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Sample records for gas wells drilled

  1. Oil and Gas Well Drilling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Oil and Gas Well Drilling Author Jeff Tester Published NA, 2011 DOI Not Provided Check for...

  2. Horizontal underbalanced drilling of gas wells with coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, R.J.; Li, J.; Lupick, G.S.

    1999-03-01

    Coiled tubing drilling technology is gaining popularity and momentum as a significant and reliable method of drilling horizontal underbalanced wells. It is quickly moving into new frontiers. To this point, most efforts in the Western Canadian Basin have been focused towards sweet oil reservoirs in the 900--1300 m true vertical depth (TVD) range, however there is an ever-increasing interest in deeper and gas-producing formations. Significant design challenges on both conventional and coiled tubing drilling operations are imposed when attempting to drill these formations underbalanced. Coiled tubing is an ideal technology for underbalanced drilling due to its absence of drillstring connections resulting in continuous underbalanced capabilities. This also makes it suitable for sour well drilling and live well intervention without the risk of surface releases of reservoir gas. Through the use of pressure deployment procedures it is possible to complete the drilling operation without need to kill the well, thereby maintaining underbalanced conditions right through to the production phase. The use of coiled tubing also provides a means for continuous wireline communication with downhole steering, logging and pressure recording devices.

  3. Laser Oil and Gas Well Drilling Demonstration Videos

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    ANL's Laser Applications Laboratory and collaborators are examining the feasibility of adapting high-power laser technology to drilling for gas and oil. The initial phase is designed to establish a scientific basis for developing a commercial laser drilling system and determine the level of gas industry interest in pursuing future research. Using lasers to bore a hole offers an entirely new approach to mechanical drilling. The novel drilling system would transfer light energy from lasers on the surface, down a borehole by a fiber optic bundle, to a series of lenses that would direct the laser light to the rock face. Researchers believe that state-of-the-art lasers have the potential to penetrate rock many times faster than conventional boring technologies - a huge benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Because the laser head does not contact the rock, there is no need to stop drilling to replace a mechanical bit. Moreover, researchers believe that lasers have the ability to melt the rock in a way that creates a ceramic sheath in the wellbore, eliminating the expense of buying and setting steel well casing. A laser system could also contain a variety of downhole sensors, including visual imaging systems that could communicate with the surface through the fiber optic cabling. Earlier studies have been promising, but there is still much to learn. One of the primary objectives of the new study will be to obtain much more precise measurements of the energy requirements needed to transmit light from surface lasers down a borehole with enough power to bore through rocks as much as 20,000 feet or more below the surface. Another objective will be to determine if sending the laser light in sharp pulses, rather than as a continuous stream, could further increase the rate of rock penetration. A third aspect will be to determine if lasers can be used in the presence of drilling fluids. In most wells, thick fluids called "drilling muds" are injected into

  4. U.S. Nominal Cost per Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 102.7 94.7 97.1 92.4 104.8 101.9 133.8 141.0 148.5 154.3 1970's 160.7 166.6 157.8 155.3 189.2 262.0 270.4 313.5 374.2 443.1 1980's 536.4 698.6 864.3 608.1 489.8 508.7 522.9 380.4 460.3 457.8 1990's 471.3 506.6 426.1 521.2 535.1 629.7 616.0 728.6 815.6 798.4 2000's 756.9 896.5 991.9

  5. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 5,682 1950's 5,466 5,497 6,071 5,654 6,059 5,964 6,301 6,898 6,657 6,613 1960's 6,298 6,457 6,728 6,370 7,547 7,295 8,321 7,478 7,697 8,092 1970's 7,695 7,649 7,400 6,596 6,456 6,748 6,777 6,625 6,662 6,630 1980's 6,604 6,772 6,921 6,395 6,502 6,787 6,777 6,698 6,683 6,606 1990's 7,100 7,122 6,907 6,482 6,564

  6. Shallow gas well drilling with coiled tubing in the San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, R.G.; Ovitz, R.W.; Guild, G.J.; Biggs, M.D.

    1996-12-31

    Coiled tubing is being utilized to drill new wells, for re-entry drilling to deepen or laterally extend existing wells, and for underbalanced drilling to prevent formation damage. Less than a decade old, coiled tubing drilling technology is still in its inaugral development stage. Initially, utilizing coiled tubing was viewed as a {open_quotes}science project{close_quotes} to determine the validity of performing drilling operations in-lieu of the conventional rotary rig. Like any new technology, the initial attempts were not always successful, but did show promise as an economical alternative if continued efforts were made in the refinement of equipment and operational procedures. A multiwell project has been completed in the San Juan Basin of Northwestern New Mexico which provides documentation indicating that coiled tubing can be an alternative to the conventional rotary rig. A 3-well pilot project, a 6-well project was completed uniquely utilizing the combined resources of a coiled tubing service company, a producing company, and a drilling contractor. This combination of resources aided in the refinement of surface equipment, personnel, mud systems, jointed pipe handling, and mobilization. The results of the project indicate that utilization of coiled tubing for the specific wells drilled was an economical alternative to the conventional rotary rig for drilling shallow gas wells.

  7. Drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells in an H/sub 2/S environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dosch, M.W.; Hodgson, S.F.

    1981-01-01

    The following subjects are covered: facts about hydrogen sulfides; drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells; detection devices and protective equipment; hazard levels and safety procedures; first aid; and H/sub 2/S in California oil, gas, and geothermal fields. (MHR)

  8. U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Dollars per Foot) Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 61.83 60.39 61.71 58.22 58.11 59.64 64.51 66.84 67.56 67.15 1970's 68.42 65.82 68.82 70.65 83.31 97.34 100.66 109.49 123.76 136.64 1980's 142.52 159.51 173.34 127.81 106.27 108.09 107.90 80.21 92.78 93.63 1990's 93.23 97.86

  9. Well drilling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvis, Robert L.; Newsom, Melvin M.

    1977-01-01

    Well drilling rates may be increased by impelling projectiles to fracture rock formations and drilling with rock drill bits through the projectile fractured rock.

  10. U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Thousand Dollars per Well) Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 54.9 54.5 58.6 55.0 55.8 60.6 68.4 72.9 81.5 88.6 1970's 94.9 94.7 106.4 117.2 138.7 177.8 191.6 227.2 280.0 331.4 1980's 367.7 453.7 514.4 371.7 326.5 349.4 364.6 279.6 354.7 362.2 1990's 383.6 421.5 382.6 426.8 483.2

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC PROPPANTS FROM GAS SHALE WELL DRILL CUTTINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Fox, K.

    2013-10-02

    The objective of this study was to develop a method of converting drill cuttings from gas shale wells into high strength proppants via flame spheroidization and devitrification processing. Conversion of drill cuttings to spherical particles was only possible for small particle sizes (< 53 {micro}m) using a flame former after a homogenizing melting step. This size limitation is likely to be impractical for application as conventional proppants due to particle packing characteristics. In an attempt to overcome the particle size limitation, sodium and calcium were added to the drill cuttings to act as fluxes during the spheroidization process. However, the flame former remained unable to form spheres from the fluxed material at the relatively large diameters (0.5 - 2 mm) targeted for proppants. For future work, the flame former could be modified to operate at higher temperature or longer residence time in order to produce larger, spherical materials. Post spheroidization heat treatments should be investigated to tailor the final phase assemblage for high strength and sufficient chemical durability.

  12. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Well) Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,412 1950's 3,766 3,837 4,015 4,373 4,365 4,339 4,734 4,950 4,801 5,120 1960's 5,321 5,145 5,186 5,198 5,171 5,337 5,474 5,629 5,716 5,531 1970's 5,644 5,670 5,259 5,286 5,173 5,238 4,960 5,053 5,066 5,082 1980's 5,093 5,149 5,453 5,187 5,158 5,193 5,080 5,112 5,155 5,038 1990's

  13. U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Dollars per Foot) Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 13.01 12.85 13.31 12.69 12.86 13.44 14.95 15.97 16.83 17.56 1970's 18.84 19.03 20.76 22.50 28.93 36.99 40.46 46.81 56.63 67.70 1980's 77.02 94.30 108.73 83.34 71.90 75.35 76.88 58.71 70.23 73.55 1990's 76.07 82.64 70.27 75.30 79.49 87.22

  14. U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 18.57 17.65 18.10 17.19 18.57 18.35 21.75 23.05 24.05 25.58 1970's 26.75 27.70 27.78 27.46 34.11 46.23 49.78 57.57 68.37 80.66 1980's 95.16 122.17 146.20 108.37 88.80 93.09 93.02 69.55 84.65 86.86 1990's 90.73 93.10 72.83 83.15 81.90 95.97 98.67 117.55 127.94 138.42 2000's 138.39 172.05 175.78

  15. U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Thousand Feet) Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 34,798 1950's 40,175 49,344 55,615 60,664 59,601 69,206 74,337 69,181 61,484 63,253 1960's 55,831 54,442 53,616 53,485 55,497 49,204 55,709 47,839 50,958 57,466 1970's 43,530 41,895 44,956 45,618 51,315 54,677 53,617 57,949 65,197 63,096 1980's 74,288 101,808 88,856 69,690 80,853

  16. U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Thousand Feet) and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 12,437 1950's 13,685 13,947 15,257 18,248 18,857 19,930 22,738 23,836 25,555 26,606 1960's 28,246 29,292 28,949 24,533 25,598 24,931 25,948 21,581 20,716 24,162 1970's 23,623 23,460 30,006 38,045 38,449 44,454 49,113 63,686 75,841 80,468 1980's 92,106 108,353 107,149

  17. U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 10,028 1950's 11,329 11,451 11,863 14,296 14,458 14,718 17,559 17,869 20,083 20,575 1960's 22,780 24,042 23,762 20,303 21,394 21,174 20,140 17,602 16,975 19,177 1970's 19,945 19,850 25,159 31,007 30,766 36,032 39,992 53,431 64,043 67,825 1980's 78,244 91,274 92,386 67,844 81,545 68,149 39,638 37,520 40,371

  18. U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 2,409 1950's 2,356 2,496 3,394 3,952 4,399 5,212 5,179 5,967 5,472 6,031 1960's 5,466 5,250 5,187 4,230 4,204 3,757 5,808 3,979 3,741 4,985 1970's 3,678 3,610 4,847 7,038 7,683 8,422 9,121 10,255 11,798 12,643 1980's 13,862 17,079 14,763 10,264 9,935 8,144 5,401 5,064 4,992 4,664 1990's 5,765 4,615 3,543 3,947 5,120

  19. Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and slim well drilling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: Discover a blind, low-moderate temperature resource: Apply a combination of detailed sub-soil gas, hydrocarbon, and isotope data to define possible upflow areas; Calibrate the sub-soil chemistry with down-hole fluid inclusion stratigraphy and fluid analyses to define a follow-up exploration drilling target; Create short term jobs and long term employment through resource exploration, development and power plant operation; Extend and adapt the DOE sub-soil 2 meter probe technology to gas sampling.

  20. Recovery Act. Sub-Soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling, Pumpernickel Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbank, Brian D.

    2015-03-27

    Nevada Geothermal Power Company (NGP) was awarded DOE Award DE-EE0002834 in January 2010 to conduct sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion studies and slim well drilling at its Black Warrior Project (now known as North Valley) in Washoe and Churchill Counties, Nevada. The project was designed to apply highly detailed, precise, low-cost subsoil and down-hole gas geochemistry methods from the oil and gas industry to identify upflow zone drilling targets in an undeveloped geothermal prospect. NGP ran into multiple institutional barriers with the Black Warrior project relating to property access and extensive cultural survey requirement. NGP requested that the award be transferred to NGP’s Pumpernickel Valley project, due to the timing delay in obtaining permits, along with additional over-budget costs required. Project planning and permit applications were developed for both the original Black Warrior location and at Pumpernickel. This included obtaining proposals from contractors able to conduct required environmental and cultural surveying, designing the two-meter probe survey methodology and locations, and submitting Notices of Intent and liaising with the Bureau of Land Management to have the two-meter probe work approved. The award had an expiry date of April 30, 2013; however, due to the initial project delays at Black Warrior, and the move of the project from Black Warrior to Pumpernickel, NGP requested that the award deadline be extended. DOE was amenable to this, and worked with NGP to extend the deadline. However, following the loss of the Blue Mountain geothermal power plant in Nevada, NGP’s board of directors changed the company’s mandate to one of cash preservation. NGP was unable to move forward with field work on the Pumpernickel property, or any of its other properties, until additional funding was secured. NGP worked to bring in a project partner to form a joint venture on the property, or to buy the property. This was unsuccessful, and NGP notified

  1. Offshore multiple well drilling and production apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkland, K.G.; Masciopinto, A.J.

    1980-03-11

    A modular multiple well drilling and production template structure is combined with a production riser base module to provide an underwater apparatus which allows a plurality of wells to be drilled, completed and produced by operations carried out from a single vessel or platform without remote installation of flowlines.

  2. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denninger, Kate; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Bell, Sean; Jacobs, Amelia; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Tilley, Mitch; Quick, Ralph

    2015-09-02

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling. This study of drilling operations seeks opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies. The scope of this study included analyzing 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'Perfect Well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.) and poor data collection practices An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate figures for analysis. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/ equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averaged 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million was spent on non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells, compared with only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry using Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real time services, and official glossary terms to describe rig operations, and advanced drilling rigs/technology.

  3. Subsea well template for directional drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsmith, R.G.

    1988-07-05

    A method is described for drilling widely spaced boreholes into a hydrocarbon producing subsea formation comprising the steps of: positioning a subsea drilling template on the bottom of a body of water, the subsea drilling template including laterally disposed, substantially cylindrical drilling guides having a longitudinal axis wherein at least one of the drilling guides has its longitudinal axis disposed at an angle of less than 90/sup 0/ relative to a horizontal plane passing through the subsea drilling template; mooring a drilling vessel floating on the surface of the body of water in a first position relative to the subsea drilling template using a plurality of mooring catenaries; extending a drill string from the floating vessel to the subsea template, the drill string passing into the one of the drilling guides along its longitudinal axis which is disposed at an angle of less than 90/sup 0/; drilling a borehole below the template into the hydrocarbon producing subsea formation; repositioning the drilling vessel to another position relative to the subsea template by adjusting the mooring catenaries; extending the drill string from the vessel into another of the drilling guides; drilling another borehole below the template; and repeating the steps of repositioning the drilling vessel, extending the drill string and drilling the widely spaced boreholes.

  4. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilley, Mitch; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Quick, Ralph

    2015-01-26

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling; however, there are opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies used. The scope of this drilling operational study included 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'perfect well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.), poor data collection, and difficult to ascertain handwriting. An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate analysis figures. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averages 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million would be lost due to non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells and only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry. It is the use of Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. However, a work-flow must also be established in order for there to be an efficient drilling program. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real time

  5. Columbia Gas preserves wetlands with directional drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luginbuhl, K.K.; Gartman, D.K.

    1995-10-01

    This paper reviews the use of directional drilling to install a 12 inch natural gas pipeline near Avon, Ohio. As a result of increased demand, the utility decided that it would need additional lines for pressure control with the only feasible route being through a forested and scrub/shrub wetland. This paper reviews the permitting requirements along with the directional drilling design and operation. Unfortunately during drilling, bentonite drilling fluids came to the surface requiring remedial action procedures. The paper then provides a detailed clean up strategy and makes recommendations on how to prevent such a break through in the future.

  6. The drilling of a horizontal well in a mature oil field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rougeot, J.E.; Lauterbach, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report documents the drilling of a medium radius horizontal well in the Bartlesville Sand of the Flatrock Field, Osage County, Oklahoma by Rougeot Oil and Gas Corporation (Rougeot) of Sperry, Oklahoma. The report includes the rationale for selecting the particular site, the details of drilling the well, the production response, conclusions reached, and recommendations made for the future drilling of horizontal wells. 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Idaho Well Construction and Drilling Forms Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Idaho Well Construction and Drilling Forms Webpage Citation Idaho Department...

  8. EM Telemetry Tool for Deep Well Drilling Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey M. Gabelmann

    2005-11-15

    This final report discusses the successful development and testing of a deep operational electromagnetic (EM) telemetry system, produced under a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. This new electromagnetic telemetry system provides a wireless communication link between sensors deployed deep within oil and gas wells and data acquisition equipment located on the earth's surface. EM based wireless telemetry is a highly appropriate technology for oil and gas exploration in that it avoids the need for thousands of feet of wired connections. In order to achieve the project performance objectives, significant improvements over existing EM telemetry systems were made. These improvements included the development of new technologies that have improved the reliability of the communications link while extending operational depth. A key element of the new design is the incorporation of a data-fusion methodology which enhances the communication receiver's ability to extract very weak signals from large amounts of ambient environmental noise. This innovative data-fusion receiver based system adapts advanced technologies, not normally associated with low-frequency communications, and makes them work within the harsh drilling environments associated with the energy exploration market. Every element of a traditional EM telemetry system design, from power efficiency to reliability, has been addressed. The data fusion based EM telemetry system developed during this project is anticipated to provide an EM tool capability that will impact both onshore and offshore oil and gas exploration operations, for conventional and underbalanced drilling applications.

  9. Horizontal well replaces hydraulic fracturing in North Sea gas well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Seymour, K.P. )

    1991-11-25

    This paper reports on excessive water production from hydraulically fractured wells in a poor quality reservoir in the North SEa which prompted the drilling of a horizontal well. Gas production from the horizontal well reached six times that of the offset vertical wells, and no water production occurred. This horizontal well proved commercial the western section of the Anglia field. Horizontal drilling in the North SEa is as an effective technology to enhance hydrocarbon recovery from reservoirs that previously had proven uncommercial with other standard techniques. It is viable for the development of marginal reservoirs, particularly where conditions preclude stimulation from hydraulic fracturing.

  10. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kent, William H.; Mitchell, Peter G.

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propagated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  11. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nardi, Anthony P.

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting a resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  12. Delaware-Val Verde gas drilling busy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petzet, G.A.

    1992-01-13

    Deep and not so deep exploration is under way in the southeastern Delaware and northwestern Val Verde basins in West Texas. Northern Terrell County is seeing a good agenda of Permian Wolfcamp development drilling in spite of testy gas prices. This paper reports that none of the drilling appears to be targeted to Ouachita facies along the Marathon portion of the Ouachita Overthrust, although oil production from several of those fields has been respectable. And a number of exploratory tests to 20,000 ft and deeper are under way or on tap in eastern Pecos County and Terrell County.

  13. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA(DOI-BLM...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory...

  14. Application of water-base mud in deep well drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y.; Qian, F.; Lo, P.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports the results of laboratory research and field practice on the application of temperature resistant water-base muds for deep drilling in Sichuan Province, China. The major problems discussed include mud stability; adjustment and control of mud properties under high temperatures and pressures; the effect of pH on the properties of mud systems. Some means of solving these and other problems involved in deep well drilling are proposed.

  15. Solicitation - Geothermal Drilling Development and Well Maintenance Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, A.R.

    1999-07-07

    Energy (DOE)-industry research and development (R and D) organization, sponsors near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling and well maintenance costs. Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) administers DOE funds for GDO cost-shared projects and provides technical support. The GDO serves a very important function in fostering geothermal development. It encourages commercialization of emerging, cost-reducing drilling technologies, while fostering a spirit of cooperation among various segments of the geothermal industry. For Sandia, the GDO also serves as a means of identifying the geothermal industry's drilling fuel/or well maintenance problems, and provides an important forum for technology transfer. Successfully completed GDO projects include: the development of a high-temperature borehole televiewer, high-temperature rotating head rubbers, a retrievable whipstock, and a high-temperature/high-pressure valve-changing tool. Ongoing GDO projects include technology for stemming lost circulation; foam cement integrity log interpretation, insulated drill pipe, percussive mud hammers for geothermal drilling, a high-temperature/ high-pressure valve changing tool assembly (adding a milling capability), deformed casing remediation, high- temperature steering tools, diagnostic instrumentation for casing in geothermal wells, and elastomeric casing protectors.

  16. Method and apparatus for deep underwater well drilling and completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawson, J.E.

    1984-01-24

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for remotely establishing an underwater well under conditions of great water depth including a drilling guide structure located on the floor of the body of water; a single handling and guiding string extending upwardly from the drilling guide structure and maintained in tension by an elongated buoy; a series of drilling guide arm units, flowline guide arm units and wellhead guide arm units to be lowered down the string, oriented relative to desired well positions and then retrieved once the wells have been drilled and the wellheads and flowlines secured in place; and a production gathering assembly to be lowered down the string, oriented relative to the wellheads and flowlines, and then coupled to these wellheads and flowlines. The orientation is accomplished between an orientation member on the outer surface of a tubular member extending upwardly from the guide structure and orientation members on the inner surfaces of open-ended members in the drilling guide arm units, flowline guide arm units, wellhead guide arm units and the production gathering assembly.

  17. Coiled tubing buckling implication in drilling and completing horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C.

    1995-03-01

    This paper discusses coiled tubing buckling and load transmission when drilling and completing horizontal wells. Comprehensive analyses and new equations are presented to predict buckling of coiled tubing, slack-off weight transmission, actual bit weight or packer load, and maximum horizontal length. Coiled tubing lock-up and yield due to buckling are also discussed. These equations can also be used for other coiled tubing operations, such as coiled tubing workover, coiled tubing well stimulation, and even for conventional joint-connected drill strings. Calculations based on the equations presented are also compared with the previous literature.

  18. Underbalanced coiled-tubing-drilled horizontal well in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodka, P.; Tirsgaard, H.; Damgaard, A.P.; Adamsen, C.J.

    1996-05-01

    Maersk Olie and Gas A/S (Maersk Oil) has drilled a 3,309-ft-long near-horizontal drainhole with coiled tubing to a total measured depth (MD) of 11,000 ft in the Danish sector of the North Sea. The well was completed in may 1994 as a 3{1/2}-in. openhole producer in the Gorm field chalk reservoir. Part of the well was drilled at underbalanced conditions, and oil production rates of up to 1,100 STB/D were reached during drilling. Conventional well-test equipment was used for handling returns. A nearby process facilities platform supplied lift gas and received the produced hydrocarbons during the drilling phase. Worth noting are the penetration of several chert layers, the fairly long reach, and the application of geosteering. Indications were that the well productivity was significantly improved compared with that of a conventionally drilled well, but problems were experienced with borehole stability in a fractured region.

  19. In-well vapor stripping drilling and characterization work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, K.J.

    1994-03-13

    This work plan provides the information necessary for drilling, sampling, and hydrologic testing of wells to be completed in support of a demonstration of the in-well vapor stripping system. The in-well vapor stripping system is a remediation technology designed to preferentially extract volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater by converting them to a vapor phase. Air-lift pumping is used to lift and aerate groundwater within the well. The volatiles escaping the aerated water are drawn off by a slight vacuum and treated at the surface while the water is allowed to infiltrate the vadose zone back to the watertable.

  20. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, Steve H.; Pigott, William R.

    1997-01-01

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

  1. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

    1997-12-30

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area. 3 figs.

  2. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  3. Surface control bent sub for directional drilling of petroleum wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Russell, Larry R.

    1986-01-01

    Directional drilling apparatus for incorporation in a drill string, wherein a lower apparatus section is angularly deviated from vertical by cam action and wherein rotational displacement of the angularly deviated apparatus section is overcome by additional cam action, the apparatus being operated by successive increases and decreases of internal drill string pressure.

  4. Geopressured-geothermal well report. Volume I. Drilling and completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Gladys McCall site activities are covered through the completion of the test well and salt water disposal well. The test well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet, then plugged back to 15,831 feet. Three 4'' diameter diamond cores were taken for analysis. An existing well on site, the Getty-Butts Gladys McCall No. 1, was reentered and completed to a depth of 3514 feet as a salt water disposal well. The geologic interpretation of the Gladys McCall site indicated target sands for testing at 15,080 feet through 15, 831 feet. Reservoir fluid temperature at this depth is estimated to be approximately 313/sup 0/F and pressure is estimated to be +-12,800 psi. The preliminary reservoir volume estimate is 3.6 billion barrels of brine. The design wells program includes environmental monitoring of the Gladys McCall site by Louisiana State University. Field stations are set up to monitor surface and ground water quality, subsidence, land loss and shoreline erosion, and seismicity. As of December 31, 1981 the study shows no significant impact on the environment by site operations.

  5. Planning and well evaluations improve horizontal drilling results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovda, S. )

    1994-10-31

    A systematic approach, including better planning and performance evaluation, improved the horizontal drilling efficiency of a multiwell program in the Oseberg field in the North Sea. The horizontal drilling program in the Oseberg field is one of the most comprehensive horizontal drilling programs in the North Sea. The present horizontal drilling program consists of 14 oil producers from the C platform and 18 from the B platform. Total horizontal displacement varies from around 1,500 m to 5,540 m. The lengths of the horizontal section vary from 600 m to 1,500 m. The paper discusses will planning, directional drilling, drilling problems with coal seams and orientation, true vertical depth control, horizontal liner cement, spacer system, cement slurries, job execution, and results.

  6. NNSA Small Business Week Day 2: United Drilling, Inc. | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Today's profile highlights United Drilling, Inc., a small minority-owned business based in Roswell, N.M. United Drilling drills oil, gas, water, geothermal, and environmental wells ...

  7. Resonant acoustic transducer and driver system for a well drilling string communication system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chanson, Gary J.; Nicolson, Alexander M.

    1981-01-01

    The acoustic data communication system includes an acoustic transmitter and receiver wherein low frequency acoustic waves, propagating in relatively loss free manner in well drilling string piping, are efficiently coupled to the drill string and propagate at levels competitive with the levels of noise generated by drilling machinery also present in the drill string. The transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring piezoelectric transmitter and amplifier combination that permits self-oscillating resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  8. Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Illinois Basin | Department of Energy Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin February 17, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon sequestration technologies nationwide, has begun drilling the injection well

  9. Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project. High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbank, Brian D.; Smith, Nicole

    2015-06-10

    The Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project – High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling ran from January 29, 2010 to September 30, 2013. During Phase 1 of the project, collection of all geophysical surveys was completed as outlined in the Statement of Project Objectives. In addition, a 5000-foot full sized exploration well was drilled by Ormat, and preexisting drilling data was discovered for multiple temperature gradient wells within the project area. Three dimensional modeling and interpretation of results from the geophysical surveys and drilling data gave confidence to move to the project into Phase 2 drilling. Geological and geophysical survey interpretations combined with existing downhole temperature data provided an ideal target for the first slim-hole drilled as the first task in Phase 2. Slim-hole 35-34 was drilled in September 2011 and tested temperature, lithology, and permeability along the primary range-bounding fault zone near its intersection with buried northwest-trending faults that have been identified using geophysical methods. Following analysis of the results of the first slim-hole 35-34, the second slim hole was not drilled and subsequent project tasks, including flowing differential self-potential (FDSP) surveys that were designed to detail the affect of production and injection on water flow in the shallow aquifer, were not completed. NGP sold the Crump project to Ormat in August 2014, afterwards, there was insufficient time and interest from Ormat available to complete the project objectives. NGP was unable to continue managing the award for a project they did not own due to liability issues and Novation of the award was not a viable option due to federal award timelines. NGP submitted a request to mutually terminate the award on February 18, 2015. The results of all of the technical surveys and drilling are included in this report. Fault interpretations from surface geology, aeromag

  10. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 4,232 1950's 4,335 4,609 4,781 4,761 4,740 4,819 4,901 5,036 4,993 5,021 1960's 5,170 5,099 5,124 4,878 5,509 5,672 5,700 5,758 5,914 6,054 1970's 6,247 5,745 5,880 6,243 5,855 5,913 6,010 5,902 6,067 6,011 1980's 5,727 5,853 5,504 5,141 5,565 5,865 6,069 6,104 6,182 6,028 1990's 6,838 6,641 6,930 6,627 6,671

  11. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,225 1950's 3,077 3,255 3,520 3,401 3,512 3,699 3,574 3,605 3,631 3,844 1960's 3,889 3,782 4,239 4,143 4,207 4,446 3,900 3,901 4,311 4,437 1970's 4,714 4,633 4,725 4,851 4,599 4,415 4,439 4,662 4,600 4,517 1980's 4,214 4,226 4,184 3,974 4,205 4,306 4,236 4,390 4,704 4,684 1990's 4,755 4,629

  12. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,658 1950's 3,733 4,059 4,334 4,447 4,408 4,498 4,425 4,488 4,449 4,602 1960's 4,575 4,799 4,790 4,933 4,980 5,007 5,117 5,188 5,589 5,739 1970's 5,700 5,796 5,882 5,808 5,649 5,674 5,607 5,605 5,812 5,716 1980's 5,533 5,582 5,367 4,800 5,178 5,317 5,447 5,294 5,748 5,579 1990's 5,685 5,658 5,480

  13. U.S. Nominal Cost per Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 44.0 45.2 50.8 48.2 48.5 53.1 56.9 61.5 66.2 70.2 1970's 80.9 86.8 94.9 105.8 141.7 177.2 190.3 230.2 281.7 339.6 1980's 376.5 464.0 515.4 366.5 329.2 372.3 389.2 259.1 366.4 355.4 1990's 367.5 441.2 357.6 387.7 491.5 481.2 541.0 655.6 973.2 1,115.5 2000's 1,075.4 1,620.4 1,673.4 2,065.1 1,977.3 2,392.9

  14. Interagency Collaboration to Address Environmental Impacts of Shale Gas Drilling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A memorandum of understanding to perform collaborative research related to airborne emissions and air quality at natural gas drilling sites has been signed by the Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

  15. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Map showing location of wells permitted, drilled and seismic test 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Map showing location of wells permitted, drilled & seismic test, 2012

  16. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Map showing location of wells permitted, drilled and seismic test 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Map showing location of wells permitted, drilled & seismic test, 2012

  17. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA...

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

    2004-05-01

    A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

  19. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of...

  20. Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison third...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    within 3 miles of the site, the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission notifies ... The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (the State) notifies DOE of any drilling ...

  1. Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Fourth...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    within 3 miles of the site, the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission notifies ... The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission notifies DOE of any drilling permit ...

  2. Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    within 3 miles of the site, the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission notifies ... The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission notifies DOE of any drilling permit ...

  3. Technical and economic evaluation of selected compact drill rigs for drilling 10,000 foot geothermal production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huttrer, G.W.

    1997-11-01

    This report summarizes the investigation and evaluation of several {open_quotes}compact{close_quotes} drill rigs which could be used for drilling geothermal production wells. Use of these smaller rigs would save money by reducing mobilization costs, fuel consumption, crew sizes, and environmental impact. Advantages and disadvantages of currently-manufactured rigs are identified, and desirable characteristics for the {open_quotes}ideal{close_quotes} compact rig are defined. The report includes a detailed cost estimate of a specific rig, and an evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio of using this rig. Industry contacts for further information are given.

  4. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feetday Niobrara Region Rig count rigs drilling data through May projected production through July June 2016 Drilling Productivity ...

  5. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feetday Utica Region Rig count rigs drilling data through May projected production through July June 2016 Drilling Productivity ...

  6. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feetday Permian Region Rig count rigs drilling data through May projected production through July June 2016 Drilling Productivity ...

  7. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feetday Marcellus Region Rig count rigs drilling data through May projected production through July June 2016 Drilling Productivity ...

  8. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feetday Eagle Ford Region Rig count rigs drilling data through May projected production through July June 2016 Drilling Productivity ...

  9. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feetday Haynesville Region Rig count rigs drilling data through May projected production through July June 2016 Drilling ...

  10. US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  11. U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells...

  12. Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of BDM/CNGD Well 3997, Lee District, Calhoun County, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, casing, completing, and stimulating the Hunter Bennett No. 3997 well located in Lee District, Calhoun County West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with CNG Development Company. The well was spudded on November 9, 1990, and drilling was completed on December 14, 1990. The well was drilled on an average asmuth of 312 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2459 feet. The well was turned to a 90 degree inclination from the vertical over a measured course length of 1216 feet. Approximately 1381 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2179 feet had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Each zone is a little more than 300 feet long. The well was stimulated with nitrogen gas in zones one and two. Early production results are encouraging. The BDM/CNGD horizontal well averaged 147 mcfd of gas over the first week of production and, in week five, began to produce oil at a rate of about 2 bbl/day.

  13. Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of BDM/CNGD Well 3997, Lee District, Calhoun County, West Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, casing, completing, and stimulating the Hunter Bennett No. 3997 well located in Lee District, Calhoun County West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with CNG Development Company. The well was spudded on November 9, 1990, and drilling was completed on December 14, 1990. The well was drilled on an average asmuth of 312 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2459 feet. The well was turned to a 90 degree inclination from the vertical over a measured course length of 1216 feet. Approximately 1381 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2179 feet had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Each zone is a little more than 300 feet long. The well was stimulated with nitrogen gas in zones one and two. Early production results are encouraging. The BDM/CNGD horizontal well averaged 147 mcfd of gas over the first week of production and, in week five, began to produce oil at a rate of about 2 bbl/day.

  14. Number of Producing Gas Wells

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 484,994 514,786 1989-2014 Alabama 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 6,165 6,118 1989-2014 Alaska 261 269 277 185 159 170 1989-2014 Arizona 6 5 5 5 5 5 1989-2014 Arkansas 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 9,843 10,150 1989-2014 California 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1,335 1,118 1989-2014

  15. U.S. Geothermal Drills Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hot Springs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Geothermal Drills Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Abstract NA Author U.S. Geothermal...

  16. Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal...

  17. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  18. Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  19. Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  20. Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  1. Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  2. Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

    2010-02-22

    In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work

  3. Phase 2 drilling operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51--20)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes the second drilling phase, completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991, of the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. The well in Long Valley Caldera is planned to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C (whichever comes first). There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart with scientific experiments in the wellbore between active drilling periods. Phase 1 drilling in 1989 was completed with 20 in. casing from surface to a depth of 2558 ft., and a 3.8 in. core hole was drilled below the shoe to a depth of 2754 in. Phase 2 included a 17-{1/2} in. hole out of the 20 in. shoe, with 13-3/8 in. casing to 6825 ft., and continuous wireline coring below that to 7588 ft. This document comprises a narrative log of the daily activities, the daily drilling reports, mud logger's reports, summary of drilling fluids used, and other miscellaneous records.

  4. Scientific Objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Leg II Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.; Latham, T.; McConnell, D.; Frye, M.; Hunt, J.; Shedd, W.; Shelander, D.; Boswell, R.M.; Rose, K.K.; Ruppel, C.; Hutchinson, D.; Collett, T.; Dugan, B.; Wood, W.

    2008-05-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Methane Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) has been performing research on marine gas hydrates since 2001 and is sponsored by both the JIP members and the U.S. Department of Energy. In 2005, the JIP drilled the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon exploration blocks in the Gulf of Mexico to acquire downhole logs and recover cores in silt- and clay-dominated sediments interpreted to contain gas hydrate based on analysis of existing 3-D seismic data prior to drilling. The new 2007-2009 phase of logging and coring, which is described in this paper, will concentrate on gas hydrate-bearing sands in the Alaminos Canyon, Green Canyon, and Walker Ridge protraction areas. Locations were selected to target higher permeability, coarser-grained lithologies (e.g., sands) that have the potential for hosting high saturations of gas hydrate and to assist the U.S. Minerals Management Service with its assessment of gas hydrate resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This paper discusses the scientific objectives for drilling during the upcoming campaign and presents the results from analyzing existing seismic and well log data as part of the site selection process. Alaminos Canyon 818 has the most complete data set of the selected blocks, with both seismic data and comprehensive downhole log data consistent with the occurrence of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Preliminary analyses suggest that the Frio sandstone just above the base of the gas hydrate stability zone may have up to 80% of the available sediment pore space occupied by gas hydrate. The proposed sites in the Green Canyon and Walker Ridge areas are also interpreted to have gas hydrate-bearing sands near the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, but the choice of specific drill sites is not yet complete. The Green Canyon site coincides with a 4-way closure within a Pleistocene sand unit in an area of strong gas flux just south of the Sigsbee Escarpment. The Walker Ridge site is characterized by a sand

  5. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 72,328 ...

  6. Kentucky Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 7,021 6,303 6,870 ...

  7. Missouri Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 1 ...

  8. Ohio Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 13,138 11,794 12,855 ...

  9. Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 4,561 3,826 4,106 ...

  10. Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 21,638 18,808 21,037 ...

  11. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 425,704 369,500 ...

  12. Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - ...

  13. Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 21 18 ...

  14. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 9,579 8,593 ...

  15. Tennessee Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

  16. Virginia Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1,849 ...

  17. Maryland Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 5 ...

  18. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 246 244 232 ...

  19. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 14,797 13,076 ...

  20. Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 58,111 51,244 ...

  1. Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 15,390 18,697 ...

  2. Nebraska Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 9 10 11 6 9 8 10 9 8 ...

  3. Drilling fluids and lost circulation in hot dry rock geothermal wells at Fenton Hill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckols, E.B.; Miles, D.; Laney, R.; Polk, G.; Friddle, H.; Simpson, G.; Baroid, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal hot dry rock drilling activities at Fenton Hill in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico encountered problems in designing drilling fluids that will reduce catastrophic lost circulation. Four wells (GT-2, EE-1, EE-2, and EE-3) penetrated 733 m (2405 ft) of Cenozoic and Paleozoic sediments and Precambrian crystalline rock units to +4572 m (+15,000 ft). The Cenozoic rocks consist of volcanics (rhyolite, tuff, and pumice) and volcaniclastic sediments. Paleozoic strata include Permian red beds (Abo Formation) and the Pennsylvanian Madera and Sandia Formations, which consist of massive limestones and shales. Beneath the Sandia Formation are igneous and metamorphic rocks of Precambrian age. The drilling fluid used for the upper sedimentary formations was a polymeric flocculated bentonite drilling fluid. Severe loss of circulation occurred in the cavernous portions of the Sandia limestones. The resultant loss of hydrostatic head caused sloughing of the Abo and of some beds within the Madera Formation. Stuck pipe, repetitive reaming, poor casing cement jobs and costly damage to the intermediate casing resulted. The Precambrian crystalline portion of the EE-2 and EE-3 wells were directionally drilled at a high angle, and drilled with water as the primary circulating fluid. Due to high temperatures (approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F) BHT) and extreme abrasiveness of the deeper part of the Precambrian crystalline rocks, special problems of corrosion inhibition and of torque friction were incurred.

  4. Selection of area and specific site for drilling a horizontal well in Calhoun County, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, T.K.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the data collection and analysis procedures used to establish criteria for geologic and engineering studies conducted by BDM to select a general area for more detailed study and a specific site for the drilling of a cooperative well with an industry partner, the Consolidated Natural Gas Development Company (CNGD). The results of detailed geologic studies are presented for two areas in Calhoun County, West Virginia, and one area along the Logan-Boone County line in West Virginia. The effects of Appalachian Basin tectonics and the Rome Trough Rift system were identified on seismic lines made available by (CNGD). These helped to identify and define the trapping mechanisms which had been effective in each area. Engineering analyses of past production histories provided data to support selection of target areas and then to select a specific site that met the project requirements for production, reservoir pressure, and risk. A final site was selected in Lee District at the southwestern margin of the Sand Ridge gas field based on the combination of a geologic trapping mechanism and reservoir pressures which were projected as 580 psi with a stress ratio of 0.53.

  5. New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and ... Number of Producing Gas Wells Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary) New York Natural Gas ...

  6. Application of coiled-tubing-drilling technology on a deep underpressured gas reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The Upper-Mississippian Elkton formation is a dolomitized shallow-water carbonate consisting of dense limestones and porous dolomites. The Elkton was deposited in an open-shelf environment as crinoid grainstones, coral packstones, and lime muds. Deposition of impermeable shales and siltstones of the Lower Cretaceous created the lateral and updip seals. Reservoir thickness can be up to 20 m, with porosities reaching 20% and averaging 10%. The reservoir gas contains approximately 0.5% hydrogen sulfide. Well 11-18 was to be completed in the Harmatten Elkton pool. The pool went on production in 1967 at an initial pressure of 23,500 kPa. At the current pressure of 16,800 kPa, the remaining reserves are underpressured at 6.5 kPa/m, and underbalanced horizontal drilling was selected as the most suitable technique for exploiting remaining reserves. Coiled-tubing (CT) technology was selected to ensure continuous underbalanced conditions and maintain proper well control while drilling. The paper describes the equipment, CT drilling summary, and drilling issues.

  7. Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

    2008-06-15

    This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

  8. Unique aspects of drilling and completing hot-dry-rock geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carden, R.S.; Nicholson, R.W.; Pettitt, R.A.; Rowley, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Drilling operations at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site have led to numerous developments needed to solve the problems caused by a very harsh downhole environment. A pair of deep wells were drilled to approximately 15,000 ft (4.6 km); formation temperatures were in excess of 600/sup 0/F (300/sup 0/C). The wells were directionally drilled, inclined at 35/sup 0/, one above the other, in a direction orthogonal to the least principal stress field. The well site is near the flank of a young silicic composite volcano in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. The completion of this pair of wells is unique in reservoir development. The lower well was planned as a cold water injector which will be cooled by the introduced water from the static geothermal gradient to about 80/sup 0/F (25/sup 0/C). The upper well will be heated during production to over 500/sup 0/F (250/sup 0/C). The well pair is designed to perform as a closed loop heat-extraction system connected by hydraulic fractures with a vertical spacing of 1200 ft between the wells. These conditions strongly constrain the drilling technique, casing design, cement formulation, and cementing operations.

  9. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  10. Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  11. Small drill-hole, gas mini-permeameter probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Molz, III, Fred J.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.; Castle, James W.

    2002-12-03

    The distal end of a basic tube element including a stopper device with an expandable plug is positioned in a pre-drilled hole in a rock face. Rotating a force control wheel threaded on the tube element exerts force on a sleeve that in turn causes the plug component of the stopper means to expand and seal the distal end of the tube in the hole. Gas under known pressure is introduced through the tube element. A thin capillary tube positioned in the tube element connects the distal end of the tube element to means to detect and display pressure changes and data that allow the permeability of the rock to be determined.

  12. Small drill-hole, gas mini-permeameter probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Molz, III, Fred J.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.; Castle, James W.

    2002-01-01

    The distal end of a basic tube element including a stopper device with an expandable plug is positioned in a pre-drilled hole in a rock face. Rotating a force control wheel threaded on the tube element exerts force on a sleeve that in turn causes the plug component of the stopper means to expand and seal the distal end of the tube in the hole. Gas under known pressure is introduced through the tube element. A thin capillary tube positioned in the tube element connects the distal end of the tube element to means to detect and display pressure changes and data that allow the permeability of the rock to be determined.

  13. The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    increase the cost of drilling, logging, and completing geothermal wells, compared to oil and gas. Cost reductions are critical because drilling and completing the production...

  14. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    full-scale laboratory investigations Michael S. Bruno 58 GEOSCIENCES; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; ROCK DRILLING; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE; ROCK MECHANICS; ROTARY DRILLING; WELL...

  15. Adaptive control system for gas producing wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedor, Pashchenko; Sergey, Gulyaev; Alexander, Pashchenko

    2015-03-10

    Optimal adaptive automatic control system for gas producing wells cluster is proposed intended for solving the problem of stabilization of the output gas pressure in the cluster at conditions of changing gas flow rate and changing parameters of the wells themselves, providing the maximum high resource of hardware elements of automation.

  16. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and ... Number of Producing Gas Wells Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary) New Mexico Natural ...

  17. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas ... Number of Producing Gas Wells Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary) North Dakota Natural ...

  18. Table 4.6 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory Wells, 1949-2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory Wells, 1949-2010 Year Wells Drilled Successful Wells Footage Drilled 1 Average Footage Drilled Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Number Percent Thousand Feet Feet per Well 1949 1,406 424 7,228 9,058 20.2 5,950 2,409 26,439 34,798 4,232 5,682 3,658 3,842 1950 1,583 431 8,292 10,306 19.5 6,862 2,356 30,957 40,175 4,335 5,466 3,733 3,898 1951 1,763 454 9,539

  19. Statement of Work for Drilling Four CERCLA Groundwater Monitoring Wells During Fiscal Year 2006, 300-FF-5 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Bruce A.

    2005-10-10

    This document contains the statement of work required to drill, characterize, and construct the proposed groundwater monitoring wells at 300-FF-5 Operable Unit during FY 2006.

  20. Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Workers at the Hanford Site have surpassed goals for drilling wells to detect and remove contamination from groundwater.

  1. Laser-Mechanical Drilling for Geothermal Energy: Low-Contact Drilling Technology to Enable Economical EGS Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Foro Energy is developing a unique capability and hardware system to transmit high power lasers over long distances via fiber optic cables. This laser power is integrated with a mechanical drilling bit to enable rapid and sustained penetration of hard rock formations too costly to drill with mechanical drilling bits alone. The laser energy that is directed at the rock basically softens the rock, allowing the mechanical bit to more easily remove it. Foro Energy’s laser-assisted drill bits have the potential to be up to 10 times more economical than conventional hard-rock drilling technologies, making them an effective way to access the U.S. energy resources currently locked under hard rock formations.

  2. Microsoft Word - RUL_1Q2009_Gas_Samp_Results_6wells_22Jan09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    09 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 22 January 2009 Purpose: The purpose of this environmental sample collection is to monitor natural gas and production water from natural gas wells drilled near the Project Rulison test site. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) directive to protect human health and the environment, samples are collected from producing gas wells and analyzed to ensure no Rulison related radionuclides have

  3. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Discover new 260F and 300F geothermal reservoirs in Oregon. To demonstrate the application of high precision geophysics for well targeting. Demonstrate a combined testing approach to Flowing Differential Self Potential (FDSP) and electrical tomography resistivity as a guide to exploration and development. Demonstrate utility and benefits of sump-less drilling for a low environmental impact. Create both short and long term employment through exploration, accelerated development timeline and operation.

  4. Drilling Sideways - A Review of Horizontal Well Technology and Its Domestic Application

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1993-01-01

    Focuses primarily on domestic horizontal drilling applications, past and present, and on salient aspects of current and near-future horizontal drilling and completion technology.

  5. Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  6. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 ...

  7. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,405 1980's 3,405 3,316 3,248 3,355 3,518 3,454 3,443 3,351 3,192 3,099 1990's 2,936 2,968 3,031 2,868 2,907 2,886 2,938 3,022 3,136 3,313 2000's 3,299 3,193 2,988 2,855 2,742

  8. Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    21/2016 Next Release Date: 08/31/2016

  9. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Values shown for the current two months are preliminary. Values shown for the previous two months may be revised to account for late submissions and corrections. Final revisions to monthly and annual values are available upon publication of the June Petroleum Marketing Monthly. Annual averages that precede the release of the June Petroleum Marketing Monthly are calculated from monthly data. Data through 2015 are final. Effective January 2009, selected crude streams were discontinued and new

  10. Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    15,690.9 16,184.9 16,220.8 16,658.8 16,651.0 17,046.1 1994-2016 East Coast (PADD 1) W W W W W W 1994-2016 New England (PADD 1A) - - - - - - 1994-2016 Connecticut - - - - - - 1994-2016 Maine - - - - - - 1994-2016 Massachusetts - - - - - - 1994-2016 New Hampshire - - - - - - 1994-2016 Rhode Island - - - - - - 1994-2016 Vermont - - - - - - 1994-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) W W W W W W 1994-2016 Delaware - - - - - - 1994-2016 District of Columbia - - - - - - 1994-2016 Maryland - - - - - -

  11. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Stocks 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 40,534 39,717 37,768 27,121 20,275 17,991 1993-2015 PAD District 1 3,913 3,741 3,513 3,190 1,785 1,901 1993-2015 Connecticut 1993-2004 Delaware 1993-2009 Florida 586 734 747 545 397 652 1993-2015 Georgia 374 251 220 269 235 220 1993-2015 Maine 130 152 254 1993-2013 Maryland 1993-2008 Massachusetts 2 4 3 6 5 5 1993-2015 New Hampshire 1993-2005 New Jersey 667 275 795 489 102 384 1993-2015 New York 194 628 483 394 43 11 1993-2015 North

  12. Successful drilling of the first horizontal well in a mature field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marruffo, I.; Achong, C.

    1996-08-01

    This paper discusses how the decision to drill the first horizontal well of a reservoir was taken, based on Production acceleration and the incremental economy of cash flow. The reservoir is located in the Guafita-Norto Field in Western Venezuela, contiguous to the La Yuca-Cano Limon Fields in Colombia. Guafita-Norte has 183 million stb of remaining oil reserves with 26 production wells on electrical submergible pumps. The STOIP of this under saturated reservoir (bubble point pressure is 36 psi) is 160 million stb with an initial GOR of 10 stf/stb, having a permeability between 1.5-12 darcies with a strong water drive, water coning and sanding problems due to fines migration. During 1995, it was decided to drill the first horizontal well in the reservoir based on a 3-D numerical simulation with radial flow (for water coning) and local grid refinement (for horizontal wells) coupled to an economic analysis. The simulation predetermines an initial production rate for a horizontal well 2.5 times greater than for a vertical one, and the incremental cash flow for the horizontal well is 4.5 MM$ larger for the vertical one in four (4) years, with a ROR of 200%. The horizontal well was drilled with oil-based mud to avoid hole collapse, and it was completed open hole with a single screen pack. The well is currently producing between 2000 and 3500 stb/d, clean, on natural flow. This study has clearly shown that the ultimate and decisive parameter to be weighed before undertaking this type of project, is the economic analysis, which must be performed as extensively as the technical analysis.

  13. U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells (Thousand Feet) Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 100,821 1950's 117,183 122,802 128,518 133,581 148,408 156,976 158,943 147,864 131,820 137,441 1960's 136,345 135,191 141,018 129,164 131,923 125,678 107,215 93,518 94,012 99,642 1970's 95,026 85,358 92,875 92,605 102,059 125,817 133,365 157,917 173,472 181,702

  14. U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 135,619 1950's 157,358 172,146 184,133 194,245 208,009 226,182 233,280 217,045 193,304 200,694 1960's 192,176 189,633 194,634 182,649 187,420 174,882 162,924 141,357 144,970 157,108 1970's 138,556 127,253 137,831 138,223

  15. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Feet per Well) and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,720 1950's 3,893 4,103 4,214 4,033 4,028 3,981 3,942 4,021 3,916 3,935 1960's 3,889 3,994 4,070 4,063 4,042 4,059 4,013 3,825 4,153 4,286 1970's 4,385 4,126 4,330 4,369 3,812 3,943 3,895 4,025 4,017 3,966 1980's 3,801 3,923 3,793 3,662 3,791 3,906 3,999

  16. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    per Well) Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,473 1950's 3,445 3,706 3,983 4,004 4,004 4,161 4,079 4,126 4,110 4,275 1960's 4,248 4,311 4,524 4,552 4,598 4,723 4,573 4,616 5,053 5,195 1970's 5,265 5,305 5,377 5,403 5,191 5,073 5,014 5,120 5,183 5,071 1980's 4,791 4,827 4,691 4,320 4,631 4,733 4,763

  17. EA-2012: Strategic Test Well (s) Planning and Drilling for Long-Term Methane Hydrate Production Testing in Alaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is preparing an EA that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of providing financial support for planning, analysis, and engineering services to support a proposed project of Petrotechnical Resources of Alaska with Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation to perform gas hydrate drilling and testing on the North Slope of Alaska.

  18. GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John K. Godwin

    2005-12-01

    Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

  19. Maximize revenue from gas condensate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, S.R.

    1988-07-01

    A computerized oil/gas modeling program called C.O.M.P. allows operators to select the economically optimum producing equipment for a given gas-condensate well-stream. This article, the first of two, discusses use of the model to analyze performance of six different production system on the same wellstream and at the same wellhead conditions. All producing equipment options are unattended wellhead facilities designed for high volume gas-condensate wells and are not gas plants. A second article to appear in September will discuss operating experience with one of the producing systems analyzed, integrated multi-stage separation with stabilization and compression (the HERO system), which was developed by U.S. Enertek, Inc. This equipment was chosen for the wellstream analyzed because of the potential revenue increase indicated by the model.

  20. Drilling and abandonment preparation of CO₂ storage wells – Experience from the Ketzin pilot site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevedel, Bernhard; Martens, Sonja; Norden, Ben; Henninges, Jan; Freifeld, Barry M.

    2014-12-31

    At Ketzin, located west of Berlin, the GFZ German Centre for Geosciences is operating Europe's largest CO₂ research storage site. This pilot site has been developed since 2004 and is comprised of one combined injection/observation well and four monitoring wells. From June 2008 to August 2013, a total of 67 kilotons of CO₂ were safely injected into the sandstone units of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation in a depth between 630 to 650 m. The paper discusses the well designs and lessons learned in drilling engineering and operations. The abandonment phase started in Ketzin with the first plug cementation of the observation well Ktzi 202 shortly after shut-in of CO₂ injection. The experience with the first CO₂ well killing operation will be reviewed.

  1. Drilling and abandonment preparation of CO₂ storage wells – Experience from the Ketzin pilot site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prevedel, Bernhard; Martens, Sonja; Norden, Ben; Henninges, Jan; Freifeld, Barry M.

    2014-12-31

    At Ketzin, located west of Berlin, the GFZ German Centre for Geosciences is operating Europe's largest CO₂ research storage site. This pilot site has been developed since 2004 and is comprised of one combined injection/observation well and four monitoring wells. From June 2008 to August 2013, a total of 67 kilotons of CO₂ were safely injected into the sandstone units of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation in a depth between 630 to 650 m. The paper discusses the well designs and lessons learned in drilling engineering and operations. The abandonment phase started in Ketzin with the first plug cementation ofmore » the observation well Ktzi 202 shortly after shut-in of CO₂ injection. The experience with the first CO₂ well killing operation will be reviewed.« less

  2. Design, drilling, and testing of a deviated HTHP exploration well in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, K.P.; MacAndrew, R.

    1994-12-01

    Significant quantities of hydrocarbon reserves are contained in North Sea high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) reservoirs. Development of these reserves will require deviated wells. This paper outlines the planning, drilling, and testing of the first deviated HTHP well in the UK Sector of the North Sea. The high temperature requires mud systems, downhole equipment, and tools designed to work at elevated temperatures. The convergence of pore and fracture pressures leads to problems owing to the narrow band of mud weight between inducing losses and inducing a kick. This aspect of these wells probably causes the most trouble. The high mud weights required for well control leads to a situation where, owing to the large difference between formation-fluid and mud pressure gradients, mud overbalance becomes so high at the bottom of long permeable hole sections that differential sticking becomes likely. These problems are magnified when drilling small-diameter directional holes. The most important single factor in controlling these problems is the mud system design.

  3. Downhole fluid sampling at the SSSDP (Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project) California State 2-14 well, Salton Sea, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.; Grigsby, C.O.; Dennis, B.

    1987-07-01

    In situ fluid sampling activities were conducted at the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSSDP) well during late December 1985 and late March 1986 to obtain unflashed samples of Salton Sea brine. In late December, three sampling runs were made to depths of approximately 1800 m and temperatures of 300/sup 0/C. In late March, 10 sampling runs were made to depths of approximately 3150 m and temperatures of 350/sup 0/C. In brief, the Los Alamos tool obtained samples from four of eight runs; the Lawrence Berkeley tool obtained samples from one of one run; the Leutert Instruments, Inc., tool obtained samples from zero of three runs; and the USGS quartz crystal experiment was lost in the well. The most complete sample was obtained from run No. 11, using the Los Alamos sampler and Sandia battery pack/controller on a wireline. About 1635 ml of brine, two noble gas samples, and two bulk gas samples were collected from this run. Samples of brine and gas from productive runs have been distributed to about 15 researchers for various types of analyses. Chemical analyses by the Los Alamos and US Geological Survey analytical teams are presented in this report, although they are not corrected for flashing and precipitation.

  4. U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oil Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 13.22 13.11 13.41 13.20 13.12 13.94 15.04 16.61 18.63 19.28 1970's 19.29 18.41 20.77 22.54 27.82 34.17 37.35 41.16 49.72 58.29 1980's 66.36 80.40 86.34 72.65 66.32 66.78 68.35 58.35 62.28 64.92 1990's 69.17 73.75 69.50 67.52 70.57 78.09 70.60 90.48 108.88 156.45 2000's 125.96 153.72 194.55 221.13 298.45

  5. U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10.56 10.56 11.20 10.58 10.64 11.21 12.34 12.87 12.88 13.23 1970's 15.21 16.02 17.28 19.22 26.76 33.86 36.94 43.49 52.55 64.60 1980's 73.70 90.03 104.09 79.10 67.18 73.69 76.53 51.05 66.96 67.61 1990's 67.49 83.05 67.82 72.56 86.60 84.60 95.74 115.09 157.79 182.99 2000's 181.83 271.63 284.17 345.94 327.91

  6. RAPID/Geothermal/Well Field/Alaska | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    At a Glance Jurisdiction: Alaska Drilling & Well Field Permit Agency: Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Drilling & Well Field Permit All wells drilled in support or in search of the...

  7. U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil Exploratory and Developmental Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Thousand Feet) and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil Exploratory and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 79,428 1950's 92,695 95,106 98,148 102,136 113,362 121,148 120,352 110,043 93,105 94,611 1960's 86,568 85,626 88,431 81,809 80,463 73,322 67,340 58,634 59,517 61,582 1970's 56,859 49,109 49,269 44,416 52,025 66,819 68,892 75,451 77,041 82,688 1980's 125,262 172,167

  8. U.S. Footage Drilled for Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells (Thousand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 43,754 1950's 50,977 63,093 70,730 73,862 75,790 85,103 90,190 83,167 74,643 79,476 1960's 77,361 74,716 77,253 76,307 81,360 76,629 69,636 61,142 64,737 71,364 1970's 58,074 54,685 58,556 55,761 62,899 69,220 68,977 76,728 85,788 81,642 1980's 99,575 134,934 123,746 105,222 119,860

  9. Tax credits stimulate gas drilling without decreasing federal tax revenue: A win-win situation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, S.B.

    1995-12-31

    The long-term U.S. natural gas resource base (1300 + TCF) exists. The challenge is the timely conversion of that resource base to proved, deliverable reserves. Tax credits stimulate the transfer of the natural gas resource base to deliverable proved reserves by effective price enhancement and through the discovery, application, and dissemination of technology. Tax incentives act as net price increases to gas producers as long as all companies have roughly the same tax rate and all are able to utilize the credit. Tax incentives can thus be merged with gas price for statistical purposes. This paper demonstrates how the existence of the 29 credits stimulated drilling, increased relatively clean burning gas reserves, resulted in new technological advances and possibly increased federal tax receipts with no upward pressure on gas prices. New tax-stimulus mechanisms are introduced that will help ensure that tax credits both stimulate drilling and increase tax revenue.

  10. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

    2012-03-31

    Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make

  11. McGinness Hills Well 27A-10 Daily Drilling Report Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Knudsen, Steven

    This data should be used with the daily drilling record and other data which can be obtained from the contact listed below

  12. McGinness Hills Well 27A-10 Daily Drilling Report Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Knudsen, Steven

    2014-03-25

    This data should be used with the daily drilling record and other data which can be obtained from the contact listed below

  13. Innovative website for drilling waste management. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: US Department of Energy (US) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; WELL DRILLING; EXPLORATION; WASTE ...

  14. Maximize revenue from gas condensate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, S.R. )

    1988-09-01

    A computerized oil/gas modeling program called C.O.M.P. was used to analyze comparative recovery, losses and revenues from six different producing systems on a given wellstream as tested on initial completion. A multi-stage separation/stabilization/compression system (HERO system) manufactured by U.S. Enertek, Inc., was subsequently installed to produce the well, plus five other wells in the immediate area. This article compares theoretical gains forecast by the modeling program with actual gains recorded during later testing of the same well with a two-stage separation hookup and the multi-stage unit. The test using two-stage separation was run as a basis for comparison. Operating temperatures and pressures for each test are shown.

  15. Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 0 0 1980's 0 0 0 3,986 18,920 31,227 27,279 23,425 17,931 12,246 1990's 15,640 16,464 13,947 10,618 11,064 7,874 5,508 4,260 3,966 2,775 2000's 7,323 3,913 3,080 1,731 850 684 2,094 2,137 1,601 1,206 2010's 1,757 1,560 14,559 14,296 13,988 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  16. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  17. IMPROVED NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James C. Furness; Donald O. Johnson; Michael L. Wilkey; Lynn Furness; Keith Vanderlee; P. David Paulsen

    2001-12-01

    This report summarizes the research conducted during Budget Period One on the project ''Improved Natural Gas Storage Well Remediation''. The project team consisted of Furness-Newburge, Inc., the technology developer; TechSavants, Inc., the technology validator; and Nicor Technologies, Inc., the technology user. The overall objectives for the project were: (1) To develop, fabricate and test prototype laboratory devices using sonication and underwater plasma to remove scale from natural gas storage well piping and perforations; (2) To modify the laboratory devices into units capable of being used downhole; (3) To test the capability of the downhole units to remove scale in an observation well at a natural gas storage field; (4) To modify (if necessary) and field harden the units and then test the units in two pressurized injection/withdrawal gas storage wells; and (5) To prepare the project's final report. This report covers activities addressing objectives 1-3. Prototype laboratory units were developed, fabricated, and tested. Laboratory testing of the sonication technology indicated that low-frequency sonication was more effective than high-frequency (ultrasonication) at removing scale and rust from pipe sections and tubing. Use of a finned horn instead of a smooth horn improves energy dispersal and increases the efficiency of removal. The chemical data confirmed that rust and scale were removed from the pipe. The sonication technology showed significant potential and technical maturity to warrant a field test. The underwater plasma technology showed a potential for more effective scale and rust removal than the sonication technology. Chemical data from these tests also confirmed the removal of rust and scale from pipe sections and tubing. Focusing of the underwater plasma's energy field through the design and fabrication of a parabolic shield will increase the technology's efficiency. Power delivered to the underwater plasma unit by a sparkplug repeatedly was

  18. U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 5,950 1950's 6,862 8,125 8,491 9,432 9,409 10,774 11,111 9,794 8,712 8,545 1960's 6,829 5,900 6,205 6,409 6,715 5,366 6,817 5,678 5,642 6,563 1970's 4,729 3,786 4,028 4,008 5,029 5,806 6,527 6,870 7,105 7,941 1980's 10,177 15,515 13,413 10,437 12,294 9,854 6,579 5,652 5,286 3,659 1990's 5,320 4,469 3,957 3,572 3,970 3,934

  19. U.S. Footage Drilled for Dry Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Dry Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 17,315 1950's 20,020 24,370 26,999 26,582 29,998 31,883 32,143 29,747 27,343 30,800 1960's 33,826 31,423 35,030 33,460 36,782 36,548 26,552 22,960 23,162 25,446 1970's 22,951 20,186 22,475 21,190 24,296 28,772 31,008 35,905 39,493 39,130 1980's 49,326 65,720 63,066 56,233 61,236 52,784 30,636 26,842 25,438 20,152

  20. U.S. Footage Drilled for Dry Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Dry Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 26,439 1950's 30,957 38,723 43,731 47,280 45,792 53,220 58,047 53,420 47,300 48,676 1960's 43,535 43,293 42,223 42,847 44,578 40,081 43,084 38,182 41,575 45,918 1970's 35,123 34,499 36,081 34,571 38,603 40,448 37,969 40,823 46,295 42,512 1980's 50,249 69,214 60,680 48,989 58,624 47,604 30,325 26,746 27,079 21,947 1990's 20,752

  1. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    August 2016 Explanatory notes Drilling Productivity Report The Drilling Productivity Report uses recent data on the total number of drilling rigs in operation along with estimates of drilling productivity and estimated changes in production from existing oil and natural gas wells to provide estimated changes in oil 1 and natural gas 2 production for seven key regions. EIA's approach does not distinguish between oil-directed rigs and gas-directed rigs because once a well is completed it may

  2. Laboratory development and field application of a novel water-based drill-in fluid for geopressured horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, J.W.; Harrison, J.C.; Hale, A.H.

    1996-12-31

    Research has identified a novel water-based drill-in fluid for drilling and completing geopressured horizontal wells. This fluid has a unique combination of properties which make it especially suitable for geopressured applications. They include the use of calcium and/or zinc bromide as a base brine, minimal concentration of calcium carbonate as bridging material, low plastic viscosity, tight fluid loss control, good filter cake properties, and excellent return permeability. This drill-in fluid has been used successfully to drill a 1,200 foot production interval, 4.75 inch diameter wellbore in the Gulf of Mexico with a system weight of 13.2 lbm/gal, bottom hole temperature of 185{degrees} F., and a 1400 to 1700 psi overbalance. The system functioned very well in both the drilling and completion operations. Fluid rheology was easily maintainable and the hole conditions were excellent without torque or drag problems. Initial production data suggests that the well is producing at expected rates with low drawdown pressure.

  3. US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  4. Drill core major, trace and rare earth element anlayses from wells RN-17B and RN-30, Reykjanes, Iceland

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-04-01

    Analytical results for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurement of major, trace and rare earth elements in drill core from geothermal wells in Reykjanes, Iceland. Total Fe was analyzed as FeO, therefore is not included under the Fe2O3 column.

  5. Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second underground nuclear test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. ...

  6. Geological aspects of drilling horizontal wells in steam flood reservoirs, west side, southern San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crough, D.D.; Holman, M.L.; Sande, J.J. )

    1994-04-01

    Shell Western E P Inc. has drilled 11 horizontal wells in four mature steam floods in the Coalinga, South Belridge, and Midway-Sunset fields. Two medium radius wells are producing from the Pliocene Etchegoin Formation in Coalinga. One medium radius well is producing from the Pleistocene Tulare Formation in South Belridge field. Three short radius and five medium radius wells are producing from the upper Miocene, Sub-Hoyt and Potter sands in Midway-Sunset field. Horizontal wells at the base of these reservoirs and/or structurally downdip near the oil-water contact are ideally suited to take advantage of the gravity drainage production mechanism. Reservoir studies and production experience have shown these horizontal wells should increase reserves, improve recovery efficiency, improve the oil-steam ratio, and improve project profitability. Geological considerations of targeting the wells vary between fields because of the different depositional environments and resulting reservoir characteristics. The thin sands and semicontinuous shales in the Tulare Formation and the Etchegoin Formation require strict structural control on the top and base of the target sand. In the Sub-Hoyt and Potter sands, irregularities of the oil-water contact and sand and shale discontinuities must be understood. Logging and measurement while drilling provide geosteering capability in medium radius wells. Teamwork between all engineering disciplines and drilling and producing operations has been critical to horizontal well success.

  7. Advanced drilling systems study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis

    1996-05-01

    This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

  8. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 5 5 4 4 2000's 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 4 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages: Number of Producing Gas

  9. Table 6.4 Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well Productivity, 1960-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well Productivity, 1960-2011 Year Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals From Crude Oil, Natural Gas, Coalbed, and Shale Gas Wells Natural Gas Well Productivity Texas 1 Louisiana 1 Oklahoma Other States 1 Federal Gulf of Mexico 2 Total Onshore Offshore Total Gross With- drawals From Natural Gas Wells 3 Producing Wells 4 Average Productivity Federal State Total Million Cubic Feet Million Cubic Feet Million Cubic Feet Number Cubic Feet per Well 1960 6,964,900

  10. Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Indiana Natural Gas Gross ...

  11. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Missouri Natural Gas Gross ...

  12. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from ... 10:10:30 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from ...

  13. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from ... 9:52:18 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from ...

  14. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-09-29

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  15. US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  16. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 8 1990's 7 7 9 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 2000's 7 7 5 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 2010's 7 8 9 7 7 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages:

  17. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4 1990's 8 6 5 8 12 15 24 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 53 100 26 28 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring

  18. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 15 1990's 11 12 22 59 87 87 88 91 95 96 2000's 98 96 106 109 111 114 114 186 322 285 2010's 276 322 270 357 310 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  19. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 18 1990's 19 16 16 18 19 17 18 17 15 19 2000's 17 20 18 15 15 15 14 18 21 24 2010's 26 24 27 26 28 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  20. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 108 1990's 111 110 112 113 104 100 102 141 148 99 2000's 152 170 165 195 224 227 231 239 261 261 2010's 269 277 185 159 170 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016

  1. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3 1990's 5 6 6 6 6 7 7 8 8 8 2000's 9 8 7 9 6 6 7 7 6 6 2010's 5 5 5 5 5 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages:

  2. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 241 1990's 356 373 382 385 390 372 370 372 185 300 2000's 280 300 225 240 251 316 316 43 45 51 2010's 50 40 40 34 36 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  3. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 53 1990's 54 54 38 47 55 56 61 60 59 60 2000's 71 68 69 61 61 69 69 71 71 89 2010's 102 100 95 65 68 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  4. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 700 1990's 690 650 600 505 460 420 2000's 380 350 400 430 280 400 330 305 285 310 2010's 230 210 212 1,089 1,024 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  5. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Drilled (Feet per Well) Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,568 1950's 3,691 3,851 3,999 3,880 3,905 3,904 3,880 3,966 3,907 3,999 1960's 4,020 4,064 4,227 4,193 4,179 4,288 4,112 4,004 4,328 4,431 1970's 4,610 4,480 4,590 4,687 4,249 4,285 4,214 4,404 4,421 4,374 1980's 4,166 4,209 4,225 4,004 4,125

  6. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Drilled (Feet per Well) Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,842 1950's 3,898 4,197 4,476 4,557 4,550 4,632 4,587 4,702 4,658 4,795 1960's 4,770 4,953 4,966 5,016 5,174 5,198 5,402 5,388 5,739 5,924 1970's 5,885 5,915 6,015 5,955 5,777 5,842 5,825 5,798 5,978 5,916 1980's 5,733 5,793 5,597 5,035 5,369 5,544 5,680 5,563

  7. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Drilled (Feet per Well) and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,698 1950's 3,979 4,056 4,342 4,599 4,670 4,672 5,018 5,326 5,106 5,396 1960's 5,486 5,339 5,408 5,368 5,453 5,562 5,928 5,898 5,994 5,918 1970's 5,860 5,890 5,516 5,488 5,387 5,470 5,220 5,254 5,262 5,275 1980's 5,275 5,351 5,617 5,319 5,276

  8. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2006-06-30

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  9. USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-02-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper

  10. Reverse trade mission on the drilling and completion of geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-09

    This draft report was prepared as required by Task No. 2 of the US Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG07-89ID12850 Reverse Trade Mission to Acquaint International Representatives with US Power Plant and Drilling Technology'' (mission). As described in the grant proposal, this report covers the reactions of attendees toward US technology, its possible use in their countries, and an evaluation of the mission by the staff leaders. Note this is the draft report of one of two missions carried out under the same contract number. Because of the diversity of the mission subjects and the different attendees at each, a separate report for each mission has been prepared. This draft report has been sent to all mission attendees, specific persons in the US Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Lab., the California Energy Commission (CEC), and various other governmental agencies.

  11. STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Wolhart

    2003-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

  12. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  13. Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  14. Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  15. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  16. Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  17. Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  18. Drilling equipment to shrink

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, S.

    2000-01-01

    Drilling systems under development will take significant costs out of the well construction process. From small coiled tubing (CT) drilling rigs for North Sea wells to microrigs for exploration wells in ultra-deepwater, development projects under way will radically cut the cost of exploratory holes. The paper describes an inexpensive offshore system, reeled systems drilling vessel, subsea drilling rig, cheap exploration drilling, laser drilling project, and high-pressure water jets.

  19. Dewatering of coalbed methane wells with hydraulic gas pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amani, M.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C.

    1995-12-31

    The coalbed methane industry has become an important source of natural gas production. Proper dewatering of coalbed methane (CBM) wells is the key to efficient gas production from these reservoirs. This paper presents the Hydraulic Gas Pump as a new alternative dewatering system for CBM wells. The Hydraulic Gas Pump (HGP) concept offers several operational advantages for CBM wells. Gas interference does not affect its operation. It resists solids damage by eliminating the lift mechanism and reducing the number of moving parts. The HGP has a flexible production rate and is suitable for all production phases of CBM wells. It can also be designed as a wireline retrievable system. We conclude that the Hydraulic Gas Pump is a suitable dewatering system for coalbed methane wells.

  20. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,310 1990's 1,307 1,334 1,333 1,336 1,348 1,347 1,367 1,458 1,479 1,498 2000's 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 2,321 2,336 2,350 525 563 2010's 620 914 819 921 895 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  1. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 13,935 1990's 16,980 17,948 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 21,500 21,000 17,568 2000's 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 18,946 19,713 19,713 17,862 21,243 2010's 22,145 25,758 24,697 23,792 24,354 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  2. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 11,248 1990's 11,713 12,169 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 13,825 14,381 14,750 2000's 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 14,175 15,892 16,563 16,290 17,152 2010's 17,670 14,632 17,936 19,494 19,256 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  3. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 16,309 1990's 16,889 15,271 13,512 15,569 12,958 14,169 15,295 14,958 18,399 16,717 2000's 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 18,838 17,459 18,145 19,213 18,860 2010's 19,137 21,235 19,792 19,528 19,251 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  4. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,207 1990's 1,438 2,620 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 6,825 7,000 6,750 2000's 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 8,900 9,200 9,712 9,995 10,600 2010's 10,100 11,100 10,900 10,550 10,500 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  5. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 543 1990's 585 629 507 620 583 535 568 560 527 560 2000's 997 1,143 979 427 1,536 1,676 1,836 2,315 2,343 2,320 2010's 1,979 5,732 1,669 1,967 1,645 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  6. Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,700 1990's 2,607 2,802 2,890 3,075 2,940 2,918 2,990 3,071 3,423 3,634 2000's 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 5,751 6,578 6,925 7,095 7,031 2010's 6,059 6,477 6,240 5,754 5,754 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  7. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,431 1990's 2,600 2,821 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 5,160 5,166 4,950 2000's 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 23,734 25,052 27,350 28,969 25,710 2010's 26,124 26,180 22,171 22,358 22,091 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  8. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 34,450 1990's 34,586 34,760 34,784 34,782 34,731 34,520 34,380 34,238 34,098 33,982 2000's 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 33,735 33,945 34,416 34,416 34,963 2010's 34,931 46,717 35,104 32,664 32,967 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  9. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 27,443 1990's 24,547 28,216 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 29,734 30,101 21,790 2000's 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 36,704 38,060 38,364 41,921 43,600 2010's 44,000 41,238 40,000 39,776 40,070 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  10. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 30,000 1990's 30,300 31,000 31,000 31,100 31,150 31,025 31,792 32,692 21,576 23,822 2000's 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 46,654 49,750 52,700 55,631 57,356 2010's 44,500 54,347 55,136 53,762 70,400 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  11. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,701 1990's 2,362 3,392 3,350 3,514 3,565 3,526 4,105 4,156 4,171 4,204 2000's 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 5,523 6,227 6,591 6,860 6,913 2010's 7,026 7,063 6,327 6,165 6,118 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  12. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,830 1990's 2,952 2,780 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 3,700 3,900 3,650 2000's 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 3,462 3,814 4,773 5,592 6,314 2010's 7,397 8,388 8,538 9,843 10,150 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  13. California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,214 1990's 1,162 1,377 1,126 1,092 1,261 997 978 930 847 1,152 2000's 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 1,356 1,451 1,540 1,645 1,643 2010's 1,580 1,308 1,423 1,335 1,118 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  14. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,125 1990's 5,741 5,562 5,912 6,372 7,056 7,017 8,251 12,433 13,838 13,838 2000's 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 22,691 20,568 22,949 25,716 27,021 2010's 28,813 30,101 32,000 32,468 38,346 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld

  15. Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 48,609 1990's 50,867 47,615 46,298 47,101 48,654 54,635 53,816 56,747 58,736 58,712 2000's 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 74,827 74,265 76,436 87,556 93,507 2010's 95,014 100,966 96,617 97,618 98,279 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  16. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 262,483 1990's 269,790 276,987 276,014 282,152 291,773 298,541 301,811 310,971 316,929 302,421 2000's 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 406,147 425,887 440,516 452,945 476,652 493,100 2010's 487,627 514,637 482,822 484,994 514,786 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA

  17. Exploration for deep gas in the Devonian Chaco Basin of Southern Bolivia: Sequence stratigraphy, predictions, and well results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.E.; Radovich, B.J.; Brett, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    In mid 1991, a team was assembled in Texaco`s Frontier Exploration Department (FED) to define the hydrocarbon potential of the Chaco Basin of Southern Bolivia. The Miraflores No. 1 was drilled in the fall of 1992, for stratigraphic objectives. The well confirmed the predicted stratigraphic trap in the Mid-Devonian, with gas discovered in two highstand and transgressive sands. They are low contrast and low resistivity sands that are found in a deep basin `tight gas` setting. Testing of the gas sands was complicated by drilling fluid interactions at the well bore. Subsequent analysis indicated that the existing porosity and permeability were reduced, such that a realistic test of reservoir capabilities was prevented.

  18. User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program case study: City of Alamosa, Colorado, Alamosa No. 1 geothermal test well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeisloft, J.; Sibbett, B.S.

    1985-08-01

    A 7118 ft (2170 m) deep geothermal test well was drilled on the south edge of the city of Alamosa, Colorado as part of the Department of Energy's User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program. The project was selected on the bases of a potential direct heat geothermal resource within the Rio Grande rift graben and resource users in Alamosa. The well site was selected on the hypothesis of a buried horst along which deep thermal fluids might be rising. In addition, there were city wells that were anomalous in temperature and the location was convenient to potential application. The Alamosa No. 1 penetrated 2000 ft (610 m) of fine clastic rocks over 4000 ft (1219 m) of volcaniclastic rock resting on precambrian crystalline rock at a depth of 6370 ft (1942 m). Due to poor hole conditions, geophysical logs were not run. The stabilized bottom hole temperature was 223/sup 0/F (106/sup 0/C) with a gradient of 2.6/sup 0/F/100 ft (47/sup 0/C/km). Limited testing indicated a very low production capacity. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, Carol T.; Bender, Donald A.; Bowman, Barry R.; Burnham, Alan K.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Comfort, III, William J.; Guymon, Lloyd G.; Henning, Carl D.; Pedersen, Knud B.; Sefcik, Joseph A.; Smith, Joseph A.; Strauch, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  20. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

    1993-03-09

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  1. Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1...

  2. Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

  3. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 0 0 ...

  4. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 3,459 3,117 ...

  5. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 ...

  6. Stopping a water crossflow in a sour-gas producing well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hello, Y. Le; Woodruff, J.

    1998-09-01

    Lacq is a sour-gas field in southwest France. After maximum production of 774 MMcf/D in the 1970`s, production is now 290 MMcf/D, with a reservoir pressure of 712 psi. Despite the loss of pressure, production is maintained by adapting the surface equipment and well architecture to reservoir conditions. The original 5-in. production tubing is being replaced with 7-in. tubing to sustain production rates. During openhole cleaning, the casing collapsed in Well LA141. The primary objective was to plug all possible hydraulic communication paths into the lower zones. The following options were available: (1) re-entering the well from the top and pulling the fish before setting cement plugs; (2) sidetracking the well; and (3) drilling a relief well to intercept Well LA141 above the reservoirs. The decision was made to start with the first option and switch to a sidetrack if this option failed.

  7. U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 31,849 29,914 28,186 27,586 28,813 29,518 29,419 29,011 27,426 26,598 2000's 27,467 27,640 25,862 23,033 19,747 18,252 15,750 14,813 13,892 12,856 2010's 12,120 10,820 9,853 8,567 8,968 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  8. Trip report for field visit to Fayetteville Shale gas wells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-09-30

    This report describes a visit to several gas well sites in the Fayetteville Shale on August 9, 2007. I met with George Sheffer, Desoto Field Manager for SEECO, Inc. (a large gas producer in Arkansas). We talked in his Conway, Arkansas, office for an hour and a half about the processes and technologies that SEECO uses. We then drove into the field to some of SEECO's properties to see first-hand what the well sites looked like. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) made several funding awards under a program called Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil (LINGO). One of the projects that received an award is 'Probabilistic Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems'. The University of Arkansas at Fayetteville has the lead on the project, and Argonne National Laboratory is a partner. The goal of the project is to develop a Web-based decision support tool that will be used by mid- and small-sized oil and gas companies as well as environmental regulators and other stakeholders to proactively minimize adverse ecosystem impacts associated with the recovery of gas reserves in sensitive areas. The project focuses on a large new natural gas field called the Fayetteville Shale. Part of the project involves learning how the natural gas operators do business in the area and the technologies they employ. The field trip on August 9 provided an opportunity to do that.

  9. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from

  10. The IEA's role in advanced geothermal drilling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, Eddie Ross; Jelacic, Allan; Finger, John Travis; Tyner, Craig E.

    2004-06-01

    This paper describes an 'Annex', or task, that is part of the International Energy Agency's Geothermal Implementing Agreement. Annex 7 is aimed at improving the state of the art in geothermal drilling, and has three subtasks: an international database on drilling cost and performance, a 'best practices' drilling handbook, and collaborative testing among participating countries. Drilling is an essential and expensive part of geothermal exploration, production, and maintenance. High temperature, corrosive fluids, and hard, fractured formations increase the cost of drilling, logging, and completing geothermal wells, compared to oil and gas. Cost reductions are critical because drilling and completing the production and injection well field can account for approximately half the capital cost for a geothermal power project. Geothermal drilling cost reduction can take many forms, e.g., faster drilling rates, increased bit or tool life, less trouble (twist-offs, stuck pipe, etc.), higher per-well production through multilaterals, and others. Annex 7 addresses all aspects of geothermal well construction, including developing a detailed understanding of worldwide geothermal drilling costs, understanding geothermal drilling practices and how they vary across the globe, and development of improved drilling technology. Objectives for Annex 7 include: (1) Quantitatively understand geothermal drilling costs and performance from around the world and identify ways to improve costs, performance, and productivity. (2) Identify and develop new and improved technologies for significantly reducing the cost of geothermal well construction. (3) Inform the international geothermal community about these drilling technologies. (4) Provide a vehicle for international cooperation, collaborative field tests, and data sharing toward the development and demonstration of improved geothermal drilling technology.

  11. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and

  12. Research projects needed for expediting development of domestic oil and gas resources through arctic, offshore, and drilling technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canja, S.; Williams, C.R.

    1982-04-01

    This document contains the research projects which were identified at an industry-government workshop on Arctic, Offshore, and Drilling Technology (AODT) held at Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, January 5-7, 1981. The purpose of the workshop was to identify those problem areas where government research could provide technology advancement that would assist industry in accelerating the discovery and development of US oil and gas resouces. The workshop results are to be used to guide an effective research program. The workshop identified and prioritized the tasks that need to be implemented. All of the projects listed in the Arctic and Offshore sections were selected as appropriate for a Department of Energy (DOE) research role. The drilling projects identified as appropriate only for industry research have been separated in the Drilling section of this report.

  13. Thermodynamic behavior of gas in storage cavities and production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugout, B.

    1982-01-01

    A computer model predicts the performance of gas storage in salt cavities in terms of the volume of cavity that is available for the gas and the pressure and temperature within the cavity and at all points of the production well. The model combines a simplified estimate of volume (derived from studies of rock mechanics) with two thermodynamic models - one for the cavity, the other for the well. Designed specifically for single-phase flow, the model produces values that agree well with measured data.

  14. State-of-the-art in coalbed methane drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltoiu, L.V.; Warren, B.K.; Natras, T.A.

    2008-09-15

    The production of methane from wet coalbeds is often associated with the production of significant amounts of water. While producing water is necessary to desorb the methane from the coal, the damage from the drilling fluids used is difficult to assess, because the gas production follows weeks to months after the well is drilled. Commonly asked questions include the following: What are the important parameters for drilling an organic reservoir rock that is both the source and the trap for the methane? Has the drilling fluid affected the gas production? Are the cleats plugged? Does the 'filtercake' have an impact on the flow of water and gas? Are stimulation techniques compatible with the drilling fluids used? This paper describes the development of a unique drilling fluid to drill coalbed methane wells with a special emphasis on horizontal applications. The fluid design incorporates products to match the delicate surface chemistry on the coal, a matting system to provide both borehole stability and minimize fluid losses to the cleats, and a breaker method of removing the matting system once drilling is completed. This paper also discusses how coal geology impacts drilling planning, drilling practices, the choice of drilling fluid, and completion/stimulation techniques for Upper Cretaceous Mannville-type coals drilled within the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A focus on horizontal coalbed methane (CBM) wells is presented. Field results from three horizontal wells are discussed, two of which were drilled with the new drilling fluid system. The wells demonstrated exceptional stability in coal for lengths to 1000 m, controlled drilling rates and ease of running slotted liners. Methods for, and results of, placing the breaker in the horizontal wells are covered in depth.

  15. Demonstration of the enrichment of medium quality gas from gob wells through interactive well operating practices. Final report, June--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackburn, S.T.; Sanders, R.G.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.; Stevenson, J.W.; Mills, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Methane released to the atmosphere during coal mining operations is believed to contribute to global warming and represents a waste of a valuable energy resource. Commercial production of pipeline-quality gob well methane through wells drilled from the surface into the area above the gob can, if properly implemented, be the most effective means of reducing mine methane emissions. However, much of the gas produced from gob wells is vented because the quality of the gas is highly variable and is often below current natural gas pipeline specifications. Prior to the initiation of field-testing required to further understand the operational criteria for upgrading gob well gas, a preliminary evaluation and assessment was performed. An assessment of the methane gas in-place and producible methane resource at the Jim Walter Resources, Inc. No. 4 and No. 5 Mines established a potential 15-year supply of 60 billion cubic feet of mien methane from gob wells, satisfying the resource criteria for the test site. To understand the effect of operating conditions on gob gas quality, gob wells producing pipeline quality (i.e., < 96% hydrocarbons) gas at this site will be operated over a wide range of suction pressures. Parameters to be determined will include absolute methane quantity and methane concentration produced through the gob wells; working face, tailgate and bleeder entry methane levels in the mine; and the effect on the economics of production of gob wells at various levels of methane quality. Following this, a field demonstration will be initiated at a mine where commercial gob gas production has not been attempted. The guidelines established during the first phase of the project will be used to design the production program. The economic feasibility of various utilization options will also be tested based upon the information gathered during the first phase. 41 refs., 41 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Parcperdue geopressure-geothermal project. Study a geopressured reservoir by drilling and producing a well in a limited geopressured water sand. Final technical report, September 28, 1979-December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, J.R.; Stanley, J.G.

    1984-01-15

    The behavior of geopressured reservoirs was investigated by drilling and producing a well in small, well defined, geopressured reservoir; and performing detailed pressure transient analysis together with geological, geophysical, chemical, and physical studies. The Dow-DOE L. R. Sweezy No. 1 well was drilled to a depth of 13,600 feet in Parcperdue field, just south of Lafayette, Louisiana, and began production in April, 1982. The production zone was a poorly consolidated sandstone which constantly produced sand into the well stream, causing damage to equipment and causing other problems. The amount of sand production was kept manageable by limiting the flow rate to below 10,000 barrels per day. Reservoir properties of size, thickness, depth, temperature, pressure, salinity, porosity, and permeability were close to predicted values. The reservoir brine was undersaturated with respect to gas, containing approximately 20 standard cubic feet of gas per barrel of brine. Shale dewatering either did not occur or was insignificant as a drive mechanism. Production terminated when the gravel-pack completion failed and the production well totally sanded in, February, 1983. Total production up to the sanding incident was 1.94 million barrels brine and 31.5 million standard cubic feet gas.

  17. Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    Natural gas hydrates are crystalline materials formed of natural gas and water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures. Because natural gas hydrates can plug drill strings, pipelines, and process equipment, there is much effort expended to prevent their formation. The goal of this project was to provide industry with more economical hydrate inhibitors. The specific goals for the past year were to: define a rational approach for inhibitor design, using the most probable molecular mechanism; improve the performance of inhibitors; test inhibitors on Colorado School of Mines apparatuses and the Exxon flow loop; and promote sharing field and flow loop results. This report presents the results of the progress on these four goals.

  18. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 24,171 52,846 49,661 2000's 69,451 82,542 55,854 74,400 88,734 87,998 75,186 101,503 116,637 108,705 2010's 108,827 60,252 81,444 101,930 90,099 113

    09 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Gross Withdrawals 821 1,407 1,344 770 770 950 1979-2014 From Gas Wells 821 1,407 1,344 770 770 950 1979-2014 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0

  19. Controls for offshore high pressure corrosive gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailliet, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    In September 1981, Shell Oil Company began production from its first high-pressure corrosive gas well in the Gulf of Mexico. The extreme pressures and corrosive nature of the gas required the installation of a 20,000 psi low alloy steel christmas tree, equipped with 12 hydraulically operated safety and control valves. This study describes the instrumentation and control system developed to operate this complex well. Similar wells have been produced on shore, but the limited space available on an offshore platform has required the development of new techniques for operating these wells. The instrumentation system described utilizes conventional pneumatics and hydraulics for control plus intrinsically-safe electronics for data acquisition. The use of intrinsically-safe field wiring provided maximum safety while avoiding the need for explosion-proof conduit and wiring methods in division one hazardous areas.

  20. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 7,465 16,034 19,428 2000's 30,481 32,805 29,911 21,778 24,574 31,831 32,480 41,067 43,009 29,807 2010's 40,216 37,626 50,538 37,119 34,825 40,10

    NA NA NA NA 9 9 1967-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA 8 8 1967-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA 1 * 2007-2014 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA 0 0 2007-2014 Repressuring NA NA NA NA 0 0 2007-2014 Vented and Flared

  1. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 75,656 84,093 89,954 2000's 121,054 108,510 109,605 115,960 136,945 147,743 166,867 171,473 180,668 192,049 2010's 175,837 162,778 189,291 181,326 167,916 207,145

    4 3 4 3 3 1991-2014 From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 3 2006-2014 From Oil Wells 4 4 3 4 3 * 1991-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0

  2. Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The AOGCC website has Alaska state oil and gas data related to monthly drilling and production reports, oil and gas databases, well history, and well information, along with...

  3. Program calculates economic limit for oil and gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juran, K.P.

    1986-10-01

    A program written for the HP-41 CV/CX computer may be used to make a quick evaluation of when an oil or gas well's production rate will cease to be economical. The article lists data necessary for performing the calculation, equations used and the programs's steps. In addition, user instructions and three sample problems are included.

  4. Geothermal Well Stimulated Using High Energy Gas Fracturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.Y.; Jacobson, R.D.; Warpinski, N.; Mohaupt, Henry

    1987-01-20

    This paper reports the result of an experimental study of the High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF) technique for geothermal well stimulation. These experiments demonstrated that multiple fractures could be created to link a water-filled borehole with other fractures. The resulting fracture network and fracture interconnections were characterized by flow tests as well as mine back. Commercial oil field fracturing tools were used successfully in these experiments. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  5. Development and Demonstration of Mobile, Small Footprint Exploration and Development Well System for Arctic Unconventional Gas Resources (ARCGAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Glavinovich

    2002-11-01

    Traditionally, oil and gas field technology development in Alaska has focused on the high-cost, high-productivity oil and gas fields of the North Slope and Cook Inlet, with little or no attention given to Alaska's numerous shallow, unconventional gas reservoirs (carbonaceous shales, coalbeds, tight gas sands). This is because the high costs associated with utilizing the existing conventional oil and gas infrastructure, combined with the typical remoteness and environmental sensitivity of many of Alaska's unconventional gas plays, renders the cost of exploring for and producing unconventional gas resources prohibitive. To address these operational challenges and promote the development of Alaska's large unconventional gas resource base, new low-cost methods of obtaining critical reservoir parameters prior to drilling and completing more costly production wells are required. Encouragingly, low-cost coring, logging, and in-situ testing technologies have already been developed by the hard rock mining industry in Alaska and worldwide, where an extensive service industry employs highly portable diamond-drilling rigs. From 1998 to 2000, Teck Cominco Alaska employed some of these technologies at their Red Dog Mine site in an effort to quantify a large unconventional gas resource in the vicinity of the mine. However, some of the methods employed were not fully developed and required additional refinement in order to be used in a cost effective manner for rural arctic exploration. In an effort to offset the high cost of developing a new, low-cost exploration methods, the US Department of Energy, National Petroleum Technology Office (DOE-NPTO), partnered with the Nana Regional Corporation and Teck Cominco on a technology development program beginning in 2001. Under this DOE-NPTO project, a team comprised of the NANA Regional Corporation (NANA), Teck Cominco Alaska and Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) have been able to adapt drilling technology developed for the

  6. Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-04-01

    Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

  7. HIGH-POWER TURBODRILL AND DRILL BIT FOR DRILLING WITH COILED TUBING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Radtke; David Glowka; Man Mohan Rai; David Conroy; Tim Beaton; Rocky Seale; Joseph Hanna; Smith Neyrfor; Homer Robertson

    2008-03-31

    Commercial introduction of Microhole Technology to the gas and oil drilling industry requires an effective downhole drive mechanism which operates efficiently at relatively high RPM and low bit weight for delivering efficient power to the special high RPM drill bit for ensuring both high penetration rate and long bit life. This project entails developing and testing a more efficient 2-7/8 in. diameter Turbodrill and a novel 4-1/8 in. diameter drill bit for drilling with coiled tubing. The high-power Turbodrill were developed to deliver efficient power, and the more durable drill bit employed high-temperature cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. This project teams Schlumberger Smith Neyrfor and Smith Bits, and NASA AMES Research Center with Technology International, Inc (TII), to deliver a downhole, hydraulically-driven power unit, matched with a custom drill bit designed to drill 4-1/8 in. boreholes with a purpose-built coiled tubing rig. The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory has funded Technology International Inc. Houston, Texas to develop a higher power Turbodrill and drill bit for use in drilling with a coiled tubing unit. This project entails developing and testing an effective downhole drive mechanism and a novel drill bit for drilling 'microholes' with coiled tubing. The new higher power Turbodrill is shorter, delivers power more efficiently, operates at relatively high revolutions per minute, and requires low weight on bit. The more durable thermally stable diamond drill bit employs high-temperature TSP (thermally stable) diamond cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. Expectations are that widespread adoption of microhole technology could spawn a wave of 'infill development' drilling of wells spaced between existing wells, which could tap potentially billions of barrels of bypassed oil at shallow depths in mature producing areas. At the same time, microhole coiled tube

  8. Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: June 12, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation at what is now the Rulison, Colorado,

  9. Serviceability of coiled tubing for sour oil and gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cayard, M.S.; Kane, R.D.

    1996-08-01

    Coiled tubing is an extremely useful tool in many well logging and workover applications in oil and gas production operations. Several important concerns regarding its use include the need for improved guidelines for the assessment of mechanical integrity, fatigue damage, and the effects of hydrogen sulfide in sour oil and gas production environments. This paper provides information regarding the use of coiled tubing in sour environments with particular emphasis on sulfide stress cracking, hydrogen induced cracking and stress-oriented hydrogen induced cracking and how they work synergistically with cyclic cold working of the steel tubing.

  10. Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... the drilling effort in Washington County, WVU had been testing the remote, wireless system for the past year. Its success during testing demonstrates its ability to be a cost-effec...