrogen). These improved calculation results were compared to previous calculations. The ratio between the separation distance predicted in this report versus that predicted for hydrogen detonation in previous calculations varies from 0 to approximately 4. Thus, the separation distances results from the previous calculations can be either overconservative or unconservative depending upon the set of hydrogen detonation parameters that are used. Consequently, it is concluded that the hydrogen-to-TNT detonation equivalency utilized in previous calculations should no longer be used.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Application of the electromagnetic borehole flowmeter and evaluation of previous pumping tests at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Final report, June 15, 1992--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-well pumping tests have been concluded at wells MW79, MW108, and PW1 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to determine the hydraulic properties of the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). Soil cores suggest that the RGA consists of a thin sandy facies (2 to 6 feet) at the top of a thicker (> 10 feet) gravelly facies. Previous analyses have not considered any permeability contrast between the two facies. To assess the accuracy of this assumption, TVA personnel conducted borehole flowmeter tests at wells MW108 and PW1. Well MW79 could not be tested. The high K sand unit is probably 10 times more permeable than comparable zone in the gravelly portion of the RGA. Previous analyses of the three multi-well aquifer tests do not use the same conceptual aquifer model. Data analysis for one pumping test assumed that leakance was significant. Data analysis for another pumping test assumed that a geologic boundary was significant. By collectively analyzing all three tests with the borehole flowmeter results, the inconsistency among the three pumping tests can be explained. Disparity exists because each pumping test had a different placement of observation wells relative to the high K zone delineating by flowmeter testing.

Young, S.C.; Julian, S.C.; Neton, M.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Thermal discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant outfalls: Impacts on stream temperatures and fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7 C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

Roy, W.K.; Ryon, M.G.; Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Div.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms ``applicable`` and ``relevant and appropriate`` is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed.

Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms applicable'' and relevant and appropriate'' is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed.

Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Method for digesting a nitro-bearing explosive compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein superoxide radicals from superoxide salt are used to break down the explosive compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for degrading explosives, and operates at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. Because the superoxide molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The superoxide salt generates reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro-bearing compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Finding New Thermoelectric Compounds Using Crystallographic Data: Atomic Displacement Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new structure-property relationship is discussed which links atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) and the lattice thermal conductivity of clathrate-like compounds. For many clathrate-like compounds, in which one of the atom types is weakly bound and ''rattles'' within its atomic cage, room temperature ADP information can be used to estimate the room temperature lattice thermal conductivity, the vibration frequency of the ''rattler'', and the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. Neutron data and X-ray crystallography data, reported in the literature, are used to apply this analysis to several promising classes of thermoelectric materials.

Chakoumakos, B.C.; Mandrus, D.G.; Sales, B.C.; Sharp, J.W.

1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

405

1. PRECONCENTRATION, THERMAL DESORPTION & ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: peltier, liq. N?.. Heated transfer line 2) Desorption & transfer by fastheatlng Cooled & heated trap jas trap. The trap is then quickly heated, under a low flow of hélium, to desorb and inject thé compounds. This highly concentrated plug of sample is transferred via a heated transfer line, to a capillary

Boyer, Edmond

406

Spin-rotation coupling in compound spin objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We generalize spin-rotation coupling to compound spin systems. In the case of muons bound to nuclei in a storage ring the decay process acquires a modulation. Typical frequencies for $Z/A\\sim 1/2$ are $\\sim 3\\times 10^6$Hz, a factor 10 higher than the modulation observed in $g-2$ experiments.

G. Lambiase; G. Papini

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Thermoelectric materials ternary penta telluride and selenide compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ternary tellurium compounds and ternary selenium compounds may be used in fabricating thermoelectric devices with a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 1.5 or greater. Examples of such compounds include Tl.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5, Tl.sub.2 GeTe.sub.5, K.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5 and Rb.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5. These compounds have similar types of crystal lattice structures which include a first substructure with a (Sn, Ge) Te.sub.5 composition and a second substructure with chains of selected cation atoms. The second substructure includes selected cation atoms which interact with selected anion atoms to maintain a desired separation between the chains of the first substructure. The cation atoms which maintain the desired separation between the chains occupy relatively large electropositive sites in the resulting crystal lattice structure which results in a relatively low value for the lattice component of thermal conductivity (.kappa..sub.g). The first substructure of anion chains indicates significant anisotropy in the thermoelectric characteristics of the resulting semiconductor materials.

Sharp, Jeffrey W. (Richardson, TX)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Thermoelectric materials: ternary penta telluride and selenide compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ternary tellurium compounds and ternary selenium compounds may be used in fabricating thermoelectric devices with a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 1.5 or greater. Examples of such compounds include Tl.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5, Tl.sub.2 GeTe.sub.5, K.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5 and Rb.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5. These compounds have similar types of crystal lattice structures which include a first substructure with a (Sn, Ge) Te.sub.5 composition and a second substructure with chains of selected cation atoms. The second substructure includes selected cation atoms which interact with selected anion atoms to maintain a desired separation between the chains of the first substructure. The cation atoms which maintain the desired separation between the chains occupy relatively large electropositive sites in the resulting crystal lattice structure which results in a relatively low value for the lattice component of thermal conductivity (.kappa..sub.g). The first substructure of anion chains indicates significant anisotropy in the thermoelectric characteristics of the resulting semiconductor materials.

Sharp, Jeffrey W. (Richardson, TX)

2002-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

409

Method and apparatus for measuring properties of a compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system that incorporates teachings of the present disclosure may include, for example, an apparatus having a collimator having at least one aperture and a fluorescence detector. The collimator can be positioned next to a compound. The compound can emit fluorescence X-rays when impacted by an X-ray beam generated by an X-ray source. The collimator can absorb at least a first portion of the fluorescence X-rays emitted by the compound and release at least a second portion of the fluorescence X-rays at the at least one aperture. The second portion of the fluorescence X-rays released by the at least one aperture have known directional information based on a position of the collimator. The fluorescence detector can detect the second portion of the fluorescence X-rays released by the at least one aperture. A three-dimensional (3-D) rendering of an elemental distribution of the compound can be determined from the fluorescence X-rays detected and the directional information. Additional embodiments are disclosed.

Meng, Ling Jian

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

410

Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline binary and ternary intermetallic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanocrystalline powders. Using this process, I was able to access several binary and ternary intermetallics, including two new phases: AuCuSn2 and AuNiSn2. These compounds were isolated as nanocrystals using low temperature solution synthesis techniques, which had...

Leonard, Brian Matthew

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

alkaline earth compounds: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline earth compounds First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Quantum computing with...

413

alkaline earth compound: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline earth compound First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Quantum computing with alkaline...

414

Polymerizable 2(2-hydroxynaphthyl)2H-benzotriazole compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Benzotriazole compounds having the formula: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is H, Cl, or OCH.sub.3 ; R.sub.2 is a hydroxynaphthyl group; and R.sub.3 is a vinyl unsaturated polymerizable group. Homopolymers or copolymers thereof are effective as UV light stabilizers and absorbers.

Gomez, P.M.; Neidlinger, H.H.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Volatile Organic Compounds in Untreated Ambient Groundwater of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1608 Mt. View Road, Rapid City, South Dakota 57702 As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment from this ambient groundwater is uncertain because the quality of the finished drinking water with the largest releases to the environment are VOCs and that the total release for these 10 compounds was almost

416

Determination of tritium distribution in labeled compounds using EPR spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Usually, the tritium distribution in a labeled compound is analyzed by T-NMR spectrometry. NMR equipment is expensive and its sensitivity is lower in comparison to EPR spectrometry. In this paper, the possibility of determining the distribution of tritium in a labeled molecule using self-radiolytic decay processes was analyzed. (authors)

Postolache, C.; Matei, L.; Georgescu, R. [Horia Hulubei, National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering IFIN HH, 407 Atomistilor street, 077125 Magurele Ilfov (Romania)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reactivity studies of antitumor active dirhodium compounds with DNA oligonucleotides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the original ligands of the given dirhodium compound. ESI MS was found to be a sufficiently soft ionization method for detecting intact metal adducts, and CID MS-MS was useful for detecting weakly bound species such as axial adducts [M+Rh2(O2CCH3...

Kang, Mijeong

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

418

Thermochemical study of liquid and solid organosilicon compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simple and reliable methods of combustion of liquid and solid organosilicon compounds which ensure a high degree of completeness of combustion were proposed. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of 11 tetraalkyl(vinyl)silanes and 15 silatranes were determined.

Voronkov, M.G.; Klyuchnikov, V.A.; Danilova, T.F.; Korchagina, A.N.; Baryshok, V.P.; Landa, L.M.

1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

419

Association Behavior of Pyrene Compounds as Models for Asphaltenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Association Behavior of Pyrene Compounds as Models for Asphaltenes Kamran Akbarzadeh,§ David C-7905 Received December 18, 2004. Revised Manuscript Received March 15, 2005 Asphaltene association in solution, and concentration, but interpretation of the results is hampered by the polyfunctional nature of asphaltenes

Kilpatrick, Peter K.

420

Hydrogen in compound semiconductors M. D. McCluskeya)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen in compound semiconductors M. D. McCluskeya) and N. M. Johnson Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Palo Alto, California 94304 Received 9 October 1998; accepted 18 December 1998 Hydrogen can consequence of hydrogenation is the passivation of dopant impurities, which leads to a decrease

McCluskey, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

General basic and coordination catalysis in reactions of haloaromatic compounds with ammonia in the presence of copper(I) compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a study made to detect general basic catalysis by ammonia (reagent) in reactions of ammonolysis of haloaromatic compounds in the presence of Cu/sup +/ ions, as well as to determine the generality of the mechanisms of the catalytic replacement of a halogen atom by an amino group in the anthraquinone and benzene series.

Chumak, V.T.; Shein, S.M.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Assessment of the influences of groundwater colloids on the migration of technetium-99 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site in Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This short report summarizes the influences of groundwater colloids on the migration/transport of {sup 99}Tc at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site in Paducah, Kentucky. Limited data suggest that inorganic colloidal materials (e.g., aluminosilicate clay minerals) may not play a significant role in the retention and transport of Tc. Studies by size fractionation reveal that both Tc and natural organic matter (NOM) are largely present in the <3K fraction. The role of NOM on Tc retention and transport is not conclusive on the basis of this study. However, a literature review suggests that Tc is very likely associated with the groundwater organics. The presence of the organic matter could have increased the solubility and cotransport of Tc at the PGDP site. Further studies, applying such techniques as gel chromatography, size exclusion, and spectroscopy, may be useful to determine the association of organic matter with Tc. If Tc is associated with groundwater organics, appropriate protocols for removal of organic matter associated with Tc may be developed. Time and resources were limited so this study is not comprehensive with respect to the role of mobile organic and inorganic colloidal materials on Tc transport in subsurface soils. The redox conditions (DO) of groundwaters reported may not represent the true groundwater conditions, which could have influenced the association and dissociation of Tc with groundwater colloidal materials. Because Tc concentrations in the groundwater (on the order of nCi/L) at the PGDP site is much lower than the solubility of reduced Tc (IV) (on the order of {approximately}10{sup {minus}8} mol/L or parts per billion), regardless of the redox conditions, Tc will stay in solution phase as TC(IV) or Tc(VII). The mechanisms of adsorption/association vs precipitation must be understood under reduced and low Tc conditions so that strategic plans for remediation of Tc contaminated soils and groundwaters can be developed.

Gu, B.; McDonald, J.A.; McCarthy, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Clausen, J.L. [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY (United States). Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Infrared absorption of gaseous CH{sub 2}BrOO detected with a step-scan Fourier-transform absorption spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH{sub 2}BrOO radicals were produced upon irradiation, with an excimer laser at 248 nm, of a flowing mixture of CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. A step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a multipass absorption cell was employed to record temporally resolved infrared (IR) absorption spectra of reaction intermediates. Transient absorption with origins at 1276.1, 1088.3, 961.0, and 884.9 cm{sup ?1} are assigned to ?{sub 4} (CH{sub 2}-wagging), ?{sub 6} (O–O stretching), ?{sub 7} (CH{sub 2}-rocking mixed with C–O stretching), and ?{sub 8} (C–O stretching mixed with CH{sub 2}-rocking) modes of syn-CH{sub 2}BrOO, respectively. The assignments were made according to the expected photochemistry and a comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers, relative IR intensities, and rotational contours with those predicted with the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ method. The rotational contours of ?{sub 7} and ?{sub 8} indicate that hot bands involving the torsional (?{sub 12}) mode are also present, with transitions 7{sub 0}{sup 1}12{sub v}{sup v} and 8{sub 0}{sup 1}12{sub v}{sup v}, v = 1–10. The most intense band (?{sub 4}) of anti-CH{sub 2}BrOO near 1277 cm{sup ?1} might have a small contribution to the observed spectra. Our work provides information for directly probing gaseous CH{sub 2}BrOO with IR spectroscopy, in either the atmosphere or laboratory experiments.

Huang, Yu-Hsuan [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuan-Pern, E-mail: yplee@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

424

Method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors includes providing a process chamber and a source electrode adjacent to the process chamber. The process chamber contains a sample comprising a Ga-based compound semiconductor. The sample is in contact with a platen which is electrically connected to a first power supply, and the source electrode is electrically connected to a second power supply. The method includes flowing SiCl.sub.4 gas into the chamber, flowing Ar gas into the chamber, and flowing H.sub.2 gas into the chamber. RF power is supplied independently to the source electrode and the platen. A plasma is generated based on the gases in the process chamber, and regions of a surface of the sample adjacent to one or more masked portions of the surface are etched to create a substantially smooth etched surface including features having substantially vertical walls beneath the masked portions.

Qiu, Weibin; Goddard, Lynford L.

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

425

Structural investigation of a new antimicrobial thiazolidine compound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thiazoles and their derivatives have attracted the interest over the last decades because of their varied biological activities: antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, inflammation or in the treatment of allergies. A new synthesized compound 3-[2-(4-Methyl-2-phenyl-thiazol-5-yl)-2-oxo-ethyl]-thazolidine-2,4-dione was investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopies and also by DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The very good correlation found between the experimental and theoretical data shows that the optimized molecular structure is very close to reality. Also the NMR spectra show a monomeric behaviour of this compound in solutions.

Cozar, I. B.; Pîrn?u, A. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Street, RO-400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Street, RO-400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Vedeanu, N.; Nastas?, C. [Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, RO-400023 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, RO-400023 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

426

Method of plasma etching GA-based compound semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors includes providing a process chamber and a source electrode adjacent thereto. The chamber contains a Ga-based compound semiconductor sample in contact with a platen which is electrically connected to a first power supply, and the source electrode is electrically connected to a second power supply. SiCl.sub.4 and Ar gases are flowed into the chamber. RF power is supplied to the platen at a first power level, and RF power is supplied to the source electrode. A plasma is generated. Then, RF power is supplied to the platen at a second power level lower than the first power level and no greater than about 30 W. Regions of a surface of the sample adjacent to one or more masked portions of the surface are etched at a rate of no more than about 25 nm/min to create a substantially smooth etched surface.

Qiu, Weibin; Goddard, Lynford L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Process for production of an aluminum hydride compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl substituted by at least one of: (i) an alkoxy group having from one to six carbon atoms; and (ii) an alkyl group having from three to twelve carbon atoms; wherein M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two.

Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Miller, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

429

Expanded Use of Bicyclic Guanidinate Ligands in Dimetal Paddlewheel Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPANDED USE OF BICYCLIC GUANIDINATE LIGANDS IN DIMETAL PADDLEWHEEL COMPOUNDS A Dissertation by MARK DAVID YOUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Carlos A. Murillo Marcetta Y. Darensbourg Committee Members, Paul A. Lindahl George Kattawar Head...

Young, Mark D.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

430

The Phosphorus Compounds of Cotton Seed Meal and Wheat Bran.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

claimed, and especially that cottonseed meal does not contain meta- or pyrophos- phoric acid. The work presented in this bulletin is a continuation of the above study of the forms of phosphorus compounds in cottonseed mea], together... with an investigation of the acid-soluble phosphorus com? pounds of wheat bran. REVIEW OF LITERATURE. Hardin states (Bulletin 8, Dew series. South Carolina ExperimeDt Sta? tion) that cottonseed meal consists largely of meta- and pyrophosphoric acids. Crawford (Jour...

Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Arsenic removal from gaseous streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium feed materials, depending on the production process, have been found to contain arsenic (As) as a contaminant. Analyses show the As to be present as As pentafluoride (AsF{sub 5}) and/or hexafluoroarsenic acid (HAsF{sub 6}) and enter the enrichment cycle through contaminated hydrogen fluoride (HF). Problems related to corrosion of cylinder valves and plugging of feed lines and valves have been attributed to the As. Techniques to separate AsF{sub 5} from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) using sodium fluoride (NaF) as a trapping media were successful and will be discussed. Procedures to significantly reduce (up to 97%) the level of As in HF will also be reported. 5 figs., 9 tabs.

Russell, R.G.; Otey, M.G.

1989-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

432

7, 1598916022, 2007 Gaseous sulphur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the transport and dispersion of the atmospheric pollutants, and leads to high pollution levels near the ground.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net/7/15989/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Transport and dispersion of atmospheric sulphur dioxide from an industrial

Boyer, Edmond

433

A TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE CURRENT WATER POLICY BOUNDARY AT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1988, groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99) was identified in samples collected from residential water wells withdrawing groundwater from the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA) north of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) facility. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided temporary drinking water supplies to approximately 100 potentially affected residents by initially supplying bottled water, water tanks, and water-treatment systems, and then by extending municipal water lines, all at no cost, to those persons whose wells could be affected by contaminated groundwater. The Water Policy boundary was established in 1993. In the Policy, DOE agreed to pay the reasonable monthly cost of water for homes and businesses and, in exchange, many of the land owners signed license agreements committing to cease using the groundwater via rural water wells. In 2012, DOE requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), managing contractor of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), provide an independent assessment of the quality and quantity of the existing groundwater monitoring data and determine if there is sufficient information to support a modification to the boundary of the current Water Policy. As a result of the assessment, ORAU concludes that sufficient groundwater monitoring data exists to determine that a shrinkage and/or shift of the plume(s) responsible for the initial development of this policy has occurred. Specifically, there is compelling evidence that the TCE plume is undergoing shrinkage due to natural attenuation and associated degradation. The plume shrinkage (and migration) has also been augmented in local areas where large volumes of groundwater were recovered by pump-and treat remedial systems along the eastern and western boundaries of the Northwest Plume, and in other areas where pump-and-treat systems have been deployed by DOE to remove source contaminants. The available evidence supports adjusting the western and northwestern Water Policy boundary. Based on the historical and modeled hydrogeological data reflecting past flow and plume attenuation, along with associated plume migration toward the northeast, the establishment of a new boundary along the westernmost margin of the earliest indication of the TCE plume is proposed and justified on hydrogeological grounds. Approximately 30% of the original area would remain within the adjusted Water Policy area west and northwest of the PGDP facility. This modification would release about 70% of the area, although individual properties would overlap the new boundary.

None

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

434

Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil guidelines as inputs into the code was also performed to determine the maximum (peak) dose for all receptors. This report contains the technical basis in support of the DOE?s derivation of ALs for the 'Property.' A complete description of the methodology, including an assessment of the input parameters, model inputs, and results is provided in this report. This report also provides initial recommendations on applying the derived soil guidelines.

Boerner, A. J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Maldonado, D. G. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

A study of the manufacturing and product possibilities of a cork/polylactic acid compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of the manufacturing and product capabilities of a cork/polylactic acid compound was conducted. Fine granulated cork, 1mm in diameter, was compounded with Natureworks' IngeoTM3051D PLA and extruded into pellets. ...

Reed, Sarah BR

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Branched peptide amphiphiles, related epitope compounds and self assembled structures thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Branched peptide amphiphilic compounds incorporating one or residues providing a pendant amino group for coupling one or more epitope sequences thereto, such compounds and related compositions for enhanced epitope presentation.

Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Guler, Mustafa O. (Evanston, IL)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

437

Krill-eye : Superposition Compound Eye for Wide-Angle Imaging via GRIN Lenses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a novel wide angle imaging system inspired by compound eyes of animals. Instead of using a single lens, well compensated for aberration, we used a number of simple lenses to form a compound eye which produces ...

Hiura, Shinsaku

438

Discrete polyene oligomer synthesis and related polymer characterization : (Appendix I: Reduced tungsten dimeric compounds)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molybdenum complexes ... were used to synthesize polyene oligomeric compounds with up to 15 conjugated double bonds by reaction with aldehyde compounds in a Wittig-like fashion. The optical properties of highly nr-conjugated ...

Hafer, Jillian E. (Jillian Elizabeth)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organoarsenic compounds in oi.l shale process waters using aPresented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.compounds in the seven oil shale process waters. These

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Hydroxymethyl phosphine compounds for use as diagnostic and therapeutic pharmaceuticals and method of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical comprises at least one functionalized hydroxyalkyl phosphine donor group and one or more sulfur or nitrogen donor and a metal combined with the ligand.

Katti, Kattesh V. (Columbia, MO); Karra, Srinivasa Rao (Columbia, MO); Berning, Douglas E. (Columbia, MO); Smith, C. Jeffrey (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Ketring, Alan R. (Columbia, MO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Hydroxymethyl phosphine compounds for use as diagnostic and therapeutic pharmaceuticals and method of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical comprises at least one functionalized hydroxyalkyl phosphine donor group and one or more sulfur or nitrogen donor and a metal combined with the ligand.

Katti, Kattesh V. (Columbia, MO); Karra, Srinivasa Rao (Columbia, MO); Berning, Douglas E. (Columbia, MO); Smith, C. Jeffrey (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Ketring, Alan R. (Columbia, MO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Polybenzimidazole Compounds, Polymeric Media, and Methods of Post-Polymerization Modifications  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

INL has developed a patented process to handle and process polybenzimdazole (PBI) compounds that previously could only be handled in very heavy low vapor pressure organic solvents. With the new process the resulting compounds are modified to provide increased solubility in higher vapor pressure solvents and at significantly greater concentrations. These compounds may be utilized in a wide array of applications where high temperature and polymeric materials are utilized. Compounds made with...

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

445

Structural and Electronic Investigations of Complex Intermetallic Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In solid state chemistry, numerous investigations have been attempted to address the relationships between chemical structure and physical properties. Such questions include: (1) How can we understand the driving forces of the atomic arrangements in complex solids that exhibit interesting chemical and physical properties? (2) How do different elements distribute themselves in a solid-state structure? (3) Can we develop a chemical understanding to predict the effects of valence electron concentration on the structures and magnetic ordering of systems by both experimental and theoretical means? Although these issues are relevant to various compound classes, intermetallic compounds are especially interesting and well suited for a joint experimental and theoretical effort. For intermetallic compounds, the questions listed above are difficult to answer since many of the constituent atoms simply do not crystallize in the same manner as in their separate, elemental structures. Also, theoretical studies suggest that the energy differences between various structural alternatives are small. For example, Al and Ga both belong in the same group on the Periodic Table of Elements and share many similar chemical properties. Al crystallizes in the fcc lattice with 4 atoms per unit cell and Ga crystallizes in an orthorhombic unit cell lattice with 8 atoms per unit cell, which are both fairly simple structures (Figure 1). However, when combined with Mn, which itself has a very complex cubic crystal structure with 58 atoms per unit cell, the resulting intermetallic compounds crystallize in a completely different fashion. At the 1:1 stoichiometry, MnAl forms a very simple tetragonal lattice with two atoms per primitive unit cell, while MnGa crystallizes in a complicated rhombohedral unit cell with 26 atoms within the primitive unit cell. The mechanisms influencing the arrangements of atoms in numerous crystal structures have been studied theoretically by calculating electronic structures of these and related materials. Such calculations allow us to examine various interactions at the atomic scale, interactions which include orbital overlap, two-electron interactions, and Madelung terms. Moreover, these electronic studies also provide links between the angstrom-scale atomic interactions and the macro-scale physical properties, such as magnetism. Over the past few decades, there have been many significant developments toward understanding structure-bonding-property relationships in extended solids in terms of variables including atomic size, valence electron concentration, and electronegativity. However, many simple approaches based on electron counting, e.g., the octet rule, the 18-electron rule, or Wade's rules for boranes, cannot be applied adequately or universally to many of the more complex intermetallic compounds. For intermetallic phases that include late transition metals and post transition main group elements as their constituents, one classification scheme has been developed and effectively applied by using their valence electron count per atom (vec). These compounds are known as Hume-Rothery electron phases, and they have a variety of structure types with vec < 2.0 as shown in Table 1.

Hyunjin Ko

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

446

ME 4171 Environmentally Conscious Design & Manufacturing (Bras) Assignment -Sheet Molding Compound Manufacture Pollution Prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compound Manufacture Pollution Prevention Sheet Molding Compound (SMC) is a fiberglass-resin compound options for pollution prevention specifically for this process. (10 points) #12; of styrene occurs at room temperature and atmospheric pressure from the paste or resin at all stages

447

Concise representation of the saturation properties for pure compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 01787 Haar et al. (1981) Tnis dork Corr 647. 067 Cor r o47. 19 220. 71 0. 01792 Q. 017826 Exper imental or Correlation Data 20 Table 7. Comparison of Triple Point Constants Compound Group p bar 1 P t mo 1/ cm Pr opane Das and?85. 45 Eubank..., 191, 1261 (1976). Haar, L. , Gallagher, J. S. , Kali, G. S. , "Tne Anatomy of the Thermodynamic Sur face of Water: The Formulation and Comparisons with Data". Paper presented at the Proc. 8th Symp. Thermo. Phys. Pr oper ties, ASHE (1981). Haynes...

Borrelli, Leslie Kieffer

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Process for removing an organic compound from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from water is disclosed. The process involves gas stripping followed by membrane separation treatment of the stripping gas. The stripping step can be carried out using one or multiple gas strippers and using air or any other gas as stripping gas. The membrane separation step can be carried out using a single-stage membrane unit or a multistage unit. Apparatus for carrying out the process is also disclosed. The process is particularly suited for treatment of contaminated groundwater or industrial wastewater.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Kamaruddin, Henky D. (San Francisco, CA)

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

449

Low temperature properties of some Er-rich intermetallic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The low temperature volumetric heat capacity ({approx}3.5 to 350 K) and magnetic susceptibility ({approx}4 to 320 K) of Er{sub 3}Rh, Er{sub 3}Ir, Er{sub 3}Pt, Er{sub 2}Al, and Er{sub 2}Sn have been measured. All of the compounds order antiferromagnetically (or ferrimagnetically), and most exhibit more than one magnetic ordering transition. The volumetric heat capacities in general are smaller than those of the prototype magnetic regenerator materials, except for Er{sub 3}Ir in the 12 to 14 K temperature range.

K.A. Gshneidner,jr; A.O. Pecharsky; L.Hale; V.K. Pecharsky

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Single event kinetic modeling of the hydrocracking of paraffins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through to a given type of elementary steps. The rate expressions thus formulated are inserted into a one-dimensional, three-phase plug flow reactor model. Experimental data have been collected for the hydrocracking of n-hexadecane. The model parameters...

Kumar, Hans

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Enhanced Separation Efficiency in Olefin/Paraffin Distillation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This factsheet describes a research project whose main objective is to develop technologies to enhance separation efficiencies by replacing the conventional packing materials with hollow fiber membranes, which have a high specific area and separated channels for both liquid and vapor phases. The use of hollow fibers in distillation columns can help refineries decrease operating costs, reduce greenhouse gas emissions through reduced heating costs, and help expand U.S. refining capacity through improvements to existing sites, without large scale capital investment.

452

Evaluation of rice husk ash as filler in tread compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rice which is one of the largest agriculture crops produces around 22% of rice rusk during its milling process. This material is mainly used as fuel for energy generation, which results in an ash, which disposal represents an environmental issue. The rice husk ash (RHA) contains over than 70% of silica in an amorphous form and a lot of applications is being developed for it all over the world. The use of silica as a filler in the tire industry is growing since it contributes significantly to the reduction of fuel consumption of the automobiles, allowing at the same time better traction (safety). This paper presents an evaluation of the use of RHA as filler in rubber tread compounds prepared in lab scale and compares its performance with compounds prepared with commercial silica and carbon black, the fillers normally used in tire industry. Mechanical and rheological properties are evaluated, with emphasis for tan delta as an indicator of tread performance related with rolling resistance (fuel consumption) and wet grip/traction (safety)

Fernandes, M. R. S., E-mail: monica.fernandes@lanxess.com [Lanxess Elastômeros do Brasil S.A., Brasil and Instituto de Química, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ) (Brazil); Furtado, C. R. G., E-mail: russi@globo.com, E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com; Sousa, A. M. F. de, E-mail: russi@globo.com, E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com [Instituto de Química, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ) (Brazil)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl{sub 4} and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies.

Last, G.V.; Lenhard, R.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Evans, J.C.; Roberson, K.R.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Rockhold, M.L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Process for producing enriched uranium having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a {sup 235}U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower {sup 235}U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF{sub 6} tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a {sup 235} U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % {sup 235} U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF{sub 6}; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF{sub 6} in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} having a {sup 235}U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6}; and converting this low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. 4 figs.

Horton, J.A.; Hayden, H.W. Jr.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

Process for producing enriched uranium having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a .sup.235 U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower .sup.235 U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF.sub.6 tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a .sup.235 U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % .sup.235 U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF.sub.6 ; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF.sub.6 in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 having a .sup.235 U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 ; and converting this low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process.

Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Fehring, Jr., Edward J. (Dublin, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

First-Principles Study of the Li-Na-Ca-N-H System: Compound Structures and Hydrogen-Storage Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system for reversible hydrogen storage,” J. Alloys Comp, volCompound structures and hydrogen-storage properties,” J.compounds: Application to hydrogen storage materials,” Phys.

Teeratchanan, Pattanasak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

459

Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs.

Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

High Temperature High Pressure Thermodynamic Measurements for Coal Model Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop a better thermodynamic model for predicting properties of high-boiling coal derived liquids, especially the phase equilibria of different fractions at elevated temperatures and pressures. The development of such a model requires data on vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE), enthalpy, and heat capacity which would be experimentally determined for binary systems of coal model compounds and compiled into a database. The data will be used to refine existing models such as UNIQUAC and UNIFAC. The flow VLE apparatus designed and built for a previous project was upgraded and recalibrated for data measurements for thk project. The modifications include better and more accurate sampling technique and addition of a digital recorder to monitor temperature, pressure and liquid level inside the VLE cell. VLE data measurements for system benzene-ethylbenzene have been completed. The vapor and liquid samples were analysed using the Perkin-Elmer Autosystem gas chromatography.

John C. Chen; Vinayak N. Kabadi

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous paraffinic compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Pressure induced phase transitions in ceramic compounds containing tetragonal zirconia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stabilized tetragonal zirconia compounds exhibit a transformation toughening process in which stress applied to the material induces a crystallographic phase transition. The phase transition is accompanied by a volume expansion in the stressed region thereby dissipating stress and increasing the fracture strength of the material. The hydrostatic component of the stress required to induce the phase transition can be investigated by the use of a high pressure technique in combination with Micro-Raman spectroscopy. The intensity of Raman lines characteristic for the crystallographic phases can be used to calculate the amount of material that has undergone the transition as a function of pressure. It was found that pressures on the order of 2-5 kBar were sufficient to produce an almost complete transition from the original tetragonal to the less dense monoclinic phase; while a further increase in pressure caused a gradual reversal of the transition back to the original tetragonal structure.

Sparks, R.G.; Pfeiffer, G.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Field-usable portable analyzer for chlorinated organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1992, a chemical sensor was developed which showed almost perfect selectivity to vapors of chlorinated solvents. When interfaced to an instrument, a chemical analyzer will be produced that has near- absolute selectivity to vapors of volatile chlorinated organic compounds. TRI has just completed the second of a 2-phase program to develop this new instrument system, which is called the RCL MONITOR. In Phase II, this instrument was deployed in 5 EM40 operations. Phase II applications covered clean-up process monitoring, environmental modeling, routine monitoring, health and safety, and technology validation. Vapor levels between 0 and 100 ppM can be determined in 90 s with a lower detection limit of 0.5 ppM using the hand-portable instrument. Based on the favorable performance of the RCL MONITOR, the commercial instrument was released for commercial sales on Sept. 20, 1996.

Buttner, W.J.; Penrose, W.R.; Stetter, J.R.; Williams, R.D.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Synthesis and Gas Phase Thermochemistry of Germanium-Containing Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The driving force behind much of the work in this dissertation was to gain further understanding of the unique olefin to carbene isomerization observed in the thermolysis of 1,1-dimethyl-2-methylenesilacyclobutane by finding new examples of it in other silicon and germanium compounds. This lead to the examination of a novel phenylmethylenesilacyclobut-2-ene, which did not undergo olefin to carbene rearrangement. A synthetic route to methylenegermacyclobutanes was developed, but the methylenegermacyclobutane system exhibited kinetic instability, making the study of the system difficult. In any case the germanium system decomposed through a complex mechanism which may not include olefin to carbene isomerization. However, this work lead to the study of the gas phase thermochemistry of a series of dialkylgermylene precursors in order to better understand the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of dialkylgermylenes. The resulting dialkylgermylenes were found to undergo a reversible intramolecular {beta} C-H insertion mechanism.

Nathan Robert Classen

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Gas and Particulate Sampling of Airborne Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The denuder surfaces of the gas and particle (GAP) sampler (developed at the Atmospheric Environment Service of Environment Canada) have been modified by coating with XAD-4 resin, using techniques developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the lower capacity integrated organic vapor/particle sampler (IOVPS). The resulting high capacity integrated organic gas and particle sampler (IOGAPS) has been operated in ambient air at 16.7 L min{sup -1} for a 24-hour period in Berkeley, California, USA. Simultaneous measurements were made at the same collection rate with a conventional sampler that used a filter followed by two sorbent beds. Gas and particle partition measurements were determined for 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) ranging from 2-ring to 6-ring species. The IOGAPS indicated a higher particle fraction of these compounds than did the conventional sampler, suggesting that the conventional sampler suffered from 'blow-off' losses from the particles collected on the filter.

Lane, D.A.; Gundel, L.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Friedel Craft's synthesis and characterization of some acene quinone compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis and characterization of some linear acene quinones of up to nine fused rings prepared by the Friedel-Craft's reaction of hydroquinone (HQ) and 1,4,9,10 tetrahydroxy anthracene (THA) with pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA), and fused AlCl/sub 3/, was carried out. The intermediate product of the reaction of THA and PMDA, 1,4 dihydroxy anthraquinone, 6,7 dicarboxylic acid (DADCA) was also isolated and its synthesis optimized. This material was reduced to 1,4,9,10-tetrahydroxy anthracene 6,7-dicarboxylic acid (TADCA) and further dehydrated to its anhydride (TADCAmh). These compounds contain the necessary chemical functionalities which may lead to the facile synthesis of higher molecular weight quinones. These acene quinones show electronic spectral absorptions extending far into the NIR region, an indication of their long conjunction length.

Galleguillos, R.; Litt, M.; Rickert, S.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Neutral-ionic transitions in organic mixed-stack compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Torrance et al. have made the interesting observation that several mixed-stack organic compounds undergo transitions from neutral states to ionic states as the temperature or pressure is varied. We examine a simple model of such transitions including Coulomb interaction and hybridization of neutral and ionic states. In the limit of weak hybridization and long-range repulsive interaction between ionic planes, it is proven that there is a complete devil's staircase where the degree of ionicity assumes an infinity of rational values. For attractive interactions between ionic planes, the neutral-ionic transition is shown to be first order for weak hybridization. Comparison with experiment indicates that this situation applies to tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) chloranil. For strong hybridization the transition is continuous but goes through a metallic phase. It is shown, for the first time, that the spectrum of the charge-transfer Hamiltonian contains both a bound spectrum, the observed charge-transfer excitations, and a continuum.

Bruinsma, R.; Bak, P.; Torrance, J.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Dissolution rates of uranium compounds in simulated lung fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maximum dissolution rates of uranium into simulated lung fluid from a variety of materials were measured at 37/sup 0/in the where f/sub i/ is in order to estimate clearance rates from the deep lung. A batch procedure was utilized in which samples containing as little as 10 ..mu..g of natural uranium could be tested. The materials included: products of uranium mining, milling and refining operations, coal fly ash, an environmental sample from a site exposed to multiple uranium sources, and purified samples of (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/U/sub 2/O/sub 7/ U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, UO/sub 2/, and UF/sub 4/. Dissolution of uranium from several materials indicated the presence of more than one type of uranium compound; but in all cases, the fraction F of uranium remaining undissolved at any time t could be represented by the sum of up to three terms in the series: F = ..sigma../sub i/f/sub i/ exp (-0.693t/UPSILON/sub i/), where f/sub i/ is the initial fraction of component i with dissolution half-time epsilon/sub i/. Values of epsilon/sub i/ varied from 0.01 day to several thousand days depending on the physical and chemical form of the uranium. Dissolution occurred predominantly by formation of the (UO/sub 2/(CO/sub 3/)/sub 3/)/sup 4 -/ ion; and as a result, tetravalent uranium compounds dissolved slowly. Dissolution rates of size-separated yellow-cake aerosols were found to be more closely correlated with specific surface area than with aerodynamic diameter.

Kalkwarf, D.R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Microscopic description of neutron emission rates in compound nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutron emission rates in thermal excited nuclei are conventionally described by statistical models with a phenomenological level density parameter that depends on excitation energies, deformations and mass regions. In the microscopic view of hot nuclei, the neutron emission rates can be determined by the external neutron gas densities without any free parameters. Therefore the microscopic description of thermal neutron emissions is desirable that can impact several understandings such as survival probabilities of superheavy compound nuclei and neutron emissivity in reactors. To describe the neutron emission rates microscopically, the external thermal neutron gases are self-consistently obtained based on the Finite-Temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (FT-HFB) approach. The results are compared with the statistical model to explore the connections between the FT-HFB approach and the statistical model. The Skyrme FT-HFB equation is solved by HFB-AX in deformed coordinate spaces. Based on the FT-HFB approach, the thermal properties and external neutron gas are properly described with the self-consistent gas substraction procedure. Then neutron emission rates can be obtained based on the densities of external neutron gases. The thermal statistical properties of $^{238}$U and $^{258}$U are studied in detail in terms of excitation energies. The thermal neutron emission rates in $^{238, 258}$U and superheavy compound nuclei $_{112}^{278}$Cn and $_{114}^{292}$Fl are calculated, which agree well with the statistical model by adopting an excitation-energy-dependent level density parameter. The coordinate-space FT-HFB approach can provide reliable microscopic descriptions of neutron emission rates in hot nuclei, as well as microscopic constraints on the excitation energy dependence of level density parameters for statistical models.

Yi Zhu; Junchen Pei

2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

469

Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ? 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ? 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space between alkaline metal hydrides (AmH), Alkaline earth metal hydrides (AeH2), alane (AlH3), transition metal (Tm) hydrides (TmHz, where z=1-3) and molecular hydrogen (H2). The effort started first with variations of known alanates and subsequently extended the search to unknown compounds. In this stage, the FPM techniques were developed and validated on known alanate materials such as NaAlH4 and Na2LiAlH6. The coupled predictive methodologies were used to survey over 200 proposed phases in six quaternary spaces, formed from various combinations of Na, Li Mg and/or Ti with Al and H. A wide range of alanate compounds was examined using SSP having additions of Ti, Cr, Co, Ni and Fe. A number of compositions and reaction paths were identified having H weight fractions up to 5.6 wt %, but none meeting the 7.5 wt%H reversible goal. Similarly, MSP of alanates produced a number of interesting compounds and general conclusions regarding reaction behavior of mixtures during processing, but no alanate based candidates meeting the 7.5 wt% goal. A novel alanate, LiMg(AlH4)3, was synthesized using SBP that demonstrated a 7.0 wt% capacity with a desorption temperature of 150°C. The deuteride form was synthesized and characterized by the Institute for Energy (IFE) in Norway to determine its crystalline structure for related FPM studies. However, the reaction exhibited exothermicity and therefore was not reversible under acceptable hydrogen gas pressures for on-board recharging. After the extensive studies of alanates, the material class of emphasis was shifted to borohydrides. Through SBP, several ligand-stabilized Mg(BH4)2 complexes were synthesized. The Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 complex was found to change behavior with slightly different synthesis conditions and/or aging. One of the two mechanisms was an amine-borane (NH3BH3) like dissociation reaction which released up to 16 wt %H and more conservatively 9 wt%H when not including H2 released from the NH3. From FPM, the stability of the Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 compound was found to increase with the inclusion of NH3 groups in the inner-Mg coordination

Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

470

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Travaglini, Michael A. (Oliver Springs, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

472

Methods for fabricating thin film III-V compound solar cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention utilizes epitaxial lift-off in which a sacrificial layer is included in the epitaxial growth between the substrate and a thin film III-V compound solar cell. To provide support for the thin film III-V compound solar cell in absence of the substrate, a backing layer is applied to a surface of the thin film III-V compound solar cell before it is separated from the substrate. To separate the thin film III-V compound solar cell from the substrate, the sacrificial layer is removed as part of the epitaxial lift-off. Once the substrate is separated from the thin film III-V compound solar cell, the substrate may then be reused in the formation of another thin film III-V compound solar cell.

Pan, Noren; Hillier, Glen; Vu, Duy Phach; Tatavarti, Rao; Youtsey, Christopher; McCallum, David; Martin, Genevieve

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

473

Liquefaction of cellulosic wastes. 6: Oxygen compounds in pyrolytic oil and water fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid hydrocarbon oil and water have been produced from the liquefaction of cellulosic matter present in municipal solid wastes. The produced pyrolytic oil and water fraction seemed to be contaminated with considerable amounts of oxygen compounds as compared with fuels derived from a petroleum origin. The oxygen compounds included organic acids (fatty and naphthenic acids), phenols, and carbonyl compounds. These classes of oxygen compounds were extracted selectively from the pyrolytic oils and water using chemical extraction methods. Methyl esters of fatty acids and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones of carbonyl compounds were identified by gas chromatography and thin layer chromatography, respectively. It was suggested that the identified oxygen compounds could be produced from the pyrolysis of volatiles (e.g., levoglucosane, which is the primary product of cellulose depolymerization) via different mechanistic pathways.

Gharieb, H.K.; Faramawy, S.; El-Amrousi, F.A.; El-Sabagh, S.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Boron cage compound materials and composites for shielding and absorbing neutrons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Boron cage compound-containing materials for shielding and absorbing neutrons. The materials include BCC-containing composites and compounds. BCC-containing compounds comprise a host polymer and a BCC attached thereto. BCC-containing composites comprise a mixture of a polymer matrix and a BCC filler. The BCC-containing materials can be used to form numerous articles of manufacture for shielding and absorbing neutrons.

Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

475

Portable instrument and method for detecting reduced sulfur compounds in a gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable real time instrument for detecting concentrations in the part per billion range of reduced sulfur compounds in a sample gas. Ozonized air or oxygen and reduced sulfur compounds in a sample gas stream react to produce chemiluminescence in a reaction chamber and the emitted light is filtered and observed by a photomultiplier to detect reduced sulfur compounds. Selective response to individual sulfur compounds is achieved by varying reaction chamber temperature and ozone and sample gas flows, and by the use of either air or oxygen as the ozone source gas.

Gaffney, J.S.; Kelly, T.J.; Tanner, R.L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - applied antiandrogenic compounds Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and epi- demiological studies demonstrate that a variety of exogenous compounds, designated... that a relatively large number of them have estrogenic, antiestrogenic, or...

477

Examination of the Potential for Formation of Energetic Compounds in Dry Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details initial results from an investigation of the potential formation and fate of energetic compounds in Savannah River Site sludge.

Barnes, M.J.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

478

E-Print Network 3.0 - antifouling compound zinc Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Toxicol 20: 467-474, 2005. Keywords... antifouling (AF) surface coat- ings. Many heavy-metal compounds, including organomer- cury, lead, arsenic... Periodicals, Inc. 467 12;toxic...

479

E-Print Network 3.0 - antifouling compounds sodium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Toxicol 20: 467-474, 2005. Keywords... antifouling (AF) surface coat- ings. Many heavy-metal compounds, including organomer- cury, lead, arsenic... Periodicals, Inc. 467 12;toxic...

480

E-Print Network 3.0 - absorbing compounds called Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which readily collectsabsorbs compounds. Protective clothing (e.g. sleeves, impervious boots or PVC... with detergent and flush thoroughly with water. Absorb wash liquid and place...