National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gas wells summary

  1. Alabama Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  2. Louisiana Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gross Withdrawals 159,456 166,570 164,270 166,973 161,280 163,799 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  3. Indiana Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  4. Maryland Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  5. Nevada Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  6. Virginia Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  7. Illinois Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  8. Colorado Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gross Withdrawals 139,822 143,397 138,325 144,845 139,698 141,947 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  9. Kentucky Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  10. Texas Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gross Withdrawals 752,341 754,086 731,049 739,603 714,788 720,593 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  11. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gross Withdrawals 398,737 408,325 396,931 404,431 403,683 429,251 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  12. Wyoming Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gross Withdrawals 168,548 167,539 162,880 167,555 163,345 165,658 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  13. Missouri Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  14. Tennessee Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  15. Alaska Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gross Withdrawals 221,340 204,073 261,150 279,434 289,770 304,048 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Coalbed Wells ...

  16. Ohio Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 88,406 87,904 89,371 104,127 104,572 113,096 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA ...

  17. Utah Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 35,984 33,029 30,933 31,404 30,891 34,204 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA ...

  18. Arkansas Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 85,763 83,954 81,546 83,309 79,278 80,492 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA ...

  19. Arizona Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.55 4.53 4.48 4.25 4.42 NA 1989-2015 Residential 23.59 24.01 23.01 20.77 14.57 12.75 1989-2015 Commercial 10.67 10.52 10.40 10.14 9.36 9.17 1989-2015 Industrial 6.80 NA 6.62 6.36 6.35 6.43 2001-2015 Electric Power 3.54 3.47 W W W W 2002-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA

  20. Mississippi Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    81 3.82 3.64 3.68 NA 4.29 1989-2015 Residential 14.87 15.82 15.39 13.96 12.13 9.71 1989-2015 Commercial 7.79 NA NA 7.81 7.98 8.06 1989-2015 Industrial 4.49 3.95 4.46 4.21 4.26 4.12 2001-2015 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2015 Repressuring

  1. Montana Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    43 3.36 3.10 3.28 2.87 3.25 1989-2015 Residential 11.68 11.78 11.04 9.01 7.34 NA 1989-2015 Commercial 9.42 9.44 9.37 8.22 7.05 6.59 1989-2015 Industrial 6.33 5.86 6.91 5.79 6.09 5.47 2001-2015 Electric Power -- -- -- -- -- -- 2002-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 4,941 4,756 4,573 4,827 4,568 4,681 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA

  2. Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.17 5.43 5.45 5.28 4.22 3.86 1989-2015 Residential 23.13 26.66 25.23 23.39 14.41 7.35 1989-2015 Commercial 13.62 15.18 14.85 14.21 10.78 6.14 1989-2015 Industrial NA 8.56 NA 9.67 7.72 6.04 2001-2015 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 217,883 213,529 204,298 209,342 200,704 206,487 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells

  3. Oregon Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6.30 5.84 5.19 5.15 3.92 3.72 1989-2015 Residential 16.60 17.52 14.81 13.88 10.10 NA 1989-2015 Commercial 10.76 11.12 10.13 10.18 8.39 9.09 1989-2015 Industrial 6.39 6.49 6.47 6.51 5.67 5.59 2001-2015 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2015 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2015

  4. Missouri Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1967-1997 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.17 5.85 5.27 4.99 5.76 4.65 1984-2015 Residential 11.66 12.02 12.25 10.88 10.83 11.59 1967-2015 Commercial 10.28 9.99 9.54 9.00 8.96 9.10 1967-2015 Industrial 8.70 8.54 7.85 8.19 8.00 7.75 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 6.34 6.11 5.64 1994-2012 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 0 53 100 26 28 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA 9 9 1967-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA 8 8

  5. Indiana Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    13 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.52 4.97 4.23 4.38 5.63 NA 1984-2015 Residential 8.63 9.46 8.94 8.43 9.02 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 7.55 8.04 7.69 7.59 8.19 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 5.65 6.53 6.19 6.54 7.45 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 5.19 13.24 12.29 1990-2012 Electric Power 4.91 W W W W W 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 620 914 819 921 895 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals 6,802 9,075 8,814 7,938 6,616 1967-2014 From Gas Wells 6,802

  6. Oregon Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    92 1979-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.78 5.84 5.21 4.82 5.40 4.65 1984-2015 Residential 12.49 11.76 11.22 10.84 11.72 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 10.10 9.60 8.91 8.60 9.44 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 7.05 6.84 5.87 5.79 6.20 6.38 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 5.61 4.23 4.57 1992-2012 Electric Power 4.57 W W W W W 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 26 24 27 26 28 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals 1,407 1,344 770 770 950 1979-2014 From Gas Wells 1,407

  7. Florida Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    87 4.44 4.53 4.17 3.92 4.65 1989-2015 Residential 24.58 24.59 24.41 23.37 21.56 19.15 1989-2015 Commercial 10.92 10.91 11.15 10.61 10.69 10.89 1989-2015 Industrial 6.69 6.02 6.08 6.29 6.20 NA 2001-2015 Electric Power 4.43 4.45 4.46 4.31 3.90 3.98 2002-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA

  8. Michigan Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.82 3.82 3.60 3.65 3.81 3.95 1989-2015 Residential 13.65 13.52 13.21 8.93 7.84 7.55 1989-2015 Commercial 9.31 9.17 9.05 7.46 6.75 6.59 1989-2015 Industrial 6.44 6.86 6.66 6.33 5.70 5.77 2001-2015 Electric Power 3.30 3.40 3.32 2.91 2.56 2.17 2002-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA

  9. Nebraska Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.11 4.16 4.68 4.04 3.83 3.23 1989-2015 Residential 14.88 15.79 15.70 13.92 9.51 6.88 1989-2015 Commercial 6.03 6.25 6.43 5.91 5.67 5.34 1989-2015 Industrial 4.31 4.38 4.32 4.15 4.09 4.85 2001-2015 Electric Power 3.81 5.08 3.38 3.22 3.37 3.63 2002-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA

  10. California Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.56 3.55 3.42 3.32 3.08 3.02 1989-2015 Residential 11.68 11.85 11.91 11.53 10.31 11.37 1989-2015 Commercial 7.68 7.87 7.84 7.69 7.20 8.23 1989-2015 Industrial 6.02 6.07 6.09 5.88 5.77 6.92 2001-2015 Electric Power 3.53 3.52 3.29 3.18 2.94 2.95 2002-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 19,225 19,655 18,928 18,868 18,266 18,868 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 From

  11. Kansas Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.39 NA NA 5.53 3.94 3.55 1989-2015 Residential 19.38 20.79 19.68 14.37 NA 7.81 1989-2015 Commercial 12.42 11.98 12.47 9.39 7.25 7.08 1989-2015 Industrial 4.12 4.07 4.02 4.31 4.76 5.79 2001-2015 Electric Power 3.52 3.70 3.68 4.88 4.03 4.66 2002-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 24,842 24,864 23,819 23,559 22,371 22,744 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 From Coalbed

  12. Nevada Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    NA 2006-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 7.19 6.77 5.13 5.16 5.90 4.06 1984-2015 Residential 12.25 10.66 10.14 9.42 11.44 11.82 1967-2015 Commercial 9.77 8.07 7.43 6.61 8.21 8.66 1967-2015 Industrial 10.53 8.99 7.34 6.66 7.83 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 8.13 4.76 8.97 1991-2012 Electric Power 5.75 5.00 3.49 W W 3.34 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 0 0 0 4 4 1996-2014 Gross Withdrawals 4 3 4 3 3 1991-2014 From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 3

  13. Nebraska Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.62 5.11 4.31 4.61 5.58 NA 1984-2015 Residential 8.95 8.84 8.68 8.39 8.77 8.94 1967-2015 Commercial 7.08 6.69 6.19 6.49 7.27 6.54 1967-2015 Industrial 5.85 5.61 4.34 4.72 5.69 4.61 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 15.10 15.29 1994-2012 Electric Power W 5.74 3.93 4.96 5.84 3.97 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 276 322 270 357 310 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals 2,255 1,980 1,328 1,032 402 1967-2014 From Gas

  14. Illinois Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wellhead NA 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.52 5.09 4.11 4.43 6.28 3.82 1984-2015 Residential 9.39 8.78 8.26 8.20 9.59 7.95 1967-2015 Commercial 8.76 8.27 7.78 7.57 8.86 7.26 1967-2015 Industrial 7.13 6.84 5.63 6.00 7.75 5.36 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 7.22 11.61 11.39 1990-2012 Electric Power 5.14 W W W W W 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 50 40 40 34 36 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals 1,702

  15. Maryland Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wellhead NA 1967-2010 Imports 5.37 5.30 13.82 15.29 8.34 1999-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.49 6.26 5.67 5.37 6.36 4.99 1984-2015 Residential 12.44 12.10 12.17 11.67 12.21 12.05 1967-2015 Commercial 9.87 10.29 10.00 10.06 10.52 10.00 1967-2015 Industrial 9.05 8.61 8.01 8.47 9.94 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 5.99 5.09 -- 1993-2012 Electric Power 5.77 5.44 W W 5.35 4.06 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 7 8 9 7 7 1989-2014 Gross

  16. Arizona Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    11 1967-2010 Exports 4.57 4.28 3.07 4.17 5.15 1989-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.59 5.91 4.68 4.73 5.20 NA 1984-2015 Residential 15.87 15.04 15.75 13.92 17.20 17.04 1967-2015 Commercial 10.72 9.99 9.35 8.76 10.34 10.53 1967-2015 Industrial 7.54 6.86 5.78 6.29 7.52 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 12.35 7.73 13.19 1991-2012 Electric Power 4.84 W 3.51 4.60 5.30 3.43 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 5 5 5 5 5 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals 183

  17. Tennessee Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.35 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.78 5.23 4.35 4.73 5.37 4.06 1984-2015 Residential 10.46 10.21 9.95 9.44 10.13 9.69 1967-2015 Commercial 9.39 9.04 8.36 8.41 9.30 8.46 1967-2015 Industrial 6.64 6.15 4.98 5.62 6.31 4.89 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 8.16 12.32 8.18 1990-2012 Electric Power 5.04 4.62 2.90 3.83 4.64 2.74 2001-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 230 210 212 1,089 1,024 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals 5,144 4,851 5,825 5,400 5,294

  18. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Pennsylvania No. 1 well, McKean County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-10-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Pennsylvania No. 1 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 741 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in MeKean County of north-central Pennsylvania.

  19. Cliff Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 6 wells - Gallia County. Phase III report. Summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-07-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Ohio No. 6 wells. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. This data presented were obtained from a study of approximately 1522 feet of core retrieved from five wells drilled in Gallia County in southeastern Ohio.

  20. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Michigan No. 2 well, Otsego County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-11-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Michigan No. 2 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data was obtained from the study of approximately 249 feet of core retrived from a well drilled in Otsego County of north-central Michigan (lower peninsula).

  1. Eastern Gas Shales Project: West Virginia No. 7 well, Wetzel County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-12-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-West Virginia No. 7 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithiology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 533 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in Wetzel county of north-central West Virginia.

  2. Minnesota Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.68 4.52 4.49 3.51 4.06 3.65 1989-2015 Residential 13.30 13.01 12.75 9.33 7.71 7.16 1989-2015 Commercial 8.17 8.03 7.72 6.43 6.20 6.10 1989-2015 Industrial 4.59 4.76 4.23 4.31 4.20 4.31 2001-2015 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Total Capacity 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 2002-2015 Gas in Storage 6,153 6,355 6,573 6,835 6,984 6,973 1990-2015 Base Gas 4,848 4,848 4,848 4,848 4,848 4,848 1990-2015 Working Gas 1,305 1,507 1,725 1,987 2,136 2,125

  3. Washington Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    29 5.84 5.08 4.25 3.51 3.46 1989-2015 Residential 12.37 12.57 11.71 11.24 9.71 9.15 1989-2015 Commercial 9.80 10.04 9.42 9.32 8.35 7.80 1989-2015 Industrial 9.45 8.94 8.87 8.48 7.87 7.27 2001-2015 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Total Capacity 46,900 46,900 46,900 46,900 46,900 46,900 2002-2015 Gas in Storage 37,248 41,994 45,053 45,877 42,090 39,380 1990-2015 Base Gas 22,300 22,300 22,300 22,300 22,300 22,300 1990-2015 Working Gas 14,948 19,694

  4. Iowa Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    54 4.61 4.62 3.58 3.81 3.79 1989-2015 Residential 15.67 17.34 16.40 13.15 8.41 7.29 1989-2015 Commercial 8.45 8.95 8.14 5.99 6.39 5.72 1989-2015 Industrial 5.32 5.00 NA 4.46 5.14 4.50 2001-2015 Electric Power 3.06 3.12 2.98 2.89 5.06 2.60 2002-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Total Capacity 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 2002-2015 Gas in Storage 233,287 246,900 263,036 277,160 272,523 255,967 1990-2015 Base Gas 197,897 197,897 197,897 197,897 197,897 197,897

  5. Connecticut Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    67-2005 Citygate 6.58 5.92 5.12 5.42 5.61 4.07 1984-2015 Residential 14.93 13.83 14.17 13.32 14.13 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 9.55 8.48 8.40 9.20 10.24 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 9.60 9.16 8.83 6.85 8.07 6.37 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 16.31 18.59 13.70 1992-2012 Electric Power 5.70 5.09 3.99 6.23 6.82 4.73 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1996 Withdrawals 1973-1996 Net Withdrawals 1973-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 651 655 743 558

  6. Delaware Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    78-2005 Citygate 5.67 9.03 7.19 5.67 5.54 NA 1984-2015 Residential 15.12 15.38 15.24 13.65 13.21 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 13.26 13.58 13.31 11.78 11.42 10.70 1967-2015 Industrial 10.18 11.69 11.61 11.24 10.95 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 24.55 28.76 30.97 1995-2012 Electric Power W W -- -- W -- 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1967-1975 Withdrawals 1967-1975 Net Withdrawals 1967-1975 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 73 64 117 63 157 1980-2014

  7. Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.14 5.65 4.88 4.88 6.96 4.71 1984-2015 Residential 10.34 9.77 9.27 8.65 10.52 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 8.53 8.03 7.34 6.94 8.74 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 7.56 7.05 5.81 6.02 8.08 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 7.84 6.10 5.71 1989-2012 Electric Power 5.43 4.91 3.27 4.47 5.47 W 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1973 Withdrawals 1974-1975 Net Withdrawals 1973-1975 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions

  8. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  9. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  10. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  11. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  12. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  13. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  14. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  15. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  16. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  17. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  18. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  19. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  20. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  1. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  2. South Dakota Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  3. New York Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  4. West Virginia Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 115,055 114,871 111,932 108,711 96,802 105,945 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA ...

  5. North Dakota Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.56 4.32 5.00 4.58 4.16 3.94 1989-2015 Residential 21.07 NA NA 9.60 6.57 5.61 1989-2015 Commercial 8.73 8.86 7.91 NA 5.68 5.23 1989-2015 Industrial 3.12 2.96 2.81 2.76 2.58 2.88 2001-2015 Electric Power 2.87 3.03 3.09 2.67 2.08 2.07 2002-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 51,167 50,537 47,895 50,958 49,559 51,065 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells

  6. New Mexico Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.64 3.74 3.57 3.34 NA 2.76 1989-2015 Residential 14.45 14.81 14.74 12.99 8.21 6.71 1989-2015 Commercial 7.52 7.65 7.65 7.67 NA 5.28 1989-2015 Industrial 4.86 4.93 5.03 5.03 4.93 4.56 2001-2015 Electric Power 3.86 3.28 3.13 3.11 2.64 2.46 2002-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 109,430 112,061 109,134 112,013 107,721 102,253 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 From

  7. SUMMARY GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS DATA WORKSHEET JANUARY 2015 | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy SUMMARY GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS DATA WORKSHEET JANUARY 2015 SUMMARY GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS DATA WORKSHEET JANUARY 2015 File SUMMARY_GREENHOUSE_GAS_EMISSIONS_DATA_WORKSHEET_JANUARY_2015.xlsx More Documents & Publications Attachment C - Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL Attachment C Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL Full Service Leased Space Data Report

  8. South Dakota Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NA 1979-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.54 5.21 4.67 4.83 6.14 4.17 1984-2015 Residential 8.77 8.59 8.39 8.23 9.27 8.21 1967-2015 Commercial 7.13 6.98 6.45 6.59 7.65 6.11 1967-2015 Industrial 5.92 6.25 5.37 5.67 6.88 4.98 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- 1991-2012 Electric Power 5.50 5.04 3.54 4.35 4.98 3.31 1998-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 102 100 95 65 68 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals 12,540 12,449 15,085 16,205 15,307 1967-2014 From

  9. Number of Producing Gas Wells

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 484,994 514,786 1989-2014 Alabama 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 6,165 6,118 1989-2014 Alaska 261 269 277 185 159 170 1989-2014 Arizona 6 5 5 5 5 5 1989-2014 Arkansas 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 9,843 10,150 1989-2014 California 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1,335 1,118 1989-2014

  10. NMOCD - Form G-106 - Geothermal Resources Well Summary Report...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: NMOCD - Form G-106 - Geothermal Resources Well Summary Report Author State of New Mexico Energy and...

  11. Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries

  12. New Jersey Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.41 7.53 6.74 6.21 6.21 NA 1984-2015 Residential 12.84 11.78 11.09 10.89 9.69 8.37 1967-2015 Commercial 10.11 9.51 8.50 9.55 10.08 8.52 1967-2015 Industrial 9.63 9.23 7.87 8.19 10.45 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- 1994-2012 Electric Power 5.66 5.24 3.63 4.34 4.83 2.96 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1967-1996 Withdrawals 1967-1996 Net Withdrawals 1967-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet)

  13. North Carolina Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.02 5.45 4.00 4.63 5.41 NA 1984-2015 Residential 12.50 12.55 12.19 11.83 11.88 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 10.18 9.64 8.62 8.81 9.12 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 8.24 7.70 6.37 6.87 7.55 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 9.77 12.13 6.48 1990-2012 Electric Power W W W W 6.05 W 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1996 Withdrawals 1974-1996 Net Withdrawals 1973-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 4,410

  14. Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10.05 8.22 4.11 4.01 4.03 NA 1984-2015 Residential 16.48 15.33 14.29 14.55 15.14 14.23 1967-2015 Commercial 14.46 13.33 12.31 12.37 12.89 11.97 1967-2015 Industrial 12.13 10.98 9.78 9.04 10.27 9.26 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 11.71 8.61 16.32 1990-2012 Electric Power 5.45 5.10 3.98 5.84 W W 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1996 Withdrawals 1973-1996 Net Withdrawals 1973-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 468 430 517 624 0 1980-2014

  15. South Carolina Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6.17 5.67 4.57 5.11 5.22 3.90 1984-2015 Residential 13.01 12.93 13.25 12.61 12.65 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 10.34 9.68 8.67 9.10 9.55 8.37 1967-2015 Industrial 6.12 5.60 4.30 5.27 6.13 4.39 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 11.16 8.85 9.77 1994-2012 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1975 Withdrawals 1973-1975 Net Withdrawals 1973-1975 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 1,360 1,386 391 879 1,371 1980-2014 Withdrawals 1,574

  16. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  17. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  18. Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  19. Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  20. Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  1. Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  2. Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  3. US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  4. Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground

  5. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  6. Adaptive control system for gas producing wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedor, Pashchenko; Sergey, Gulyaev; Alexander, Pashchenko

    2015-03-10

    Optimal adaptive automatic control system for gas producing wells cluster is proposed intended for solving the problem of stabilization of the output gas pressure in the cluster at conditions of changing gas flow rate and changing parameters of the wells themselves, providing the maximum high resource of hardware elements of automation.

  7. Horizontal well replaces hydraulic fracturing in North Sea gas well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Seymour, K.P. )

    1991-11-25

    This paper reports on excessive water production from hydraulically fractured wells in a poor quality reservoir in the North SEa which prompted the drilling of a horizontal well. Gas production from the horizontal well reached six times that of the offset vertical wells, and no water production occurred. This horizontal well proved commercial the western section of the Anglia field. Horizontal drilling in the North SEa is as an effective technology to enhance hydrocarbon recovery from reservoirs that previously had proven uncommercial with other standard techniques. It is viable for the development of marginal reservoirs, particularly where conditions preclude stimulation from hydraulic fracturing.

  8. Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From

  9. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  10. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  11. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  12. Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  13. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  14. New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  15. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  16. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  17. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  18. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  19. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  20. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  1. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  2. Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  3. Maximize revenue from gas condensate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, S.R.

    1988-07-01

    A computerized oil/gas modeling program called C.O.M.P. allows operators to select the economically optimum producing equipment for a given gas-condensate well-stream. This article, the first of two, discusses use of the model to analyze performance of six different production system on the same wellstream and at the same wellhead conditions. All producing equipment options are unattended wellhead facilities designed for high volume gas-condensate wells and are not gas plants. A second article to appear in September will discuss operating experience with one of the producing systems analyzed, integrated multi-stage separation with stabilization and compression (the HERO system), which was developed by U.S. Enertek, Inc. This equipment was chosen for the wellstream analyzed because of the potential revenue increase indicated by the model.

  4. GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John K. Godwin

    2005-12-01

    Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

  5. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells (Summary)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2,869,960 3,958,315 5,817,122 8,500,983 10,532,858 11,896,204 2007-2013 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2013 Alabama 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2013 Arizona 0 0 0 0 0 0...

  6. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells (Summary)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2007-2015 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 Alabama NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 Arizona NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015 Arkansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2015...

  7. Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply...

  8. Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: April 3, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second underground nuclear test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation, at what

  9. Maximize revenue from gas condensate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, S.R. )

    1988-09-01

    A computerized oil/gas modeling program called C.O.M.P. was used to analyze comparative recovery, losses and revenues from six different producing systems on a given wellstream as tested on initial completion. A multi-stage separation/stabilization/compression system (HERO system) manufactured by U.S. Enertek, Inc., was subsequently installed to produce the well, plus five other wells in the immediate area. This article compares theoretical gains forecast by the modeling program with actual gains recorded during later testing of the same well with a two-stage separation hookup and the multi-stage unit. The test using two-stage separation was run as a basis for comparison. Operating temperatures and pressures for each test are shown.

  10. Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 0 0 1980's 0 0 0 3,986 18,920 31,227 27,279 23,425 17,931 12,246 1990's 15,640 16,464 13,947 10,618 11,064 7,874 5,508 4,260 3,966 2,775 2000's 7,323 3,913 3,080 1,731 850 684 2,094 2,137 1,601 1,206 2010's 1,757 1,560 14,559 14,296 13,988 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  11. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0...

  12. Natural Gas: A Preliminary Summary 1998

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    This special report provides preliminary natural gas data for 1998 which were reported on monthly surveys of the industry through December.

  13. Natural Gas: A Preliminary Summary 1999

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This special report provides preliminary natural gas data for 1999 which were reported on monthly surveys of the industry through December.

  14. First AEO2015 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 August 8, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS FROM: ANGELINA LAROSE TEAM LEAD NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAM JOHN STAUB TEAM LEAD EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ANALYSIS TEAM EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION and NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAMS SUBJECT: First AEO2015 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on August 7, 2014) Attendees: Tien Nguyen (DOE) Joseph Benneche (EIA) Dana Van Wagener (EIA)* Troy Cook (EIA)* Angelina LaRose (EIA) Laura Singer (EIA) Michael

  15. AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 August 12, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS FROM: ANGELINA LAROSE TEAM LEAD NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAM JOHN STAUB TEAM LEAD EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ANALYSIS TEAM EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION and NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAMS SUBJECT: First AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on July 25, 2013) Attendees: Anas Alhajji (NGP)* Samuel Andrus (IHS)* Emil Attanasi (USGS)* Andre Barbe (Rice University) David J. Barden (self) Joseph

  16. Second AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 November 12, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS FROM: ANGELINA LAROSE TEAM LEAD NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAM JOHN STAUB TEAM LEAD EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ANALYSIS TEAM EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION and NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAMS SUBJECT: Second AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary (presented September 26, 2013) Attendees: Robert Anderson (DOE) Peter Balash (NETL)* David Bardin (self) Joe Benneche (EIA) Philip Budzik (EIA) Kara Callahan

  17. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...10US3","N3020US3","N3035US3","N3045US3" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic ...

  18. Geothermal reservoir well stimulation program. Final program summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Eight field experiments and the associated theoretical and laboratory work performed to develop the stimulation technology are described. A discussion of the pre-stimulation and post-stimulation data and their evaluation is provided for each experiment. Overall results have shown that stimulation is viable where adequate reservoirs are penetrated by wells encountering formation damage or locally tight formation zones. Seven of the eight stimulation experiments were at least technically successful in stimulating the wells. The two fracture treatments in East Mesa 58-30 more than doubled the producing rate of the previously marginal producer. The two fracture treatments at Raft River and the two at Baca were all successful in obtaining significant production from previously nonproductive intervals. However, these treatments failed to establish commercial production due to deficiencies in either fluid temperature or reservoir transmissivity. The Beowawe chemical stimulation treatment appears to have significantly improved the well's injectivity, but production data were not obtained because of well mechanical problems. The acid etching treatment in the well at the Geysers did not have any material effect on producing rate. Evaluations of the field experiments to date have suggested improvements in treatment design and treatment interval selection which offer substantial encouragement for future stimulation work.

  19. U.S. Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wellhead NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2015 Imports 2.66 2.74 2.75 3.23 2.40 2.28 1989-2015 By Pipeline 2.44 2.51 2.49 2.37 2.19 2.13 1997-2015 As Liquefied Natural Gas 4.53 3.45 6.03 12.38 4.20 4.02 1997-2015 Exports 3.06 3.09 2.92 2.73 2.63 2.57 1989-2015 By Pipeline 2.96 2.99 2.84 2.66 2.35 2.30 1997-2015 As Liquefied Natural Gas 8.10 7.91 7.17 6.53 16.67 15.95 1997-2015 Citygate 4.65 4.58 4.54 4.00 3.68

  20. U.S. Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    48 3.95 2.66 NA NA NA 1922-2015 Imports 4.52 4.24 2.88 3.83 5.30 3.24 1985-2015 By Pipeline 4.46 4.09 2.79 3.73 5.21 2.84 1985-2015 As Liquefied Natural Gas 4.94 5.63 4.27 6.80 8.85 7.37 1985-2015 Exports 5.02 4.64 3.25 4.08 5.51 3.07 1985-2015 By Pipeline 4.75 4.35 3.08 4.06 5.40 2.94 1985-2015 As Liquefied Natural Gas 9.53 10.54 12.82 13.36 15.66 10.92 1985-2015 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.18 5.63 4.73 4.88 5.71 4.25 1973-2015 Residential 11.39 11.03 10.65 10.32 10.97

  1. Table 6.4 Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well Productivity, 1960-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well Productivity, 1960-2011 Year Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals From Crude Oil, Natural Gas, Coalbed, and Shale Gas Wells Natural Gas Well Productivity Texas 1 Louisiana 1 Oklahoma Other States 1 Federal Gulf of Mexico 2 Total Onshore Offshore Total Gross With- drawals From Natural Gas Wells 3 Producing Wells 4 Average Productivity Federal State Total Million Cubic Feet Million Cubic Feet Million Cubic Feet Number Cubic Feet per Well 1960 6,964,900

  2. Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Feet per Well) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

  3. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3 1990's 5 6 6 6 6 7 7 8 8 8 2000's 9 8 7 9 6 6 7 7 6 6 2010's 5 5 5 5 5 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  4. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1,482,053 1,363,737...

  5. US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  6. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  7. Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... for Improved Enhanced Oil Recovery Technique Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site New Breathalyzer Offers Hope of Pain-Free Diabetes Monitoring

  8. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Thousand Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources...

  9. Dewatering of coalbed methane wells with hydraulic gas pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amani, M.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C.

    1995-12-31

    The coalbed methane industry has become an important source of natural gas production. Proper dewatering of coalbed methane (CBM) wells is the key to efficient gas production from these reservoirs. This paper presents the Hydraulic Gas Pump as a new alternative dewatering system for CBM wells. The Hydraulic Gas Pump (HGP) concept offers several operational advantages for CBM wells. Gas interference does not affect its operation. It resists solids damage by eliminating the lift mechanism and reducing the number of moving parts. The HGP has a flexible production rate and is suitable for all production phases of CBM wells. It can also be designed as a wireline retrievable system. We conclude that the Hydraulic Gas Pump is a suitable dewatering system for coalbed methane wells.

  10. Table 1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, 2010-2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, 2010-2014 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year 487,627 514,637 482,822 R 484,994 514,786 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,247,498 12,291,070 12,504,227 R 10,759,545 10,384,119 From Oil Wells 5,834,703 5,907,919 4,965,833 R 5,404,699 5,922,088 From Coalbed Wells 1,916,762 1,779,055 1,539,395 R 1,425,783 1,285,189 From Shale Gas Wells 5,817,122 8,500,983

  11. Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,700 1990's 2,607 2,802 2,890 3,075 2,940 2,918 2,990 3,071 3,423 3,634 2000's 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 5,751 6,578 6,925 7,095 7,031 2010's 6,059 6,477 6,240 5,754 5,754 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  12. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 17,087 1990's 17,124 20,021 18,040 20,846 23,292 23,510 24,134 27,421 28,200 26,007 2000's 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 40,157 41,634 42,644 44,241 44,784 2010's 44,748 32,302 28,206 27,073 27,957 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  13. California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,214 1990's 1,162 1,377 1,126 1,092 1,261 997 978 930 847 1,152 2000's 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 1,356 1,451 1,540 1,645 1,643 2010's 1,580 1,308 1,423 1,335 1,118 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  14. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 13,935 1990's 16,980 17,948 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 21,500 21,000 17,568 2000's 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 18,946 19,713 19,713 17,862 21,243 2010's 22,145 25,758 24,697 23,792 24,354 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  15. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

    1993-03-09

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  16. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, Carol T.; Bender, Donald A.; Bowman, Barry R.; Burnham, Alan K.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Comfort, III, William J.; Guymon, Lloyd G.; Henning, Carl D.; Pedersen, Knud B.; Sefcik, Joseph A.; Smith, Joseph A.; Strauch, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  17. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 0 0...

  18. Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  19. US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells ...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  20. Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  1. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  2. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 3,459 3,117...

  3. Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  4. Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  5. Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From

  6. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Summary of Gruy Federal's Well-of-Opportunity Program to January 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Scouting and monitoring techniques peculiar to geopressured-geothermal wells and legal problems are presented. The following are tabulated: priority wells actively monitored, industry contacts, and the summary of industry responses to well-or-opportunity solicitation. (MHR)

  7. Oil and Gas Well Drilling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Oil and Gas Well Drilling Author Jeff Tester Published NA, 2011 DOI Not Provided Check for...

  8. Trip report for field visit to Fayetteville Shale gas wells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-09-30

    This report describes a visit to several gas well sites in the Fayetteville Shale on August 9, 2007. I met with George Sheffer, Desoto Field Manager for SEECO, Inc. (a large gas producer in Arkansas). We talked in his Conway, Arkansas, office for an hour and a half about the processes and technologies that SEECO uses. We then drove into the field to some of SEECO's properties to see first-hand what the well sites looked like. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) made several funding awards under a program called Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil (LINGO). One of the projects that received an award is 'Probabilistic Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems'. The University of Arkansas at Fayetteville has the lead on the project, and Argonne National Laboratory is a partner. The goal of the project is to develop a Web-based decision support tool that will be used by mid- and small-sized oil and gas companies as well as environmental regulators and other stakeholders to proactively minimize adverse ecosystem impacts associated with the recovery of gas reserves in sensitive areas. The project focuses on a large new natural gas field called the Fayetteville Shale. Part of the project involves learning how the natural gas operators do business in the area and the technologies they employ. The field trip on August 9 provided an opportunity to do that.

  9. Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed

  10. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed

  11. Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed

  12. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and

  13. Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Estimated Production 1992-2007 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1,146 1,400 1998-2014 Gross Withdrawals 2,444,102 2,259,144...

  14. 201X EIA-23S Annual Report of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves, Summary Level

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1X EIA-23S Annual Report of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves, Summary Level 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas Washington, DC 20585 OMB Number: 1905-0057 Expiration Date: xx/xx/xxxx Version No.: xxxx.xx Burden: 8 hours ANNUAL REPORT OF DOMESTIC OIL AND GAS RESERVES FORM EIA-23S Summary Level Report Instructions SURVEY YEAR 201X Table of Contents Page General Instructions

  15. Geothermal Well Stimulated Using High Energy Gas Fracturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.Y.; Jacobson, R.D.; Warpinski, N.; Mohaupt, Henry

    1987-01-20

    This paper reports the result of an experimental study of the High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF) technique for geothermal well stimulation. These experiments demonstrated that multiple fractures could be created to link a water-filled borehole with other fractures. The resulting fracture network and fracture interconnections were characterized by flow tests as well as mine back. Commercial oil field fracturing tools were used successfully in these experiments. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  16. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

    2012-03-31

    Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make-up water for successive fracs. RFW, however, contains dissolved salts, suspended sediment and oils that may interfere with fracking fluids and/or clog fractures. This would lead to impaired well productivity. The major technical constraints to recycling RFW involves: identification of its composition, determination of industry standards for make-up water, and development of techniques to treat RFW to acceptable levels. If large scale RFW recycling becomes feasible, the industry will realize lower transportation and disposal costs, environmental conflicts, and risks of interruption in well development schedules.

  17. Serviceability of coiled tubing for sour oil and gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cayard, M.S.; Kane, R.D.

    1996-08-01

    Coiled tubing is an extremely useful tool in many well logging and workover applications in oil and gas production operations. Several important concerns regarding its use include the need for improved guidelines for the assessment of mechanical integrity, fatigue damage, and the effects of hydrogen sulfide in sour oil and gas production environments. This paper provides information regarding the use of coiled tubing in sour environments with particular emphasis on sulfide stress cracking, hydrogen induced cracking and stress-oriented hydrogen induced cracking and how they work synergistically with cyclic cold working of the steel tubing.

  18. Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: June 12, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation at what is now the Rulison, Colorado,

  19. SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version (from ArcGIS 9.0 to ArcGIS 9.2) of the polygon smoothing algorithm described below. A bug that occurred when multiple wells had the same location was also fixed. SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINE POLYGONS MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS Why smooth buffered field outlines? See the issues in the figure below: [pic] The smoothing application provided as VBA code below does the following: Adds area to the concave portions; doesn't

  20. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gas is heavily used for power generation. Such conditions could cause a mid-year spike in prices to above 6 per MMBtu. With high natural gas prices, natural gas demand is...

  1. U.S. Nominal Cost per Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 102.7 94.7 97.1 92.4 104.8 101.9 133.8 141.0 148.5 154.3 1970's 160.7 166.6 157.8 155.3 189.2 262.0 270.4 313.5 374.2 443.1 1980's 536.4 698.6 864.3 608.1 489.8 508.7 522.9 380.4 460.3 457.8 1990's 471.3 506.6 426.1 521.2 535.1 629.7 616.0 728.6 815.6 798.4 2000's 756.9 896.5 991.9

  2. Horizontal underbalanced drilling of gas wells with coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, R.J.; Li, J.; Lupick, G.S.

    1999-03-01

    Coiled tubing drilling technology is gaining popularity and momentum as a significant and reliable method of drilling horizontal underbalanced wells. It is quickly moving into new frontiers. To this point, most efforts in the Western Canadian Basin have been focused towards sweet oil reservoirs in the 900--1300 m true vertical depth (TVD) range, however there is an ever-increasing interest in deeper and gas-producing formations. Significant design challenges on both conventional and coiled tubing drilling operations are imposed when attempting to drill these formations underbalanced. Coiled tubing is an ideal technology for underbalanced drilling due to its absence of drillstring connections resulting in continuous underbalanced capabilities. This also makes it suitable for sour well drilling and live well intervention without the risk of surface releases of reservoir gas. Through the use of pressure deployment procedures it is possible to complete the drilling operation without need to kill the well, thereby maintaining underbalanced conditions right through to the production phase. The use of coiled tubing also provides a means for continuous wireline communication with downhole steering, logging and pressure recording devices.

  3. Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, metric equivalents, 2010-2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, metric equivalents, 2010-2014 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year 487,627 514,637 482,822 R 484,994 514,786 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 375,127 348,044 354,080 R 304,676 294,045 From Oil Wells 165,220 167,294 140,617 R 153,044 167,695 From Coalbed Wells 54,277 50,377 43,591 R 40,374 36,392 From Shale Gas Wells 164,723 240,721 298,257 R 337,891 389,474

  4. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  5. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  6. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2002). Natural gas prices were higher than expected in October as storms in the Gulf of Mexico in late September temporarily shut in some gas production, causing spot prices at...

  7. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    economy. In 2003, natural gas demand growth is expected across all sectors. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, July 2002 History Projections Apr-02 Ma May-02 Jun-02...

  8. New York Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    196 281 253 184 144 143 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 196 271 245 178 138 138 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease...

  9. Modeling coiled-tubing velocity strings for gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, J.; Martinez, A.

    1998-02-01

    Because of its ability to prolong well life, its relatively low expense, and the relative ease with which it is installed, coiled tubing has become a preferred remedial method of tubular completion for gas wells. Of course, the difficulty in procuring wireline-test data is a drawback to verifying the accuracy of the assumptions and predictions used for coiled-tubing selection. This increases the importance of the prediction-making process, and, as a result, places great emphasis on the modeling methods that are used. This paper focuses on the processes and methods for achieving sound multiphase-flow predictions by looking at the steps necessary to arrive at coiled-tubing selection. Furthermore, this paper examines the variables that serve as indicators of the viability of each tubing size, especially liquid holdup. This means that in addition to methodology, emphasis is placed on the use of a good wellbore model. The computer model discussed is in use industry wide.

  10. Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 92 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  11. Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,417 5,166 5,431 1980's 5,900 12,763 17,751 20,182 27,443 33,331 31,799 31,380 31,236 38,545 1990's 34,332 35,391 41,284 41,532 42,497 46,916 61,276 69,084 71,019 75,034 2000's 68,752 67,034 64,735 56,363 53,805 53,404 38,313 43,379 43,300 40,023 2010's 39,444 35,020 12,703

  12. Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 92 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  13. Miscellaneous Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    349 363 393 233 188 185 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 271 353 270 219 169 167 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 78 10 104 7 19 18 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 349 350 379 222 179 17

  14. Mississippi Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    22 858 868 612 600 563 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 884 822 806 550 557 505 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 38 36 62 62 43 58 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 917 853 860 607 595 558

  15. Montana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    93 959 792 616 590 686 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 681 657 522 327 286 361 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 312 302 270 289 304 325 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 976 944 778 602 575 667

  16. Federal Offshore, Pacific (California) Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dec. 31 740 725 711 652 264 243 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 9 3 0 0 0 0 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 731 722 711 652 264 243 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 739 724 710 651 261 240

  17. Florida Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 56 6 16 15 0 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 0 26 4 16 14 0 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 7 30 2 0 1 0 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 7 56 6 16 15 0

  18. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of...

  19. [Fuel substitution of vehicles by natural gas: Summaries of four final technical reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This report contains summary information on three meetings and highlights of a fourth meeting held by the Society of Automotive Engineers on natural gas fueled vehicles. The meetings covered the following: Natural gas engine and vehicle technology; Safety aspects of alternately fueled vehicles; Catalysts and emission control--Meeting the legislative standards; and LNG--Strengthening the links.

  20. Ohio Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    896 832 758 1,235 3,201 7,193 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 799 742 684 1,012 2,887 6,985 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 97 90 74 223 314 208 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 896 832 758 1,233 3,161 6,72

  1. Combination gas producing and waste-water disposal well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malinchak, Raymond M.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a waste-water disposal system for use in a gas recovery well penetrating a subterranean water-containing and methane gas-bearing coal formation. A cased bore hole penetrates the coal formation and extends downwardly therefrom into a further earth formation which has sufficient permeability to absorb the waste water entering the borehole from the coal formation. Pump means are disposed in the casing below the coal formation for pumping the water through a main conduit towards the water-absorbing earth formation. A barrier or water plug is disposed about the main conduit to prevent water flow through the casing except for through the main conduit. Bypass conduits disposed above the barrier communicate with the main conduit to provide an unpumped flow of water to the water-absorbing earth formation. One-way valves are in the main conduit and in the bypass conduits to provide flow of water therethrough only in the direction towards the water-absorbing earth formation.

  2. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    change the pattern of annual demand shifts reported in earlier Outlooks. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, December 2002 History Projections Sep-02 Oct-02 Nov-02...

  3. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to increase because of accelerated economic growth and generally lower prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, October 2003 History Projections Jul-03 Aug-03 Sep-03...

  4. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to increase because of accelerated economic growth and generally lower prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, November 2003 History Projections Aug-03 Sep-03 Oct-03...

  5. Oklahoma Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    24,207 28,182 29,937 28,714 28,900 34,319 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 23,115 26,873 27,683 25,018 24,370 27,358 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1,092 1,309 2,254 3,696 4,530 6,961 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 22,769 26,345 27,830 26,599 26,873 31,778 1977-2014 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 1979-2008

  6. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,018 14,068 26,719 36,543 50,078 60,443 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 6,885 13,924 26,585 36,418 49,809 60,144 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 133 144 134 125 269 299 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 6,985 13,960 26,529 36,348 49,674 59,873 1977-2014 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 1979-1981

  7. Texas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    85,034 94,287 104,454 93,475 97,921 105,955 1981-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 76,272 84,157 90,947 74,442 75,754 79,027 1981-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 8,762 10,130 13,507 19,033 22,167 26,928 1981-2014 Dry Natural Gas 80,424 88,997 98,165 86,924 90,349 97,154 1981-2014 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 1981

  8. Utah Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,411 7,146 8,108 7,775 7,057 6,970 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 6,810 6,515 7,199 6,774 6,162 6,098 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 601 631 909 1,001 895 872 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 7,257 6,981 7,857 7,548 6,829 6,685 1977-2014 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 1979

  9. Louisiana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0,970 29,517 30,545 22,135 20,389 23,258 1981-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 19,898 28,838 29,906 21,362 19,519 22,350 1981-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1,072 679 639 773 870 908 1981-2014 Dry Natural Gas 20,688 29,277 30,358 21,949 20,164 22,975 1981-2014 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 1981

  10. Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2012, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) released a new report, 'Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity.' The study provides a new methodological approach to estimate natural gas related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, tracks trends in regulatory and voluntary industry practices, and explores various electricity futures. The Executive Summary provides key findings, insights, data, and figures from this major study.

  11. Using coiled tubing in HP/HT corrosive gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    High-yield-strength (100,000 psi) coiled tubing (CT) material has allowed for CT intervention in Mobile Bay Norphlet completions. These wells are approximately 22,000-ft-vertical-depth, high-pressure, hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) gas wells. Operations performed on the Norphlet wells include a scale cleanout to approximately 22,000 ft, a hydrochloric acid (HCl) job at 415 F, and buildup removal from a safety valve. The scale cleanout was performed first with a spiral wash tool. The well was killed with 10-lbm/gal sodium bromide (NaBr) brine; the same brine was used for cleanout fluid. Cost savings of 60% were realized. A HCl matrix acid job at 415 F was performed next, followed by a scale cleanout across the downhole safety valve. The safety valve was cleared of debris in 1 operational day. Estimated cost of the CT operation was 5 to 10% less than that of a rig workover. The 100,000-psi-yield Ct material used for the Mobile Bay operations does not comply with the (NACE) Standard MR-0175. But on the basis of extensive laboratory testing by the CT manufacturer, the decision was made that the material would pass a modified test performed with decreased H{sub 2}S levels. A maximum level of 400 ppm H{sub 2}S was determined as the safe working limit. Because the maximum H{sub 2}S content in the wells described later was 120 ppm, the risk of sulfide-stress cracking (SSC) was considered acceptably low. Elevated bottomhole temperatures (BHT`s) increase the corrosion rate of metals exposed to corrosives. Extensive laboratory testing of corrosion inhibitors allowed for design of a matrix-acidizing treatment to remove near-wellbore damage caused by lost zinc bromide (ZnBr) completion brine.

  12. NM, West Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2,086 11,809 11,254 9,720 9,459 9,992 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 12,004 11,704 11,111 9,578 9,322 9,766 1979-2014 Natural Gas...

  13. New Mexico Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6,644 16,529 16,138 14,553 14,567 16,426 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 14,662 14,316 13,586 11,734 11,154 11,743 1979-2014 Natural Gas...

  14. Laser Oil and Gas Well Drilling Demonstration Videos

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    ANL's Laser Applications Laboratory and collaborators are examining the feasibility of adapting high-power laser technology to drilling for gas and oil. The initial phase is designed to establish a scientific basis for developing a commercial laser drilling system and determine the level of gas industry interest in pursuing future research. Using lasers to bore a hole offers an entirely new approach to mechanical drilling. The novel drilling system would transfer light energy from lasers on the surface, down a borehole by a fiber optic bundle, to a series of lenses that would direct the laser light to the rock face. Researchers believe that state-of-the-art lasers have the potential to penetrate rock many times faster than conventional boring technologies - a huge benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Because the laser head does not contact the rock, there is no need to stop drilling to replace a mechanical bit. Moreover, researchers believe that lasers have the ability to melt the rock in a way that creates a ceramic sheath in the wellbore, eliminating the expense of buying and setting steel well casing. A laser system could also contain a variety of downhole sensors, including visual imaging systems that could communicate with the surface through the fiber optic cabling. Earlier studies have been promising, but there is still much to learn. One of the primary objectives of the new study will be to obtain much more precise measurements of the energy requirements needed to transmit light from surface lasers down a borehole with enough power to bore through rocks as much as 20,000 feet or more below the surface. Another objective will be to determine if sending the laser light in sharp pulses, rather than as a continuous stream, could further increase the rate of rock penetration. A third aspect will be to determine if lasers can be used in the presence of drilling fluids. In most wells, thick fluids called "drilling muds" are injected into the borehole to wash out rock cuttings and keep water and other fluids from the underground formations from seeping into the well. The technical challenge will be to determine whether too much laser energy is expended to clear away the fluid where the drilling is occurring. (Copied with editing from http://www.ne.anl.gov/facilities/lal/laser_drilling.html). The demonstration videos, provided here in QuickTime format, are accompanied by patent documents and PDF reports that, together, provide an overall picture of this fascinating project.

  15. Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1992 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1993 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1994 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1995 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1996 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1997 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1998 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  16. Alabama Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,948 2,724 2,570 2,304 1,670 2,121 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,919 2,686 2,522 2,204 1,624 1,980 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 29 38 48 100 46 141 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 2,871 2,629 2,475 2,228 1,597 2,036

  17. Alaska Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,183 8,917 9,511 9,667 7,383 6,805 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1,090 1,021 976 995 955 954 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 8,093 7,896 8,535 8,672 6,428 5,851 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 9,101 8,838 9,424 9,579 7,316 6,745

  18. Arkansas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10,872 14,181 16,374 11,039 13,524 12,795 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 10,852 14,152 16,328 10,957 13,389 12,606 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 20 29 46 82 135 189 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 10,869 14,178 16,370 11,035 13,518 12,789

  19. Michigan Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,805 2,975 2,549 1,781 1,839 1,873 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,728 2,903 2,472 1,687 1,714 1,765 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 77 72 77 94 125 108 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 2,763 2,919 2,505 1,750 1,807 1,845

  20. NM, East Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,558 4,720 4,884 4,833 5,108 6,434 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,658 2,612 2,475 2,156 1,832 1,977 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1,900 2,108 2,409 2,677 3,276 4,457 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 4,141 4,226 4,379 4,386 4,633 5,799

  1. North Dakota Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,213 1,869 2,652 3,974 6,081 6,787 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 143 152 141 105 91 45 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1,070 1,717 2,511 3,869 5,990 6,742 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 1,079 1,667 2,381 3,569 5,420 6,034

  2. North Louisiana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    17,273 26,136 27,411 18,467 17,112 19,837 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 17,220 26,063 27,313 18,385 16,933 19,645 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 53 73 98 82 179 192 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 17,143 26,030 27,337 18,418 17,044 19,722

  3. Virginia Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,091 3,215 2,832 2,579 2,373 2,800 1982-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 3,091 3,215 2,832 2,579 2,373 2,800 1982-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 0 0 0 1982-2014 Dry Natural Gas 3,091 3,215 2,832 2,579 2,373 2,800 1982-2014

  4. California Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,926 2,785 3,042 2,119 2,023 2,260 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 612 503 510 272 247 273 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 2,314 2,282 2,532 1,847 1,776 1,987 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 2,773 2,647 2,934 1,999 1,887 2,107

  5. Colorado Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,081 25,372 26,151 21,674 23,533 21,992 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 22,199 23,001 23,633 18,226 19,253 16,510 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1,882 2,371 2,518 3,448 4,280 5,482 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 23,058 24,119 24,821 20,666 22,381 20,851

  6. Kansas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,500 3,937 3,747 3,557 3,772 4,606 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 3,417 3,858 3,620 3,231 3,339 3,949 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 83 79 127 326 433 657 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 3,279 3,673 3,486 3,308 3,592 4,359

  7. Kentucky Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,919 2,785 2,128 1,515 1,794 1,753 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,887 2,674 2,030 1,422 1,750 1,704 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 32 111 98 93 44 49 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 2,782 2,613 2,006 1,408 1,663 1,611

  8. West Virginia Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6,090 7,163 10,532 14,881 23,209 31,153 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 6,066 7,134 10,480 14,860 23,139 31,121 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 24 29 52 21 70 32 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 5,946 7,000 10,345 14,611 22,765 29,432

  9. Wyoming Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    36,748 36,526 36,930 31,636 34,576 28,787 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 36,386 36,192 36,612 30,930 33,774 27,507 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 362 334 318 706 802 1,280 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 35,283 35,074 35,290 30,094 33,618 27,553

  10. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    levels and 25 percent below the 5-year average. Natural gas prices are likely to stay high as long as above-normal storage injection demand competes with industrial and...

  11. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3.20 per MMBtu, which is about 0.84 higher than last winter's price. Domestic dry natural gas production is projected to fall by about 1.7 percent in 2002 compared with the...

  12. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    this winter is expected to be almost 9 percent higher than last winter, as estimated gas consumption weighted heating degree days during the fourth quarter of 2002 and first...

  13. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and continued increases in demand over 2002 levels. Cold temperatures this past winter led to a record drawdown of storage stocks. By the end of March, estimated working gas...

  14. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    price trend reflects a number of influences, such as unusual weather patterns that have led to increased gas consumption, and tensions in the Middle East and rising crude oil...

  15. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    commercial sector demand are offset by lower demand in the electric power sector. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, September 2003 History Projections Jun-03 Jul-03 Aug-03...

  16. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    by 1.8 percent as the economy continues to expand and prices ease slightly. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, January 2004 History Projections Oct-03 Nov-03 Dec-03...

  17. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of 2005 relative to the first quarter of 2004 and relatively lower fuel oil prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, April 2004 History Projections Jan-04 Feb-04 Mar-04...

  18. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    should relieve some of the potential upward price pressure on the domestic market Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, January 2003 History Projections Oct-02 Nov-02 Dec-02...

  19. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    because of somewhat weaker prices and higher demand in the electric power sector. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, July 2003 History Projections Apr-03 May-03 Jun-03 Jul-03...

  20. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    than those of 2003, when stocks after the winter of 2002-2003 were at record lows. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, December 2003 History Projections Sep-03 Oct-03 Nov-03...

  1. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    power sector eases and relative coal and fuel oil spot prices decline somewhat. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, May 2004 History Projections Feb-04 Mar-04 Apr-04 May-04...

  2. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    demand in the first quarter of 2005 relative to the first quarter of 2004. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, March 2004 History Projections Dec-03 Jan-04 Feb-04...

  3. ,"Illinois Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Summary" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Prices",5,"Monthly","12/2015","1/15/1989" ,"Data 2","Production",10,"Monthly","12/2015","1/15/1991" ,"Data 3","Underground

  4. ,"Iowa Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Summary" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Prices",5,"Monthly","12/2015","1/15/1989" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",7,"Monthly","12/2015","1/15/1990" ,"Data

  5. California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,537 2,134 1980's 2,446 2,170 1,931 1,799 1,319 6,126 5,342 2,068 1,413 855 1990's 340 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 156 312 266 582 2010's 71 259 640 413 431 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  6. Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,428,342 3,725,728 3,902,074 1980's 3,839,367 3,854,440 3,522,247 2,904,722 3,288,820 2,784,091 2,542,447 2,913,949 2,992,004 2,970,536 1990's 3,140,870 2,946,749 2,867,842 2,883,761 2,995,676 2,937,666 3,166,015 3,194,743 3,115,154 3,009,296 2000's 2,919,128 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

  7. Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    [ 6450-01-P ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy

  8. Summary of gas release events detected by hydrogen monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCCAIN, D.J.

    1999-05-18

    This paper summarizes the results of monitoring tank headspace for flammable gas release events. In over 40 tank years of monitoring the largest detected release in a single-shell tank is 2.4 cubic meters of Hydrogen. In the double-shell tanks the largest release is 19.3 cubic meters except in SY-101 pre mixer pump installation condition.

  9. FROZEN HEAT A GLOBAL OUTLOOK ON METHANE GAS HYDRATES EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROZEN HEAT A GLOBAL OUTLOOK ON METHANE GAS HYDRATES EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Beaudoin, Y. C., Boswell, R., Dallimore, S. R., and Waite, W. (eds), 2014. Frozen Heat: A UNEP Global Outlook on Methane Gas Hydrates. United Nations Environment Programme, GRID-Arendal. © United Nations Environment Programme, 2014 This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part and in any form for educational or non-profit purposes without special permission from the copyright holder, provided acknowledgement of the

  10. ,"Nevada Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1991" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  11. ,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1980" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  12. ,"New Jersey Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  13. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data

  14. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  15. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",15,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data

  16. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  17. ,"South Carolina Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  18. ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",13,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 4","Consumption",11,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  19. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Production",11,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data

  20. ,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  1. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data

  2. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data

  3. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data

  4. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  5. ,"Delaware Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  6. ,"Maine Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  7. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Imports and Exports",1,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1999" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data

  8. Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in Monolayer InN Quantum Wells....

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in Monolayer InN Quantum Wells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in Monolayer InN Quantum Wells. Abstract not...

  9. Well-to-Wheels Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Canadian Oil Sands...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Well-to-Wheels Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Canadian Oil Sands Products: Implications for U.S. Petroleum Fuels Title Well-to-Wheels Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Canadian Oil Sands...

  10. Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Well-to-Wheels ... More Documents & Publications Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas ...

  11. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5.85 per MMBtu from July through December, while composite spot prices will likely stay well above 6.00. Spot prices at the Henry Hub averaged 6.34 per MMBtu in May and...

  12. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and 6.00 per MMBtu in the fourth quarter, while composite spot prices will likely stay well above 6.00 through December. Spot prices averaged about 5.35 per MMBtu in the...

  13. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the rest of the winter and perhaps well into spring, with prices averaging 4.90 per MMBtu through March and 4.45 in April (Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2003). Wellhead...

  14. Performance of wells in solution-gas-drive reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camacho-V, R.G. ); Raghavan, R. )

    1989-12-01

    The authors examine buildup responses in solution-gas-drive reservoirs. The development presented here parallels the development for single-phase liquid flow. Analogs from pseudopressures and time transformations are presented and gas-drive-solutions are correlated with appropriate liquid-flow solutions. The influence of the skin region is documented. The basis for the success of the producing GOR method to compute the saturation distribution at shut-in is presented. The consequences of using the Perrine-Martin analog to analyze buildup data are discussed.

  15. ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",13,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016"

  16. ,"New York Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",11,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas

  17. ,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1979" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016"

  18. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",13,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1968" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016"

  19. ,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas

  20. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1922" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1925" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1900" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",6,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1935" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas

  1. ,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016"

  2. ,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",12,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",1,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",6,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas

  3. ,"California Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas

  4. ,"Georgia Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",1,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1999" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016"

  5. ,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016"

  6. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",13,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016"

  7. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas

  8. ,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",1,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016"

  9. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016"

  10. ,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016"

  11. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 72,328 63,451 67,732 63,118 62,276 59,557 61,217 60,722 59,142 65,119 67,627 70,643 1992 66,374 62,007 65,284 63,487 63,488 60,701 62,949 63,036 61,442 66,259 65,974 68,514 1993 66,943 61,161 64,007 60,709 61,964 63,278 60,746 62,204 59,969 64,103 63,410 70,929 1994 65,551 60,458 63,396 60,438 60,965 61,963 60,675 62,160

  12. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  13. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled ...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  14. Serviceability of coiled tubing for sour oil and gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) can reduce useful coiled-tubing (CT) life by strength degradation through a combination of hydrogen blistering, hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), stress-oriented hydrogen-induced cracking (SOHIC), sulfide-stress cracking (SSC), and possible weight-loss corrosion. These effects may work synergistically with the cyclic cold working of the steel that takes place during spooling and running. Prior studies on carbon steels have shown that cold work may significantly reduce the SSC threshold stresses. To develop a CT performance database, CLI Intl. Inc. conducted a multiclient program to increase understanding of the combined effects of strain cycling and resistance of CT to cracking in H{sub 2}S environments. The program was supported by 14 sponsors consisting of major oil and gas companies, service companies, CT manufacturers, and materials suppliers.

  15. Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009...

  16. Microsoft Word - RUL_3Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_18Wells.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells near the Project Rulison Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 13 July 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom hole locations (BHLs) of the 18 gas wells sampled are within 1.1 miles of the Project Rulison detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background:

  17. Summary of the chemical characteristics of the HGP-A well; Puna, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The HGP-A geothermal well is located on the Lower East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano. It was completed in 1976 to a depth of 1966 meters and has a bottomhole temperature of 360/sup 0/C. Evaluation of the chemistry of the fluids produced indicate that recharge to the reservoir discovered by the HGP-A well is largely fresh meteoric water with smaller amounts of seawater recharge. The changes in fluid chemistry during production suggest that at least two separate aquifers are providing fluids to the well and that silica deposition is occurring in the reservoir formation. Isotopic data indicate that the fluid circulation and residence times in the reservoir are relatively short and that the heat source for this part of the rift zone is either very young or relatively large.

  18. Lightweight proppants for deep gas well stimulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutler, R.A.; Ratsep, O.; Johnson, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    The need exists for lower density, less expensive proppants for use in hydraulic fracturing treatments. Ceramics, fabricated as fully sintered or hollow spheres, are the best materials for obtaining economical proppants due to their chemical/thermal stability and high strength. This report summarizes work performed during the fourth and final year of a Department of Energy research program to develop improved proppants for hydraulic fracturing applications. Hollow proppants with strengths intermediate between sand and bauxite were fabricated by spray drying. A counter current spray drying technique using a single fluid nozzle was able to make spherical ceramic proppants. The effect of spray-drying parameters on proppant strength is discussed. Further optimization of spray drying parameters is needed to achieve proppants with single, concentric voids and thick walls. Novel techniques for densifying proppants were investigated including plasma, microwave and radio frequency induction heating. Densification times were two orders of magnitude faster than conventional sintering cycles. The problems associated with ultrarapid densification are discussed as well as areas where this type of processing should be applied. A method of strengthening sand and other low strength proppants is discussed. Residual compressive surface stresses can be induced which strengthen the proppants which fail in tension. Accomplishments during the present research program are reviewed and areas of additional research which will lead to improved proppants are identified. 20 references, 23 figures, 19 tables.

  19. Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  20. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 475,614 500,196 1993...

  1. US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  2. U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Developmental Wells (Thousand...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  3. U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory Wells (Thousand...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's...

  4. Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells The patented system delivers continuous electromagnetic data on the reservoir conditions, enabling economical and effective monitoring and analysis. April 3, 2012 One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas

  5. Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and slim well

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    drilling | Department of Energy Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and slim well drilling Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and slim well drilling DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: Discover a blind, low-moderate temperature resource: Apply a combination of detailed sub-soil gas, hydrocarbon, and isotope data to define possible upflow areas; Calibrate the sub-soil chemistry with down-hole fluid inclusion

  6. Microsoft Word - RUL_1Q2009_Gas_Samp_Results_6wells_22Jan09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    09 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 22 January 2009 Purpose: The purpose of this environmental sample collection is to monitor natural gas and production water from natural gas wells drilled near the Project Rulison test site. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) directive to protect human health and the environment, samples are collected from producing gas wells and analyzed to ensure no Rulison related radionuclides have

  7. Microsoft Word - RUL_1Q2011_Gas_Samp_Results_7Wells

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    31 March 2011 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom-hole locations (BHLs) of the seven gas wells sampled are between 0.75 and 0.90 mile from the Project Rulison detonation point. All wells sampled are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from tight sandstone formations. On 10 September 1969, a

  8. Microsoft Word - RUL_2Q2011_Gas_Samp_Results_7Wells_23June2011

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    23 June 2011 Purpose: The purpose of this environmental sample collection is to monitor natural gas and production water from natural gas wells drilled near the Project Rulison test site. As part of the DOE's directive to protect human health and the environment, sample are collected and analyzed from producing gas wells to ensure no Rulison related radionuclides have migrated outside the DOE institution control boundary. Using the DOE Rulison Monitoring Plan as guidance, samples are collected

  9. New and existing gas wells promise bountiful LPG output in Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Michigan remains the leading LP-gas producer in the Northeast quadrant of the U.S. This paper reports that boosted by a number of new natural gas wells and a couple of new gas processing plants, the state is firmly anchored in the butane/propane production business. Since 1981, more than 100 deep gas wells, most in excess of 8000 feet in depth, have been completed as indicated producers in the state. Many of these are yielding LPG-grade stock. So, combined with LPG-grade production from shallower geologic formations, the supply picture in this area looks promising for the rest of the country.

  10. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 NA NA 2010's NA NA NA 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals

  11. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 NA NA 2010's NA NA NA 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals

  12. Microsoft Word - RBL_3Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_3Wells

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    near the Project Rio Blanco Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 13 September 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor natural gas wells for radionuclides from Project Rio Blanco. The bottom-hole locations (BHLs) of the 3 gas wells sampled are within 1.4 miles of the Project Rio Blanco detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Mesaverde Group. Background: Project Rio

  13. Drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells in an H/sub 2/S environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dosch, M.W.; Hodgson, S.F.

    1981-01-01

    The following subjects are covered: facts about hydrogen sulfides; drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells; detection devices and protective equipment; hazard levels and safety procedures; first aid; and H/sub 2/S in California oil, gas, and geothermal fields. (MHR)

  14. Table 4.5 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells, 1949-2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells, 1949-2010 Year Wells Drilled Successful Wells Footage Drilled 1 Average Footage Drilled Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Number Percent Thousand Feet Feet per Well 1949 21,352 3,363 12,597 37,312 66.2 79,428 12,437 43,754 135,619 3,720 3,698 3,473 3,635 1950 23,812 3,439 14,799 42,050 64.8 92,695 13,685 50,977 157,358 3,893 3,979 3,445

  15. Table 4.6 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory Wells, 1949-2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory Wells, 1949-2010 Year Wells Drilled Successful Wells Footage Drilled 1 Average Footage Drilled Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Number Percent Thousand Feet Feet per Well 1949 1,406 424 7,228 9,058 20.2 5,950 2,409 26,439 34,798 4,232 5,682 3,658 3,842 1950 1,583 431 8,292 10,306 19.5 6,862 2,356 30,957 40,175 4,335 5,466 3,733 3,898 1951 1,763 454 9,539

  16. Table 4.7 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Development Wells, 1949-2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Development Wells, 1949-2010 Year Wells Drilled Successful Wells Footage Drilled 1 Average Footage Drilled Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Number Percent Thousand Feet Feet per Well 1949 19,946 2,939 5,369 28,254 81.0 73,478 10,028 17,315 100,821 3,684 3,412 3,225 3,568 1950 22,229 3,008 6,507 31,744 79.5 85,833 11,329 20,020 117,183 3,861 3,766 3,077 3,691 1951 21,416

  17. Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Vehicles | Department of Energy Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Presented at the U.S. Department of EnergyLight Duty Vehicle Workshop in Washington, D.C. on July 26, 2010. PDF icon wtw_analysis_phevs.pdf More Documents & Publications Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles System

  18. Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

    2006-09-01

    This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  19. Transient aspects of unloading oil and gas wells with coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, H.

    1995-12-31

    Unloading oil and gas wells with coiled tubing (CT) conveyed nitrogen circulation is a transient process in which the original heavier fluid in a wellbore is displaced by nitrogen and lighter reservoir fluid. The transient aspects need to be considered when determining nitrogen volume and operation time for unloading a well. A computer wellbore simulator has been developed and used to study the transient effects. The simulator includes transient multiphase mass transport and takes into account the different fluids in the wellbore and from the reservoir. The simulator also includes the gas rise in the wellbore liquid below the CT and can be used for gas well unloading. The transient results of oil and gas well unloading are presented. The effects of CT size and depth, workover fluid, and nitrogen rate and volume on unloading are discussed. Unlike continuous gas lift, the total gas volume needed and the operation time in an unloading process can only be determined and optimized based on a transient analysis.

  20. In situ experiments of geothermal well stimulation using gas fracturing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.Y.; Warpinski, N.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1988-07-01

    The results of an experimental study of gas fracturing technology for geothermal well stimulation demonstrated that multiple fractures could be created to link water-filled boreholes with existing fractures. The resulting fracture network and fracture interconnections were characterized by mineback as well as flow tests. Commercial oil field fracturing tools were used successfully in these experiments. Simple scaling laws for gas fracturing and a brief discussion of the application of this technique to actual geothermal well stimulation are presented. 10 refs., 42 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. NEW AND NOVEL FRACTURE STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE REVITALIZATION OF EXISTING GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-12-01

    Gas storage wells are prone to continued deliverability loss at a reported average rate of 5% per annum (in the U.S.). This is a result of formation damage due to the introduction of foreign materials during gas injection, scale deposition and/or fines mobilization during gas withdrawal, and even the formation and growth of bacteria. As a means to bypass this damage and sustain/enhance well deliverability, several new and novel fracture stimulation technologies were tested in gas storage fields across the U.S. as part of a joint U.S. Department of Energy and Gas Research Institute R&D program. These new technologies include tip-screenout fracturing, hydraulic fracturing with liquid CO{sub 2} and proppant, extreme overbalance fracturing, and high-energy gas fracturing. Each of these technologies in some way address concerns with fracturing on the part of gas storage operators, such as fracture height growth, high permeability formations, and fluid sensitivity. Given the historical operator concerns over hydraulic fracturing in gas storage wells, plus the many other unique characteristics and resulting stimulation requirements of gas storage reservoirs (which are described later), the specific objective of this project was to identify new and novel fracture stimulation technologies that directly address these concerns and requirements, and to demonstrate/test their potential application in gas storage wells in various reservoir settings across the country. To compare these new methods to current industry deliverability enhancement norms in a consistent manner, their application was evaluated on a cost per unit of added deliverability basis, using typical non-fracturing well remediation methods as the benchmark and considering both short-term and long-term deliverability enhancement results. Based on the success (or lack thereof) of the various fracture stimulation technologies investigated, guidelines for their application, design and implementation have been developed. A final research objective was to effectively deploy the knowledge and experience gained from the project to the gas storage industry at-large.

  2. Well-to-Wheels Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Canadian Oil Sands Products:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Implications for U.S. Petroleum Fuels | Argonne National Laboratory Well-to-Wheels Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Canadian Oil Sands Products: Implications for U.S. Petroleum Fuels Title Well-to-Wheels Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Canadian Oil Sands Products: Implications for U.S. Petroleum Fuels Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2015 Authors Cai, H, Brandt, AR, Yeh, S, Englander, JG, Han, J, Elgowainy, A, M.Q., W Journal Environmental Science & Technology Volume 49 Start

  3. Microsoft Word - RUL_4Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_8Wells

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    the Project Rulison Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 21 October 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom hole locations (BHLs) of the 8 gas wells sampled are within 0.75 and 1.0 mile of the Project Rulison detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second

  4. Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles | Department of Energy This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for recharging plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs. PDF icon Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles More

  5. Application of new and novel fracture stimulation technologies to enhance the deliverability of gas storage wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Based on the information presented in this report, our conclusions regarding the potential for new and novel fracture stimulation technologies to enhance the deliverability of gas storage wells are as follows: New and improved gas storage well revitalization methods have the potential to save industry on the order of $20-25 million per year by mitigating deliverability decline and reducing the need for costly infill wells Fracturing technologies have the potential to fill this role, however operators have historically been reluctant to utilize this approach due to concerns with reservoir seal integrity. With advanced treatment design tools and methods, however, this risk can be minimized. Of the three major fracturing classifications, namely hydraulic, pulse and explosive, two are believed to hold potential to gas storage applications (hydraulic and pulse). Five particular fracturing technologies, namely tip-screenout fracturing, fracturing with liquid carbon dioxide, and fracturing with gaseous nitrogen, which are each hydraulic methods, and propellant and nitrogen pulse fracturing, which are both pulse methods, are believed to hold potential for gas storage applications and will possibly be tested as part of this project. Field evidence suggests that, while traditional well remediation methods such as blowing/washing, mechanical cleaning, etc. do improve well deliverability, wells are still left damaged afterwards, suggesting that considerable room for further deliverability enhancement exists. Limited recent trials of hydraulic fracturing imply that this approach does in fact provide superior deliverability results, but further RD&D work is needed to fully evaluate and demonstrate the benefits and safe application of this as well as other fracture stimulation technologies.

  6. Executive Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Executive Summary September 2015 Quadrennial Technology Review ES Executive Summary ES Executive Summary Introduction The United States is in the midst of an energy revolution. Over the last decade, the United States has slashed net petroleum imports, dramatically increased shale gas production, scaled up wind and solar power, and cut the growth in electricity consumption to nearly zero through widespread efficiency measures. Emerging advanced energy technologies provide a rich set of options to

  7. Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison third Quarter 2015

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 November 2015 Doc. No. S13372 Page 1 of 6 Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: June 22, 2015 Background Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below ground surface in the Williams

  8. Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison, 2nd Quarter, Fiscal Year 2015

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2nd Quarter FY 2015, Rulison Site October 2015 Doc. No. S13368 Page 1 of 6 Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison, 2nd Quarter, Fiscal Year 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: March 31, 2015 Background Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet

  9. Utilization of endless coiled tubing and nitrogen gas in geothermal well system maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McReynolds, A.S.; Maxson, H.L.

    1980-09-01

    The use of endless coiled tubing and nitrogen gas combine to offer efficient means of initiating and maintaining geothermal and reinjection well productivity. Routine applications include initial flashing of wells in addition to the surging of the formation by essentially the same means to increase production rates. Various tools can be attached to the tubing for downhole measurement purposes whereby the effectiveness of the tools is enhanced by this method of introduction to the well bore. Remedial work such as scale and fill removal can also be accomplished in an efficient manner by using the tubing as a work string and injecting various chemicals in conjunction with specialized tools to remedy downhole problems.

  10. Installation of 2 7/8-in. coiled-tubing tailpipes in live gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.A.; Bayes, K.P.

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes a technique for installing 2 7/8-in. coiled tubing as tailpipe extensions below existing production packers in live gas wells. It also covers the use of coiled tubing as a way to complete wells. Large savings in rig time and deferred production have been realized with this technique. Fluid losses to the formation do not occur, and no expensive rig time is needed to kill or clean up the wells, as required for conventional workovers below existing production packers. This technique is particularly applicable in depleted reservoirs that could be impaired by traditional workover methods.

  11. Stopping a water crossflow in a sour-gas producing well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hello, Y. Le; Woodruff, J.

    1998-09-01

    Lacq is a sour-gas field in southwest France. After maximum production of 774 MMcf/D in the 1970`s, production is now 290 MMcf/D, with a reservoir pressure of 712 psi. Despite the loss of pressure, production is maintained by adapting the surface equipment and well architecture to reservoir conditions. The original 5-in. production tubing is being replaced with 7-in. tubing to sustain production rates. During openhole cleaning, the casing collapsed in Well LA141. The primary objective was to plug all possible hydraulic communication paths into the lower zones. The following options were available: (1) re-entering the well from the top and pulling the fish before setting cement plugs; (2) sidetracking the well; and (3) drilling a relief well to intercept Well LA141 above the reservoirs. The decision was made to start with the first option and switch to a sidetrack if this option failed.

  12. Successful removal of zinc sulfide scale restriction from a hot, deep, sour gas well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenrick, A.J.; Ali, S.A.

    1997-07-01

    Removal of zinc sulfide scale with hydrochloric acid from a hot, deep, Norphlet Sandstone gas well in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a 29% increase in the production rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near-wellbore area. The presence of zinc sulfide is explained by the production of 25 ppm H{sub 2}S gas, and the loss of 50--100 bbl of zinc bromide fluid to the formation. Although zinc sulfide scale has been successfully removed with hydrochloric acid in low-to-moderate temperature wells, no analogous treatment data were available for high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) Norphlet wells. Therefore laboratory testing was initiated to identify suitable acid systems for scale removal, and select a high quality corrosion inhibitor that would mitigate detrimental effects of the selected acid on downhole tubulars and surface equipment. This case history presents the first successful use of hydrochloric acid in removing zinc sulfide scale from a HTHP Norphlet sour gas well.

  13. Demonstration of the enrichment of medium quality gas from gob wells through interactive well operating practices. Final report, June--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackburn, S.T.; Sanders, R.G.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.; Stevenson, J.W.; Mills, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Methane released to the atmosphere during coal mining operations is believed to contribute to global warming and represents a waste of a valuable energy resource. Commercial production of pipeline-quality gob well methane through wells drilled from the surface into the area above the gob can, if properly implemented, be the most effective means of reducing mine methane emissions. However, much of the gas produced from gob wells is vented because the quality of the gas is highly variable and is often below current natural gas pipeline specifications. Prior to the initiation of field-testing required to further understand the operational criteria for upgrading gob well gas, a preliminary evaluation and assessment was performed. An assessment of the methane gas in-place and producible methane resource at the Jim Walter Resources, Inc. No. 4 and No. 5 Mines established a potential 15-year supply of 60 billion cubic feet of mien methane from gob wells, satisfying the resource criteria for the test site. To understand the effect of operating conditions on gob gas quality, gob wells producing pipeline quality (i.e., < 96% hydrocarbons) gas at this site will be operated over a wide range of suction pressures. Parameters to be determined will include absolute methane quantity and methane concentration produced through the gob wells; working face, tailgate and bleeder entry methane levels in the mine; and the effect on the economics of production of gob wells at various levels of methane quality. Following this, a field demonstration will be initiated at a mine where commercial gob gas production has not been attempted. The guidelines established during the first phase of the project will be used to design the production program. The economic feasibility of various utilization options will also be tested based upon the information gathered during the first phase. 41 refs., 41 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Dollars per Foot) Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 61.83 60.39 61.71 58.22 58.11 59.64 64.51 66.84 67.56 67.15 1970's 68.42 65.82 68.82 70.65 83.31 97.34 100.66 109.49 123.76 136.64 1980's 142.52 159.51 173.34 127.81 106.27 108.09 107.90 80.21 92.78 93.63 1990's 93.23 97.86

  15. Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Principal Investigator Will Gosnold University of North Dakota Low Temperature Demonstration Projects May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Insert photo of your choice 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov - Timeline * Start date: 1/29/2010 * End date: 1/31/2013 * Percent complete: ~ 5% - Budget * Total project funding: $3,467, 057 * DOE

  16. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  17. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  18. U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Thousand Dollars per Well) Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 54.9 54.5 58.6 55.0 55.8 60.6 68.4 72.9 81.5 88.6 1970's 94.9 94.7 106.4 117.2 138.7 177.8 191.6 227.2 280.0 331.4 1980's 367.7 453.7 514.4 371.7 326.5 349.4 364.6 279.6 354.7 362.2 1990's 383.6 421.5 382.6 426.8 483.2

  19. U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dollars per Well) Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 261.1 256.2 271.8 252.4 252.2 269.1 295.1 305.1 327.0 338.7 1970's 344.6 327.6 352.8 367.8 399.5 467.9 476.7 531.4 611.8 668.8 1980's 680.4 767.4 820.0 570.1 482.5 501.2 511.7 382.0 468.6 461.1 1990's 470.2 499.1 442.9 482.9

  20. Well-To-Wheels Energy and Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ii This page intentionally left blank. iii CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ........................................................................................................ xi NOTATION .............................................................................................................................. xiii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ...................................................................................................... 1 ES.1 CD Operation of Gasoline PHEVs and BEVs

  1. LA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    728 386 519 519 420 341 1981-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 215 279 468 391 332 273 1981-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 513 107 51 128 88 68 1981-2014 Dry Natural Gas 701 371 502 502 402 327 1981-2014 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 1981

  2. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 3 OF 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energys Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

  3. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 1 OF 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energys Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

  4. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 2 OF 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energys Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

  5. Shallow gas well drilling with coiled tubing in the San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, R.G.; Ovitz, R.W.; Guild, G.J.; Biggs, M.D.

    1996-12-31

    Coiled tubing is being utilized to drill new wells, for re-entry drilling to deepen or laterally extend existing wells, and for underbalanced drilling to prevent formation damage. Less than a decade old, coiled tubing drilling technology is still in its inaugral development stage. Initially, utilizing coiled tubing was viewed as a {open_quotes}science project{close_quotes} to determine the validity of performing drilling operations in-lieu of the conventional rotary rig. Like any new technology, the initial attempts were not always successful, but did show promise as an economical alternative if continued efforts were made in the refinement of equipment and operational procedures. A multiwell project has been completed in the San Juan Basin of Northwestern New Mexico which provides documentation indicating that coiled tubing can be an alternative to the conventional rotary rig. A 3-well pilot project, a 6-well project was completed uniquely utilizing the combined resources of a coiled tubing service company, a producing company, and a drilling contractor. This combination of resources aided in the refinement of surface equipment, personnel, mud systems, jointed pipe handling, and mobilization. The results of the project indicate that utilization of coiled tubing for the specific wells drilled was an economical alternative to the conventional rotary rig for drilling shallow gas wells.

  6. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William B.

    1997-01-01

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation.

  7. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, W.B. III

    1997-05-27

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie`s Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. 7 figs.

  8. U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Thousand Feet) Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 34,798 1950's 40,175 49,344 55,615 60,664 59,601 69,206 74,337 69,181 61,484 63,253 1960's 55,831 54,442 53,616 53,485 55,497 49,204 55,709 47,839 50,958 57,466 1970's 43,530 41,895 44,956 45,618 51,315 54,677 53,617 57,949 65,197 63,096 1980's 74,288 101,808 88,856 69,690 80,853

  9. U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Dollars per Foot) Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 13.01 12.85 13.31 12.69 12.86 13.44 14.95 15.97 16.83 17.56 1970's 18.84 19.03 20.76 22.50 28.93 36.99 40.46 46.81 56.63 67.70 1980's 77.02 94.30 108.73 83.34 71.90 75.35 76.88 58.71 70.23 73.55 1990's 76.07 82.64 70.27 75.30 79.49 87.22

  10. U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 18.57 17.65 18.10 17.19 18.57 18.35 21.75 23.05 24.05 25.58 1970's 26.75 27.70 27.78 27.46 34.11 46.23 49.78 57.57 68.37 80.66 1980's 95.16 122.17 146.20 108.37 88.80 93.09 93.02 69.55 84.65 86.86 1990's 90.73 93.10 72.83 83.15 81.90 95.97 98.67 117.55 127.94 138.42 2000's 138.39 172.05 175.78

  11. Next Generation * Natural Gas (NG)2 Information Requirements--Executive Summary

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has initiated the Next Generation * Natural Gas (NG)2 project to design and implement a new and comprehensive information program for natural gas to meet customer requirements in the post-2000 time frame.

  12. TX, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    64 131 118 94 59 42 1981-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 161 128 113 88 56 42 1981-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 3 3 5 6 3 0 1981-2014 Dry Natural Gas 164 131 118 94 59 42 1981

  13. CA, Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    169 180 173 305 284 277 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1 2 1 2 2 8 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 168 178 172 303 282 269 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 163 173 165 290 266 261

  14. CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    91 92 102 98 90 84 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 91 92 102 98 90 84 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 84 87 97 93 86 8

  15. CA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    57 66 82 66 75 76 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 4 3 3 1 0 0 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 53 63 79 65 75 76 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 57 66 82 66 75 76

  16. Combination gas-producing and waste-water disposal well. [DOE patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malinchak, R.M.

    1981-09-03

    The present invention is directed to a waste-water disposal system for use in a gas recovery well penetrating a subterranean water-containing and methane gas-bearing coal formation. A cased bore hole penetrates the coal formation and extends downwardly therefrom into a further earth formation which has sufficient permeability to absorb the waste water entering the borehole from the coal formation. Pump means are disposed in the casing below the coal formation for pumping the water through a main conduit towards the water-absorbing earth formation. A barrier or water plug is disposed about the main conduit to prevent water flow through the casing except for through the main conduit. Bypass conduits disposed above the barrier communicate with the main conduit to provide an unpumped flow of water to the water-absorbing earth formation. One-way valves are in the main conduit and in the bypass conduits to provide flow of water therethrough only in the direction towards the water-absorbing earth formation.

  17. Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

    2007-09-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

  18. Stimulation rationale for shale gas wells: a state-of-the-art report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, C.; Barbour, T.; Blanton, T.L.

    1980-12-01

    Despite the large quantities of gas contained in the Devonian Shales, only a small percentage can be produced commercially by current production methods. This limited production derives both from the unique reservoir properties of the Devonian Shales and the lack of stimulation technologies specifically designed for a shale reservoir. Since October 1978 Science Applications, Inc. has been conducting a review and evaluation of various shale well stimulation techniques with the objective of defining a rationale for selecting certain treatments given certain reservoir conditions. Although this review and evaluation is ongoing and much more data will be required before a definitive rationale can be presented, the studies to date do allow for many preliminary observations and recommendations. For the hydraulic type treatments the use of low-residual-fluid treatments is highly recommended. The excellent shale well production which is frequently observed with only moderate wellbore enlargement treatments indicates that attempts to extend fractures to greater distances with massive hydraulic treatments are not warranted. Immediate research efforts should be concentrated upon limiting production damage by fracturing fluids retained in the formation, and upon improving proppant transport and placement so as to maximize fracture conductivity. Recent laboratory, numerical modeling and field studies all indicate that the gas fracturing effects of explosive/propellant type treatments are the predominate production enhancement mechanism and that these effects can be controlled and optimized with properly designed charges. Future research efforts should be focused upon the understanding, prediction and control of wellbore fracturing with tailored-pulse-loading charges. 36 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 View History Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation 25,347 22,522 19,288 17,427 14,938 14,008 1992-2007 Dry Natural Gas 24,689 22,059 18,812 17,007 14,549 13,634 1992-2007 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 965 717 713 688 649 620 1992-2007

  20. U.S. Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    283,879 317,647 348,809 322,670 353,994 388,841 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 250,496 281,901 305,986 269,514 295,504 319,724 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 33,383 35,746 42,823 53,156 58,490 69,117 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 272,509 304,625 334,067 308,036 338,264 368,704 1925-2014 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 1979

  1. U.S. Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    283,879 317,647 348,809 322,670 353,994 388,841 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 250,496 281,901 305,986 269,514 295,504 319,724 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 33,383 35,746 42,823 53,156 58,490 69,117 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 272,509 304,625 334,067 308,036 338,264 368,704 1925-2014 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 1979

  2. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William Banning

    2000-01-01

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. Resistivity measurements are obtained from within the cased well by conducting A.C. current from within the cased well to a remote electrode at a frequency that is within the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 20 Hz.

  3. Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-04-01

    Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

  4. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterbentz, James William; Bayless, Paul David; Nelson, Lee Orville; Gougar, Hans David; Strydom, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Provide an initial summary description of the design and its main attributes: Summarize the main Test Reactor attributes: reactor type, power, coolant, irradiation conditions (fast and thermal flux levels, number of test loops, positions and volumes), costs (project, operational), schedule and availability factor. Identify secondary missions and power conversion options, if applicable. Include statements on the envisioned attractiveness of the reactor type in relation to anticipated domestic and global irradiation services needs, citing past and current trends in reactor development and deployment. Include statements on Test Reactor scalability (e.g. trade-off between size, power/flux levels and costs), prototypical conditions, overall technology maturity of the specific design and the general technology type. The intention is that this summary must be readable as a stand-alone section.

  5. California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 11,226 12,829 1980's 11,634 11,759 12,222 12,117 12,525 13,378 12,935 10,962 9,728 8,243 1990's 7,743 7,610 7,242 6,484 7,204 5,904 6,309 7,171 6,883 6,738 2000's 7,808 7,262 7,068 6,866 6,966 6,685 6,654 6,977 6,764 5,470 2010's 5,483 4,904 4,411 5,057 5,530 - = No Data Reported;

  6. TX, RRC District 1 Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    523 2,599 6,127 9,141 8,118 12,431 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1,456 2,332 5,227 6,516 4,442 7,733 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 67 267 900 2,625 3,676 4,698 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 1,398 2,399 5,910 8,868 7,784 11,945

  7. TX, RRC District 10 Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,594 8,484 8,373 8,007 7,744 8,354 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 6,984 7,915 7,475 7,073 6,660 7,140 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 610 569 898 934 1,084 1,214 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 6,882 7,663 7,513 7,253 7,034 7,454

  8. TX, RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    909 2,235 3,690 5,985 6,640 7,524 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1,837 2,101 2,766 3,986 4,348 4,802 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 72 134 924 1,999 2,292 2,722 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 1,800 2,090 3,423 5,462 5,910 6,559

  9. TX, RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,802 2,774 2,490 2,429 2,592 2,483 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,326 2,308 2,091 1,965 1,795 1,760 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 476 466 399 464 797 723 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 2,616 2,588 2,260 2,154 2,307 2,19

  10. TX, RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,057 7,392 10,054 9,566 11,101 12,482 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 6,961 7,301 9,993 9,467 11,038 12,291 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 96 91 61 99 63 191 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 6,728 7,014 9,458 8,743 9,640 11,057

  11. TX, RRC District 5 Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    22,623 24,694 28,187 17,640 19,531 18,155 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 22,602 24,686 28,147 17,587 19,354 17,970 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 21 8 40 53 177 185 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 22,343 24,363 27,843 17,331 19,280 17,880

  12. TX, RRC District 6 Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    13,257 15,416 15,995 11,726 12,192 12,023 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 12,806 14,958 15,524 11,204 11,553 11,640 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 451 458 471 522 639 383 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 12,795 14,886 15,480 11,340 11,655 11,516

  13. TX, RRC District 7B Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,424 2,625 3,887 3,363 3,267 2,695 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,322 2,504 3,754 3,183 3,040 2,418 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 102 121 133 180 227 277 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 2,077 2,242 3,305 2,943 2,787 2,290

  14. TX, RRC District 7C Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5,430 5,432 5,236 5,599 5,584 7,103 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 3,724 3,502 2,857 2,523 2,183 2,444 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1,706 1,930 2,379 3,076 3,401 4,659 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 4,827 4,787 4,475 4,890 4,800 6,422

  15. TX, RRC District 8 Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,440 8,105 8,088 8,963 9,715 11,575 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 3,950 3,777 3,006 2,309 2,315 2,480 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 3,490 4,328 5,082 6,654 7,400 9,095 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 6,672 7,206 7,039 7,738 8,629 9,742

  16. TX, RRC District 8A Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1,289 1,228 1,289 1,280 1,338 1,328 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 43 58 31 20 23 24 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1,246 1,170 1,258 1,260 1,315 1,304 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 1,218 1,164 1,226 1,214 1,269 1,257

  17. TX, RRC District 9 Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11,522 13,172 10,920 9,682 10,040 9,760 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 11,100 12,587 9,963 8,521 8,947 8,283 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 422 585 957 1,161 1,093 1,477 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 10,904 12,464 10,115 8,894 9,195 8,791

  18. CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,609 2,447 2,685 1,650 1,574 1,823 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 607 498 506 269 245 265 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 2,002 1,949 2,179 1,381 1,329 1,558 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 2,469 2,321 2,590 1,550 1,460 1,69

  19. Federal Offshore U.S. Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,856 12,120 10,820 9,853 8,567 8,968 1990-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 7,633 6,916 5,374 3,989 3,037 3,634 1990-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 5,223 5,204 5,446 5,864 5,530 5,334 1990-2014 Dry Natural Gas 12,552 11,765 10,420 9,392 8,193 8,527 1990

  20. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dec. 31 2,451 2,145 1,554 1,497 1,508 1,445 1981-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1,822 1,456 1,015 643 535 607 1981-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 629 689 539 854 973 838 1981-2014 Dry Natural Gas 2,451 2,145 1,554 1,450 1,450 1,397

  1. LA, South Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,969 2,995 2,615 3,149 2,857 3,080 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,463 2,496 2,125 2,586 2,254 2,432 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 506 499 490 563 603 648 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 2,844 2,876 2,519 3,029 2,718 2,92

  2. Lower 48 States Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    274,696 308,730 339,298 313,003 346,611 382,036 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 249,406 280,880 305,010 268,519 294,549 318,770 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 25,290 27,850 34,288 44,484 52,062 63,266 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 263,408 295,787 324,643 298,457 330,948 361,959

  3. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LabSpaces New Research Puts Theory of Water Structure on Thin Ice summary written by Raven Hanna Water has unusual and complex properties that make it especially well suited to...

  4. Cliffs Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 5 well - Lorain County. Phase II report. Preliminary laboratory results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-04-01

    The US Department of Energy is funding a research and development program entitled the Eastern Gas Shales Project designed to increase commercial production of natural gas in the eastern United States from Middle and Upper Devonian Shales. The program's objectives are as follows: (1) to evaluate recoverable reserves of gas contained in the shales; (2) to enhanced recovery technology for production from shale gas reservoirs; and (3) to stimulate interest among commercial gas suppliers in the concept of producing large quantities of gas from low-yield, shallow Devonian Shale wells. The EGSP-Ohio No. 5 well was cored under a cooperative cost-sharing agreement between the Department of Energy (METC) and Columbia Gas Transmission Corporation. Detailed characterization of the core was performed at the Eastern Gas Shale Project's Core Laboratory. At the well site, suites of wet and dry hole geophysical logs were run. Characterization work performed at the Laboratory included photographic logs, lithologic logs, fracture logs, measurements of core color variation, and stratigraphic interpretation of the cored intervals. In addition samples were tested for physical properties by Michigan Technological University. Physical properties data obtained were for: directional ultrasonic velocity; directional tensile strength; strength in point load; and trends of microfractures.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC PROPPANTS FROM GAS SHALE WELL DRILL CUTTINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Fox, K.

    2013-10-02

    The objective of this study was to develop a method of converting drill cuttings from gas shale wells into high strength proppants via flame spheroidization and devitrification processing. Conversion of drill cuttings to spherical particles was only possible for small particle sizes (< 53 {micro}m) using a flame former after a homogenizing melting step. This size limitation is likely to be impractical for application as conventional proppants due to particle packing characteristics. In an attempt to overcome the particle size limitation, sodium and calcium were added to the drill cuttings to act as fluxes during the spheroidization process. However, the flame former remained unable to form spheres from the fluxed material at the relatively large diameters (0.5 - 2 mm) targeted for proppants. For future work, the flame former could be modified to operate at higher temperature or longer residence time in order to produce larger, spherical materials. Post spheroidization heat treatments should be investigated to tailor the final phase assemblage for high strength and sufficient chemical durability.

  6. Miscellaneous: Uruguay energy supply options study assessing the market for natural gas - executive summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conzelmann, G.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-03-04

    Uruguay is in the midst of making critical decisions affecting the design of its future energy supply system. Momentum for change is expected to come from several directions, including recent and foreseeable upgrades and modifications to energy conversion facilities, the importation of natural gas from Argentina, the possibility for a stronger interconnection of regional electricity systems, the country's membership in MERCOSUR, and the potential for energy sector reforms by the Government of Uruguay. The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of several fuel diversification strategies on Uruguay's energy supply system. The analysis pays special attention to fuel substitution trends due to potential imports of natural gas via a gas pipeline from Argentina and increasing electricity ties with neighboring countries. The Government of Uruguay has contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to study several energy development scenarios with the support of several Uruguayan institutions. Specifically, ANL was asked to conduct a detailed energy supply and demand analysis, develop energy demand projections based on an analysis of past energy demand patterns with support from local institutions, evaluate the effects of potential natural gas imports and electricity exchanges, and determine the market penetration of natural gas under various scenarios.

  7. State policies affecting natural gas consumption (Notice of inquiry issued on August 14, 1992). Summary of comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemon, R.; Kamphuis-Zatopa, W.

    1993-03-25

    On August 14, 1992, the United States Department of Energy issued a Request for Comments Concerning State Policies Affecting Natural Gas Consumption. This Notice of (NOI) noted the increasing significance of the role played by states and sought to gain better understanding of how state policies impact the gas industry. The general trend toward a. more competitive marketplace for natural gas, as well as recent regulatory and legislative changes at the Federal level, are driving State regulatory agencies to reevaluate how they regulate natural gas. State action is having a significant impact on the use of natural gas for generating electricity, as well as affecting the cost-effective trade-off between conservation expenditures and gas use. Additionally, fuel choice has an impact upon the environment and national energy security. In light of these dimensions, the Department of Energy initiated this study of State regulation. The goals of this NOI are: (1) help DOE better understand the impact of State policies on the efficient use of gas; (2) increase the awareness of the natural gas industry and Federal and State officials to the important role of State policies and regulations; (3) create an improved forum for dialogue on State and Federal natural gas issues; and, (4) develop a consensus on an analytical agenda that would be most helpful in addressing the regulatory challenges faced by the States. Ninety-seven parties filed comments, and of these ninety-seven, fifteen parties filed reply comments. Appendix One lists these parties. This report briefly syntheses the comments received. The goal is to assist parties to judging the extent of consensus on the problems posed and the remedies suggested, aid in identifying future analytical analyses, and assist parties in assessing differences in strategies and regulatory philosophies which shape these issues and their resolution.

  8. Table 9. Summary of U.S. natural gas imports by point of entry, 2010-2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Table 9. Summary of U.S. natural gas imports by point of entry, 2010-2014 (volumes in million cubic feet, prices in dollars per thousand cubic feet) See footnotes at end of table. Pipeline (Canada) Eastport, ID 708,806 4.19 606,099 3.90 634,194 2.59 686,449 3.34 608,147 4.14 Calais, ME 131,035 4.94 149,736 4.40 76,540 3.44 55,248 4.86 79,590 9.70 Detroit, MI 79 8.37 19 5.17 0 -- 165 4.44 188 5.26 Marysville, MI 5,694 4.44 9,946 4.42 8,099 2.99 2,337 4.15 4,650 6.86 St. Clair, MI 5,591 4.97

  9. Oil and gas resources of the Fergana basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan). Advance summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-07

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA), in cooperation with the US Geological Survey (USGS), has assessed 13 major petroleum producing regions outside of the United States. This series of assessments has been performed under EIA`s Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). The basic approach used in these assessments was to combine historical drilling, discovery, and production data with EIA reserve estimates and USGS undiscovered resource estimates. Field-level data for discovered oil were used for these previous assessments. In FESAP, supply projections through depletion were typically formulated for the country or major producing region. Until now, EIA has not prepared an assessment of oil and gas provinces in the former Soviet Union (FSU). Before breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Fergana basin was selected for a trial assessment of its discovered and undiscovered oil and gas. The object was to see if enough data could be collected and estimated to perform reasonable field-level estimates of oil and gas in this basin. If so, then assessments of other basins in the FSU could be considered. The objective was met and assessments of other basins can be considered. Collected data for this assessment cover discoveries through 1987. Compared to most other oil and gas provinces in the FSU, the Fergana basin is relatively small in geographic size, and in number and size of most of its oil and gas fields. However, with recent emphasis given to the central graben as a result of the relatively large Mingbulak field, the basin`s oil and gas potential has significantly increased. At least 7 additional fields to the 53 fields analyzed are known and are assumed to have been discovered after 1987.

  10. R and D opportunities in gas-side fouling. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, L.L.

    1984-02-01

    This report provides an overview of five research reports that were generated for the Fouling and Corrosion Program. In addition, a listing of research and development opportunities in gas-side fouling is provided. R and D opportunities are designated as technology transfer, basic research, or applied research opportunities.

  11. Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of generating electricity from non-conventional low temperature (150 to 300º F) geothermal resources in oil and gas settings.

  12. Hydrogen Gas Retention and Release from WTP Vessels: Summary of Preliminary Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Wells, Beric E.; Bao, Jie; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Buchmiller, William C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Chun, Jaehun; Karri, Naveen K.; Li, Huidong; Tran, Diana N.

    2015-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently being designed and constructed to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in the 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. A number of technical issues related to the design of the pretreatment facility (PTF) of the WTP have been identified. These issues must be resolved prior to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) reaching a decision to proceed with engineering, procurement, and construction activities for the PTF. One of the issues is Technical Issue T1 - Hydrogen Gas Release from Vessels (hereafter referred to as T1). The focus of T1 is identifying controls for hydrogen release and completing any testing required to close the technical issue. In advance of selecting specific controls for hydrogen gas safety, a number of preliminary technical studies were initiated to support anticipated future testing and to improve the understanding of hydrogen gas generation, retention, and release within PTF vessels. These activities supported the development of a plan defining an overall strategy and approach for addressing T1 and achieving technical endpoints identified for T1. Preliminary studies also supported the development of a test plan for conducting testing and analysis to support closing T1. Both of these plans were developed in advance of selecting specific controls, and in the course of working on T1 it was decided that the testing and analysis identified in the test plan were not immediately needed. However, planning activities and preliminary studies led to significant technical progress in a number of areas. This report summarizes the progress to date from the preliminary technical studies. The technical results in this report should not be used for WTP design or safety and hazards analyses and technical results are marked with the following statement: “Preliminary Technical Results for Planning – Not to be used for WTP Design or Safety Analyses.”

  13. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  14. H.R. 577: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide a tax credit for the production of oil and gas from existing marginal oil and gas wells and from new oil and gas wells. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This document contains H.R. 577, A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide a tax credit for the production of oil and gas from existing marginal oil and gas wells and from new oil and gas wells. This Bill was introduced in the House of Representatives, 104th Congress, First Session, January 19, 1995.

  15. S.32: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide a tax credit for the production of oil and gas from existing marginal oil and gas wells and from new oil and gas wells. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This bill would establish tax credits for the production of oil and natural gas from existing marginal oil or gas wells, and from new oil and gas wells. It does so by adding a section to the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 which spells out the rules, the credit amounts, the scope of the terms used to define such facilities, and other rules.

  16. Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and ... vehicles (PHEVs), as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs. ...

  17. Institutional project summary University of Redlands direct fired gas absorption chiller system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    The University of Redlands, located in the California Inland Empire City of Redlands supplies six campus building with chilled and hot water for cooling and space heating from a centrally located Mechanical Center. The University was interested in lowering chilled water production costs and eliminating Ozone depleting chloroflourocarbon (CFC) refrigerants in addition to adding chiller capacity for future building to be added to the central plant piping {open_quotes}loop{close_quotes}. After initially providing a feasibility study of chiller addition alternatives and annual hourly load models, GRT & Associates, Inc. (GRT) provided design engineering for the installation of a 500 Ton direct gas fired absorption chiller addition to the University of Redland`s mechanical center. Based on the feasibility study and energy consumption tests done after the new absorption chiller was added, the university estimates annual energy cost saving versus the existing electric chiller is approximately $65,000 per year. Using actual construction costs, the simple before tax payback period for the project is six years.

  18. Investigation of gas hydrate-bearing sandstone reservoirs at the "Mount Elbert" stratigraphic test well, Milne Point, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, R.M.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.; Digert, S. Inc., Anchorage, AK); Hancock, S.; Weeks, M. Inc., Anchorage, AK); Mt. Elbert Science Team

    2008-01-01

    In February 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy, BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc., and the U.S. Geological Survey conducted an extensive data collection effort at the "Mount Elbert #1" gas hydrates stratigraphic test well on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The 22-day field program acquired significant gas hydrate-bearing reservoir data, including a full suite of open-hole well logs, over 500 feet of continuous core, and open-hole formation pressure response tests. Hole conditions, and therefore log data quality, were excellent due largely to the use of chilled oil-based drilling fluids. The logging program confirmed the existence of approximately 30 m of gashydrate saturated, fine-grained sand reservoir. Gas hydrate saturations were observed to range from 60% to 75% largely as a function of reservoir quality. Continuous wire-line coring operations (the first conducted on the ANS) achieved 85% recovery through 153 meters of section, providing more than 250 subsamples for analysis. The "Mount Elbert" data collection program culminated with open-hole tests of reservoir flow and pressure responses, as well as gas and water sample collection, using Schlumberger's Modular Formation Dynamics Tester (MDT) wireline tool. Four such tests, ranging from six to twelve hours duration, were conducted. This field program demonstrated the ability to safely and efficiently conduct a research-level openhole data acquisition program in shallow, sub-permafrost sediments. The program also demonstrated the soundness of the program's pre-drill gas hydrate characterization methods and increased confidence in gas hydrate resource assessment methodologies for the ANS.

  19. Table 11. Summary of U.S. natural gas exports by point of exit, 2010-2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Table 11. Summary of U.S. natural gas exports by point of exit, 2010-2014 (volumes in million cubic feet, prices in dollars per thousand cubic feet) See footnotes at end of table. Pipeline (Canada) Eastport, ID 12 5.85 10 4.74 0 -- 6 3.27 0 -- Calais, ME 452 4.53 1,028 4.46 6,952 4.30 13,425 8.45 2,694 6.22 Detroit, MI 44,275 4.69 43,690 4.26 50,347 3.10 50,439 4.04 46,981 5.36 Marysville, MI 22,198 4.87 41,964 4.48 42,866 3.18 35,273 3.98 24,583 5.45 Sault Ste. Marie, MI 4,011 5.27 9,555 4.23

  20. An evaluation of the deep reservoir conditions of the Bacon-Manito geothermal field, Philippines using well gas chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Amore, Franco; Maniquis-Buenviaje, Marinela; Solis, Ramonito P.

    1993-01-28

    Gas chemistry from 28 wells complement water chemistry and physical data in developing a reservoir model for the Bacon-Manito geothermal project (BMGP), Philippines. Reservoir temperature, THSH, and steam fraction, y, are calculated or extrapolated from the grid defined by the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) and H2-H2S (HSH) gas equilibria reactions. A correction is made for H2 that is lost due to preferential partitioning into the vapor phase and the reequilibration of H2S after steam loss.

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells, 1st Quarter FY 2015, Rulison Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1st Quarter FY 2015, Rulison Site June 2015 Doc. No. S13052 Page 1 of 6 Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison, 1st Quarter, Fiscal Year 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: January 7, 2015 Background Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6

  2. Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mintz, M.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Energy Systems

    2010-06-30

    Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000 Btu of fossil fuel and generates from 1.5 to 18.4 kg of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions per million Btu of fuel on a 'well-to-wheel' (WTW) basis. This compares with approximately 1.1 million Btu and 78.2 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for CNG from fossil natural gas and 1.2 million Btu and 97.5 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for petroleum gasoline. Because of the additional energy required for liquefaction, LFG-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) requires more fossil fuel (222,000-227,000 Btu/million Btu WTW) and generates more GHG emissions (approximately 22 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu WTW) if grid electricity is used for the liquefaction process. However, if some of the LFG is used to generate electricity for gas cleanup and liquefaction (or compression, in the case of CNG), vehicle fuel produced from LFG can have no fossil fuel input and only minimal GHG emissions (1.5-7.7 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu) on a WTW basis. Thus, LFG-based natural gas can be one of the lowest GHG-emitting fuels for light- or heavy-duty vehicles. This report discusses the size and scope of biomethane resources from landfills and the pathways by which those resources can be turned into and utilized as vehicle fuel. It includes characterizations of the LFG stream and the processes used to convert low-Btu LFG into high-Btu renewable natural gas (RNG); documents the conversion efficiencies and losses of those processes, the choice of processes modeled in GREET, and other assumptions used to construct GREET pathways; and presents GREET results by pathway stage. GREET estimates of well-to-pump (WTP), pump-to-wheel (PTW), and WTW energy, fossil fuel, and GHG emissions for each LFG-based pathway are then summarized and compared with similar estimates for fossil natural gas and petroleum pathways.

  3. Water and gas chemistry from HGP-A geothermal well: January 1980 flow test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.M.

    1980-09-01

    A two-week production test was conducted on the geothermal well HGP-A. Brine chemistry indicates that approximately six percent of the well fluids are presently derived from seawater and that this fraction will probably increase during continued production. Reservoir production is indicated to be from two chemically distinct aquifers: one having relatively high salinity and low production and the other having lower salinity and producing the bulk of the discharge.

  4. Development and Demonstration of Mobile, Small Footprint Exploration and Development Well System for Arctic Unconventional Gas Resources (ARCGAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Glavinovich

    2002-11-01

    Traditionally, oil and gas field technology development in Alaska has focused on the high-cost, high-productivity oil and gas fields of the North Slope and Cook Inlet, with little or no attention given to Alaska's numerous shallow, unconventional gas reservoirs (carbonaceous shales, coalbeds, tight gas sands). This is because the high costs associated with utilizing the existing conventional oil and gas infrastructure, combined with the typical remoteness and environmental sensitivity of many of Alaska's unconventional gas plays, renders the cost of exploring for and producing unconventional gas resources prohibitive. To address these operational challenges and promote the development of Alaska's large unconventional gas resource base, new low-cost methods of obtaining critical reservoir parameters prior to drilling and completing more costly production wells are required. Encouragingly, low-cost coring, logging, and in-situ testing technologies have already been developed by the hard rock mining industry in Alaska and worldwide, where an extensive service industry employs highly portable diamond-drilling rigs. From 1998 to 2000, Teck Cominco Alaska employed some of these technologies at their Red Dog Mine site in an effort to quantify a large unconventional gas resource in the vicinity of the mine. However, some of the methods employed were not fully developed and required additional refinement in order to be used in a cost effective manner for rural arctic exploration. In an effort to offset the high cost of developing a new, low-cost exploration methods, the US Department of Energy, National Petroleum Technology Office (DOE-NPTO), partnered with the Nana Regional Corporation and Teck Cominco on a technology development program beginning in 2001. Under this DOE-NPTO project, a team comprised of the NANA Regional Corporation (NANA), Teck Cominco Alaska and Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) have been able to adapt drilling technology developed for the mineral industry for use in the exploration of unconventional gas in rural Alaska. These techniques have included the use of diamond drilling rigs that core small diameter (< 3.0-inch) holes coupled with wireline geophysical logging tools and pressure transient testing units capable of testing in these slimholes.

  5. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pan, Wei; Dimakis, Emmanouil; Wang, George T.; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Tsui, Daniel C.

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in monolayer InN quantum wells embedded in GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5×1015 cm-2 and 420 cm2 /Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  6. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts. South Atlantic summary report update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havran, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    An update of the South Atlantic Summary Report 2, this report provides current information about Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil- and gas-related activities and their onshore impacts for the period June 1982 to February, 1983. The geographical area covered by the report extends from north of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to Cape Canaveral, Florida. The information is designed to assist in planning for the onshore effects associated with offshore oil and gas development. It covers lease and transportation strategies and the nature and location of onshore facilities. An appendix summarizes related state and federal studies. 11 references, 2 tables.

  7. Natural Gas Imports (Summary)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    10 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 3,740,757 3,468,693 3,137,789 2,883,355 2,695,378 2,718,239 1973-2015 California 22,503 2,171 0 23 0 2007-2014 Georgia 106,454 75,641 59,266 15,575 7,155 1999-2014 Idaho 708,806 606,099 634,194 686,449 608,147 1982-2014 Louisiana 90,867 60,554 20,132 5,750 5,880 1982-2014 Maine 131,035 149,736 76,540 55,248 79,892 1982-2014 Maryland 43,431 13,981 2,790 5,366 11,585 1999-2014 Massachusetts 164,984 135,278 86,609 63,987 28,825 1982-2014 Michigan 11,365

  8. Natural Gas Processed (Summary)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 15,904,517 16,267,757 16,566,883 17,538,026 17,884,427 19,754,802 1967-2014 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 1,317,031 1,002,608 1,000,964 2012-2014 Alabama 248,232 242,444 230,546 87,269 89,258 80,590 1969-2014 Alaska 2,830,034 2,731,803 2,721,396 2,788,997 2,811,384 2,735,783 1969-2014 Arkansas

  9. Minnesota Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Imports 4.49 4.15 2.87 3.87 5.60 1989-2014 Exports -- 3.90 3.46 3.83 11.05 1999-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.48 5.04 4.26 4.58 6.56 4.40 1984-2015 Residential 8.76 8.85 7.99 8.19 9.89 8.84 1967-2015 Commercial 7.60 7.46 6.36 6.86 8.66 7.30 1967-2015 Industrial 5.58 5.55 4.28 4.94 6.57 4.95 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 16.49 10.55 10.56 1993-2012 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2015 Imports and Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Imports 451,405 548,686 406,327 243,805 328,610

  10. Mississippi Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4.17 1967-2010 Imports -- 12.93 -- -- -- 2007-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.73 5.29 3.97 4.44 5.29 NA 1984-2015 Residential 10.19 9.47 9.60 9.00 9.49 9.71 1967-2015 Commercial 8.75 7.99 7.37 7.61 8.36 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 6.19 5.83 4.85 5.82 6.15 4.69 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- 1994-2012 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 853 860 607 595 558 1977-2014 Adjustments 1 109 65 29 -15 1977-2014

  11. Montana Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3.64 1967-2010 Imports 4.13 3.75 2.45 3.23 4.39 1989-2014 Exports 4.05 3.82 2.40 3.43 5.38 1989-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.17 5.11 4.23 4.21 5.03 3.71 1984-2015 Residential 8.64 8.80 8.05 8.19 9.11 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 8.54 8.66 7.98 8.09 8.77 7.82 1967-2015 Industrial 8.07 8.13 7.54 7.33 7.99 6.45 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 9.60 8.20 6.48 1990-2012 Electric Power W W W -- W -- 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 944 778 602

  12. Colorado Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3.96 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.26 4.94 4.26 4.76 5.42 3.96 1984-2015 Residential 8.13 8.25 8.28 7.85 8.89 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 7.58 7.84 7.58 7.26 8.15 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 5.84 6.42 5.79 5.90 6.84 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 10.79 9.56 11.65 1990-2012 Electric Power 5.16 4.98 W 4.91 5.49 3.81 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 24,119 24,821 20,666 22,381 20,851 1977-2014 Adjustments 449 801 -363 -272 627

  13. Florida Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wellhead NA 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.49 5.07 3.93 4.44 5.05 NA 1984-2015 Residential 17.89 18.16 18.34 18.46 19.02 19.29 1967-2015 Commercial 10.60 11.14 10.41 10.87 11.38 10.74 1967-2015 Industrial 8.33 8.07 6.96 6.77 6.89 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 17.98 5.56 9.83 1989-2012 Electric Power 6.54 5.86 4.80 5.08 5.58 4.41 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 56 6 16 15 0 1977-2014 Adjustments 64 -54 -2 1 -2 1977-2014

  14. Georgia Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Imports 4.39 4.20 2.78 3.36 4.33 1999-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.93 5.19 4.35 4.66 5.19 3.82 1984-2015 Residential 15.17 15.72 16.23 14.60 14.45 15.06 1967-2015 Commercial 10.95 10.51 9.75 9.38 9.86 8.49 1967-2015 Industrial 6.25 5.90 4.61 5.38 6.07 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 5.17 5.57 14.51 1993-2012 Electric Power 5.21 4.72 3.40 4.45 4.98 3.27 1997-2015 Imports and Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Imports 106,454 75,641 59,266 15,575 7,155 1999-2014 Underground Storage

  15. Hawaii Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Citygate 22.94 31.58 32.39 28.45 26.94 18.11 1984-2015 Residential 44.50 55.28 52.86 49.13 47.51 40.00 1980-2015 Commercial 36.55 45.58 47.03 41.92 40.42 31.17 1980-2015 Industrial 24.10 29.80 30.89 27.56 26.75 18.81 1997-2015 Electric Power -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Total Consumption 2,627 2,619 2,689 2,855 2,928 1997-2014 Pipeline & Distribution Use 2 2 3 1 1 2004-2014 Delivered to Consumers 2,625 2,616 2,687 2,853 2,927 2,929 1997-2015 Residential 509

  16. Idaho Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Imports 4.19 3.90 2.59 3.34 4.14 1989-2014 Exports 5.85 4.74 -- 3.27 -- 1999-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 4.82 4.65 4.07 3.93 4.29 NA 1984-2015 Residential 8.95 8.80 8.26 8.12 8.54 8.62 1967-2015 Commercial 8.21 8.09 7.35 7.29 7.70 7.61 1967-2015 Industrial 6.39 6.36 5.73 5.47 5.96 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 7.51 5.10 9.27 1994-2012 Electric Power W W W W W 2.89 2001-2015 Imports and Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Imports 708,806 606,099 634,194 686,449 608,147 1982-2014

  17. Kansas Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    23 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.08 5.53 4.74 4.98 6.10 NA 1984-2015 Residential 10.61 9.93 10.12 10.19 10.59 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 9.65 8.89 8.82 9.07 9.53 8.83 1967-2015 Industrial 5.49 5.28 3.87 4.86 5.70 4.37 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel -- 9.87 9.00 1994-2012 Electric Power 5.05 4.79 3.28 4.57 5.65 3.95 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 3,673 3,486 3,308 3,592 4,359 1977-2014 Adjustments 140 125 -236 -20 94 1977-2014

  18. Kentucky Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    47 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.69 5.18 4.17 4.47 5.16 NA 1984-2015 Residential 10.02 10.44 10.19 9.80 10.62 10.94 1967-2015 Commercial 8.61 8.79 8.28 8.32 9.04 8.80 1967-2015 Industrial 5.57 5.16 3.96 4.84 5.80 4.36 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- 1992-2012 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 2,613 2,006 1,408 1,663 1,611 1977-2014 Adjustments -58 -34 -282 103 -9 1977-2014 Revision Increases

  19. Louisiana Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    23 1967-2010 Imports 4.84 7.57 7.98 14.40 14.59 1989-2014 Exports 7.07 9.63 11.80 -- -- 2007-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.43 5.67 3.48 4.12 4.90 3.32 1984-2015 Residential 11.73 11.37 11.54 10.80 10.89 10.71 1967-2015 Commercial 9.88 9.36 8.44 8.59 9.01 7.93 1967-2015 Industrial 4.68 4.25 2.96 3.86 4.68 2.90 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 11.14 10.58 10.53 1990-2012 Electric Power 4.79 W 2.99 3.95 4.74 W 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of

  20. Maine Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Imports 4.94 4.40 3.45 4.86 9.71 1999-2014 Exports 4.53 4.46 4.30 8.43 6.68 2007-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.19 8.14 7.73 7.35 10.33 NA 1984-2015 Residential 14.14 14.20 15.94 15.21 16.90 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 11.71 11.69 12.22 12.79 15.13 14.40 1967-2015 Industrial 11.23 10.89 10.35 10.32 11.93 NA 1997-2015 Electric Power W W W W W W 2001-2015 Imports and Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Imports 131,035 149,736 76,540 55,248 79,892 1982-2014 Exports 452 1,028 6,952

  1. Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Imports 4.86 4.77 3.69 5.49 8.00 1989-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 7.74 7.04 6.03 6.20 6.96 NA 1984-2015 Residential 14.53 13.81 13.22 13.49 14.50 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 12.00 11.68 10.68 11.25 12.48 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 10.41 10.14 9.82 10.15 11.53 9.34 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 12.48 4.28 14.63 1990-2012 Electric Power 5.44 5.07 3.68 5.96 6.66 4.38 1997-2015 Imports and Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Imports 164,984 135,278 86,609 63,987 28,825 1982-2014 Underground

  2. Michigan Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wellhead 3.79 1967-2010 Imports 4.73 4.38 2.88 4.02 8.34 1989-2014 Exports 4.85 4.44 3.12 4.07 6.26 1989-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 7.07 6.18 5.50 4.91 5.54 4.22 1984-2015 Residential 11.32 10.47 9.95 9.09 9.33 8.78 1967-2015 Commercial 8.95 9.14 8.35 7.82 8.28 7.49 1967-2015 Industrial 9.25 8.27 7.38 6.97 7.84 6.59 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- 1990-2012 Electric Power 4.97 4.76 3.21 4.58 6.78 3.21 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves

  3. Alabama Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4.46 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.46 5.80 5.18 4.65 4.93 NA 1984-2015 Residential 15.79 15.08 16.20 15.47 14.59 13.95 1967-2015 Commercial 13.34 12.36 12.56 12.35 11.92 11.03 1967-2015 Industrial 6.64 5.57 4.35 4.98 5.49 3.94 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 16.24 11.45 17.99 1990-2012 Electric Power 4.85 W 3.09 4.14 4.74 3.06 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 2,629 2,475 2,228 1,597 2,036 1977-2014 Adjustments 32 -49 112 -274

  4. Alaska Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3.17 1967-2010 Exports 12.19 12.88 15.71 -- 15.74 1989-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1970-2005 Citygate 6.67 6.53 6.14 6.02 6.34 6.57 1988-2015 Residential 8.89 8.77 8.47 8.85 9.11 9.68 1967-2015 Commercial 8.78 8.09 8.09 8.34 8.30 7.80 1967-2015 Industrial 4.23 3.84 5.11 8.16 7.97 7.21 1997-2015 Electric Power W 5.04 4.32 4.73 5.06 5.40 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 8,838 9,424 9,579 7,316 6,745 1977-2014 Adjustments 1 -1 -2 -5 -21 1977-2014

  5. Arkansas Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3.84 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.76 6.27 5.36 4.99 5.84 4.76 1984-2015 Residential 11.53 11.46 11.82 10.46 10.39 11.20 1967-2015 Commercial 8.89 8.90 7.99 7.68 7.88 8.08 1967-2015 Industrial 7.28 7.44 6.38 6.74 6.99 6.97 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel -- -- 9.04 1994-2012 Electric Power 5.11 W 3.19 4.32 W W 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 14,178 16,370 11,035 13,518 12,789 1977-2014 Adjustments -34 728 -743 -78 -3 1977-2014

  6. California Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    87 1967-2010 Imports 4.76 3.57 -- 3.59 -- 2007-2014 Exports 4.51 4.18 2.90 3.89 4.56 1997-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 4.86 4.47 3.46 4.18 4.88 3.27 1984-2015 Residential 9.92 9.93 9.14 9.92 11.51 11.38 1967-2015 Commercial 8.30 8.29 7.05 7.81 9.05 7.98 1967-2015 Industrial 7.02 7.04 5.77 6.57 7.65 6.35 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 5.55 7.32 7.01 1990-2012 Electric Power 4.99 4.71 3.68 4.53 5.23 3.39 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of

  7. Connecticut Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.58 4.45 4.59 3.58 3.36 3.80 1989-2015 Residential 18.22 19.33 NA 15.30 12.50 11.82 1989-2015 Commercial 9.29 9.52 NA 9.53 8.48 8.18 1989-2015 Industrial 5.88 5.66 6.59 5.76 5.87 6.60 2001-2015 Electric Power 2.48 2.69 3.08 3.17 5.14 5.06 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers 16,880 17,528 15,795 17,525 19,928 23,268 2001-2015 Residential 1,120 997 975 2,158 3,952 4,884 1989-2015 Commercial 2,379 2,512 2,577 3,155 4,122 5,038 1989-2015 Industrial 1,758 1,826 1,734

  8. Delaware Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10.56 10.03 10.35 6.54 5.14 4.98 1989-2015 Residential 21.80 23.75 23.22 NA 14.03 11.09 1989-2015 Commercial 13.35 13.86 13.93 12.54 10.82 9.15 1989-2015 Industrial 8.82 11.38 11.40 11.15 9.62 8.32 2001-2015 Electric Power -- -- -- -- -- -- 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers 8,917 8,330 7,939 6,849 6,797 7,386 2001-2015 Residential 163 166 157 378 720 978 1989-2015 Commercial 375 409 432 812 1,065 1,177 1989-2015 Industrial 2,669 2,636 2,448 2,590 2,682 3,040

  9. Georgia Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    16 4.16 4.14 3.80 3.37 3.51 1989-2015 Residential 25.45 24.78 25.75 20.43 15.20 14.41 1989-2015 Commercial 9.08 9.07 9.38 8.65 9.72 7.80 1989-2015 Industrial 4.06 4.25 4.15 4.02 3.65 3.74 2001-2015 Electric Power 3.40 3.36 3.31 2.85 2.64 W 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers 58,820 54,742 49,172 52,445 55,858 56,505 2001-2015 Residential 3,662 3,731 3,794 5,873 10,248 11,943 1989-2015 Commercial 2,164 2,274 2,417 3,159 4,695 5,185 1989-2015 Industrial 12,955 12,710

  10. Hawaii Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    22.97 17.72 15.38 14.59 14.92 14.81 1989-2015 Residential 45.12 37.43 36.33 37.38 38.46 38.20 1989-2015 Commercial 36.02 30.45 28.60 27.06 28.13 28.72 1989-2015 Industrial 21.32 19.06 18.87 17.77 17.47 14.88 2001-2015 Electric Power -- -- -- -- -- -- 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers 243 240 233 240 228 251 2001-2015 Residential 45 43 41 44 44 47 1989-2015 Commercial 159 156 153 152 148 167 1989-2015 Industrial 38 41 37 43 36 36 2001-2015 Vehicle Fuel 1 1 1 1 1 1

  11. Idaho Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    65 4.50 NA 3.75 3.52 3.34 1989-2015 Residential 10.72 10.96 9.56 8.93 7.74 7.89 1989-2015 Commercial 8.41 8.12 8.00 7.65 6.93 7.12 1989-2015 Industrial 6.09 6.08 5.93 5.77 NA 5.39 2001-2015 Electric Power 2.85 2.92 3.01 2.92 2.72 2.41 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers 6,426 NA 6,838 NA NA 13,715 2001-2015 Residential 464 359 638 995 3,624 4,740 1989-2015 Commercial 625 583 694 1,066 2,068 2,719 1989-2015 Industrial 2,094 NA 2,564 NA NA 3,403 2001-2015 Vehicle Fuel

  12. Maine Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9.76 NA 5.52 4.38 7.52 8.01 1989-2015 Residential 20.79 22.87 21.79 NA 13.49 13.63 1989-2015 Commercial 12.17 12.29 11.47 8.63 10.48 11.30 1989-2015 Industrial 4.68 4.81 4.72 4.56 8.20 8.50 2001-2015 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers NA NA NA NA NA NA 2001-2015 Residential 46 45 46 136 232 298 1989-2015 Commercial 409 425 415 569 779 961 1989-2015 Industrial NA NA NA NA NA NA 2001-2015 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2015 Electric Power

  13. Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 7.15 7.59 4.62 4.42 5.42 1989-2015 Residential 13.26 13.78 13.23 NA 11.15 12.66 1989-2015 Commercial 8.94 9.00 8.52 NA 8.57 10.00 1989-2015 Industrial 6.64 7.08 6.34 5.59 7.41 9.02 2001-2015 Electric Power 2.57 3.08 4.14 4.31 3.62 2.53 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers 31,404 31,673 25,692 29,699 31,148 36,395 2001-2015 Residential 2,619 2,442 2,465 5,784 9,387 12,553 1989-2015 Commercial 3,912 3,873 4,066 7,399 9,210 10,044 1989-2015 Industrial 2,219 2,286

  14. Vermont Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6.39 6.34 5.96 4.59 5.08 5.93 1989-2015 Residential 21.69 23.04 23.16 18.41 14.89 13.84 1989-2015 Commercial 6.10 NA 6.97 6.20 6.65 7.37 1989-2015 Industrial 5.90 4.53 4.65 5.58 5.42 5.81 2001-2015 Electric Power -- -- -- -- -- -- 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers NA 544 566 NA 1,024 1,168 2001-2015 Residential 87 73 79 164 288 393 1989-2015 Commercial NA 318 336 522 557 586 1989-2015 Industrial NA 153 150 NA 178 188 2001-2015 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2015

  15. Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    68 5.95 5.61 4.25 4.21 3.96 1989-2015 Residential 13.27 14.05 12.80 8.42 7.89 7.38 1989-2015 Commercial 6.42 6.44 6.18 5.37 6.34 6.12 1989-2015 Industrial 4.54 4.91 4.56 4.69 5.37 5.43 2001-2015 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers 25,107 23,388 23,582 29,272 38,845 49,528 2001-2015 Residential 2,475 2,308 2,498 6,080 11,070 16,428 1989-2015 Commercial 2,782 2,964 2,867 4,985 7,776 10,352 1989-2015 Industrial 8,824 9,124 9,103 10,742 12,289

  16. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,"Production",10,"Monthly","122015","1151991" ,"Data 3","Underground ... 37817,111095,98938,79019,19919,3042,180,-2862 37848,111095,101835,79019,...

  17. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,"Production",10,"Monthly","122015","1151991" ,"Data 3","Underground ... 40283,11027,3761,4025,1991,17,1233 40313,9569,2493,3208,1909,17,1942 ...

  18. Texas Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    70 1967-2010 Imports 6.72 6.78 10.09 12.94 11.79 1993-2014 Exports 4.68 4.44 3.14 3.94 4.67 1989-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.89 5.39 4.30 4.89 5.77 4.20 1984-2015 Residential 10.82 10.21 10.55 10.50 11.16 10.65 1967-2015 Commercial 7.90 7.07 6.63 7.25 8.26 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 4.61 4.21 3.02 3.92 4.71 2.90 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 5.38 7.03 10.14 1990-2012 Electric Power 4.66 4.36 2.99 3.94 4.62 2.88 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves

  19. Ohio Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.87 5.51 4.47 4.51 4.91 4.49 1984-2015 Residential 11.13 10.78 9.91 9.46 10.16 9.49 1967-2015 Commercial 9.25 8.55 7.11 6.21 7.82 6.62 1967-2015 Industrial 7.40 6.77 5.48 6.03 7.06 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- 1990-2012 Electric Power 5.01 W 3.05 3.95 4.31 2.42 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 832 758 1,233 3,161 6,723 1977-2014 Adjustments 127 -99 -41 -328 -426 1977-2014 Revision

  20. Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    71 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.18 5.67 5.00 4.75 5.35 4.59 1984-2015 Residential 11.12 10.32 11.10 9.71 10.10 10.26 1967-2015 Commercial 9.77 8.94 8.95 8.05 8.26 8.22 1967-2015 Industrial 8.23 7.37 7.65 7.16 8.27 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 8.18 10.98 9.13 1991-2012 Electric Power 4.84 W 3.04 4.13 W W 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 26,345 27,830 26,599 26,873 31,778 1977-2014 Adjustments -394 -368 -686 -622 816

  1. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NA 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 7.04 6.28 5.52 5.26 5.59 NA 1984-2015 Residential 12.90 12.46 11.99 11.63 11.77 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 10.47 10.42 10.24 10.11 10.13 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 8.23 9.86 9.58 9.13 9.95 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 3.76 3.40 7.96 1990-2012 Electric Power 5.27 4.85 3.15 4.17 5.04 2.52 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 13,960 26,529 36,348 49,674 59,873 1977-2014 Adjustments -373 -224 -240 664

  2. Wyoming Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.30 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.04 4.65 4.03 4.51 5.27 4.36 1984-2015 Residential 8.58 8.72 8.42 8.27 9.34 9.19 1967-2015 Commercial 7.13 7.29 6.72 6.81 7.69 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 4.91 5.57 4.87 4.62 5.89 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 10.08 11.96 14.15 1991-2012 Electric Power W W W W W 5.18 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 35,074 35,290 30,094 33,618 27,553 1977-2014 Adjustments 521 -209 692 2,058 -1,877 1977-2014

  3. Utah Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    23 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.53 5.68 5.50 5.70 5.74 5.70 1984-2015 Residential 8.22 8.44 8.70 8.55 9.48 9.72 1967-2015 Commercial 6.83 7.05 7.00 7.13 7.71 7.97 1967-2015 Industrial 5.57 5.50 4.69 5.22 5.83 5.89 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 11.61 13.01 15.02 1990-2012 Electric Power W W 3.04 4.10 W W 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 6,981 7,857 7,548 6,829 6,685 1977-2014 Adjustments -80 134 289 -582 -20 1977-2014 Revision

  4. Vermont Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6.54 5.81 4.90 5.72 6.61 1989-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1982-2005 Citygate 8.29 7.98 6.63 6.16 7.08 NA 1984-2015 Residential 16.14 16.17 16.73 15.87 14.68 14.56 1980-2015 Commercial 11.82 11.90 12.09 7.57 9.13 NA 1980-2015 Industrial 6.57 6.09 4.89 8.59 6.63 5.50 1997-2015 Electric Power 5.73 5.26 4.14 -- W -- 1997-2015 Imports and Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Imports 8,895 10,319 8,247 10,324 10,621 1982-2014 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Total Consumption 8,443 8,611 8,191 9,602

  5. Virginia Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NA 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.88 6.64 5.64 5.54 5.98 NA 1984-2015 Residential 12.73 12.72 12.42 11.68 12.07 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 9.55 9.69 8.77 8.83 9.17 8.11 1967-2015 Industrial 6.68 6.44 5.29 6.02 6.43 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 4.31 4.55 15.16 1993-2012 Electric Power 5.72 W 3.38 4.29 6.12 3.55 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 3,215 2,832 2,579 2,373 2,800 1982-2014 Adjustments 59 -413 66 -9 89 1982-2014

  6. Washington Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.22 3.96 2.72 3.62 4.32 1989-2014 Exports 4.81 4.47 3.87 4.02 5.05 1998-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.29 5.55 4.48 4.89 5.82 4.42 1984-2015 Residential 12.24 12.30 11.87 11.37 10.59 10.61 1967-2015 Commercial 10.49 10.40 9.82 9.21 9.03 9.14 1967-2015 Industrial 9.37 9.47 8.77 8.37 8.55 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 12.89 9.88 11.06 1990-2012 Electric Power 5.52 W W W W W 1998-2015 Imports and Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Imports 332,358 313,922 312,236 333,050 359,348

  7. ,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...2015","1152013" ,"Data 4","Consumption",6,"Monthly","122015","1151989" ,"Release Date:","2292016" ,"Next Release Date:","3312016" ,"Excel File ...

  8. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...5,987563,399102,588461,53249,995,-52254 39005,1021583,998690,399102,599588,20602,9459,-11144 39036,1021583,991977,399102,592875,11217,17912,6694 39066,1021583,942457,396874,545584,...

  9. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 37695,159737,143763,15974,,0,10880,13536,1965,133356 37726,151054,135949,15105,,0,11144,12903,1639,125368 37756,143494,129144,14349,,0,10300,5571,1461,126161 ...

  10. Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing Oil/Gas Wells in Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing Oil/Gas Wells in Texas.

  11. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0

  12. AURORA: A FORTRAN program for modeling well stirred plasma and thermal reactors with gas and surface reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeks, E.; Grcar, J.F.; Kee, R.J.; Moffat, H.K.

    1996-02-01

    The AURORA Software is a FORTRAN computer program that predicts the steady-state or time-averaged properties of a well mixed or perfectly stirred reactor for plasma or thermal chemistry systems. The software was based on the previously released software, SURFACE PSR which was written for application to thermal CVD reactor systems. AURORA allows modeling of non-thermal, plasma reactors with the determination of ion and electron concentrations and the electron temperature, in addition to the neutral radical species concentrations. Well stirred reactors are characterized by a reactor volume, residence time or mass flow rate, heat loss or gas temperature, surface area, surface temperature, the incoming temperature and mixture composition, as well as the power deposited into the plasma for non-thermal systems. The model described here accounts for finite-rate elementary chemical reactions both in the gas phase and on the surface. The governing equations are a system of nonlinear algebraic relations. The program solves these equations using a hybrid Newton/time-integration method embodied by the software package TWOPNT. The program runs in conjunction with the new CHEMKIN-III and SURFACE CHEMKIN-III packages, which handle the chemical reaction mechanisms for thermal and non-thermal systems. CHEMKIN-III allows for specification of electron-impact reactions, excitation losses, and elastic-collision losses for electrons.

  13. Executive Summary: Executive Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Executive Summary United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Executive Summary Table of Contents EXECSUM-1.0 Overview EXECSUM-1.1 Contents of the CRA-2014 EXECSUM-1.2 Programmatic Changes Since the CRA-2009 EXECSUM-1.3 PA Results EXECSUM-1.4 Summary of Changes to the Application List of Figures Figure EXECSUM- 1. CRA-2014 PA and CRA-2009 PABC Overall Mean CCDFs for Total Normalized Releases

  14. Well-to-wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Hydrogen Produced with Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Ye; Wang, Michael Q.; Vyas, Anant D.; Wade, David C.; Taiwo, Temitope A.

    2004-07-01

    A fuel-cycle model-called the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model-has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate well-to-wheels (WTW) energy and emission impacts of motor vehicle technologies fueled with various transportation fuels. The GREET model contains various hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production pathways for fuel-cell vehicles (FCVs) applications. In this effort, the GREET model was expanded to include four nuclear H{sub 2} production pathways: (1) H{sub 2} production at refueling stations via electrolysis using Light Water Reactor (LWR)-generated electricity; (2) H{sub 2} production in central plants via thermo-chemical water cracking using steam from High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR); (3) H{sub 2} production in central plants via high-temperature electrolysis using HTGR-generated electricity and steam; and (4) H{sub 2} production at refueling stations via electrolysis using HTGR-generated electricity The WTW analysis of these four options include these stages: uranium ore mining and milling; uranium ore transportation; uranium conversion; uranium enrichment; uranium fuel fabrication; uranium fuel transportation; electricity or H{sub 2} production in nuclear power plants; H{sub 2} transportation; H{sub 2} compression; and H{sub 2} FCVs operation. Due to large differences in electricity requirements for uranium fuel enrichment between gas diffusion and centrifuge technologies, two scenarios were designed for uranium enrichment: (1) 55% of fuel enriched through gaseous diffusion technology and 45% through centrifuge technology (the current technology split for U.S. civilian nuclear power plants); and (2) 100% fuel enrichment using the centrifuge technology (a future trend). Our well-to-pump (WTP) results show that significant reductions in fossil energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are achieved by nuclear-based H{sub 2} compared to natural gas-based H{sub 2} production via steam methane reforming for a unit of H{sub 2} delivered at refueling stations. In particular, 73-98% of GHG emissions and 81- 99% of fossil energy use are reduced by nuclear-based H{sub 2} relative to natural gas-based H{sub 2}, depending on the uranium enrichment technology and type of nuclear reactor used. When H{sub 2} is applied to FCVs, the WTW results also show large benefit in reducing fossil energy use and GHG emissions. (authors)

  15. Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas in a high-throughput gasifier. Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldmann, H.F.; Paisley, M.A.; Folsom, D.W.; Kim, B.C.

    1981-10-31

    Results of the experimental work conducted thus far have shown that wood can be readily gasified in a steam environment into a hydrocarbon rich fuel gas that can be used as a replacement for petroleum-based fuels or natural gas with minimal boiler retrofit. Further, this conversion can be achieved in a compact gasification reactor with heat supplied by a circulating entrained phase, thereby eliminating the need for an oxygen plant. Tars have not been found except at the lowest gasifier temperatures employed, and therefore heat recovery from the product gas should be much simpler than that from commercially available fixed-bed gasification systems where product gas contains significant quantities of tar. The data generated have been used in a preliminary conceptual design. Evaluation of this design has shown that a medium-Btu gas can be produced from wood at a cost competitive with natural gas or petroleum-based fuels.

  16. Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maryn, S.

    1994-03-01

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

  17. Recovery Act. Sub-Soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling, Pumpernickel Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbank, Brian D.

    2015-03-27

    Nevada Geothermal Power Company (NGP) was awarded DOE Award DE-EE0002834 in January 2010 to conduct sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion studies and slim well drilling at its Black Warrior Project (now known as North Valley) in Washoe and Churchill Counties, Nevada. The project was designed to apply highly detailed, precise, low-cost subsoil and down-hole gas geochemistry methods from the oil and gas industry to identify upflow zone drilling targets in an undeveloped geothermal prospect. NGP ran into multiple institutional barriers with the Black Warrior project relating to property access and extensive cultural survey requirement. NGP requested that the award be transferred to NGP’s Pumpernickel Valley project, due to the timing delay in obtaining permits, along with additional over-budget costs required. Project planning and permit applications were developed for both the original Black Warrior location and at Pumpernickel. This included obtaining proposals from contractors able to conduct required environmental and cultural surveying, designing the two-meter probe survey methodology and locations, and submitting Notices of Intent and liaising with the Bureau of Land Management to have the two-meter probe work approved. The award had an expiry date of April 30, 2013; however, due to the initial project delays at Black Warrior, and the move of the project from Black Warrior to Pumpernickel, NGP requested that the award deadline be extended. DOE was amenable to this, and worked with NGP to extend the deadline. However, following the loss of the Blue Mountain geothermal power plant in Nevada, NGP’s board of directors changed the company’s mandate to one of cash preservation. NGP was unable to move forward with field work on the Pumpernickel property, or any of its other properties, until additional funding was secured. NGP worked to bring in a project partner to form a joint venture on the property, or to buy the property. This was unsuccessful, and NGP notified the DOE on February 13, 2014 that it would not be able to complete the project objectives before the recovery act awards deadline and submitted a mutual termination request to the DOE which was accepted.

  18. Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems - A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems - A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions May 2005 Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems - A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions Norman Brinkman, General Motors Corporation Michael Wang, Argonne National Laboratory Trudy Weber, General Motors Corporation Thomas Darlington, Air Improvement Resource, Inc. May

  19. Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing Oil/Gas Wells in Texas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing Oil/Gas Wells in Texas George Alcorn Jr. Universal GeoPower May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov * DOE-FOA-0000109 * Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing Oil/Gas Wells in Texas *

  20. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Information Program. Update 2, August 1981, Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their Onshore Impacts: a summary report, July 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    In July 1980, the Office of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Information issued an initial report called Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their Onshore Impacts: A Summary Report, July 1980. The purpose of this report was to provide State and local governments with current information about offshore oil and gas resources and onshore activity in the area extending from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, to Cape Canaveral, Florida. This information was designed to assist in socioeconomic planning for the onshore impacts of oil and gas development in the affected areas. This report, Update 2, discusses Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities and their onshore impacts for the period of February 1981 to August 1981. Because of the minimal offshore oil- and gas-related activity in the South Atlantic Region, the onshore impacts are also minimal. Very little, if any, development has occurred as a result of exploration or development. Even though the South Atlantic OCS does contain large areas with hydrocarbon potential, little optimism has been generated by exploration associated with Lease Sale 43. Lease Sale 56 included tracts with geologic conditions more favorable to the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons, especially the deepwatr tracts, but industry showed moderate interest in the first deepwater lease sale. The level of nearshore and onshore activity may increase with exploration associated with Lease Sale 56. More permanent onshore development will be contingent on the outcome of exploration efforts.

  1. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop, October 18-19, 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL : Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, R. comp.; Ahmed, S. comp.

    2012-02-21

    The overall objective of the Workshop was to identify opportunities for accelerating the use of both natural gas (NG) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as motor fuels and in stationary power applications. Specific objectives of the Workshop were to: (1) Convene industry and other stakeholders to share current status/state-of-the-art of NG and H{sub 2} infrastructure; (2) Identify key challenges (including non-technical challenges, such as permitting, installation, codes, and standards) preventing or delaying the widespread deployment of NG and H{sub 2} infrastructure. Identify synergies between NG and H{sub 2} fuels; and (3) Identify and prioritize opportunities for addressing the challenges identified above, and determine roles and opportunities for both the government and industry stakeholders. Plenary speakers and panel discussions summarized the current status of the NG and H{sub 2} infrastructure, technology for their use in transportation and stationary applications, and some of the major challenges and opportunities to more widespread use of these fuels. Two break-out sessions of three groups each addressed focus questions on: (1) infrastructure development needs; (2) deployment synergies; (3) natural gas and fuel cell vehicles (NGVs, FCVs), specialty vehicles, and heavy-duty trucks; (4) CHP (combined heat and power), CHHP (combined hydrogen, heat, and power), and synergistic approaches; and (5) alternative uses of natural gas.

  2. Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Molburg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Energy Systems

    2009-03-31

    Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and incorporated the fuel economy and electricity use of alternative fuel/vehicle systems simulated by the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to conduct a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW results were separately calculated for the blended charge-depleting (CD) and charge-sustaining (CS) modes of PHEV operation and then combined by using a weighting factor that represented the CD vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) share. As indicated by PSAT simulations of the CD operation, grid electricity accounted for a share of the vehicle's total energy use, ranging from 6% for a PHEV 10 to 24% for a PHEV 40, based on CD VMT shares of 23% and 63%, respectively. In addition to the PHEV's fuel economy and type of on-board fuel, the marginal electricity generation mix used to charge the vehicle impacted the WTW results, especially GHG emissions. Three North American Electric Reliability Corporation regions (4, 6, and 13) were selected for this analysis, because they encompassed large metropolitan areas (Illinois, New York, and California, respectively) and provided a significant variation of marginal generation mixes. The WTW results were also reported for the U.S. generation mix and renewable electricity to examine cases of average and clean mixes, respectively. For an all-electric range (AER) between 10 mi and 40 mi, PHEVs that employed petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel), a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline (E85), and hydrogen were shown to offer a 40-60%, 70-90%, and more than 90% reduction in petroleum energy use and a 30-60%, 40-80%, and 10-100% reduction in GHG emissions, respectively, relative to an internal combustion engine vehicle that used gasoline. The spread of WTW GHG emissions among the different fuel production technologies and grid generation mixes was wider than the spread of petroleum energy use, mainly due to the diverse fuel production technologies and feedstock sources for the fuels considered in this analysis. The PHEVs offered reductions in petroleum energy use as compared with regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). More petroleum energy savings were realized as the AER increased, except when the marginal grid mix was dominated by oil-fired power generation. Similarly, more GHG emissions reductions were realized at higher AERs, except when the marginal grid generation mix was dominated by oil or coal. Electricity from renewable sources realized the largest reductions in petroleum energy use and GHG emissions for all PHEVs as the AER increased. The PHEVs that employ biomass-based fuels (e.g., biomass-E85 and -hydrogen) may not realize GHG emissions benefits over regular HEVs if the marginal generation mix is dominated by fossil sources. Uncertainties are associated with the adopted PHEV fuel consumption and marginal generation mix simulation results, which impact the WTW results and require further research. More disaggregate marginal generation data within control areas (where the actual dispatching occurs) and an improved dispatch modeling are needed to accurately assess the impact of PHEV electrification. The market penetration of the PHEVs, their total electric load, and their role as complements rather than replacements of regular HEVs are also uncertain. The effects of the number of daily charges, the time of charging, and the charging capacity have not been evaluated in this study. A more robust analysis of the VMT share of the CD operation is also needed.

  3. Well-to-wheels analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Poch, L.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.; Mahalik, M.; Rousseau, A.

    2010-06-14

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed for mass production by the automotive industry. PHEVs have been touted for their potential to reduce the US transportation sector's dependence on petroleum and cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by (1) using off-peak excess electric generation capacity and (2) increasing vehicles energy efficiency. A well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis - which examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation - can help researchers better understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for PHEV recharging, as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs. For the WTW analysis, Argonne National Laboratory researchers used the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed by Argonne to compare the WTW energy use and GHG emissions associated with various transportation technologies to those associated with PHEVs. Argonne researchers estimated the fuel economy and electricity use of PHEVs and alternative fuel/vehicle systems by using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) model. They examined two PHEV designs: the power-split configuration and the series configuration. The first is a parallel hybrid configuration in which the engine and the electric motor are connected to a single mechanical transmission that incorporates a power-split device that allows for parallel power paths - mechanical and electrical - from the engine to the wheels, allowing the engine and the electric motor to share the power during acceleration. In the second configuration, the engine powers a generator, which charges a battery that is used by the electric motor to propel the vehicle; thus, the engine never directly powers the vehicle's transmission. The power-split configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 10- and 20-mile electric range because they require frequent use of the engine for acceleration and to provide energy when the battery is depleted, while the series configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 30- and 40-mile electric range because they rely mostly on electrical power for propulsion. Argonne researchers calculated the equivalent on-road (real-world) fuel economy on the basis of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency miles per gallon (mpg)-based formulas. The reduction in fuel economy attributable to the on-road adjustment formula was capped at 30% for advanced vehicle systems (e.g., PHEVs, fuel cell vehicles [FCVs], hybrid electric vehicles [HEVs], and battery-powered electric vehicles [BEVs]). Simulations for calendar year 2020 with model year 2015 mid-size vehicles were chosen for this analysis to address the implications of PHEVs within a reasonable timeframe after their likely introduction over the next few years. For the WTW analysis, Argonne assumed a PHEV market penetration of 10% by 2020 in order to examine the impact of significant PHEV loading on the utility power sector. Technological improvement with medium uncertainty for each vehicle was also assumed for the analysis. Argonne employed detailed dispatch models to simulate the electric power systems in four major regions of the US: the New England Independent System Operator, the New York Independent System Operator, the State of Illinois, and the Western Electric Coordinating Council. Argonne also evaluated the US average generation mix and renewable generation of electricity for PHEV and BEV recharging scenarios to show the effects of these generation mixes on PHEV WTW results. Argonne's GREET model was designed to examine the WTW energy use and GHG emissions for PHEVs and BEVs, as well as FCVs, regular HEVs, and conventional gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs). WTW results are reported for charge-depleting (CD) operation of PHEVs under different recharging scenarios. The combined WTW results of CD and charge-sustaining (CS) PHEV operations (using the utility factor method) were also examined and reported. According to the utility factor method, the share of vehicle miles traveled during CD operation is 25% for PHEV10 and 51% for PHEV40. Argonne's WTW analysis of PHEVs revealed that the following factors significantly impact the energy use and GHG emissions results for PHEVs and BEVs compared with baseline gasoline vehicle technologies: (1) the regional electricity generation mix for battery recharging and (2) the adjustment of fuel economy and electricity consumption to reflect real-world driving conditions. Although the analysis predicted the marginal electricity generation mixes for major regions in the United States, these mixes should be evaluated as possible scenarios for recharging PHEVs because significant uncertainties are associated with the assumed market penetration for these vehicles. Thus, the reported WTW results for PHEVs should be directly correlated with the underlying generation mix, rather than with the region linked to that mix.

  4. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reveals the Assembly and Evolution of Complex Metalloenzymes summary written by Raven Hanna The potential for using biological enzymes to make hydrogen to use as a...

  5. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Costs by Changing the Structure and Reactivity of Platinum summary written by Raven Hanna Hydrogen fuel cells are a green alternative to fossil fuels for powering...

  6. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Effects of Aerosol Source on Ocean Photosynthesis summary written by Raven ... Soluble iron can reach oceans by water currents carrying dusts or by air currents carrying ...

  7. Program Summaries

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Program Summaries Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee ...

  8. Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Preston; Jordan, Preston D.; Benson, Sally M.

    2008-05-15

    Well blowout rates in oil fields undergoing thermally enhanced recovery (via steam injection) in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005 were on the order of 1 per 1,000 well construction operations, 1 per 10,000 active wells per year, and 1 per 100,000 shut-in/idle and plugged/abandoned wells per year. This allows some initial inferences about leakage of CO2 via wells, which is considered perhaps the greatest leakage risk for geological storage of CO2. During the study period, 9% of the oil produced in the United States was from District 4, and 59% of this production was via thermally enhanced recovery. There was only one possible blowout from an unknown or poorly located well, despite over a century of well drilling and production activities in the district. The blowout rate declined dramatically during the study period, most likely as a result of increasing experience, improved technology, and/or changes in safety culture. If so, this decline indicates the blowout rate in CO2-storage fields can be significantly minimized both initially and with increasing experience over time. Comparable studies should be conducted in other areas. These studies would be particularly valuable in regions with CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and natural gas storage.

  9. Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S3. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arizona, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5 5 5 5 5 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 183 168 117 72 106 From

  10. Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Poch, L.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.; Mahalik, M.; Rousseau, A.

    2010-06-01

    This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for recharging plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs.

  11. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Finding the Crystal Structure of P-gp: A Protein that Makes Cancer Cells Resistant to Chemotherapy summary written by Raven Hanna Medications can be...

  12. New Hampshire Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Imports 5.48 5.45 4.08 6.63 10.55 1999-2014 Exports -- 7.54 2.62 6.65 4.06 2007-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1980-2005 Citygate 8.83 8.07 7.15 7.60 9.28 NA 1984-2015 Residential 14.46 14.67 13.74 13.84 16.27 NA 1980-2015 Commercial 12.72 11.46 11.95 12.13 14.96 13.63 1977-2015 Industrial 11.59 11.57 10.48 10.68 9.46 8.10 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 1994-1995 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2015 Imports and Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Imports 18,297 19,826 47,451 63,446 52,160 1982-2014 Exports

  13. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,"Production",10,"Monthly","122015","1151991" ,"Data 3","Underground ... 35292,,435487,304592,130895,20814,900,19913 35323,,463642,304592,159050,28469,460,280...

  14. New Hampshire Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.87 7.17 5.90 NA 4.34 6.40 1989-2015 Residential 19.32 22.79 23.02 17.97 14.18 15.13 1989-2015 Commercial 13.74 14.78 14.76 12.30 11.15 12.39 1989-2015 Industrial 4.81 4.75 4.00 4.30 5.91 7.74 2001-2015 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers NA NA NA NA NA NA 2001-2015 Residential 146 147 148 242 657 854 1989-2015 Commercial 221 226 232 377 823 1,017 1989-2015 Industrial NA NA NA NA NA NA 2001-2015 Vehicle Fuel 6 6 6 6 6 6 2010-2015 Electric

  15. New Jersey Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.67 4.84 5.00 4.37 4.30 4.27 1989-2015 Residential 12.03 12.98 12.38 10.30 9.08 7.85 1989-2015 Commercial 8.66 8.78 8.03 8.10 8.66 8.24 1989-2015 Industrial 8.62 8.41 8.63 7.57 7.11 7.92 2001-2015 Electric Power 2.07 2.20 2.08 2.00 1.80 1.71 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers 47,857 46,260 NA NA 56,469 63,409 2001-2015 Residential 5,478 4,422 4,498 9,214 16,149 22,163 1989-2015 Commercial 7,486 8,431 NA NA 11,186 13,623 1989-2015 Industrial 4,256 4,032 4,128 4,370

  16. North Carolina Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.64 4.68 4.46 3.88 NA 3.10 1989-2015 Residential 21.31 NA 21.72 14.57 12.12 12.84 1989-2015 Commercial 9.38 NA 9.30 8.01 8.45 NA 1989-2015 Industrial 5.78 5.70 5.96 5.86 5.57 5.70 2001-2015 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers 37,432 NA 35,685 35,342 43,008 NA 2001-2015 Residential 1,090 NA 1,121 2,814 6,342 7,028 1989-2015 Commercial 2,535 NA 3,004 4,282 5,548 NA 1989-2015 Industrial 7,854 8,154 7,974 9,044 8,911 9,049 2001-2015 Vehicle

  17. Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.52 2.41 2.31 2.24 2.22 2.22 1989-2015 Residential 19.72 20.92 20.98 19.02 15.46 13.47 1989-2015 Commercial 16.62 17.00 17.11 15.74 12.87 10.96 1989-2015 Industrial 9.61 10.09 9.79 9.92 9.48 8.22 2001-2015 Electric Power 2.40 2.42 2.78 3.74 3.50 W 2002-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1994-1996 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers 8,254 8,371 4,837 6,216 7,643 6,847 2001-2015 Residential 430 397 385 1,038 1,591 1,903 1989-2015 Commercial 258 249 244

  18. South Carolina Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.97 3.96 4.01 3.56 3.20 3.48 1989-2015 Residential 24.86 22.97 24.15 16.51 NA NA 1989-2015 Commercial 8.33 8.04 8.28 7.97 8.35 10.06 1989-2015 Industrial 4.22 4.46 4.13 4.03 3.86 4.01 2001-2015 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers 23,407 22,303 20,307 22,863 25,780 NA 2001-2015 Residential 496 521 542 1,020 2,345 2,982 1989-2015 Commercial 1,324 1,399 1,380 1,827 2,136 NA 1989-2015 Industrial 6,642 6,718 6,616 7,238 7,342 NA 2001-2015

  19. New Mexico Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.32 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 4.84 4.52 3.70 4.08 4.99 NA 1984-2015 Residential 9.63 9.14 8.69 8.92 10.13 8.58 1967-2015 Commercial 7.47 6.98 6.31 6.77 7.87 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 6.17 6.22 4.96 5.58 6.45 4.95 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 4.46 9.43 10.05 1994-2012 Electric Power W W W 4.35 4.93 3.21 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 15,412 15,005 13,586 13,576 15,283 1977-2014 Adjustments -89 73 153 -202 555 1977-2014

  20. New York Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 1967-2010 Imports 5.43 4.96 3.83 5.59 8.60 1989-2014 Exports -- 4.69 3.61 4.29 5.56 1999-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.86 6.04 5.35 5.02 5.47 4.14 1984-2015 Residential 14.04 13.71 12.97 12.49 12.54 11.20 1967-2015 Commercial 10.88 9.32 7.84 8.00 8.31 6.89 1967-2015 Industrial 8.55 8.18 6.92 7.44 8.13 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 8.32 9.81 21.00 1990-2012 Electric Power 5.73 5.56 3.95 5.26 5.46 3.51 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of

  1. North Dakota Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 1967-2010 Imports 4.41 4.04 2.72 3.59 5.00 1994-2014 Exports -- -- -- -- 14.71 1999-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.50 5.06 4.43 4.99 6.37 NA 1984-2015 Residential 8.08 8.10 7.43 7.43 8.86 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 7.03 7.00 6.04 6.32 7.74 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 5.22 5.10 4.48 4.14 5.61 3.14 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 8.84 8.08 6.17 1990-2012 Electric Power 6.51 8.66 6.44 -- 4.08 2.89 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 1,667 2,381

  2. West Virginia Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NA 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.31 5.91 4.99 4.65 5.07 4.00 1984-2015 Residential 11.39 10.91 10.77 9.98 10.21 10.46 1967-2015 Commercial 10.27 9.65 9.35 8.61 8.92 9.15 1967-2015 Industrial 5.40 4.89 3.60 4.30 5.00 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- 1992-2012 Electric Power 5.14 W 3.33 4.29 W W 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 7,000 10,345 14,611 22,765 29,432 1977-2014 Adjustments -359 -1 251 -565 -559 1977-2014

  3. South Atlantic summary report 2. Revision of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, J.L.; Kurz, F.N.; Porter, E.O.

    1982-05-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in the South Atlantic Region began in 1960, when geophysical surveys of the area were initiated. In 1977, a Continental Offshore Stratigraphic Test (COST) well was drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. In March 1978, the first lease sale, Sale 43, was held, resulting in the leasing of 43 tracts. Approximately a year later, in May 1979, the first exploratory drilling began, and by February 1980, six exploratory wells had been drilled by four companies. Hydrocarbons were not found in any of these wells. Lease Sale 56, the second lease sale in the South Atlantic Region, was held in August 1981. The sale resulted in the leasing of 47 tracts. Most of the leased tracts are in deep water along the Continental Slope off North Carolina. To date, no drilling has occurred on these tracts, but it is likely that two wells will be drilled or will be in the process of being drilled by the end of 1982. Reoffering Sale RS-2 is scheduled for July 1982, and it will include tracts offered in Lease Sale 56 that were not awarded leases. Lease Sale 78 is scheduled to be held in July 1983. The most recent (March 1982) estimates of risked resources for leased lands in the South Atlantic OCS are 27 million barrels of oil and 120 billion cubic feet of gas. To date, onshore impacts resulting from OCS exploration have been minimal, and they were associated with Lease Sale 43 exploratory activities. In June 1981, the South Atlantic Regional Technical Working Group prepared a Regional Transportation Management Plan for the South Atlantic OCS. The plan is principally an integration of regulatory frameworks, policies, and plans that are applicable to pipeline siting from each of the South Atlantic coastal States and Federal agencies with jurisdiction in the area.

  4. Lightweight proppants for deep-gas-well stimulation. Third annual report, July 1, 1981-June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutler, R.A.; Enniss, D.O.; Swartz, G.C.; Jones, A.H.

    1983-04-01

    The need exists for lower-density, less-expensive proppants for use in hydraulic-fracturing treatments. Ceramics, fabricated as fully sintered or hollow spheres, are the best materials for obtaining economical proppants with adequate strength. Fabrication techniques are described for fabricating solid-porcelain proppants and hollow-ceramic proppants. Porcelain proppants made by mix-pelletization techniques have good characteristics for propping wells with closure stresses to 96.5 MPa (14,000 psi). The properties of porcelain proppants are compared with twelve commercially available or experimental proppants. Several of the proppants evaluated had adequate conductivity for most hydraulic-fracturing jobs and are less expensive than bauxite. A single-fluid nozzle, counter-current spray-drying technique was used to make hollow, spherical proppants. Alumina was used as the ceramic raw material for these spray-drying experiments, but the same technique can be used with other ceramic materials. Hollow proppants with strengths comparable to sand have been spray dried but further optimization of spray drying parameters is needed to achieve proppants with concentric voids and improved strength. Bauxite, mullite, alumina and mullite rods were fast fired in a plasma in order to see if it is feasible to sinter these materials rapidly. Fast firing appears to be an alternative method of sintering proppants and may reduce costs, thereby making proppants more cost competitive with sand. 42 figures, 20 tables.

  5. Executive Summary | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Executive Summary Executive Summary Introduction The United States is in the midst of an energy revolution. Over the last decade, the United States has slashed net petroleum imports, dramatically increased shale gas production, scaled up wind and solar power, and cut the growth in electricity consumption to nearly zero through widespread efficiency measures. Emerging advanced energy technologies provide a rich set of options to address our energy challenges, but their large-scale deployment

  6. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FUSION ENERGY SCIENCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE Panel on High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas ADVANCING THE SCIENCE OF HIGH ENERGY DENSITY LABORATORY PLASMAS January 2009 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.......................................................................................... 5 1 HIGH ENERGY DENSITY LABORATORY PLASMA SCIENCE .................................... 15 2 THE CHARGE TO FESAC

  7. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6-2015 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Maryland NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Michigan NA NA NA NA NA NA ...

  8. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    14,414,287 13,247,498 12,291,070 12,504,227 10,759,545 10,384,119 1967-2014 U.S. State Offshore 259,848 234,236 208,970 204,667 186,887 159,337 1978-2014 Federal Offshore U.S. 1,878,928 1,701,665 1,355,489 1,028,474 831,636 720,400 1977-2014 Alaska 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 91,686 104,219 1967-2014 Alaska Onshore 96,685 85,383 76,066 74,998 64,537 81,565 1992-2014 Alaska State Offshore 40,954 42,034 36,202 32,875 27,149 22,654 1978-2014 Arkansas 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 107,666

  9. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6-2015 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Maryland NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Michigan NA NA NA NA NA NA...

  10. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    14,414,287 13,247,498 12,291,070 12,504,227 10,759,545 10,384,119 1967-2014 U.S. State Offshore 259,848 234,236 208,970 204,667 186,887 159,337 1978-2014 Federal Offshore U.S....

  11. Usage Summaries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Usage Summaries PDSF Group Batch Summary Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2016 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 Partial SGE62 2015 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 2014 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 2013 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 2012 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 2011 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62

  12. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 image Outside view of the T=4 subunit arrangement. » Links Scientific Highlight Johnson Lab » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Following the pH-dependent Conformational Changes of a Maturing Viral Capsid summary written by Raven Hanna The capsid that surrounds viruses is formed from subunit proteins that interact in specific ways to form a tight shell. The processes of coming together and forming interactions are multistep and complex and are fundamental events to

  13. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 25, 2010 seafloor_biofilms Image of pillow basalts from inside the Pisces Submersible. » Links Scientific Highlight Templeton Lab EMSL News Imaging at SSRL » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Researchers Discover an Unexpected Source of Energy for Deep-sea Microbial Communities summary written by Raven Hanna New rock formed by deep undersea volcanoes does not stay bare long. Microbes quickly move onto these basalts to form communities in the form of biofilms. As

  14. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hasan Research Princeton News Release » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Macroscopic Quantum Insulator State Observed summary written by Raven Hanna One of the strangest consequences of quantum mechanics is the seemingly instantaneous communication of subatomic particles over long distances. Known as quantum entanglement, pairs or groups of particles can become linked so that any changes made to one will cause the others to respond quicker than the time it takes for light

  15. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    03, 2008 » Links Scientific Highlight Tainer Website Scripps Press Release » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Role of Specific Protein Mutations in Causing Human Disease Revealed summary written by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communication Office Scientists are one step closer to understanding a piece of the machinery involved in DNA transcription and repair, thanks to work done in part at the SSRL macromolecular crystallography Beam Line 11-1. The team, led by The Scripps

  16. EFRC Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Frontier Research Center Alex Zunger (NREL) Summary statement: We will focus on material discovery via an "Inverse Band Structure" (IBS) methodology to theoretically identify promising structures and compositions and then apply a combination of high-throughput and targeted materials synthesis to experimentally converge on the optimum properties. RESEARCH PLAN AND DIRECTIONS Rather than use the conventional approach "given the structure, find the electronic properties,"

  17. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic and their onshore impacts. Atlantic summary report, July 1, 1983-December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolph, R.W.; Havran, K.J.

    1984-12-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf in the Atlantic continues. Hydrocarbon exploration efforts have been and probably will continue to be concentrated on four major sedimentary basins: the Georges Bank Basin, the Baltimore Canyon Trough, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau Basin. To date, 46 exploratory wells have been drilled in these areas, most of them in the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area where resource estimates indicate the hydrocarbon potential is the greatest of the three Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf planning areas. Currently, no operators are involved in exploration efforts in the Atlantic. No commercial discoveries have been announced. Since the first and most successful sale of Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf blocks in Lease Sale 40 in August 1976, there have been eight other sales bringing total revenues of almost $3 billion to the Federal Treasury. The current tentative milestone chart for the 5-year offshore leasing schedule calls for four additional lease sales to be held in the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Although no firm plans have been made for the transportation of potential offshore hydrocarbons to onshore processing facilities, it is believed that oil would be transported by tanker or tug-barge system to existing refineries on the Raritan and Delaware Bays. Gas probably would be transported by pipeline to one of several onshore landfalls identifed by Atlantic Coast States and in Federal environmental impact documents. Recent onshore support for Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf exploration came from Davisville, Rhode Island, the only shore support base for the Atlantic that was active during 1984. Three maps are provided in the back pocket of this report for the North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic planning areas. 29 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hg Methylation » Links Scientific Highlight BL2-3 BL6-2C BL9-3 BL10-2 » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Imaging Mercury in the Rhizosphere of Wetland Plants summary written by Raven Hanna High levels of mercury in our diets can have adverse effects on our health, and fish are a major source of dietary mercury. Because of a process called biomagnification, mercury levels in fish can build up to be at a much higher concentration than in the surrounding water. The mercury

  19. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2008 » Links Scientific Highlight Harbury Website » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces A Golden Ruler Used to Measure the Stretching Rigidity of Short-length Scale DNA summary written by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communication Office DNA is softer and stretchier than previously believed, at least on the short length scales of up to 20 base pairs. This finding is the result of a recent study conducted in part at SSRL's biological small-angle x-ray scattering Beam Line 4-2 by a

  20. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25, 2008 » Links Scientific Highlight Saphire Website Scripps Press Release Tracking Ebola, Scripps At the Forefront » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Revealing a Structural Weakness of the Deadly Ebolavirus summary written by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communication Office Scientists are one step closer to conquering the deadly Ebolavirus, thanks to research conducted at SSRL structural biology Beam Lines 9-2 and 11-1 and ALS Beam Line 5.02 by a team of researchers led by

  1. Chair Summaries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chair Summaries from the 2006 Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICC) Workshop D. Craig, 1 R. Goldston, 2 T. R. Jarboe, 3 B. A. Nelson, 3 C. R. Sovinec, 1 S. Woodruff, 3, *and G. Wurden 4 The goal of the ICC program within the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) is to improve magnetic and inertial fusion concepts and to advance plasma science. ICC2006 is a continuation of the ICC series, which last year met in Madison, Wisconsin. It provides a forum for an exchange of ideas through

  2. Executive Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE/RL-2011-50, REV. 1 iii DOE/RL-2011-50, REV. 1 iv This page intentionally left blank. DOE/RL-2011-50, REV. 1 v Executive Summary The evaluation of potential impacts to groundwater from contaminants in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site is important for making final remedial action decisions for waste sites. The potential impacts or risk associated with groundwater protection pertains to soil contamination throughout the entire vadose zone, and is the principal exposure pathway for

  3. Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Liu, T.J. H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-06-01

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  4. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

    2009-09-01

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  5. SSRL29 Workshop Summaries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshop Summaries X-ray Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future</ font> (Chairs: John Miao and Keith Hodgson) This workshop provided a forum to discuss the scientific applications of a variety of imaging and spectro-microscopic techniques. Invited speakers discussed important results using these applications and predicted possible future scientific directions with the advance of instrumentation and x-r ay sources. The workshop was well attended with over fifty

  6. Well Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Well Placement Well Placement LANL maintains an extensive groundwater monitoring and surveillance program through sampling. August 1, 2013 Finished groundwater well head with solar...

  7. Alternative Neutron Detection Testing Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-04-08

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. Most currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large area neutron detector. This type of neutron detector is used in the TSA and other RPMs installed in international locations and in the Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation RPMs deployed primarily for domestic applications. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world and, thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated wavelength-shifting plastic fibers. Reported here is a summary of the testing carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on these technologies to date, as well as measurements on 3He tubes at various pressures. Details on these measurements are available in the referenced reports. Sponsors of these tests include the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Department of Defense (DoD), as well as internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory funds.

  8. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 6. Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, S

    2007-09-05

    Throughout fifty-three years of operations, an estimated 792,000 Ci (29,300 TBq) of tritium have been released to the atmosphere at the Livermore site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); about 75% was tritium gas (HT) primarily from the accidental releases of 1965 and 1970. Routine emissions contributed slightly more than 100,000 Ci (3,700 TBq) HT and about 75,000 Ci (2,800 TBq) tritiated water vapor (HTO) to the total. A Tritium Dose Reconstruction was undertaken to estimate both the annual doses to the public for each year of LLNL operations and the doses from the few accidental releases. Some of the dose calculations were new, and the others could be compared with those calculated by LLNL. Annual doses (means and 95% confidence intervals) to the potentially most exposed member of the public were calculated for all years using the same model and the same assumptions. Predicted tritium concentrations in air were compared with observed mean annual concentrations at one location from 1973 onwards. Doses predicted from annual emissions were compared with those reported in the past by LLNL. The highest annual mean dose predicted from routine emissions was 34 {micro}Sv (3.4 mrem) in 1957; its upper confidence limit, based on very conservative assumptions about the speciation of the release, was 370 {micro}Sv (37 mrem). The upper confidence limits for most annual doses were well below the current regulatory limit of 100 {micro}Sv (10 mrem) for dose to the public from release to the atmosphere; the few doses that exceeded this were well below the regulatory limits of the time. Lacking the hourly meteorological data needed to calculate doses from historical accidental releases, ingestion/inhalation dose ratios were derived from a time-dependent accident consequence model that accounts for the complex behavior of tritium in the environment. Ratios were modified to account for only those foods growing at the time of the releases. The highest dose from an accidental release was calculated for a release of about 1,500 Ci HTO that occurred in October 1954. The likely dose for this release was probably less than 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem), but, because of many unknowns (e.g., release-specific meteorological and accidental conditions) and conservative assumptions, the uncertainty was very high. As a result, the upper confidence limit on the predictions, considered a dose that could not have been exceeded, was estimated to be 2 mSv (200 mrem). The next highest dose, from the 1970 accidental release of about 290,000 Ci (10,700 TBq) HT when wind speed and wind direction were known, was one-third as great. Doses from LLNL accidental releases were well below regulatory reporting limits. All doses, from both routine and accidental releases, were far below the level (3.6 mSv [360 mrem] per year) at which adverse health effects have been documented in the literature.

  9. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output:

  10. Geothermal Energy Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Renner

    2007-08-01

    Following is complete draft.Geothermal Summary for AAPG Explorer J. L. Renner, Idaho National Laboratory Geothermal energy is used to produce electricity in 24 countries. The United States has the largest capacity (2,544 MWe) followed by Philippines (1,931 MWe), Mexico (953 MWe), Indonesia (797 MWe), and Italy (791 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). When Chevron Corporation purchased Unocal Corporation they became the leading producer of geothermal energy worldwide with projects in Indonesia and the Philippines. The U. S. geothermal industry is booming thanks to increasing energy prices, renewable portfolio standards, and a production tax credit. California (2,244 MWe) is the leading producer, followed by Nevada (243 MWe), Utah (26 MWe) and Hawaii (30 MWe) and Alaska (0.4 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). Alaska joined the producing states with two 0.4 KWe power plants placed on line at Chena Hot Springs during 2006. The plant uses 30 liters per second of 75C water from shallow wells. Power production is assisted by the availability of gravity fed, 7C cooling water (http://www.yourownpower.com/) A 13 MWe binary power plant is expected to begin production in the fall of 2007 at Raft River in southeastern Idaho. Idaho also is a leader in direct use of geothermal energy with the state capital building and several other state and Boise City buildings as well as commercial and residential space heated using fluids from several, interconnected geothermal systems. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 modified leasing provisions and royalty rates for both geothermal electrical production and direct use. Pursuant to the legislation the Bureau of Land management and Minerals Management Service published final regulations for continued geothermal leasing, operations and royalty collection in the Federal Register (Vol. 72, No. 84 Wednesday May 2, 2007, BLM p. 24358-24446, MMS p. 24448-24469). Existing U. S. plants focus on high-grade geothermal systems located in the west. However, interest in non-traditional geothermal development is increasing. A comprehensive new MIT-led study of the potential for geothermal energy within the United States predicts that mining the huge amounts of stored thermal energy in the Earths crust not associated with hydrothermal systems, could supply a substantial portion of U.S. electricity with minimal environmental impact (Tester, et al., 2006, available at http://geothermal.inl.gov). There is also renewed interest in geothermal production from other non-traditional sources such as the overpressured zones in the Gulf Coast and warm water co-produced with oil and gas. Ormat Technologies, Inc., a major geothermal company, recently acquired geothermal leases in the offshore overpressured zone of Texas. Ormat and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center recently announced plans to jointly produce geothermal power from co-produced water from the Teapot Dome oilfield (Casper Star-Tribune, March 2, 2007). RMOTC estimates that 300 KWe capacity is available from the 40,000 BWPD of 88C water associated with oil production from the Tensleep Sandstone (Milliken, 2007). The U. S. Department of Energy is seeking industry partners to develop electrical generation at other operating oil and gas fields (for more information see: https://e-center.doe.gov/iips/faopor.nsf/UNID/50D3734745055A73852572CA006665B1?OpenDocument). Several web sites offer periodically updated information related to the geothermal industry and th

  11. Well Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Well Placement Well Placement LANL maintains an extensive groundwater monitoring and surveillance program through sampling. August 1, 2013 Finished groundwater well head with solar power Finished groundwater well head with solar power How does LANL determine where to put a monitoring well? Project teams routinely review groundwater monitoring data to verify adequate placement of wells and to plan the siting of additional wells as needed. RELATED IMAGES

  12. Oklahoma Natural Gas - Residential Efficiency Rebates | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    250 Clothes Dryer: up to 500 Summary To encourage customers to install high-efficiency natural gas equipment in homes, Oklahoma Natural Gas offers rebates to residential...

  13. Prices for Natural Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Prices for Natural Gas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Prices for Natural Gas AgencyCompany Organization: Google Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic...

  14. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  15. Peer review panel summary report for technical determination of mixed waste incineration off-gas systems for Rocky Flats; Appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-12-31

    A Peer Review Panel was convened on September 15-17, 1992 in Boulder, Co. The members of this panel included representatives from DOE, EPA, and DOE contractors along with invited experts in the fields of air pollution control and waste incineration. The primary purpose of this review panel was to make a technical determination of a hold, test and release off gas capture system should be implemented in the proposed RF Pland mixed waste incineration system; or if a state of the art continuous air pollution control and monitoring system should be utilized as the sole off-gas control system. All of the evaluations by the panel were based upon the use of the fluidized bed unit proposed by Rocky Flats and cannot be generalized to other systems.

  16. Untitled Page -- Other Sites Summary

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Other Sites Summary Search Other Sites Considered Sites Other Sites All LM Quick Search All Other Sites 11 E (2) Disposal Cell - 037 ANC Gas Hills Site - 040 Argonne National Laboratory - West - 014 Bodo Canyon Cell - 006 Burro Canyon Disposal Cell - 007 Cheney Disposal Cell - 008 Chevron Panna Maria Site - 030 Clive Disposal Cell - 036 Commercial (Burial) Disposal Site Maxey Flats Disposal Site - KY 02 Conoco Conquista Site - 031 Cotter Canon City Site - 009 Dawn Ford Site - 038 EFB White Mesa

  17. STEP Financial Incentives Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    STEP Financial Incentives Summary, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  18. Draft GTCC EIS Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE/EIS-0375-D) February 2011 SUMMARY ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y On the cover: The photographs on the front cover are, from left to right: glove boxes contaminated with GTCC Other Waste, abandoned Am-241 and Cs-137 gauges and shipping shields, and disused well logging sources being loaded into a 55-gallon drum. COVER SHEET Lead Agency: U.S.

  19. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Mid-Atlantic and their onshore impacts: a summary report, November 1979. Update 3, August 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    At the present, there are no operators drilling in the Mid-Atlantic Region. The prime targets for future exploration will be in areas of 3000 to 6000 feet (914 to 1829 m) depth of water, seaward of previously leased tracts. No commercial discoveries have been found during the 4-year drilling history of the area. Because of the minimal offshore oil- and gas-related activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region, the onshore impacts are also minimal. Little development has occurred as a result of exploration or development. The level of nearshore and onshore activity may increase with exploration associated with upcoming Lease Sale 59. More permanent onshore development will be contingent on the outcome of future exploration efforts. After Lease Sale 59, the next sale is Lease Sale 76, which is tentatively scheduled for March 1983.

  20. Investigation of cold fusion phenomena in deuterated metals. Final report, Volume 1. Overview, executive summary, chemistry, physics, gas reactions, metallurgy. Technical information series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, L.; Barrowes, S.C.; Bergeson, H.E.; Bourgeois, F.; Cedzynska, K.

    1991-06-01

    The March 1989 announcement by Pons and Fleischmann stimulated worldwide interest in the cold fusion phenomenon. In Utah the legislature appropriated $5 million to support cold fusion research and development. As cold fusion inquiries continue worldwide, this interim report has been written to document the scientific and legal work that has been funded by the Utah legislature. Partial contents include these titles of papers: Cold Fusion Studies in a High-Pressure Sealed Cell; Tritium and Neutron Generation in Palladium Cathodes with High Deuterium Loading; Deuterium-Gas Phase Reactions on Palladium; Excess Heat Estimation with the Kalman Filter; Ultrasonic Energy Effects on Palladium Electrodes in Cold Fusion Cells; Nuclear Measurements on Deuterium-Loaded Palladium and Titanium.