Sample records for gas-a colorless odorless

  1. Combating An Odorless, Tasteless, Unseen Problem in Nebraska Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Combating An Odorless, Tasteless, Unseen Problem in Nebraska Drinking Water By Steve Ress You can with the specter of arsenic contamination in their drinking water. For more than 60 years, the maximum allowable limit for arsenic in public drinking water supplies has been 50 parts per billion (ppb) and most public

  2. Safetygram #9- Liquid Hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen is colorless as a liquid. Its vapors are colorless, odorless, tasteless, and highly flammable.

  3. Is the Missing Ultra-Red Material Colorless Ice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. M. Grundy

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The extremely red colors of some transneptunian objects and Centaurs are not seen among the Jupiter family comets which supposedly derive from them. Could this mismatch result from sublimation loss of colorless ice? Radiative transfer models show that mixtures of volatile ice and nonvolatile organics could be extremely red, but become progressively darker and less red as the ice sublimates away.

  4. Fully Integrated NxN MEMS Wavelength Selective Switch with 100% Colorless Add-Drop Ports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    Fully Integrated NxN MEMS Wavelength Selective Switch with 100% Colorless Add-Drop Ports Shifu Yuan/drop ports. © 2007 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (060.2330) Fiber optics communications; (060 multi-port wavelength selective switches using liquid crystal devices. Micro-Electro-Mechanical System

  5. Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

    1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist....

  6. 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Earth's Modern Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    contact with high energy solar radiation · Thermopause is at 480km · High temperature, but not "hot--composition, temperature, and function. · List and describe the components of the modern atmosphere, giving their relative%), and others (1%). · Variable Gases: Water Vapor (H2O) (0 to 4%), CO2 (0.038%). · 4Less: Odorless, Colorless

  7. The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West Virginia in 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West for this research was provided by the West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association (WVONGA). The opinions herein Natural gas is a colorless, odorless, and tasteless fuel that is used by households, manufacturers

  8. inAir: A Longitudinal study of Indoor Air Quality Measurements and Visualizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankoff, Jennifer

    pollutants are colorless and odorless, while many activities are inconspicuous and routine. We implemented inAir. Among those, air pollution and its effects on health have been researched extensively over past several decades [13]. In particular, the health effects of air pollution cover a wide variety of respiratory

  9. The nonequilibrium Ehrenfest gas: a chaotic model with flat obstacles?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Bianca; Lamberto Rondoni

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that the non-equilibrium version of the Lorentz gas (a billiard with dispersing obstacles, electric field and Gaussian thermostat) is hyperbolic if the field is small. Differently the hyperbolicity of the non-equilibrium Ehrenfest gas constitutes an open problem, since its obstacles are rhombi and the techniques so far developed rely on the dispersing nature of the obstacles. We have developed analytical and numerical investigations which support the idea that this model of transport of matter has both chaotic (positive Lyapunov exponent) and non-chaotic steady states with a quite peculiar sensitive dependence on the field and on the geometry, not observed before. The associated transport behaviour is correspondingly highly irregular, with features whose understanding is of both theoretical and technological interest.

  10. THE BOSE GAS: A SUBTLE MANY-BODY PROBLEM Elliott H. Lieb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    analysis of a gas or liquid of interacting bosons is due to Bogolubov in 1947. His approximate theoryTHE BOSE GAS: A SUBTLE MANY-BODY PROBLEM Elliott H. Lieb Abstract. Now that the properties to be correct. Another problem of great interest is the existence of Bose-Einstein condensation, and what little

  11. Feasibility studies of colorless LR 115 SSNTD for alpha-particle radiobiological experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    microscope. 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. PACS: 29.40; 23.60 Keywords: Solid-state nuclear track experiments involve irradiating cells with alpha-particles and require accurate positions where the alpha, it is natural that solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) were used as substrates for cell cultures

  12. A Really Good Hammer: Quantification of Mass Transfer Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers (475th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Tom [BNL Environmental Sciences, Tracer Technology Group

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven Labs perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology can be viewed as a hammer looking for nails. But, according to Tom Watson, leader of the Labs Tracer Technology Group in the Environmental Research and Technology Division (ERTD), Its a really good hammer! The colorless, odorless and safe gases have a number of research uses, from modeling how airborne contaminants might move through urban canyons to help first responders plan their response to potential terrorist attacks and accidents to locating leaks in underground gas pipes. Their extremely low background level detectable at one part per quadrillion allows their transport to be easily tracked. Lab researchers used PFTs during the 2005 Urban Dispersion Program field studies in New York City, gathering data to help improve models of how a gas or chemical release might move around Manhattans tall buildings and canyons. Closer to home, scientists also used PFTs to make ventilation measurements in Bldg. 400 on the Lab site to provide data to test air flow models used in determining the effects of passive and active air exchange on the levels of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and to determine the effects of an accidental or intentional release of hazardous substances in or around buildings.

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University College London Collection: Biology and Medicine 37 Safety Topic Liquid Nitrogen Cold :77 K (-196 C; -321 F) Summary: Asphyxiant Dangerous because it is odorless,...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality case Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interaction Institute, Carnegie... quality with bare human perception as air pollutants are mostly invisible and odorless. We believe... that computing technologies can...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality index Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interaction Institute, Carnegie... quality with bare human perception as air pollutants are mostly invisible and odorless. We believe... that computing technologies can...

  16. Gas: A Neglected Phase in Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B

    2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The gas phase is generally ignored in remediation of metals and radionuclides because it is assumed that there is no efficient way to exploit it. In the literal sense, all remediations involve the gas phase because this phase is linked to the liquid and solid phases by vapor pressure and thermodynamic relationships. Remediation methods that specifically use the gas phase as a central feature have primarily targeted volatile organic contaminants, not metals and radionuclides. Unlike many organic contaminants, the vapor pressure and Henry's Law constants of metals and radionuclides are not generally conducive to direct air stripping of dissolved contaminants. Nevertheless, the gas phase can play an important role in remediation of inorganic contaminants and provide opportunities for efficient, cost effective remediation. The objective here is to explore ways in which manipulation of the gas phase can be used to facilitate remediation of metals and radionuclides.

  17. Energy Economizer for Low Temperature Stack Gas: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipton, J. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    it to preheat air for boiler operation. The system incorporated a heat pipe heat exchanger flanged in a stack by-pass loop that would efficiently capture and transfer heat at low temperature differences (?T 350-5000 F). After reclaiming heat from this source...

  18. Investing in Oil and Natural Gas A Few Key Issues

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year in Review W ithWellheadFeet)

  19. Utilization of low-quality natural gas: A current assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acheson, W.P.; Hackworth, J.H.; Kasper, S.; McIlvried, H.G.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to evaluate the low quality natural gas (LQNG) resource base, current utilization of LQNG, and environmental issues relative to its use, to review processes for upgrading LQNG to pipeline quality, and to make recommendations of research needs to improve the potential for LQNG utilization. LQNG is gas from any reservoir which contains amounts of nonhydrocarbon gases sufficient to lower the heating value or other properties of the gas below commercial, pipeline standards. For the purposes of this study, LQNG is defined as natural gas that contains more than 2% carbon dioxide, more than 4% nitrogen, or more than 4% combined CO{sub 2} plus N{sub 2}. The other contaminant of concern is hydrogen sulfide. A minor contaminant in some natural gases is helium, but this inert gas usually presents no problems.

  20. Date Issue Brief # ISSUE BRIEF Natural Gas: A Bridge to a Low?Carbon Future?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen P. A. Brown; Alan J. Krupnick; Margaret A. Walls; Stephen P. A. Brown; Alan J. Krupnick; Margaret A. Walls

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issue Brief 09?11Resources for the Future Resources for the Future is an independent, nonpartisan think tank that, through its social science research, enables policymakers and stakeholders to make better, more informed decisions about energy, environmental, natural resource, and public health issues. Headquartered in Washington, DC, its research scope comprises programs in nations around the world.

  1. Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Production of oxygenates from synthesis gas---A technology review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report concentrates on the production of oxygenates from coal via gasification and indirect liquefaction. At the present the majority of oxygenate synthesis programs are at laboratory scale. Exceptions include commercial and demonstration scale plants for methanol and higher alcohols production, and ethers such as MTBE. Research and development work has concentrated on elucidating the fundamental transport and kinetic limitations governing various reactor configurations. But of equal or greater importance has been investigations into the optimal catalyst composition and process conditions for the production of various oxygenates.

  2. Synthesis of Isobutene and Isobutane from Synthesis Gas. A Literature Review Since 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The isosynthesis reaction is commonly referred as the reaction that converts selectively synthesis gas to isobutene and isobutane. The main feature of this reaction is the production of branched hydrocarbons in higher proportion with respect to linear hydrocarbons than expected from thermodynamic equilibrium and with a molecular weight distribution favoring iso-C4 hydrocarbons. This article reviews and summarizes isosynthesis research results reported in the open scientific literature with emphasis on the articles published in the last two decades.

  3. Backward Raman amplification in a partially ionized gas A. A. Balakin,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was accessed 10,11 . The experimental success was achieved using a gas jet of propane, subse- quently ionized that would be most desired. Using the pro- pane gas jet, as opposed to pure hydrogen, eased conditions on the gas jet nozzle, since a lower gas pressure could pro- duce a higher density target. However, the use

  4. Methods of Gas Phase Capture of Iodine from Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas: A Literature Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daryl Haefner

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature survey was conducted to collect information and summarize the methods available to capture iodine from fuel reprocessing off-gases. Techniques were categorized as either wet scrubbing or solid adsorbent methods, and each method was generally described as it might be used under reprocessing conditions. Decontamination factors are quoted only to give a rough indication of the effectiveness of the method. No attempt is made to identify a preferred capture method at this time, although activities are proposed that would provide a consistent baseline that would aid in evaluating technologies.

  5. Gaussian fluctuations in an ideal bose-gas -- a simple model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Petrova; O Nedopekin; D Tayurskii; Q A Wang

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the canonical ensemble, we suggested the simple scheme for taking into account Gaussian fluctuations in a finite system of ideal boson gas. Within framework of scheme we investigated the influence of fluctuations on the particle distribution in Bose -gas for two cases - with taking into account the number of particles in the ground state and without this assumption. The temperature and fluctuation parameter dependences of the modified Bose- Einstein distribution have been determined. Also the dependence of the condensation temperature on the fluctuation distribution parameter has been obtained.

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - anthocyanins rich extract-induced Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and colorless... .; Noda, T.; Tanaka, H.; Fukushima, M. Anthocyanin-rich purple potato flake extract has antioxidant Source: Tang, Juming - Department of Biological Systems...

  7. Author's personal copy Microelectronics Journal 38 (2007) 12111216

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Lee

    ], solid oxide fuel cells [3,4], H2 engine cars [1], etc. However, H2 is a hazardous, odorless and highly grown by a cost-effective and fast synthesis route using an aqueous solution method and rapid thermal. These analyses indicate high quality ZnO nanorods. Furthermore, our synthesis technique permits branched nanorods

  8. Listening to Air Quality Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    cities of the developing world, urban air pollution has worsened, which has been detrimental quality with bare human perception as air pollutants are mostly invisible and odorless. We believe in surroundings. INTRODUCTION Urban air pollution is higher in developing countries because they often depend more

  9. Dynamics of the electric current in an ideal electron gas: a sound mode inside the quasi-particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grozdanov, Sao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the equation of motion for the Noether current in an electron gas within the framework of the Schwinger-Keldysh Closed-Time-Path formalism. The equation is shown to be highly non-linear and irreversible even for a non-interacting, ideal gas of electrons at non-zero density. We truncate the linearised equation of motion, written as the Laurent series in Fourier space, so that the resulting expressions are local in time, both at zero and at small finite temperatures. Furthermore, we show that the one-loop Coulomb interactions only alter the physical picture quantitatively, while preserving the characteristics of the dynamics that the electric current exhibits in the absence of interactions. As a result of the composite nature of the Noether current, composite sound waves are found to be the dominant IR collective excitations at length scales between the inverse Fermi momentum and the mean free path that would exist in an interacting electron gas. We also discuss the difference and the transition betwee...

  10. International market integration for natural gas? : a cointegration analysis of priced in Europe, North America and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L'Hegaret, Guillaume

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the degree of natural gas market integration in Europe, North America and Japan, between the mid 1990?s and 2002. Our hypothesis is that there was a certain split of prices between Europe and North America. The ...

  11. Dynamics of the electric current in an ideal electron gas: a sound mode inside the quasi-particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sao Grozdanov; Janos Polonyi

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the equation of motion for the Noether current in an electron gas within the framework of the Schwinger-Keldysh Closed-Time-Path formalism. The equation is shown to be highly non-linear and irreversible even for a non-interacting, ideal gas of electrons at non-zero density. We truncate the linearised equation of motion, written as the Laurent series in Fourier space, so that the resulting expressions are local in time, both at zero and at small finite temperatures. Furthermore, we show that the one-loop Coulomb interactions only alter the physical picture quantitatively, while preserving the characteristics of the dynamics that the electric current exhibits in the absence of interactions. As a result of the composite nature of the Noether current, composite sound waves are found to be the dominant IR collective excitations at length scales between the inverse Fermi momentum and the mean free path that would exist in an interacting electron gas. We also discuss the difference and the transition between the hydrodynamical regime of an ideal gas, defined in this work, and the hydrodynamical regime in phenomenological hydrodynamics, which is normally used for the description of interacting gases.

  12. IEEE Communications Magazine May 200750 0163-6804/07/$20.00 2007 IEEE This work was supported

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    -definition television, multimedia/ multiparty online gaming, telemedicine, telecom- muting, and surveillance, to get, colorless ONUs, and WDM PONs. We then lift the veil of future WDM EPONs, and elaborate on evolutionary cost

  13. Published on Web 12/23/2007 Matrix Isolation Chemistry in a Porous Metal-Organic Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Published on Web 12/23/2007 Matrix Isolation Chemistry in a Porous Metal-Organic Framework, during which time the colorless solid turned dark red, indicating the attachment of Cr(CO)3 units. Upon

  14. Home Safety: Radon Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Denny, Monica L.

    1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Every home should be tested for radon, an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally. Radon is estimated to be the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. However, with proper equipment, radon is easy to detect... poten- tial for radon (Fig. 1), homes in Texas have been found to have radon levels that exceed U.S. Environ- mental Protection Agency (EPA) recommendations. Every home is susceptible to a radon gas problem. Health/cancer risks Radon produces...

  15. Sensory analysis of acidified dairy products using response surface methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Maria de Guadalupe

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Basic acidified dairy product formula. Page 2 Experimental design . . 15 3 Concentration of variables and experimental design codes. . . . . . 15 4 Amount of acidulant added to samples of sour cream and final pH values. . . . . 18 5 Sensory... to the odorless product acetoin (10, 19). For many cultured dairy products, the major flavor defect is observed when the concentration of diacetyl is below the desired concentration (7, 18, 29). Acetaldehyde is produced by decarboxylation of pyruvate. Its...

  16. Glossary of Volatile Organic Compounds Ethylbenzene Carbon tetrachloride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Ethylbenzene Ethylbenzene is a colorless, flammable liquid found in natural products such as coal tar and petroleum. It is also found in manufactured products such as inks, insecticides, and paints. Ethylbenzene in the air. In surface water, ethylbenzene breaks down by reacting with other chemicals found naturally

  17. 36 Volume 74 Number 6 A d VA N c E M E N T O f T H E SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    dermatitis, congenital defects, and cancer. This article discusses the adverse effects of continual exposure that is quite soluble in water. Form- aldehyde is colorless at room temperature and has an irritating, pungent of formaldehyde gas in water. In the body, form- aldehyde quickly metabolizes to formic acid. The measurement

  18. Evidence That the Streptomyces Developmental Protein WhiD, a Member of the WhiB Family, Binds a [4Fe-4S] Cluster*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buttner, Mark

    , suggesting that these residues might act as ligands for a metal cofactor. Overexpressed WhiD, purified from of S 1/2. The anaerobically reconstituted [4Fe-4S] cluster was oxygen sensitive. Upon exposure to air was colorless in the near UV/visible region. These changes are consistent with an oxygen- induced change from

  19. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepa from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porsity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity.

  20. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, R.W.

    1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepared from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porosity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity. 3 figs.

  1. Alternative Fuel Tool Kit How to Implement: Propane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , colorless gas that is a byproduct of natural gas production and crude oil refining. Propane autogas What is Liquefied Petroleum Gas? Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is commonly referred to as propane energy storage, propane is stored as a liquid in a pressurized tank onboard the vehicle, typically at 100

  2. MSU Extension Publication Archive Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations. Up-to-date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    storage pits. It is colorless, heavier than air, and highly soluble in water; it has the characteristic and asphyxiating when improperly managed. Another prob- 1emis unvented heaters in poorly ventilated buildings. Human fatal- ities have occurred from entering a manure collection or storage pit without insuring

  3. Geologic origin of magnetic volcanic glasses in the KBS tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlinger, C.M.; Smith, R.M.; Veblen, D.R.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic glass shards and banded pumice from the KBS tuff of northern Kenya exhibit marked variations in magnetic susceptibility and color (colorless to dark brown). The darker glass shards exhibit superparamagnetism, which they now know to be carried by a population of tiny microcrystals of Fe-rich cubic oxide, approx. 20 to approx. 100 A in size, thought to be magnetite. A theory for their origin is one of nucleation and growth (precipitation) in quenched homogeneous glass (colorless) at temperatures of approx. 700-1000/sup 0/C during and immediately subsequent to eruption. Results from high-temperature heating experiments on KBS shards support this idea. The precipitate appears in the KBS shards as a consequence of their cooling history and is the origin of their coloring; the origin cannot lie in negligible compositional differences between the colorless and darkest shards. On the other hand, banded pumice from the KBS tuff has both dark and colorless glasses of differing compositions. The pumice appears banded because precipitation occurred preferentially in the Fe-rich glass. Although magma mixing may have played a role in the eruption of these materials, on the basis of their survey of distal eruptive products, it would appear that the volumetric amount of the mafic end member (dark pumice) was insubstantial.

  4. Supporting Information Wiley-VCH 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    chromatography (ethyl acetate in hexanes 2%10% on SiO2) to yield 602 mg (92% yield) of allyl silane 10 Facility. II. Experimental Procedures HO SiMe3 Enantioenriched allyl silane 16. To a 23 °C solution, as a colorless oil. #12;S4 Allyl silane 10 (2.36 g, 6.7 mmol) was dissolved in THF (67 mL, 0.1M with respect

  5. W W W . Q I A G E N . C O M EasyXpressTM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Introduction 7 The EasyXpress Insect System 7 DNA Templates 11 Minimum template requirements 11 Plasmid DNA 11 Purification of In Vitro-Synthesized Proteins Carrying a 6xHis tag 15 Protocol 156 Protein Synthesis Using screw-cap) 2 x 50 µl RNase-Free Water (colorless screw-cap) 1 x 1.9 ml EasyXpress Insect Positive

  6. Reliability models for finger joint strength and stiffness properties in Douglas-fir visual laminating grades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burk, Allan Gerard

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    combination of formaldehyde, phenol, resorcinol, melamine, or urea. Two of the most common are melamine-urea resins and phenol-resorcinol resins. Melamine-urea resins are colorless liquids and are prepared by mixing powdered resins at a 60:40 melamine... . This curing is usually accomplished with r adiofr equency (RF ) heating. Phenol-resorcinol resins are dark reddish liquids and are prepared by adding powdered hardeners such as formaldehyde. They are popular in the laminating industry because they can...

  7. Recirculation of Factory Heat and Air to Reduce Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiel, G. R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -makeup ventilation systems. First we must distinguish between gaseous and particulate contaminants in order to select appropriate types of air cleaning equipment. Next the physical (and chemical) char acteristics of those specific contaminants must be considered... particles. (Note that most gases and vapors are colorless and invisible ?...suspended particulates are almost the only visible air con taminants .) Because the chemical vapor pressure of the nuisance contaminants which create visibly polluted factory...

  8. Haze Formation and Behavior in Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arm, Stuart T.; Jenkins, J. A.

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous haze formation and behavior was studied in the liquid-liquid system tri-n-butyl phosphate in odorless kerosene and 3M nitric acid with uranyl nitrate and cesium nitrate representing the major solute and an impurity, respectively. A pulsed column, mixer-settler and centrifugal contactor were chosen to investigate the effect of different turbulence characteristics on the manifestation of haze since these contactors exhibit distinct mixing phenomena. The dispersive processes of drop coalescence and breakage, and water precipitation in the organic phase were observed to lead to the formation of haze drops of {approx}1 um in diameter. The interaction between the haze and primary drops of the dispersion was critical to the separation efficiency of the liquid-liquid extraction equipment. Conditions of high power input and spatially homogeneous mixing enabled the haze drops to become rapidly assimilated within the dispersion to maximize the scrub performance and separation efficiency of the equipment.

  9. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Charles H. (Overland Park, KS)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range.

  10. Sources and distribution of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni in turkeys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acuff, Gary Royce

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Characteristics Cam lobacter s ecies C. ~e uni C. coli C. fetus subsp. fetus C. fetus subsp. venerealis Oxidase Ferment sugars N03 reduction N02 reduction H2S (SIN) H2S (strip)a Hippurate hydrolysis Growth with: 1% glycine 3. 5X NaCl Growth at: 25 C 30.... These plates were incubated at 42 C for 48 h in an atmosphere of 5% 02, 1+ 002, and 85K N2. Suspect colonies (smooth, convex, translucent, colorless to cream-colored, pin-point to 1-1. 2 mm in diameter or often spreading colonies) of C. fetus subsp. jejuni...

  11. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, C.H.

    1986-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range. 1 fig.

  12. , 227 240 . Half-life Radioactive decay Reaction with 2200 m/s neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    . 700-800 U2N3 UN2 . 1.2.5. 1.5 . , . UF4 UF6 UO2 HF . UO3 + 4HF Boils at 1 atm UF6 Black ~1427 8.95 UF4 Green 1036 1457 6.70 U4F17 Black 430 Disp. 6.94 U2F9 390 Disp. 7.06 UF5 White 348 Disp. 6.45 UF6 Colorless 64.05 56.54 5.06 UCl3 Olive green 837 1657 5.51 UCl4 Dark

  13. Preparation of brightness stabilization agent for lignin containing pulp from biomass pyrolysis oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agblevor, Foster A. (Blacksburg, VA); Besler-Guran, Serpil (Flemington, NJ)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing a brightness stabilization mixture of water-soluble organic compounds from biomass pyrolysis oils comprising: a) size-reducing biomass material and pyrolyzing the size-reduced biomass material in a fluidized bed reactor; b) separating a char/ash component while maintaining char-pot temperatures to avoid condensation of pyrolysis vapors; c) condensing pyrolysis gases and vapors, and recovering pyrolysis oils by mixing the oils with acetone to obtain an oil-acetone mixture; d) evaporating acetone and recovering pyrolysis oils; e) extracting the pyrolysis oils with water to obtain a water extract; f) slurrying the water extract with carbon while stirring, and filtering the slurry to obtain a colorless filtrate; g) cooling the solution and stabilizing the solution against thermally-induced gelling and solidification by extraction with ethyl acetate to form an aqueous phase lower layer and an organic phase upper layer; h) discarding the upper organic layer and extracting the aqueous layer with ethyl acetate, and discarding the ethyl acetate fraction to obtain a brown-colored solution not susceptible to gelling or solidification upon heating; i) heating the solution to distill off water and other light components and concentrating a bottoms fraction comprising hydroxyacetaldehyde and other non-volatile components having high boiling points; and j) decolorizing the stabilized brown solution with activated carbon to obtain a colorless solution.

  14. An experience of electron beam (EB) irradiated gemstones in Malaysian nuclear agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idris, Sarada, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Hairaldin, Siti Zulaiha, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Tajau, Rida, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Karim, Jamilah, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Jusoh, Suhaimi, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Ghazali, Zulkafli, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Ahmad, Shamshad [School of Chemicals and Material Engineering, NUST Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In Nuclear Malaysia, a study on gemstone irradiation using beta particle is conducted. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the gemstone colour enhancement by using different kind of precious and non-precious gemstones. By using irradiation technique, selected gemstones are exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate colour centres culminating in the introduction of deeper colours. The colour centres may be stable or unstable depending on the nature of colour centre produced. The colour change of irradiated stones were measured by HunterLab colour measurement. At 50 kGy, Topaz shows changes colour from colourless to golden. Meanwhile pearl shows changes from pale colour to grey. Kunzite and amethyst shows colour changes from colorless to green and pale colour to purple. Gamma survey meter measurement confirmed that irradiation treatment with 3 MeV electron beam machine does not render any activation that activate the gems to become radioactive.

  15. Color SU(3) symmetry, confinement, stability, clustering and quark mass dependence in the q{sup 4}q system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dmitrasinovic, V. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, lab 010, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the color SU(3) dynamics of q{sup 4}q system, i.e. of the pentaquark. First we study this system in the model with two-body interaction proportional to the color charges. We construct the potential matrix and show, (1) Confinement: the color singlet qq potential energy rises infinitely with the separation distance, (2) Stability: All colorless states' energies are bounded from below (3) Color singlet clustering: the pentaquark color-singlet state Hamiltonian turns into a sum of a three-quark (baryon) and a quark-antiquark (meson) cluster Hamiltonian, in the limit of asymptotically large separations. We evaluate the four excitation eigenfrequencies of pentaquarks in the harmonic oscillator two-body confining potential and the ground states' dependence on the quark-antiquark mass ratio. We show that the pentaquark is unlikely to bind even with a top antiquark, in contrast to tetraquarks.

  16. Quantum-mechanical description of in-medium fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Z. Kopeliovich; H. -J. Pirner; I. K. Potashnikova; Ivan Schmidt; A. V. Tarasov; O. O. Voskresenskaya

    2008-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a quantum-mechanical description of quark-hadron fragmentation in a nuclear environment. It employs the path-integral formulation of quantum mechanics, which takes care of all phases and interferences, and which contains all relevant time scales, like production, coherence, formation, etc. The cross section includes the probability of pre-hadron (colorless dipole) production both inside and outside the medium. Moreover, it also includes inside-outside production, which is a typical quantum-mechanical interference effect (like twin-slit electron propagation). We observe a substantial suppression caused by the medium, even if the pre-hadron is produced outside the medium and no energy loss is involved. This important source of suppression is missed in the usual energy-loss scenario interpreting the effect of jet quenching observed in heavy ion collisions. This may be one of the reasons of a too large gluon density, reported by such analyzes.

  17. Micelle formation and surface activity of functional redox relays: viologens substituted by a long alkyl chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krieg, M.; Pileni, M.P.; Braun, A.M.; Gratzel, M.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Viologens are receiving increasing attention from 2 major domains. First, photo- and electroreproductive processes are being developed which exploit the pronounced chromophore effect associated with the one-electron reduction of the viologens: the 2+ state is practically colorless, while the 1+ state has an intense color. However, the most prominent impact in viologen-related research arises from their use as mediators, sometimes referred to as electron relays, in the photionduced generation of hydrogen from water. Photobiologists had discovered earlier that methyl viologen in chloroplast suspensions is suited to act as a Hill reagent which can be coupled with hydrogenase to yield H/sub 2/ under illumination. More recently, in vitro systems have been developed in which synthetic dyes replace the chloroplasts as redox sensitizers. These have been shown to be remarkably effective in H/sub 2/ production. The surfactant and micellar properties of a series of potent candidates, i.e., long-chain-substituted viologens are investigated.

  18. Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order Subtraction Formalism in Hadron Collisions and its Application to Higgs-Boson Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catani, Stefano; Grazzini, Massimiliano [INFN, Sezione di Firenze and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy)

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider higher-order QCD corrections to the production of colorless high-mass systems (lepton pairs, vector bosons, Higgs bosons, etc.) in hadron collisions. We propose a new formulation of the subtraction method to numerically compute arbitrary infrared-safe observables for this class of processes. To cancel the infrared divergences, we exploit the universal behavior of the associated transverse-momentum (q{sub T}) distributions in the small-q{sub T} region. The method is illustrated in general terms up to the next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD perturbation theory. As a first explicit application, we study Higgs-boson production through gluon fusion. Our calculation is implemented in a parton level Monte Carlo program that includes the decay of the Higgs boson into two photons. We present selected numerical results at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  19. Removal of phenols from wastewater by soluble and immobilized tyrosinase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Tatsumi, Kenji (National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An enzymatic method for removal of phenols from industrial wastewater was investigated. Phenols in an aqueous solution were removed after treatment with mushroom tyrosinase. The reduction order of substituted phenols is catechol > p-cresol > p-chlorophenol > phenol > p-methoxyphenol. In the treatment of tyrosinase alone, no precipitate was formed but a color change from colorless to dark-brown was observed. The colored products were removed by chitin and chitosan which are available abundantly as shellfish waste. In addition, the reduction rate of phenols was observed to be accelerated in the presence of chitosan. Tyrosinase, immobilized by using amino groups in the enzyme on cation exchange resins, can be used repeatedly. By treatment with immobilized tyrosinase, 100% of phenol was removed after 2 h, and the activity was reduced very little even after 10 repeat treatments.

  20. Spin-Flavor van der Waals Forces and NN interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvaro Calle Cordon, Enrique Ruiz Arriola

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal in Nuclear Physics is the derivation of the Nucleon-Nucleon (NN) interaction from Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In QCD the fundamental degrees of freedom are colored quarks and gluons which are confined to form colorless strongly interacting hadrons. Because of this the resulting nuclear forces at sufficiently large distances correspond to spin-flavor excitations, very much like the dipole excitations generating the van der Waals (vdW) forces acting between atoms. We study the Nucleon-Nucleon interaction in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation at second order in perturbation theory including the Delta resonance as an intermediate state. The potential resembles strongly chiral potentials computed either via soliton models or chiral perturbation theory and has a van der Waals like singularity at short distances which is handled by means of renormalization techniques. Results for the deuteron are discussed.

  1. The Colorful Chemical Bottle Experiment Kit: From School Laboratory To Public Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpanuparb, Taweetham

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The blue bottle experiment was first introduced to the chemical education literature as a simple demonstration on kinetics. Its original formulation contains only glucose, NaOH and small amount of methylene blue. The solution turns blue when shaken and fades to colorless upon standing. This bluing/de-bluing cycle may be repeated and may be compared to blood colors in animal's respiratory cycle. Inspired by the blue bottle experiment, the colorful chemical bottle experiment kit was commercially developed in 2006. The kit is a versatile pedagogical tool, not only for physical chemistry but also for analytical, biological and organic chemistry. It also helps teaching concepts in scientific method and laboratory safety. This manuscript contains four parts, brief review on literature relating to the blue bottle experiment, description of the colorful chemical bottle experiment kit, pedagogical discussion of the experiments and preliminary evaluation from students.

  2. Effective atomic numbers of blue topaz at different gamma-rays energies obtained from Compton scattering technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuschareon, S., E-mail: tuscharoen@hotmail.com; Limkitjaroenporn, P., E-mail: tuscharoen@hotmail.com; Kaewkhao, J., E-mail: tuscharoen@hotmail.com [Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science (CEGM), Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom, 73000, Thailand and Science Program, Faculty of Science and Technology, Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom, 73000 (Thailand)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Topaz occurs in a wide range of colors, including yellow, orange, brown, pink-to-violet and blue. All of these color differences are due to color centers. In order to improve the color of natural colorless topaz, the most commonly used is irradiated with x- or gamma-rays, indicated that attenuation parameters is important to enhancements by irradiation. In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients of blue topaz were measured at the different energy of ?-rays using the Compton scattering technique. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient are in good agreement with the theoretical values. The mass attenuation coefficients increase with the decrease in gamma rays energies. This may be attributed to the higher photon interaction probability of blue topaz at lower energy. This result is a first report of mass attenuation coefficient of blue topaz at different gamma rays energies.

  3. Mass spectral characterization of petroleum dyes, tracers, and additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngless, T.L.; Swansiger, J.T.; Danner, D.A.; Greco, M.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum dyes, additives, and tracers are important for identifying gasolines in spill and contamination problems. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was used for the characterization of 21 commercial petroleum dyes. Many contained common chromophores, typically azo or anthraquinone groups, and often differed only in their degree of alkyl substitution. Few dyes were pure and typically contained several chromogens with homologous series of substituents. A separation method was developed to concentrate the polar fractions containing the additives. Subsequent characterization of the polar fraction by GC/MS showed distinct differences between different gasolines. Various colorless tracers were evaluated in terms of detectability, soil adsorption, and cost. Many tracers exhibited soil adsorption and interferences which limited their detectability. Alcohols in the C8-C10 range were found to be the most suitable tracers with GC/MS detection limits of 1 ppm. 22 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Julio Enrique

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas ?a, storage in aquifers in the midwestern U.S states of Illinois and Indiana and salt caverns

  5. Unconstrained Hamiltonian formulation of low energy QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans-Peter Pavel

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a generalized polar decomposition of the gauge fields into gauge-rotation and gauge-invariant parts, which Abelianises the Non-Abelian Gauss-law constraints, an unconstrained Hamiltonian formulation of QCD can be achieved. The exact implementation of the Gauss laws reduces the colored spin-1 gluons and spin-1/2 quarks to unconstrained colorless spin-0, spin-1, spin-2 and spin-3 glueball fields and colorless Rarita-Schwinger fields. The obtained physical Hamiltonian naturally admits a systematic strong-coupling expansion in powers of \\lambda=g^{-2/3}, equivalent to an expansion in the number of spatial derivatives. The leading-order term corresponds to non-interacting hybrid-glueballs, whose low-lying spectrum can be calculated with high accuracy by solving the Schr\\"odinger-equation of the Dirac-Yang-Mills quantum mechanics of spatially constant fields (at the moment only for the 2-color case). The discrete glueball excitation spectrum shows a universal string-like behaviour with practically all excitation energy going in to the increase of the strengths of merely two fields, the "constant Abelian fields" corresponding to the zero-energy valleys of the chromomagnetic potential. Inclusion of the fermionic degrees of freedom significantly lowers the spectrum and allows for the study of the sigma meson. Higher-order terms in \\lambda lead to interactions between the hybrid-glueballs and can be taken into account systematically using perturbation theory, allowing for the study of IR-renormalisation and Lorentz invariance. The existence of the generalized polar decomposition used, the position of the zeros of the corresponding Jacobian (Gribov horizons), and the ranges of the physical variables can be investigated by solving a system of algebraic equations. It is exactly solvable for 1 spatial dimension and several numerical solutions can be found for 2 and 3 spatial dimensions.

  6. Solid bitumen at Atigun Gorge, central Brooks Range front: Implications for oil exploration in the North Slope fold and thrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, D.G.; Johnsson, M.J.; Bird, K.J. (U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atigun Gorge area of the north-central Brooks range is a structurally complex region in which a sequence of north-verging duplex structures involving Paleozoic and Mesozoic Ellesmerian continental margin deposits are structurally overlain by a south-verging thrust of Brookian foreland basin deposits of Albian age. The resulting structural triangle zone is marked by numerous small-scale thrusts involving Permian and Triassic strata in which solid bitumen, occupying fissures up to 10 cm wide and several meters in length, has been found. The presence of aromatics in the odorless, black material was confirmed by ultraviolet fluorescence following extraction in dichloromethane. The occurrence of solid bitumen at Atigun Gorge adds to a growing inventory of hydrocarbon-filled fractures found mostly in Cretaceous rocks in the Brooks Range foothills. These occurrences are consistent with a model of hydrocarbon generation beneath the northern margin of the Brooks Range. The regional distribution of vitrinite reflectance isograds suggests that the northern margin of the Brooks Range and the adjoining foreland basin deposits of the North Slope have experienced similar thermal histories. The 0.6% vitrinite reflectance isograd intersects the land surface along the southern margin of the foreland and the 2.0% isograd lies within the northern part of the range. Although these relations suggest the possibility of petroleum resources at shallow depths beneath the Brooks Range foothills, they also indicate that a considerable amount of differential uplift has occurred, probably resulting in redistribution and some leakage of any oil and gas accumulations.

  7. Bright Ideas in Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melville, Jo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    like fossil fuels or hydrogen, storage is impractical justenergy as hydrogen gas (a common energy storage mechanism,rich hydrogen provides a good solution to energy storage

  8. Evolution of simple configurations of gravitating gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. P. Pronko

    2011-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We considered the dynamics of gravitating gas - a continuous media with peculiar properties. The exact solutions of its Euler equations for simple initial conditions is obtained.

  9. The Atlantic Alliance and Geopolitics: New Realities and New Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lie, Kai Olaf

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from East Siberia and Kazakhstan. 4) The emerging role ofand gas. A pipeline from Kazakhstan to China (Sin kiang) wasUzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan and Kirgizstan. ) Russia

  10. Evaluation of factors that influence microbial communities and methane production in coal microcosms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Vast reserves of coal represent a largely untapped resource that can be used to produce methane gas, a cleaner energy alternative compared to burning oil (more)

  11. Sea-Change from Bush to Clinton: Setting a New Course for Offshore Oil Development and U.S. Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Robert Jay

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    renewable energy, advanced nuclear reactors, fu- sion, coal, natural gas, a natural resource policy, basic science and moderating world population growth." ' '

  12. Survival of charmonia in a hot environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Z. Kopeliovich; I. K. Potashnikova; Ivan Schmidt; M. Siddikov

    2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A colorless c-cbar dipole emerging from a heavy ion collision and developing the charmonium wave function can be broken-up by final state interactions (FSI) propagating through the hot medium created in the collision. We single out two mechanisms of charmonium attenuation: (i) Debye color screening, called melting; and (ii) color-exchange interaction with the medium, called absorption. The former problem has been treated so far only for charmonia at rest embedded in the medium, while in practice their transverse momenta at the LHC are quite high, =7-10 GeV^2. We demonstrate that a c-cbar dipole may have a large survival probability even at infinitely high temperature. We develop a procedure of Lorentz boosting of the Schroedinger equation to a moving reference frame and perform the first realistic calculations of the charmonium survival probability employing the path-integral technique, incorporating both melting and absorption. These effects are found to have comparable magnitudes. We also calculated the FSI suppression factor for the radial excitation psi(2S) and found it to be stronger than for J/psi, except large p_T, where psi(2S) is relatively enhanced. The azimuthal asymmetry parameter v_2 is also calculated.

  13. Removal of phenols and aromatic amines from wastewater by a combination treatment with tyrosinase and a coagulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Tatsumi, Kenji (National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1995-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of phenols and aromatic amines from industrial wastewater by tyrosinase was investigated. A color change from colorless to dark brown was observed, but no precipitate was formed. Colored products were found to be easily removed by a combination treatment with tyrosinase and a cationic polymer coagulant containing amino group, such as hexamethylenediamine-epichlorohidrin polycondensate, polyethleneimine, or chitosan. The first two coagulants, synthetic polymers, were more effective than chitosan, a polymer produced in crustacean shells. Phenols and aromatic amines are not precipitated by any kind of coagulants, but their enzymatic reaction products are easily precipitated by a cationic polymer coagulant. These results indicate that the combination of tyrosinase and a cationic polymer coagulant is effective in removing carcinogenic phenols and aromatic amines from an aqueous solution. Immobilization of tyrosinase on magnetite gave a good retention of activity (80%) and storage stability i.e., only 5% loss after 15 days of storage at ambient temperature. In the treatment of immobilized tyrosinase, colored enzymatic reaction products were removed by less coagulant compared with soluble tyrosinase.

  14. Electrospun nanofibers of Er{sup 3+}-doped TiO{sub 2} with photocatalytic activity beyond the absorption edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Yali; Wang, Wenzhong, E-mail: wzwang@mail.sic.ac.cn

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Er{sup 3+}-doped TiO{sub 2} nanofibers with different Er{sup 3+} contents were prepared via electrospinning and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, ultravioletvisible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and photocurrent measurement. Photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared samples were evaluated by the decolorization of methyl orange aqueous solution under simulated solar light irradiation. The results indicated that the photocatalytic activity of Er{sup 3+}-doped TiO{sub 2} nanofibers was much higher than that of the undoped one, and the optimal dosage of Er{sup 3+} at 1 mol% achieved the highest degradation rate. Moreover, the photocatalytic activity of Er{sup 3+}-doped TiO{sub 2} nanofibers under the irradiation of light with the wavelength beyond the absorption edge of TiO{sub 2} was explored by the decolorization of a dye, rhodamine B and the photodegradation of a typical colorless pollutant, phenol. The results further revealed the mechanism of the enhanced photocatalytic activity through Er{sup 3+} doping in TiO{sub 2} nanofibers. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: ?Er{sup 3+}:TiO{sub 2} nanofibers with different Er{sup 3+} contents were prepared via electrospinning. ?The photocatalytic activity of Er{sup 3+}:TiO{sub 2} was much higher than that of undoped one. ?Er{sup 3+}:TiO{sub 2} could be activated by the light with wavelength beyond the absorption edge.

  15. The photocatalysis of Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} under the irradiation of blue LED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Wang, Wenzhong, E-mail: wzwang@mail.sic.ac.cn; Zhang, Ling; Sun, Songmei

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: OH trap and hole sink were involved to investigate the active radicals. Holes play a more important role in the degradation of RhB. The OH were related to the decomposition of phenol. The O{sub 2}-played a leading role in the photodegradation of phenol. Blue LED is competitive and promising alternative for the future application. - Abstract: Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} has been reported as a promising photocatalyst in wastewater treatment. The active radicals generated over the Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} during the photocatalytic process were thought to be hydroxyl radical (OH) but have not been proved. Herein, Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} with nanoplate like morphology was synthesized and its photocatalytic performances in the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) and phenol as colored and colorless model pollutants respectively were evaluated under the irradiation of blue light emitting diode (LED). The tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as a OH trap and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) as a hole sink were involved to investigate the main active groups that are generated on Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} and function during the photodegradation of RhB and phenol. In addition, it is a competitive and promising alternative plan to use blue LED as light source for the future practical application in environmental remediation.

  16. Russias Natural Gas Export Potential up to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paltsev, Sergey

    Recent increases in natural gas reserve estimates and advances in shale gas technology make natural gas a fuel with good prospects to serve a bridge to a low-carbon world. Russia is an important energy supplier as it holds ...

  17. On environmental lifecycle assessment for policy selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    input such as energy from coal and energy for natural gas, aIowa corn using coal-based energy for processing versus cornabout the relative mix of coal and gas based energy input to

  18. SPENT SHALE AS A CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL SHALE RETORT WATER. ANNUAL REPORT FOR PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 1978 - SEPTEMBER 30, 1979.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Control Technology for Shale Oil Wastewaters,~~ inpyrolysized to produce shale oil, gas, a solid referred towaters are co-produced with shale oil and separated from it

  19. Optimization for Design and Operation of Natural Gas Transmission Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dilaveroglu, Sebnem 1986-

    2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    and compressor stations. On an existing network, the model also optimizes the total flow through pipelines that satisfy demand to determine the best purchase amount of gas. A mixed integer nonlinear programming model for steady-state natural gas transmission...

  20. Chemical kinetic modeling of oxy-fuel combustion of sour gas for enhanced oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bongartz, Dominik

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxy-fuel combustion of sour gas, a mixture of natural gas (primarily methane (CH 4 )), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), could enable the utilization of large natural gas resources, especially when ...

  1. affects host cell: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Figure S1, related to Figure 2. M1T15448 GAS replicate efficiently in the cytosol of epithelial cells replication of GAS. (A)...

  2. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C2-557 Colloque C2, suppl. au Journal de Physique 11, Vol. 1, septembre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by the pressure drop occurring in the bottle. Flow meter Pressure gauge Tic14 evaporator Saturator Isothermal and the flow rate of the Hz carrier gas. A known quantity of BCls was feed into an Ar-filled bottle wlth

  3. A versatile source to produce high-intensity, pulsed supersonic radical beams for crossed-beam experiments: The cyanogen radical CN,,X2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    CN radicals in a low- pressure fast-flow chemical reactor. Although valuable ki- netic data of the ablated species with molecular nitrogen, which acts also as a seeding gas. A chopper wheel located after

  4. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

  5. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

  6. Electrochemical investigations of product deposition and dissolution of the reduced forms of alkyl viologens on glassy carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelman, E.E.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reductions of several alkyl viologens in aqueous solutions at a glassy carbon working electrode were investigated. All of the viologens studied exist as colorless dication salts (V[sup 2+]) which are easily reduced to the violet cation radical (V[sup +.]) by a one electron process. The dications can be reduced directly to the yellow-brown, quinoidal neutral species (V[sup 0]) by a two electron process, or to neutral via the cation radical by two successive one electron transfers. In the absence of sodium n-alkyl sulfates, all but one displayed reversible, diffusion-controlled electron transfers for the V[sup 2+]/V[sup +.] couple. With addition of sodium decyl, undecyl and dodecyl sulfates at concentrations below their critical micelle concentrations (cmc), the cation radical product of methyl and ethyl viologen deposits on the electrode surface. The addition of these surfactants at concentrations below their cmc's precipitated the dicationic species of butyl, benzyl, and heptyl viologens. All redox forms of the viologens are solubilized by the onset of micelles. Double potential step chronocoulometry showed the deposition mechanism to be governed by solubility product equilibria. Open-circuit rotating ring-disk electrode (OC-RRDE) voltammetric experiments revealed that two forms of deposit exist. Above the cmc, little or no deposition of neutral forms occurs as V[sup 0] is solubilized in the hydrocarbon interior of the micelles. Cyclic voltammetric investigations revealed that there are also two forms of deposit for neutral viologens. For heptyl viologen, there may be more than two forms of both the V[sup +.] and V[sup 0] deposits. Deposition of the neutral form is governed by nucleation and subsequent growth. From RRDE voltammetry lower limits of solubility of neutral viologens were estimated. OC-RRDE voltammetric experiments showed that dissolution occurred by extremely fast conproportionation reaction which caused the process to be mass-transfer controlled.

  7. A comparison of mechanical properties and scaling law relationships for silica aerogels and their organic counterparts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Tillotson, T.M.; Alviso, C.T.; Poco, J.F.; LeMay, J.D.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams derived from the supercritical extraction of highly crosslinked, inorganic or organic gels. The resultant materials have ultrafine cell/pore sizes (< 100 nm), high surface areas (350--1000m{sup 2}/g), and a microstructure composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles or polymeric chains with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. TEM and SAXS show that this microstructure is sensitive to variations in processing conditions that influence crosslinking chemistry and growth processes prior to gelation. Traditional silica aerogels are prepared via the hydrolysis and condensation of tetramethoxy silane (TMOS) or tetraethoxy silane (TEOS). Factors such as pH and the (H{sub 2}O)/(TMOS) ratio affect the microstructure of the dried aerogel. It is generally accepted that polymeric' silica aerogels result from acid catalysis while colloidal'silica aerogels result from base catalysis. Recently, Hrubesh and Tillotson developed a new condensed silica' procedure for obtaining silica aerogels with densities as low as 0.004g/cc, i.e. only 3{times} the density of air. Organic aerogels are formed from the aqueous, polycondensation of (1) resorcinol/formaldehyde or (2) melamine/formaldehyde. The microstructure of the resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels is dictated by the amount of base catalyst used in the sol-gel polymerization. In addition, these materials can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form vitreous carbon aerogels. Melamine- formaldehyde (MF) aerogels that are both colorless and transparent are only formed under acidic conditions (i.e. pH = 1--2). In this paper, the microstructural dependence and scaling law relationships for the compressive modulus of silica, carbon, RF, and MF aerogels will be discussed in detail. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Enhanced electrochromic property of nickel hydroxide thin films prepared by anodic deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chigane, Masaya; Ishikawa, Masami (Osaka Municipal Technical Research Inst. (Japan). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nickel hydroxide and nickel oxide thin films have received much attention as electrochromic (EC) materials, particularly as the materials for a complementary counterlayer against an EC tungsten oxide layer in smart window systems. Nickel hydroxide thin films were prepared onto transparent conductive tin oxide (NESA) substrates by potentiostatic electrolysis of a nickel amine complex solution at various potentials (0.6 to 1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Nickel hydroxide thin film (F0.7) obtained at relatively lower anodic potential (0.7 V) showed enhanced electrochromism between colorless and dark brown in a sodium borate buffer solution at pH 12; the absorption spectrum in the colored (oxidized) state was broadened in the visible and near-infrared region compared with the nickel hydroxide films prepared at the higher anodic potential (1.1 V). characterization of the films revealed that crystal structure of F0.7 is assigned to [alpha]-Ni(OH)[sub 2], and that its electrochromism is based on the reversible oxidation to hexagonal [gamma][sub 2]-2NiO[sub 2] [center dot] NiOOH structure. Composite nickel hydroxide film, i.e., by the electrolytic deposition at 1.1 V followed by that at 0.7 V, showed electrochromic property similar to F0.7 and its durability in repeated redox cycles were much improved in comparison with that of F0.7. Electrochromic properties in switching performance of this composite nickel hydroxide film were investigated.

  9. Occurrence of pore-filling halite in carbonate rocks, Nesson Anticline, Williston basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucher, E.J.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clear, colorless pore-filling halite of late diagenetic origin occurs locally in the Devonian Dawson Bay, Winnipegosis, and Ashern Formations, the Silurian Interlake Formation, and the Ordovician Red River Formation. The halite occludes a variety of pore types and individual pores are filled with single crystals or aggregates of only a few crystals. This halite is present in quantities ranging from a trace to approximately 12%. Cores from McGregor field, Williams County, show the Winnipegosis Formation consists of mixed-skeletal lime wackestones and mudstones. These contain vugs up to 4 in. (10 cm) in size, intraparticle pores, and shelter porosity within pelecypod shells, up to 4 in. (10 cm) in size, which are occluded with halite. Halite also fills common small discontinuous vertical fractures. The upper 200 ft (61 m) of the Interlake Formation locally exhibits the most striking occurrences of pore-filling halite. These dolostones consist predominantly of intraclast-peloid mudstones, wackestones, packstones, occasional grainstones, algal boundstones, and solution-collapse breccias containing vug, fenestral, interparticle, shelter, intercrystalline, moldic, channel, breccia, and fracture porosity types. All porosity types, except intercrystalline, can be halite filled. A rare occurrence of pore-filling halite exists in Red River cores from Blue Buttes field, McKenzie County, where a dolomitic, mixed-skeletal, lime mudstone and wackestone lithofacies contains vugs, discontinuous vertical fractures, and intraparticle porosity types occluded with halite. In most occurrences, the pore systems were noneffective prior to halite infilling and had no potential as hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, it has been demonstrated that halite plugging in the Interlake Formation has locally formed updip seals to hydrocarbon migration.

  10. Controlling And Operating Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (Hcci) Engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flowers, Daniel L. (San Leandro, CA)

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine system includes an engine that produces exhaust gas. A vaporization means vaporizes fuel for the engine an air induction means provides air for the engine. An exhaust gas recirculation means recirculates the exhaust gas. A blending means blends the vaporized fuel, the exhaust gas, and the air. An induction means inducts the blended vaporized fuel, exhaust gas, and air into the engine. A control means controls the blending of the vaporized fuel, the exhaust gas, and the air and for controls the inducting the blended vaporized fuel, exhaust gas, and air into the engine.

  11. Vrme-och strmningsteknik / Thermal and flow engineering Massverfring & separationsteknik /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    = a b c d e and z = max(c,d,e). 1201. Ett tv-komponent gas-vtskesystem med en gas (A) (C2H4 fr e = 0-component gas-liquid system of a gas (A) (C2H4 for e = 0 or 1; H2 for e = 2 or 3; CO2 for e = 4 or 5; CH4 for e = 6 or 7; H2S for e = 8 or 9) and water (B) is at thermodynamic equilibrium at temperature 5a C

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED "ODDERON SEARCHES AT RHIC" (VOLUME 76)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORGANIZERS: GURYN, W.; KOVCHEGOV, Y.; VOGELSANG, W.; TRUEMAN, L.

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Odderon, a charge-conjugation-odd partner of the Pomeron, has been a puzzle ever since its introduction in 1973. The Pomeron describes a colorless exchange with vacuum quantum numbers in the t-channel of hadronic scattering at high energies. The concept was originally formulated for the non-perturbative regime of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In perturbation theory, the simplest picture of the Poineron is that of a two-gluon exchange process, whereas an Odderon can be thought of as an exchange of three gluons. Both the Pomeron and the Odderon are expected in QCD. However, while there exists plenty of experimental data that could be successfully described by Pomeron exchanges (for example in electron-proton and hadron-hadron scattering at high energies), no experimental sign of the Odderon has been observed. One of the very few hints so far is the difference in the diffractive minima of elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering measured at the ISR. The Odderon has recently received renewed attention by QCD researchers, mainly for the following two reasons. First of all, RHIC has entered the scene, offering exciting unique new opportunities for Odderon searches. RHIC provides collisions of nuclei at center-of-mass energies far exceeding those at all previous experiments. RHIC also provides collisions of protons of the highest center-of-mass energy, and in the interval, which has not been explored previously in p {bar p} collisions. In addition, it also has the unique feature of polarization for the proton beams, promising to become a crucial tool in Odderon searches. Indeed, theorists have proposed possible signatures of the Odderon in some spin asymmetries measurable at RHIC. Qualitatively unique signals should be seen in these observables if the Odderon coupling is large. Secondly, the Odderon has recently been shown to naturally emerge from the Color Glass Condensate (CGC), a theory for the high-energy asymptotics of QCD. It has been argued that saturation/CGC effects tend to decrease the Odderon intercept, possibly providing an explanation for the lack of experimental evidence for the Odderon so far. This has added further motivation for pursuing searches for the Odderon. During the workshop the status of the Odderon in QCD and its phenomenology were reviewed. The participants also agreed on the most promising observables for the Odderon search at RHIC, which we list. The conclusion of the workshop is that the best available setup to address experimental questions related to the search for the Odderon at RHIC is the proposed combination of STAR experiment and Roman pots of pp2pp experiment, described in the proposal ''Physics with Tagged Forward Protons with the STAR detector at RHIC''.

  13. Preparation, characterization and applications of novel carbon and nitrogen codoped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles from annealing TiN under CO atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Song, Peng; Li, Jing; Cui, Xiaoli, E-mail: xiaolicui@fudan.edu.cn

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Carbon and nitrogen codoped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were firstly fabricated by calcining TiN powder under CO atmosphere at different temperatures between 400 and 600 C, both the improved photocatalytic activity for degradation of methylene blue and enhanced photovoltaic performance for dye sensitized solar cells were demonstrated. - Highlights: CN-codoped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were prepared by calcining TiN under CO atmosphere. More visible light response was confirmed by UVvis DRS and photocatalytic results. Enhanced conversion efficiency was observed for the DSSCs from CN-TiO{sub 2} photoanode. CN-codoping played an important role to improve the photocatalytic performance. - Abstract: Carbon and nitrogen codoped titania (CN-TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were fabricated by calcining titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles under carbon monoxide (CO) atmosphere at four different temperatures in a range of 400600 C. The as-prepared samples were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Enhanced light absorption in both the UV and visible light region was observed for the resulted CN-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UVvis DRS). Improved photocatalytic activity toward the degradation of methylene blue by the CN-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was demonstrated under UV and visible light, respectively. The highest degradation rate was achieved for CN-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (13%) compared to N-TiO{sub 2} (10%) and the commercial P25 (5%) under visible light illumination for 40 min. Furthermore, the improved photocatalytic activity of CN-TiO{sub 2} was also confirmed by the degradation of colorless resorcinol under UVvis light irradiation. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated using P25, N-TiO{sub 2} and CN-TiO{sub 2} photoanodes, respectively. The highest conversion efficiency of 3.31% was achieved by the DSSCs based on the CN-TiO{sub 2} photoanodes in comparison with the commercial P25 (1.61%) and N-TiO{sub 2} (2.44%) photoanodes. This work demonstrates that thermal treatment of TiN nanoparticles under CO atmosphere has shown to be a rapid, direct and clean approach to synthesize photocatalysts with enhanced photocatalytic and photovoltaic performance.

  14. Non-equilibrium and local detection of the normal fraction of a trapped two-dimensional Bose gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -dimensional Bose gas, a quantity that generally differs from the Bose-Einstein condensed fraction. The idea-Einstein condensation [7]. A possibil- ity explored in [8] is to look at the response of a gas in a toroidal trap for atomic samples, as the superfluid core co-exists with an external ring of normal gas [10]. In p

  15. Observation of a shape resonance in the collision of two cold 87 H. M. J. M. Boesten,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzen, Daniel J.

    A fascinating aspect of the recent successful Bose- Einstein condensation BEC experiments in cold-gas samples from a photoas- sociation experiment in a gas sample of doubly polarized 87 Rb atoms. Using it we of the properties that are fully deter- mined by a. It is believed that in a homogeneous gas a Bose condensate

  16. ccsd-00000540(version1):1Aug2003 Production of Long-Lived Ultracold Li2 Molecules from a Fermi gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    samples, the collapse of Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) for negative scattering length [4], solitonccsd-00000540(version1):1Aug2003 Production of Long-Lived Ultracold Li2 Molecules from a Fermi gas a degenerate two component Fermi gas by sweeping a magnetic field across a Feshbach resonance. The atom

  17. A Cognitive Vision System for Nuclear Fusion Device Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to produce controlled thermonuclear fusion power by magnetic confinement of a plasma (fully ionized gasA Cognitive Vision System for Nuclear Fusion Device Monitoring Vincent Martin1 , Victor Moncada1 optimizations. The framework is generic and can be easily adapted to different fusion device environ- ments

  18. The Woodland Carbon Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

  19. Nuclear Technology & Canadian Oil Sands: Integration of Nuclear Power with In-Situ Oil Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of natural gas, a plant producing 100,000 barrels of bitumen per day would prevent up to 100 megatonnes of CO at these facilities. There are a number of concerns surrounding the continued use of natural gas, including carbon dioxide emissions and increasing gas prices. Three scenarios for the use of the reactor are analyzed:(1

  20. North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-515-3480 | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu | 8/2013 Advancing Clean Energy for a Sustainable Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -515-3480 | www.cleantransportation.org Natural Gas A clean choice for your vehicle Natural gas is widely used. Most natural gas is extracted from gas wells or produced in conjunction with crude oil. Renewable natural gas can also be produced from decaying organic materials, such as waste from plants, landfills

  1. North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-515-3480 | www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu | 8/2013 Advancing Clean Energy for a Sustainable Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .nccleantech.nscu.edu Natural Gas A clean choice for your vehicle Natural gas is widely used in industrial and home applications. Increasingly it is also being employed as a clean burning vehicle fuel. Most natural gas is extracted from gas wells or produced in conjunction with crude oil. Renewable natural gas can also be produced from

  2. Inductively heated particulate matter filter regeneration control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore Jr., Michael J; Kirby, Kevin W; Phelps, Amanda; Gregoire, Daniel J

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and zones. The system also includes a heating element. A control module selectively activates the heating element to inductively heat one of the zones.

  3. Journal of Power Sources 188 (2009) 8288 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago, Juan G.

    of PEM fuel cell technology faces significant hurdles in terms of cost, durability, and reliability November 2008 Available online 27 November 2008 Keywords: PEM fuel cell Water management Porous plate Wick Heat pipe Dry gas a b s t r a c t We present a study of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells

  4. LRRR Emplacement Range and Azimuth From. LM for Fra Mauro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    from the site during the landing, and the effectiveness of the descent stage as a blast deflector by decent engine blast; 4) dust "kicked-up'' by the ALSEP Active Seismic Experiment mortar; 5) the mortar flight path Heating F ~om LM Exhaust Gas. - A detailed analysis has not been per- formed of this effect

  5. NO. REV. HO. LRRR(300) Emplacement Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    engine blast; 4 Heating From LM Exhaust Gas. - A detailed analysis has not been performed of this effect during the landing. and the effectiveness of the descent stage as a blast deflector. These uncertainties.e.~ a deployment distance of 300 feet minimum from the LM~ as is in effect for ALSEP~ is recommended. Support- ing

  6. The atoms may be charged or neutral (how?) mass range: 1.67 10-27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : where does our food come from? different plants have a different isotope content What other uses (2008) *mention UCSB project "Children of the corn" #12; Can we get energy from atoms? ... fusion and fission "The sun is a mass of incandescent gas A gigantic nuclear furnace Where hydrogen is built

  7. Industry Sector Case Study Building Technologies Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    's remote location far away from any infrastructure, planning focused on making it as self and its control components. If needed, the system is backed up by a combined heat and power (CHP) plant might be used up, necessitating a switch to LP gas, a scarce resource at this remote location. Desigo

  8. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 34, NO. 3, JUNE 2006 855 Kinetics of Plasma Particles and Electron Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    in the interelectrode gap. In a low-pressure gas, a high-current density discharge can be supported if the density Identifier 10.1109/TPS.2006.873250 In ablative wall discharges (e.g., metallic electrode ablation in arcs[2 of the vapor particles. The hydrodynamic pa- rameters (temperature, density, velocity) in the Knudsen layer

  9. Volume203,number2,3 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 19February1993 Transient grating spectroscopy of exciton sound waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    of exciton sound waves in dense exciton fluids Jan A. Leegwater and Shaul Mukamel Department of Chemistry to that of sound waves in an ordinary gas. A method to probe these motions using transient grating with strong pump density may disappear and reap- pear later. The physical mechanism is analogous to that of sound waves

  10. Introduction The Sun is a mass of incandescent gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nittler, Larry R.

    Chapter 1 Introduction The Sun is a mass of incandescent gas A gigantic nuclear furnace Building that our bodies contain atoms that, like most elements and their isotopes in the Solar System, were part of the molecular cloud from which the Solar System condensed, and were trapped in primitive

  11. Why Does the Sun Shine? Is the Sun on Fire?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    . · Total chemical potential would be 1045 ergs. · This is the solar luminosity for 4000 years. = 5 x 1044 A gigantic nuclear furnace where hydrogen is built into helium at a temperature of millions of degrees Yo ho of incandescent gas A gigantic nuclear furnace where hydrogen is built into helium at a temperature of millions

  12. Turkeys. Photo by Jeff Vanuga. Sow with piglet. Photo by Scott Bauer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    of "bio-gas," can be used to fuel a variety of cooking, heating, cooling, and lighting applications to promote bio-gas projects is known as Introduction..................... 1 Digestion Process........... 2 Bio-Gas: A Resource Requiring Care ................ 4 Energy Content and Relative Value of Bio

  13. STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 08-1008-11 Quality Act Requirements Relating to ) Greenhouse Gas Emission Impacts of ) Power Plants required by the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) are required to consider the greenhouse gas a careful and thorough analysis of the total costs and benefits of permitting new generation. The Commission

  14. From Waste to Hydrogen: An Optimal Design of Energy Production and Distribution Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Yueyue

    at costs similar to producing hydrogen from natural gas, a non-renewable energy source. We also provide: (530)7546408 #12;2 1. Introduction Transportation and energy industries are closely dependent on each States. The number is still growing despite increases in energy efficiency. For example, over last twenty

  15. Effect of flue gas impurities on the process of injection and storage of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nogueira de Mago, Marjorie Carolina

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , corefloods were conducted at 1,500 psig and 70??C, in which flue gas was injected into an Austin chalk core containing initially methane. Two types of flue gases were injected: dehydrated flue gas with 13.574 mole% CO2 (Gas A), and treated flue gas (N2, O2...

  16. 1 Copyright 1999 by ASME MULTI-PHASE CFD ANALYSIS OF NATURAL AND VENTILATED CAVITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunz, Robert Francis

    volume fraction transport/generation for liquid, condensable vapor and non-con- densable gas fields between condensable vapor and non-condensable gas, a requirement of our current applica- tion. By solving1 Copyright © 1999 by ASME MULTI-PHASE CFD ANALYSIS OF NATURAL AND VENTILATED CAVITATION ABOUT

  17. A review of the theory of Coriolis flowmeter measurement errors due to entrained particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basse, Nils Plesner

    is provided in Table 1. The measurement errors due to compressibility increase with decreasing speed of sound,12]. Nomenclature: a fluid is either a liquid or a gas. A particle can be either a solid or a fluid (gas bubble or liquid droplet). To date, the published bubble theory has dealt with zero particle density combined

  18. WHAT IS A NETWORK? (Gas and Electricity) A complex, interconnected group or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Francis

    WHAT IS A NETWORK? (Gas and Electricity) A complex, interconnected group or system Electricity and Gas: A system used to distribute electricity and gas around the world/certain area, by compromising to minimise costs and generate the most electricity and gas as possible, which maximises profits

  19. Physics 112 Second Midterm Exam February 22, 2000 MIDTERM EXAM INSTRUCTIONS: You have 90 minutes to complete this

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    to the mixing process? (The gas constant R NAk, where NA is Avogadro's number.) (a) 0 (b) -5RT ln 2 (c) +5RT ln is observed at T = 10, 000 K. The heat capacities of the gas at constant pressure and constant volume decoupled? (It is enough to consider the relative volume occupied by the expanding photon gas.) (a) 103 (b

  20. Empirical Modelling and Simulation of Transmission Loss between Wireless Sensor Nodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Robert C

    ; channel model; gas turbine engine I. INTRODUCTION Testing of gas turbine engines currently demands the useEmpirical Modelling and Simulation of Transmission Loss between Wireless Sensor Nodes in Gas a grid of hypothetical WSN node locations on the surface of a gas turbine engine are reported for eight

  1. Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Balsavich, John (Foxborough, MA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

  2. Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID) [Ammon, ID; Carney, Francis H. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through an expander creating work output. A compressor may be driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream.

  3. Apparatus for the liquefaction of a gas and methods relating to same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatuses and methods are provided for producing liquefied gas, such as liquefied natural gas. In one embodiment, a liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream may be sequentially pass through a compressor and an expander. The process stream may also pass through a compressor. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. A portion of the liquid gas may be used for additional cooling. Gas produced within the system may be recompressed for reintroduction into a receiving line.

  4. Face crack reduction strategy for particulate filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter that comprises an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and at least one portion. A control module initiates combustion of PM in the PM filter using a heater and selectively adjusts oxygen levels of the exhaust gas to adjust a temperature of combustion adjacent to the at least one portion of the PM filter. A method comprises providing a particulate matter (PM) filter that comprises an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and at least one portion; initiating combustion of PM in the PM filter using a heater; selectively adjusting oxygen levels of the exhaust gas to adjust a temperature of combustion adjacent to the at least one portion of the PM filter.

  5. Kapundaite, (Na,Ca)[subscript 2]Fe[subscript 4][superscript 3+](PO[subscript 4])[subscript 4](OH)[subscript 3]5H[subscript 2]O, a new phosphate species from Toms quarry, South Australia: Description and structural relationship to mlonjosephite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Stuart J.; Birch, William D.; Kampf, Anthony R.; Christy, Andrew G.; Pluth, Joseph J.; Pring, Allan; Raudsepp, Mati; Chen, Yu-Sheng (Museum Vic.); (SA Museum); (NHM-LA); (UC); (UBC); (ANU)

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Kapundaite, ideally (Na,Ca){sub 2}Fe{sub 4}{sup 3+}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}(OH){sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O, is a new mineral (IMA2009-047) from Toms phosphate quarry, Kapunda, South Australia, Australia. The new mineral occurs as cavernous aggregates of fibers up to several centimeters across, associated with leucophosphite, natrodufrenite, and meurigite-Na crystals and amorphous brown, black, and/or greenish coatings. Individual kapundaite crystals are very thin flattened fibers up to a few millimeters in length, but typically no more than a few micrometers in thickness. The main form observed is {l_brace}100{r_brace}; other forms in the [010] zone are present, but cannot be measured. Crystals of kapundaite are pale to golden yellow, transparent to translucent, have a yellow streak and silky luster, and are non-fluorescent. Mohs hardness is estimated to be about 3; no twinning or cleavage was observed. Kapundaite is biaxial (+), with indices of refraction = 1.717(3), {beta} = 1.737(3), and {gamma} = 1.790(3). 2V could not be measured; 2V{sub calc} is 64.7{sup o}. The optical orientation is Z = b, Y {approx} c with weak pleochroism: X = nearly colorless, Y = light brown, Z = pale brown; absorption: Y > Z > X. No dispersion was observed. The empirical chemical formula (mean of seven electron microprobe analyses) calculated on the basis of 24 O is (Ca{sub 1.13}Na{sub 0.95}){sub {Sigma}2.08}(Fe{sub 3.83}{sup 3+}Mn{sub 0.03}Al{sub 0.02}Mg{sub 0.01}){sub {Sigma}3.89}P{sub 3.92}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2.11}O. Kapundaite is triclinic, space group P{sub {bar 1}}, a = 6.317(5), b = 7.698(6), c = 9.768(7) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 105.53(1){sup o}, {beta} = 99.24(2){sup o}, {gamma} = 90.09(2){sup o}, V = 451.2(6) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 1. The five strongest lines in the powder X-ray diffraction pattern are [d{sub obs} in {angstrom} (I) (hkl)]: 9.338 (100) (001), 2.753 (64) (2{sub {bar 1}}1), 5.173 (52) (011), 2.417 (48) ({sub {ovr 21}}3, 202, 0{sub {bar 1}}4), and 3.828 (45) (0{sub {bar 2}}1). The crystal structure was solved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data using synchrotron radiation and refined to R{sub 1} = 0.1382 on the basis of 816 unique reflections with F{sub o} > 4{sub {sigma}}F. The structure of kapundaite is based on a unique corrugated octahedral-tetrahedral sheet, which is composed of two types of chains parallel to a. Kapundaite is structurally related to melonjosephite. The mineral is named for the nearest town to the quarry.

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure and photoluminescence of a new Eu-doped Sr containing sialon (Sr{sub 0.94}Eu{sub 0.06})(Al{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7}){sub 4}(N{sub 0.8}O{sub 0.2}){sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamane, Hisanori, E-mail: yamane@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Shimooka, Satoshi; Uheda, Kyota [Mitsubishi Chemical Group, Science and Technology Research Center, Inc. 1000 Kamoshida-cho, Aoba-ku, Yokohama 227-8502 (Japan)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Colorless transparent platelet single crystals of a novel Eu{sup 2+}-doped strontium silicon aluminum oxynitride, (Sr{sub 0.94}Eu{sub 0.06})(Al{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7}){sub 4}(N{sub 0.8}O{sub 0.2}){sub 6}, were prepared at 1800 Degree-Sign C and 0.92 MPa of N{sub 2}. Fundamental reflections of electron and X-ray diffraction of the crystals were indexed with a face-centered orthorhombic unit cell (a=5.8061(5) A, b=37.762(3) A, c=9.5936(9) A). Diffuse streaks elongated in the b-axis direction were observed around the fundamental reflections hkl with h=2n+1 of the electron and X-ray diffraction, indicating stacking faults of (0 1 0)[1 0 0]/2. A crystal structure model without the stacking faults was obtained using the X-ray diffraction data of the fundamental reflections with the space group Fdd2. A SiN{sub 4}-tetrahedron double layer of [SiN{sub 2}]{sub 2} and a Sr/Eu double layer of [(Sr{sub 0.94}Eu{sub 0.06})Al{sub 1.2}Si{sub 0.8}N{sub 0.8} O{sub 1.2}]{sub 2} are stacked alternately along the b-axis direction. The title compound showed an emission with a peak wavelength of 490 nm under 334 nm excitation at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Single crystals of a novel Eu{sup 2+}-doped strontium silicon aluminum oxynitride, (Sr{sub 0.94}Eu{sub 0.06})(Al{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7}){sub 4}(N{sub 0.8}O{sub 0.2}){sub 6}, having stacking faults on the (0 1 0) plane of an orthorhombic cell, were prepared at 1800 Degree-Sign C and 0.92 MPa of N{sub 2}. The compound showed emission with a peak wavelength of 490 nm under 334 nm excitation at room temperature. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new compound Eu{sup 2+}-doped (Sr{sub 0.94}Eu{sub 0.06})(Al{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7}){sub 4}(N{sub 0.8}O{sub 0.2}){sub 6} was prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stacking faults in the compound were clarified by electron and X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A basic crystal structure model was obtained based on the X-ray diffraction data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An emission of 490 nm under 334 nm excitation at room temperature was observed.

  7. Current-biased potentiometric NOx sensor for vehicle emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Louis Peter (Castro Valley, CA); Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA)

    2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A nitrogen oxide sensor system for measuring the amount of nitrogen oxide in a gas. A first electrode is exposed to the gas. An electrolyte is positioned in contact with the first electrode. A second electrode is positioned in contact with the electrolyte. A means for applying a fixed current between the first electrode and the second electrode and monitoring the voltage required to maintain the fixed current provides a measurement of the amount of nitrogen oxide in the gas.

  8. Ris Energy Report 3 Hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperatures and pressures,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , hydrogen in the gaseous state has an extremely high ability to diffuse through solid materials be stored as a gas, a liquid or a solid. In the case of solid storage, the hydrogen exists as a chemical.0 70 10.0 141.0 Methanol 12.5 99 19.0 22.7 Gasoline 33.4 47.6 Lead/Acid Battery 0.2 Advanced battery 0

  9. Understanding the Needs of Arkansas School Districts Relative to Building Use and Control Utility Tracking Personnel and Facility Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keazer, J. A.; Nutter, D. W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    buildings are used by 2. Our school district utilizes autom Utility Tracking 3. Our school district carefully tracks water, natural gas, a 4. As the superintendent, I receive useful repor 5. Our school district would rank well in energy 6. Our school... districts agree and 50% answered neutral to the statement, Our school district would rank well in energy use per student as compared to other Arkansas school districts. Seventy percent of large districts agree with this statement. This indicates...

  10. Characterization of a soil contaminated by oilfield brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Mutairi, K.; Harris, T. [Univ. of Tulsa, OH (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brine contamination of soil is a common environmental problem associated with the onshore production of oil and gas. A site of extensive contamination in Oklahoma has been characterized using conductimetry, direct potentiometry (pH- and chloride-selective electrodes), and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (for Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}) to determine the extent of the contamination and the efficacy of various remediation technologies.

  11. Operating Experience with a Large Fluidized-Bed Gasifier of Woodwaste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guard, R. F. W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPERATING EXPERIENCE WITH A LARGE FLUIDIZED-BED GASIFIER OF WOODWASTE Robin F.W. Guard Omnifuel Gasification Systems Toronto, Ontario ABSTRACT The town of Hearst in northern Ontario is the lo cation of many forest product industries. One... Houston, TX, April 4-7, 1982 energy recovery systems before choosing gasification. The main reason for the choice was the need to be able to distribute the energy to four existing boilers in different locations, all working on natural gas. A secondary...

  12. Enhanced Efficiency of Internal Combustion Engines By Employing Spinning Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geyko, Vasily; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A gain in fuel efficiency of several percent is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in the efficiency.

  13. Investigation of the thermal conductivity of unconsolidated sand packs containing oil, water, and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gore, David Eugene

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATION OF THE THERNAL CONDUCTIVITY OF UNCONSOLIDATED SAND PACKS CONTAINING OIL, WATER, AND GAS A Thesis David E. Gore Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Nechanical College oi' Texas in Partial fulfillment.... EXPERIMENTAL EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURE All tests were performed on unconsolidated sand packs containing either one, two, or three saturating fluids, Phys- ical properties of the sand and saturating fluids are shown in Tables I and II in the Appendix...

  14. Interacting quintessence dark energy models in Lyra manifold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Khurshudyan; J. Sadeghi; R. Myrzakulov; A. Pasqua; H. Farahani

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we consider two-component dark energy models in Lyra manifold. The first component is assumed as a quintessence field while the second model may be a viscous polytropic gas, a viscous Van der Waals gas or a viscous modified Chaplygin gas. We also consider the possibility of interaction between components. By using numerical analysis, we study some cosmological parameters of the models and compare them with observational data.

  15. Process for the manufacture of an attrition resistant sorbent used for gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Venkataramani, Venkat S.; Ayala, Raul E.

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This process produces a sorbent for use in desulfurization of coal gas. A zinc titanate compound and a metal oxide are mixed by milling the compounds in an aqueous medium, the resulting mixture is dried and then calcined, crushed, sleved and formed into pellets for use in a moving-bed reactor. Metal oxides suitable for use as an additive in this process include: magnesium oxide, magnesium oxide plus molybdenum oxide, calcium oxide, yttrium oxide, hafnium oxide, zirconium oxide, cupric oxide, and tin oxide. The resulting sorbent has a percentage of the original zinc or titanium ions substituted for the oxide metal of the chosen additive.

  16. Gas energy meter for inferential determination of thermophysical properties of a gas mixture at multiple states of the gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B. (San Antonio, TX); Kelner, Eric (San Antonio, TX); Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas energy meter that acquires the data and performs the processing for an inferential determination of one or more gas properties, such as heating value, molecular weight, or density. The meter has a sensor module that acquires temperature, pressure, CO2, and speed of sound data. Data is acquired at two different states of the gas, which eliminates the need to determine the concentration of nitrogen in the gas. A processing module receives this data and uses it to perform a "two-state" inferential algorithm.

  17. Low exhaust temperature electrically heated particulate matter filter system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI); Bhatia, Garima (Bangalore, IN)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter, a sensor, a heating element, and a control module. The PM filter includes with an upstream end that receives exhaust gas, a downstream end and multiple zones. The sensor detects a temperature of the exhaust gas. The control module controls current to the heating element to convection heat one of the zones and initiate a regeneration process. The control module selectively increases current to the heating element relative to a reference regeneration current level when the temperature is less than a predetermined temperature.

  18. Catalytic partial oxidation of hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Krummenacher, Jakob J.; West, Kevin N.

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the production of a reaction product including a carbon containing compound. The process includes providing a film of a fuel source including at least one organic compound on a wall of a reactor, contacting the fuel source with a source of oxygen, forming a vaporized mixture of fuel and oxygen, and contacting the vaporized mixture of fuel and oxygen with a catalyst under conditions effective to produce a reaction product including a carbon containing compound. Preferred products include .alpha.-olefins and synthesis gas. A preferred catalyst is a supported metal catalyst, preferably including rhodium, platinum, and mixtures thereof.

  19. Chiral Magnetic Effect in QED induced by longitudinal photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Acosta Avalo; H. Perez Rojas

    2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the existence of the chiral magnetic effect in an electron-positron magnetized gas. A pseudo-vector(conserved)Ohm current is induced by the electric field related to the longitudinal QED mode propagating parallel to the external magnetic field $\\textbf{B}$ and separating opposite charges of the same heliticity. From a relation between axial and electromagnetic currents we obtain a non-conserved current leading to an expression close to the usual axial anomaly. The effect is interesting in connection to the QCD chiral magnetic case reported in current literature.

  20. Electrically heated particulate filter with reduced stress

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V.

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter comprising an inlet for receiving exhaust gas. A zoned heater is arranged in the inlet and comprises a resistive heater comprising N zones, where N is an integer greater than one. Each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates others of the N zones.

  1. Water-saving liquid-gas conditioning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Christopher; Zhuang, Ye

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises contacting a process gas with a hygroscopic working fluid in order to remove a constituent from the process gas. A system for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises a hygroscopic working fluid comprising a component adapted to absorb or react with a constituent of a process gas, and a liquid-gas contactor for contacting the working fluid and the process gas, wherein the constituent is removed from the process gas within the liquid-gas contactor.

  2. Ultracapacitor having residual water removed under vacuum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wei, Chang (Niskayuna, NY); Jerabek, Elihu Calvin (Glenmont, NY); Day, James (Scotia, NY)

    2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multilayer cell is provided that comprises two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the current collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying pores in the electrodes and separator. The mutilayer cell is electrolyzed to disassociate water within the cell to oxygen gas and hydrogen gas. A vacuum is applied to the cell substantially at the same time as the electrolyzing step, to remove the oxygen gas and hydrogen gas. The cell is then sealed to form a ultracapacitor substantially free from water.

  3. A Non-Aqueous Reduction Process for Purifying 153Gd Produced in Natural Europium Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnsen, Amanda M.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Fisher, Darrell R.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gadolinium-153 is a low-energy gamma-emitter used in nuclear medicine imaging quality assurance. Produced in nuclear reactors using natural Eu2O3 targets, 153Gd is radiochemically separated from europium isotopes by europium reduction. However, conventional aqueous europium reduction produces hydrogen gas, a flammability hazard in radiological hot cells. We altered the traditional reduction method, using methanol as the process solvent to nearly eliminate hydrogen gas production. This new, non-aqueous reduction process demonstrates greater than 98% europium removal and gadolinium yields of 90%.

  4. Systems and method for delivering liquified gas to an engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); O'Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Siahpush, Ali S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Brown, Kevin B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquified gas delivery system for a motorized platform includes a holding tank configured to receive liquified gas. A first conduit extends from a vapor holding portion of the tank to a valve device. A second conduit extends from a liquid holding portion of the tank to the valve device. Fluid coupled to the valve device is a vaporizer which is in communication with an engine. The valve device selectively withdraws either liquified gas or liquified gas vapor from the tank depending on the pressure within the vapor holding portion of the tank. Various configurations of the delivery system can be utilized for pressurizing the tank during operation.

  5. Thermal engine driven heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drake, Richard L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for separating volatile organic compounds from a stream of process gas. An internal combustion engine drives a plurality of refrigeration systems, an electrical generator and an air compressor. The exhaust of the internal combustion engine drives an inert gas subsystem and a heater for the gas. A water jacket captures waste heat from the internal combustion engine and drives a second heater for the gas and possibly an additional refrigeration system for the supply of chilled water. The refrigeration systems mechanically driven by the internal combustion engine effect the precipitation of volatile organic compounds from the stream of gas.

  6. Wireless zoned particulate matter filter regeneration control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Kirby, Kevin W [Calabasas Hills, CA; Phelps, Amanda [Malibu, CA

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An assembly includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that comprises an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and multiple zones. An absorbing layer absorbs microwave energy in one of N frequency ranges and is arranged with the upstream end. N is an integer. A frequency selective filter has M frequency selective segments and receives microwave energy in the N frequency ranges. M is an integer. One of the M frequency selective segments permits passage of the microwave energy in one of the N frequency ranges and does not permit passage of microwave energy in the other of the N frequency ranges.

  7. Environmental information volume: Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of the Liquid Phase Methanol Process using coal-derived synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This report describes the proposed actions, alternative to the proposed action, the existing environment at the coal gasification plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements, offsite fuel testing, and DME addition to methanol production. Appendices include the air permit application, solid waste permits, water permit, existing air permits, agency correspondence, and Eastman and Air Products literature.

  8. The production of activated silica with carbon dioxide gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, William Bell

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ional to the per cent of carbon dioxi. de 1n the flue gas for a constant total gas flow rate. REFE REN CES l. Andrews, R. V, , Hanford Works Eocument (1952), 2. Andrews, R. V. & J. A. W. W. A, , ~46 82 (1954). 3. Andrews, R. V, , Personal Communication 4... of the reciuire . ents for the dedree of iliASTER OF SCIENCE Janus', 1956 Major Subject: Chemi. cal Engineering TH PRODUCTION OP ACTIVATED SILICA 7iIITH CARBON DIOXIDE GAS A Thesis William Bell Hayes III Approved as to style and content by: Chairmen...

  9. Apparatus for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Gloucester, MA); Marcucci, Rudolph V. (Danvers, MA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for enriching the isotopic Hg content of mercury is provided. The apparatus includes a reactor, a low pressure electric discharge lamp containing a fill including mercury and an inert gas. A filter is arranged concentrically around the lamp. In a preferred embodiment, constant mercury pressure is maintained in the filter by means of a water-cooled tube that depends from it, the tube having a drop of mercury disposed in it. The reactor is arranged around the filter, whereby radiation from said lamp passes through the filter and into said reactor. The lamp, the filter and the reactor are formed of a material which is transparent to ultraviolet light.

  10. A Sharper Safety Picture | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring:Home|PhysicsGasand Videofor GasA Sharper Safety

  11. A Stable Zr-Porphyrinic MOF Exhibiting pH-Dependent Fluorescence | Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. A Unified Approach to Runtime Performance and Power Optimization in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring:Home|PhysicsGasand Videofor GasA Sharper

  13. A bioinspired redox relay that mimics radical interactions of the Tyr-His

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring:Home|PhysicsGasand Videofor GasA Sharperpairs of

  14. A comparison of the CO2 capture characteristics of zeolites and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring:Home|PhysicsGasand Videofor GasA Sharperpairs

  15. A first-principles study of the effect of charge doping on the 1D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. September 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  17. Shale Gas Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  18. Short Term Energy Outlook ,November 2002

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  19. Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  20. Short Term Energy Outlook, December 2002

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  1. Short Term Energy Outlook, February 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  2. Short Term Energy Outlook, January 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  3. Short Term Energy Outlook, March 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  5. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. Natural GasquestionnairesquestionnairesGasA.San3 1 Short-Term

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. Natural GasquestionnairesquestionnairesGasA.San3 1 Short-Term(STEO)

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. Natural GasquestionnairesquestionnairesGasA.San3 1

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  9. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  10. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  13. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  16. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  17. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  19. Short-Term Energy Outlook April 1999-Summer Gasoline Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2000--STEO Preface

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. Natural GasquestionnairesquestionnairesGasA.San34 1and Summer Fuels

  2. Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. Natural GasquestionnairesquestionnairesGasA.San34 1and Summer Fuels4 1

  3. Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. Natural GasquestionnairesquestionnairesGasA.San34 1and Summer Fuels4

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  5. Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  9. Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  10. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Energy-weighted industrial production indices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Uncertainties in the Short-Term Global Petroleum and Other Liquids Supply Forecast

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  13. Short-Term Energy Outlook- May 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  14. Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OFFuels in ItsStationHydrogenNatural Gas> Landfills

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Los Angeles Public Works Fleet Converts to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OFFuels in ItsStationHydrogenNaturalNatural Gas> Public

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Los Angeles Saves With Hybrid and Plug-In

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OFFuels in ItsStationHydrogenNaturalNatural Gas>

  18. Apparatus For The Liquefaaction Of Natural Gas And Methods Relating To Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID); Rateman, Kevin T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Palmer, Gary L. (Shelley, ID); Klinger, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Vranicar, John J. (Concord, CA)

    2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through a turbo expander creating work output. A compressor is driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream. Additional features and techniques may be integrated with the liquefaction process including a water clean-up cycle and a carbon dioxide (CO2) clean-up cycle.

  19. Apparatus For The Liquefaaction Of Natural Gas And Methods Relating To Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID); Raterman, Kevin T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Palmer, Gary L. (Shelley, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Vranicar, John J. (Concord, CA)

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through a turbo expander creating work output. A compressor is driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream. Additional features and techniques may be integrated with the liquefaction process including a water clean-up cycle and a carbon dioxide (CO2) clean-up cycle.

  20. Apparatus For The Liquefaaction Of Natural Gas And Methods Relating To Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID); Raterman, Kevin T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Palmer, Gary L. (Shelley, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Vranicar, John J. (Concord, CA)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through a turbo expander creating work output. A compressor is driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream. Additional features and techniques may be integrated with the liquefaction process including a water clean-up cycle and a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) clean-up cycle.

  1. Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID); Raterman, Kevin T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Palmer, Gary L. (Shelley, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Vranicar, John J. (Concord, CA)

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through a turbo expander creating work output. A compressor is driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream. Additional features and techniques may be integrated with the liquefaction process including a water clean-up cycle and a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) clean-up cycle.

  2. Estimation and Reduction Methodologies for Fugitive Emissions from Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scataglia, A.

    .0214 Compressor Seals Gas/Vapor 0.228 Pressure Relief Seals Gas/Vapor 0.104 Flanges All 0.00083 Open-Ended Lines All 0.0017 Sampling Connections All 0.0150 Table 1. Average Emission Factors for Fugitive Emissions (kg/hr/source). The product of the emission...Tssion Factor Emission Factor Val ves Gas a LLb HL c 0.0451 0.0852 0.00023 d 0.00048 0.00171 0.00023 Pump Sea Is LL HL 0.437 0.3885 0.0120 0.0135 Compressor Seal se Pressure ReI ief Valves Flanges Open -Ended Lines Gas Gas All All 1...

  3. Gas turbine topping combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Janos (Winchester, MA); Dowdy, Thomas E. (Orlando, FL); Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Delmont, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combustor for burning a mixture of fuel and air in a rich combustion zone, in which the fuel bound nitrogen in converted to molecular nitrogen. The fuel rich combustion is followed by lean combustion. The products of combustion from the lean combustion are rapidly quenched so as to convert the fuel bound nitrogen to molecular nitrogen without forming NOx. The combustor has an air radial swirler that directs the air radially inward while swirling it in the circumferential direction and a radial fuel swirler that directs the fuel radially outward while swirling it in the same circumferential direction, thereby promoting vigorous mixing of the fuel and air. The air inlet has a variable flow area that is responsive to variations in the heating value of the fuel, which may be a coal-derived fuel gas. A diverging passage in the combustor in front of a bluff body causes the fuel/air mixture to recirculate with the rich combustion zone.

  4. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.; Bagheri, R.

    1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

  5. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA); Bagheri, Reza (Bethlehem, PA)

    1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  6. Hypersonic gasdynamic laser system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foreman, K.M.; Maciulaitis, A.

    1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a visible, or near to mid infra-red, hypersonic gas dynamic laser system. It comprises: a hypersonic vehicle for carrying the hypersonic gas dynamic laser system, and also providing high energy ram air for thermodynamic excitation and supply of the laser gas; a laser cavity defined within the hypersonic vehicle and having a laser cavity inlet for the laser cavity formed by an opening in the hypersonic vehicle, such that ram air directed through the laser cavity opening supports gas dynamic lasing operations at wavelengths less than 10.6{mu} meters in the laser cavity; and an optical train for collecting the laser radiation from the laser cavity and directing it as a substantially collimated laser beam to an output aperture defined by an opening in the hypersonic vehicle to allow the laser beam to be directed against a target.

  7. Mechanical swirler for a low-NO{sub x}, weak-swirl burner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, R.K.; Yegian, D.T.

    1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a mechanical swirler for generating diverging flow in lean premixed fuel burners. The swirler of the present invention includes a central passage with an entrance for accepting a feed gas, a flow balancing insert that introduces additional pressure drop beyond that occurring in the central passage in the absence of the flow balancing insert, and an exit aligned to direct the feed gas into a combustor. The swirler also has an annular passage about the central passage and including one or more vanes oriented to impart angular momentum to feed gas exiting the annular passage. The diverging flow generated by the swirler stabilizes lean combustion thus allowing for lower production of pollutants, particularly oxides of nitrogen. 16 figs.

  8. Container and method for absorbing and reducing hydrogen concentration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Lee, Myung W. (North Augusta, SC); Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for absorbing hydrogen from an enclosed environment comprising providing a vessel; providing a hydrogen storage composition in communication with a vessel, the hydrogen storage composition further comprising a matrix defining a pore size which permits the passage of hydrogen gas while blocking the passage of gaseous poisons; placing a material within the vessel, the material evolving hydrogen gas; sealing the vessel; and absorbing the hydrogen gas released into the vessel by the hydrogen storage composition. A container for absorbing evolved hydrogen gas comprising: a vessel having an interior and adapted for receiving materials which release hydrogen gas; a hydrogen absorbing composition in communication with the interior, the composition defining a matrix surrounding a hydrogen absorber, the matrix permitting the passage of hydrogen gas while excluding gaseous poisons; wherein, when the vessel is sealed, hydrogen gas, which is released into the vessel interior, is absorbed by the hydrogen absorbing composition.

  9. Recent results from the EBIT and Super EBIT at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marrs, R.E.

    1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron beam ion trap (EBIT), and the higher-energy Super EBIT at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory can produce any highly charged ion. These highly charged ions are used in a variety of research programs. Recent results from four different experiments are reviewed here. K-shell ionization cross sections have been measured for the hydrogenlike ions of several elements, and L-shell ionization cross sections have been measured for uranium ions. A measurement of the ground-state hyperfine transition in hydrogenlike {sup 165}H{sup 66+} is notable because of the complete absence of Doppler shifts. A cryogenic Penning trap, injected with EBIT ions, has been used to observe a single highly charged ion as it recombines by sequential electron capture from H{sub 2} gas. A large sputtered ion yield, suggesting a surface Coulomb explosion, has been observed from insulators bombarded with very highly charged EBIT ions. 21 refs., 11 figs.

  10. Salt Wash Field, Grand Country, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, C.D. (Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salt Wash field is located 15 miles southeast of Green River, Utah, in the Paradox fold and fault belt. The field was discovered in 1961 and has produced over 1.3 million bbl of oil and 11.6 billion ft[sup 3] of gas from the Mississippian Leadville LImestone. The average surface elevation is 4389 ft above sea level, and the depth to the top of the oil production is form 8500 to 8914 ft. Salt Wash field is an anticline with over 200 ft of closure on top of the Leadville. The producing zone is in the lower Leadville with intercrystalline and vuggy porosity developed in limestone and crystalline dolomitic limestone. The produced oil is a 50 to 53 API gravity crude with a 40[degrees]F pour point. The gas, a mixture of two sources, is predominately nitrogen (>70[sup [approximately

  11. Lyapunov Exponents from Kinetic Theory for a Dilute, Field-driven Lorentz Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. van Beijeren; J. R. Dorfman; E. G. D. Cohen; H. A. Posch; Ch. Dellago

    1996-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Positive and negative Lyapunov exponents for a dilute, random, two-dimensional Lorentz gas in an applied field, $\\vec{E}$, in a steady state at constant energy are computed to order $E^{2}$. The results are: $\\lambda_{\\pm}=\\lambda_{\\pm}^{0}-a_{\\pm}(qE/mv)^{2}t_{0}$ where $\\lambda_{\\pm}^{0}$ are the exponents for the field-free Lorentz gas, $a_{+}=11/48, a_{-}=7/48$, $t_{0}$ is the mean free time between collisions, $q$ is the charge, $m$ the mass and $v$ is the speed of the particle. The calculation is based on an extended Boltzmann equation in which a radius of curvature, characterizing the separation of two nearby trajectories, is one of the variables in the distribution function. The analytical results are in excellent agreement with computer simulations. These simulations provide additional evidence for logarithmic terms in the density expansion of the diffusion coefficient.

  12. Use of laboratory triaxial-creep data and finite-element analysis to predict observed creep behavior of leached salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preece, D.S.; Stone, C.M.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing interest is being shown worldwide in using leached salt caverns to store oil and natural gas. A critical factor in the use of existing caverns and the design of new ones is the creep behavior of the salt surrounding the caverns. An understanding of this behavior is being gained by using laboratory triaxial creep data as material property input to finite element computer programs designed to calculate displacements and stresses due to creep. An important step in verifying these predictive methods is the comparison of field data from existing caverns with finite element analyses which incorporate the material properties and geometry of each site. This comparison has been made for caverns in the Eminence Dome (Mississippi), West Hackberry Dome (Louisiana), and Bayou Chocktaw Dome (Louisiana) with reasonably good correlation being obtained between measured and predicted volumetric response of the caverns. These comparisons are discussed in this paper.

  13. Systems for delivering liquified natural gas to an engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); O'Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Siahpush, Ali S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Brown, Kevin B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel delivery system includes a fuel tank configured to receive liquid natural gas. A first conduit extends from a vapor holding portion of the fuel tank to an economizer valve. A second conduit extends from a liquid holding portion of the fuel tank to the economizer valve. Fluid coupled to the economizer valve is a vaporizer which is heated by coolant from the engine and is positioned below the fuel tank. The economizer valve selectively withdraws either liquid natural gas or vaporized natural gas from the fuel tank depending on the pressure within the vapor holding portion of the fuel tank. A delivery conduit extends from the vaporizer to the engine. A return conduit having a check valve formed therein extends from the delivery conduit to the vapor holding portion of the fuel tank for pressurizing the fuel tank.

  14. Supplementary Paper SP 3.1: Russias Natural Gas Export Potential up to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Paltsev

    Recent increases in natural gas reserve estimates and advances in shale gas technology make natural gas a fuel with good prospects to serve a bridge to a low-carbon world. Russia is an important energy supplier as it holds the world largest natural gas reserves and it is the worlds largest exporter of natural gas. Energy was one of the driving forces of Russias recent economic recovery from the economic collapse of 1990s. The country enjoyed more that 5 percent annual real economic growth for the period of 2000-2008. The robust growth with ever increasing energy prices had contributed to a sense of a long-term economic stability in Russia. These

  15. Mitigating the effect of siloxanes on internal combustion engines using landfill gasses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A waste gas combustion method that includes providing a combustible fuel source, in which the combustible fuel source is composed of at least methane and siloxane gas. A sodium source or magnesium source is mixed with the combustible fuel source. Combustion of the siloxane gas of the combustible fuel source produces a silicon containing product. The sodium source or magnesium source reacts with the silicon containing product to provide a sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or a magnesium containing silicate. By producing the sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or the magnesium containing silicate, or magnesium source for precipitating particulate silica instead of hard coating, the method may reduce or eliminate the formation of silica deposits within the combustion chamber and the exhaust components of the internal combustion engine.

  16. Dark Energy and Search for the Generalized Second Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balendra Kr. Dev Choudhury; Julie Saikia

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of accelerated Hubble expansion in the SNIa data and the observed power spectrum of the microwave background radiation provide an ample support for Dark energy and Dark matter. Except for the so far well-known facts that cold dark matter (or simply dark matter) is pressureless, and dark energy has a negative pressure, the nature of these two still remains a complete mystery. The mystery facilitates different consideration. In one hand, dark matter and dark energy are assumed as distinct entities, and other interpretation is that both are different manifestation of a common structure, often referred as quartessence. Chaplygin gas, a perfect fluid also favours the second interpretation. Here, we consider modified chaplygin gas as dark energy candidate. Taking into account the existence of the observer's event horizon in accelerated universe, we find the condition where the generalized second law of gravitational thermodynamics is valid and the positivity of the temperature of the phantom fluid remains intact.

  17. Premixing direct injector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Thomas Edward (Greer, SC); Stevenson, Christian Xavier (Inman, SC); York, William David (Greer, SC); Ziminsky, Willy Steve (Simpsonville, SC)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel injection nozzle comprises a body member having an upstream wall opposing a downstream wall, a baffle member having an upstream surface and a downstream surface, a first chamber, a second chamber, a fuel inlet communicative with the first chamber operative to emit a first gas into the first chamber, and a plurality of mixing tubes, each of the mixing tubes having a tube inner surface, a tube outer surface, a first inlet communicative with an aperture in the upstream wall operative to receive a second gas, a second inlet communicative with the tube outer surface and the tube inner surface operative to translate the first gas into the mixing tube, a mixing portion operative to mix the first gas and the second gas, and an outlet communicative with an aperture in the downstream wall operative to emit the mixed first and second gasses.

  18. Filter for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Gloucestor, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A filter for enriching the .sup.196 Hg content of mercury, including a reactor, a low pressure electric discharge lamp containing a fill of mercury and an inert gas. A filter is arranged concentrically around the lamp. The reactor is arranged around said filter, whereby radiation from said lamp passes through the filter and into said reactor. The lamp, the filter and the reactor are formed of quartz, and are transparent to ultraviolet light. The .sup.196 Hg concentration in the mercury fill is less than that which is present in naturally occurring mercury, that is less than about 0.146 atomic weight percent. Hydrogen is also included in the fill and serves as a quenching gas in the filter, the hydrogen also serving to prevent disposition of a dark coating on the interior of the filter.

  19. Filter for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1989-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A filter is described for enriching the [sup 196]Hg content of mercury, including a reactor, a low pressure electric discharge lamp containing a fill of mercury and an inert gas. A filter is arranged concentrically around the lamp. The reactor is arranged around said filter, whereby radiation from said lamp passes through the filter and into said reactor. The lamp, the filter and the reactor are formed of quartz, and are transparent to ultraviolet light. The [sup 196]Hg concentration in the mercury fill is less than that which is present in naturally occurring mercury, that is, less than about 0.146 atomic weight percent. Hydrogen is also included in the fill and serves as a quenching gas in the filter, the hydrogen also serving to prevent disposition of a dark coating on the interior of the filter. 9 figs.

  20. Process and system for removing impurities from a gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henningsen, Gunnar; Knowlton, Teddy Merrill; Findlay, John George; Schlather, Jerry Neal; Turk, Brian S

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluidized reactor system for removing impurities from a gas and an associated process are provided. The system includes a fluidized absorber for contacting a feed gas with a sorbent stream to reduce the impurity content of the feed gas; a fluidized solids regenerator for contacting an impurity loaded sorbent stream with a regeneration gas to reduce the impurity content of the sorbent stream; a first non-mechanical gas seal forming solids transfer device adapted to receive an impurity loaded sorbent stream from the absorber and transport the impurity loaded sorbent stream to the regenerator at a controllable flow rate in response to an aeration gas; and a second non-mechanical gas seal forming solids transfer device adapted to receive a sorbent stream of reduced impurity content from the regenerator and transfer the sorbent stream of reduced impurity content to the absorber without changing the flow rate of the sorbent stream.

  1. University coal research/historically black colleges and universities and other minority institutions contractors review meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of papers/posters were presented on topics concerning power generation, including solid oxide fuel cells, hydrogen production, mercury as a combustion product, carbon dioxide separation from flue gas. A total of 31 presentations in slide/overview/viewgraph form and with a separate abstract are available online (one in abstract form only) and 24 poster papers (text). In addition 41 abstracts only are available. Papers of particular interest include: Hydrogen production from hydrogen sulfide in IGCC power plants; Oxidation of mercury in products of coal combustion; Computer aided design of advanced turbine aerofoil alloys for industrial gas turbines in coal fired environments; Developing engineered fuel using flyash and biomass; Conversion of hydrogen sulfide in coal gases to elemental sulfur with monolithic catalysts; Intelligent control via wireless sensor networks for advanced coal combustion systems; and Investment of fly ash and activated carbon obtained from pulverized coal boilers (poster).

  2. Plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive as an ecologically beneficial component for liquid motor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siryk, Yury Paul; Balytski, Ivan Peter; Korolyov, Volodymyr George; Klishyn, Olexiy Nick; Lnianiy, Vitaly Nick; Lyakh, Yury Alex; Rogulin, Victor Valery

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive for liquid motor fuels comprises an anaerobic fermentation vessel, a gasholder, a system for removal of sulphuretted hydrogen, and a hotwell. The plant further comprises an aerobic fermentation vessel, a device for liquid substance pumping, a device for liquid aeration with an oxygen-containing gas, a removal system of solid mass residue after fermentation, a gas distribution device; a device for heavy gases utilization; a device for ammonia adsorption by water; a liquid-gas mixer; a cavity mixer, a system that serves superficial active and dispersant matters and a cooler; all of these being connected to each other by pipelines. The technical result being the implementation of a process for producing an oxygen containing additive, which after being added to liquid motor fuels, provides an ecologically beneficial component for motor fuels by ensuring the stability of composition fuel properties during long-term storage.

  3. Heat Treating Apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Saro, Robert (Annandale, NJ); Bateman, Willis (Sutton Colfield, GB)

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for heat treating a heat treatable material including a housing having an upper opening for receiving a heat treatable material at a first temperature, a lower opening, and a chamber therebetween for heating the heat treatable material to a second temperature higher than the first temperature as the heat treatable material moves through the chamber from the upper to the lower opening. A gas supply assembly is operatively engaged to the housing at the lower opening, and includes a source of gas, a gas delivery assembly for delivering the gas through a plurality of pathways into the housing in countercurrent flow to movement of the heat treatable material, whereby the heat treatable material passes through the lower opening at the second temperature, and a control assembly for controlling conditions within the chamber to enable the heat treatable material to reach the second temperature and pass through the lower opening at the second temperature as a heated material.

  4. Flow characteristics in underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, H.L.; Himmelblau, D.M.; Edgar, T.F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Hoe Creek No. 2 (Wyoming) underground-coal-gasification field test, researchers introduced helium pulses to characterize the flow field and to estimate the coefficients in dispersion models of the flow. Flow models such as the axial-dispersion and parallel tanks-in-series models allowed interpretation of the in situ combustion flow field from the residence time distribution of the tracer gas. A quantitative analysis of the Hoe Creek tracer response curves revealed an increasing departure from a plug-flow regime with time, which was due to the combined effects of the free and forced convection in addition to the complex nonuniformity of the flow field. The Peclet number was a function of temperature, pressure, gas recovery, and characteristic velocity, as well as the split of the gas between the parallel streams in the model.

  5. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

  6. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, West Virginia University, University of Utah, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. Feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification, coalbed methane, light products produced by Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, methanol, and natural gas.

  7. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McInnis, Edwin L. (Allentown, PA); Scharff, Robert P. (Louisville, KY); Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  8. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McInnis, E.L.; Scharff, R.P.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figures.

  9. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McInnis, Edwin L. (Allentown, PA); Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA)

    1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  10. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McInnis, E.L.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

    1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

  11. Self-gravitating clouds of generalized Chaplygin and modified anti-Chaplygin Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. C. Lipscombe

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chaplygin gas has been proposed as a possible dark energy, dark matter candidate. As a working fluid in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe, it exhibits early behavior reminiscent of dark matter, but at later times is more akin to a cosmological constant. In any such universe, however, one can expect local perturbations to form. Here we obtain the general equations for a self-gravitating relativistic Chaplygin gas. We solve these equations and obtain the mass-radius relationship for such structures, showing that only in the phantom regime is the mass-radius relationship large enough to be a serious candidate for highly compact massive objects at the galaxy core. In addition, we study the cosmology of a modified anti-Chaplygin gas. A self-gravitating cloud of this matter is an exact solution to Einstein's equations.

  12. An effective loading method of americium targets in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohki, Shigeo; Sato, Isamu; Mizuno, Tomoyasu; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the development of target fuel with high americium (Am) content has been launched for the reduction of the overall fuel fabrication cost of the minor actinide (MA) recycling. In the framework of the development, this study proposes an effective loading method of Am targets in fast reactors. As a result of parametric survey calculations, we have found the ring-shaped target loading pattern between inner and outer core regions. This loading method is satisfactory both in core characteristics and in MA transmutation property. It should be noted that the Am targets can contribute to the suppression of the core power distribution change due to burnup. The major drawback of Am target is the production of helium gas. A target design modification by increasing the cladding thickness is found to be the most feasible measure to cope with the helium production. (authors)

  13. Hydraulic accumulator-compressor for geopressured enhanced oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydraulic accumulator-compressor vessel using geothermal brine under pressure as a piston to compress waste (CO.sub.2 rich) gas is used in a system having a plurality of gas separators in tandem to recover pipeline quality gas from geothermal brine. A first high pressure separator feeds gas to a membrance separator which separates low pressure waste gas from high pressure quality gas. A second separator produces low pressure waste gas. Waste gas from both separators is combined and fed into the vessel through a port at the top as the vessel is drained for another compression cycle. High pressure brine is then admitted into the vessel through a port at the bottom of the vessel. Check valves control the flow of low pressure waste gas into the vessel and high pressure waste gas out of the vessel.

  14. Gas turbine topping combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, J.; Dowdy, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A combustor is described for burning a mixture of fuel and air in a rich combustion zone, in which the fuel bound nitrogen in converted to molecular nitrogen. The fuel rich combustion is followed by lean combustion. The products of combustion from the lean combustion are rapidly quenched so as to convert the fuel bound nitrogen to molecular nitrogen without forming NOx. The combustor has an air radial swirler that directs the air radially inward while swirling it in the circumferential direction and a radial fuel swirler that directs the fuel radially outward while swirling it in the same circumferential direction, thereby promoting vigorous mixing of the fuel and air. The air inlet has a variable flow area that is responsive to variations in the heating value of the fuel, which may be a coal-derived fuel gas. A diverging passage in the combustor in front of a bluff body causes the fuel/air mixture to recirculate with the rich combustion zone. 14 figs.

  15. Process for removing a nitrogen gas from mixture comprising N/sub 2/ and CO or CO/sub 2/ and CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, S.; Hayashi, S.; Kumagai, M.; Tukahara, Y.

    1984-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes are disclosed for removing N/sub 2/ from a feed gas comprising CO+N/sub 2/ or CO, CO/sub 2/+N/sub 2/ through PSA by using at least two adsorption columns containing an adsorbent exhibiting selective adsorb property to carbon monoxide which comprises: a step of pressurizing an adsorption column by the feed gas; a step of introducing the feed gas into the adsorption column, in which step was previously completed, so as to adsorb CO, or CO+CO/sub 2/ on or in the adsorbent; a step of connecting the adsorption column, in which step was previously completed, to the other adsorption column in which step was previously completed, to reduce the pressure in the former adsorption column to one atmosphere or a pressure close to it; a step of purging nitrogen by passing product gas through the adsorption column; a step of desorbing carbon monoxide adsorbed on or in the adsorbent of the adsorption column, by vacuum pump to recover a product gas; and a step of a connecting the adsorption column, in which step was previously completed, to the other adsorption column in which step was previously completed to increase pressure in the former column, periodically switching the flow between or among said adsorption columns so as to repeat the above steps in all the adsorption columns.

  16. Portable tester for determining gas content within a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Jr., Fred (Donora, PA); Schatzel, Steven J. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable tester is provided for reading and displaying the pressure of a gas released from a rock core sample stored within a sealed container and for taking a sample of the released pressurized gas for chemical analysis thereof for subsequent use in a modified direct method test which determines the volume of gas and specific type of gas contained within the core sample. The portable tester includes a pair of low and high range electrical pressure transducers for detecting a gas pressure; a pair of low and high range display units for displaying the pressure of the detected gas- a selector valve connected to the low and high range pressure transducers, a selector knob for selecting gas flow to one of the flow paths; control valve having an inlet connection to the sealed container, and outlets connected to: a sample gas canister, a second outlet port connected to the selector valve means for reading the pressure of the gas from the sealed container to either the low range or high range pressure transducers, and a connection for venting gas contained within the sealed container to the atmosphere. A battery is electrically connected to and supplies the power for operating the unit. The pressure transducers, display units, selector and control valve means and the battery is mounted to and housed within a protective casing for portable transport and use.

  17. Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI coal-gasification research program. Evaluation of the IGT Peatgas PDU data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostwick, L.E.; Chen, R.G.; Hubbard, D.A.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As requested by DOE, Kellogg has reviewed the data base generated by IGT for the Peatgas process during laboratory and PDU testing. Kellogg's central finding, from the review reported here, is that the existing data base contains sufficient evidence to warrant further evaluation of the Peatgas process at pilot plant scale. The existing data base relates to testing with peats from (primarily) Minnesota, North Carolina and Maine. Thermobalance studies were employed to define a few kinetic parameters, i.e., the rate of base carbon conversion. Numerous tests using a small coiled-tube reactor and the lift-line PDU were conducted to investigate hydrogasification, where hydrogen or a steam/hydrogen mixture was the reactive gas. A fluidized bed PDU was employed to investigate steam-oxygen gasification and fluidization relationships were studied. The primary advantages to be gained by Peatgas pilot plant testing are, in Kellogg's opinion, the demonstration and evaluation of the three process stages (drying, hydrogasification and steam-oxygen gasification) in an integrated mode. The lack of integrated operation is a significant shortcoming of the existing data base and as such Kellogg would not recommend use of the data base for purposes other than pilot plant design and preliminary engineering studies. Other more specific comments regarding the data base are given.

  18. National Ignition Campaign Hohlraum Energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meezan, N B; Atherton, L J; Callahan, D A; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Dzenitis, E G; Edwards, M J; Haynam, C A; Hinkel, D E; Jones, O S; Landen, O; London, R A; Michel, P A; Moody, J D; Milovich, J L; Schneider, M B; Thomas, C A; Town, R J; Warrick, A L; Weber, S V; Widmann, K; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; MacGowan, B J; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Nikroo, A

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The first series of experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, 'The National Ignition Facility: ushering in a new age for high energy density science,' Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] tested ignition hohlraum 'energetics,' a term described by four broad goals: (1) Measurement of laser absorption by the hohlraum; (2) Measurement of the x-ray radiation flux (T{sub RAD}{sup 4}) on the surrogate ignition capsule; (3) Quantitative understanding of the laser absorption and resultant x-ray flux; and (4) Determining whether initial hohlraum performance is consistent with requirements for ignition. This paper summarizes the status of NIF hohlraum energetics experiments. The hohlraum targets and experimental design are described, as well as the results of the initial experiments. The data demonstrate low backscattered energy (< 10%) for hohlraums filled with helium gas. A discussion of our current understanding of NIF hohlraum x-ray drive follows, including an overview of the computational tools, i.e., radiation-hydrodynamics codes, that have been used to design the hohlraums. The performance of the codes is compared to x-ray drive and capsule implosion data from the first NIF experiments. These results bode well for future NIF ignition hohlraum experiments.

  19. Romania program targets methanol and Fischer-Tropsch research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, the chemical organic industry, the petrochemical and engine fuels industry in Romania are entirely based on hydrocarbons from oil. To reduce the oil dependence of this sector and to ensure the stipulated growth rate of 8-9%, research and development programs have been set up with a view to the diversification of raw materials. In research on hydrocarbons from alcohol conversion, three process variants are known, i.e. olefins from methanol, gasolines from methanol and a combined gasolines and aromatic hydrocarbons from methanol. The Romanian process of methanol conversion to hydrocarbons is very flexible, with all the variants mentioned being carried out in the same plant by modifying the catalysts. In research on hydrocarbons from synthesis gas a modern process is being developed for gasification of brown coal in a fluidized bed, under pressure, in the presence of oxygen and water vapors. In the field of carbon oxide hydrogenation, studies have been carried out on selective Fischer-Tropsch processes in which the reaction products are high value hydrocarbon fractions.

  20. Gaseous reactor control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Khalik, S.

    1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a nuclear reactor control system for controlling the reactivity of the core of a nuclear reactor. It includes a control gas having a high neutron cross-section; a first tank containing a first supply of the control gas; a first conduit providing a first fluid passage extending into the core, the first conduit being operatively connected to communicate with the first tank; a first valve operatively connected to regulate the flow of the control gas between the first tank and the first conduit; a second conduit concentrically disposed around the first conduit such that a second fluid passage is defined between the outer surface of the first conduit and the inner surface of the second conduit; a second tank containing a second supply of the control gas, the second tank being operatively connected to communicate with the second fluid passage; a second supply valve operatively connected to regulate the flow of the control gas between the second tank and the second fluid passage.

  1. High-pressure late cycle direct injection of natural gas in a rail medium speed diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakenell, J.F.; O'Neal, G.B.; Baker, Q.A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of an Electro-Motive Division (EMD) 567B, two-cylinder locomotive research engine, when operated on high-pressure/late-cycle injection of natural gas, is presented in this paper. A redesign and fabrication of the fuel system was undertaken to facilitate the consumption of natural gas. A small percentage of No.2 diesel fuel (DF-2) was used to ignite the natural gas. Engine performance, while running natural gas, resulted in matching rated speed and power with slightly lower thermal efficiency. Full power was achieved with a ratio of 99 percent natural gas and 1 percent diesel fuel. However, at high natural gas to diesel fuel ratios, audible knock was detected. The primary objective of the project was to establish technical feasibility of, and basic technology for, operating medium-speed rail diesel engines on high-pressure natural gas. Secondary objectives were to attain adequate engine performance levels for rail application, develop a system oriented toward retrofit of in-service locomotives, and realize any potential improvements in thermal efficiency due to use of the high-pressure/late-cycle approach.

  2. DESIGN OF A CONTAINMENT VESSEL CLOSURE FOR SHIPMENT OF TRITIUM GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberl, K; Paul Blanton, P

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a design summary of the containment vessel closure for the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP). This new package is a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The new design is based on changes in the regulatory requirements. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials that enhance the package's ability to withstand dynamic loading and thermal effects. This paper will specifically summarize the design philosophy and engineered features of the BTSP containment vessel closure. The closure design incorporates a concave closure lid, metallic C-Ring seals for containing tritium gas, a metal bellows valve and an elastomer O-Ring for leak testing. The efficient design minimizes the overall vessel height and protects the valve housing from damage during postulated drop and crush scenarios. Design features will be discussed.

  3. ROSAT Observations of Compact Groups of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Saracco; P. Ciliegi

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for X-ray emission from compact groups revealed detection from 8 out of the 12 HCG images extracted from the ROSAT public archive. For two of them the X-ray emission originates from galaxies in the group. On the contrary, three groups show an extended emission clearly caused by hot intracluster gas. A Raymond-Smith hot plasma model provides an excellent fit to the X-ray spectra. The estimated temperatures are distributed in a quite narrow range (from 0.73 to 0.92 keV) and are consistent, within the errors, with 0.9 keV. The luminosity ranging from 0.75 to $5.1\\cdot10^{42}$erg s$^{-1}$. The most relevant result is the low metal abundance surely detected in two of them and likely in a third that characterizes the hot gas cloud responsible for the X-ray emission. The data concerning the remaining 3 detected compact groups are not sufficient to discriminate with certainty between diffuse and/or point-like X-ray emission. However the results of the spectral analysis point to the presence of a hot gas again with low metal abundance.

  4. Plasma wake field XUV radiation source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prono, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM); Jones, Michael E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A XUV radiation source uses an interaction of electron beam pulses with a gas to create a plasma radiator. A flowing gas system (10) defines a circulation loop (12) with a device (14), such as a high pressure pump or the like, for circulating the gas. A nozzle or jet (16) produces a sonic atmospheric pressure flow and increases the density of the gas for interacting with an electron beam. An electron beam is formed by a conventional radio frequency (rf) accelerator (26) and electron pulses are conventionally formed by a beam buncher (28). The rf energy is thus converted to electron beam energy, the beam energy is used to create and then thermalize an atmospheric density flowing gas to a fully ionized plasma by interaction of beam pulses with the plasma wake field, and the energetic plasma then loses energy by line radiation at XUV wavelengths Collection and focusing optics (18) are used to collect XUV radiation emitted as line radiation when the high energy density plasma loses energy that was transferred from the electron beam pulses to the plasma.

  5. Biological production of ethanol from coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the ``wild strain`` produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  6. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4] and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the wild strain'' produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  7. Russias Natural Gas Export Potential up to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Paltsev; Sergey Paltsev

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent increases in natural gas reserve estimates and advances in shale gas technology make natural gas a fuel with good prospects to serve a bridge to a low-carbon world. Russia is an important energy supplier as it holds the world largest natural gas reserves and it is the worlds largest exporter of natural gas. Energy was one of the driving forces of Russias recent economic recovery from the economic collapse of 1990s. These prospects have changed drastically with a global recession and the collapse of oil and gas prices from their peaks of 2008. An additional factor is an ongoing surge in a liquefied natural gas (LNG) capacity and a development of Central Asias and the Middle East gas supplies that can compete with Russian gas in its traditional (European) and potential (Asian) markets. To study the long-term prospects for Russian natural gas, we employ the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy. While we consider the updated reserve estimates for all world regions, in this paper we focus on the results for Russian natural gas trade. The role of natural gas is explored in the context of several policy assumptions: with no greenhouse gas mitigation policy and scenarios of emissions targets in developed countries. Scenarios where Europe takes on an even more restrictive target of 80

  8. Synthesis of higher alcohols from carbon monoxide and hydrogen in a slurry reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCutchen, M.S.

    1992-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher, i.e. C{sub 2{sup +}}, alcohols are desired as gasoline additives, feedstocks for producing ethers and as alternative fuels for automobiles. In all cases, the backbone branching of an alcohol improves octane rating, which is essential for good engine performance. These types of branched, higher alcohols are the desired products for a process converting synthesis gas, a CO and H{sub 2} mixture, often generated from coal gasification. Based on this premise, promoted ZnCr oxide catalysts appear to be as one of the best avenues for further investigation. Once this investigation is complete, a natural extension is to replace the Cr in the ZnCr oxide catalyst with Mo and W, both in the same elemental triad with Cr. Mo has already been shown as an active HAS catalyst, both on a SiO{sub 2} support and in the MoS{sub 2} form. The three catalyst combinations, ZnMo, ZnW, and MnCr oxides will be tested in the stirred autoclave system. However, if none of the three indicate any comparable activity and/or selectivity toward higher alcohols as compared with other HAS catalysts, then an investigation of the effects of Cs promotion on the ZnCr oxide methanol catalysts will be executed.

  9. Source profiles for nonmethane organic compounds in the atmosphere of Cairo, Egypt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doskey, P. V.; Fukui, Y.; Sultan, M.; Maghraby, A. A.; Taher, A.; Environmental Research; Cairo Univ.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Profiles of the sources of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) were developed for emissions from vehicles, petroleum fuels (gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and natural gas), a petroleum refinery, a smelter, and a cast iron factory in Cairo, Egypt. More than 100 hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons were tentatively identified and quantified. Gasoline-vapor and whole-gasoline profiles could be distinguished from the other profiles by high concentrations of the C{sub 5} and C{sub 6} saturated hydrocarbons. The vehicle emission profile was similar to the whole-gasoline profile, with the exception of the unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, which were present at higher concentrations in the vehicle emission profile. High levels of the C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} saturated hydrocarbons, particularly n-butane, were characteristic features of the petroleum refinery emissions. The smelter and cast iron factory emissions were similar to the refinery emissions; however, the levels of benzene and toluene were greater in the former two sources. The LPG and natural gas emissions contained high concentrations of n-butane and ethane, respectively. The NMOC source profiles for Cairo were distinctly different from profiles for U.S. sources, indicating that NMOC source profiles are sensitive to the particular composition of petroleum fuels that are used in a location.

  10. Simulating a 4-effect absorption chiller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, G. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Zaltash, A.; Adcock, P.W.; DeVault, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Energy Div.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorption chillers are heat-operated refrigeration machines that operate on one of the earliest known principles of refrigeration. Current absorption chillers typically use either steam or a gas-fired burner as the energy source. All current gas-fired absorption cooling systems are based on the well known single-effect or double-effect cycles. To further improve utilization of the high temperature heat available from natural gas, a variety of triple-effect cycles have been proposed and are being developed that are capable of substantial performance improvement over equivalent double-effect cycles. This article describes a study that investigated the possibility of even further improving utilization of the high temperature heat available from natural gas combustion. During the study, performance simulation was conducted for a 4-effect lithium bromide/water cycle. From an environmental perspective, absorption chillers provide several benefits. They use absorption pairs (such as lithium bromide/water) as the working fluids, rather than chlorofluorocarbons or hydrochlorofluorocarbons, which contribute to ozone depletion and global warming.

  11. Model methodology and data description of the Production of Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the methodology and data used in the Production of Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas (PROLOG) model. The model forecasts annual oil and natural gas production on a regional basis. Natural gas is modeled by gas category, generally conforming to categories defined by the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) of 1978, as well as a category representing gas priced by way of a spot market (referred to as ''spot'' gas). A linear program is used to select developmental drilling activities for conventional oil and gas and exploratory drilling activities for deep gas on the basis of their economic merit, subject to constraints on available rotary rigs and constraints based on historical drilling patterns. Using exogenously specified price paths for oil and gas, net present values are computed for fixed amounts of drilling activity for oil and gas development and deep gas exploration in each of six onshore regions. Through maximizing total net present value, the linear program provides forecasts of drilling activities, reserve additions, and production. Oil and shallow gas exploratory drilling activities are forecast on the basis of econometrically derived equations, which are dependent on specified price paths for the two fuels. 10 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Thermal and Bulk Comptonization in Accretion-Powered X-Ray Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a new theoretical model for the spectral formation process in accretion-powered X-ray pulsars based on a detailed treatment of the bulk and thermal Comptonization occurring in the accreting, shocked gas. A rigorous eigenfunction expansion method is employed to obtain the analytical solution for the Green's function describing the scattering of radiation injected into the column from a monochromatic source located at an arbitrary height above the stellar surface. The emergent spectrum is calculated by convolving the Green's function with source terms corresponding to bremsstrahlung, cyclotron, and blackbody emission. The energization of the photons in the shock, combined with cyclotron absorption, naturally produces an X-ray spectrum with a relatively flat continuum shape and a high-energy quasi-exponential cutoff. We demonstrate that the new theory successfully reproduces the phase-averaged spectra of the bright pulsars Her X-1, LMC X-4, and Cen X-3. In these luminous sources, it is shown that the emergent spectra are dominated by Comptonized bremsstrahlung emission.

  13. Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, A.H.

    1984-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

  14. Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

  15. Distillation sequence for the purification and recovery of hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reyneke, Rian (Katy, TX); Foral, Michael (Aurora, IL); Papadopoulos, Christos G. (Naperville, IL); Logsdon, Jeffrey S. (Naperville, IL); Eng, Wayne W. Y. (League City, TX); Lee, Guang-Chung (Houston, TX); Sinclair, Ian (Warrington, GB)

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is an improved distillation sequence for the separation and purification of ethylene from a cracked gas. A hydrocarbon feed enters a C2 distributor column. The top of the C2 distributor column is thermally coupled to an ethylene distributor column, and the bottoms liquid of a C2 distributor column feeds a deethanizer column. The C2 distributor column utilizes a conventional reboiler. The top of the ethylene distributor is thermally coupled with a demethanizer column, and the bottoms liquid of the ethylene distributor feeds a C2 splitter column. The ethylene distributor column utilizes a conventional reboiler. The deethanizer and C2 splitter columns are also thermally coupled and operated at a substantially lower pressure than the C2 distributor column, the ethylene distributor column, and the demethanizer column. Alternatively, a hydrocarbon feed enters a deethanizer column. The top of the deethanizer is thermally coupled to an ethylene distributor column, and the ethylene distributor column utilizes a conventional reboiler. The top of the ethylene distributor column is thermally coupled with a demethanizer column, and the bottoms liquid of the ethylene distributor column feeds a C2 splitter column. The C2 splitter column operates at a pressure substantially lower than the ethylene distributor column, the demethanizer column, and the deethanizer column.

  16. Development of a hydrogen generator based on the partial oxidation of natural gas integrated with PEFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recupero, V.; Pino, L.; Di Leonardo, R.; Lagana, M. [Inst. CNR-TAE, Messina (Italy)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As is well known, the most acknowledged process for generation of hydrogen for fuel cells is based upon the steam reforming of methane or natural gas. A valid alternative could be a process based on partial oxidation of methane, since the process is mildly exothermic and therefore not energy intensive. Consequently, great interest is expected from conversion of methane into syngas, if an autothermal, low energy intensive, compact and reliable process could be developed. This paper covers the activities, performed by CNR Institute Transformation and Storage of Energy, Messina, Italy, on theoretical and experimental studies for a compact hydrogen generator, via catalytic selective partial oxidation of methane, integrated with a PEFC (Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell). In particular, the project focuses the attention on methane partial oxidation via heterogeneous selective catalysts, in order to: demonstrate the basic Catalytic Selective Partial Oxidation of Methane (CSPOM) technology in a subscale prototype, equivalent to a nominal output of 5 kWe; develop the CSPOM technology for its application in electric energy production by means of fuel cells; assess, by a balance of plant analysis, and a techno-economic evaluation, the potential benefits of the CSPOM for different categories of fuel cells.

  17. Final Technical Report: "New Tools for Physics with Low-energy Antimatter"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surko, Clifford M. [U. C. San Diego] [U. C. San Diego

    2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to develop new tools to manipulate antimatter plasmas and to tailor them for specific scientific and technical uses. The work has two specific objectives. One is establishing the limits for positron accumulation and confinement in the form of single-component plasmas in Penning-Malmberg traps. This technique underpins a wealth of antimatter applications. A second objective is to develop an understanding of the limits for formation of cold, bright positron beams. The research done in this grant focused on particular facets of these goals. One focus was extracting tailored beams from a high-field Penning-Malmberg trap from the magnetic field to form new kinds of high-quality electrostatic beams. A second goal was to develop the technology for colder trap-based beams using a cryogenically cooled buffer gas. A third objective was to conduct the basic plasma research to develop a new high-capacity multicell trap (MCT) for research with antimatter. Progress is reported here in all three areas. While the goal of this research is to develop new tools for manipulating positrons (i.e., the antiparticles of electrons), much of the work was done with test electron plasmas for increased data rate. Some of the techniques developed in the course of this work are also relevant to the manipulation and use of antiprotons.

  18. Characteristics of high-purity Cu thin films deposited on polyimide by radio-frequency Ar/H{sub 2} atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, P. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Zheng, W. [Research and Technology Center, Yazaki Corp., 1500 Misyuuku, Susono 410-1194 (Japan); Meng, Y. D. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Nagatsu, M. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    With a view to fabricating future flexible electronic devices, an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet driven by 13.56 MHz radio-frequency power is developed for depositing Cu thin films on polyimide, where a Cu wire inserted inside the quartz tube was used as the evaporation source. A polyimide substrate is placed on a water-cooled copper heat sink to prevent it from being thermally damaged. With the aim of preventing oxidation of the deposited Cu film, we investigated the effect of adding H{sub 2} to Ar plasma on film characteristics. Theoretical fitting of the OH emission line in OES spectrum revealed that adding H{sub 2} gas significantly increased the rotational temperature roughly from 800 to 1500 K. The LMM Auger spectroscopy analysis revealed that higher-purity Cu films were synthesized on polyimide by adding hydrogen gas. A possible explanation for the enhancement in the Cu film deposition rate and improvement of purity of Cu films by H{sub 2} gas addition is that atomic hydrogen produced by the plasma plays important roles in heating the gas to promote the evaporation of Cu atoms from the Cu wire and removing oxygen from copper oxide components via reduction reaction.

  19. Incentives for Methane Mitigation and Energy-Efficiency Improvements in Case of Ukraines Natural Gas Transmission System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roshchanka, Volha; Evans, Meredydd

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing methane losses is a concern for climate change policy and energy policy. The energy sector is the major source of methane emissions into the atmosphere. Reducing methane emissions and avoiding combustion can be very cost-effective, but various barriers prevent such energy-efficiency measures from taking place. To date, few examples of industry-wide improvements exist. One example of substantial investments into upgrading natural gas transmission system comes from Ukraine. The Ukrainian transmission company, Ukrtransgaz, reduced its own systems natural gas consumption by 68 percent in 2011 compared to the level in 2005. Evaluating reductions in methane emissions is challenging because of lack of accurate data and gaps in accounting methodologies. At the same time, Ukraines transmission system has undergone improvements that, at the very least, have contained methane emissions, if not substantially reduced them. In this paper, we describe recent developments in Ukraines natural gas transmission system and analyze the incentives that forced the sector to pay close attention to its methane losses. Ukraine is one of most energy-intensive countries, among the largest natural gas consumers in the world, and a significant emitter of methane. The country is also dependent on imports of natural gas. A combination of steep increases in the price of imported natural gas, and comprehensive domestic environmental and energy policies, regional integration policy, and international environmental agreements has created conditions for successful methane emission and combustion reductions. Learning about such case studies can help us design better policies elsewhere.

  20. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

  1. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Scotto

    2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NO{sub x} emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of high-flammable content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. The actual NO{sub x} reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammable content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NO{sub x} reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NO{sub x} emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  2. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark V. Scotto; Mark A. Perna

    2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NOx emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of highflammables content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NOx emissions. The actual NOx reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammables content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NOx reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NOx emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NOx emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  3. Influence of process parameters on properties of reactively sputtered tungsten nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addonizio, Maria L.; Castaldo, Anna; Antonaia, Alessandro; Gambale, Emilia; Iemmo, Laura [ENEA, Portici Research Centre, Piazzale E. Fermi 1, I-80055, Portici (Italy)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten nitride (WN{sub x}) thin films were produced by reactive dc magnetron sputtering of tungsten in an Ar-N{sub 2} gas mixture. The influence of the deposition power on the properties of tungsten nitride has been analyzed and compared with that induced by nitrogen content variation in the sputtering gas. A combined analysis of structural, electrical and optical properties on thin WN{sub x} films obtained at different deposition conditions has been performed. It was found that at an N{sub 2} content of 14% a single phase structure of W{sub 2}N films was formed with the highest crystalline content. This sputtering gas composition was subsequently used for fabricating films at different deposition powers. Optical analysis showed that increasing the deposition power created tungsten nitride films with a more metallic character, which is confirmed with resistivity measurements. At low sputtering powers the resulting films were crystalline whereas, with an increase of power, an amorphous phase was also present. The incorporation of an excess of nitrogen atoms resulted in an expansion of the W{sub 2}N lattice and this effect was more pronounced at low deposition powers. Infrared analysis revealed that in WN{sub x} films deposited at low power, chemisorbed N{sub 2} molecules did not behave as ligands whereas at high deposition power they clearly appeared as ligands around metallic tungsten. In this study, the influence of the most meaningful deposition parameters on the phase transformation reaction path was established and deposition conditions suitable for producing thermally stable and highly crystalline W{sub 2}N films were found.

  4. Permitting and solid waste management issues for the Bailly Station wet limestone Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinsky, F.T. (Pure Air, Allentown, PA (United States)); Ross, J. (Northern Indiana Public Service Co., Hammond, IN (United States)); Dennis, D.S. (United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Denver, CO (United States). Stearns-Roger Div.); Huston, J.S. (Environmental Alternatives, Inc., Warren NJ (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pure Air (a general partnership between Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc.). is constructing a wet limestone co-current advanced flue gas desulfurization (AFGD) system that has technological and commercial advantages over conventional FGD systems in the United States. The AFGD system is being installed at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company's Bailly Generating Station near Gary, Indiana. The AFGD system is scheduled to be operational by the Summer, 1992. The AFGD system will remove at least 90 percent of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas from Boilers 7 and 8 at the Station while burning 3.2 percent sulfur coal. Also as part of testing the AFGD system, 95 percent removal of SO{sub 2} will be demonstrated on coals containing up to 4.5 percent sulfur. At the same time that SO{sub 2} is removed from the flue gas, a gypsum by-product will be produced which will be used for wallboard manufacturing. Since the AFGD system is a pollution control device, one would expect its installation to be received favorably by the public and regulatory agencies. Although the project was well received by regulatory agencies, on public group (Save the Dunes Council) was initially concerned since the project is located adjacent to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The purpose of this paper is to describe the project team's experiences in obtaining permits/approvals from regulatory agencies and in dealing with the public. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason M. Keith

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

  6. Testing the accuracy of the Hydro-PM approximation in numerical simulations of the Lyman-alpha forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Viel; Martin G. Haehnelt; Volker Springel

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We implement the hydro-PM (HPM) technique (Gnedin & Hui 1998) in the hydrodynamical simulation code GADGET-II and quantify the differences between this approximate method and full hydrodynamical simulations of the Lyman-alpha forest in a concordance LCDM model. At redshifts z=3 and z=4, the differences between the gas and dark matter (DM) distributions, as measured by the one-point distribution of density fluctuations, the density power spectrum and the flux power spectrum, systematically decrease with increasing resolution of the HPM simulqation. However, reducing these differences to less than a few percent requires a significantly larger number of grid-cells than particles, with a correspondingly larger demand for memory. Significant differences in the flux decrement distribution remain even for very high resolution hydro-PM simulations, particularly at low redshift. At z=2, the differences between the flux power spectra obtained from HPM simulations and full hydrodynamical simulations are generally large and of the order of 20-30 %, and do not decrease with increasing resolution of the HPM simulation. This is due to the presence of large amounts of shock-heated gas, a situation which is not adequately modelled by the HPM approximation. We confirm the results of Gnedin & Hui (1998) that the statistical properties of the flux distribution are discrepant by > 5-20 % when compared to full hydrodynamical simulations. The discrepancies in the flux power spectrum are strongly scale- and redshift-dependent and extend to large scales. Considerable caution is needed in attempts to use calibrated HPM simulations for quantitative predictions of the flux power spectrum and other statistical properties of the Lyman-alpha forest.

  7. Heat exchanger with transpired, highly porous fins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kutscher, Charles F. (Golden, CO); Gawlik, Keith (Boulder, CO)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat exchanger includes a fin and tube assembly with increased heat transfer surface area positioned within a hollow chamber of a housing to provide effective heat transfer between a gas flowing within the hollow chamber and a fluid flowing in the fin and tube assembly. A fan is included to force a gas, such as air, to flow through the hollow chamber and through the fin and tube assembly. The fin and tube assembly comprises fluid conduits to direct the fluid through the heat exchanger, to prevent mixing with the gas, and to provide a heat transfer surface or pathway between the fluid and the gas. A heat transfer element is provided in the fin and tube assembly to provide extended heat transfer surfaces for the fluid conduits. The heat transfer element is corrugated to form fins between alternating ridges and grooves that define flow channels for directing the gas flow. The fins are fabricated from a thin, heat conductive material containing numerous orifices or pores for transpiring the gas out of the flow channel. The grooves are closed or only partially open so that all or substantially all of the gas is transpired through the fins so that heat is exchanged on the front and back surfaces of the fins and also within the interior of the orifices, thereby significantly increasing the available the heat transfer surface of the heat exchanger. The transpired fins also increase heat transfer effectiveness of the heat exchanger by increasing the heat transfer coefficient by disrupting boundary layer development on the fins and by establishing other beneficial gas flow patterns, all at desirable pressure drops.

  8. Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virr, M.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020[degree]F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

  9. Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virr, M.J.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020{degree}F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

  10. Dual Layer Monolith ATR of Pyrolysis Oil for Distributed Synthesis Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawal, Adeniyi [Stevens Institute of Technology, Castle Point Hoboken NJ 07030

    2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have successfully demonstrated a novel reactor technology, based on BASF dual layer monolith catalyst, for miniaturizing the autothermal reforming of pyrolysis oil to syngas, the second and most critical of the three steps for thermochemically converting biomass waste to liquid transportation fuel. The technology was applied to aged as well as fresh samples of pyrolysis oil derived from five different biomass feedstocks, namely switch-grass, sawdust, hardwood/softwood, golden rod and maple. Optimization of process conditions in conjunction with innovative reactor system design enabled the minimization of carbon deposit and control of the H2/CO ratio of the product gas. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis of the integrated process using in part, experimental data from the project, indicates (1) net energy recovery of 49% accounting for all losses and external energy input, (2) weight of diesel oil produced as a percent of the biomass to be ~14%, and (3) for a â??demonstrationâ?? size biomass to Fischer-Tropsch liquid plant of ~ 2000 daily barrels of diesel, the price of the diesel produced is ~$3.30 per gallon, ex. tax. However, the extension of catalyst life is critical to the realization of the projected economics. Catalyst deactivation was observed and the modes of deactivation, both reversible and irreversible were identified. An effective catalyst regeneration strategy was successfully demonstrated for reversible catalyst deactivation while a catalyst preservation strategy was proposed for preventing irreversible catalyst deactivation. Future work should therefore be focused on extending the catalyst life, and a successful demonstration of an extended (> 500 on-stream hours) catalyst life would affirm the commercial viability of the process.

  11. Passamaquoddy Innovative Clean Coal Technology Program: Public design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} was conceived and developed specifically to address two problems experienced by the Dragon cement plant; meeting increasingly stringent gas emission limits for sulfur dioxide, and disposing of kiln dust, containing alkali oxides, which had to be wasted in order to avoid kiln operating and product quality problems. The idea involved making the kiln dust into a slurry in order to leach out the species (primarily potassium and sulfur) which rendered it unacceptable for return to kiln feed. This slurry, the liquid part of which is an alkaline solution, acts as a scrubbing reagent for SO{sub 2} in the flue gas while CO{sub 2} in the gas serves to precipitate soluble calcium and release sulfate for combination with the potassium. The effect of the process is to scrub SO{sub 2} from kiln flue gas, extract the volatile species from the dust allowing it to be returned to the kiln, and yield a leachate comprising potassium sulfate which can be crystallized (using heat recovered from the flue gas) and sold as fertilizer. Apart from widespread application in the cement industry, it was evident that, if the process could be demonstrated, its potential would extend to any plant burning fossil fuel where an alkaline waste either occurs intrinsically or can be juxtaposed. Obvious candidates appeared to include the pulp and paper industry and waste incineration. The chemistry was proved in a 1/100th scale pilot plant using actual kiln dust and a slip stream of kiln gas. A full scale demonstration installation was commissioned in 1989 by CDN (USA), the owners of the Dragon plant with the financial support of the US Department of Energy under its innovative Clean Coal Technology Program.

  12. Turbulent mixing of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid at low-Mach number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battista, F.; Casciola, C. M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sapienza University, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Picano, F. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Padova, via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercritical fluids near the critical point are characterized by liquid-like densities and gas-like transport properties. These features are purposely exploited in different contexts ranging from natural products extraction/fractionation to aerospace propulsion. Large part of studies concerns this last context, focusing on the dynamics of supercritical fluids at high Mach number where compressibility and thermodynamics strictly interact. Despite the widespread use also at low Mach number, the turbulent mixing properties of slightly supercritical fluids have still not investigated in detail in this regime. This topic is addressed here by dealing with Direct Numerical Simulations of a coaxial jet of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid. Since acoustic effects are irrelevant in the low Mach number conditions found in many industrial applications, the numerical model is based on a suitable low-Mach number expansion of the governing equation. According to experimental observations, the weakly supercritical regime is characterized by the formation of finger-like structures the so-called ligaments in the shear layers separating the two streams. The mechanism of ligament formation at vanishing Mach number is extracted from the simulations and a detailed statistical characterization is provided. Ligaments always form whenever a high density contrast occurs, independently of real or perfect gas behaviors. The difference between real and perfect gas conditions is found in the ligament small-scale structure. More intense density gradients and thinner interfaces characterize the near critical fluid in comparison with the smoother behavior of the perfect gas. A phenomenological interpretation is here provided on the basis of the real gas thermodynamics properties.

  13. Cooperative Research in C1 Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    C1 chemistry refers to the conversion of simple carbon-containing materials that contain one carbon atom per molecule into valuable products. The feedstocks for C1 chemistry include natural gas, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methanol and synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Synthesis gas, or syngas, is produced primarily by the reaction of natural gas, which is principally methane, with steam. It can also be produced by gasification of coal, petroleum coke, or biomass. The availability of syngas from coal gasification is expected to increase significantly in the future because of increasing development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation. Because of the abundance of remote natural gas, the advent of IGCC, and environmental advantages, C1 chemistry is expected to become a major area of interest for the transportation fuel and chemical industries in the relatively near future. The CFFLS will therefore perform a valuable national service by providing science and engineering graduates that are trained in this important area. Syngas is the source of most hydrogen. Approximately 10 trillion standard cubic feet (SCF) of hydrogen are manufactured annually in the world. Most of this hydrogen is currently used for the production of ammonia and in a variety of refining and chemical operations. However, utilization of hydrogen in fuel cells is expected to grow significantly in the next century. Syngas is also the feedstock for all methanol and Fischer-Tropsch plants. Currently, world consumption of methanol is over 25 million tons per year. There are many methanol plants in the U.S. and throughout the world. Methanol and oxygenated transportation fuel products play a significant role in the CFFLS C1 program. Currently, the only commercial Fischer-Tropsch plants are overseas, principally in South Africa (SASOL). However, new plants are being built or planned for a number of locations. One possible location for future F-T plant development in the U.S. is in the Alaskan oil fields.

  14. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leininger, T.F.; Robin, A.M.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Suggitt, R.M.

    1995-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial oxidation process is described for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF, H{sub 2}S, COS, N{sub 2}, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000 F. 1 figure.

  15. Modeling of thermal plasma arc technology FY 1994 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawkes, G.L.; Nguyen, H.D.; Paik, S.; McKellar, M.G.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal plasma arc process is under consideration to thermally treat hazardous and radioactive waste. A computer model for the thermal plasma arc technology was designed as a tool to aid in the development and use of the plasma arc-Joule beating process. The value of this computer model is to: (a) aid in understanding the plasma arc-Joule beating process as applied to buried waste or exhumed buried waste, (b) help design melter geometry and electrode configuration, (c) calculate the process capability of vitrifying waste (i.e., tons/hour), (d) develop efficient plasma and melter operating conditions to optimize the process and/or reduce safety hazards, (e) calculate chemical reactions during treatment of waste to track chemical composition of off-gas products, and composition of final vitrified waste form and (f) help compare the designs of different plasma-arc facilities. A steady-state model of a two-dimensional axisymmetric transferred plasma arc has been developed and validated. A parametric analysis was performed that studied the effects of arc length, plasma gas composition, and input power on the temperatures and velocity profiles of the slag and plasma gas. A two-dimensional transient thermo-fluid model of the US Bureau of Mines plasma arc melter has been developed. This model includes the growth of a slag pool. The thermo-fluid model is used to predict the temperature and pressure fields within a plasma arc furnace. An analysis was performed to determine the effects of a molten metal pool on the temperature, velocity, and voltage fields within the slag. A robust and accurate model for the chemical equilibrium calculations has been selected to determine chemical composition of final waste form and off-gas based on the temperatures and pressures within the plasma-arc furnace. A chemical database has been selected. The database is based on the materials to be processed in the plasma arc furnaces.

  16. ENGINEERING A NEW MATERIAL FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K. Constant

    2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the engineering development of a reusable calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas. A two-step pelletization method has been employed to produce relatively strong, ''core-in-shell,'' spherical pellets. Each pellet consists of a highly reactive core surrounded by a strong, inert, porous shell. A suitable core is composed largely of CaO which reacts with H{sub 2}S to form CaS. Pellet cores have been prepared by pelletizing either pulverized limestone or plaster of Paris, and shells have been made of various materials. The most suitable shell material has been formed from a mixture of alumina and limestone particles. The core-in-shell pellets require treatment at high temperature to convert the core material to CaO and to partially sinter the shell material. Pellet cores derived from plaster of Paris have proved superior to those derived from limestone because they react more rapidly with H{sub 2}S and their reactivity does not seem to decline with repeated loading and regeneration. The rate of reaction of H{sub 2}S with CaO derived from either material is directly proportional to H{sub 2}S concentration. The rate of reaction does not appear to be affected significantly by temperature in the range of 1113 K (840 C) to 1193 K (920 C) but decreases markedly at 1233 K (960 C). The rate is not affected by shell thickness within the range tested, which also provides adequate compressive strength.

  17. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Multi-fuel reformers: Phase 1 -- Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

  18. Development of a hydrogen generator for fuel cells based on the partial oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recupero, V.; Torre, T.; Saija, G.; Fiordano, N. [Institute CNR-TAE, Lucia, Messina (Italy)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As well known, the most acknowledged process for generation of hydrogen for fuel cells is based upon the steam reforming of methane or natural gas (SRM). The reaction is endothermic ({Delta}H{sub 298}= 206 kJ/mole) and high H{sub 2}O/CH{sub 4} ratios are required in order to limit coke formation at T higher than 1000 K. Moreover, it is a common practice that the process`s fuel economy is highly sensitive to proper heat fluxes and reactor design (tubular type) and to operational conditions. Efficient heat recovery can be accomplished only on large scale units (> 40,000 Nm{sup 3}/h), far from the range of interest of {open_quotes}on-site{close_quotes} fuel cells. Even if, to fit the needs of the fuel cell technology, medium sized external reforming units (50-200 Nm{sup 3} H{sub 2}/h) have been developed and/or planned for integration with both the first and the second generation fuel cells, amelioration in their heat recovery and efficiency is at the expense of an increased sophistication and therefore at higher per unit costs. In all cases, SRM requires an extra {open_quotes}fuel{close_quotes} supply (to substain the endothermicity of the reaction) in addition to stoichiometric requirements ({open_quotes}feed{close_quotes} gas). A valid alternative could be a process based on catalytic partial oxidation of CH{sub 4} (CSPOM), since the process is mildly exothermic ({Delta}H{sub 298}= -35.6 kJ/mole) and therefore not energy intensive. Consequently, great interest is expected from conversion of methane into syngas, if an autothermal, low energy intensive, compact and reliable process could be developed.

  19. X-RAY SCALING RELATION IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: DARK MATTER AS A PRIMARY FACTOR IN RETAINING HOT GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Fabbiano, Giuseppina [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have revisited the X-ray scaling relations of early-type galaxies (ETG) by investigating, for the first time, the L{sub X,Gas}-M{sub Total} relation in a sample of 14 ETGs. In contrast to the large scatter (a factor of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}) in the L{sub X,Total}-L{sub B} relation, we found a tight correlation between these physically motivated quantities with an rms deviation of a factor of three in L{sub X,Gas} = 10{sup 38}-10{sup 43} erg s{sup 1} or M{sub Total} = a few 10{sup 10} to a few 10{sup 12} M{sub ?}. More striking, this relation becomes even tighter with an rms deviation of a factor of 1.3 among the gas-rich galaxies (with L{sub X,Gas} > 10{sup 40} erg s{sup 1}). In a simple power-law form, the new relation is (L{sub X,Gas}/10{sup 40} erg s{sup 1}) = (M{sub Total}/3.2 10{sup 11} M{sub ?}){sup 3}. This relation is also consistent with the steep relation between the gas luminosity and temperature, L{sub X,Gas} ? T{sub Gas} {sup 4.5}, identified by Boroson et al., if the gas is virialized. Our results indicate that the total mass of an ETG is the primary factor in regulating the amount of hot gas. Among the gas-poor galaxies (with L{sub X,Gas} < a few 10{sup 39} erg s{sup 1}), the scatter in the L{sub X,Gas}-M{sub Total} (and L{sub X,Gas}-T{sub Gas}) relation increases, suggesting that secondary factors (e.g., rotation, flattening, star formation history, cold gas, environment, etc.) may become important.

  20. Rod seal device for Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, D.; Itaba, T.; Momose, Y.

    1987-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A rod seal device for a Stirling engine is described which consists of: a piston rod having a first end connected to an operating piston for the engine and a second end connected to a guide piston disposed in a crank case; a compression chamber defined by the operating piston and a cylinder of the engine and including a working gas for the engine; a first intermediate chamber surrounding an outer periphery of the piston rod and being connected to the compression chamber and kept to maintain a minimum level of pressure of the working gas; a high pressure oil chamber disposed next to the first intermediate chamber and surrounding the outer periphery of the piston rod. A first low pressure oil chamber disposed next to the high pressure oil chamber via an oil seal member and surrounding the outer periphery of the piston rod. A first scraper seal disposed next to the first low pressure oil chamber and surrounding the outer periphery of the piston rod; a second intermediate chamber disposed next to the first low pressure oil chamber via the first scraper seal and surrounding the outer periphery of the piston rod; a second scraper seal disposed next to the second intermediate chamber and surrounding the outer periphery of the piston rod; a second low pressure oil chamber disposed next to the second intermediate chamber via the second scraper seal and surrounding the outer periphery of the piston rod, a second oil pump disposed between the second low pressure oil chamber and the second low pressure oil reservoir to positively discharge any gas introduced into the second low pressure oil chamber to the atmosphere; and a further oil seal disposed between the second low pressure oil chamber and a working gas chamber in the crank use for a power take-off device.

  1. Environmental report for the Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Skinner, W.H.; Norris, E.S.; Duck, R.R.; Hass, R.B.; Morgan, M.E.; Helble, J.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fossil Energy Program has a mission to develop energy systems that utilize national coal resources in power systems with increased efficiency and environmental compatibility. Coal gasification technology is a versatile candidate that meets this goal. This two phased project consists primarily of the design, construction and operation of a 5-foot inside diameter (minimum) fixed-bed gasifier called PyGas{trademark} and supporting infrastructure (Phase I), and an additional follow on phase consisting of the design, construction and operation of a hot fuel gas cleanup unit (Phase II). Issues expected to be successfully overcome by PyGas{trademark} through its application in this test facility include the processing of high-swelling coals, which causes agglomeration in conventional fixed-bed gasifiers. Such coals comprise 87% of all eastern coals. Other issues expected to be eliminated or significantly reduced include: production of ash clinkers, production of ammonia, the presence of significant tars and fines, and the volatilization of alkalinity in the product fuel gas. A second portion of the NEPA report is concerned with the emission of toxic metal compounds by the gasification process improvement facility (GPIF). The GPIF facility will be located on site at the Fort Martin facility of Allegheny Power Company, and the energy produced (steam) will be directly used by Fort Martin to produce electricity. The coal used at the GPIF facility will be the same coal used by the utility. Therefore, the emissions of the GPIF will be put in context of the entire facility. The GPIF assessment will be divided into four sections: Estimation of the toxic metals content of the raw coal; calculation of the emissions from Fort Martin normally; an estimate of the emission from the GPIF; and a comparison of the two flows.

  2. Demonstration of the enrichment of medium quality gas from gob wells through interactive well operating practices. Final report, June--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackburn, S.T.; Sanders, R.G.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.; Stevenson, J.W.; Mills, R.A.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane released to the atmosphere during coal mining operations is believed to contribute to global warming and represents a waste of a valuable energy resource. Commercial production of pipeline-quality gob well methane through wells drilled from the surface into the area above the gob can, if properly implemented, be the most effective means of reducing mine methane emissions. However, much of the gas produced from gob wells is vented because the quality of the gas is highly variable and is often below current natural gas pipeline specifications. Prior to the initiation of field-testing required to further understand the operational criteria for upgrading gob well gas, a preliminary evaluation and assessment was performed. An assessment of the methane gas in-place and producible methane resource at the Jim Walter Resources, Inc. No. 4 and No. 5 Mines established a potential 15-year supply of 60 billion cubic feet of mien methane from gob wells, satisfying the resource criteria for the test site. To understand the effect of operating conditions on gob gas quality, gob wells producing pipeline quality (i.e., < 96% hydrocarbons) gas at this site will be operated over a wide range of suction pressures. Parameters to be determined will include absolute methane quantity and methane concentration produced through the gob wells; working face, tailgate and bleeder entry methane levels in the mine; and the effect on the economics of production of gob wells at various levels of methane quality. Following this, a field demonstration will be initiated at a mine where commercial gob gas production has not been attempted. The guidelines established during the first phase of the project will be used to design the production program. The economic feasibility of various utilization options will also be tested based upon the information gathered during the first phase. 41 refs., 41 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. ADVANCED, LOW/ZERO EMISSION BOILER DESIGN AND OPERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovidiu Marin; Fabienne Chatel-Pelage

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reviews the work performed during the quarter January-March 2003. The main objectives of the project are: To demonstrate the feasibility of the full-oxy combustion with flue gas recirculation on Babcock & Wilcox's 1.5MW pilot boiler, To measure its performances in terms of emissions and boiler efficiency while selecting the right oxygen injection strategies, To perform an economical feasibility study, comparing this solution with alternate technologies, and To design a new generation, full oxy-fired boiler. The main objective of this quarter was to initiate the project, primarily the experimental tasks. The contractor and its subcontractors have defined a working plan, and the first tasks have been started. Task 1 (Site Preparation) is now in progress, defining the modifications to be implemented to the boiler and oxygen delivery system. The changes are required in order to overcome some current limitations of the existing system. As part of a previous project carried out in 2002, several changes have already been made on the pilot boiler, including the enrichment of the secondary and tertiary air with oxygen or the replacement of these streams with oxygen-enriched recycled flue gas. A notable modification for the current project involves the replacement of the primary air with oxygen-enriched flue gas. Consequently, the current oxygen supply and flue gas recycle system is being modified to meet this new requirement. Task 2 (Combustion and Emissions Performance Optimization) has been initiated with a preliminary selection of four series of tests to be performed. So far, the project schedule is on-track: site preparation (Task 1) should be completed by August 1st, 2003 and the tests (Task 2) are planned for September-October 2003. The Techno-Economic Study (Task 3) will be initiated in the following quarter.

  4. Test Series 2. 3 detailed test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test Series 2.3 is chronologically the second of the five sub-series of tests which comprise Test Series 2, the second major Test Series as part of the combustion research phase to be carried out at the Grimethorpe Experimental Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion Facility. Test Series 2.3 will consist of 700 data gathering hours which is expected to require some 1035 coal burning hours. The tests will be performed using US supplied coal and dolomite. This will be the first major series of tests on the Facility with other than the UK datum coal and dolomite. The document summarises the background to the facility and the experimental program. Described are modifications which have been made to the facility following Test Series 2.1 and a series of Screening Tests. Detailed test objectives are specified as are the test conditions for the experiments which comprise the test series. The test results will provide information on the effects of the bed temperature, excess air level, Ca/S ratio, number of coal feed lines, and combustion efficiency and sulphur retention. A significant aspect of the test series will be part load tests which will investigate the performance of the facility under conditions of turn down which simulate load following concepts specified for two combined cycle concepts, i.e., their CFCC combined cycle and a turbo charged combined cycle. The material test plan is also presented. The principal feature of the materials programme is the planned exposure of a set of static turbine blade specimens in a cascade test loop to the high temperature, high pressure flue gas. A schedule for the programme is presented as are contingency plans.

  5. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leininger, Thomas F. (Chino Hills, CA); Robin, Allen M. (Anaheim, CA); Wolfenbarger, James K. (Torrance, CA); Suggitt, Robert M. (Wappingers Falls, NY)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial oxidation process for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2 O, CH.sub.4, NH.sub.3, HCl, HF, H.sub.2 S, COS, N.sub.2, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000.degree. F.

  6. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. These feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. Some highlights of the results obtained during the first year of the current research contract are summarized as: (1) Terminal alkynes are an effective chain initiator for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reactions, producing normal paraffins with C numbers {ge} to that of the added alkyne. (2) Significant improvement in the product distribution towards heavier hydrocarbons (C{sub 5} to C{sub 19}) was achieved in supercritical fluid (SCF) FT reactions compared to that of gas-phase reactions. (3) Xerogel and aerogel silica supported cobalt catalysts were successfully employed for FT synthesis. Selectivity for diesel range products increased with increasing Co content. (4) Silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) molecular sieve catalysts have been developed for methanol to olefin conversion, producing value-added products such as ethylene and propylene. (5) Hybrid Pt-promoted tungstated and sulfated zirconia catalysts are very effective in cracking n-C{sub 36} to jet and diesel fuel; these catalysts will be tested for cracking of FT wax. (6) Methane, ethane, and propane are readily decomposed to pure hydrogen and carbon nanotubes using binary Fe-based catalysts containing Mo, Ni, or Pd in a single step non-oxidative reaction. (7) Partial dehydrogenation of liquid hydrocarbons (cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane) has been performed using catalysts consisting of Pt and other metals on stacked-cone carbon nanotubes. (8) An understanding of the catalytic reaction mechanisms of the catalysts developed in the CFFS C1 program is being achieved by structural characterization using multiple techniques, including XAFS and Moessbauer spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, NMR, ESR, and magnetometry.

  7. Pyramid Resource Center-Green Energy Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flory, Paul, D.

    2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    There are currently over 3,500 USA/Canadian landfills listed by the EPA/EC and like numbers in Europe that are producing methane-rich landfill gas (LFG). This gas is typically made up of 50-percent methane (CH4), 35-percent carbon dioxide (CO2), and 2 to 25% nitrogen and oxygen (N2 & O2), plus dozens of dilute contaminants. LFG is classified as a renewable fuel, because it is generated via biological decay of municipal solid waste, a constant byproduct of human activity. To date, most LFG has been allowed to escape into the atmosphere. On account of its high CH4 content, LFG may contribute to climate change, as CH4 is one of the most harmful greenhouse gases with 21 times the global warming potential of CO2. Of the landfills that collect LFG, most simply flare it. In the past decade, some landfills have begun to use LFG for electricity generation or for direct combustion as low Btu gas. Very few landfills upgrade LFG to high Btu gas. A patented CO2 WashTM process developed by Acrion Technologies Inc., and licensed to Firm Green Inc. shows promise as an economically and environmentally sustainable process to recover energy and prevent pollution from landfills. The CO2 WashTM has already been proven at lab-scale. It upgrades LFG, which consists of 50% methane (CH4) + 35% carbon dioxide (CO2) + 2 to 25% nitrogen + oxygen (N2+O2), 1 to 2% water vapor, and dozens of contaminants (which total a few hundred to a few thousand parts per million). CH4, which by itself has an energy content of 1,012 British thermal units (Btu) per standard cubic foot (SCF), is the only component in LFG that contributes to its energy content, which is therefore about 400-550 Btu/SCF. Accordingly, raw LFG is usually referred to as medium-Btu gas. To be salable, it is necessary to remove essentially all the components besides CH4, while keeping the vast majority of the revenue producing CH4. This is high-Btu gas, yielding 850 to 1,000 Btu/SCF. The CO2 WashTM process upgrades LFG to about 930 Btu/SCF, and reduces the contaminants to levels that make it salable as a vehicle fuel in the form of compressed natural gas (CNG).

  8. Natural gas pipeline technology overview.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

  9. INVESTIGATION ON THE FLAME EXTINCTION LIMIT OF FUEL BLENDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahsan R. Choudhuri

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lean flame extinction limits of binary fuel mixtures of methane (CH{sub 4}), propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}), and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were measured using a twin-flame counter-flow burner. Experiments were conducted to generate an extinction equivalence ratio vs. global stretch rate plot and an extrapolation method was used to calculate the equivalence ratio corresponding to an experimentally unattainable zero-stretch condition. The foregoing gases were selected because they are the primary constitutes of natural gas, which is the primary focus of the present study. To validate the experimental setup and methodology, the flame extinction limit of pure fuels at zero stretch conditions were also estimated and compared with published values. The lean flame extinction limits of methane (f{sub ext} = 4.6%) and propane (f{sub ext} = 2.25%) flames measured in the present study agreed with the values reported in the literature. It was observed that the flame extinction limit of fuel blends have a polynomial relation with the concentration of component fuels in the mixture. This behavior contradicts with the commonly used linear Le Chatelier's approximation. The experimentally determined polynomial relations between the flame extinction limits of fuel blends (i.e. methane-propane and methane-ethane) and methane concentration are as follows: (1) Methane-Propane--%f{sub ext} = (1.05 x 10{sup -9}) f{sup 5}-(1.3644 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(6.40299 x 10{sup -6}) f{sup 3}-(1.2108459 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2}+(2.87305329 x 10{sup -3}) f+2.2483; (2) Methane-Ethane--%f{sub ext} = (2.1 x 10{sup -9})f{sup 5}-(3.5752 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(2.095425 x 10{sup -5}) f{sup 3}-(5.037353 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2} + 6.08980409 f + 2.8923. Where f{sub ext} is the extinction limits of methane-propane and methane-ethane fuel blends, and f is the concentration (% volume) of methane in the fuel mixture. The relations were obtained by fitting fifth order curve (polynomial regression) to experimentally measured extinction limits at different mixture conditions. To extend the study to a commercial fuel, the flame extinction limit for Birmingham natural gas (a blend of 95% methane, 5% ethane and 5% nitrogen) was experimentally determined and was found to be 3.62% fuel in the air-fuel mixture.

  10. Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define the sweep efficiency of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

  11. Simultaneous Removal of NOx and Mercury in Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neville G. Pinto; Panagiotis G. Smirniotis

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a 18-month investigation to advance the development of a novel Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor (LTSCAR), for the simultaneous removal of NO{sub x} and mercury (elemental and oxidized) from flue gases in a single unit operation located downstream of the particulate collectors, are reported. In the proposed LTSCAR, NO{sub x} removal is in a traditional SCR mode but at low temperature, and, uniquely, using carbon monoxide as a reductant. The concomitant capture of mercury in the unit is achieved through the incorporation of a novel chelating adsorbent. As conceptualized, the LTSCAR will be located downstream of the particulate collectors (flue gas temperature 140-160 C) and will be similar in structure to a conventional SCR. That is, it will have 3-4 beds that are loaded with catalyst and adsorbent allowing staged replacement of catalyst and adsorbent as required. Various Mn/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalysts were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to reduce NO at low temperature using CO as the reductant. It has been shown that with a suitably tailored catalyst more than 65% NO conversion with 100% N{sub 2} selectivity can be achieved, even at a high space velocity (SV) of 50,000 h-1 and in the presence of 2 v% H{sub 2}O. Three adsorbents for oxidized mercury were developed in this project with thermal stability in the required range. Based on detailed evaluations of their characteristics, the mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) adsorbent was found to be most promising for the capture of oxidized mercury. This adsorbent has been shown to be thermally stable to 200 C. Fixed-bed evaluations in the targeted temperature range demonstrated effective removal of oxidized mercury from simulated flue gas at very high capacity ({approx}>58 mg Hg/g adsorbent). Extension of the capability of the adsorbent to elemental mercury capture was pursued with two independent approaches: incorporation of a novel nano-layer on the surface of the chelating mercury adsorbent to achieve in situ oxidation on the adsorbent, and the use of a separate titania-supported manganese oxide catalyst upstream of the oxidized mercury adsorbent. Both approaches met with some success. It was demonstrated that the concept of in situ oxidation on the adsorbent is viable, but the future challenge is to raise the operating capacity beyond the achieved limit of 2.7 mg Hg/g adsorbent. With regard to the manganese dioxide catalyst, elemental mercury was very efficiently oxidized in the absence of sulfur dioxide. Adequate resistance to sulfur dioxide must be incorporated for the approach to be feasible in flue gas. A preliminary benefits analysis of the technology suggests significant potential economic and environmental advantages.

  12. INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FuelCell Energy

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water treatment/instrument air, and power conditioning/controls were built and shipped to the site. The two fuel cell modules, each rated at 1 MW on natural gas, were fabricated by FuelCell Energy in its Torrington, CT manufacturing facility. The fuel cell modules were conditioned and tested at FuelCell Energy in Danbury and shipped to the site. Installation of the power plant and connection to all required utilities and syngas was completed. Pre-operation checkout of the entire power plant was conducted and the plant was ready to operate in July 2004. However, fuel gas (natural gas or syngas) was not available at the WREL site due to technical difficulties with the gasifier and other issues. The fuel cell power plant was therefore not operated, and subsequently removed by October of 2005. The WREL fuel cell site was restored to the satisfaction of WREL. FuelCell Energy continues to market carbonate fuel cells for natural gas and digester gas applications. A fuel cell/turbine hybrid is being developed and tested that provides higher efficiency with potential to reach the DOE goal of 60% HHV on coal gas. A system study was conducted for a 40 MW direct fuel cell/turbine hybrid (DFC/T) with potential for future coal gas applications. In addition, FCE is developing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power plants with Versa Power Systems (VPS) as part of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program and has an on-going program for co-production of hydrogen. Future development in these technologies can lead to future coal gas fuel cell applications.

  13. IMPROVED BIOMASS UTILIZATION THROUGH REMOTE FLOW SENSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington University- St. Louis:; ,; Muthanna Al-Dahhan (Principal Investigator); E-mail: muthanna@wustl.edu; ,; Rajneesh Varma; Khursheed Karim; Mehul Vesvikar; Rebecca Hoffman; ,; Oak Ridge National Laboratory:; ,; David Depaoli, (Co-principal investigator); Email: depaolidw@ornl.gov; ,; Thomas Klasson; Alan L. Wintenberg; Charles W Alexander; Lloyd Clonts; ,; Iowa Energy Center; ,; ,; Norm Olson; Email: nolson@energy.iastate.edu

    2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of the livestock industry provides a valuable source of affordable, sustainable, and renewable bioenergy, while also requiring the safe disposal of the large quantities of animal wastes (manure) generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. If these biomass resources are mishandled and underutilized, major environmental problems will be created, such as surface and ground water contamination, odors, dust, ammonia leaching, and methane emission. Anaerobic digestion of animal wastes, in which microorganisms break down organic materials in the absence of oxygen, is one of the most promising waste treatment technologies. This process produces biogas typically containing {approx}65% methane and {approx}35% carbon dioxide. The production of biogas through anaerobic digestion from animal wastes, landfills, and municipal waste water treatment plants represents a large source of renewable and sustainable bio-fuel. Such bio-fuel can be combusted directly, used in internal combustion engines, converted into methanol, or partially oxidized to produce synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) that can be converted to clean liquid fuels and chemicals via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Different design and mixing configurations of anaerobic digesters for treating cow manure have been utilized commercially and/or tested on a laboratory scale. These digesters include mechanically mixed, gas recirculation mixed, and slurry recirculation mixed designs, as well as covered lagoon digesters. Mixing is an important parameter for successful performance of anaerobic digesters. It enhances substrate contact with the microbial community; improves pH, temperature and substrate/microorganism uniformity; prevents stratification and scum accumulation; facilitates the removal of biogas from the digester; reduces or eliminates the formation of inactive zones (dead zones); prevents settling of biomass and inert solids; and aids in particle size reduction. Unfortunately, information and findings in the literature on the effect of mixing on anaerobic digestion are contradictory. One reason is the lack of measurement techniques for opaque systems such as digesters. Better understanding of the mixing and hydrodynamics of digesters will result in appropriate design, configuration selection, scale-up, and performance, which will ultimately enable avoiding digester failures. Accordingly, this project sought to advance the fundamental knowledge and understanding of the design, scale up, operation, and performance of cow manure anaerobic digesters with high solids loading. The project systematically studied parameters affecting cow manure anaerobic digestion performance, in different configurations and sizes by implementing computer automated radioactive particle tracking (CARPT), computed tomography (CT), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and by developing novel multiple-particle CARPT (MP-CARPT) and dual source CT (DSCT) techniques. The accomplishments of the project were achieved in a collaborative effort among Washington University, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Iowa Energy Center teams. The following investigations and achievements were accomplished: Systematic studies of anaerobic digesters performance and kinetics using various configurations, modes of mixing, and scales (laboratory, pilot plant, and commercial sizes) were conducted and are discussed in Chapter 2. It was found that mixing significantly affected the performance of the pilot plant scale digester ({approx}97 liter). The detailed mixing and hydrodynamics were investigated using computer automated radioactive particle tracking (CARPT) techniques, and are discussed in Chapter 3. A novel multiple particle tracking technique (MP-CARPT) technique that can track simultaneously up to 8 particles was developed, tested, validated, and implemented. Phase distribution was investigated using gamma ray computer tomography (CT) techniques, which are discussed in Chapter 4. A novel dual source CT (DSCT) technique was developed to measure the phase distribution of dyn

  14. Mercury Calibration System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on actual capabilities of the current calibration technology. As part of the current effort, WRI worked with Thermo Fisher elemental mercury calibrator units to conduct qualification experiments to demonstrate their performance characteristics under a variety of conditions and to demonstrate that they qualify for use in the CEM calibration program. Monitoring of speciated mercury is another concern of this research. The mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants are comprised of both elemental and oxidized mercury. Current CEM analyzers are designed to measure elemental mercury only. Oxidized mercury must first be converted to elemental mercury prior to entering the analyzer inlet in order to be measured. CEM systems must demonstrate the ability to measure both elemental and oxidized mercury. This requires the use of oxidized mercury generators with an efficient conversion of the oxidized mercury to elemental mercury. There are currently two basic types of mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) generators used for this purpose. One is an evaporative HgCl{sub 2} generator, which produces gas standards of known concentration by vaporization of aqueous HgCl{sub 2} solutions and quantitative mixing with a diluent carrier gas. The other is a device that converts the output from an elemental Hg generator to HgCl{sub 2} by means of a chemical reaction with chlorine gas. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer system involves reaction of elemental mercury vapor with chlorine gas at an elevated temperature. The draft interim protocol for oxidized mercury units involving reaction with chlorine gas requires the vendors to demonstrate high efficiency of oxidation of an elemental mercury stream from an elemental mercury vapor generator. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer unit is designed to operate at the power plant stack at the probe outlet. Following oxidation of elemental mercury from reaction with chlorine gas, a high temperature module reduces the mercuric chloride back to elemental mercury. WRI conducted work with a custom laboratory configured stand-alone oxidized mercury generator unit prov

  15. The Disruption of Vessel-Spanning Bubbles with Sloped Fins in Flat-Bottom and 2:1 Elliptical-Bottom Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Chun, Jaehun; Russell, Renee L.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Mastor, Michael M.

    2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive sludge was generated in the K-East Basin and K-West Basin fuel storage pools at the Hanford Site while irradiated uranium metal fuel elements from the N Reactor were being stored and packaged. The fuel has been removed from the K Basins, and currently, the sludge resides in the KW Basin in large underwater Engineered Containers. The first phase to the Sludge Treatment Project being led by CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is to retrieve and load the sludge into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and transport the sludge to T Plant for interim storage. The STSCs will be stored inside T Plant cells that are equipped with secondary containment and leak-detection systems. The sludge is composed of a variety of particulate materials and water, including a fraction of reactive uranium metal particles that are a source of hydrogen gas. If a situation occurs where the reactive uranium metal particles settle out at the bottom of a container, previous studies have shown that a vessel-spanning gas layer above the uranium metal particles can develop and can push the overlying layer of sludge upward. The major concern, in addition to the general concern associated with the retention and release of a flammable gas such as hydrogen, is that if a vessel-spanning bubble (VSB) forms in an STSC, it may drive the overlying sludge material to the vents at the top of the container. Then it may be released from the container into the cells secondary containment system at T Plant. A previous study demonstrated that sloped walls on vessels, both cylindrical coned-shaped vessels and rectangular vessels with rounded ends, provided an effective approach for disrupting a VSB by creating a release path for gas as a VSB began to rise. Based on the success of sloped-wall vessels, a similar concept is investigated here where a sloped fin is placed inside the vessel to create a release path for gas. A key potential advantage of using a sloped fin compared to a vessel with a sloped wall is that a small fin decreases the volume of a vessel available for sludge storage by a very small fraction compared to a cone-shaped vessel. The purpose of this study is to quantify the capability of sloped fins to disrupt VSBs and to conduct sufficient tests to estimate the performance of fins in full-scale STSCs. Experiments were conducted with a range of fin shapes to determine what slope and width were sufficient to disrupt VSBs. Additional tests were conducted to demonstrate how the fin performance scales with the sludge layer thickness and the sludge strength, density, and vessel diameter based on the gravity yield parameter, which is a dimensionless ratio of the force necessary to yield the sludge to its weight.( ) Further experiments evaluated the difference between vessels with flat and 2:1 elliptical bottoms and a number of different simulants, including the KW container sludge simulant (complete), which was developed to match actual K-Basin sludge. Testing was conducted in 5-in., 10-in., and 23-in.-diameter vessels to quantify how fin performance is impacted by the size of the test vessel. The most significant results for these scale-up tests are the trend in how behavior changes with vessel size and the results from the 23-in. vessel. The key objective in evaluating fin performance is to determine the conditions that minimize the volume of a VSB when disruption occurs because this reduces the potential for material inside the STSC from being released through vents.

  16. Pressurized Oxidative Recovery of Energy from Biomass Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Misra

    2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to evaluate the technical feasibility of using pressurized oxyfuel, the ThermoEnergy Integrated Power System (TIPS), to recover energy from biomass. The study was focused on two frontscomputer simulation of the TIPS plant and corrosion testing to determine the best materials of construction for the critical heat exchanger components of the process. The goals were to demonstrate that a successful strategy of applying the TIPS process to wood waste could be achieved. To fully investigate the technical and economic benefits of using TIPS, it was necessary to model a conventional air-fired biomass power plant for comparison purposes. The TIPS process recovers and utilizes the latent heat of vaporization of water entrained in the fuel or produced during combustion. This latent heat energy is unavailable in the ambient processes. An average composition of wood waste based on data from the Pacific Northwest, Pacific Southwest, and the South was used for the study. The high moisture content of wood waste is a major advantage of the TIPS process. The process can utilize the higher heating value of the fuel by condensing most of the water vapor in the flue gas and making the flue gas a useful source of heat. This is a considerable thermal efficiency gain over conventional power plants which use the lower heating value of the fuel. The elevated pressure also allows TIPS the option of recovering CO2 at near ambient temperatures with high purity oxygen used in combustion. Unlike ambient pressure processes which need high energy multi-stage CO2 compression to supply pipeline quality product, TIPS is able to simply pump the CO2 liquid using very little auxiliary power. In this study, a 15.0 MWe net biomass power plant was modeled, and when a CO2 pump was included it only used 0.1 MWe auxiliary power. The need for refrigeration is eliminated at such pressures resulting in significant energy, capital, and operating and maintenance savings. Since wood waste is a fuel with a high moisture and hydrogen content, it is one of the best applications for TIPS. The only way to fully utilize the latent heat is by using a pressurized system and the oxy-fuel approach allows for carbon capture and easier emission control. Pressurized operation also allows for easier emission control than atmospheric oxyfuel because presence of infiltration air in the atmospheric case. For the case of wood waste as the fuel however, the ability of TIPS to fully utilize the heat of condensation is the most valuable advantage of the process. The project research showed that titanium alloys were the best materials of construction for the heat exchangers. All other materials tested failed to withstand even brief periods in the harsh environment (high temperature, acidic, and oxidizing conditions). Titanium was able to survive due to the formation of a stable TiO2 passivation layer.

  17. Direct Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasification in a Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Sinquefield; Xiaoyan Zeng, Alan Ball

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification of black liquor (BLG) has distinct advantages over direct combustion in Tomlinson recovery boilers. In this project we seek to resolve causticizing issues in order to make pressurized BLG even more efficient and cost-effective. One advantage of BLG is that the inherent partial separation of sulfur and sodium during gasification lends itself to the use of proven high yield variants to conventional kraft pulping which require just such a separation. Processes such as polysulfide, split sulfidity, ASAQ, and MSSAQ can increase pulp yield from 1% to 10% over conventional kraft but require varying degrees of sulfur/sodium separation, which requires additional [and costly] processing in a conventional Tomlinson recovery process. However during gasification, the sulfur is partitioned between the gas and smelt phases, while the sodium all leaves in the smelt; thus creating the opportunity to produce sulfur-rich and sulfur-lean white liquors for specialty pulping processes. A second major incentive of BLG is the production of a combustible product gas, rich in H2 and CO. This product gas (a.k.a. syngas) can be used in gas turbines for combined cycle power generation (which is twice as efficient as the steam cycle alone), or it can be used as a precursor to form liquid fuels, such as dimethyl ether or Fischer Tropsh diesel. There is drawback to BLG, which has the potential to become a third major incentive if this work is successful. The causticizing load is greater for gasification of black liquor than for combustion in a Tomlinson boiler. So implementing BLG in an existing mill would require costly increases to the causticizing capacity. In situ causticizing [within the gasifier] would handle the entire causticizing load and therefore eliminate the lime cycle entirely. Previous work by the author and others has shown that titanate direct causticizing (i.e. in situ) works quite well for high-temperature BLG (950C), but was limited to pressures below about 5 bar. It is desirable however to operate BLG at 20-30 bar for efficiency reasons related to either firing the syngas in a turbine, or catalytically forming liquid fuels. This work focused on achieving high direct causticizing yields at 20 bars pressure. The titanate direct causticizing reactions are inhibited by CO2. Previous work has shown that the partial pressure of CO2 should be kept below about 0.5 bar in order for the process to work. This translates to a total reactor pressure limit of about 5 bar for airblown BLG, and only 2 bar for O2-blown BLG. In this work a process was developed in which the CO2 partial pressure could be manipulated to a level under 0.5 bar with the total system pressure at 10 bar during O2-blown BLG. This fell short of our 20 bar goal but still represents a substantial increase in the pressure limit. A material and energy balance was performed, as well as first-pass economics based on capital and utilities costs. Compared to a reference case of using BLG with a conventional lime cycle [Larson, 2003], the IRR and NVP were estimated for further replacing the lime kiln with direct causticizing. The economics are strongly dependent on the price of lime kiln fuel. At $6/mmBTU the lime cycle is the clear choice. At $8/mmBTU the NPV is $10M with IRR of 17%. At $12/mmBTU the NPV is $45M with IRR of 36%. To further increase the total allowable pressure, the CO2 could be further decreased by further decreasing the temperature. Testing should be done at 750C. Also a small pilot should be built.

  18. Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, UTE Mountain UTE Reservation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Hachey

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this project were: (1) To enhance recovery of oil contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute tribal lands. (2) To promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American Oil production corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other Tribes. (3) To develop an understanding of multicomponent seismic data as it relates to the variations in permeability and porosity of algal mounds, as well as lateral facies variations, for use in both reservoir development and exploration. (4) To identify any undiscovered algal mounds for field-extension within the area of seismic coverage. (5) To evaluate the potential for applying CO{sub 2} floods, steam floods, water floods or other secondary or tertiary recovery processes to increase production. The technical work scope was carried out by: (1) Acquiring multicomponent seismic data over the project area; (2) Processing and reprocessing the multicomponent data to extract as much geological and engineering data as possible within the budget and time-frame of the project; (3) Preparing maps and data volumes of geological and engineering data based on the multicomponent seismic and well data; (4) Selecting drilling targets if warranted by the seismic interpretation; (5) Constructing a static reservoir model of the project area; and (6) Constructing a dynamic history-matched simulation model from the static model. The original project scope covered a 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) area encompassing two algal mound fields (Towaoc and Roadrunner). 3D3C seismic data was to acquired over this area to delineate mound complexes and image internal reservoir properties such as porosity and fluid saturations. After the project began, the Red Willow Production Company, a project partner and fully-owned company of the Southern Ute Tribe, contributed additional money to upgrade the survey to a nine-component (3D9C) survey. The purpose of this upgrade to nine components was to provide additional shear wave component data that might prove useful in delineating internal mound reservoir attributes. Also, Red Willow extended the P-wave portion of the survey to the northwest of the original 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) 3D9C area in order to extend coverage further to the northwest to the Marble Wash area. In order to accomplish this scope of work, 3D9C seismic data set covering two known reservoirs was acquired and processed. Three-dimensional, zero-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) data was acquired to determine the shear wave velocities for processing the sh3Dseismic data. Anisotropic velocity, and azimuthal AVO processing was carried out in addition to the conventional 3D P-wave data processing. All P-, PS- and S-wave volumes of the seismic data were interpreted to map the seismic response. The interpretation consisted of conventional cross-plots of seismic attributes vs. geological and reservoir engineering data, as well as multivariate and neural net analyses to assess whether additional resolution on exploration and engineering parameters could be achieved through the combined use of several seismic variables. Engineering data in the two reservoirs was used to develop a combined lithology, structure and permeability map. On the basis of the seismic data, a well was drilled into the northern mound trend in the project area. This well, Roadrunner No.9-2, was brought into production in late April 2006 and continues to produce modest amounts of oil and gas. As of the end of August 2007, the well has produced approximately 12,000 barrels of oil and 32,000 mcf of gas. A static reservoir model was created from the seismic data interpretations and well data. The seismic data was tied to various markers identified in the well logs, which in turn were related to lithostratigraphy. The tops and thicknesses of the various units were extrapolated from well control based upon the seismic data that was calibrated to the well picks. The reservoir engineering properties were available from a number of wel

  19. Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (<70%). High airflow rate was required to achieve >50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal of mercury from simulated flue gas. A business model was generated to summarize anti