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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

too rapidly to see): a. Loading -PARS II is loading the report definition and data query. b. Downloading (generating report) c. Opening Excel d. Formatting report Report...

2

PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peck 1.1 5102010 Exercise 6 -Monthly Status screen updated to PARS II 4152010 Version 30-31 Replaced screens and changed text. J. Peck 1.1 5102010 Ex 8 and 9 36-38...

3

PARS II TRAINING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i 10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1) Department of Energy September 13, 2010 September 13,, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1: Find and View a Project ............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3

4

NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By:...

5

PARS II Extraction Utility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility v8020130510.zip More Documents & Publications PARS II Extraction Utility Release Notes PARS II CPP...

6

PARS II FAQ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 PARS II Project Assessment and Reporting System Frequently Asked Questions (Click on a Question to go to Its Answer) General PARS II Project Information Q: What is the motivation, purpose and expected benefit from the PARS II system? Q: Where can I go to find out information on PARS II? Accessing and Using PARS II Q: Where can I go to access PARS II? Q: How do I obtain a PARS II User ID and Password? Q: PARS II will not allow me to log-in, it just keeps displaying the login window for User ID and Password. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I do not see a list of my projects. What should I do? Q: I am a FPD tracking a project and it does not appear on my project list. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I receive a white screen. What should I do?

7

PARS II Training Schedule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 4 5 6 7 8 WEEK 3 11 12 13 14 15 WEEK 4 18 19 20 21 22 WEEK 5 25 26 27 28 PARS II Training Schedule FEBRUARY 2013 Webinar PARS 102: Session A) 10:00 - 12:00 1 Hour Break...

8

Par Pond water balance  

SciTech Connect

A water budget for the Par Pond hydrologic system was established in order to estimate the rate of groundwater influx to Par Pond. This estimate will be used in modeling exercises to predict Par Pond reservoir elevation and spillway discharge in the scenario where Savannah River water is no longer pumped and discharged into Par Pond. The principal of conservation of mass was used to develop the water budget, where water inflow was set equal to water outflow. Components of the water budget were identified, and the flux associated with each was determined. The water budget was considered balanced when inflow and outflow summed to zero. The results of this study suggest that Par Pond gains water from the groundwater system in the upper reaches of the reservoir, but looses water to the groundwater system near the dam. The rate of flux of groundwater from the water table aquifer into Par Pond was determined to be 13 cfs. The rate of flux from Par Pond to the water table aquifer near the dam was determined to be 7 cfs.

Hiergesell, R.A.; Dixon, K.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

PARS II User Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document serves as a reference manual to assist DOE end-users in performing their respective functions within the PARS II web application. The document provides a description and “How To” for...

10

PARS II TRAINING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Viewing and Reporting 1 Viewing and Reporting Training Workbook V1.0 Department of Energy May 10, 2010 May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 ii May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 iii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 Find and View a Project ............................................................................................. 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ....................................................................................................................... 3

11

Electron Affinity Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electron Affinity Search Help. Search options (step 1) (Back to search). You may search for species based on electron affinity values in two ways: ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

PARS II Course Presentation (Course 103) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presentation (Course 103) PARS II Course Presentation (Course 103) PARS103Presentation.zip More Documents & Publications PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II PARS II...

13

PARS II | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II PARS II Welcome to PARS II PARS II is the Department's official "System of Record" for capital asset project performance information. Because PARS II uses the same data as maintained in our contractors' project management systems, everyone from the Federal Project Director's staff to the Secretary of Energy will have easy access to the same data. The PARS II software application is managed by the MA Office of Engineering and Construction Management and is used by federal and contractor personnel across the nation to record and track the progress of major construction and environmental cleanup projects. Questions or comments about PARS II should be directed to the PARS II Help Desk via email at i-Manage.eas@hq.doe.gov or by calling 301-903-2500

14

PARS II FAQ | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications PARS 3.0 Data Model Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II) Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II)...

15

PAR | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PAR PAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Photosynthetically active radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 10km x 10km (Purpose): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE -National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files Source INPE (National Institute for Space Research) and LABSOLAR (Laboratory of Solar Energy/Federal University of Santa Catarina) - Brazil Date Released August 08th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated August 08th, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords INPE LABSOLAR PAR solar SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 10.4 MiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 15.7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

16

PARS II Software Release Notes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

New and improved functionality was released in Version 8.0.20120308 of PARS II. This release offers PARS II Users a significant number of enhancements across all facets of the application. These...

17

Gaseous Fuel Injection Modeling using a Gaseous Sphere Injection Methodology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growing interest in gaseous fuels (hydrogen and natural gas) for internal combustion engines calls for the development of computer models for simulation of gaseous fuel injection, air entrainment and the ensuing combustion. This paper introduces a new method for modeling the injection and air entrainment processes for gaseous fuels. The model uses a gaseous sphere injection methodology, similar to liquid droplet in injection techniques used for liquid fuel injection. In this paper, the model concept is introduced and model results are compared with correctly- and under-expanded experimental data.

Hessel, R P; Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

18

GASEOUS SCINTILLATION COUNTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gaseous excitation counter for detecting the presence amd measuring the energy of subatomic particles and electromagnetic radiation is described. The counter includes a gas-tight chamber filled with an elemental gas capable of producing ultra-violet excitation quanta when irradiated with subatomic particles and electromagnetic radiation. The gas has less than one in a thousand parts ultra-violet absorbing contamination. When nuclear radiation ps present the ultra-violet light produced by the gas strikes a fluorescent material within the counter, responsive to produce visible excitation quanta, and photo-sensitive counting means detect the visible emission.

Eggler, C.; Huddleston, C.M.

1959-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

19

prsente par Joseph BURGUBURU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 I �tude d'une chambre de combustion de type TVC 25 2 Généralités sur la combustion 27 2.1 Régimes turbines à gaz . . . . . . . . . 50 3 La stabilisation par cavité 55 3.1 Dynamique de l'écoulement sur une - AE Technologie Enhancement for Clean Combustion in Aero-Engines TET Température d'Entrée Turbine TTV

20

prsente par Alexandre Demeure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particulier ceux du bowling pour le cadeau de départ qui m'a été très utile par la suite . Je remercie aussi progresser dans notre compréhension des problèmes et solutions, que ce soit au labo, à l'hotel, dans un train nuit à l'hotel ^_^. Je remercie aussi Jean et Théodora qui m'ont eux aussi sauvé la vie en m'emmenant à

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

PARS II Extraction Utility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II Extraction Utility DEC1387487110111DekkerPMISExtractionUtilityv8020101217.zip More Documents & Publications Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility Release Notes for the PARS...

22

Axioms of affine buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove equivalence of certain axiom sets for affine buildings. Along the lines a purely combinatorial proof of the existence of a spherical building at infinity is given. As a corollary we obtain that ``being an affine building'' is independent of the metric structure of the space.

Schwer, Petra N

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

ARM - Datastreams - pars2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamspars2 Datastreamspars2 Documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : PARS2 OTT Parsivel2 Laser Disdrometer Active Dates 2012.09.24 - 2013.09.26 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties Originating Instrument Laser Disdrometer (LDIS) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time Class size width mm class_size_width ( particle_size ) Diameter of largest drop observed mm diameter_max ( time ) Diameter of smallest drop observed mm diameter_min ( time )

24

PARS II Training Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II Training Materials PARS II Training Materials PARS II Training Materials PARS II presentation hand-outs and step-by-step "how to" exercises for each course are available for download. Users who are attending Web classes should download these documents prior to attending the class. PARS 102 - Monthly Updating and Reporting Introduction to PARS II, finding and selecting projects in your domain, viewing Oversight and Assessment (OA) data, viewing Contractor Project Performance (CPP) dashboards, updating your monthly status assessment, adding attachments, and running standard, pre-built reports. PARS 102 Presentation PARS 102 Workbook PARS 103 - Updating Projects and Reporting Introduction to PARS II, finding and selecting projects in your domain, entering new projects into PARS II, entering and editing Oversight and

25

Segmentation par modèle déformable surfacique localement régularisé par spline lissante.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??La segmentation d'image par modèles déformables est une méthode permettant de localiser les frontières d'un objet. Dans le cas d'images difficiles à segmenter en raison… (more)

Velut, Jérôme

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Affine buildings for dihedral groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct rank 2 thick nondiscrete affine buildings associated with an arbitrary finite dihedral group.

Berenstein, Arkady

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application More Documents &...

28

PARS 3.0 Data Model | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Model More Documents & Publications PARS II FAQ Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II) Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II)...

29

PARS II Training Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Materials Training Materials PARS II Training Materials PARS II presentation hand-outs and step-by-step "how to" exercises for each course are available for download. Users who are attending Web classes should download these documents prior to attending the class. Slides from the APM "Road Show" Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II) PARS 102 - Monthly Updating and Reporting Introduction to PARS II, finding and selecting projects in your domain, viewing Oversight and Assessment (OA) data, viewing Contractor Project Performance (CPP) dashboards, updating your monthly status assessment, adding attachments, and running standard, pre-built reports. PARS 102 Presentation PARS 102 Workbook PARS 103 - Updating Projects and Reporting

30

PARS II Training | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

II Training PARS II Training PARS II training is delivered as traditional, instructor-led, hands-on classroom training, and also, as instructor-led Webinars with limited...

31

Independent Oversight Inspection, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2006 Independent Oversight Inspection, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2006 November 2006 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, conducted an inspection of the emergency management program at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in August and September 2006. The coordination of emergency plans and procedures among USEC and DOE contractor organizations has successfully integrated the emergency management programs into a single cohesive program for the PORTS site. Other strengths include accurate hazards surveys that identify applicable

32

Gaseous electrode development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the present study is to optimize the gaseous electrode for use in an MHD generator and to test this optimum configuration in an operating MHD channel. The arc gaseous electrode concept is based on the use of an arc source in the body of the MHD channel electrode, wherein the arc follows a helical path and generates a plasma which flows out of a long, thin slot cut parallel to the cylindrical annulus, to provide a low impedance path for the MHD current through the boundary layer so that electrode erosion due to arcing can be reduced. Bench-scale tests on the arc plasma source were conducted. The effect of the parameters such as magnetic field, yaw angle with respect to the magnetic field, electrode geometry, and arc cathode materials were studied. Based on these studies, an optimum design was selected for testing in the MHD channel. Tests were conducted with the arc gaseous electrode in the cathode wall of a diagonal conducting wall MHD generator at magnetic fields up to 3.83 Tesla, with a supersonic flow of combustion products seeded with 1.0 w/o of potassium. The measured MHD plasma conductivity varied between 12 and 22 S/m. Results are presented and discussed in detail. (WHK)

Jones, M.S. Jr.; Scannell, E.P.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Thiagarajan, V.; Mallavarpu, R.; Armstrong, A.J.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 7, 2011 (V1.3) July 7, 2011 (V1.3) PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload 2 July 7, 2011 (V1.3) PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload Course Objectives * Upon completion of this course, users will be able to: - Navigate in the PARS II application - Select a Project to update - Update Project data by performing * An Upload of the latest monthly project performance data extracted from the contractor's local Earned Value Management System (EVMS) * Replace the current or a prior monthly upload in response to feedback or to correct data - Verify the success of the upload - View and interpret the import log generated by the upload process 3 July 7, 2011 (V1.3) PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload Overview PARS II 4 July 7, 2011 (V1.3) PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload PARS II Overview * Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) product

34

PARS II 102 Training Workbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Monthly Updating and Reporting 2 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook V8.0.20101108 Department of Energy March 30, 2011 March 30, 2011 PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting V8.0.20101108 ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 - Find and View a Project............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ........................................................................................................................ 4 View a Project ......................................................................................................................... 4

35

Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program...

37

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Penetration Fire Seals at the DUF6 Conversion Building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, March 26, 2010 Consent...

38

PARS II Course Descriptions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Descriptions Descriptions PARS II Course Descriptions Sign up for PARS 102 or PARS 103, depending on your project assessment role and function. PARS 104 will be offered to site contractors as part of Dekker's Contractor deployment training. # Course Name Course Description Intended Audience PARS 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Duration: 4 hrs Introduction to PARS II, finding and selecting projects in your domain, viewing Oversight and Assessment (OA) data, viewing Contractor Project Performance (CPP) dashboards, updating your monthly status assessment, adding attachments, and running standard, pre-built reports. Individuals who do not require monthly update training will be excused approximately one half hour early. FPD and Program staff who update the OA Monthly Status, but not other OA data.

39

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2013 November 5, 2013 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the preparedness of the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, contractors at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and selected non-leased facilities to respond to a severe natural phenomena event (NPE). The review was conducted in July and August 2013 by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, which is within the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations performed this

40

Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

Hindin, Saul G. (Mendham, NJ); Roberts, George W. (Westfield, NJ)

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Illinois Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

42

Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

43

Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

44

Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

45

Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

46

Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

47

Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

48

Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

49

Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

50

Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

51

Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

52

West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

53

Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

54

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive...

55

Production and Handling Slide 25: The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

56

Production and Handling Slide 24: The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Site Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Site Refer to...

57

PARS II Change Request (CR) Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Title: Phone #: Office/Symbol: Email: CHANGE TYPE: Defect: New Requirement: PRIORITY: PARS II Change Request Form (APR 2011) PARS II Change Request (CR) Form 1 = Prevents the accomplishment of an essential PARS-II capability 3 = Adversely affects the accomplishment of an essential PARS-II capability, but a work-around solution is known 4 = Results in User / Operator inconvenience or annoyance, but does not affect an essential PARS-II capability 5 = Any other effect 1) Detailed description of problem/need. (If possible, provide project #(s) you are working with). PROBLEM/CHANGE DESCRIPTION: 2) Where in system defect is seen or where new functionality is required (i.e., which screen, which report). Screenshots (as separate attachments) are helpful.

58

Contractor-specific Documentation & Information in PARS II |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor-specific Documentation & Information in PARS II Contractor-specific Documentation & Information in PARS II DOE Office of Acquisition and Project Management established...

59

PARS II Process Document - Project Phasing (Multiple CD-2 from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II Process Document - On Hold Projects.pdf More Documents & Publications ESAAB SOP Requirements to coordinate agreements, milestones and decision documents (AMDD) PARS II...

60

PARS II Process Document- Submitting & Processing Email as Offical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II Process Document- Submitting & Processing Email as Offical Project Action Approval Document PARS II Process Document- Submitting & Processing Email as Offical Project...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

PARS II Process Document - Over Target Baseline (OTB) Reporting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II Process Document - Over Target Baseline (OTB) Reporting PARS II Process Document - Over Target Baseline (OTB) Reporting This document details the process by which...

62

PARS II CPP Upload Template File | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

File PARS II CPP Upload Template File DPMIS091110OECMCompleteProjectTemplate.zip More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - PARS II CPP Upload Requirements.docx...

63

Configuring Workstations for use with the PARS II System | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuring Workstations for use with the PARS II System Configuring Workstations for use with the PARS II System ConfiguringWorkstationsforusewiththePARSIISystem0.pdf...

64

Configuring Workstations for use with the PARS II System | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuring Workstations for use with the PARS II System Configuring Workstations for use with the PARS II System ConfiguringWorkstationsforusewiththePARSIISystem2013071...

65

Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

byDeputySecretaryPoneman17May2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II) PARS II Data Quality...

66

PARS II Earned Value Data Migration Template | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data Migration Template PARSITEMPLATE.xls More Documents & Publications Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II) PARS II CPP Upload...

67

Combination free electron and gaseous laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Manhattan Project: K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 > Working K-25 into the Mix, Oak Ridge:...

69

Affine $\\Lambda$-Buildings II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to provide an easier set of axioms for Affine $\\Lambda$-Buildings by extending results of Anne Parreau on the equivalence of axioms for Euclidean buildings. In particular we give an easier set of axioms for an affine $\\Lambda$-building, utilizing a notion of a strong exchange condition on apartments and sectors having a sector panel lying in an apartment.

Bennett, Curtis D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- January 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution

71

PAR solar radiation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PAR solar radiation PAR solar radiation Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Mean values of PAR Solar Radiation in kWh/m2/day for 40km cells for 1 year (month, season, year) based on data from 1995 to 2005 (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders Source INPE (National Institute for Spatial Research) and LABSOLAR (Laboratory of Solar Energy/Federal University of Santa Catarina) - Brazil Date Released August 05th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated August 05th, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords INPE LABSOLAR PAR solar radiation renewable energy South America SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 977.7 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 1.8 MiB)

72

PARS II User Account Access Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Management Office of Management Office of Engineering and Construction Management User Account Access Guide for PARS II Version 1.5 June 25, 2011 Submitted by: Energy Enterprise Solutions 20440 Century Blvd. Suite 150 Germantown, MD 20874 Phone 301-916-0050 Fax 301-916-0066 www.eesllc.net June 25, 2011 (V1.5) PARS II User Account Access Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. June 25, 2011 (V1.5) PARS II User Account Access Guide iii Title Page Document Name: User Account Access Guide for PARS II Version Number: V1.5 Publication Date: June 25, 2011 Contract Number: DE-AT01-06IM00102 Project Number: 1ME07 CLIN 4 Prepared by: Scott Burns, Energy Enterprise Solutions, LLC Reviewed by: Judith Bernsen, Energy Enterprise Solutions, LLC

73

PARS II - Integrated Project Team Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

John Makepeace (OECM) Kai Mong (EES), Ken Henderson (EES), Norm Ayers (EES) October 29, 2009 2 2 Agenda * PARS II OA & CPP Software * PARS II Deployment Timeline * Deployment Overview * Organizational Roles & Responsibilities * Project List and Schedule * Next Steps 3 PARS II OA & CPP Software * Oversight & Assessment (OA) * Web interface collects summary-level project data: status assessments, forecasts, PB, KPPs * Used by FPD, Program and OECM each month * Contractor Project Performance (CPP) * Web interface for uploading contractor's project files: earned value, schedule, variance, MR, risk * Used by contractor each month 4 PARS II Deployment Timeline 4 11/1/2009 12/1/2009 1/1/2010 2/1/2010 3/1/2010 4/1/2010 5/1/2010 6/1/2010 7/1/2010 8/1/2010 9/1/2010 10/1/2010 11/1/2010

74

Simulink/PARS Integration Support  

SciTech Connect

The state of the art for signal processor hardware has far out-paced the development tools for placing applications on that hardware. In addition, signal processors are available in a variety of architectures, each uniquely capable of handling specific types of signal processing efficiently. With these processors becoming smaller and demanding less power, it has become possible to group multiple processors, a heterogeneous set of processors, into single systems. Different portions of the desired problem set can be assigned to different processor types as appropriate. As software development tools do not keep pace with these processors, especially when multiple processors of different types are used, a method is needed to enable software code portability among multiple processors and multiple types of processors along with their respective software environments. Sundance DSP, Inc. has developed a software toolkit called “PARS”, whose objective is to provide a framework that uses suites of tools provided by different vendors, along with modeling tools and a real time operating system, to build an application that spans different processor types. The software language used to express the behavior of the system is a very high level modeling language, “Simulink”, a MathWorks product. ORNL has used this toolkit to effectively implement several deliverables. This CRADA describes this collaboration between ORNL and Sundance DSP, Inc.

Vacaliuc, B. [ORNL] [ORNL; Nakhaee, N. [Sundance DSP, Inc.] [Sundance DSP, Inc.

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

75

Gaseous Arginine Conformers and Their Unique Intramolecular Interactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive ab initio calculations were employed to characterize stable conformers of gaseous arginine, both canonical and zwitterionic tautomers. Step-by-step geometry optimizations of possible single-bond rotamers at the B3LYP/6-31G(d), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels yield numerous structures that are more stable than any known ones. The final electronic energies of the conformers were determined at the CCSD/6-31++G(d,p) level. The lowest energies of the canonical and zwitterionic structures are lower than the existing ones by 2.0 and 2.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The relative energies, rotational constants, dipole moments and harmonic frequencies of the stable conformers were given for future experimental verifications. The conformational distributions at various temperatures, estimated based upon the thermodynamic principles, consist almost exclusively of the newly found structures. One striking feature is the occurrence of the blue-shifting hydrogen bonds in all the six most stable conformers. A unique feature of important conformations is the coexistence of dihydrogen, blue- and red-shifting hydrogen bonds. In addition to the hydrogen bonds, the stereoelectronic effects were also found to be important stabilization factors. The calculated and measured proton affinities agree within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties, affirming high quality of our conformational search. The theoretical gas phase basicity of 245.9 kcal/mol is also in good agreement with the experimental value of 240.6 kcal/mol. The extensive searches establish firmly that gaseous arginine exists primarily in the canonical and not the zwitterionic form. Computing resources were available through a Computational Grand Challenge Application grant from the Molecular Sciences Computing Facility in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830.

Ling, Sanliang; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Zhijian; Lin, Zijing; Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

76

Gaseous Arginine Conformers and Their Unique Intramolecular Interactions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive ab initio calculations were employed to characterize stable conformers of gaseous arginine, both the canonical and zwitterionic tautomers. Step-by-step geometry optimizations of possible single-bond rotamers at the B3LYP/6-31G(d), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p), and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels yield numerous structures that are more stable than any known ones. The final electronic energies of the conformers were determined at the CCSD/6-31++G(d,p) level. The lowest energies of the canonical and zwitterionic structures are lower than the existing values by 2.0 and 2.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The relative energies, rotational constants, dipole moments, and harmonic frequencies of the stable conformers remain for future experimental verification. The conformational distributions at various temperatures, estimated according to thermodynamic principles, consist almost exclusively of the newly found structures. One striking feature is the occurrence of blueshifting hydrogen bonds in all six of the most stable conformers. A unique feature of important conformations is the coexistence of dihydrogen and blue- and red-shifting hydrogen bonds. In addition to the hydrogen bonds, the stereoelectronic effects were also found to be important stabilization factors. The calculated and measured proton affinities agree within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties, affirming the high quality of our conformational search. The theoretical gas-phase basicity of 245.9 kcal/mol is also in good agreement with the experimental value of 240.6 kcal/mol. The extensive searches establish firmly that gaseous arginine exists primarily in the canonical and not the zwitterionic form.

Ling, Sanliang; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Zhijian; Lin, Zijing; Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

77

Gaseous insulators for high voltage electrical equipment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gaseous insulators comprise compounds having high attachment cross sections for electrons having energies in the 0-1.3 electron volt range. Multi-component gaseous insulators comprise compounds and mixtures having overall high electron attachment cross sections in the 0-1.3 electron volt range and moderating gases having high cross sections for inelastic interactions with electrons of energies 1-4 electron volts. Suitable electron attachment components include hexafluorobutyne, perfluorobutene-2, perfluorocyclobutane, perfluorodimethylcyclobutane, perfluorocyclohexene, perfluoromethylcyclohexane, hexafluorobutadiene, perfluoroheptene-1 and hexafluoroazomethane. Suitable moderating gases include N.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The gaseous insulating mixture can also contain SF.sub.6, perfluoropropane and perfluorobenzene.

Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); James, David R. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Pai, Robert Y. (Concord, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Gaseous insulators for high voltage electrical equipment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gaseous insulators comprise compounds having high attachment cross sections for electrons having energies in the 0-1.3 electron volt range. Multi-component gaseous insulators comprise compounds and mixtures having overall high electron attachment cross sections in the 0-1.3 electron volt range and moderating gases having high cross sections for inelastic interactions with electrons of energies 1-4 electron volts. Suitable electron attachment components include hexafluorobutyne, perfluorobutene-2, perfluorocyclobutane, perfluorodimethylcyclobutane, perfluorocyclohexene, perfluoromethylcyclohexane, hexafluorobutadiene, perfluoroheptene-1 and hexafluoroazomethane. Suitable moderating gases include N.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The gaseous insulating mixture can also contain SF.sub.6, perfluoropropane and perfluorobenzene.

Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); James, David R. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Pai, Robert Y. (Concord, TN)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) can be an important pathway for mercury removal from an aquatic environment. DGM evasional fluxes from an aquatic system can account for up to 95% of atmospheric Hg and its deposition pathways. While this makes DGM an important species of mercury to investigate, the difficulty of accurately analyzing DGM has prevented many from studying it. In this study, DGM was measured in two different types of estuarine environments and with two different methods, discrete and continuous analysis. The discrete technique works reasonably well and is reproducible, but it does not allow one to observe rapid changes in DGM concentration due to long analysis times (~2 hr per sample). When used in this study, the discrete sampling technique agreed well with the continuous technique for Offatts Bayou, Galveston, Texas, and Georgiana Slough in the California Bay-Delta region. The average DGM concentration during the March continuous study at Offatts Bayou was 25.3 ± 8.8 pg L-1. This is significantly higher than the average DGM concentration from Georgiana Slough during late March 2006 (9.6 ± 6.6 pg L-1). DGM seemed to correlate best with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) data in every study, suggesting that the primary control of its formation is solar irradiation. Stronger positive correlations with PAR were seen when DGM data was shifted back one hour, indicating that mercury photoreactions take time to complete. DGM also correlated positively with wind speed in most instances. However, increased wind speed should enhance air to water transfer of elemental mercury, thus one would expect a negative correlation. DGM co-varied negatively with salinity during the continuous studies, suggesting that the DGM pool is reduced in surface waters by chloride mediated oxidation. Three predictive flux models were used in the study to assess the potential for DGM water to air transfer. For both the Georgiana Slough and Offatts Bayou studies, the predicted flux dropped to or below zero after sunset. This study does contribute to the understanding of DGM cycling in aquatic environments as there are few studies that have made continuous DGM measurements in estuarine environments.

Landin, Charles Melchor

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) can be an important pathway for mercury removal from an aquatic environment. DGM evasional fluxes from an aquatic system can account for up to 95% of atmospheric Hg and its deposition pathways. While this makes DGM an important species of mercury to investigate, the difficulty of accurately analyzing DGM has prevented many from studying it. In this study, DGM was measured in two different types of estuarine environments and with two different methods, discrete and continuous analysis. The discrete technique works reasonably well and is reproducible, but it does not allow one to observe rapid changes in DGM concentration due to long analysis times (~2 hr per sample). When used in this study, the discrete sampling technique agreed well with the continuous technique for Offatts Bayou, Galveston, Texas, and Georgiana Slough in the California Bay-Delta region. The average DGM concentration during the March continuous study at Offatts Bayou was 25.3 + 8.8 pg L-1. This is significantly higher than the average DGM concentration from Georgiana Slough during late March 2006 (9.6 + 6.6 pg L-1). DGM seemed to correlate best with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) data in every study, suggesting that the primary control of its formation is solar irradiation. Stronger positive correlations with PAR were seen when DGM data was shifted back one hour, indicating that mercury photoreactions take time to complete. DGM also correlated positively with wind speed in most instances. However, increased wind speed should enhance air to water transfer of elemental mercury, thus one would expect a negative correlation. DGM co-varied negatively with salinity during the continuous studies, suggesting that the DGM pool is reduced in surface waters by chloride mediated oxidation. Three predictive flux models were used in the study to assess the potential for DGM water to air transfer. For both the Georgiana Slough and Offatts Bayou studies, the predicted flux dropped to or below zero after sunset. This study does contribute to the understanding of DGM cycling in aquatic environments as there are few studies that have made continuous DGM measurements in estuarine environments.

Landin, Charles Melchor

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Glossary of Screen Labels for PARS II V1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glossary 1 Glossary 1 Glossary of Screen Labels for PARS II V1.0.0 Goal The primary goal of this glossary is to help PARS II end users understand the items of data that they are viewing or entering on their PARS II application screens. It does not provide technical information on the schema of the PARS II database. A separate PARS II Data Dictionary document is being provided for PARS II users who need such technical information. Overview This document consists of a table defining each data label displayed on PARS II screens. It is divided into sections by PARS II screen title. To find the meaning of a data item, first find the section describing the relevant screen, then find the particular screen label description. The sections are listed in order of the major functional area of the PARS II System:

82

Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II) Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II) Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II) Welcome to PARS II PARS II is the Department's official "System of Record" for capital asset project performance information. Because PARS II uses the same data as maintained in our contractors' project management systems, everyone from the Federal Project Director's staff to the Secretary of Energy will have easy access to the same data. The PARS II software application is managed by the MA Office of Engineering and Construction Management and is used by federal and contractor personnel across the nation to record and track the progress of major construction and environmental cleanup projects. Questions or comments about PARS II should be directed to the PARS II Help

83

Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant [HIAR-PAD-2011-07-27] The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission support responsibilities. Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August 2011 Independent Activity Report, Argonne National Laboratory - August 2011

84

Affine toric SL(2)-embeddings  

SciTech Connect

In the theory of affine SL(2)-embeddings, which was constructed in 1973 by Popov, a locally transitive action of the group SL(2) on a normal affine three-dimensional variety X is determined by a pair (p/q,r), where 0

affine G/H-embedding to be toric is proved. Let X be a normal affine variety, G a simply connected semisimple group acting regularly on X, and H subset of G a closed subgroup such that the character group X(H) of the group H is finite. If an open equivariant embedding G/H{yields}X is defined, then X is toric if and only if there exist a quasitorus T-hat and a (GxT-hat)-module V such that X{approx_equal}{sup G}V//T-hat. In the substantiation of this result a key role is played by Cox's construction in toric geometry. Bibliography: 12 titles.

Gaifullin, S A [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

ParCAT: Parallel Climate Analysis Toolkit  

SciTech Connect

Climate science is employing increasingly complex models and simulations to analyze the past and predict the future of Earth s climate. This growth in complexity is creating a widening gap between the data being produced and the ability to analyze the datasets. Parallel computing tools are necessary to analyze, compare, and interpret the simulation data. The Parallel Climate Analysis Toolkit (ParCAT) provides basic tools to efficiently use parallel computing techniques to make analysis of these datasets manageable. The toolkit provides the ability to compute spatio-temporal means, differences between runs or differences between averages of runs, and histograms of the values in a data set. ParCAT is implemented as a command-line utility written in C. This allows for easy integration in other tools and allows for use in scripts. This also makes it possible to run ParCAT on many platforms from laptops to supercomputers. ParCAT outputs NetCDF files so it is compatible with existing utilities such as Panoply and UV-CDAT. This paper describes ParCAT and presents results from some example runs on the Titan system at ORNL.

Smith, Brian E [ORNL; Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Wehner, Michael [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- April 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

87

voqu sur l'imagerie et confirm par succs thrapeutique, nous avons dtect par PCR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

évoqué sur l'imagerie et confirmé par succès thérapeutique, nous avons détecté par PCR de l'encéphalopathie toxoplasmique, nous avons noté 5 PCR positives dans le sang périphérique. La surveillance de ces sujets est en cours. La recherche d'ADN toxoplasmique par PCR sur le sang périphérique, examen non invasif, donne des

Recanati, Catherine

88

Glossary of Screen Labels for PARS II V1 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glossary of Screen Labels for PARS II V1 Glossary of Screen Labels for PARS II V1 Glossary of Screen Labels for PARS II V1 More Documents & Publications PARS II Standard Operating...

89

Gaseous modification of MCrAlY coatings  

SciTech Connect

The present invention generally describes methods for modifying MCrAlY coatings by using gaseous carburization, gaseous nitriding or gaseous carbonitriding. The modified MCrAlY coatings are useful in thermal barrier coating systems, which may be used in gas turbine engines.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

PARS II Data Quality Memorandum from Deputy Secretary Poneman...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data Quality Memorandum from Deputy Secretary Poneman (June 19, 2012) PARS II Data Quality Memorandum from Deputy Secretary Poneman (June 19, 2012) PARS II Data Quality.pdf More...

91

PARS II New Contractor Information for Interconnection Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the tables below and return this form to the PARS II Support Team at DL-CF-40PARS2Support@hq.doe.gov. Contractor Point of Contact Information Name Position CompanyOrganization...

92

ParFlow User's Manual Reed M. Maxwell1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5.1 Introduction to the ParFlow TCL commands (PFTCL) . . . . . . . . . . . 14 3.5.2 PFTCL Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3.5.3 Common examples using ParFlow TCL commands (PFTCL) . . . . . . . . 21 3.6 Directory of Test

93

Microsoft Word - PARS II Process Document - Close Period 2013...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II APM DepSec Monthly Report & Close Period, V-2013-04-29 Page 1 PARS II Process Document APM DEPSEC MONTHLY REPORT & CLOSE PERIOD PURPOSE The purpose of this document is to...

94

Attractions of Affine Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All attempts to quantize gravity face several difficult problems. Among these problems are: (i) metric positivity (positivity of the spatial distance between distinct points), (ii) the presence of anomalies (partial second-class nature of the quantum constraints), and (iii) perturbative nonrenormalizability (the need for infinitely many distinct counterterms). In this report, a relatively nontechnical discussion is presented about how the program of affine quantum gravity proposes to deal with these problems.

John R. Klauder

2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

95

PARS II Process Document OVERTARGET BASELINE (OTB) REPORTING IN PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process Document Process Document OVERTARGET BASELINE (OTB) REPORTING IN PARS II PURPOSE The purpose of this document is to describe the process by which contractors should conduct OTB reporting after OTB on the project was approved and implemented in the contractor system. SCOPE This process applies to projects on which OVERTARGET BASELINE (OTB) was approved and implemented and identifies data elements, information, and processes by which contractor should report changes related to OTB in PARS II. PROCESS Upon implementation of OTB, the following data elements must be provided by the contractor into PARS II. Contractor should validate accuracy of the data in each identified field by reviewing EV_CPR_HEADER table of the PARS II Upload Template file. * OTB/OTS Date: Date when OTB/OTS was implemented in contractor system. If this data element does

96

PARS II On Hold Projects, V-2013-04-02 Page 1 PARS II Process...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On Hold Projects, V-2013-04-02 Page 1 PARS II Process Document ON HOLD PROJECTS - Place On Hold, Re-Activate, and Cancel PURPOSE The purpose of this document is to describe the...

97

NNT : 2013 EMSE 0681 prsente par  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications à haute température comme le spatial, le nucléaire, les piles à combustibles SOFC, etc, [4], [5 utilisation comme électrolyte solide dans des applications telles que les piles à combustibles SOFC (Solid dans les anodes des piles à combustible (SOFC). La zircone stabilisée YSZ peut être obtenue par

98

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of residual enriched uranium in facility components for safeguards and nuclear criticality safety purposes. Current practices used to perform NDA measurements frequently have poorly defined uncertainties due to multiple factors. Working reference material (WRM) standards and container-specific surrogates are required to verify and validate NDA methods used to support characterization of gaseous diffusion equipment within the D&D project. Because working reference

99

SUR LES RADIOLMENTS FORMS DANS L'URANIUM IRRADI PAR LES NEUTRONS. II Par IRNE CURIE et PAUL SAVITCH.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUR LES RADIO�L�MENTS FORM�S DANS L'URANIUM IRRADI� PAR LES NEUTRONS. II Par IR�NE CURIE et PAUL SAVITCH. Institut du Radium. Laboratoire Curie. Sommaire. 2014 Il se forme dans l'uranium irradié par les l'irra- diation de l'uranium par les neutrons, résultats dont nous avons vérifié une partie. Ces

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

100

Gaseous Diffusion Plant Production Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Gaseous Diffusion Plants Department of Energy Gaseous Diffusion Plants Phase I: Needs Assessment Robert Wages Oil, Chemical and Atomic Inte national Union Steven Markowitz Mount Sinai School of Medicine Sylvia Kieding Oil, Chemical and Atomic International Union Mark Griffon University of Massachusetts Lowell Elizabeth Averill Samaras Alice Hamilton College October 1, 1997 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Number Executive Summary 1 J: OVERVIEW 1. Introduction 2-3 2. Methods 3-8 3. Principal Findings 9-16 4. Need for Medical Surveillance and Risk Communication 16-17 PART II: METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS 4. Exposure Assessment Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C 5. Focus Group Results Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C 6. Epidemiology and Other Health Studies EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Purpose We report the results and analysis of a one year needs assessment study evaluating

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Alternative gaseous-fuels safety assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A relative safety assessment of alternative gaseous and reference liquid fuels utilized for light automotive transportation in the public sector was completed. The specific fuels considered were compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and the liquid fuels, gasoline and diesel. The assessment methodology describes and develops the relative hazards of these fuels from an integrated generic physicochemical property and accident scenario point of view. A technique involving a method of eliciting expert judgment combined with a comparative scoring methodology was applied in establishing fuel relative safety rankings. Limitations of this type of assessment are discussed. Selected accident scenarios included fuel leakage in both residential and public garages; fueling line rupture at a refueling station in the presence of user vehicles or delivery vehicles; and vehicle collisions under rural, urban, and vehicular tunnel conditions. Overall, the results obtained demonstrate dependency upon the specific application or scenario. Gaseous fuels have increased relative risks in certain situations and are relatively safe in others. The results suggest that alternative gaseous fuels are not disqualified for public usage. The assessment also provides rationale for the development of selected safe handling criteria and recommendations.

Krupka, M.C.; Peaslee, A.T. Jr.; Laquer, H.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

PARS II KNOWN ISSUES AND SUGGESTED WORKAROUNDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KNOWN ISSUES AND SUGGESTED KNOWN ISSUES AND SUGGESTED WORKAROUNDS October 1, 2010 1 The following information identifies known issues in PARS II and suggests possible workarounds to address those issues. Upon log-in, I receive a white screen. What should I do? A fix was added to PARS II to partially mitigate the issue of users getting a blank white screen when logging in. This issue is caused by their previous session having timed out, and Internet Explorer not recognizing that the session can't be restored. Note: While the fix assists in reducing the number of instances of this happening, it does not completely eliminate the issue as there are factors outside of the application that affect it. In the event the user receives a white screen, the following workaround is

103

PARS II Standard Operating Procedure Business Rules  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 25, 2011 June 25, 2011 U.S. Department of Energy The PARS II Standard Operating Procedure is a "living document" and will be updated on an ongoing basis. Comments or suggestions are welcome and should be forwarded to the PARS II administrator at PARSIIsupportoecm@hq.doe.gov. Notes Comment Pages Comment Pages Index Screenshot Pages Introduction I-1 Generic Business Rules I-2 Select Project I-3 - I-5 Enter/Modify Project Information I-6 - I-15 Enter/Modify Contact Information I-16 - I-21 Creating a Project I-22 Enter CD0 Information I-23 - I-26 Enter CD1 Information I-27 - I-29 Enter CD2 Information I-30 - I-33 Enter CD3A Information I-34 - I-36 Enter CD3 Information I-37 - I-39 Enter CD4 Information I-40 - I-42 Enter Closeout Information I-43 - I-45 Enter BCP Information I-46 - I-50 Screenshot

104

Band Formation during Gaseous Diffusion in Aerogels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study experimentally how gaseous HCl and NH_3 diffuse from opposite sides of and react in silica aerogel rods with porosity of 92 % and average pore size of about 50 nm. The reaction leads to solid NH_4Cl, which is deposited in thin sheet-like structures. We present a numerical study of the phenomenon. Due to the difference in boundary conditions between this system and those usually studied, we find the sheet-like structures in the aerogel to differ significantly from older studies. The influence of random nucleation centers and inhomogeneities in the aerogel is studied numerically.

M. A. Einarsrud; F. A. Maao; A. Hansen; M. Kirkedelen; J. Samseth

1997-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

105

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building The K-25 plant, located on the southwestern end of the Oak Ridge reservation, used the gaseous diffusion method to separate uranium-235 from uranium-238. Based on the well-known principle that molecules of a lighter isotope would pass through a porous barrier more readily than molecules of a heavier one, gaseous diffusion produced through myriads of repetitions a gas increasingly rich in uranium-235 as the heavier uranium-238 was separated out in a system of cascades. Although producing minute amounts of final product measured in grams, gaseous diffusion required a massive

106

Affinity Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Affinity Wind Farm Affinity Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Affinity Wind Farm Facility Affinity Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Under Construction Owner Affinity Wind LLC Developer Affinity Wind LLC Location Pittsfield, Illinois Coordinates 39.606658053878°, -90.986366271973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.606658053878,"lon":-90.986366271973,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

107

Conformal field theory on affine Lie groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Working directly on affine Lie groups, we construct several new formulations of the WZW model, the gauged WZW model, and the generic affine-Virasoro action. In one formulation each of these conformal field theories (CFTs) is expressed as a one-dimensional mechanical system whose variables are coordinates on the affine Lie group. When written in terms of the affine group element, this formulation exhibits a two-dimensional WZW term. In another formulation each CFT is written as a two-dimensional field theory, with a three- dimensional WZW term, whose fields are coordinates on the affine group. On the basis of these equivalent formulations, we develop a translation dictionary in which the new formulations on the affine Lie group are understood as mode formulations of the conventional formulations on the Lie group. Using this dictionary, we also express each CFT as a three-dimensional field theory on the Lie group with a four-dimensional WZW term. 36 refs.

Clubok, K.S.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the...

109

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

110

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012...

111

,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Bcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release...

112

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

113

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

114

,"Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

115

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

116

,"West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

117

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE...

118

The Thermodynamics of Gaseous, Cuprous Chloride Monomer and Trimer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No.W-7405-eng~48B TIiE THERMODYNAMICS OF GASEOUS" CUPROUSCu(s) + HCl::= I Thermodynamics of Vaporization to Monomeric

Brewer, Leo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Virtual Screening of Materials for Gaseous Fuel Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Virtual Screening of Materials for Gaseous Fuel Storage .... Numerical Study on Behavior of Top-Blown Supersonic Jets and Their Interaction  ...

120

Stably free modules over smooth affine threefolds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the stably free modules over a smooth affine threefold over an algebraically closed field of characteristic different from 2 are free.

Jean Fasel.; no 1; 33--49

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Stably free modules over smooth affine threefolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the stably free modules over a smooth affine threefold over an algebraically closed field of characteristic different from 2 are free.

Fasel, Jean

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Ionization Energies, Electron Affinities and Electronegativies ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 28, 2007 ... Periodic table of the elements containing ionization energies, electron affinities, and electronegativities. CITATION: : R.E. Dickerson, H.B. Gray ...

123

Contractor-Specific Documentation & Information in PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor-Specific Documentation & Information in PARS II Contractor-Specific Documentation & Information in PARS II DOE Office of Acquisition and Project Management established guidelines for documentation that should be available within PARS II through contractor-specific records that are not linked to any specific project within PARS II. This guidance is applicable only to those contractors who are currently executing Active Post CD-2 Capital Asset Construction Project(s) that are reported in PARS II. Table below outlines specific documents that should be attached to the contractor record in PARS II as well as the party responsible for ensuring contractor record contains each specific document. DOCUMENT NAME DOCUMENT DESCRIPTION UPLOAD RESPONSIBILITY EVMS Systems Description Current contractor EVMS Systems Description document with all

124

Contractor-Specific Documentation & Information in PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor-Specific Documentation & Information in PARS II DOE Office of Acquisition and Project Management established guidelines for documentation that should be available within...

125

PARS II Process Document SUBMITTING AND PROCESSING EMAIL AS OFFICIAL...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II Process Document SUBMITTING AND PROCESSING EMAIL AS OFFICIAL PROJECT ACTION APPROVAL DOCUMENTATION PURPOSE The purpose of this document is to describe the process and...

126

PARS II Process Document - Over Target Baseline (OTB) Reporting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Over Target Baseline (OTB) Reporting PARS II Process Document - Over Target Baseline (OTB) Reporting This document details the process by which contractors should conduct Over...

127

PARS II Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) PARS II Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) PARSIISOPVersion1.120110811.pdf More Documents & Publications External Independent Review (EIR)...

128

PARS II Process Document OVERTARGET BASELINE (OTB) REPORTING...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor should validate accuracy of the data in each identified field by reviewing EVCPRHEADER table of the PARS II Upload Template file. * OTBOTS Date: Date when OTBOTS...

129

Loop realizations of quantum affine algebras  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We give a simplified description of quantum affine algebras in their loop presentation. This description is related to Drinfeld's new realization via halves of vertex operators. We also define an idempotent version of the quantum affine algebra which is suitable for categorification.

Cautis, Sabin [Department of Mathematics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, 90089 (United States); Licata, Anthony [Department of Mathematics, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

2011 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The conference will cover theory and experiments, and systems ranging from molecular to biological to clusters to materials. The meeting goal continues to be bringing together scientists interested in fundamentals, with those applying fundamental phenomena to a wide range of practical problems. Each of the ten conference sessions will focus on a topic within this spectrum, and there will also be poster sessions for contributed papers, with sufficient space and time to allow all participants to present their latest results. To encourage active participation by young investigators, about ten of the poster abstracts will be selected for 15 minute 'hot topic' talks during the conference sessions. Hot topic selection will be done about a month before the meeting. Funds should be available to offset the participation cost for young investigators.

Scott Anderson

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

131

2011 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE  

SciTech Connect

The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The conference will cover theory and experiments, and systems ranging from molecular to biological to clusters to materials. The meeting goal continues to be bringing together scientists interested in fundamentals, with those applying fundamental phenomena to a wide range of practical problems. Each of the ten conference sessions will focus on a topic within this spectrum, and there will also be poster sessions for contributed papers, with sufficient space and time to allow all participants to present their latest results. To encourage active participation by young investigators, about ten of the poster abstracts will be selected for 15 minute 'hot topic' talks during the conference sessions. Hot topic selection will be done about a month before the meeting. Funds should be available to offset the participation cost for young investigators.

Scott Anderson

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

132

Gaseous-fuel safety assessment. Status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory, in support of studies sponsored by the Office of Vehicle and Engine Research and Development in the US Department of Energy, has undertaken a safety assessment of selected gaseous fuels for use in light automotive transportation. The purpose is to put into perspective the hazards of these fuels relative to present day fuels and delineated criteria for their safe handling. Fuels include compressed and liquified natural gas (CNG and LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and for reference gasoline and diesel. This paper is a program status report. To date, physicochemical property data and general petroleum and transportation information were compiled; basic hazards defined; alternative fuels were safety-ranked based on technical properties alone; safety data and vehicle accident statistics reviewed; and accident scenarios selected for further analysis. Methodology for such analysis is presently under consideration.

Krupka, M.C.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Bartlit, J.R.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - 026 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (026 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is located in south central Ohio, approximately 20 miles north of Portsmouth, Ohio and 70 miles south of Columbus, Ohio. Construction of the PGDP began in late 1952 to expand the Federal Government¿s gaseous diffusion program already in place at Oak Ridge, Tennessee and Paducah, Kentucky. The facility was built to increase the production of enriched uranium at rates substantially above the other

134

Enforcement Documents - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Enforcement Documents - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Intennech, Inc. - March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Intermech, Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Anchor Bolts and Pipe Supports at the DUF6 Conversion Buildings at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, INC - March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Penetration Fire Seals at the DUF6 Conversion Building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant March 26, 2010 Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 Consent Order issued to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC related to

135

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission support responsibilities. Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August

136

Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Peak Geothermal Systems, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Peak Geothermal Systems, Nevada Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Gaseous emissions from the landscape can be used to explore for geothermal systems, characterize their lateral extent, or map the trends of concealed geologic structures that may provide important reservoir permeability at depth. Gaseous geochemical signatures vary from system to system and utilization of a multi-gas analytical approach to exploration or characterization should enhance the survey's clarity. This paper describes

137

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration Property Type Quantity Description The estimated potential energy generation from gaseous biopower for a particular place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_of_energy It's possible types are Watt hours - 1000 Wh, Watt hour, Watthour Kilowatt hours - 1 kWh, Kilowatt hour, Kilowatthour Megawatt hours - 0.001 MWh, Megawatt hour, Megawatthour Gigawatt hours - 0.000001 GWh, Gigawatt hour, Gigawatthour Joules - 3600000 J, Joules, joules Pages using the property "PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25)

138

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass Property Type Quantity Description The potential mass of gaseous biopower material for a place. Use this type to express a quantity of magnitude, or an object's resistance to acceleration. The default unit is the kilogram (kg). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilogram Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Kilograms - 1 kg, kilo, kilogram, kilograms, Kilogram, kilogramme, kilos Grams - 1000 g, gram, gramme, grams Tonnes - 0.001 tonnes, metric tons, Tonnes, Metric Tonnes Pounds - 2.205 lbs, pounds, pound, Pounds, Lbs Stone - 0.1575 stones, st, stone Ounces - 35.27 ounces, oz, Ounces, ounce BDT - 0.001 BDT, Bone Dry Tonnes, bdt Pages using the property "PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass"

139

Commercial Cooling Par Engineering: Order (2013-CE-5312)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered Commercial Cooling Par Engineering, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Commercial Cooling Par Engineering had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

140

PARS II New Contractor Information for Interconnection Security Agreement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Contractor Information for Interconnection Security Agreement New Contractor Information for Interconnection Security Agreement V1.0 (November 18, 2010) The Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters Program Cyber Security Plan (PCSP), dated February 2008, requires the Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS) II System Owner and the contractor sign an Interconnection Security Agreement (ISA). The requirement for an Interconnection Security Agreement can be found on page 182 of the PCSP. The ISA template is available for review on the PARS II portal (http://management.energy.gov/online_resources/pars2.htm) under Contractor Documents. Before the contractor begins sending data to PARS II, DOE will send the ISA to the contractor for review and signature. In order to prepare the ISA for review and signature, the PARS II Support Team needs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ProcessThreadAffinity_v2.potx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process and Thread Affinity with OpenMP --- 1 --- October 7 , 2 013 Outline * Mo0va0on * How to compile and run * Default p rocessthread a ffinity * Aprun o p0ons t o m anipulate...

142

PARS II On Hold Projects, V-2013-04-02 Page 1 PARS II Process Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On Hold Projects, V-2013-04-02 Page 1 On Hold Projects, V-2013-04-02 Page 1 PARS II Process Document ON HOLD PROJECTS - Place On Hold, Re-Activate, and Cancel PURPOSE The purpose of this document is to describe the process of placing active pre CD-2 capital asset projects on hold, removing projects from hold through re-activation or cancellation, and reporting of these projects in PARS II. SCOPE This process applies to active pre CD-2 capital asset projects and On Hold Pre CD-2 Capital Asset Projects only that were identified by the project team and approved by Acquisition Executive (AE), or Secretarial Acquisition Executive (SAE) for Major Systems Projects, as on hold. PROCESS The goal of the process is to ensure adherence to rules identified by Change Review Board (CRB) for placing

143

PARS 3.0 Data Model Dictionary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Table/Field Names and Definitions Table/Field Names and Definitions PARS 3.0 Page 1 13-Jan-03 Database Table Table Description 1. Project ID Project identification table containing information about the project. This is usually the first table of information configured with project data when creating a new project. Field Field Definition External Source 1. DOE Project ID DOE project identification code as reported in the project data sheet (e.g., 97-D-102). Project Data Sheet 2. DOE Project Name Project Name (e.g., National Ignition Facility). Project Data Sheet 3. Managing Office Code Alphanumberic code for DOE Office providing oversight and direction (e.g. EM, NNSA, SC, etc.). Select from a picklist Project Data Sheet 4. Site Code Alphanumeric abbreviation for Project Site (e.g., LLNL

144

Gaseous Detectors: recent developments and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multiwire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volume with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photo-lithography and micro-processing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high energy physics, MPGD applications has expanded to nuclear physics, UV and visible photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection and medical physics.

Maxim Titov

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

145

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from gaseous biopower for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

146

DOE Seeks Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnati – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Task Proposal (RTP) for deactivation activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in Paducah, Kentucky.

147

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 121 116 93 1970's 79 55 70 71 75 68 61 45 64 49 1980's 41 29 40 55 61 145 234 318 272 254 1990's 300 395 604 513 513 582 603 734 732 879 2000's 586 691 566 647 634 700 794 859 1,008 1,295 2010's 4,578 8,931 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Processing

148

Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition December 19, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis K-25 Demolition - Oak Ridge 2013 K-25 Demolition - Oak Ridge 2013 Media Contacts Ben Williams, DOE, (865) 574-4912 Wayne McKinney, UCOR, (865) 576-6284 Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Today, the Department of Energy announced that its contractor URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC, or UCOR, has completed demolition of the K-25 gaseous diffusion building, the largest facility in the DOE complex. UCOR took over the project in 2011 and has maintained a strong safety record while completing the demolition over one year ahead of its current schedule and approximately $300 million under the current budget. All debris removal is expected to be completed in spring 2014.

149

Feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion equipment  

SciTech Connect

The five buildings at the K-25 Site formerly involved in the gaseous diffusion process contain 5000 gaseous diffusion stages as well as support facilities that are internally contaminated with uranium deposits. The gaseous diffusion facilities located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant also contain similar equipment and will eventually close. The decontamination of these facilities will require the most cost-effective technology consistent with the criticality, health physics, industrial hygiene, and environmental concerns; the technology must keep exposures to hazardous substances to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report documents recent laboratory experiments that were conducted to determine the feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of the internal surfaces of the gaseous diffusion equipment that is contaminated with uranium deposits. A gaseous fluorinating agent is used to fluorinate the solid uranium deposits to gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The lab results regarding the feasibility of the gas-phase process are encouraging. These results especially showed promise for a novel decontamination approach called the long-term, low-temperature (LTLT) process. In the LTLT process: The equipment is rendered leak tight, evacuated, leak tested, and pretreated, charged with chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) to subatmospheric pressure, left for an extended period, possibly > 4 months, while processing other items. Then the UF{sub 6} and other gases are evacuated. The UF{sub 6} is recovered by chemical trapping. The lab results demonstrated that ClF{sub 3} gas at subatmospheric pressure and at {approx} 75{degree}F is capable of volatilizing heavy deposits of uranyl fluoride from copper metal surfaces sufficiently that the remaining radioactive emissions are below limits.

Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Commercial Cooling Par Engineering: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) Commercial Cooling Par Engineering: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) January 31, 2013 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Commercial Cooling Par Engineering failed to certify walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the energy conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Commercial Cooling Par Engineering: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) More Documents & Publications Commercial Cooling Par Engineering: Order (2013-CE-5312)

151

ADVISORY ALERT: Dekker, Ltd. Digital Signature - PARS II Reporting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADVISORY ALERT: Dekker, Ltd. Digital Signature - PARS II Reporting ADVISORY ALERT: Dekker, Ltd. Digital Signature - PARS II Reporting As you know, to run reports in the PARS II, users must install an active X control to their workstations. The FIRST TIME a user attempts to run a report after installing the Active X control, a Security Warning will appear stating: That warning appears because, although the digital signature is valid, the digital signature is from a publisher (in this case Dekker, Ltd.) whom you have not yet chosen to trust. The following steps instruct you how to clear the security warning so that you may continue working with PARS II reports. Please note: Once you complete the process of accepting the Dekker, LTd. digital signature, this warning will not re-appear. This process must be done ONCE to "inform" your PC that Dekker, LTd. is an

152

PARS II Process Document - On Hold Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On Hold Projects PARS II Process Document - On Hold Projects This document details the process approved by the CRB for placing Capital Asset projects on hold, re-activating on hold...

153

PARS II Process Document - DOE Period Close | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Period Close PARS II Process Document - DOE Period Close This document details the process adopted by the Office of Acquisition and Project Management to prepare APM DepSec...

154

PARS II Process Document - Project Phasing (Multiple CD-2 from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Phasing (Multiple CD-2 from Single CD-1) PARS II Process Document - Project Phasing (Multiple CD-2 from Single CD-1) This document details the process by which projects...

155

Contractor-specific Documentation & Information in PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE Office of Acquisition and Project Management established guidelines for documentation that should be available within PARS II through contractor-specific records that are not linked to any...

156

Argonne CNM Highlight: Designer Affinity Reagents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Designer Affinity Reagents Designer Affinity Reagents B. Kay Single-chain variable fragments (scFv) can be displayed on the surface of the bacteriophage M13 and still function in selectively binding their antigens. Even though these antibody fragments are much smaller (25 vs. 150 kDa) than the intact molecules, they can bind their antigens with exquisite sensitivity and specificity. Libraries of scFv antibodies can be screened by affinity selection for binding to any type of target, such as a protein or an organic molecule. The resulting isolated antibodies can be used in a wide variety of applications (e.g., detectors, crystallization agents, and modifiers of target activity). In addition, such antibodies can be used as adapters that bridge inert materials in a defined manner, and thus may be excellent tools for building nanostructures.

157

,,"PARS II Interim Migration Template"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

" " ,,"PARS II Interim Migration Template" ,,"Fields","Data" ,,"DOE Project ID:","DOE Project # and Project Name" ,,"Year:","Please select a Year" ,,"Month:","Please select a Month" ,,"Fields","Data (Entered in $K) [Data Entry field]" ,,"BCWS ($K):",0 ,,"BCWP ($K):",0 ,,"ACWP ($K):",0 ,,"Management Reserves Remaining ($K):",0 ,,"Percent Complete (%):",0 ,,"Instructions" ,,"1. Log into PARS II" ,,"2. Select the appropriate Project" ,,"3. While still on the Projects screen, click on ""Attachments""" ,,"4. Click on ""Add"""

158

PARS_UserManualV3t5.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management, Budget, and Evaluation (OMBE) Management, Budget, and Evaluation (OMBE) Office of Engineering and Construction Management (OECM) March, 2005 User Manual version 3.5 Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS) Table of Contents 1. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................... 6 1.1. WHAT IS PARS? .................................................................................................................6 1.1.1. Web Enabled Database.................................................................................................. 6 1.1.2. Reporting System........................................................................................................... 6 1.1.3. Assessment System.........................................................................................................

159

Moment invariants to affine transformation of colours  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most colour descriptors are not robust because they are constructed for simple colour transformations, such as a diagonal-offset transformation. In this paper, a type of colour descriptor is proposed which is composed of rational expression of moments ... Keywords: Affine transformation, Colour, Image retrieval, Moment invariants, Pattern recognition

Ming Gong, Hua Li, Weiguo Cao

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) power supply  

SciTech Connect

The Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) consists of 8 dipole magnets connected in series. These magnets are energized via one 12-pulse dc power supply. The power supply consists of four phase controlled half-wave wye group converters. Each of the two half-wave converters are connected through an interphase transformer to obtain a full-wave converter with 120{degrees} conduction. The input voltage for these two half-wave converters are 180{degrees} apart. The two full-wave converters are connected in parallel through a third interphase transformer. This type of connection of the converters not only provides the required output current, it also improves the input power factor of the power supply. The output of the wye group converters is filtered through a passive L-R-C filter to reduce the ripple content of the output current. At low current values of the power supply the current ripple is high, thus a large filter is needed, which adds to the cost of the power supply, however at high output current levels, the current ripple is less severe. The large size of the filter can be reduced by adding an anti-parallel rectifier diode(D1) to the output of the power supply. A freewheeling diode(D2) is connected before the choke to circulate the current once the power supply is turned off. In order to measure the current in the magnet a high precision, low drift, zero flux current transductor is used. This transductor senses the magnet current which provides a feedback signal to control the gating of the converter`s thyristors. A true 14 bit Digital to Analog Converter (DAC) is programmed by the control computer for the required current value, providing a reference for the current regulator. Fast correction of the line transients is provided by a relatively fast voltage loop controlled by a high gain slow response current loop.

Fathizadeh, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - April  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 2013 April 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - April 2013 April 2013 Review of the Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO). The objective of the Independent Oversight review was to evaluate PPPO's conduct of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase I verification review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The contractor at PORTS is Fluor-Babcock & Wilcox Portsmouth (FBP). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations

162

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Paducah Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 464-0009 Local Outreach Office: Joe Hudson 1930 North 13th Street Paducah, KY 42001 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

163

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Portsmouth Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: Jeanne Cisco 2288 Wakefield Mound Road Piketon, OH 45661 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the Unitedsteel Workers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and

164

AFRICAN AMERICAN AFFINITY GROUP ARTICLES OF THE CONSTITUTION & BYLAWS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AFRICAN AMERICAN AFFINITY GROUP AFRICAN AMERICAN AFFINITY GROUP ARTICLES OF THE CONSTITUTION & BYLAWS Date: May 22, 2012 African-American Affinity Group AFRICAN AMERICAN AFFINITY GROUP ARTICLES OF THE CONSTITUTION - 2 - Revised and accepted May 22, 2012 ARTICLES OF THE CONSTITUTION ARTICLE I - NAME SECTION 1 The name of the Organization is the "African -American Affinity Group" (AAAG). ARTICLE II - MISSION SECTION 1 The African-American Affinity Group (AAAG) exists to provide a forum where employees and guests can promote awareness of the Black, African, African-American and Caribbean cultures, share professional insights, acquire information and provide leadership on their careers and work

165

Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data Elements for PARS II Data Elements for PARS II Revised: July 27, 2009 - Version 5.1 This document should be printed on legal size paper, in landscape mode. 1.0 Overview The PARS II application will collect two major types of data from DOE Field Site and DOE Headquarters locations. The two types of data are called: (1) Oversight and Assessment Data and (2) Contractor Project Performance Data and are designed to provide information to support for the concepts and data elements represented by the DOE EVMS Gold Card 1 . A reproduction the relevant section of the Gold Card appears to the right. Performance Baseline (TPC) CBB + Profit Fee Non Contract Costs (Includes DOE Direct Costs) Contingency (DOE Held) Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB) Profit Fee (Contractor) Management

166

Microsoft PowerPoint - PARS II Deployment Discussion 20090416.ppt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II PARS II Deployment Discussion John Makepeace (OECM) Kai Mong (EES), Judith Bernsen (EES/PMC) April 16, 2009 2 Purpose * Review inclusion/exclusion of projects * Discuss the proposed schedule for transitioning projects PARS II Timeline 3 Target Dates * May 2009 - DOE-wide announcement * May 2009 - Contact Group 1 * Sep 2009 - Error free files from Group 1 * Dec 2009 - Group 1 repeatable process established * Feb 2010 - Groups 1-3 begin reporting * Sep 2010 - Group 9 begins reporting 4 5 Exclusion Criteria * Project was excluded if * Planned CD-4 date was on or before Sep 30 2010 * Project was at CD-0 or CD-1 with no planned CD-2 date on or before Sep 30 2010 * Project at CD-3 and more than 50% complete (schedule) * Project TPC < $20M 6 Grouping Criteria * Projects were grouped using the following

167

Artificial neural network in gaseous emissions prediction with bioreactor usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The artificial neural network is used more and more often for prediction of processes related with the biowaste management. In this area, composting is one of the most important process of biowaste recycling. However, the gaseous emissions from the composted ... Keywords: composting, data acquisition, emissions, multilayer perceptron, neural modeling, prediction

Piotr Boniecki; Jacek Dach; Krzysztof Pilarski; Aleksander J?dru?; Krzysztof Nowakowski; Hanna Piekarska-Boniecka; Jacek Przyby?

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Methods for deacidizing gaseous mixtures by phase enhanced absorption  

SciTech Connect

An improved process for deacidizing a gaseous mixture using phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption is described. The process utilizes a multiphasic absorbent that absorbs an acid gas at increased rate and leads to reduced overall energy costs for the deacidizing operation.

Hu, Liang

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

169

The real air quality benefits of gaseous-fueled vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a justification for prominent inclusion of currently available gaseous-fueled vehicles (i.e., vehicles powered by propane, sometimes called liquefied petroleum gas [LPG], or natural gas--chiefly, methane--stored onboard the vehicle in gaseous or liquid state but combusted as a gas) in the mix of strategies to (a) reduce public exposure to toxic and fine particulate emissions in the urbanized areas of the developing world and (b) achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality. It also presents estimates of associated emission reduction credits into the future. Important considerations discussed are the location of fine particle and toxic emissions in congested urban areas, and the location and timing of ozone precursor emissions, with emphasis on how gaseous-fueled vehicles' role in the relationship among and magnitude of these variables differs from that of their conventionally-fueled counterparts. Efforts to enhance the measurement and quantification of gaseous-fuel benefits are also described.

Saricks, C. L.

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

170

Adaptive high-resolution simulation of realistic gaseous detonation waves  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The numerical approximation of detonation waves in gaseous combustible mixtures is extremely demanding since a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. A dynamically adaptive high-resolution finite volume method is described that has enabled accurately resolved computational investigations of the transient behavior of regularly oscillating detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in realistic two-dimensional geometry.

Deiterding, Ralf [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Recent Advances in Laser-based Diagnostics for Gaseous Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-based diagnostic techniques offer unique capabilities for experimentation on gaseous flows. In this paper, we overview recent progress of two concepts: spectrally resolved absorption and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. The absorption ... Keywords: PLIF, absorption spectroscopy, acetone, combustion control, diode laser, hypersonic, supersonic

R. Hanson; D. Baer; C. Morris; M. Thurber; E. Furlong; S. Wehe

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Estimation of Carbon-14 in Nuclear Power Plant Gaseous Effluents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants report the amount of radioactivity released through permitted effluent pathways in their plant annual reports. This report provides users with a method for calculating the amount of carbon-14 (14C) generated in a light water reactor (LWR) core and released through plant gaseous effluent pathways.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

173

Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,127 971 1,334 1970's 1,270 1,217 1,058 878 679 567 520 367 485 1,146 1980's 553 830 831 633 618 458 463 437 811 380 1990's 445 511 416 395 425 377 340 300 495 5,462 2000's 11,377 15,454 16,477 11,430 13,697 14,308 14,662 13,097 10,846 18,354 2010's 18,405 11,221 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

174

Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,499 3,667 3,475 1970's 3,235 2,563 1,197 1,118 952 899 823 674 883 1,308 1980's 1,351 1,327 1,287 1,258 1,200 1,141 1,318 1,275 1,061 849 1990's 800 290 413 507 553 488 479 554 451 431 2000's 377 408 395 320 254 231 212 162 139 168 2010's 213 268 424 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

175

An automatic method for generating affine moment invariants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Affine moment invariants are important if one wants to recognize the surface of a plane in three dimensions when the orientation of the plane is not known beforehand and only two-dimensional information is available. The notion of generating function ... Keywords: Affine invariant, Affine transformation, Generating invariants, Pattern recognition

Jin Liu; Deren Li; Wenbing Tao; Li Yan

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

How to Submit a Request for a PARS II Account | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How to Submit a Request for a PARS II Account How to Submit a Request for a PARS II Account How to Submit a Request for a PARS II Account The account access process for PARS II relies on the Department of Energy's MIS Application Gateway system to verify the requestor's identity and to approve his/her request for access to a specific DOE Headquarters application, such as PARS II. Once approved by the MIS Application Gateway, the PARS II Help Desk Administrator will assign a new PARS II account to the requestor. Please follow the steps listed below to apply for a PARS II account. 1. If the federal employee or contractor does not already have an account with the Department of Energy's MIS Application Gateway, then the requestor must apply for an account and be approved by a local federal sponsor. To

177

Beckman presents keynote address at ParCo2013 | Argonne National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

talk at the International Conference on Parallel Computing (ParCo2013) in Munich, Germany, September 10. Established in 1983, ParCo is one of the longest running international...

178

Class 8. Telomeres and PAR October 5, 2009 Boyd, et al., 1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Class 8. Telomeres and PAR October 5, 2009 1 Telomeres A model Boyd, et al., 1996 #12;Class 8. Telomeres and PAR October 5, 2009 2 Spatial cue -> polarity Cuenca, A. A. et al. Development 2003://ftp.wormbase.org/pub/wormbase/datasets/seydoux_2003/MOVIE02%20PAR-6.mov #12;Class 8. Telomeres and PAR October 5, 2009 3 Cuenca, A. A. et al

Devoto, Stephen H.

179

COMPTEUR CERENKOV A GAZ POUR LECTRONS Par JACQUES SAYAG,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

169 COMPTEUR CERENKOV A GAZ POUR �LECTRONS Par JACQUES SAYAG, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire Cerenkov à fréon sous la pression atmosphérique, destiné à sélectionner, parmi les particules d'un faisceau courbe expérimentale obtenue en faisant fonctionner le compteur Cerenkov sur un faisceau négatif de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

180

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gaseous Hydrogen Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7-8, 2003 Crystal City, Virginia Breakout Session Name Targets/Objectives More work is needed to better define delivery target metrics Assumptions about targets for costs and energy efficiency need to be qualified Technology improvements likely to lower costs, but may not have major impact on total cost A significant impact on cost would come through permitting policy changes, e.g., use of public land Breakout Session Name Priority Barriers System Issues: need to assess delivery options in context of total system Materials: corrosion, H2 permeability Construction: welding, joining Maintenance and Operation: leak detection Pipeline Safety: odorants, flame visibility

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PORTS-2011-08-03 PORTS-2011-08-03 Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 08/01/2011 - 08/03/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Portsmouth Site Office (PORTS) and the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky, from August 1-3, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's

182

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PAD-2011-07-27 PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 07/25/2011 - 07/27/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission

183

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAD-2011-07-27 PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 07/25/2011 - 07/27/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission

184

Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant State Kentucky Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/RCRA Scope Summary Ensure that the environmental impacts of activities at the Site are investigated and appropriate response actions are taken. Parties U.S. DOE; Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet; U.S. EPA Date 2/01/1998 SCOPE * Ensure all releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants are addressed to achieve comprehensive remediation of the site. * Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring response actions in accordance with CERCLA, RCRA, and Kentucky Law. * Facilitate cooperation, exchange of information, and participation of the Parties and

185

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PORTS-2011-08-03 PORTS-2011-08-03 Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 08/01/2011 - 08/03/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Portsmouth Site Office (PORTS) and the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky, from August 1-3, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's

186

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Method for diverting a gaseous sand-consolidating fluid  

SciTech Connect

An unconsolidated gas-producing sand in which the permeability is layered and the productivity can be impaired by liquid blocking can be consolidated by wetting the rock surfaces with a limited amount of water, injecting a smoke which selectively reduces the permeability of the most permeable layers by depositing on their faces unconsolidated masses of substantially inert solid particles and injecting a gaseous silicon polyhalide to convert a significant proportion of the rock surface-wettingwater to a grain bonding silica gel.

Davies, D. R.; Richardson, E. A.

1980-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Method and apparatus for analyzing particle-containing gaseous suspensions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method and apparatus permit analyses, by optical means, of properties of gaseous suspensions of particles, by measuring radiation that is emitted, transmitted or scattered by the particles. Determinations of composition, size, temperature and spectral emittance can be performed either in-situ or by sampling, and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometric techniques are most effectively used. Apparatus specifically adapted for performing radiation scattering analyses, and for collecting radiation from different sources, are provided. 51 figs.

Solomon, P.R.; Carangelo, R.M.; Best, P.E.

1987-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

189

Directed Evolution of Human Estrogen Receptor Variants with Significantly Enhanced Androgen Specificity and Affinity*S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Directed Evolution of Human Estrogen Receptor Variants with Significantly Enhanced Androgen a directed evolution ap- proach to create hER variants with enhanced androgen specificity and affinity variants and a few site-directed mutants generated de novo led to several unexpected findings including

Zhao, Huimin

190

North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,150 5,428 4,707 1970's 4,490 3,592 3,199 2,969 2,571 2,404 2,421 2,257 2,394 2,986 1980's 3,677 5,008 5,602 7,171 7,860 8,420 6,956 7,859 6,945 6,133 1990's 6,444 6,342 6,055 5,924 5,671 5,327 4,937 5,076 5,481 5,804 2000's 6,021 6,168 5,996 5,818 6,233 6,858 7,254 7,438 7,878 10,140 2010's 11,381 14,182 26,156 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014

191

Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 115,177 140,290 179,117 1970's 193,209 195,072 197,967 206,833 194,329 189,541 172,584 166,392 161,511 165,515 1980's 142,171 142,423 128,858 124,193 132,501 117,736 115,604 124,890 120,092 121,425 1990's 119,405 129,154 132,656 130,336 128,583 146,048 139,841 150,008 144,609 164,794 2000's 164,908 152,862 152,724 124,955 133,434 103,381 105,236 110,745 94,785 95,359 2010's 102,448 95,630 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

192

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,351 3,244 2,705 1970's 2,330 2,013 1,912 1,581 1,921 2,879 6,665 11,494 14,641 15,686 1980's 15,933 14,540 14,182 13,537 12,829 11,129 11,644 10,876 10,483 9,886 1990's 8,317 8,103 8,093 7,012 6,371 6,328 6,399 6,147 5,938 5,945 2000's 5,322 4,502 4,230 3,838 4,199 3,708 3,277 3,094 3,921 2,334 2010's 2,943 2,465 2,480 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013

193

California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 34,803 32,639 30,334 1970's 29,901 27,585 24,156 17,498 17,201 15,221 14,125 13,567 13,288 10,720 1980's 8,583 7,278 14,113 14,943 15,442 16,973 16,203 15,002 14,892 13,376 1990's 12,424 11,786 12,385 12,053 11,250 11,509 12,169 11,600 10,242 10,762 2000's 11,063 11,060 12,982 13,971 14,061 13,748 14,056 13,521 13,972 13,722 2010's 13,244 12,095 12,755 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

194

Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 11,500 8,573 8,579 1970's 6,574 6,133 6,063 5,441 5,557 5,454 5,231 4,764 6,192 3,923 1980's 6,845 5,638 6,854 6,213 6,516 6,334 4,466 2,003 2,142 1,444 1990's 1,899 2,181 2,342 2,252 2,024 2,303 2,385 2,404 2,263 2,287 2000's 1,416 1,558 1,836 1,463 2,413 1,716 2,252 1,957 2,401 3,270 2010's 4,576 4,684 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014

195

New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 46,149 48,635 50,484 1970's 52,647 53,810 54,157 55,782 54,986 56,109 61,778 72,484 77,653 62,107 1980's 59,457 60,544 56,857 56,304 58,580 53,953 51,295 65,156 63,355 61,594 1990's 66,626 70,463 75,520 83,193 86,607 85,668 108,341 109,046 106,665 107,850 2000's 110,411 108,958 110,036 111,292 105,412 101,064 99,971 96,250 92,579 94,840 2010's 91,963 90,291 84,562 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

196

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 4,126 4,546 4,058 1970's 3,405 4,152 4,114 4,674 6,210 9,620 11,944 13,507 13,094 12,606 1980's 12,651 13,427 12,962 11,314 10,771 11,913 10,441 10,195 11,589 13,340 1990's 13,178 15,822 18,149 18,658 19,612 25,225 23,362 28,851 24,365 26,423 2000's 29,105 29,195 31,952 33,650 35,821 34,782 36,317 38,180 53,590 67,607 2010's 82,637 90,801 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

197

Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 236 1970's 225 281 243 199 501 694 661 933 1,967 4,845 1980's 4,371 4,484 4,727 4,709 5,123 5,236 4,836 4,887 4,774 5,022 1990's 4,939 4,997 5,490 5,589 5,647 5,273 5,361 4,637 4,263 18,079 2000's 24,086 13,754 14,826 11,293 15,133 13,759 21,065 19,831 17,222 17,232 2010's 19,059 17,271 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages:

198

Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 433,684 457,117 447,325 1970's 466,016 448,288 470,105 466,143 448,993 435,571 428,635 421,110 393,819 352,650 1980's 350,312 345,262 356,406 375,849 393,873 383,719 384,693 364,477 357,756 343,233 1990's 342,186 353,737 374,126 385,063 381,020 381,712 398,442 391,174 388,011 372,566 2000's 380,535 355,860 360,535 332,405 360,110 355,589 373,350 387,349 401,503 424,042 2010's 433,622 481,308 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

199

Affine Toda Systems Coupled to Matter Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate higher grading integrable generalizations of the affine Toda systems. The extra fields, associated to non zero grade generators, obey field equations of the Dirac type and are regarded as matter fields. The models possess soliton configurations, which can be interpreted as particles of the theory, on the same footing as those associated to fundamental fields. A special subclass of these models is remarkable. They possess a $U(1)$ Noether current which, after a special gauge fixing of the conformal symmetry, is proportional to a topological current. This leads to the confinement of the matter field inside the solitons, which can be regarded as a one dimensional bag model for QCD. These models are also relevent to the study of electron self--localization in (quasi)-one-dimensional electron--phonon systems.

L. A. Ferreira; J-L. Gervais; J. Sanchez Guillen; M. V. Saveliev

1995-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

200

Aspects of Solitons in Affine Integrable Hierarchies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that one of the basic ingredients for the appearance of soliton solutions in integrable hierarchies, is the existence of ``vacuum solutions'' corresponding to Lax operators lying in some abelian subalgebra of the associated affine Kac-Moody algebra. Using the dressing transformation we construct the solutions in the orbit of those vacuum solutions, and conjecture that the solitons correspond to some special points in those orbits. The generalized tau-function for those hierarchies are defined for integrable highest weight representations. It applies for any level of the representation. We illustrate our methods with the recently proposed non abelian Toda models coupled to matter fields. A very special class of such theories possess a U(1) Noether charge that is proportional to a topological charge. That leads to a mechanism that confines the matter fields inside the solitons.

Luiz A. Ferreira; Joaquin Sanchez Guillen

1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Microsoft Word - PARS II CPP Upload Requirements.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U U C (C Pro U.S. D Contrac CPP) U oject A S Phon Depart ctor Pr Upload Assessm System Vers Ap Su Energy E 20440 Cent German ne 301-916- ww tment roject P d Requ ment a m (PAR sion 1.4 Dr pril 9, 2010 ubmitted by nterprise So tury Blvd. S ntown, MD -0050 Fax ww.eesllc.ne t of En Perform uireme and Re RS II) raft 0 : olutions Suite 150 20874 301-916-00 et nergy mance ents for eportin 66 y e r ng ii Title Page Document Name: Contractor Project Performance (CPP) Upload Requirements for PARS II, V1.4 Publication Date: April 9, 2010 Contract Number: DE-AT01-06IM00102 Project Number: 1ME07, CLIN 2 Prepared by: Steven Ducharme, PMC, LLC Lenore Morrison, PMC, LLC Judith Bernsen, PMC, LLC Edited by: Dennis Stoner, EES, LLC Reviewed by: Mark Landry, Dekker, LTD

202

PARS II Reports Catalog, V 0.02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Catalog, V 0.02 Catalog, V 0.02 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Project Assessment and Reporting System Reports Catalog Version 0.02 This booklet describes each report in PARS II, including those created specifically for the DOE, and those that come standard with the Dekker PMIS(tm) software package. Each report description is followed by an image or images of the report. 2 Introduction This document contains detailed description and specifications of all reports currently available in PARS II Shared Reports. All reports are distributed in logical folders that relate to a report's general use and this document will help the user to identify specific report that would address individual need. While all reports listed in the document are available to all users, below are some general guidelines as to the usefulness

203

Partially affine control problems: second order conditions and a well ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 17, 2011 ... Partially affine control problems: second order conditions and a well-posed shooting algorithm. M. Soledad Aronna(aronna ***at*** ...

204

Gaseous divertor simulation in an arc-jet device  

SciTech Connect

The first experimental simulation of the gaseous tokamak divertor is presented. Significant results are: (1) neutral gas at a pressure of a few mTorr is sufficient to absorb the entire localized flux of plasma thermal energy and reidstribute it over a wide area; (2) elastic ion-neutral collisions constitute the main energy absorbing process (at T/sub e,i/ less than or equal to 5 eV), and (3) a large pressure difference between divertor and main plasma chamber is maintained by plasma pumping in the connecting channel.

Hsu, W.L.; Yamada, M.; Barrett, P.J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Removing gaseous contaminants in {sup 3}He by cryogenic stripping  

SciTech Connect

The Tritium Operations Group at LLNL, Tritium Facility has recently developed a {sup 3}He recovery system to remove argon, xenon, neon, hydrogen, and all other contaminants from the {sup 3}He stream in an Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) experimental apparatus. In this paper the authors will describe in detail the background information, technical requirements, the design approach, and the results of their experimental tests. The authors believe this gas purification system may have other applications as it provides at a reasonable cost an efficient method for purification of gaseous helium.

Benapfl, M.; Biltoft, P.; Coombs, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Tritium Operations Group

1995-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

206

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This calendar year 1990 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the summary, discussion, and conclusions (Part 1) and the data presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are as follows: report 1990 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (when appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance.

Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Reducing the axioms of non-discrete affine buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove equivalence of certain reduced axiom sets for generalized affine buildings. Our results extend the work of Anne Parreau. Further we give a purely combinatorial proof of the existence of a spherical building at infinity which does not rely on metric properties. As a corollary we obtain that "being an affine building" is independent of the metric structure of the space.

Bennett, Curtis D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Stabilizing low complexity feedback control of constrained piecewise affine systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Piecewise affine (PWA) systems are powerful models for describing both non-linear and hybrid systems. One of the key problems in controlling these systems is the inherent computational complexity of controller synthesis and analysis, especially if constraints ... Keywords: Model predictive control, Multi-parametric programming, Optimal control, Piecewise affine system

Pascal Grieder; Michal Kvasnica; Mato Baoti?; Manfred Morari

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

PARS II Data Extraction Utility Version 8.0.20130510 Release Notes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II Data Extraction Utility PARS II Data Extraction Utility Version 8.0.20130510 Release Notes The Department of Energy (DOE) is pleased to announce the newest version of the DOE PARS II Data Extraction Utility, version 8.0.20130510. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project management data from a variety of source systems for upload into the DOE Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II). This release is a minor update and incorporates a number of new features and updates primarily focused to improve the existing functionality. Specifically, this version includes enhancements for sites and contractors using Deltek COBRA 4X/5.0 for the Earned Value (EV) Management system to provide EV data to DOE via PARS II upload. The quality of each DOE PARS II Extraction Utility release is of primary consideration at the

210

DOE Seeks Proposals for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Technical Services Contract  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnati - The Department of Energy today issued a Draft Request for Proposals (RFP) for an Environmental Technical Services acquisition at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Piketon, Ohio.

211

Low energy consumption method for separating gaseous mixtures and in particular for medium purity oxygen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the separation of gaseous mixtures such as air and for producing medium purity oxygen, comprising compressing the gaseous mixture in a first compressor to about 3.9-4.1 atmospheres pressure, passing said compressed gaseous mixture in heat exchange relationship with sub-ambient temperature gaseous nitrogen, dividing the cooled, pressurized gaseous mixture into first and second streams, introducing the first stream into the high pressure chamber of a double rectification column, separating the gaseous mixture in the rectification column into a liquid oxygen-enriched stream and a gaseous nitrogen stream and supplying the gaseous nitrogen stream for cooling the compressed gaseous mixture, removing the liquid oxygen-enriched stream from the low pressure chamber of the rectification column and pumping the liquid, oxygen-enriched steam to a predetermined pressure, cooling the second stream, condensing the cooled second stream and evaporating the oxygen-enriched stream in an evaporator-condenser, delivering the condensed second stream to the high pressure chamber of the rectification column, and heating the oxygen-enriched stream and blending the oxygen-enriched stream with a compressed blend-air stream to the desired oxygen concentration.

Jujasz, Albert J. (North Olmsted, OH); Burkhart, James A. (Olmsted Falls, OH); Greenberg, Ralph (New York, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility: Overview of STF capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (STF) constructed at the Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site is a basic research tool for studying the dynamics of accidental releases of various hazardous liquids. This Facility is designed to (1) discharge, at a controlled rate, a measured volume of hazardous test liquid on a prepared surface of a dry lake bed (Frenchman Lake); (2) monitor and record process operating data, close-in and downwind meteorological data, and downwind gaseous concentration levels; and (3) provide a means to control and monitor these functions from a remote location. The STF will accommodate large and small-scale testing of hazardous test fluid release rates up to 28,000 gallons per minute. Spill volumes up to 52,800 gallons are achievable. Generic categories of fluids that can be tested are cryogenics, isothermals, aerosol-forming materials, and chemically reactive. The phenomena that can be studied include source definition, dispersion, and pool fire/vapor burning. Other capabilities available at the STF include large-scale wind tunnel testing, a small test cell for exposing personnel protective clothing, and an area for developing mitigation techniques.

Gray, H.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Greenhouse warming potential of candidate gaseous diffusion plant coolants  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary estimate has been made of the greenhouse warming potential (GWP) of coolants under consideration as substitutes for CFC-114 in the gaseous diffusion plants. Coolants are not at present regulated on the basis of GWP, but may well be in the future. Use of c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} or n-C{sub 4}F{sub 10} is estimated to have three to four times the greenhouse impact of an equivalent use of CFC-114. Neither of the substitutes, of course, would cause any ozone depletion. HCFC-124 (a probable commercial substitute for CFC-114, but not presently under serious consideration due to its relatively high UF{sub 6} reactivity) would have much less greenhouse and ozone depletion impact than CFC-114. The GWP estimates derive from a simple model that approximately reproduces literature values for similar compounds. The major uncertainty in these estimates lies in the atmospheric lifetime, especially of the perfluorocarbon compounds, for which little reliable information exists. In addition to GWP estimates for coolants, the overall greenhouse impact of the gaseous diffusion plants is calculated, including indirect power-related CO{sub 2} emissions. This result is used to compare greenhouse impacts of nuclear- and coal-produced electricity. 11 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Microsoft Word - PARS II 102 Training Workbook V1.0.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook V1.0 Department of Energy May 10, 2010 May 10, 2010 PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting V1.0 ii May 10, 2010 PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting V1.0 iii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 Find and View a Project ............................................................................................. 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3

215

Online learning of a neural fuel control system for gaseous fueled si engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This dissertation presents a new type of fuel control algorithm for gaseous fuelled vehicles. Gaseous fuels such as hydrogen and natural gas have been shown to be less polluting than liquid fuels such as gasoline, both at the tailpipe and on a total ...

Travis Kent Wiens

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Extending the Photon Mapping Method for Realistic Rendering of Hot Gaseous Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluid dynamics have proved very successful. As a result, diverse physically based fluid animation fluids. In addition to the generation of ap- pealing motions of gaseous fluids, several inter- esting, they are gen- erated within the gaseous fluid, but an energy value is assigned to each one according to the to

Texas at Austin, University of

217

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Production Workers Screening Projects Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Paducah Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: James Harbison 2525 Cairo Road Paducah, KY 42001 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing test, and an educational workshop. This program also offers CT

218

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant Former Workers, Construction Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Portsmouth Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPh, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 464-0009 Local Outreach Office: Ron Bush 1236 Gallia Street Portsmouth, OH 45662 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

219

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program.

Horak, C.M. [ed.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Gaseous diffusion plant transition from DOE to external regulation  

SciTech Connect

After many years of operation as government-owned/contractor-operated facilities, large portions of the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, were leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). These facilities are now certified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and subject to oversight by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The transition from DOE to NRC regulation was more difficult than expected. The original commitment was to achieve NRC certification in October 1995; however, considerably more time was required and transition-related costs escalated. The Oak Ridge Operations Office originally estimated the cost of transition at $60 million; $240 million has been spent to date. The DOE`s experience in transitioning the GDPs to USEC operation with NRC oversight provides valuable lessons (both positive and negative) that could be applied to future transitions.

Dann, R.K.; Crites, T.R.; Rahm-Crites, L.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

222

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sne_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sne_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

223

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_spa_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_spa_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

224

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

225

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_swy_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_swy_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

226

,"Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_smt_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_smt_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

227

,"Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

228

,"Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sal_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sal_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

229

,"California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

230

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sok_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sok_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

231

,"Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_soh_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_soh_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

232

,"Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sut_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sut_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

233

,"Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sak_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sak_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

234

,"Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sin_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sin_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

235

Application of Gaseous Sphere Injection Method for Modeling Under-expanded H2 Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology for modeling gaseous injection has been refined and applied to recent experimental data from the literature. This approach uses a discrete phase analogy to handle gaseous injection, allowing for addition of gaseous injection to a CFD grid without needing to resolve the injector nozzle. This paper focuses on model testing to provide the basis for simulation of hydrogen direct injected internal combustion engines. The model has been updated to be more applicable to full engine simulations, and shows good agreement with experiments for jet penetration and time-dependent axial mass fraction, while available radial mass fraction data is less well predicted.

Whitesides, R; Hessel, R P; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

236

,"Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_smi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_smi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

237

,"Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

238

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sms_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sms_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

239

,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_stx_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_stx_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

240

Dispersing the Gaseous Protoplanetary Disc and Halting Type II Migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than 30 extra-solar Jupiter-like planets have shorter periods than the planet Mercury. It is generally accepted that they formed further out, past the ’snow line ’ (?1 AU), and migrated inwards. In order to be driven by tidal torques from the gaseous disc, the disc exterior to the planet had to contain about a planetary mass. The fact that the planets stopped migrating means that their outer disc was removed. We suggest, following the simulation by Bate et al. (2003), that the outer disc was accreted by the planet. This not only halts migration but removes the outer disc for planets interior to about 2 AU. The disc further out could have been removed by photoevaporation (Matsuyama et al. 2003). Furthermore, as also shown by Bate et al. (op cit) this process also provides an upper limit to planetary masses in agreement with the analysis of observed planetary masses by Zucker & Mazeh (2002). In this scenario, the endgame is a race. The central star is accreting the inner disc and the planet, while the planet is accreting the outer disc. The planet survives if it accretes its outer disc before being accreted by the star. The winner is determined solely by the ratio of the mass of the outer disc to the local surface density of the disc. Some planets are certainly eaten by the central star. Subject headings: extrasolar planets, Jupiter 1.

M. Lecar; D. D. Sasselov

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

GASEOUS CO ABUNDANCE-AN EVOLUTIONARY TRACER FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

Planck cold clumps are among the most promising objects to investigate the initial conditions of the evolution of molecular clouds. In this work, by combing the dust emission data from the survey of the Planck satellite with the molecular data of {sup 12}CO/{sup 13}CO/C{sup 18}O (1-0) lines from observations with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope, we investigate the CO abundance, CO depletion, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of 674 clumps in the early cold cores sample. The median and mean values of the CO abundance are 0.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 1.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, respectively. The mean and median of CO depletion factor are 1.7 and 0.9, respectively. The median value of X{sub CO-to-H{sub 2}} for the whole sample is 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} K{sup -1} km{sup -1} s. The CO abundance, CO depletion factor, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor are strongly (anti-)correlated to other physical parameters (e.g., dust temperature, dust emissivity spectral index, column density, volume density, and luminosity-to-mass ratio). To conclude, the gaseous CO abundance can be used as an evolutionary tracer for molecular clouds.

Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com, E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

243

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This calendar year 1989 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the Summary, Discussion, and Conclusions (Part 1) and the Data Presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are the following: report 1989 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance. Routine monitoring and sampling for radiation, radioactive materials, and chemical substances on and off the DOE site are used to document compliance with appropriate standards, to identify trends, to provide information for the public, and to contribute to general environmental knowledge. The surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of protecting the public, employees, and environment from harm that could be caused by its activities and reducing negative environmental impacts to the greatest degree practicable. Environmental-monitoring information complements data on specific releases, trends, and summaries. 26 refs.

Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

DOE Seeks Quotes for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Technical Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnati– The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for an Environmental Technical Services acquisition at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) for the Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO).

246

Early Morning Ventilation of a Gaseous Tracer from a Mountain Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important component of a joint Environmental Protection Agency–Department of Energy field experiment in Brush Creek Valley, Colorado in July–August 1982, was an aircraft sampling task to help verify the early morning ventilation of a gaseous ...

Montie M. Orgill

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Interpolation and Profile Correction (IPC) Method for Shortwave Radiative Transfer in Spectral Intervals of Gaseous Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new interpolation and profile correction (IPC) method for radiance/flux calculations in gaseous absorption bands is presented. The IPC method is designed to allow an arbitrary spectral resolution including monochromatic mode. It features a ...

Alexei I. Lyapustin

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A Relaxed Eddy Accumulation System for Measuring Surface Fluxes of Total Gaseous Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system was designed to continuously measure total gaseous mercury (TGM) fluxes over a forest canopy. TGM concentration measurements were measured at 5-min intervals with a Tekran model 2537A mercury analyzer ...

Jesse O. Bash; David R. Miller

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department Annual Operating Report, CY 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of the waste management operations section of the liquid and gaseous waste operations department at ORNL for 1993. The process waste, liquid low-level waste, gaseous waste systems activities are reported, as well as the low-level waste solidification project. Upgrade activities is the various waste processing and treatment systems are summarized. A maintenance activity overview is provided, and program management, training, and other miscellaneous activities are covered.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Infrared Spectroscopy of Atomic Lines in Gaseous Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectroscopy in the infrared provides a means to assess important properties of the plasma in gaseous nebulae. We present some of our own work that illustrates the need for interactions between the themes of this conference - astronomical data, atomic data, and plasma simulations. We undertook Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) observations with the intent of better understanding the effects of density variations in nebulae, particularly planetary nebulae (PNs), by determining average electron densities from the flux ratios of several fine-structure, IR emission lines. Instead, we are able to ascertain only minor density information because of several instances of the observed line flux ratios being out of range of the theoretical predictions using current atomic data. In these cases, the ISO data cannot presently be used to derive electron density, but rather provide direction for needed improvements in the atomic collision strengths. We have detected an unidentified (uid) strong emission line in an ISO/SWS spectrum of the Orion Nebula. The line has a rest wavelength 2.89350$\\pm$0.00003 $\\mu$m. A long-slit UKIRT observation confirms the presence of this line and shows that the emission is spatially extended and appears to be coincident with the brightest part of the ionized region. We do not detect the uid line in our SWS02 spectra of any of the several bright PNs which we observed for a comparable time. The need for basic atomic data, in this case wavelengths to aid species identification, is paramount for future progress. We look toward the future with a brief synopsis of upcoming or planned IR missions.

R. H. Rubin; R. J. Dufour; T. R. Geballe; S. W. J. Colgan; J. P. Harrington; S. D. Lord; A. L. Liao; D. A. Levine

2001-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II) Release Notes: Version 8.0.20120308  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Assessment & Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II) Release Notes: Version 8.0.20120308 Release Date: 05/19/2012 Achieving Management and Operational Excellence Page 2 PARS II - Enhancements New and improved functionality was released in Version 8.0.20120308 of PARS II. This release offers PARS II Users a significant number of enhancements across all facets of the application. These enhancements include additional refinements to the "look and feel" of the system. Enhancements are a result of community/User recommendations. System usability as well as providing improved means for data collection, validation and reporting were strategically designed and tested over the past several months. An explanation of each enhancement ,

252

Microsoft Word - PARS II Process Document - Close Period 2013-04-29 _FINAL_  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II APM DepSec Monthly Report & Close Period, V-2013-04-29 Page 1 PARS II APM DepSec Monthly Report & Close Period, V-2013-04-29 Page 1 PARS II Process Document APM DEPSEC MONTHLY REPORT & CLOSE PERIOD PURPOSE The purpose of this document is to describe the process of preparing the APM Deputy Secretary Monthly Report and closing the DOE Reporting Period in PARS II. SCOPE This process applies to the Headquarters Office of Acquisition and Project Management (HQ OAPM) and its support contractors as the organization that prepares the monthly reports and closes the monthly reporting period. The process covers data validation and verification; running, distributing and archiving of reports; and

253

PARS II Process Document SUBMITTING AND PROCESSING EMAIL AS OFFICIAL PROJECT ACTION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II Process Document PARS II Process Document SUBMITTING AND PROCESSING EMAIL AS OFFICIAL PROJECT ACTION APPROVAL DOCUMENTATION PURPOSE The purpose of this document is to describe the process and documentation requirements for submitting and processing approvals of project actions (i.e. On Hold Memo, Critical Decision Approval Memo, FPD Designation Memo, etc.) in PARS II via electronic signature. SCOPE This process applies to all Acquisition Executives and other approving officials wishing to substitute ink-and- paper approval of project action with electronic notification of the approval action through electronic mail (email) message. PROCESS DESCRIPTION AND REQUIREMENTS In an effort to streamline the project action approval process and minimize the time lag in updating PARS II,

254

PARS II Phased Project Reporting Process, V-2013-03-14 Page 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phased Project Reporting Process, V-2013-03-14 Page 1 PARS II Process Document PROJECT PHASING (MULTIPLE CD-2 FROM SINGLE CD-1) PURPOSE The purpose of this document is to describe...

255

Filtrage anisotrope robuste et segmentation par B-spline snake : application aux images échographiques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Le contexte de ce travail est le traitement d'images échographiques. Plus précisément, on s'est intéressé au filtrage et à la segmentation automatique d'images dégradées par… (more)

Tauber, Clovis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Sur le parcours des rayons 03B1 de l'uranium Par Lon BLOCH,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sur le parcours des rayons 03B1 de l'uranium Par Léon BLOCH, Agrégé de l'Université de Paris parcours des rayons x de l'uranium a été dé- terminé par Bragg1 au moyen d'une méthode indirecte. Bragg a mesuré l'ionisatiol totale due au rayonnement de l'uranium lorsque la substance est recouverte d

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

257

Microsoft Word - PARS II User Acct Access Guide.rtf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

O O f f f f i i c c e e o o f f t t h h e e E E n n g g i i n n e e e e r r i i n n g g a a n n d d C C o o n n s s t t r r u u c c t t i i o o n n M M a a n n a a g g e e m m e e n n t t U U s s e e r r A A c c c c o o u u n n t t A A c c c c e e s s s s G G u u i i d d e e f f o o r r P P A A R R S S I I I I Version 1.1 May 10, 2010 Submitted by: Energy Enterprise Solutions 20440 Century Blvd. Suite 150 Germantown, MD 20874 Phone 301-916-0050 Fax 301-916-0066 www.eesllc.net 2 Title Page Document Name: User Account Access Guide for PARS II Publication Date: May 10, 2010 Contract Number: DE-AT01-06IM00102 Project Number: 1ME07 CLIN 2 Prepared by: Kai Mong, EES Norm Ayers, EES Reviewed by: Ken Henderson, EES Josephine Peck, EES Approval: _________________________________ John Makepeace, DOE OECM MA-50

258

Carburization of austenitic alloys by gaseous impurities in helium  

SciTech Connect

The carburization behavior of Alloy 800H, Inconel Alloy 617 and Hastelloy Alloy X in helium containing various amounts of H/sub 2/, CO, CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/ was studied. Corrosion tests were conducted in a temperature range from 649 to 1000/sup 0/C (1200 to 1832/sup 0/F) for exposure time up to 10,000 h. Four different helium environments, identified as A, B, C, and D, were investigated. Concentrations of gaseous impurities were 1500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 450 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and 50 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment A; 200 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 100 ..mu..atm CO, 20 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/, 50 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O and 5 ..mu..atm CO/sub 2/ for Environment B; 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and < 0.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment C; and 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and 1.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment D. Environments A and B were characteristic of high-oxygen potential, while C and D were characteristic of low-oxygen potential. The results showed that the carburization kinetics in low-oxygen potential environments (C and D) were significantly higher, approximately an order of magnitude higher at high temperatures, than those in high-oxygen potential environments (A and B) for all three alloys. Thermodynamic analyses indicated no significant differences in the thermodynamic carburization potential between low- and high-oxygen potential environments. It is thus believed that the enhanced carburization kinetics observed in the low-oxygen potential environments were related to kinetic effects. A qualitatively mechanistic model was proposed to explain the enhanced kinetics. The present results further suggest that controlling the oxygen potential of the service environment can be an effective means of reducing carburization of alloys.

Lai, G.Y.; Johnson, W.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Phyto remediation groundwater trends at the DOE portsmouth gaseous  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the progress of a phyto-remediation action being performed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) X-740 Waste Oil Handling Facility to remediate contaminated groundwater under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure action. This action was effected by an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) decision to use phyto-remediation as the preferred remedy for the X-740 groundwater contamination. This remedy was recognized as a cost-effective, low-maintenance, and promising method to remediate groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE). During 1999, prior to the tree installation at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in the area were collected from 10 monitoring wells completed in the Gallia Formation. The Gallia is the uppermost water-bearing zone and contains most of the groundwater contamination at PORTS. During the tree installation which took place during the summer of 1999, four new Gallia monitoring wells were installed at the X-740 Area in addition to the 10 Gallia wells which had been installed in the same area during the early 1990's. Manual water level measurements were collected quarterly from these 14 Gallia monitoring wells between 1998 and 2001. These manual water level measurements were collected to monitor the combined impact of the trees on the groundwater prior to root development. Beginning in 2001, water level measurements were collected monthly during the growing season (April-September) and quarterly during the dormant season (October-March). A total of eight water level measurements were collected annually to monitor the phyto-remediation system's effect on the groundwater in the X- 740 Area. The primary function of the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area is to hydraulically prevent further spreading of the TCE plume. This process utilizes deep-rooted plants, such as poplar trees, to extract large quantities of water from the saturated zone. The focus of any phyto-remediation system is to develop a cone of depression under the entire plantation area. This cone of depression can halt migration of the contaminant plume and can create a hydraulic barrier, thereby maintaining plume capture. While a cone of depression is not yet evident at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in 2004 and 2005 differed from measurements taken in previous years, indicating that the now mature trees are influencing groundwater flow direction and gradient at the site. Water level measurements taken from 2003 through 2005 indicate a trend whereby groundwater elevations steadily decreased in the X-740 Phyto-remediation System. During this time, an average groundwater table drop of 0.30 feet was observed. Although the time for the phyto-remediation system to mature had been estimated at two to three years, these monitoring data indicate a period of four to five years for the trees to reach maturity. Although, these trends are not apparent from analysis of the potentiometric surface contours, it does appear that the head gradient across the site is higher during the spring and lower during the fall. It is not clear, however, whether this trend was initiated by the installation of the phyto-remediation system. This paper will present the groundwater data collected to date to illustrate the effects of the trees on the groundwater table. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

DeNardo, Sally (El Macero, CA); DeNardo, Gerald (El Macero, CA); Balhorn, Rodney (Livermore, CA)

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 BEFORE THE OHIO ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY In the Matter Of: United States Department of Energy : Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant : Findings and Orders P.O. Box 700 : Piketon, Ohio 45661-0700 : Respondent It is hereby agreed by and among the parties hereto as follows: Table of Contents I. Jurisdiction II. Parties Bound III. Definitions IV. Findings of Fact V. Orders VI. Limitations of Director's Approval VII. Notice VIII. Project Managers IX. Dispute Resolution X. Funding XI. Other Applicable Laws XII. Reservation of Rights XIII. Modification XIV. Termination XV. Other Claims XVI. Signatories XVII. Waiver I. Jurisdiction These Director's Final Findings and Orders ("Orders") are issued to the United States

262

Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: K-25 Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: Bruce Lawson 133 Raleigh Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Local Medical Clinics: ParkMed 110 S. Illinois Avenue Oak Ridge, TN 37380 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge,

263

Simulation of VUV electroluminescence in micropattern gaseous detectors: the case of GEM and MHSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electroluminescence produced during avalanche development in gaseous avalanche detectors is an useful information for triggering, calorimetry and tracking in gaseous detectors. Noble gases present high electroluminescence yields, emitting mainly in the VUV region. The photons can provide signal readout if appropriate photosensors are used. Micropattern gaseous detectors are good candidates for signal amplification in high background and/or low rate experiments due to their high electroluminescence yields and radiopurity. In this work, the VUV light responses of the Gas Electron Multiplier and of the Micro-Hole Strip Plate, working with pure xenon, are simulated and studied in detail using a new and versatile C++ toolkit. It is shown that the solid angle subtended by a photosensor placed below the microstructures depends on the operating conditions. The obtained absolute EL yields, determined for different gas pressures and as functions of the applied voltage, are compared with those determined experimentally.

C. A. B. Oliveira; P. M. M. Correia; H. Schindler; A. L. Ferreira; C. M. B. Monteiro; J. M. F. dos Santos; S. Biagi; R. Veenhof; J. F. C. A. Veloso

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

264

Quasi-monoenergetic protons accelerated by laser radiation pressure and shocks in thin gaseous targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated effective CO{sub 2} laser acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic protons from thick gaseous hydrogen target (of thickness tens of laser wavelengths) via hole boring and shock accelerations. We present here an alternative novel acceleration scheme by combining laser radiation pressure acceleration with shock acceleration of protons in a thin gaseous target of thickness several laser wavelengths. The laser pushes the thin gaseous plasma forward while compressing it with protons trapped in it. We demonstrated the combined acceleration with two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and obtained quasi-monoenergetic protons {approx}44 MeV in a gas target of thickness twice of the laser wavelength irradiated by circularly polarized CO{sub 2} laser with normalized laser amplitude a{sub 0}=10.

He Minqing; Shao Xi; Liu Chuansheng; Liu Tungchang; Su Jaojang; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z. [East-West Space Science Center, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Sheng Zhengming [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Oak Ridge National Lebroatory Liquid&Gaseous Waste Treatment System Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

Excellence in Laboratory operations is one of the three key goals of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Agenda. That goal will be met through comprehensive upgrades of facilities and operational approaches over the next few years. Many of ORNL's physical facilities, including the liquid and gaseous waste collection and treatment systems, are quite old, and are reaching the end of their safe operating life. The condition of research facilities and supporting infrastructure, including the waste handling facilities, is a key environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concern. The existing infrastructure will add considerably to the overhead costs of research due to increased maintenance and operating costs as these facilities continue to age. The Liquid Gaseous Waste Treatment System (LGWTS) Reengineering Project is a UT-Battelle, LLC (UT-B) Operations Improvement Program (OIP) project that was undertaken to develop a plan for upgrading the ORNL liquid and gaseous waste systems to support ORNL's research mission.

Van Hoesen, S.D.

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

266

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1996  

SciTech Connect

This annual report summarizes operating activities dealing with the process waste system, the liquid low-level waste system, and the gaseous waste system. It also describes upgrade activities dealing with the process and liquid low-level waste systems, the cathodic protection system, a stack ventilation system, and configuration control. Maintenance activities are described dealing with nonradiological wastewater treatment plant, process waste treatment plant and collection system, liquid low-level waste system, and gaseous waste system. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits/reviews/tours, and environmental restoration support.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

A Possible Anisotropy in Blackbody Radiation Viewed through Non-uniform Gaseous Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-local gauge symmetry of a complex scalar field, which can be trivially extended to spinor fields, was demonstrated in a recent paper (Mod.Phys.Lett. A13, 1265 (1998) ; hep-th/9902020). The corresponding covariant Lagrangian density yielded a new, non-local Quantum Electrodynamics. In this letter we show that as a consequence of this new QED, a blackbody radiation viewed through gaseous matter appears to show a slight deviation from the Planck formula, and propose an experimental test to check this effect. We also show that a non-uniformity in this gaseous matter distribution leads to an (apparent) spatial anisotropy in the blackbody radiation.

T K Rai Dastidar

1999-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

268

PARS II Phased Project Reporting Process, V-2013-03-14 Page 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phased Project Reporting Process, V-2013-03-14 Page 1 Phased Project Reporting Process, V-2013-03-14 Page 1 PARS II Process Document PROJECT PHASING (MULTIPLE CD-2 FROM SINGLE CD-1) PURPOSE The purpose of this document is to describe the process of entering, managing, and reporting projects in PARS II that adopted Phasing approach. SCOPE This process applies to projects that are managed as a larger program through CD1 but are executed in phases with parts of the projects reaching CD2 approvals earlier than the main project. PROCESS The main goal of the process is to ensure that as new projects are created for various phases of the original CD1 program, DOE portfolio is not overstated in portfolio reports and to ensure that linking is retained in PARS II between original CD1 program and resulting CD2 project phases.

269

Universite Paris XI UFR scientifique d'Orsay N d'ordre : IPNO-T-09-10 presentee par  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fonction de la temp´erature . . . 10 1.3.3 M´ethode de couplage par une m´ethode multi-groupes . . . . . . . 41 3 COUPLAGE DES CODES 43 3.1 MURE comme logiciel de temp´erature des sections efficaces par une m´ethode d

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

270

On-Line Measurement of Heat of Combustion of Gaseous Hydrocarbon Fuel Mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for the on-line measurement of the heat of combustion of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel mixtures has been developed and tested. The method involves combustion of a test gas with a measured quantity of air to achieve a preset concentration of oxygen ...

Sprinkle Danny R.; Chaturvedi Sushil K.; Kheireddine Ali

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from net excess hydrogen in a catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons in the presence of hydrogen, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products. An improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from the net excess hydrogen is realized by chilling and contacting said hydrogen with a normally liquid hydrocarbon stream in a plural stage absorption zone at an elevated pressure.

Scheifele, C.A.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

273

Method of absorbing UF.sub.6 from gaseous mixtures in alkamine absorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering uranium hexafluoride from gaseous mixtures employing as an absorbent a liquid composition at least one of the components of which is chosen from the group consisting of ethanolamine, diethanolamine, and 3-methyl-3-amino-propane-diol-1,2.

Lafferty, Robert H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Smiley, Seymour H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Radimer, Kenneth J. (Little Falls, NJ)

1976-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

274

Affine Jordan cells, logarithmic correlators, and hamiltonian reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a particular type of logarithmic extension of SL(2,R) Wess-Zumino-Witten models. It is based on the introduction of affine Jordan cells constructed as multiplets of quasi-primary fields organized in indecomposable representations of the Lie algebra sl(2). We solve the simultaneously imposed set of conformal and SL(2,R) Ward identities for two- and three-point chiral blocks. These correlators will in general involve logarithmic terms and may be represented compactly by considering spins with nilpotent parts. The chiral blocks are found to exhibit hierarchical structures revealed by computing derivatives with respect to the spins. We modify the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations to cover affine Jordan cells and show that our chiral blocks satisfy these equations. It is also demonstrated that a simple and well-established prescription for hamiltonian reduction at the level of ordinary correlators extends straightforwardly to the logarithmic correlators as the latter then reduce to the known results for two- and three-point conformal blocks in logarithmic conformal field theory.

Jorgen Rasmussen

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

275

Synthse vocale par slection linguistiquement oriente d'units non-uniformes : LiONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthèse vocale par sélection linguistiquement orientée d'unités non-uniformes : LiONS Vincent point emploient, en proportions variables, des caractéristiques linguistiques, acoustiques et symbo- liques. Les caractéristiques linguistiques sont directement issues de l'analyse de la langue, tandis que

Dupont, Stéphane

276

Mise en correspondance par correlation avec prise en compte des occultations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mise en correspondance par corr´elation avec prise en compte des occultations Occlusions handling cours de l'appariement, provient des occultations. C'est pourquoi le second objectif est de pr compte le probl`eme des occultations. Les r´esultats mettent en ´evidence la meilleure m´ethode qui

Chambon, Sylvie

277

Article de synthse L'amplification des squences de nuclotides par PCR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Article de synthèse L'amplification des séquences de nucléotides par PCR et les nouvelles'Ã?tude de la Fertilité; Paris, 19-21 octobre 1989) Résumé ― La PCR (polymerase chain reaction) est en plus grande dans les approches diagnostiques. PCR amplification / ADN / ARN / diagnostic

Recanati, Catherine

278

Project Plan 7930 Cell G PaR Remote Handling System Replacement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For over 40 years the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have made Californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) available for a wide range of industries including medical, nuclear fuels, mining, military and national security. The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) located within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) processes irradiated production targets from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Operations in Building 7930, Cell G provide over 70% of the world's demand for {sup 252}Cf. Building 7930 was constructed and equipped in the mid-1960s. Current operations for {sup 252}Cf processing in Building 7930, Cell G require use of through-the-wall manipulators and the PaR Remote Handling System. Maintenance and repairs for the manipulators is readily accomplished by removal of the manipulator and relocation to a repair shop where hands-on work can be performed in glove boxes. Contamination inside cell G does not currently allow manned entry and no provisions were created for a maintenance area inside the cell. There has been no maintenance of the PaR system or upgrades, leaving operations vulnerable should the system have a catastrophic failure. The Cell G PaR system is currently being operated in a run to failure mode. As the manipulator is now 40+ years old there is significant risk in this method of operation. In 2006 an assessment was completed that resulted in recommendations for replacing the manipulator operator control and power centers which are used to control and power the PaR manipulator in Cell G. In mid-2008 the chain for the bridge drive failed and subsequent examinations indicated several damaged links (see Figure 1). To continue operations the PaR manipulator arm is being used to push and pull the bridge as a workaround. A retrieval tool was fabricated, tested and staged inside Cell G that will allow positioning of the bridge and manipulator arm for removal from the cell should the PaR system completely fail. A fully functioning and reliable Par manipulator arm is necessary for uninterrupted {sup 252}Cf operations; a fully-functioning bridge is needed for the system to function as intended.

Kinney, Kathryn A [ORNL

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Long-range global warming impact of gaseous diffusion plant operation  

SciTech Connect

The DOE gaseous diffusion plant complex makes extensive use of CFC-114 as a primary coolant. As this material is on the Montreal Protocol list of materials scheduled for production curtailment, a substitute must be found. In addition to physical cooling properties, the gaseous diffusion application imposes the unique requirement of chemical inertness to fluorinating agents. This has narrowed the selection of a near-term substitute to two fully fluorinated material, FC-318 and FC-3110, which are likely to be strong, long-lived greenhouse gases. In this document, calculations are presented showing, for a number of plausible scenarios of diffusion plant operation and coolant replacement strategy, the future course of coolant use, greenhouse gas emissions (including coolant and power-related indirect CO{sub 2} emissions), and the consequent global temperature impacts of these scenarios.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OH OH EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: February 2008 ETR-12 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) is proposed for long-term containment of contaminated materials from the planned Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Acceptable performance of the proposed OSWDF will depend on interactions between engineered landfill features and operations methods that recognize the unique characteristics of the waste stream and site-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 State Ohio Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Agreement between the Ohio EPA and DOE approving the STP and setting waste treatment milestones Parties DOE; Ohio Department of Environmental Protection Date 10/4/1995 SCOPE * Approve the Compliance Plan Volume of the amended PSTP submitted to Ohio EPA on October 2, 1995, hereafter referred to as "approved STP." * Set forth guidelines for storage and treatment of mixed wastes at the Facility which are not being stored in accordance with the LDR requirements of OAC rule 3745-59- 50. * Establish milestones and target dates for approved STP. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES

282

Summary - Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah, KY Paducah, KY EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: August 2008 ETR-16 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility(OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is an active uranium enrichment facility that was placed on the National Priorities List. DOE is required to remediate the PGDP in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is evaluating alternatives to dispose of waste generated from the remedial activities at the PGDP. One option is to construct an on-site disposal facility (OSDF) meeting the CERCLA requirements.

283

Process and system for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gaseous streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-stage UCSRP process and system for removal of sulfur from a gaseous stream in which the gaseous stream, which contains a first amount of H.sub.2S, is provided to a first stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess SO.sub.2 mode at a first amount of SO.sub.2, producing an effluent gas having a reduced amount of SO.sub.2, and in which the effluent gas is provided to a second stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess H.sub.2S mode, producing a product gas having an amount of H.sub.2S less than said first amount of H.sub.2S.

Basu, Arunabha (Aurora, IL); Meyer, Howard S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Lynn, Scott (Pleasant Hill, CA); Leppin, Dennis (Chicago, IL); Wangerow, James R. (Medinah, IL)

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

284

Nuclear safety procedure upgrade project at USEC/MMUS gaseous diffusion plants  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Utility Services has embarked on a program to upgrade procedures at both of its Gaseous Diffusion Plant sites. The transition from a U.S. Department of Energy government-operated facility to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated has necessitated a complete upgrade of plant operating procedures and practices incorporating human factors as well as a philosophy change in their use. This program is designed to meet the requirements of the newly written 10CFR76, {open_quotes}The Certification of Gaseous Diffusion Plants,{close_quotes} and aid in progression toward NRC certification. A procedures upgrade will help ensure increased nuclear safety, enhance plant operation, and eliminate personnel procedure errors/occurrences.

Kocsis, F.J. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

D&D of the French High Enrichment Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the D&D program that is being implemented at France's High Enrichment Gaseous Diffusion Plant, which was designed to supply France's Military with Highly Enriched Uranium. This plant was definitively shut down in June 1996, following French President Jacques Chirac's decision to end production of Highly Enriched Uranium and dismantle the corresponding facilities.

BEHAR, Christophe; GUIBERTEAU, Philippe; DUPERRET, Bernard; TAUZIN, Claude

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the major Environmental Restoration (ER) concerns at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The identified solid waste management units at PGDP are listed. In the Department of Energy (DOE) Five Year Plan development process, one or more waste management units are addressed in a series of activity data sheets (ADSs) which identify planned scope, schedule, and cost objectives that are representative of the current state of planned technical development for individual or multiple sites.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high purity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Ghate, M.R.; Yang, R.T.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

288

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon, zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high parity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber.

Ghate, Madhav R. (Morgantown, WV); Yang, Ralph T. (Williamsville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Environmental effects of the construction and operation of a gaseous diffusion plant  

SciTech Connect

The impacts upon the environment resulting from construction, stert-up, and operation of a gaseous dfffusion plant are described. Some of the impacts are typical regardless of location of the plant. Others are atypical and depend upon location; those are presented, by way of example, as they occur at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The various environmental contaminants that may be produced in the operating plant are described. The concentrations of those contaminants are stated; and the adverse biological effects of pertinent conteminants are elucidated. UF/sup 6/ may be enriched in the Portsmouth Gaseous Wffusion Plant to almost any /sup 235/U concentration desired. The environmental impact of the plant varies somewhat according to /sup 235/U concentrations. However, commercial plants are not expected to enrich /sup 235/U in concentrations greater than 4%. for this reason, environmental effects due to Portsmouth operations within that range are emphasized. The study revealed that present discharges from the plants generally have no detrimental effects upon the environment. (auth)

1973-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

Oak Ridge National Lebroatory Liquid&Gaseous Waste Treatment System Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

Excellence in Laboratory operations is one of the three key goals of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Agenda. That goal will be met through comprehensive upgrades of facilities and operational approaches over the next few years. Many of ORNL's physical facilities, including the liquid and gaseous waste collection and treatment systems, are quite old, and are reaching the end of their safe operating life. The condition of research facilities and supporting infrastructure, including the waste handling facilities, is a key environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concern. The existing infrastructure will add considerably to the overhead costs of research due to increased maintenance and operating costs as these facilities continue to age. The Liquid Gaseous Waste Treatment System (LGWTS) Reengineering Project is a UT-Battelle, LLC (UT-B) Operations Improvement Program (OIP) project that was undertaken to develop a plan for upgrading the ORNL liquid and gaseous waste systems to support ORNL's research mission.

Van Hoesen, S.D.

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Use of New Parameterizations for Gaseous Absorption in the CLIRAD-SW Solar Radiation Code for Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new gaseous absorption parameterizations are incorporated in the CLIRAD-SW solar radiation code for models, openly distributed for the scientific community. In the new parameterizations, the magnitude of absorption coefficients in each ...

T. A. Tarasova; B. A. Fomin

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Joint Test Plan to Identify the Gaseous By-Products of CH3I Loading on AgZ  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this test plan is to describe research to determine the gaseous by-products of the adsorption of CH3I on hydrogen reduced silver exchanged mordenite (AgZ).

R. T. Jubin; N. R. Soelberg; D. M. Strachan; T. M. Nenoff; B. B. Spencer

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review, April 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology......................................................................................................................................... 1

294

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review, April 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology......................................................................................................................................... 1

295

Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

Wijmans Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTY PERFORMANCE OF COMMERCIAL GRADE API PIPELINE STEELS IN HIGH PRESSURE GASEOUS HYDROGEN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continued growth of the world s developing countries has placed an ever increasing demand on traditional fossil fuel energy sources. This development has lead to increasing research and development of alternative energy sources. Hydrogen gas is one of the potential alternative energy sources under development. Currently the most economical method of transporting large quantities of hydrogen gas is through steel pipelines. It is well known that hydrogen embrittlement has the potential to degrade steel s mechanical properties when hydrogen migrates into the steel matrix. Consequently, the current pipeline infrastructure used in hydrogen transport is typically operated in a conservative fashion. This operational practice is not conducive to economical movement of significant volumes of hydrogen gas as an alternative to fossil fuels. The degradation of the mechanical properties of steels in hydrogen service is known to depend on the microstructure of the steel. Understanding the levels of mechanical property degradation of a given microstructure when exposed to hydrogen gas under pressure can be used to evaluate the suitability of the existing pipeline infrastructure for hydrogen service and guide alloy and microstructure design for new hydrogen pipeline infrastructure. To this end, the 2 Copyright 2010 by ASME microstructures of relevant steels and their mechanical properties in relevant gaseous hydrogen environments must be fully characterized to establish suitability for transporting hydrogen. A project to evaluate four commercially available pipeline steels alloy/microstructure performance in the presences of gaseous hydrogen has been funded by the US Department of Energy along with the private sector. The microstructures of four pipeline steels were characterized and then tensile testing was conducted in gaseous hydrogen and helium at pressures of 800, 1600 and 3000 psi. Based on measurements of reduction of area, two of the four steels that performed the best across the pressure range were selected for evaluation of fracture and fatigue performance in gaseous hydrogen at 800 and 3000 psi. This paper will describe the work performed on four commercially available pipeline steels in the presence of gaseous hydrogen at pressures relevant for transport in pipelines. Microstructures and mechanical property performances will be compared. In addition, recommendations for future work related to gaining a better understanding of steel pipeline performance in hydrogen service will be discussed.

Stalheim, Mr. Douglas [DGS Metallurgical Solutions Inc; Boggess, Todd [Secat; San Marchi, Chris [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Jansto, Steven [Reference Metals Company; Somerday, Dr. B [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Sofronis, Prof. Petros [University of Illinois

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Microsoft Word - PARS II Letter of Introduction 20091119d.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Enterprise Solutions, LLC Energy Enterprise Solutions, LLC 20440 Century Blvd. Suite 150 Germantown, Maryland 20874 Phone: 301-916-0050 Fax: 301-916-0066 www.eesllc.net November 19, 2009 Contractor Person Name Contractor Company Address 1 Address 2 City, State, Zip Dear [Mr./Mrs.] ________, Energy Enterprise Solutions (EES), under contract to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Engineering and Construction Management (OECM), is preparing to deploy the next generation of the Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS). This new system, called PARS II, will be used by Federal Project Directors, Program Office staff, and OECM analyst personnel to enter status assessments, forecasts and other data. It will automate the upload of contractor earned value and schedule data, and will provide the federal staff with a common view

298

u.s. Dl!PAR1'M:ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PAR1'M:ENT OF ENERGY PAR1'M:ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlIIINATION RECIPIENT :University of California San Diego PROJECT TITL.E: San Diego Center for Algae Biotechnology Page 1 of2 STATE: CA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instnlment Number NEPA Control Number em Number EEOOO3142 GF0-10-582 EE3142 Based on my review ortbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorukd under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting . construction (or modification), operation, and deoommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example. preparation of chemical standards and sample analYSIS):

299

Le produit et le rayonnement de l'uranium X1 Par F. SODDY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

53 Le produit et le rayonnement de l'uranium X1 Par F. SODDY [Laboratoire de chimie-physique de l probablement deux pro- duits à rayons '1., intermédiaires entre l'uranium X et te radium. Boltwood a montre différence de 12 unités entre le poids atomique de l'uranium et celui dut radium. Cette différence correspond

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

300

EFFETS DES FAIBLES IRRADIATIONS SUR L'URANIUM Par Y. QUR,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

489. EFFETS DES FAIBLES IRRADIATIONS SUR L'URANIUM Par Y. QU�R�, Centre d'�tudes Nucléaires de fragments de fission dans l'uranium, on présente quelques résultats de mesure de longueur et de résistivité modifiés. Abstract. 2014 After recalling Brinkman's model for the action of fission fragments on uranium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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301

Sur la radioactivit des solutions de sels d'uranium Par L. MICHIELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

432 Sur la radioactivité des solutions de sels d'uranium Par L. MICHIELS [Laboratoire de'une substanceradioactive ne produisant pas d'émanation, telle que l'uranium. D'une première série d'expériences effectuées au moyen de solutions de sulfate uranico-potassique K(UO)SO4+H2O dont la teneur, exprimée en uranium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

302

Seismic analysis of the Par Pond Dam: Study of slope failure and liquefaction. Technical evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

Stability concerns of the Par Pond Dam, an embankment structure in the Savannah River Site complex, resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the state of its integrity. Specifically, excessive seepage through the embankment, slope failure due to an earthquake event as well as liquefaction potential of the embankment and the foundation are addressed and the potential of failure is evaluated. Lastly, remedial benefits of the addition of a berm structure are also assessed.

Simos, N.; Reich, M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

REDUCTION DE L'OCTOOXYDE D'URANIUM EN DIOXYDE D'URANIUM PAR L'AMMONIAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REDUCTION DE L'OCTOOXYDE D'URANIUM EN DIOXYDE D'URANIUM PAR L'AMMONIAC P. Suhubiette1 , F mines, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint Etienne Cedex2, France Résumé. Ce travail présente l'étude cinétique de la réduction de l'octooxyde d'uranium par l'ammoniac en dioxyde d'uranium. Cette réduction

304

South America PAR SR Solar Model from INPE and LABSOLAR | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PAR SR Solar Model from INPE and LABSOLAR PAR SR Solar Model from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Mean values of PAR Solar Radiation in kWh/m2/day for 40km cells for 1 year (month, season, year) based on data from 1995 to 2005 (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The BRASIL-SR model (developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) and the ARCVIEW software were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files. The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy n the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to apply solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory. The BRASIL-SR model is not validated for areas covered by snow.

305

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During second quarter 1993, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During second quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS or any other flagging criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. During first quarter 1993, aluminum and iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the KSS and the PSS wells. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 35 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells, except for a single measurement of 1 mg/L in well PSS 1D. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow direction is south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates). The groundwater flow direction at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site could not be determined second quarter 1993.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Solar neutrinos, helicity effects and new affine gravity with torsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New f(R,T) model of gravitation, introduced previously by the author, is considered. It is based on an affine geometrical construction in which the torsion is a dynamical field, the coupling is minimal and the theory is Lorentz invariant by construction. It was shown that the Dirac equation emerges from the same space time and acquires a modification (coupling-like) of the form {\\gamma}^{{\\alpha}}j((1-d)/d){\\gamma}h_{{\\alpha}}, with h_{{\\alpha}} the torsion axial vector, j a parameter of pure geometrical nature and d, the spacetime dimension. In the present work it is shown that this interaction produces a mechanism of spin (helicity) flipping, with its consequent weak symmetry violation. The cross section of this process is explicitly calculated and a logaritmical energy dependence (even at high energies) is found. This behavior is reminiscent of similar computations made by Hans Bethe in the context of neutrino astrophysics. These results are applied to the solar neutrino case and compared with similar results coming from a gravitational model with torsion of string theory type and within the standard model context respectively.

Diego Julio Cirilo-Lombardo; BLTP-JINR

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

307

Stability of sampled-data piecewise affine systems: A time-delay approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the stability analysis of sampled-data piecewise-affine (PWA) systems consisting of a continuous-time plant in feedback connection with a discrete-time emulation of a continuous-time state feedback controller. The sampled-data system ... Keywords: Lyapunov stability, Piecewise affine systems, Sampled-data systems

Behzad Samadi; Luis Rodrigues

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Affine invariant matching of broken boundaries based on particle swarm optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Affine invariant matching of broken image contours with model shapes is an important but difficult research topic in computer vision. One of the effective approaches to date encapsulates the process as an optimization problem which determines, with the ... Keywords: Affine invariant matching, Broken boundary, Particle swarm optimization, Real coded genetic algorithm, Repeated trial, Simple genetic algorithm

Terry Y. F. Yuen; Peter W. M. Tsang

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Measuring the Effect of Fuel Chemical Structure on Particulate and Gaseous Emissions using Isotope Tracing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique initially developed for radiocarbon dating and recently applied to internal combustion engines, carbon atoms within specific fuel molecules can be labeled and followed in particulate or gaseous emissions. In addition to examining the effect of fuel chemical structure on emissions, the specific source of carbon for PM can be identified if an isotope label exists in the appropriate fuel source. Existing work has focused on diesel engines, but the samples (soot collected on quartz filters or combustion gases captured in bombs or bags) are readily collected from large industrial combustors as well.

Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Martin, G C; Upatnicks, A; Dibble, R W; Cheng, S

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

310

Replacement of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) at the DOE gaseous diffusion plants: An assessment of global impacts  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) formerly operated two gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) for enriching uranium and maintained a third shutdown GDP. These plants maintain a large inventory of dichlorotetrafluorethane (CFC-114), a cholorofluorocarbon (CFC), as a coolant. The paper evaluates the global impacts of four alternatives to modify GDP coolant system operations for a three-year period beginning in 1996. Interim modification of GDP coolant system operations has the potential to reduce stratospheric ozone depletion from GDP coolant releases while a permanent solution is studied.

Socolof, M.L.; Saylor, R.E.; McCold, L.N.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

312

(2) Quantities and Prices of Animal Manure and Gaseous Fuels Generated:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this context, we are defining animal manure as the excrement of livestock reared in agricultural operations as well as straw, sawdust, and other residues used as animal bedding. Gaseous fuels may be derived from municipal and industrial landfills (landfill gas) or from animal manure and solid biomass such as crop silage or the organic fraction of MSW (biogas). Both landfill gas and biogas are generated via anaerobic digestion, a multi-stage process whereby bacteria convert carbohydrates, fats, and proteins to methane (Evans 2001). EPA does not consider these materials to be wastes in themselves, when used as fuel, but rather materials derived from wastes.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

SciTech Connect

This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 3 contains reports from 6 government contractors on LPG, anhydrous ammonia, and hydrogen energy systems. Report subjects include: simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water; LPG safety research; state-of-the-art of release prevention and control technology in the LPG industry; ammonia: an introductory assessment of safety and environmental control information; ammonia as a fuel, and hydrogen safety and environmental control assessment.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

2013 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, FEBRUARY 24 - MARCH 1, 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The long-standing goal of our community is to develop new strategies for capturing complex molecular architectures as gas phase ions where they can be isolated, characterized and manipulated with great sensitivity. Emergent areas of interest include catalytic mechanisms, cryogenic processing of ions extracted from solution, ion fragmentation mechanisms, and new methods for ion formation and structural characterization. The conference will cover theoretical and experimental advances on systems ranging from model studies at the molecular scale to preparation of nanomaterials and characterization of large biological molecules.

Williams, Evan

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Separation of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from a catalytic reforming effluent and recovery of purified hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for the catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products, is disclosed. Relatively impure hydrogen is separated from the reforming zone effluent, compressed, and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product to provide relatively pure hydrogen, a portion of which is recycled to the reforming zone. The balance is further compressed and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product to provide an improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons as well as an improved recovery of purified hydrogen at a pressure suitable for use in the relatively high pressure hydrotreating of sulfur-containing feedstocks.

Coste, A.C.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

316

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL); Jalan, Vinod M. (Concord, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Linking the gaseous and the condensed phases of matter: The slow electron and its interactions  

SciTech Connect

The interfacing of the gaseous and the condensed phases of matter as effected by interphase and cluster studies on the behavior of key reactions involving slow electrons either as reacting initial particles or as products of the reactions themselves is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the measurement of both the cross sections and the energetics involved, although most of the available information to date is on the latter. The discussion is selectively focussed on electron scattering (especially the role of negative ion states in gases, clusters, and dense matter), ionization, electron attachment and photodetachment. The dominant role of the electric polarization of the medium is emphasized.

Christophorou, L.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Isotope shift on the chlorine electron affinity revisited by an MCHF/CI approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today, the electron affinity is experimentally well known for most of the elements and is a useful guideline for developing ab initio computational methods. However, the measurements of isotope shifts on the electron affinity are limited by both resolution and sensitivity. In this context, theory eventually contributes to the knowledge and understanding of atomic structures, even though correlation plays a dominant role in negative ions properties and, particularly, in the calculation of the specific mass shift contribution. The present study solves the longstanding discrepancy between calculated and measured specific mass shifts on the electron affinity of chlorine (Phys. Rev. A 51 (1995) 231)

Carette, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Heat-pipe effect on the transport of gaseous radionuclides released from a nuclear waste container  

SciTech Connect

When an unsaturated porous medium is subjected to a temperature gradient and the temperature is sufficiently high, vadose water is heated and vaporizes. Vapor flows under its pressure gradient towards colder regions where it condenses. Vaporization and condensation produce a liquid saturation gradient, creating a capillary pressure gradient inside the porous medium. Condensate flows towards the hot end under the influence of a capillary pressure gradient. This is a heat pipe in an unsaturated porous medium. We study analytically the transport of gaseous species released from a spent-fuel waste package, as affected by a time-dependent heat pipe in an unsaturated rock. For parameter values typical of a potential repository in partially saturated fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, we found that a heat pipe develops shortly after waste is buried, and the heat-pipe`s spatial extent is time-dependent. Water vapor movements produced by the heat pipe can significantly affect the migration of gaseous radionuclides. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Zhou, W.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) Apparatus for Nuclear Diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The RAGS (Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility. Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D A; Velsko, C A; Jedlovec, D R; Yeamans, C B; Moody, K J; Tereshatov, E; Stoeffl, W; Riddle, A

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

322

Anisotropic gaseous models of tidally limited star clusters -- comparison with other methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new models of the evolution and dissolution of star clusters evolving under the combined influence of internal relaxation and external tidal fields, using the anisotropic gaseous model based on the Fokker-Planck approximation, and a new escaper loss cone model. This model borrows ideas from loss cones of stellar distributions near massive black holes, and describes physical processes related to escaping stars by a simple model based on two timescales and a diffusion process. We compare our results with those of direct $N$-body models and of direct numerical solutions of the orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck equation. For this comparative study we limit ourselves to idealized single point mass star clusters, in order to present a detailed study of the physical processes determining the rate of mass loss, core collapse and other features of the system's evolution. With the positive results of our study the path is now open in the future to use the computationally efficient gaseous models for future studies with more realism (mass spectrum, stellar evolution).

R. Spurzem; M. Giersz; K. Takahashi; A. Ernst

2004-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for Environment has responsibility for identifying, characterizing, and ameliorating the environmental, health, and safety issues and public concerns associated with commercial operation of specific energy systems. The need for developing a safety and environmental control assessment for liquefied gaseous fuels was identified by the Environmental and Safety Engineering Division as a result of discussions with various governmental, industry, and academic persons having expertise with respect to the particular materials involved: liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, and anhydrous ammonia. This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in Fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 1 (Executive Summary) describes the background, purpose and organization of the LGF Program and contains summaries of the 25 reports presented in Volumes 2 and 3. Annotated bibliographies on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety and Environmental Control Research and on Fire Safety and Hazards of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) are included in Volume 1.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Mixture of micronized coal powder with gaseous fuels for use in internal combustion engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved fuel mixture for use in internal combustion engines is described. This fuel is an intimate mixture of micronized coal, having an average particle size of less than 100 microns, with a gaseous fuel selected from natural gas and coal-derived. The coal can be present from more than 0 percent to less than 100 percent, with generally the lower percentages being preferred. The addition of the coal to the gaseous fuel improves engine efficiency and power rating, and also decreases peak engine pressure allowing for higher compression ratios. An increase in the amount of the coal increases the oxides of sulfur while reducing the oxides of nitrogen in the exhaust. An increase in the amount of gas, on the other hand, increases the oxides of nitrogen but lowers oxides of sulfur. Accordingly, a preferred mixture will depend upon a particular application for the coal/gas fuel and thereby increases user fuel flexibility considerations. Modeling of the fuel mixture for use in a diesel engine is described. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Carpenter, L.K.

1990-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

325

Fast affine invariant shape matching from 3d images based on the distance association map and the genetic algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decision on whether a pair of closed contours is derived from different views of the same object, a task commonly known as affine invariant matching, can be encapsulated as the search for the existence of an affine transform between them. Past research ... Keywords: affine invariant matching, chamfer distance transform

Peter Wai-Ming Tsang; W. C. Situ; Chi Sing Leung; Kai-Tat Ng

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Graphical Calculus for the Double Affine Q-Dependent Braid Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define a double affine $Q$-dependent braid group. This group is constructed by appending to the braid group a set of operators $Q_i$, before extending it to an affine $Q$-dependent braid group. We show specifically that the elliptic braid group and the double affine Hecke algebra (DAHA) can be obtained as quotient groups. Complementing this we present a pictorial representation of the double affine $Q$-dependent braid group based on ribbons living in a toroid. We show that in this pictorial representation we can fully describe any DAHA. Specifically, we graphically describe the parameter $q$ upon which this algebra is dependent and show that in this particular representation $q$ corresponds to a twist in the ribbon.

Glen Burella; Paul Watts; Vincent Pasquier; Jiri Vala

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

327

Par Pond phytoplankton in association with refilling of the pond: Final Report for sampling from February 1995 -- September 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of phytoplankton analyses from Par Pond samples collected between February 1995 and September 1996. The principal objective of the study was to determine the effect of refilling of Par Pond following repair of the dam on the phytoplankton community. Algal blooms are often responsible for fish kills and other detrimental effects in ponds and lakes, and it was postulated that decaying vegetation from formerly exposed sediments might trigger algal blooms that could result in fish kills in Par Pond following the refill. Sporadic algal blooms involving blue-green algae were detected, especially during the summer of 1996. However, the data derived from the study demonstrates that overall, the refilling effort caused no significant negative impact to the pond attributable to phytoplankton dynamics.

Wilde, E.W.; Johnson, M.A.; Cody, W.C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride National Center for Physics, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest, Romania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-493 Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride I. Ursu National Center- vation of235 U NMR signal in liquid UF6 at B = 11.747 T has been recently reported [7]. The aim of this Letter is to investigate the effect of the 23 5U enrichment on the 19F NMR spectra in gaseous UF6. Using

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

329

Apparatus for recovering gaseous hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Santa Fe, NM); Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

Heffel, James W. (Lake Matthews, CA); Scott, Paul B. (Northridge, CA); Park, Chan Seung (Yorba Linda, CA)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 1 - Future Uses of the Subtitle D Landfill 2 3. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 2 - OSDF Siting in a Brownfield Area 3 4. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 3 - Seismic Issues 4 5. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 4 - Post-Closure Public Use of the OSDF 5 6. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 5 - Public Communication Plan 7 7. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 6 - Baseline Schedule 8 8. RECOMMENDATIONS 8 9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 10 10. REFERENCES 10 APPENDIX 11 1 1. INTRODUCTION The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is an active uranium enrichment facility that is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Uranium enrichment facilities at PGDP are leased to and operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. In 1994, PGDP was placed

332

Lessons Learned from Practical Field Experience with High Pressure Gaseous Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/2010 5/2010 www.cleanvehicle.org 1 Lessons Learned from Practical Field Experience with High Pressure Gaseous Fuels DOE - DOT CNG - H 2 Workshop December 10, 2009 Douglas Horne, PE - CVEF President Rob Adams, P.Eng. - Marathon Technical Services The Facts  NGVs have been used in North America for over 30 years  Codes and Standards (C&S) provide opportunity for safe reliable operation of NGVs  C&S evolve with new technology and field experience  People make mistakes, continuous training is critical for safe operations  Cylinders have a limited life -track your cylinders! 2/25/2010 www.cleanvehicle.org 2 Incidents in North America  Since 1984 CVEF has recorded 97 incidents of which 67 involved CNG vehicles - 37 incidents involve either a CNG leak (15) or a

333

Assessment of methods for analyzing gaseous mixtures of hydrogen isotopes and helium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mass spectrographic methods have served well in the past to analyze gaseous mixtures of the hydrogen isotopes. Alternate methods of analyses are reviewed which offer wider ranges and variety of isotopic determinations. This report describes possible improvements of the mass spectrographic determinations, gas chromatography, anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, microwave-induced optical emission spectroscopy, and methods of measuring tritium using radiation detection devices. Precision, accuracy, limitations, and costs are included for some of the methods mentioned. Costs range from $70,000 for the anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy equipment, which can determine hydrogen isotopes but not helium, to less than $10,000 for the gas chromatographic equipment, which can determine hydrogen isotopes and helium with precision and accuracy comparable to those of the mass spectrometer.

Attalla, A.; Bishop, C.T.; Bohl, D.R.; Buxton, T.L.; Sprague, R.E.; Warner, D.K.

1976-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Preliminary assessment of the gaseous fuels aftermarket conversion industry. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the report is to provide information to be used in assessing the potential impacts of EPA's proposed Gaseous Fuels and Clean Fuel Fleet rulemakings on the aftermarket conversion industry. Therefore, the report will focus on issues germane to determining these impacts (such as financial profiles of companies involved, future trends in industry development and sales, and costs of complying with conversion requirements) rather than assessing the viability of current technologies or the emissions benefits of alternative fuels. Moreover, the report focuses on conversions to CNG and LPG as conversions to these fuels are most viable at this time, even though EPA's proposed conversion regulations could potentially apply to any fuel (e.g., liquid natural gas).

Not Available

1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

335

Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to "float" in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields.

Hobson, David O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Alexeff, Igor (Oak Ridge, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Clinton, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1990 to November 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 23, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, guiding plans for remediation, and protecting human health. In September 1992, a renewed permit was issued which requires toxicity monitoring of continuous and intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities. This report includes ESD/ORNL activities occurring from December 1990 to November 1992.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1992--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The goals of BMP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, characterize potential health and environmental impacts, document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, bioaccumulation studies, and ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1992 to December 1993, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A.; Hinzman, R.L.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to ''float'' in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields. 6 figs.

Hobson, D.O.; Alexeff, I.; Sikka, V.K.

1987-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

339

Liquefied gaseous fuels safety and environmental control assessment program: third status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Status Report contains contributions from all contractors currently participating in the DOE Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LG) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program and is presented in two principal sections. Section I is an Executive Summary of work done by all program participants. Section II is a presentation of fourteen individual reports (A through N) on specific LGF Program activities. The emphasis of Section II is on research conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Reports A through M). Report N, an annotated bibliography of literature related to LNG safety and environmental control, was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of its LGF Safety Studies Project. Other organizations who contributed to this Status Report are Aerojet Energy Conversion Company; Applied Technology Corporation; Arthur D. Little, Incorporated; C/sub v/ International, Incorporated; Institute of Gas Technology; and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for Reports A through N for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

GROW1: a crop growth model for assessing impacts of gaseous pollutants from geothermal technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary model of photosynthesis and growth of field crops was developed to assess the effects of gaseous pollutants, particularly airborne sulfur compounds, resulting from energy production from geothermal resources. The model simulates photosynthesis as a function of such variables as irradiance, CO/sub 2/ diffusion resistances, and internal biochemical processes. The model allocates the products of photosynthesis to structural (leaf, stem, root, and fruit) and storage compartments of the plant. The simulations encompass the entire growing season from germination to senescence. The model is described conceptually and mathematically and examples of model output are provided for various levels of pollutant stress. Also, future developments that would improve this preliminary model are outlined and its applications are discussed.

Kercher, J.R.

1977-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Separation of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from a catalytic reforming effluent and recovery of purified hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for the catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products, is disclosed. Relatively impure hydrogen is separated from the reforming zone effluent, compressed, and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product to provide relatively pure hydrogen, a portion of which is recycled to the reforming zone. The balance is further compressed and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product in a plural stage absorption zone to provide an improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons as well as an improved recovery of purified hydrogen at a pressure suitable, for example, the relatively high pressure hydrotreating of sulfur-containing feedstocks.

O'brien, D.E.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

342

Privatization of the gaseous diffusion plants and impacts on nuclear criticality safety administration  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 created the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) on July 1, 1993. The USEC is a government-owned business that leases those Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) facilities at the Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, sites from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that are required for enriching uranium. Lockheed Martin Utility Services is the operating contractor for the USEC-leased facilities. The DOE has retained use of, and regulation over, some facilities and areas at the Portsmouth and Paducah sites for managing legacy wastes and environmental restoration activities. The USEC is regulated by the DOE, but is currently changing to regulation under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The USEC is also preparing for privatization of the uranium enrichment enterprise. These changes have significantly affected the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) programs at the sites.

D`Aquila, D.M.; Holliday, R.T. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Dean, J.C. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution, January 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of the Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1

344

Analytical risk-based model of gaseous and liquid-phase radon transport in landfills with radium sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical model of gaseous and liquid-phase radon transport through soils is derived for environmental modeling of landfills containing uranium mill tailings or Ra-226 sources. Processes include radon diffusion in both the gas and liquid phases, ... Keywords: Landfill, Multiphase, Performance assessment, Probabilistic modeling, Radium, Radon, Transport

Clifford K. Ho

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Int. J. Environment and Pollution, Vol. 8, Nos. 3-6, 1997 727 Gaseous pollutant dispersion around urban-canopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Meroney, 1983: Gas dispersion near a cubical model building. Part I. Mean concentration measurements. JInt. J. Environment and Pollution, Vol. 8, Nos. 3-6, 1997 727 Gaseous pollutant dispersion around numerical predictions of atmospheric dispersion in the urban environment on sub-meso scales. Wind

Fedorovich, Evgeni

346

Tests of Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors for Active1 Target Time Projection Chambers in nuclear physics2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests of Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors for Active1 Target Time Projection Chambers in nuclear the gas used as the detection medium10 is also a target for nuclear reactions, have been used for a wide variety of11 nuclear physics applications since the eighties. Improvements in MPGD (Mi-12 cro Pattern

Recanati, Catherine

347

Separation and recovery of hydrogen and normally gaseous hydrocarbons from net excess hydrogen from a catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons in the presence of hydrogen, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products. An improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from the net excess hydrogen is realized by chilling and contacting said hydrogen with a normally liquid hydrocarbon stream in a plural stage absorption zone at an elevated pressure.

Scheifele, C.A.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

Adaptive and Efficient Computing for Subsurface Simulation within ParFlow  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with the PF.WRF model as a means to enable more accurate predictions of wind fluctuations and subsurface storage. As developed at LLNL, PF.WRF couples a groundwater (subsurface) and surface water flow model (ParFlow) to a mesoscale atmospheric model (WRF, Weather Research and Forecasting Model). It was developed as a unique tool to address coupled water balance and wind energy questions that occur across traditionally separated research regimes of the atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface. PF.WRF is capable of simulating fluid, mass, and energy transport processes in groundwater, vadose zone, root zone, and land surface systems, including overland flow, and allows for the WRF model to both directly drive and respond to surface and subsurface hydrologic processes and conditions. The current PF.WRF model is constrained to have uniform spatial gridding below the land surface and matching areal grids with the WRF model at the land surface. There are often cases where it is advantageous for land surface, overland flow and subsurface models to have finer gridding than their atmospheric counterparts. Finer vertical discretization is also advantageous near the land surface (to properly capture feedbacks) yet many applications have a large vertical extent. However, the surface flow is strongly dependent on topography leading to a need for greater lateral resolution in some regions and the subsurface flow is tightly coupled to the atmospheric model near the surface leading to a need for finer vertical resolution. In addition, the interactions (e.g. rain) will be highly variable in space and time across the problem domain so an adaptive scheme is preferred to a static strategy to efficiently use computing and memory resources. As a result, this project focussed on algorithmic research required for development of an adaptive simulation capability in the PF.WRF system and its subsequent use in an application problem in the Central Valley of California. This report documents schemes of use for a future implementation of an adaptive grid capability within the ParFlow subsurface flow simulator in PF.WRF. The methods describe specific handling of the coarse/fine boundaries within a cell-centered discretization of the nonlinear parabolic Richards equation model for variable saturated flow. In addition, we describe development of a spline fit and table lookup method implemented within ParFlow to enhance computational efficiency of variably saturated flow calculations.

Tiedeman, H; Woodward, C S

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

349

UN SYSTEME MULTI-AGENTS GOUVERNE PAR DES LOIS LINGUISTIQUES POUR LE TRAITEMENT DE LA LANGUE NATUREI,LE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TALISMAN UN SYSTEME MULTI-AGENTS GOUVERNE PAR DES LOIS LINGUISTIQUES POUR LE TRAITEMENT DE LA de Linguistique Frangaise 1700 Univcrsit6 de FRIBOURG. SUISSE ABSTRACT Natural language processinggration d'outils linguistiques o0 les diff6rents agents du sysl~me peuvent mettre en oeuvre des m6thodes

350

The deformations of flat affine structures on the two-torus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The group action which defines the moduli problem for the deformation space of flat affine structures on the two-torus is the action of the affine group $\\Aff(2)$ on $\\bbR^2$. Since this action has non-compact stabiliser $\\GL(2,\\bbR)$, the underlying locally homogeneous geometry is highly non-Riemannian. In this article, we describe the deformation space of all flat affine structures on the two-torus. In this context interesting phenomena arise in the topology of the deformation space, which, for example, is \\emph{not} a Hausdorff space. This contrasts with the case of constant curvature metrics, or conformal structures on surfaces, which are encountered in classical Teichm\\"uller theory. As our main result on the space of deformations of flat affine structures on the two-torus we prove that the holonomy map from the deformation space to the variety of conjugacy classes of homomorphisms from the fundamental group of the two-torus to the affine group is a local homeomorphism.

Baues, Oliver

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Configuring Client PCs for use with Project Assessment and Reporting System(PARS II)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4/2011 4/2011 Page 1 of 4 1 PROCEDURES 1.1 Introduction Most users will be comfortable with contacting their IT Helpdesk for completing the instructions below. However, if you have Admin rights on your workstation, and are comfortable with making configuration changes to it, you may follow these directions yourself. 1.2 Installation of ActiveX Control WINDOWS XP 1. Log onto the workstation to be configured using an ID/Password that can perform administrative functions on that workstation (e.g. Install software, add Active-X controls). Note that administrative access is only required for initial workstation configuration, not ongoing operation of the PARS II application. 2. Check hardware, software and network requirements as identified in section 2 below. Less than

352

Release Notes: Version 8.0.20110608 of PARS II Release Date: 06/25/2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

| 1 | 1 Release Notes: Version 8.0.20110608 of PARS II Release Date: 06/25/2011 Section 1. System Enhancements CPP Upload Enhancement added - new functionality added that allows a System Administrator to select which CPP warnings appear or not appear in the Error/Warning report for a CPP upload o This functionality is available under Administration/Warning Configuration o When selected, the application will display a window with two columns: Projects and Warning Messages o User selects which project or projects for which they want to change the message display. o Then the user selects which messages from the list that they will not want to display in the report. Items checked do not display in the report as indicated by the message at the

353

Microsoft Word - PARS II User Guide V1.0.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 10, 2010 Submitted by: Energy Enterprise Solutions 20440 Century Blvd. Suite 150 Germantown, MD 20874 Phone 301-916-0050 Fax 301-916-0066 www.eesllc.net Project Assessment and Reporting System U U s s e e r r G G u u i i d d e e This page left blank intentionally. Title Page Document Name: PARS II User Guide V1.0 Publication Date: May 10, 2010 Contract Number: AM01-06IM00054 Project Number: 1ME07 CLIN 2 Written by: Jo Peck, EES Reviewed by: Ken Henderson, EES Steve Ducharme, PMC Judith Bernsen, PMC Approval: John Makepeace, OECM MA-50 This page left blank intentionally. Change Control Page Current Version # Date of Revision Section & Title Page Numbers Summary of Changes Author V1.0 5/10/2010 All All Changes from Peer Review, including

354

A Direct Error Measure for Affine Models of Nonlinear Algebraic Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Direct Error Measure for Affine Models of Nonlinear Algebraic Systems A Direct Error Measure for Affine Models of Nonlinear Algebraic Systems Speaker(s): David Lorenzetti Date: June 2, 1999 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The Newton-Raphson solution of a nonlinear system iterately linearizes the equations, then steps to the solution of the resulting affine model. When a step exceeds the predictive range of its model, the method can diverge. The traditional response -- aggregating the equations into a cost function, and applying a minimization method -- suppresses information about how each equation model performs. Direct error measures examine the equations individually, allowing finer control over step lengths. The seminar will develop one such measure through the geometry of simple one- and two-dimensional examples, then present results from a suite of larger

355

TREATMENT OF GASEOUS EFFLUENTS ISSUED FROM RECYCLING – A REVIEW OF THE CURRENT PRACTICES AND PROSPECTIVE IMPROVEMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of gaseous waste management for the recycling of nuclear used fuel is to reduce by best practical means (ALARA) and below regulatory limits, the quantity of activity discharged to the environment. The industrial PUREX process recovers the fissile material U(VI) and Pu(IV) to re-use them for the fabrication of new fuel elements e.g. recycling plutonium as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel or recycling uranium for new enrichment for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Meanwhile the separation of the waste (activation and fission product) is performed as a function of their pollution in order to store and avoid any potential danger and release towards the biosphere. Raffinate, that remains after the extraction step and which contains mostly all fission products and minor actinides is vitrified, the glass package being stored temporarily at the recycling plant site. Hulls and end pieces coming from PWR recycled fuel are compacted by means of a press leading to a volume reduced to 1/5th of initial volume. An organic waste treatment step will recycle the solvent, mainly tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) and some of its hydrolysis and radiolytic degradation products such as dibutyl phosphate (HDPB) and monobutyl phosphate (H2MBP). Although most scientific and technological development work focused on high level waste streams, a considerable effort is still under way in the area of intermediate and low level waste management. Current industrial practices for the treatment of gaseous effluents focusing essentially on Iodine-129 and Krypton-85 will be reviewed along with the development of novel technologies to extract, condition, and store these fission products. As an example, the current industrial practice is to discharge Kr-85, a radioactive gas, entirely to the atmosphere after dilution, but for the large recycling facilities envisioned in the near future, several techniques such as 1) cryogenic distillation and selective absorption in solvents, 2) adsorption on activated charcoal, 3) selective sorption on chemical modified zeolites, or 4) diffusion through membranes with selective permeability are potential technologies to retain the gas.

Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; William Kerlin; Steven Bakhtiar

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Impact of nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation on gaseous releases from a landfill bioreactor cell  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the impact of nitrate injection on a full scale landfill bioreactor through the monitoring of gaseous releases and particularly N{sub 2}O emissions. During several weeks, we monitored gas concentrations in the landfill gas collection system as well as surface gas releases with a series of seven static chambers. These devices were directly connected to a gas chromatograph coupled to a flame ionisation detector and an electron capture detector (GC-FID/ECD) placed directly on the field. Measurements were performed before, during and after recirculation of raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate. Raw leachate recirculation did not have a significant effect on the biogas concentrations (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O) in the gas extraction network. However, nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation induced a marked increase of the N{sub 2}O concentrations in the gas collected from the recirculation trench (100-fold increase from 0.2 ppm to 23 ppm). In the common gas collection system however, this N{sub 2}O increase was no more detectable because of dilution by gas coming from other cells or ambient air intrusion. Surface releases through the temporary cover were characterized by a large spatial and temporal variability. One automated chamber gave limited standard errors over each experimental period for N{sub 2}O releases: 8.1 {+-} 0.16 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 384), 4.2 {+-} 0.14 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 132) and 1.9 {+-} 0.10 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 49), during, after raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation, respectively. No clear correlation between N{sub 2}O gaseous surface releases and recirculation events were evidenced. Estimated N{sub 2}O fluxes remained in the lower range of what is reported in the literature for landfill covers, even after nitrate injection.

Tallec, G.; Bureau, C. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France); Peu, P.; Benoist, J.C. [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Lemunier, M. [Suez-Environnement, CIRADE, 38 Av. Jean Jaures, 78440 Gargenville (France); Budka, A.; Presse, D. [SITA France, 132 Rue des 3 Fontanot, 92000 Nanterre Cedex (France); Bouchez, T. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France)], E-mail: theodore.bouchez@cemagref.fr

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Characterizing the impact of end-system affinities on the end-to-end performance of high-speed flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-core end-systems use Receive Side Scaling (RSS) to parallelize protocol processing. RSS uses a hash function on the standard flow descriptors and an indirection table to assign incoming packets to receive queues which are pinned to specific cores. ... Keywords: 40 Gbps network, ESnet, RFS, RPS, application affinity, end-system performance, flow affinity, high-speed network, multi-core affinization

Nathan Hanford, Vishal Ahuja, Mehmet Balman, Matthew K. Farrens, Dipak Ghosal, Eric Pouyoul, Brian Tierney

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWR-GALE Code). Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report revises the original issuance of NUREG-0017, ''Calculation of Releases of Radioactive Materials in Gaseous and Liquid Effluents from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR-GALE-Code)'' (April 1976), to incorporate more recent operating data now available as well as the results of a number of in-plant measurement programs at operating pressurized water reactors. The PWR-GALE Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the releases of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents (i.e., the gaseous and liquid source terms). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses the PWR-GALE Code to determine conformance with the requirements of Appendix I to 10 CFR Part 50.

Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Six-dimensional muon beam cooling in a continuous, homogeneous, gaseous hydrogen absorber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fast reduction of the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams is required for muon colliders and is also of great importance for neutrino factories based on accelerated muon beams. Ionization cooling, where all momentum components are degraded by an energy absorbing material and only the longitudinal momentum is restored by RF cavities, provides a means to quickly reduce transverse beam sizes. However, the beam momentum spread cannot be reduced by this method unless the longitudinal emittance can be transformed or exchanged into the transverse emittance. The best emittance exchange plans up to now have been accomplished by using magnets to disperse the beam along the face of a wedge-shaped absorber such that higher momentum particles pass through thicker parts of the absorber and thus suffer larger ionization energy loss. In the scheme advocated in this paper, it is noted that one can generate a magnetic channel filled with absorber where higher momentum corresponds to a longer path length and therefore larger ionization energy loss. Thus a homogeneous absorber, without any special edge shaping, can provide the desired emittance exchange. An attractive example of a cooling channel based on this principle involves the use of RF cavities filled with a continuous gaseous hydrogen absorber in a magnetic channel composed of a solenoidal field with superimposed helical transverse dipole, quadrupole, and octupole fields. The theory of this helical channel is described to support the analytical prediction of a million-fold reduction in phase space volume in a channel 150 m long.

Yaroslav Derbenev; Rolland P. Johnson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Infrared absorption strengths of potential gaseous diffusion plant coolants and related reaction products  

SciTech Connect

The DOE gaseous diffusion plant complex makes extensive use of CFC-114 as a primary coolant. As this material is scheduled for production curtailment within the next few years, a search for substitutes is underway, and apparently workable alternatives have been found and are under testing. The presently favored substitutes, FC-c3l8 and FC-3110, satisfy ozone depletion and operational chemical compatibility concerns, but will be long-lived greenhouse gases, and thus may be regulated on that basis in the future. A further search is therefore underway for compounds with shorter atmospheric lifetimes which could otherwise satisfy operational physical and chemical requirements. A number of such candidates are in the process of being screened for chemical compatibility in a fluorinating environment. This document presents infrared spectral data developed and used in that study for candidates recently examined, and also for many of their fluorination reaction products. The data include gas-phase infrared spectra, quantitative peak intensities as a function of partial pressure, and integrated absorbance strength in the IR-transparent atmospheric window of interest to global warming modeling. Combining this last property with literature or estimated atmospheric lifetimes, rough estimates of global warming potential for these compounds are also presented.

Trowbridge, L.D.; Angel, E.C.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) conducted March 14 through 25, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental risk associated with ORGDP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORGDP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during is on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the ORGDP Survey findings for in inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 120 refs., 41 figs., 74 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Corrosion behavior of stainless steel in solid oxide fuel cell simulated gaseous environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant progress in reducing the operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) from {approx}1000 C to {approx} 750 C may permit the replacement of currently used ceramic interconnects by metallic interconnects in planar SOFCs (PSOFC). The use of metallic interconnects will result in a substantial cost reduction of PSOFCs. The interconnects operate in severe gaseous environments, in which one side of the interconnect can be exposed to hydrogen and the other side to air or oxygen at temperatures up to 800 C. Similar environmental conditions can exist in devices used for separating hydrogen from CO after reforming methane and steam. Type 304 stainless steel was selected for this base line study aimed at understanding corrosion processes in dual gas environments. This paper discusses the oxidation resistance of 304 stainless steel exposed to a dual environment gas at 800 C. The dual environment consisted of air on one side of the specimen and 1% hydrogen in nitrogen on the other side. The surface characterization techniques used in this study were optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as various x-ray techniques.

Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Matthes, Steven A.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.; Wilson, Rick D.; Singh, P.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Gaseous Radiochemical Method for Registration of Ionizing Radiation and Its Possible Applications in Science and Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents a new possibility of registration of ionizing radiation by the flowing gaseous radiochemical method (FGRM). The specified method uses the property of some solid crystalline lattice materials for a free emission of radioactive isotopes of inert gas atoms formed as a result of nuclear reactions. Generated in an ampoule of the detector, the radioactive inert gases are transported by a gas-carrier into the proportional gas counter of the flowing type, where the decay rate of the radioactive gas species is measured. This quantity is unequivocally related to the flux of particles (neutrons, protons, light and heavy ions) at the location of the ampoule. The method was used to monitor the neutron flux of the pulsed neutron target "RADEX" driven by the linear proton accelerator of INR RAS. Further progress of the FGRM may give rise to possible applications in nuclear physics, astrophysics and medicine, in the nondestructive control of fissionable materials, diagnostics of thermonuclear plasma, monitoring of fluxes and measurement of spectra of bombarding particles.

S. G. Lebedev; V. E. Yants

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

364

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1993 to December 1994  

SciTech Connect

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was implemented in 1987 by the University of Kentucky. Research staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as reviewers and advisers to the University of Kentucky. Beginning in fall 1991, ESD added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and (4) recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. In September 1992, a renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit was issued to PGDP. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1993 to December 1994, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was conducted by the University of Kentucky Between 1987 and 1992 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from January 1996 to December 1996, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.; Konetsky, B.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Petrie, R.B.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

IAEA Verification Experiment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Report on the Cascade Header Enrichment Monitor  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe the Cascade Header Enrichment Monitor (CHEM) for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant at Piketon, Ohio, and present the calibration and measurement results. The US government has offered excess fissile material that is no longer needed for defense purposes for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspection. Measurement results provided by the CHEM were used by the IAEA in a verification experiment to provide confidence that the US successfully blended excess highly enriched uranium (HEU) down to low enriched uranium (LEU). The CHEM measured the uranium enrichment in two cascade header pipes, a 20.32-cm HEU pipe and a 7.62-cm product LEU pipe. The CHEM determines the amount of {sup 235}U from the 185.7-keV gamma-ray photopeak and the amount of total uranium by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) of the 98.4-keV x-ray from uranium with a {sup 57}Co XRF source. The ratio yields the enrichment. The CHEM consists of a collimator assembly, an electromechanically cooled germanium detector, and a rack-mounted personal computer running commercial and custom software. The CHEM was installed in December 1997 and was used by the IAEA inspectors for announced and unannounced inspections on the HEU and LEU header pipes through October 1998. The equipment was sealed with tamper-indicating enclosures when the inspectors were not present.

P. L. Kerr; D. A. Close; W. S. Johnson; R. M. Kandarian; C. E. Moss; C. D. Romero

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Radioactivity discharged in gaseous wastes from separations facilities 200 Area stacks during 1970  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes by stack number the amount of radioactivity discharged from the facilities of Chemical Processing Division, Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company. Emission data for 231-Z Building and 2724-W, Laundry Building, which are operated by other AEC Contractors are not available for this report. Total beta, alpha and I{sup l3l} radioactive emissions from the stacks for 1970 were as follows: alpha (Pu, assumed) 1.59 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} C, alpha (U, assumed) 1.44 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} C, beta 1.93C, and I{sup 131} 4.92 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} C. Air samples taken continuously from gaseous release facilities were analyzed for total beta and alpha activity (and iodine activity, where applicable). Where sample data were not available, the total radioactive emission was adjusted by using the average emission rate prior to the subject period; or where activity was near constant, by using the daily average as a base. A gamma scan of the 291-S stack is included in the report.

Maxfield, H.L.

1971-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

368

Design and reliability optimization of a MEMS micro-hotplate for combustion of gaseous fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report will detail the process by which the silicon carbide (SiC) microhotplate devices, manufactured by GE, were imaged using IR microscopy equipment available at Sandia. The images taken were used as inputs to a finite element modeling (FEM) process using the ANSYS software package. The primary goal of this effort was to determine a method to measure the temperature of the microhotplate. Prior attempts to monitor the device's temperature by measuring its resistance had proven to be unreliable due to the nonlinearity of the doped SiC's resistance with temperature. As a result of this thermal modeling and IR imaging, a number of design recommendations were made to facilitate this temperature measurement. The lower heating value (LHV) of gaseous fuels can be measured with a catalyst-coated microhotplate calorimeter. GE created a silicon carbide (SiC) based microhotplate to address high-temperature survivability requirements for the application. The primary goal of this effort was to determine a method to measure the temperature of the microhotplate. Prior attempts to monitor the device's temperature by measuring its resistance had proven to be unreliable due to the non-linearity of the doped SiC's resistance with temperature. In this work, thermal modeling and IR imaging were utilized to determine the operation temperature as a function of parameters such as operation voltage and device sheet resistance. A number of design recommendations were made according to this work.

Manginell, R. P.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and Surrounding Area, Portsmouth, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the 16 square-mile (~41 square-kilometer) area surrounding the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The survey was performed in August 2007 utilizing a large array of helicopter mounted sodium iodide detectors. The purpose of the survey was to update the previous radiological survey levels of the environment and surrounding areas of the plant. A search for a missing radium-226 source was also performed. Implied exposure rates, man-made activity, and excess bismuth-214 activity, as calculated from the aerial data are presented in the form of isopleth maps superimposed on imagery of the surveyed area. Ground level and implied aerial exposure rates for nine specific locations are compared. Detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with those expected from normal background emitters. At specific plant locations described in the report, man-made activity was consistent with the operational histories of the location. There was no spectral activity that would indicate the presence of the lost source.

Namdoo Moon

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Independent Oversight Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, November 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant May 2011 November 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology ....................................................................................................................................... 2

371

Gaseous dry deposition of atmospheric mercury: A comparison of two surface resistance models for deposition to semiarid vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the United States, atmospheric mercury (Hg) deposition, from regional and international sources, is the largest contributor to increased Hg concentrations in bodies of water leading to bioaccumulation of methyl mercury in fish. In this work, modeled dry deposition velocities (vd) for gaseous Hg are calculated using two surface resistance parameterizations found in the literature. The flux is then estimated as the product of the species concentration and modeled vd. The calculations utilize speciated atmospheric mercury concentrations measured during an annual monitoring campaign in southern Idaho. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were monitored with Tekran models 2537A and 1130, respectively. Two anemometers collected meteorological data, including one fast-response three-dimensional sonic anemometer to measure turbulence parameters. For the flux calculation, three resistances are required to model the mechanisms that transport gaseous Hg from the atmosphere to the surface, with the surface resistance being the largest source of error. Results from two surface resistance models are presented. In particular, the downward flux is sensitive to the choice of model and input parameters such as seasonal category and mesophyll resistance. A comparison of annual GEM and RGM fluxes calculated using the two models shows good agreement for RGM (3.2% difference for annual deposition); however, for the low-solubility species of GEM, the models show a 64% difference in annual fluxes, with a range of 32% to 200% in seasonal fluxes. Results indicate the importance of understanding the diurnal variation of the physical processes modeled in the surface resistance parameterization for vd.

Heather A. Holmes; Eric R. Pardyjak; Kevin D. Perry; Michael L. Abbott

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution, January 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1

373

DIFFERENTIAL OPERATORS ON AN AFFINE CURVE S. P. SMITH and J. T. STAFFORD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIFFERENTIAL OPERATORS ON AN AFFINE CURVE S. P. SMITH and J. T. STAFFORD [Received 11 November 1986, 16A33. Proc. London Math. Soc. (3) 56 (1988) 229-259. #12;230 S. P. SMITH AND J. T. STAFFORD 0. #12;232 S. P. SMITH AND J. T. STAFFORD Given the above description of J, one may alternatively define

Smith, S. Paul

374

Stable cycling of lithium sulfide cathodes through strong affinity with a bifunctional binder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stable cycling of lithium sulfide cathodes through strong affinity with a bifunctional binder Zhi lithium­sulfur batteries have attracted great interest in recent years because of their high theoretical specific energy, which is several times that of current lithium-ion batteries. Compared to sulfur, fully

Cui, Yi

375

Solitons, Tau-functions and Hamiltonian Reduction for Non-Abelian Conformal Affine Toda Theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the Hamiltonian reduction of the two-loop Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten model (WZNW) based on an untwisted affine Kac-Moody algebra $\\cgh$. The resulting reduced models, called {\\em Generalized Non-Abelian Conformal Affine Toda (G-CAT)}, are conformally invariant and a wide class of them possesses soliton solutions; these models constitute non-abelian generalizations of the Conformal Affine Toda models. Their general solution is constructed by the Leznov-Saveliev method. Moreover, the dressing transformations leading to the solutions in the orbit of the vacuum are considered in detail, as well as the $\\tau$-functions, which are defined for any integrable highest weight representation of $\\cgh$, irrespectively of its particular realization. When the conformal symmetry is spontaneously broken, the G-CAT model becomes a generalized Affine Toda model, whose soliton solutions are constructed. Their masses are obtained exploring the spontaneous breakdown of the conformal symmetry, and their relation to the fundamental particle masses is discussed.

L. A. Ferreira; J. L. Miramontes; J. Sanchez Guillen

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Prediction of SAMPL3 host-guest affinities with the binding energy distribution analysis method (BEDAM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prediction of SAMPL3 host-guest affinities with the binding energy distribution analysis method are described to predict the free energies of binding of a series of anaesthetic drugs to a recently. The correlation coefficient between computed and measured binding free energies is 70% with high statistical

377

Affine crystal structure on rigged configurations of type $D_{n}^{(1)}$  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extending the work in Schilling (Int. Math. Res. Not. 2006:97376, 2006), we introduce the affine crystal action on rigged configurations which is isomorphic to the Kirillov---Reshetikhin crystal B r,s of type Keywords: Crystal bases, Quantum algebras, Rigged configurations

Masato Okado; Reiho Sakamoto; Anne Schilling

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Affine Type A Crystal Structure on Tensor Products of Rectangles, Demazure Characters, and Nilpotent Varieties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Answering a question of Kuniba, Misra, Okado, Takagi, and Uchiyama, it is shown that certain higher level Demazure characters of affine type A, coincide with the graded characters of coordinate rings of closures of conjugacy classes of nilpotent matrices. Keywords: Kostka polynomial, Littlewood-Richardson coefficient, crystal graph, tableau

Mark Shimozono

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A Graphics Processing Unit Accelerated Genetic Algorithm for Affine Invariant Matching of Broken Contours  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past research works have demonstrated matching of fragmented contours can be effectively accomplished with the integration of genetic algorithms and migrant principle. Despite the success, the computation involved in the evaluation of the fitness function ... Keywords: Affine Invariant Matching, Broken contours, Fragment Shader, Genetic Algorithm, Graphics Processing Unit., Migrant Principle

Chi-Sing Leung; Ping-Man Lam; P. W. Tsang; Wuchao Situ

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Affine invariant matching of broken boundaries based on simple genetic algorithm and contour reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Viewpoint independent identification of fragmented object contours can be accomplished by matching them against a collection of known reference models. For the class of near-planar objects, the matching process can be posed as the search for the existence ... Keywords: Affine invariant matching, Contour reconstruction, Fragmented contours, Migrant principle, Quality migrants, Simple genetic algorithm

P. W. M. Tsang; W. C. Situ

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

PAndAS IN THE MIST: THE STELLAR AND GASEOUS MASS WITHIN THE HALOS OF M31 AND M33  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale surveys of the prominent members of the Local Group have provided compelling evidence for the hierarchical formation of massive galaxies, revealing a wealth of substructure that is thought to be the debris from ancient and ongoing accretion events. In this paper, we compare two extant surveys of the M31-M33 subgroup of galaxies: the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey of the stellar structure, and a combination of observations of the H I gaseous content, detected at 21 cm. Our key finding is a marked lack of spatial correlation between these two components on all scales, with only a few potential overlaps between stars and gas. The paucity of spatial correlation significantly restricts the analysis of kinematic correlations, although there does appear to be H I kinematically associated with the Giant Stellar Stream where it passes the disk of M31. These results demonstrate that different processes must significantly influence the dynamical evolution of the stellar and H I components of substructures, such as ram pressure driving gas away from a purely gravitational path. Detailed modeling of the offset between the stellar and gaseous substructures will provide a determination of the properties of the gaseous halos of M31 and M33.

Lewis, Geraint F. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)] [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Braun, Robert [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); McConnachie, Alan W. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)] [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Irwin, Michael J.; Chapman, Scott C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Martin, Nicolas F. [Observatoire de Strasbourg, 11, rue de l'Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France)] [Observatoire de Strasbourg, 11, rue de l'Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Fardal, Mark [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Dubinski, John [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George Street, University of Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George Street, University of Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Widrow, Larry [Department of Physics, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Mackey, A. Dougal [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)] [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Babul, Arif [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Tanvir, Nial R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Rich, Michael, E-mail: geraint.lewis@sydney.edu.au [Division of Astronomy, University of California, 8979 Math Sciences, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)] [Division of Astronomy, University of California, 8979 Math Sciences, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

382

Summary and Outlook of the International Workshop on Aging Phenomena in Gaseous Detectors (DESY, Hamburg, October, 2001)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Energy Physics experiments are currently entering a new era which requires the operation of gaseous particle detectors at unprecedented high rates and integrated particle fluxes. Full functionality of such detectors over the lifetime of an experiment in a harsh radiation environment is of prime concern to the involved experimenters. New classes of gaseous detectors such as large-scale straw-type detectors, Micro-pattern Gas Detectors and related detector types with their own specific aging effects have evolved since the first workshop on wire chamber aging was held at LBL, Berkeley in 1986. In light of these developments and as detector aging is a notoriously complex field, the goal of the workshop was to provide a forum for interested experimentalists to review the progress in understanding of aging effects and to exchange recent experiences. A brief summary of the main results and experiences reported at the 2001 workshop is presented, with the goal of providing a systematic review of aging effects in state-of-the-art and future gaseous detectors.

M. Titov; M. Hohlmann; C. Padilla; N. Tesch

2002-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

383

Method for selectively removing fluorine and fluorine-containing contaminants from gaseous UF/sub 6/. [ClF/sub 3/  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a method for effecting preferential removal and immobilization of certain gaseous contaminants from gaseous UF/sub 6/. The contaminants include fluorine and fluorides which are more reactive with CaCO/sub 3/ than is UF/sub 6/. The method comprises contacting the contaminant-carrying UF/sub 6/ with particulate CaCO/sub 3/ at a temperature effecting reaction of the contaminant and the CaCO/sub 3/.

Jones, R.L.; Otey, M.G.; Perkins, R.W.

1980-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

384

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1995, samples from monitoring wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) samples were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 12,076. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. There were no constituents which exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. There were also no constituents which were above the SRS Flag 2 criteria in any well at the three sites during second quarter 1995.

Chase, J.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Prioritizing and scheduling Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant safeguards upgrades. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Site Safeguards and Security Plan (SSSP), facilities are required to develop a Resource Plan (RP). The Resource Plan provides documentation and justification for the facility`s planned upgrades, including the schedule, priority, and cost estimates for the safeguards and security upgrades. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) management has identified and obtained funding approval for a number of safeguards and security upgrades, including line-item construction projects. These upgrade projects were selected to address a variety of concerns identified in the PORTS vulnerability assessments and other reviews performed in support of the SSSP process. However, budgeting and scheduling constraints do not make it possible to simultaneously begin implementation of all of the upgrade projects. A formal methodology and analysis are needed to explicitly address the trade-offs between competing safeguards objectives, and to prioritize and schedule the upgrade projects to ensure that the maximum benefit can be realized in the shortest possible time frame. The purpose of this report is to describe the methodology developed to support these upgrade project scheduling decisions. The report also presents the results obtained from applying the methodology to a set of the upgrade projects selected by PORTS S&S management. Data for the analysis are based on discussions with personnel familiar with the PORTS safeguards and security needs, the requirements for implementing these upgrades, and upgrade funding limitations. The analysis results presented here assume continued highly enriched uranium (HEU) operations at PORTS. However, the methodology developed is readily adaptable for the evaluation of other operational scenarios and other resource allocation issues relevant to PORTS.

Edmunds, T.; Saleh, R.; Zevanove, S.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio, is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Uranium hexafluoride enriched uranium than 1.0 wt percent {sup 235}U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 (Reference 1) and 178 (Reference 2), or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF{sub 6} cylinders/overpacks. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF{sub 6} packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the is documented in Reference 4.

Becker, D.L.; Green, D.J.; Lindquist, M.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Modifying woody plants for efficient conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Short Rotation Woody Crop Program (SRWCP), Department of Energy, is developing woody plant species as sources of renewable energy. Much progress has been made in identifying useful species, and testing site adaptability, stand densities, coppicing abilities, rotation lengths, and harvesting systems. Conventional plant breeding and intensive cultural practices have been used to increase above-ground biomass yields. Given these and foreseeable accomplishments, program leaders are now shifting attention to prospects for altering biomass physical and chemical characteristics, and to ways for improving the efficiency with which biomass can be converted to gaseous and liquid fuels. This report provides a review and synthesis of literature concerning the quantity and quality of such characteristics and constituents, and opportunities for manipulating them via conventional selection and breeding and/or molecular biology. Species now used by SRWCP are emphasized, with supporting information drawn from others as needed. Little information was found on silver maple (Acer saccharinum), but general comparisons (Isenberg 1981) suggest composition and behavior similar to those of the other species. Where possible, conclusions concerning means for and feasibility of manipulation are given, along with expected impacts on conversion efficiency. Information is also provided on relationships to other traits, genotype X environment interactions, and potential trade-offs or limitations. Biomass productivity per se is not addressed, except in terms of effects that may by caused by changes in constituent quality and/or quantity. Such effects are noted to the extent they are known or can be estimated. Likely impacts of changes, however effected, on suitability or other uses, e.g., pulp and paper manufacture, are notes. 311 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Dinus, R.J.; Dimmel, D.R.; Feirer, R.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Malcolm, E.W. (Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13, 173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During fourth quarter 1992, no constituents analyzed exceeded the PDWS or the SRS Flag 2 criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 26 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow directions are south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates).

Thompson, C.Y.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Microsoft PowerPoint - PARS II CPP Deployment Schedule 13Aug10.pptx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAY-SEPTEMBER 2010 MAY-SEPTEMBER 2010 CALENDAR YEAR PLAN (Projects post CD-2 w/Contractor Project Perfomance (CPP upload) As of: 13 Aug 10 2010 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 MAY EM-INL-CWI JUNE EM-ORP-BNI EM-Oak Ridge-Isotek EM/NA-LANL-LANS NA-Pantex- SC S JULY SC SLAC S f d SC LBNL UCLBNL 1 NA-Y12-BWXTY12 EM ORNL BJC SC-BNL-BSA NA-SRS-SAMS (MOX) EM-SRS-SRR EM SPRU WGI B&W Pantex SC-TJNAF-JSA AUGUST SC-SLAC-Stanford SC-LBNL-UCLBNL 1 EM-ORNL-BJC EM/NA-SRS-SRNS* EM/NA-SRS-SRNS* EM-SPRU-WGI NA-SNL-SCLM SEPTEMBER Labor Day EM/NA SRS SRNS EM/NA SRS SRNS NA SNL SCLM Weekend/ Holiday. Onsite Work Interface Operational SC-FNAL-FRA Sites can upload into PARS II production servers by the 7 th of the month following their Interface Operational date.

390

Method for resurrecting negative electron affinity photocathodes after exposure to an oxidizing gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method by which negative electron affinity photocathodes (201), single crystal, amorphous, or otherwise ordered, can be made to recover their quantum yield following exposure to an oxidizing gas has been discovered. Conventional recovery methods employ the use of cesium as a positive acting agent (104). In the improved recovery method, an electron beam (205), sufficiently energetic to generate a secondary electron cloud (207), is applied to the photocathode in need of recovery. The energetic beam, through the high secondary electron yield of the negative electron affinity surface (203), creates sufficient numbers of low energy electrons which act on the reduced-yield surface so as to negate the effects of absorbed oxidizing atoms thereby recovering the quantum yield to a pre-decay value.

Mulhollan, Gregory A; Bierman, John C

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

On boundary fusion and functional relations in the Baxterized affine Hecke algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct boundary type operators satisfying the fused reflection equation for arbitrary representations of the Baxterized affine Hecke algebra. These operators are analogues of the fused reflection matrices in solvable half-line spin chain models. We show that these operators lead to a family of commuting transfer matrices of Sklyanin type. We derive fusion type functional relations for these operators for two families of representations.

A. Babichenko; V. Regelskis

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

392

Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to obtain results from a given sample collection. The destructive assay instrument, LAARS-destructive assay (DA), uses a simple purpose-built fixture with a sampling planchet to collect adsorbed UF6 gas from a cylinder valve or from a process line tap or pigtail. A portable LAARS-DA instrument scans the microgram quantity of uranium collected on the planchet and the assay of the uranium is measured to ~0.15% relative precision. Currently, destructive assay samples for bias defect measurements are collected in small sample cylinders for offsite mass spectrometry measurement.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Phillips, Jon R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Design of an Unattended Environmental Aerosol Sampling and Analysis System for Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The resources of the IAEA continue to be challenged by the rapid, worldwide expansion of nuclear energy production. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) represent an especially formidable dilemma to the application of safeguard measures, as the size and enrichment capacity of GCEPs continue to escalate. During the early part of the 1990's, the IAEA began to lay the foundation to strengthen and make cost-effective its future safeguard regime. Measures under Part II of 'Programme 93+2' specifically sanctioned access to nuclear fuel production facilities and environmental sampling by IAEA inspectors. Today, the Additional Protocol grants inspection and environmental sample collection authority to IAEA inspectors at GCEPs during announced and low frequency unannounced (LFUA) inspections. During inspections, IAEA inspectors collect environmental swipe samples that are then shipped offsite to an analytical laboratory for enrichment assay. This approach has proven to be an effective deterrence to GCEP misuse, but this method has never achieved the timeliness of detection goals set forth by IAEA. Furthermore it is questionable whether the IAEA will have the resources to even maintain pace with the expansive production capacity of the modern GCEP, let alone improve the timeliness in reaching current safeguards conclusions. New safeguards propositions, outside of familiar mainstream safeguard measures, may therefore be required that counteract the changing landscape of nuclear energy fuel production. A new concept is proposed that offers rapid, cost effective GCEP misuse detection, without increasing LFUA inspection access or introducing intrusive access demands on GCEP operations. Our approach is based on continuous onsite aerosol collection and laser enrichment analysis. This approach mitigates many of the constraints imposed by the LFUA protocol, reduces the demand for onsite sample collection and offsite analysis, and overcomes current limitations associated with the in-facility misuse detection devices. Onsite environmental sample collection offers the ability to collect fleeting uranium hexafluoride emissions before they are lost to the ventilation system or before they disperse throughout the facility, to become deposited onto surfaces that are contaminated with background and historical production material. Onsite aerosol sample collection, combined with enrichment analysis, provides the unique ability to quickly detect stepwise enrichment level changes within the facility, leading to a significant strengthening of facility misuse deterence. We report in this paper our study of several GCEP environmental sample release scenarios and simulation results of a newly designed aerosol collection and particle capture system that is fully integrated with the Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) uranium particle enrichment analysis instrument that was developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Anheier, Norman C.; Munley, John T.; Alexander, M. L.

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

Advanced Laser Diagnostics Development for the Characterization of Gaseous High Speed Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of high-speed flows represents a challenging problem in the fluid dynamics field due to the presence of chemical reactions and non-equilibrium effects. Hypersonic flights, where speeds reach Mach 5 and above, are particularly influenced by these effects, resulting in a direct impact on the flow and consequently on the aerodynamic performance of a vehicle traveling at these speeds. The study of hypersonic flow conditions requires the experimental capability of determining local temperatures, pressures and velocities using non-intrusive techniques. Furthermore, the simultaneous measurement of two or more variables in a complex flow boosts the amount of information that is obtained since valuable correlations can be established. This research includes the design, construction and characterization of a hypersonic flow apparatus explicitly intended as a tool for advanced laser diagnostics development. This apparatus is characterized by its pulsed operation mode that translates into a significant reduction in mass flow rates and can be operated for long periods at Mach numbers ranging from 2.8 to 6.2. The flow conditions during the uniform flow time interval of each pulse vary by less than 1%, generating a flow of sufficient quality for quantitative measurements. The development of a laser diagnostic technique, the VENOM technique, which is a non-intrusive method to provide simultaneous 2-D measurements of the mean and instantaneous fluctuations in two-component velocity and temperature is also presented. This technique represents the first single diagnostic capable of instantaneous two-component velocimetry and thermometry in a gaseous flow field by combining two Nitric Oxide Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence methods: two-component Molecular Tagging Velocimetry and two-line thermometry, employing the nascent NO(v"=1) arising from the NO2 photodissociation as a molecular tracer. The VENOM technique is expected to be not only applicable to cold high-speed flows, which is the focus of the present work, but also to combustion and other reactive or high-enthalpy flow fields.

Sanchez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Elucidating the solid, liquid and gaseous products from batch pyrolysis of cotton-gin trash.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cotton-gin trash (CGT) was pyrolyzed at different temperatures and reaction times using an externally-heated batch reactor. The average yields of output products (solid/char, liquid/bio-oil, and gaseous) were determined. The heating value (HV) of CGT was measured to be around 15-16 MJ kg- 1 (6500-7000 Btu lb-1). In the first set of tests, CGT was pyrolyzed at 600, 700, and 800°C and at 30, 45, and 60 min reaction period. The maximum char yield of 40% by weight (wt.%) was determined at 600°C and 30 min settings, however, the HV of char was low and almost similar to the HV of CGT. A maximum gas yield of 40 wt.% was measured at 800°C and 60 min and the highest liquid yield of 30 wt.% was determined at 800°C and 30 min. In the modified pyrolysis test, the effects of temperature (500, 600, 700, and 800°C) on the product yield and other properties were investigated. The experiment was performed using the same reactor purged with nitrogen at a rate of 1000 cm3 min-1. Gas yield increased as temperature was increased while the effect was opposite on char yield. The maximum char yield of 38 wt.% was determined at 500°C and 30 min. The char had the largest fraction in the energy output (70-83%) followed by gas (10-20%) and bio-oil (7- 9%). Maximum gas yield of 35 wt.% was determined at 800°C. The average yield of CO, H2 and total hydrocarbons (THC) generally increased with increased temperature but CO2 production decreased. Methane, ethane, and propane dominated the THC. The bio-oil yield at 600°C was the highest at about 30 wt.% among the temperature settings. The HV of bio-oil was low (2-5 MJ kg-1) due to minimal non-HC compounds and high moisture content (MC). A simple energy balance of the process was performed. The process was considered energy intensive due to the high amount of energy input (6100 kJ) while generating a maximum energy output of only 10%. After disregarding the energy used for preparation and pyrolysis, the energy losses ranged from 30-46% while the energy of the output represent between 55-70% of the input energy from CGT.

Aquino, Froilan Ludana

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE ColloqueC5, supplmentau no 11-12, Tome 34, Novembre-Dcembre 1973,page C5-11 SIMULATION PAR BOMBARDEMENT D'IONS Nif  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-11 SIMULATION PAR BOMBARDEMENT D'IONS Nif DE MOYENNE Ã?NERGIE DES EFFETS D'IRRADIATION EN BILE DANS LE NICKEL ET

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

397

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) apparatus for nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited)  

SciTech Connect

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D. A.; Velsko, C. A.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Yeamans, C. B.; Moody, K. J.; Tereshatov, E.; Stoeffl, W.; Riddle, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-236, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Affine parametrization of the dark sector: Constraints from WMAP5 and SDSS  

SciTech Connect

We study a set of universe models where the dark sector is described by a perfect fluid with an affine equation of state P=P{sub 0}+{alpha}{rho}, focusing specifically on cosmological perturbations in a flat universe. We perform a Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis spanning the full parameter space of the model using the WMAP 5-yr data and the SDSS LRG4 survey. The affine fluid can either play the role of a unified dark matter, accounting for both dark matter and a cosmological constant, or work alongside cold dark matter (CDM), as a form of dark energy. A key ingredient is the sound speed, that depends on the nature of the fluid and that, for any given background model, adds a degree of freedom to the perturbations: in the barotropic case the square of the sound speed is simply equal to the affine parameter {alpha}; if entropic perturbations are present the effective sound speed has to be specified as an additional parameter. In addition to the barotropic case, we consider the two limiting cases of effective sound speed equal to 0 or 1. For {alpha}=c{sub s}{sup 2}=0 our unified dark matter model is equivalent to the standard {lambda}CDM with adiabatic perturbations. Apart of a trivial subcase, all models considered satisfy the data constraints, with quite standard values for the usual cosmological parameters. In general our analysis confirms that cosmological data sets require both a collisionless massive and cold component to form the potential wells that lead to structure formation, and an effective cosmological constant that drives the late accelerated expansion.

Pietrobon, Davide; Bruni, Marco [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Mercantile House, Portsmouth PO1 2EG (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Balbi, Amedeo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma 'Tor Vergata', via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Quercellini, Claudia [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Rapid purification of circular DNA by triplex-mediated affinity capture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-step capture of a target supercoiled double-stranded DNA molecule is accomplished by forming a local triple-helix among two strands of the supercoiled circular DNA and an oligonucleotide probe. The oligonucleotide is bound to an immobilizing support which facilitates the immobilization and purification of target DNA molecules. Non-target DNA molecules and other contaminating cellular material are easily removed by washing. The triple-helical structure is destabilized by raising the pH, leaving purified target DNA in the supernatant and reusable affinity capture oligonucleotide secured to the immobilizing support.

Ji, Huamin (4817 Sheboygan Ave., Madison, WI 53705); Smith, Lloyd M. (1115 Amherst Dr., Madison, WI 53705)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Rapid purification of circular DNA by triplex-mediated affinity capture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-step capture of a target supercoiled double-stranded DNA molecule is accomplished by forming a local triple-helix among two strands of the supercoiled circular DNA and an oligonucleotide probe. The oligonucleotide is bound to an immobilizing support which facilitates the immobilization and purification of target DNA molecules. Non-target DNA molecules and other contaminating cellular material are easily removed by washing. The triple-helical structure is destabilized by raising the pH, leaving purified target DNA in the supernatant and reusable affinity capture oligonucleotide secured to the immobilizing support. 3 figs.

Ji, H.; Smith, L.M.

1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. No constituents exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Aluminum, iron, lead, and manganese, which were above standards and Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during first quarter 1994, were not analyzed this quarter. Second quarter results are similar to results for fourth quarter 1993.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Engineering an ultra-stable affinity reagent based on Top7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Antibodies are widely used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications because of their sensitive and specific recognition of a wide range of targets; however, their application is limited by their structural complexity. More demanding applications require greater stability than can be achieved by immunoglobulin-based reagents. Highly-stable, proteinbased affinity reagents are being investigated for this role with the goal of identifying a suitable scaffold that can attain specificity and sensitivity similar to that of antibodies while performing under conditions where antibodies fail. We have engineered Top7 a highly stable, computationally-designed protein to specifically bind human CD4 by inserting a peptide sequence derived from a CD4-specific antibody. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to evaluate the structural effect of the peptide insertion at a specific site within Top7 and suggest that this Top7 variant retains conformational stability over 100 °C. This engineered protein specifically binds CD4 and, consistent with simulations, is extremely resistant to thermal and chemical denaturation retaining its secondary structure up to at least 95°C and requiring 6 M guanidine to completely unfold. This CD4-specific protein demonstrates the functionality of Top7 as a viable scaffold for use as a general affinity reagent which could serve as a robust and inexpensive alternative to antibodies.

Boschek, Curt B.; Apiyo, David O.; Soares, Thereza A.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Pefaur, Noah; Straatsma, TP; Baird, Cheryl L.

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

Tau-functions and Dressing Transformations for Zero-Curvature Affine Integrable Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solutions of a large class of hierarchies of zero-curvature equations that includes Toda and KdV type hierarchies are investigated. All these hierarchies are constructed from affine (twisted or untwisted) Kac-Moody algebras~$\\ggg$. Their common feature is that they have some special ``vacuum solutions'' corresponding to Lax operators lying in some abelian (up to the central term) subalgebra of~$\\ggg$; in some interesting cases such subalgebras are of the Heisenberg type. Using the dressing transformation method, the solutions in the orbit of those vacuum solutions are constructed in a uniform way. Then, the generalized tau-functions for those hierarchies are defined as an alternative set of variables corresponding to certain matrix elements evaluated in the integrable highest-weight representations of~$\\ggg$. Such definition of tau-functions applies for any level of the representation, and it is independent of its realization (vertex operator or not). The particular important cases of generalized mKdV and KdV hierarchies as well as the abelian and non abelian affine Toda theories are discussed in detail.

L. A. Ferreira; J. L. Miramontes; J. Sanchez Guillen

1996-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

404

12-fold Quasicrystallography from affine E6, B6, and F4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasicrystallography may take a century to settle down as commented by Prof Freeman J. Dyson in an address to the American Mathematical Society. One possible way to obtain the quasicrystallographic structures is the projections of the higher dimensional lattices in 2D or 3D. This paper introduces a general technique for the projections of the lattices described by the affine Coxeter groups and, as examples, apply it to the projections of the lattices described by the affine Coxeter groups Wa(E6), Wa(B6), and Wa(F4) onto the Coxeter plane. These are the groups described by the Coxeter number h=12. The dihedral subgroup D12 of the Coxeter groups plays the crucial role in the symmetry of the projected set of points. It can be derived by defining two generators R1 and R2 which act as reflection generators in the orthogonal planes where the product R1R2 describes the Coxeter element of the Coxeter group. The canonical projections (strip projections) of the lattices determine the nature of the quasicrystallographic structures with 12-fold symmetry as well as the crystallographic structures with 4-fold and 6-fold symmetry. We note that the projections of the lattice Wa(F4) and Wa(B6) describe the 12-fold symmetric quasicrystal structure obtained from the Ni-Cr particles. .

Mehmet Koca; Nazife O. Koca; Ramazan Koc

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

405

AN AFFINE-INVARIANT SAMPLER FOR EXOPLANET FITTING AND DISCOVERY IN RADIAL VELOCITY DATA  

SciTech Connect

Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) proves to be powerful for Bayesian inference and in particular for exoplanet radial velocity fitting because MCMC provides more statistical information and makes better use of data than common approaches like chi-square fitting. However, the nonlinear density functions encountered in these problems can make MCMC time-consuming. In this paper, we apply an ensemble sampler respecting affine invariance to orbital parameter extraction from radial velocity data. This new sampler has only one free parameter, and does not require much tuning for good performance, which is important for automatization. The autocorrelation time of this sampler is approximately the same for all parameters and far smaller than Metropolis-Hastings, which means it requires many fewer function calls to produce the same number of independent samples. The affine-invariant sampler speeds up MCMC by hundreds of times compared with Metropolis-Hastings in the same computing situation. This novel sampler would be ideal for projects involving large data sets such as statistical investigations of planet distribution. The biggest obstacle to ensemble samplers is the existence of multiple local optima; we present a clustering technique to deal with local optima by clustering based on the likelihood of the walkers in the ensemble. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the sampler on real radial velocity data.

Hou Fengji; Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Goodman, Jonathan; Weare, Jonathan [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Schwab, Christian, E-mail: fh417@nyu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16. mu. m laser radiation using gaseous CF/sub 4/  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 ..mu..m laser radiation using gaseous CF/sub 4/. Laser radiation at 16 ..mu..m has been observed in a cooled static cell containing low pressure CF/sub 4/ optically pumped by an approximately 3 W output power c-w CO/sub 2/ laser. The laser cavity employed was a multiple-pass off-axis-path two spherical mirror ring resonator. Unidirectional CF/sub 4/ laser output power at 615 cm/sup -1/ exceeded 2 mW. Computer calculations indicate that for modest pump powers of about 40 W, approximately 1 W of emitted laser radiation at 16 ..mu..m might be obtained.

Telle, J.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 .mu.m laser radiation using gaseous CF.sub.4  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 .mu.m laser radiation using gaseous CF.sub.4. Laser radiation at 16 .mu.m has been observed in a cooled static cell containing low pressure CF.sub.4 optically pumped by an approximately 3 W output power cw CO.sub.2 laser. The laser cavity employed was a multiple-pass off-axis-path two spherical mirror ring resonator. Unidirectional CF.sub.4 laser output power at 615 cm.sup.-1 exceeded 2 mW. Computer calculations indicate that for modest pump powers of about 40 W, approximately 1 W of emitted laser radiation at 16 .mu.m might be obtained.

Telle, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Mailbox Computer System for the IAEA verification experiment on HEU downlending at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

IN APRIL 1996, THE UNITED STATES (US) ADDED THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT TO THE LIST OF FACILITIES ELIGIBLE FOR THE APPLICATION OF INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA) SAFEGUARDS. AT THAT TIME, THE US PROPOSED THAT THE IAEA CARRY OUT A ''VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT'' AT THE PLANT WITH RESPECT TO DOOWNBLENDING OF ABOUT 13 METRIC TONS OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) IN THE FORM OF URANIUM HEXAFLUROIDE (UF6). DURING THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1997 THROUGH JULY 1998, THE IAEA CARRIED OUT THE REQUESTED VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT. THE VERIFICATION APPROACH USED FOR THIS EXPERIMENT INCLUDED, AMONG OTHER MEASURES, THE ENTRY OF PROCESS-OPERATIONAL DATA BY THE FACILITY OPERATOR ON A NEAR-REAL-TIME BASIS INTO A ''MAILBOX'' COMPUTER LOCATED WITHIN A TAMPER-INDICATING ENCLOSURE SEALED BY THE IAEA.

Aronson, A.L.; Gordon, D.M.

2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Detection of illicit HEU production in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants using neutron counting techniques on product cylinders  

SciTech Connect

Innovative and novel safeguards approaches are needed for nuclear energy to meet global energy needs without the threat of nuclear weapons proliferation. Part of these efforts will include creating verification techniques that can monitor uranium enrichment facilities for illicit production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU). Passive nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques will be critical in preventing illicit HEU production because NDA offers the possibility of continuous and unattended monitoring capabilities with limited impact on facility operations. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) are commonly used to produce low-enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel. In a GCEP, gaseous UF{sub 6} spins at high velocities in centrifuges to separate the molecules containing {sup 238}U from those containing the lighter {sup 235}U. Unfortunately, the process for creating LEU is inherently the same as HEU, creating a proliferation concern. Insuring that GCEPs are producing declared enrichments poses many difficult challenges. In a GCEP, large cascade halls operating thousands of centrifuges work together to enrich the uranium which makes effective monitoring of the cascade hall economically prohibitive and invasive to plant operations. However, the enriched uranium exiting the cascade hall fills product cylinders where the UF{sub 6} gas sublimes and condenses for easier storage and transportation. These product cylinders hold large quantities of enriched uranium, offering a strong signal for NDA measurement. Neutrons have a large penetrability through materials making their use advantageous compared to gamma techniques where the signal is easily attenuated. One proposed technique for detecting HEU production in a GCEP is using neutron coincidence counting at the product cylinder take off stations. This paper discusses findings from Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code simulations that examine the feasibility of such a detector.

Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

High voltage research (breakdown strengths of gaseous and liquid insulators) and environmental effects of dielectric gases. Semiannual report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics covered include basic studies of gaseous dielectrics, direct current breakdown strengths of gases/mixtures, environmental effects studies and decomposition analyses, impulse studies, breakdown strengths of binary mixtures with concentric cylinder geometry, and a discussion of the experimental apparatus. (GHT)

Christophorou, L.G.; James, D.R.; Pai, R.Y.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The importance of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} for sulphation of gaseous KCl - An experimental investigation in a biomass fired CFB boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is based on results obtained during co-combustion of wood pellets and straw in a 12 MW circulating fluidised bed (CFB) boiler. Elemental sulphur (S) and ammonium sulphate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}) were used as additives to convert the alkali chlorides (mainly KCl) to less corrosive alkali sulphates. Their performance was then evaluated using several measurement tools including, IACM (on-line measurements of gaseous alkali chlorides), a low-pressure impactor (particle size distribution and chemical composition of extracted fly ash particles), and deposit probes (chemical composition in deposits collected). The importance of the presence of either SO{sub 2} or SO{sub 3} for gas phase sulphation of KCl is also discussed. Ammonium sulphate performed significantly better than elemental sulphur. A more efficient sulphation of gaseous KCl was achieved with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} even when the S/Cl molar ratio was less than half compared to sulphur. Thus the presence of gaseous SO{sub 3} is of greater importance than that of SO{sub 2} for the sulphation of gaseous KCl. (author)

Kassman, Haakan [Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Division of Energy Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Baefver, Linda [Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Energy Technology, Boraas (Sweden); Aamand, Lars-Erik [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Division of Energy Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Annual book of ASTM Standards 2008. Section Five. Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels. Volume 05.06. Gaseous fuels; coal and coke  

SciTech Connect

The first part covers standards for gaseous fuels. The second part covers standards on coal and coke including the classification of coals, determination of major elements in coal ash and trace elements in coal, metallurgical properties of coal and coke, methods of analysis of coal and coke, petrogrpahic analysis of coal and coke, physical characteristics of coal, quality assurance and sampling.

NONE

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Improving the accuracy of flow units prediction through two committee machine models: An example from the South Pars Gas Field, Persian Gulf Basin, Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intelligent reservoir characterization is a prerequisite study for development of oil and gas fields. Hydraulic flow units are mappable portions of hydrocarbon-bearing rocks that control fluid flow, and their modeling allows an accurate understanding ... Keywords: Committee machine, Flow units, Fuzzy logic, Genetic algorithm, Iran, Neural network, Neuro-fuzzy, South Pars Gas Field

Javad Ghiasi-Freez; Ali Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi; Mansur Ziaii

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Torsion in Boundary Coinvariants and K-theory for Affine Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $(G,{\\mathfrak I},N,S)$ be an affine topological Tits system, and let $\\Gamma$ be a torsion free cocompact lattice in $G$. This article studies the coinvariants $H_0(\\Gamma; C(\\Omega,{\\mathbb Z}))$, where $\\Omega$ is the Furstenberg boundary of $G$. It is shown that the class $[1]$ of the identity function in $H_0(\\Gamma; C(\\Omega,{\\mathbb Z}))$ has finite order, with explicit bounds for the order. A similar statement applies to the $K_0$ group of the boundary crossed product $C^*$-algebra $C(\\Omega)\\rtimes\\Gamma$. If the Tits system has type $\\widetilde A_2$, exact computations are given, both for the crossed product algebra and for the reduced group $C^*$-algebra.

Guyan Robertson.; 33 (2005); 347-369

415

Stable cycling of lithium sulfide cathodes through strong affinity with a bifunctional binder  

SciTech Connect

Rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries have attracted great interest in recent years because of their high theoretical specific energy, which is several times that of current lithium-ion batteries. Compared to sulfur, fully-lithiated Li{sub 2}S represents a more attractive cathode material because it enables pairing with safer, lithium metal-free anodes. Here, we demonstrate stable and high-performance Li{sub 2}S cathodes by using ab initio simulations to guide our rational selection of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) binder which exhibits strong affinity with both Li{sub 2}S and lithium polysulfides. A high discharge capacity of 760 mA h g{sup -1} of Li{sub 2}S (~ 1090 mA h g{sup -1} of S) was achieved at 0.2 C with stable cycling over prolonged 500 charge/discharge cycles.

Seh, Zhi Wei; Zhang, Qianfan; Li, Weiyang; Zheng, Guangyuan; Yao, Hongbin; Cui, Yi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Flow of power-law fluids in self-affine fracture channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The two-dimensional pressure driven flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids in self-affine fracture channels at finite Reynolds number is calculated. The channels have constant mean aperture and two values $\\zeta$=0.5 and 0.8 of the Hurst exponent are considered. The calculation is based on the lattice-Boltzmann method, using a novel method to obtain a power-law variation in viscosity, and the behavior of shear-thinning, Newtonian and shear-thickening liquids is compared. Local aspects of the flow fields, such as maximum velocity and pressure fluctuations, were studied, and the non-Newtonian fluids were compared to the (previously-studied) Newtonian case. The permeability results may be collapsed into a master curve of friction factor vs. Reynolds number using a scaling similar to that employed for porous media flow, and exhibits a transition from a linear regime to a more rapid variation at Re increases.

Yiguang Yan; Joel Koplik

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

Image sequence coding using multiple-level segmentation and affine motion estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—A very low bit-rate video codec using multiple-level segmentation and affine motion compensation is presented. The translational motion model is adequate to motion compensate small regions even when complex motion is involved; however, it is no longer capable of delivering satisfactory results when applied to large regions or the whole frame. The proposed codec is based on a variable block size algorithm enhanced with global motion compensation, inner block segmentation, and a set of motion models used adaptively in motion compensation. The experimental results show that the proposed method gives better results in terms of the bit rate under the same PSNR constraint for most of the tested sequences as compared with the fixed block size approach and traditional variable block size codec in which only translational motion compensation is utilized. Index Terms — Codecs, data compression, motion compensation, video coding. I.

Kui Zhang; Miros?aw Bober; Associate Member; Josef Kittler

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Microsoft Word - Configuring Workstations for use with the PARS II System.V3.0.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30/2010 30/2010 1 PROCEDURES 1.1 Introduction Most users will be comfortable with contacting their IT Helpdesk for completing the instructions below. However, If you have Admin rights on your workstation, and are comfortable with making configuration changes to it, you may follow these directions yourself. 1.2 Installation of Dekker, Ltd. ActiveX Control 1. Log onto the workstation to be configured using an ID/Password that can perform administrative functions on the workstation being configured (e.g. Install software, add Active-X controls). Note that administrative access is only required for initial workstation configuration, not ongoing operation of the PARS II application on the workstation. 2. Check hardware, software and network requirements as identified in section 2 below.

419

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application sites groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1995, samples from monitoring wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) samples were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 12,076. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. The only constituent that exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well was lead which was found in wells HSS 3D and PSS 3D. Aluminum and iron were above Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during first quarter 1995.

Chase, J.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Enhanced affine invariant matching of broken boundaries based on particle swarm optimization and the dynamic migrant principle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently particle swarm optimization (PSO) has been successfully applied in identifying contours that are originated from different views of the same object. As compared with similar approaches based on simple genetic algorithms (SGA), the PSO exhibits ... Keywords: Affine invariant matching, Broken boundary, Dynamic migrant principle, Particle swarm optimization, Static migrant principle

Peter W. M. Tsang; Terry Y. F. Yuen; W. C. Situ

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Double-pulse and single-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for distinguishing between gaseous and particulate phase analytes  

SciTech Connect

We explore the use of a combination of double-pulse and single-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) methodologies as a means of differentiating between solid-phase and gaseous-phase analytes (namely, carbon) in an aerosol stream. A range of spectral data was recorded for double-pulse and single-pulse configurations, including both ns and fs prepulse widths, while varying the gas-phase mass percentage of the carbon from about 10% to 90% for various fixed carbon concentrations. The carbon emission response, as measured by the peak-to-continuum ratio, was greater for the double-pulse configuration as compared with the single-pulse response and was also enhanced as the percentage of solid-phase carbon was increased. Using a combination of the double-pulse and single-pulse emission signals, a monotonically increasing response function was found to correlate with the percentage of gas-phase analyte. However, individual data points at the measured gas-phase percentages reveal considerable scatter from the predicted trend. Furthermore, the double-pulse to single-pulse ratio was only pronounced with the ns-ns configuration as compared with the fs-ns scheme. Overall, the LIBS methodology has been demonstrated as a potential means to discriminate between gas-phase and particulate-phase fractions of the same elemental species in an aerosol, although future optimization of the temporal parameters should be explored to improve the precision and accuracy of this approach.

Asgill, Michael E.; Brown, Michael S.; Frische, Kyle; Roquemore, William M.; Hahn, David W.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Effect of gaseous corrosion on the strength of SiC and Si sub 3 N sub 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of gaseous corrosion on the room-temperature flexural strength of SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were investigated. Sintered {alpha}-SiC and hot-pressed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were exposed to flowing H{sub 2} or Ar at 1400{degrees}C for 10 h. The explored variables, water vapor pressure in the H{sub 2} or oxygen partial pressure in the Ar, were found to significantly affect the corrosion of these materials. Reductions in room-temperature strength were observed when weight loss resulted from active oxidation, except for the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} exposed in Ar containing O{sub 2}. Large pits that formed during exposure were responsible for the strength reductions. When the P{sub H{sub 2}O} in H{sub 2} or P{sub O{sub 2}} in Ar was high enough to form a thin oxide layer on the sample surface, the observed strength increased, ultimately to values greater than that of the as-polished material. However, under conditions in which a much thicker oxide layer was formed, the strengths were unaffected or decreased slightly, the latter being attributed to the generation of new flaws such as bubbles or cracks in the oxide layer. 34 refs., 8 figs.

Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Prediction of external corrosion for steel cylinders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Application of an empirical method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer of 1995, ultrasonic wall thickness data were collected for 100 steel cylinders containing depleted uranium (DU) hexafluoride located at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The cylinders were selected for measurement to assess the condition of the more vulnerable portion of the cylinder inventory at PGDP. The purpose of this report is to apply the method used in Lyon to estimate the effects of corrosion for larger unsampled populations as a function of time. The scope of this report is limited and is not intended to represent the final analyses of available data. Future efforts will include continuing analyses of available data to investigate defensible deviations from the conservative assumptions made to date. For each cylinder population considered, two basic types of analyses were conducted: (1) estimates were made of the number of cylinders as a function of time that will have a minimum wall thickness of either 0 mils (1 mil = 0.00 1 in.) or 250 mils and (2) the current minimum wall thickness distributions across cylinders were estimated for each cylinder population considered. Additional analyses were also performed investigating comparisons of the results for F and G yards with the results presented in Lyon (1995).

Lyon, B.F.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Nuclear criticality safety controls for uranium deposits during D and D at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management has issued a challenge to complete DOE environmental cleanup within a decade. The response for Oak Ridge facilities is in accordance with the DOE ten-year plan which calls for completion of > 95% of environmental management work by the year 2006. This will result in a 99% risk reduction and in a significant savings in base line costs in waste management (legacy waste); remedial action (groundwater, soil, etc.); and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). It is assumed that there will be long-term institutional control of cascade equipment, i.e., there will be no walk away from sites, and that there will be firm radioactivity release limits by 1999 for recycle metals. An integral part of these plants is the removal of uranium deposits which pose nuclear criticality safety concerns in the shut down of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. DOE has initiated the Nuclear Criticality Stabilization Program to improve nuclear criticality safety by removing the larger uranium deposits from unfavorable geometry equipment. Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements have identified the location of these deposits. The objective of the K-25 Site Nuclear Criticality Stabilization Program is to remove and place uranium deposits into safe geometry storage containers to meet the double contingency principle. Each step of the removal process results in safer conditions where multiple controls are present. Upon completion of the Program, nuclear criticality risks will be greatly reduced.

Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Jollay, L.J. III; Dahl, T.L. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Investigation of Auxiliary Power Substation 95A4 fault and fire, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, March 24, 1982  

SciTech Connect

On March 24, 1982, an electrical fault and resultant fire in the 480 volt Auxiliary Power Substation 95A4 at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant destroyed that substation. There were no personal injuries, the overall loss was limited to the Substation, and the cost of replacing the Substation with repaired and new components has been estimated at $184,000. At the time of the incident, Goodyear was involved in a project to replace the obsolete 480 volt circuit breaker of the Auxiliary Power System. This project involved the disassembly, refurishing, and reassembly of 480 volt circuit breaker carriages by Goodyear personnel. The fault occurred in a circuit breaker upgraded under this project. The investigation of this accident is reported. The evidence suggests the fault resulted from the improper assembly of an upgraded 480 volt circuit breaker. Compounding the problem and leading to the extensive damage was the failure of the transformer secondary breaker to trip open as designed and interrupt the flow of power to the substation. It is surmised that inadequate testing during preventive maintenance contributed to this condition. Additional factors which may have contributed to the accident included: no requirements for assuring the competence of the electricians who installed the circuit breakers, no specific assembly instructions to the electricians, inadequate procedure instructions, and an inadequate procedure governing operational or load testing of the breaker. (LCL)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Novel mass spectrometric instrument for gaseous and particulate characterization and monitoring. Technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the Office of Technology Development as outlined by the director of the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program (EM), Leo Duffy, in 1991 appropriations hearings include conducting an aggressive technology development program for waste management, waste minimization, waste treatment, storage and disposal of waste. This will be done through the development of more effective remediation technology to reduce occupational and public exposure. We are developing a method to monitor airborne emissions from the TSCA plant at Oak Ridge which will provide real-time, accurate, and inexpensive data on the emission of hazardous organic and inorganic chemicals in both gaseous and particulate form, and to assist DOE in maintaining its ambitious schedules and overcoming significant scientific limitations of its current monitoring technologies. In May 1988 under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) established a timetable remedial investigation/feasibility study, and a Federal Facility Agreement is being negotiated with the Environmental Protection Agency and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment. As a result, work has begun on inactive waste sites at ORNL to excavate and isolate wastes in compliance with current standards. In addition, ORNL must comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which regulates generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes and corrective action of releases to the environment of hazardous wastes from active facilities.

Coggiola, M.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Characterization Activities Conducted at the 183-DR Site in Support of an In Situ Gaseous Reduction Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Situ Gaseous Reduction (ISGR) is a technology developed by DOE for the remediation of soil waste sites contaminated with hexavalent chromium. This document presents information associated with characterization activities conducted at the 183-DR site at Hanford, which is associated with a significant groundwater contaminant plume and was formerly a water treatment facility that utilized chromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Geotechnical and chemical data were collected during the excavation of trenches and the drilling of two vadose zone boreholes to support a possible ISGR demonstration at 183-DR. Although elevated total chromium and trace levels of hexavalent chromium were identified from one of the trenches and one of the boreholes, it appears that the boreholes missed the vadose zone contaminant source responsible for the chromium groundwater plume located downgradient of the 183-DR site. Recommendations are provided, however, for future work at 183-DR that may serve to identify the source for the groundwater plume and possibly provide an opportunity for an ISGR demonstration.

Thornton, Edward C.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Olsen, Khris B.; Schalla, Ronald; Cantrell, Kirk J.

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Influence of the Linker Geometry in Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) Ligands on Solution-Phase Uranyl Affinity  

SciTech Connect

Seven water-soluble, tetradentate bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) (bis-Me-3,2-HOPO) ligands were synthesized that vary only in linker geometry and rigidity. Solution phase thermodynamic measurements were conducted between pH 1.6 and pH 9.0 to determine the effects of these variations on proton and uranyl cation affinity. Proton affinity decreases by introduction of the solubilizing triethylene glycol group as compared to un-substituted reference ligands. Uranyl affinity was found to follow no discernable trends with incremental geometric modification. The butyl-linked 4Li-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand exhibited the highest uranyl affinity, consistent with prior in vivo decorporation results. Of the rigidly-linked ligands, the o-phenylene linker imparted the best uranyl affinity to the bis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand platform.

Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

429

Production d'ions lourds multicharges par une source d'ions à laser $CO_{2}$. Utilisation de ces ions pour l'étude de l'interaction ion-surface métallique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production d'ions lourds multicharges par une source d'ions à laser $CO_{2}$. Utilisation de ces ions pour l'étude de l'interaction ion-surface métallique

Amdidouche, Y

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

DOE CALiPER Program, Report 20.1 Subjective Evaluation of Beam Quality, Shadow Quality, and Color Quality for LED PAR38 Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report focuses on human-evaluated characteristics, including beam quality, shadow quality, and color quality. Using a questionnaire that included rank ordering, opinions on 27 of the Report 20 PAR38 lamps were gathered during a demonstration event for members of the local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) chapter. This was not a rigorous scientific experiment, and the data should not be extrapolated beyond the scope of the demonstration. The results suggest that many of the LED products compared favorably to halogen PAR38 benchmarks in all attributes considered. LED lamps using a single-emitter design were generally preferred for their beam quality and shadow quality, and the IES members ranking of color quality did not always match the rank according to the color rendering index (CRI).

Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Miller, Naomi J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

constante, qui a d'ailleurs t considre par H. Becque-rel pour le crown et diffrents verres de flint.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

verres de flint. La première colonne du tableau ci-dessous contient les numéros de fabrication des verres ~71,'~ à 772 et pour les flints de 86~ à 965,5. H. Becquerel avait trouvé pour le crown el des nombres variant entre 0,~0'1 et 0,234 pour les flints. , SUR LA TRANSPARENCE DES CORPS AUX RAYONS X; Par EDM. VAN

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

432

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the quired by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. No constituents exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Aluminum and iron were above Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during third quarter 1994. These constituents were not analyzed during the previous quarter. Third quarter results are similar to results for first quarter 1994.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three Wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. Lead presently exceeds the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in two wells from the three sites. As in third quarter 1993, aluminum, iron, and lead were reported in excess of the SRS Flag 2 criteria during first quarter 1994. An elevated concentration of manganese was found in one well at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site during first quarter.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Gaseous mercury release during steam curing of aerated concretes that contain fly ash and activated carbon sorbent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gaseous mercury released from aerated concrete during both presteam curing at 25{sup o}C and steam curing at 80{sup o}C was measured in controlled laboratory experiments. Mercury release originated from two major components in the concrete mixture: (1) class F coal fly ash and (2) a mixture of the fly ash and powdered activated carbon onto which elemental mercury was adsorbed. Mercury emitted during each curing cycle was collected on iodated carbon traps in a purge-and-trap arrangement and subsequently measured by cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Through 3 h of presteam curing, the release of mercury from the freshly prepared mixture was less than 0.03 ng/kg of concrete. Releases of total mercury over the 21 h steam curing process ranged from 0.4 to 5.8 ng of mercury/kg of concrete and depended upon mercury concentrations in the concrete. The steam-cured concrete had a higher mercury release rate (ng kg{sup -1} h{sup -1}) compared to air-cured concrete containing fly ash, but the shorter curing interval resulted in less total release of mercury from the steam-cured concrete. The mercury flux from exposed concrete surfaces to mercury-free air ranged from 0.77 to 11.1 ng m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, which was similar to mercury fluxes for natural soils to ambient air of 4.2 ng m{sup -2} h{sup -1} reported by others. Less than 0.022% of the total quantity of mercury present from all mercury sources in the concrete was released during the curing process, and therefore, nearly all of the mercury was retained in the concrete. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Danold W. Golightly; Chin-Min Cheng; Ping Sun; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker; Panuwat Taerakul; William E. Wolfe [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Unattended Monitoring of HEU Production in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants using Automated Aerosol Collection and Laser-based Enrichment Assay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward low carbon energy production. Pivotal to the global nuclear power renaissance is the development and deployment of robust safeguards instrumentation that allows the limited resources of the IAEA to keep pace with the expansion of the nuclear fuel cycle. Undeclared production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains a primary proliferation concern for modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), due to their massive separative work unit (SWU) processing power and comparably short cascade equilibrium timescale. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an unattended safeguards instrument, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely detection of HEU production within a GCEP. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulates, followed by laser spectroscopy to characterize the uranium enrichment level. Our prior investigation demonstrated single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and relative isotope ratio uncertainty better than 10% using gadolinium as a surrogate for uranium. In this paper we present measurement results on standard samples containing traces of depleted, natural, and low enriched uranium, as well as measurements on aerodynamic size uranium particles mixed in background materials (e.g., dust, minerals, soils). Improvements and optimizations in the detection electronics, signal timing, calibration, and laser alignment have lead to significant improvements in detection sensitivity and enrichment accuracy, contributing to an overall reduction in the false alarm probability. The sample substrate media was also found to play a significant role in facilitating laser-induced vaporization and the production of energetic plasma conditions, resulting in ablation optimization and further improvements in the isotope abundance sensitivity.

Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

436

Towards understanding of Nipah virus attachment protein assembly and the role of protein affinity and crowding for membrane curvature events.  

SciTech Connect

Pathogenic viruses are a primary threat to our national security and to the health and economy of our world. Effective defense strategies to combat viral infection and spread require the development of understanding of the mechanisms that these pathogens use to invade the host cell. We present in this report results of our research into viral particle recognition and fusion to cell membranes and the role that protein affinity and confinement in lipid domains plays in membrane curvature in cellular fusion and fission events. Herein, we describe 1) the assembly of the G attachment protein of Nipah virus using point mutation studies to define its role in viral particle fusion to the cell membrane, 2) how lateral pressure of membrane bound proteins induce curvature in model membrane systems, and 3) the role of membrane curvature in the selective partitioning of molecular receptors and specific affinity of associated proteins.

Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Hayden, Carl C.; Negrete, Oscar A.; Davis, Ryan Wesley; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 930,320 953,451 1,024,082 1,066,366 1,134,473 1,250,340 1930-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2011 Alabama 19,831 17,222 17,232 19,059 17,271 1969-2011 Alaska 26,332 24,337 22,925 20,835 21,554 21,470 1969-2012 Arkansas 162 139 168 213 268 424 1967-2012 California 13,521 13,972 13,722 13,244 12,095 12,755 1967-2012 Colorado 38,180 53,590 67,607 82,637 90,801 1967-2011 Florida 132 22 0 0 0 0 1968-2012 Illinois 48 42 31 345 1,043 0 1967-2012 Indiana 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2012

438

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

implement Cold Shutdown requirements; disposition of depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinders; and perform Decontamination and Decommissioning. Portsmouth D&D Project Portsmouth...

439

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas pipelines can be used for H2 without total loss of natural gas flow capability #12;Breakout technology #12;Breakout Session Name R&D Needs Advanced Compressors Survey existing and emerging compression, `invisible' flame Role of federal gov't vs industry for H2 research to address market failures #12;

440

Rate of Contamination Removal of Two Phyto-remediation Sites at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes applications of phyto-remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. Phyto-remediation has been implemented to assist in the removal of TCE (trichloroethylene) in the groundwater at two locations at the PORTS facility: the X-740 area and the X-749/X-120 area. Phyto-remediation technology is based on the ability of certain plants species (in this case hybrid poplar trees) and their associated rhizo-spheric microorganisms to remove, degrade, or contain chemical contaminants located in the soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, and possibly even the atmosphere. Phyto-remediation technology is a promising clean-up solution for a wide variety of pollutants and sites. Mature trees, such as the hybrid poplar, can consume up to 3,000 gallons of groundwater per acre per day. Organic compounds are captured in the trees' root systems. These organic compounds are degraded by ultraviolet light as they are transpired along with the water vapor through the leaves of the trees. The phyto-remediation system at the X-740 area encompasses 766 one-year old hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x nigra, Populus nigra x maximowiczii, and Populus deltoides x nigra) that were planted 10 feet apart in rows 10 feet to 20 feet apart, over an area of 2.6 acres. The system was installed to manage the VOC contaminant plume. At the X749/X-120 area, a phyto-remediation system of 2,640 hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x maximowiczii) was planted in seven areas/zones to manage the VOC contaminant plume. The objectives of these systems are to remove contamination from the groundwater and to prevent further migration of contaminants. The goal of these remediation procedures is to achieve completely mature and functional phyto-remediation systems within two years of the initial planting of the hybrid poplar trees at each planting location. There is a direct relationship between plant transpiration, soil moisture, and groundwater flow in a phyto-remediation system. The existing monitoring program was expanded in 2004 in order to evaluate the interactions among these processes. The purpose of this monitoring program was to determine the rate of contaminant removal and to more accurately predict the amount of time needed to remediate the contaminated groundwater. Initial planting occurred in 1999 at the X-740 area, with additional replanting in 2001 and 2002. In 2003, coring of selected trees and chemical analyses illustrated the presence of TCE; however, little impact was observed in groundwater levels, analytical monitoring, and periodic tree diameter monitoring at the X-740 area. To provide better understanding of how these phyto-remediation systems work, a portable weather station was installed at the X-740 area to provide data for estimating transpiration and two different systems for measuring sap flow and sap velocity were outfitted to numerous trees. After evaluating and refining the groundwater flow and contaminant transport models, the data gathered by these two inventive methods can be used to establish a rate of contaminant removal and to better predict the time required in order to meet remediation goals for the phyto-remediation systems located at the PORTS site. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM Federal Services, P.O. Box 789, Piketon, OH 45661 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING VARIABILITY IN MW66 AND NEARBY WELLS, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of disposal records, soil data, and spatial/temporal groundwater data from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 7 indicate that the peak contaminant concentrations measured in monitoring well (MW) 66 result from the influence of the regional PGDP NW Plume, and does not support the presence of significant vertical transport from local contaminant sources in SWMU 7. This updated evaluation supports the 2006 conceptualization which suggested the high and low concentrations in MW66 represent different flow conditions (i.e., local versus regional influences). Incorporation of the additional lines of evidence from data collected since 2006 provide the basis to link high contaminant concentrations in MW66 (peaks) to the regional 'Northwest Plume' and to the upgradient source, specifically, the C400 Building Area. The conceptual model was further refined to demonstrate that groundwater and the various contaminant plumes respond to complex site conditions in predictable ways. This type of conceptualization bounds the expected system behavior and supports development of environmental cleanup strategies, providing a basis to support decisions even if it is not feasible to completely characterize all of the 'complexities' present in the system. We recommend that the site carefully consider the potential impacts to groundwater and contaminant plume migration as they plan and implement onsite production operations, remediation efforts, and reconfiguration activities. For example, this conceptual model suggests that rerouting drainage water, constructing ponds or basin, reconfiguring cooling water systems, capping sites, decommissioning buildings, fixing (or not fixing) water leaks, and other similar actions will potentially have a 'direct' impact on the groundwater contaminant plumes. Our conclusion that the peak concentrations in MW66 are linked to the regional PGDP NW Plume does not imply that there TCE is not present in SWMU 7. The available soil and groundwater data indicate that the some of the waste disposed in this facility contacted and/or were contaminated by TCE. In our assessment, the relatively small amount of TCE associated with SWMU 7 is not contributing detectable TCE to the groundwater and does not represent a significant threat to the environment, particularly in an area where remediation and/or management of TCE in the NW plume will be required for an extended timeframe. If determined to be necessary by the PGDP team and regulators, additional TCE characterization or cleanup activities could be performed. Consistent with the limited quantity of TCE in SWMU 7, we identify a range of low cost approaches for such activities (e.g., soil gas surveys for characterization or SVE for remediation). We hope that this information is useful to the Paducah team and to their regulators and stakeholders to develop a robust environmental management path to address the groundwater and soil contamination associated with the burial ground areas.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

442

OpenEI - PAR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by INPE -National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files

License

443

Double Sens Uniques par  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design," IEEE Electron Device Lett., vol. 28, no. 6, pp. 479­481, Jun. 2007. [13] R. A. Coutu, Jr., P. E. Technol., vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 397­401, Sep. 2002. [16] R. A. Coutu, "Electrostatic radio frequency (RF

van de Walle, Axel

444

prsente par Julien COMTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................................... 23 I.3.2.1. La conversion catalytique selon Fisher-Tropsch du procédé Fisher

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

445

Prsente par : Antoine Fournier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Function LSF : Leaf Spectro Fluorimeter LUE : Light Use Efficiency MODTRAN : Moderate TRANsmission code

446

Three-electrode low pressure discharge apparatus and method for uniform ionization of gaseous media. [CO/sub 2/ laser oscillator and pulse smoother  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uniform, transverse electrical discharges are produced in gaseous media without the necessity of switching the main discharge voltage with an external device which carries the entire discharge current. A three-electrode low pressure discharge tube is charged across its anode and cathode to below breakdown voltage using a dc voltage source. An array of resistors or capacitors can be made to discharge to the wire screen anode by means of a low energy high voltage pulse circuit producing sufficient preionization in the region between the anode and cathode to initiate and control the main discharge. The invention has been demonstrated to be useful as a CO/sub 2/ laser oscillator and pulse-smoother. It can be reliably operated in the sealed-off mode.

McLellan, E.J.

1980-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2  

SciTech Connect

Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative feedbacks on leakage rates, with a combination of self-enhancing and self-limiting effects. Lower viscosity and density of CO{sub 2} as compared to aqueous fluids provides a potential for self-enhancing effects during leakage, while strong cooling effects from liquid CO{sub 2} boiling into gas, and from expansion of gas rising towards the land surface, act to self-limit discharges. Strong interference between fluid phases under three-phase conditions (aqueous - liquid CO{sub 2} - gaseous CO{sub 2}) also tends to reduce CO{sub 2} fluxes. Feedback on different space and time scales can induce non-monotonic behavior of CO{sub 2} flow rates.

Pruess, K.

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Influences of gaseous environment on low growth-rate fatigue crack propagation in steels. Annual report No. 1, January 1980. Report No. FPL/R/80/1030  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influence of gaseous environment is examined on fatigue crack propagation behavior in steels. Specifically, a fully martensitic 300-M ultrahigh strength steel and a fully bainitic 2-1/4Cr-1Mo lower strength steel are investigated in environments of ambient temperature moist air and low pressure dehumidified hydrogen and argon gases over a wide range of growth rates from 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -2/ mm/cycle, with particular emphasis given to behavior near the crack propagation threshold ..delta..K/sub 0/. It is found that two distinct growth rate regimes exist where hydrogen can markedly accelerate crack propagation rates compared to air, (1) at near-threshold levels below (5 x 10/sup -6/ mm/cycle) and (2) at higher growth rates, typically around 10/sup -5/ mm/cycle above a critical maximum stress intensity K/sub max//sup T/. Hydrogen-assisted crack propagation at higher growth rates is attributed to a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism, with K/sub max//sup T/ nominally equal to K/sub Iscc/ (the sustained load stress corrosion threshold) in high strength steels, and far below K/sub Iscc/ in the strain-rate sensitive lower strength steels. Hydrogen-assisted crack propagation at near-threshold levels is attributed to a new mechanism involving fretting-oxide-induced crack closure generated in moist (or oxygenated) environments. The absence of hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms at near-threshold levels is supported by tests showing that ..delta..K/sub 0/ values in dry gaseous argon are similar to ..delta..K/sub 0/ values in hydrogen. The potential ramifications of these results are examined in detail.

Ritchie, R.O.; Suresh, S.; Toplosky, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Torsion in K-theory for boundary actions on affine buildings of type $\\tA_n$.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\Gamma$ be a torsion free lattice in $G = \\PGL(n+1,\\FF)$, where $n\\ge 1$ and $\\FF$ is a non-archimedean local field. Then $\\Gamma$ acts on the Furstenberg boundary $G/P$, where $P$ is a minimal parabolic subgroup of $G$. The identity element $\\id$ in the crossed product $C^*$-algebra $C(G/P)\\rtimes \\Gamma$ generates a class $[\\id]$ in the $K_0$ group of $C(G/P)\\rtimes \\Gamma$. It is shown that $[\\id]$ is a torsion element of $K_0$ and there is an explicit bound for the order of $[\\id]$. The result is proved more generally for groups acting on affine buildings of type $\\tA_n$. For $n=1, 2$ the Euler-Poincaré characteristic $\\chi(\\Gamma)$ annihilates the class $[\\id]$.

Guyan Robertson.; 251-269

450

A committee machine with intelligent systems for estimation of total organic carbon content from petrophysical data: An example from Kangan and Dalan reservoirs in South Pars Gas Field, Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total organic carbon (TOC) content present in reservoir rocks is one of the important parameters, which could be used for evaluation of residual production potential and geochemical characterization of hydrocarbon-bearing units. In general, organic-rich ... Keywords: Committee machine, Fuzzy logic, Genetic algorithm, Neural network, Neuro-fuzzy, Petrophysical data, South Pars Gas Field, Total organic carbon

Ali Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi; Hossain Rahimpour-Bonab; Mohammadreza Rezaee

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Artificial neural network modeling and cluster analysis for organic facies and burial history estimation using well log data: A case study of the South Pars Gas Field, Persian Gulf, Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intelligent and statistical techniques were used to extract the hidden organic facies from well log responses in the Giant South Pars Gas Field, Persian Gulf, Iran. Kazhdomi Formation of Mid-Cretaceous and Kangan-Dalan Formations of Permo-Triassic Data ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Burial history, Cluster analysis, Organic facies, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, Well log data

Bahram Alizadeh; Saeid Najjari; Ali Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarter 1994 and 1994 summary  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals. also are required by the permits.

Chase, J.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Affine invariant matching of broken boundaries in noisy images based on the quality migrant injection genetic algorithm and a successive erosion and distance accumulation scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Viewpoint invariant identification of fragmented scene contours can be realized by matching them against a collection of known reference models. For near planar objects, the matching of a pair of contours can be encapsulated as the search for the existence ... Keywords: Affine invariant matching, Fragmented contours, Migrant principle, Noisy images, Simple genetic algorithm, Successive erosion and distance accumulation

P. W. M. Tsang; W. C. Situ

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The SU(3)/Z_3 QCD(adj) deconfinement transition via the gauge theory/"affine" XY-model duality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earlier, two of us and M. Unsal [arXiv:1112.6389] showed that some 4d gauge theories, compactified on a small spatial circle of size L and considered at temperatures 1/beta near deconfinement, are dual to 2d "affine" XY-spin models. We use the duality to study deconfinement in SU(3)/Z_3 theories with n_f>1 massless adjoint Weyl fermions, QCD(adj) on R^2 x S^1_beta x S^1_L. The"affine" XY-model describes two "spins" - compact scalars taking values in the SU(3) root lattice, with nearest-neighbor interactions and subject to an "external field" preserving the topological Z_3^t and a discrete Z_3^chi subgroup of the chiral symmetry of the 4d gauge theory. The equivalent Coulomb gas representation of the theory exhibits electric-magnetic duality, which is also a high-/low-temperature duality. A renormalization group analysis suggests - but is not convincing, due to the onset of strong coupling - that the self-dual point is a fixed point, implying a continuous deconfinement transition. Here, we study the nature of the transition via Monte Carlo simulations. The Z_3^t x Z_3^chi order parameter, its susceptibility, the vortex density, the energy per spin, and the specific heat are measured over a range of volumes, temperatures, and "external field" strengths (in the gauge theory, these correspond to magnetic bion fugacities). The finite-size scaling of the susceptibility and specific heat we find is characteristic of a first-order transition. Furthermore, for sufficiently large but still smaller than unity bion fugacity (as can be achieved upon an increase of the S^1_L size), at the critical temperature we find two distinct peaks of the energy probability distribution, indicative of a first-order transition, as has been seen in earlier simulations of the full 4d QCD(adj) theory. We end with discussions of the global phase diagram in the beta-L plane for different numbers of flavors.

Mohamed M. Anber; Scott Collier; Erich Poppitz

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

455

Effects of gaseous NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on the concentration profiles of PCDD/F in flyash under post-combustion zone conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on 2378-PCDD/F in flyash and flue gases was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 21-40% from the flue gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 99% PCDD and 93% PCDF reductions in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 89% PCDD and 76% PCDF reductions in the flue gases. - Abstract: The influence of gaseous ammonia and sulphur dioxide on the formation of 2378-substituted PCDD/F on a reference flyash from a municipal waste incinerator has been investigated using a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor. The reference flyash samples (BCR-490) was reacted under a simulated flue gas stream at temperatures of 225 and 375 Degree-Sign C for 96 h. The experiments were carried out in two series: first with simulated flue gas alone, and then with injection of NH{sub 3} or SO{sub 2} gas into the flue gas just before the reactor inlet. It was found that the injection of gaseous ammonia into the flue gas could decrease the concentration of both PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% from the solid phase and by 21-40% from the gas phase. Converting the results to I-TEQ values, it could reduce the total I-TEQ values of PCDD and PCDF in the sum of the flyash and exhaust flue gas by 42-75% and 24-57% respectively. The application of SO{sub 2} led to 99% and 93% reductions in the PCDD and PCDF average congener concentrations, respectively in the solid phase. In the gas phase, the total reductions were 89% and 76% for PCDD and PCDF, respectively. Moreover, addition of SO{sub 2} reduced the total I-TEQ value of PCDD and PCDF in the flyash and exhaust flue gas together by 60-86% and 72-82% respectively. Sulphur dioxide was more effective than ammonia in suppressing PCDD/F formation in flyash under the conditions investigated.

Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A. [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Williams, Paul T., E-mail: p.t.williams@leeds.ac.uk [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Improved estimates of separation distances to prevent unacceptable damage to nuclear power plant structures from hydrogen detonation for gaseous hydrogen storage. Technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides new estimates of separation distances for nuclear power plant gaseous hydrogen storage facilities. Unacceptable damage to plant structures from hydrogen detonations will be prevented by having hydrogen storage facilities meet separation distance criteria recommended in this report. The revised standoff distances are based on improved calculations on hydrogen gas cloud detonations and structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures. Also, the results presented in this study do not depend upon equivalencing a hydrogen detonation to an equivalent TNT detonation. The static and stagnation pressures, wave velocity, and the shock wave impulse delivered to wall surfaces were computed for several different size hydrogen explosions. Separation distance equations were developed and were used to compute the minimum separation distance for six different wall cases and for seven detonating volumes (from 1.59 to 79.67 lbm of hydrogen). These improved calculation results were compared to previous calculations. The ratio between the separation distance predicted in this report versus that predicted for hydrogen detonation in previous calculations varies from 0 to approximately 4. Thus, the separation distances results from the previous calculations can be either overconservative or unconservative depending upon the set of hydrogen detonation parameters that are used. Consequently, it is concluded that the hydrogen-to-TNT detonation equivalency utilized in previous calculations should no longer be used.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Thermal discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant outfalls: Impacts on stream temperatures and fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks  

SciTech Connect

The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7 C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

Roy, W.K.; Ryon, M.G.; Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Div.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A 40 Myr OLD GASEOUS CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK AT 49 CETI: MASSIVE CO-RICH COMET CLOUDS AT YOUNG A-TYPE STARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gaseous molecular disk that orbits the main-sequence A-type star 49 Ceti has been known since 1995, but the stellar age and the origin of the observed carbon monoxide molecules have been unknown. We now identify 49 Ceti as a member of the 40 Myr old Argus Association and present a colliding comet model to explain the high CO concentrations seen at 49 Ceti and the 30 Myr old A-type star HD 21997. The model suggests that massive-400 Earth mass-analogs of the Sun's Kuiper Belt are in orbit around some A-type stars, that these large masses are composed primarily of comet-like objects, and that these objects are rich in CO and perhaps also CO{sub 2}. We identify additional early-type members of the Argus Association and the Tucana/Horologium and Columba Associations; some of these stars display excess mid-infrared emission as measured with the Widefield Infrared Survey Explorer.

Zuckerman, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Song, Inseok, E-mail: ben@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: song@physast.uga.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

459

Potential Hazards Relating to Pyrolysis of c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} in Selected Gaseous Diffusion Plant Operations  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program intended to replace the present evaporative coolant at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) with a non-ozone-depleting alternate, a series of investigations of the suitability of candidate substitutes in under way. One issue concerning a primary candidate, c-C4F8, is the possibility that it might produce the highly toxic perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in high temperature environments. This study was commissioned to determine the likelihood and severity of decomposition under two specific high temperature thermal environments, namely the use of a flame test for the presence of coolant vapors and welding in the presence of coolant vapors. The purpose of the study was to develop and evaluate available data to provide information that will allow the technical and industrial hygiene staff at the GDPs to perform appropriate safety evaluations and to determine the need for field testing or experimental work. The scope of this study included a literature search and an evaluation of the information developed therefrom. Part of that evaluation consists of chemical kinetics modeling of coolant decomposition in the two operational environments. The general conclusions are that PFIB formation is unlikely in either situation but that it cannot be ruled out completely under extreme conditions. The presence of oxygen, moisture, and combustion products will tend to lead to formation of oxidation products (COF2, CO, CO2, and HF) rather than PFIB.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Verification experiment on the downblending of high enriched uranium (HEU) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Digital video surveillance of the HEU feed stations  

SciTech Connect

As part of a Safeguards Agreement between the US and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio, was added to the list of facilities eligible for the application of IAEA safeguards. Currently, the facility is in the process of downblending excess inventory of HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) from US defense related programs for commercial use. An agreement was reached between the US and the IAEA that would allow the IAEA to conduct an independent verification experiment at the Portsmouth facility, resulting in the confirmation that the HEU was in fact downblended. The experiment provided an opportunity for the DOE laboratories to recommend solutions/measures for new IAEA safeguards applications. One of the measures recommended by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and selected by the IAEA, was a digital video surveillance system for monitoring activity at the HEU feed stations. This paper describes the SNL implementation of the digital video system and its integration with the Load Cell Based Weighing System (LCBWS) from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The implementation was based on commercially available technology that also satisfied IAEA criteria for tamper protection and data authentication. The core of the Portsmouth digital video surveillance system was based on two Digital Camera Modules (DMC-14) from Neumann Consultants, Germany.

Martinez, R.L.; Tolk, K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whiting, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Castleberry, K.; Lenarduzzi, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gaseous par affinic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms applicable'' and relevant and appropriate'' is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed.

Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms ``applicable`` and ``relevant and appropriate`` is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed.

Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Model of leaf photosynthesis and the effects of simple gaseous sulfur compounds (H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A theoretical development is presented of a leaf model and the effects of simple sulfur compounds (H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}) on photosynthesis based upon biochemical mechanisms. The model is developed to interpret short-term fumigation experiments and to use with season-long fumigation experiments to assess the effects of these compounds on growth. The model is designed as a submodel in a growth-and-allocation model of the plant. Included in this development are an analysis of the diffusion of CO{sub 2} and sulfur compound into the leaf, enzymatic interactions of sulfur in dark and light reactions of photosynthesis, temperature dependence of the kinetics and denaturization of enzymes, metabolism of sulfur compounds, and a hypothesis for the long-term effects of sulfur compounds. Enhanced photosynthesis at low H{sub 2}S levels, depression of photosynthesis at high H/sub 2/S levels, threshold to effects of sulfur pollutants, and the nature of the temperature dependence of photosynthesis are explained. Parameters in the model for sugar beets from data in the literature and from experiments funded through LLL were used. The properties of the model were analyzed. Data and experiments still required, sensitivities of the model to parameters and variables, implications to assessments, and the setting of standards for gaseous pollutants, are discussed.

Kercher, J.R.

1978-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

464

Thermal Discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Outfalls: Impacts on Stream Temperatures and Fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks  

SciTech Connect

The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

Roy, W.K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Atmospheric mercury in Changbai Mountain area, northeastern China I. The seasonal distribution pattern of total gaseous mercury and its potential sources  

SciTech Connect

An intensive field campaign for the measurement of total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations in ambient air was conducted in Changbai Mountain area from 5 August 2005 to 5 July 2006 using an automatic atmospheric mercury analyzer (Tekran 2537A), which was the first time TGM was monitored at a remote area in northeastern China. 99% of the hourly TGM concentrations fell between 1.28 and 9.49 ng m{sup -3} with an annual arithmetic mean of 3.58{+-}1.78 ng m{sup -3}, which was significantly elevated compared to values obtained in remote areas of Europe and North America. Seasonal mean TGM concentrations displayed a descending trend as follows: winter, spring, fall, and summer. Compared to spring/winter, TGM concentrations were lower in the summer/fall but the standard deviation (SD) of TGM levels was higher and indicated a correlation with anthropogenic emissions. TGM concentrations showed seasonal differences with respect to meteorological parameters: TGM levels in spring/winter were most correlated with wind speed, and correlated with solar radiation only in the winter, while TGM levels in summer/fall periods were most correlated with air temperature. There was a strong diurnal variation of seasonal TGM with significantly higher concentrations in daytime/nighttime compared to the early morning. The seasonal diel TGM pattern indicated regional biofuel and coal combustion were the primary mercury sources.

Wan Qi [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Feng Xinbin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China)], E-mail: fengxinbin@vip.skleg.cn; Lu, Julia [Department of Chemistry and Biology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada)], E-mail: Julialu@ryerson.ca; Zheng Wei [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Song Xinjie [Department of Chemistry and Biology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada); Han Shijie; Xu Hao [Open Research Station of Changbai Mountain Forest Ecosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yanbian 133613 (China)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Review of the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Oversight of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Criticality Safety Program, May 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Oversight of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Criticality Safety Program May 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

467

PARCOURS DES ALPHA DE 4,5 MeV DANS L'URANIUM, L'OR, LE ZIRCONIUM ET LE SILICIUM. Par Mmes A. GARIN et H. FARAGGI,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

76. PARCOURS DES ALPHA DE 4,5 MeV DANS L'URANIUM, L'OR, LE ZIRCONIUM ET LE SILICIUM. Par Mmes A uranium alloys of known concentration in uranium it is possible to measure the range of 4,5 MeV 03B1 mesurant l'émission oc d'alliages d'uranium de différentes concentrations. Nous avons pu disposer d

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

468

PUMP FOR GASEOUS WORKING FLUIDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas pump having a substantially constant rate of flow and a relatively efficient punnping action is described. A number of flexible plates disposed longitudinally in and in contact with a duct are caused to oscillate transversly so as to produce wave-llke deformations of the plates. These deformations are mechanically produced by pushrods and an eccentric gearing arrangement, and are so synchronized that the waves travel from the inlet to the outlet of the duct, and, in so doing, move the gas by positive displacement.

Lipscomb, R.

1948-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

469

HIGH ENERGY GASEOUS DISCHARGE DEVICES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The high-energy electrical discharge device described comprises an envelope, a pair of main discharge electrodes supported in opposition in the envelope, and a metallic shell symmetrically disposed around and spaced from the discharge path between the electrodes. The metallic shell comprises a first element of spaced helical turns of metallic material and a second element of spaced helical turns of methllic material insulatedly supported in superposition outside the first element and with the turns overlapping the gap between the turns of the first element.

Josephson, V.

1960-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

470

Investigation of the Effect of Functional Group Substitutions on the Gas-Phase Electron Affinities and Ionization Energies of Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids Ions using Density Functional Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cathodic and anodic stabilities of room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are important factors in their applications in electrochemical devices. In this work, we investigated the electron affinities of cations and ...

Ong, Shyue Ping

471

ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the multiple lines of evidence support the occurrence of cometabolism and the potential for the process to contribute to temporal and spatial attenuation of TCE in PGDP groundwater, then a follow-up enzyme probe microcosm study to better estimate biological degradation rate(s) is warranted.

Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

472

Fissible Deposit Characterization at the Former Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant by {sup 252}CF-Source-Driven Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deposit Removal Project was undertaken with the support of the U. S. Department of Energy at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The project team performed the safe removal of the hydrated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) deposits from the K-29 Building of the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The deposits had developed as a result of air leakage into UF{sub 6} gas process pipes; UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} became hydrated by moisture from the air and deposited inside the pipes. The mass, its distribution, and the hydrogen content [that is, the ratio of H to U (H/U)], were the key parameters that controlled the nuclear criticality safety of the deposits. Earlier gamma-ray spectrometry measurements in K-29 had identified the largest deposits in the building. The first and third largest deposits in the building were measured in this program. The first deposit, found in the Unit 2, Cell 7, B-Line Outlet process pipe (called the ''Hockey Stick'') was about 1,300 kg ({+-} 50% uncertainty) at 3.34 wt% {sup 235}U enrichment ({+-}50% uncertainty) and according to the gamma-ray spectroscopy was uniformly distributed. The second deposit (the third-largest deposit in the building), found in the Unit 2, Cell 6, A-Line Outlet process pipe (called the ''Tee-Pipe''), had a uranium deposit estimated to be about 240 kg ({+-} 50% uncertainty) at 3.4 wt % {sup 235}U enrichment ({+-} 20% uncertainty). Before deposit removal activities began, the Deposit Removal Project team needed to survey the inside of the pipes intrusively to assess the nuclear criticality safety of the deposits. Therefore, the spatial distribution of the deposits, the total uranium deposit mass, and the moderation level resulting from hydration of the deposits, all of which affect nuclear criticality safety were required. To perform the task safely and effectively, the Deposit Removal Project team requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) characterize the two largest deposits with the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven transmission (CFSDT) technique, an active neutron interrogation method developed for use at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to identify nuclear weapons components in containers. The active CFSDT measurement technique uses CFSDT time-of-flight measurements of prompt neutrons and gamma rays from an externally introduced {sup 252}Cf source.

Hannon, T.F.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Uckan, T.; Valentine, T.E.; Wyatt, M.S.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

A TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE CURRENT WATER POLICY BOUNDARY AT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1988, groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99) was identified in samples collected from residential water wells withdrawing groundwater from the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA) north of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) facility. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided temporary drinking water supplies to approximately 100 potentially affected residents by initially supplying bottled water, water ta